Release 4.3 notes

Synclavier® PowerPC™ 1.3
Welcome to Synclavier®
PowerPC™ 1.3
Version 1.3
June 1, 1999
Synclavier® PowerPC™ is a Macintosh application program and associated hardware modules
that provide for Macintosh-native operation of the complete Synclavier® Real Time Software.
A PCI-based interface card called the PCI-1 installs in your PowerPC™-based Macintosh
Computer. This interface card communicates with your existing Synclavier® voice cards and
hardware modules using a high-speed multi-conductor twisted-pair cable and an adapter board.
The end result is a seamless integration of the complete Synclavier® software package into an
operating environment that runs in native mode on your Macintosh's PowerPC processor.
What does all this mean for you? This very first release of Synclavier® PowerPC™ will
enable you to
• Load sound files into Poly RAM directly from a SCSI hard drive or Macintoshhosted Disk Image File located either on your local Macintosh hard drive or
anywhere on your Macintosh network
• Run EditView® and AutoConform™ on any Macintosh, either PowerPC or 68k,
that is networked to your hosting computer
• Run multiple copies of EditView® at the same time, for example at an edit station
and a mix station simultaneously
• Boot directly from your Macintosh hard drive and eliminate the use of 51 / 4 " floppies
altogether
• Realize significantly reduced boot-load times
• Notice vastly-faster screen drawing on all Synclavier® screens, including the Gscreen Recorder Display, the L-screen Sample-to-Memory Editor, and the Audio
Event Editor
• Achieve vastly-faster editing of sound files using the L-screen Sample-to-Memory
Editor
• Develop whole new ways of working with your Synclavier® that are faster, easier,
and more productive. And maybe even fun.
One thing that won't change about your Synclavier® is its sound. You might possibly
notice more accurate and crisper rhythms, especially on 64- and 96-voice systems. Real-timeeffects should be performed more accurately without
bogging the system down. Vibrato will be cleaner in
Theoretically, all Synclavier® complex sequences. But the sound of the voice cards
software modules including SFM themselves will be identical.
and the Screen Editor are available
within the Synclavier® PowerPC™
The following pages document this very first
operating environment. If you find release of Synclavier® PowerPC™. Enjoy!
something that doesn't work, let us
know! I tested everything I could
think of...
What's New in this release
Release 1.0 - July 9, 1998
- Initial test release.
Release 1.0.1 - October 28, 1998
- Completed Bus Timing dialog. Fixed bugs with DTD-to-Poly transfer, DTD-to-Optical
transfer. Fixed bugs with vibrato timing. Initial product release.
Release 1.0.2 - November 16, 1998
- Completed Multi-Processor Macintosh support. Completed initial documentation. PCI1 Test Program 1.7 released with Settings... menu support.
Release 1.0.3 - November 20, 1998
- Added "PCI-1 In Use" warning dialog. Added communication indicator in MIDINet
and AutoConform.
Release 1.0.4 - December 4, 1998
- Fixed MIDINet communication problems. PCI-1 Test Program 1.8 released with
multiprocessor bug fixes. Added documentation warning about SYNCNet INIT Version.
Provided limited SuperFloppy access. L-page scrub and multiple poly bin bugs fixed.
Release 1.0.6 - January 21, 1999
- Added metronome calibration (startup and Settings...). Added control over M512k
memory allocation.
Release 1.0.8 - February 21, 1999
- Added support for TransferMation™.
Release 1.0.9 - February 22, 1999
- Added 'Capture Printer Output to File' menu command to support the Music Printing
software option.
Release 1.2 - April 5, 1999
- Fixed EditView scrub problems on fast Macs. Fixed B/R page scrolling problems.
Fixed hang while searching on B/R page; allowed <BREAK> to interrupt B/R page
search.
Added Option-Quit menu selection to quickly quit RTP.
Fixed
TransferMation crashing problem.
Release 1.3 - June 1, 1999
- Provided change of disk setup on the fly using InterChange™ 1.3. Provided call up of
sound files, timbre files and sequences using InterChange™ 2.0.
Use of
Synclavier®PCILib.dll for shared communication.
Page 2
Table of Contents
What's New in this release ..............................................................................................2
System Requirements......................................................................................................4
Software Installation ..............................................................................................5
Software Installation Notes...........................................................................6
Hardware Installation.............................................................................................7
Hardware Installation Notes..........................................................................7
Launching Synclavier® PowerPC™ ..............................................................................8
Setting the Cable Length and Bus Loading Settings.......................................................9
Why set the Cable Length and Bus Loading?........................................................9
Using the Test Software to determine Bus Loading ..............................................10
Understanding the Test Program output ................................................................10
"PCI-1 Is In Use" ............................................................................................................12
What Happens if I "Force Quit"?....................................................................................13
Using Synclavier® PowerPC™ on a Network ...............................................................14
Types of Macintosh Networks ...............................................................................14
Sharing a Disk Image File......................................................................................15
Precautions to Observe when Sharing a Disk Image File......................................15
Using "Program Linking" with EditView®, AutoConform, MIDINet..................15
What is Program Linking.......................................................................................16
Connecting to a Remote Synclavier® PowerPC™................................................19
Using "Reconnect".................................................................................................19
Using Synclavier® PowerPC™ on Multiprocessor Macintosh......................................20
Using Synclavier® PowerPC™......................................................................................21
Accessing the 5 1/4" SuperFloppy drive.........................................................................21
Metronome Calibration ...................................................................................................23
Creating M512k Memory................................................................................................23
Page 3
System Requirements
Synclavier® PowerPC is designed to run on many different models of the Macintosh
platform. It will run on older 68k Macintoshes for demonstration purposes, but it has little
practical utility on those platforms except perhaps as a
disk formatting workstation or for running EditView®.
Modern PowerPC Macintoshes like the 7300,
7500, 7600, 8500, 9500, 9600 and the G3 models will
perform quite well, especially with processors faster than
200 Mhz.
Special software hooks included in
Synclavier® PowerPC™ take advantage of multiprocessor Macintoshes such as the 9600MP;
performance on those platforms is excellent.
I run Synclavier® PowerPC™ on a
G3 PowerBook all the time using
one of the PCI Expansion Chassis
from Magma Corp. It works great!
Synclavier® PowerPC™ uses about 7 megabytes
of RAM. You will need a minimum of 20 megabytes of
hard disk storage for installation. You will likely wish to create a Disk Image File that is several
hundred or more megabytes in size if you wish to store sound files on your Macintosh hard drive.
You may wish to use two Macintoshes networked via EtherNet; one Mac for EditView®
and the other for Synclavier® PowerPC™. More options for networking are described later in
this manual.
What's a Multi-Processor Macintosh?
Several companies including Apple
Computer and Daystar at one time
made Power Macintosh computers
with multiple PowerPC processors in
them. These models themselves are no
longer being manufactured, but
processor cards from those models will
generally operate in the 7500/7600/
8500/9500/9600 style Macintoshes that
have removable processor slots. I
upgraded my own 132 Mhz 7600 to a
dual-processor model by purchasing an
MP400 (dual 200 Mhz 604e
processors) upgrade card for about
$500.00. For those hearty souls that
dare dabble in used equipment, a dual
processor Mac is a superb hardware
platform for Synclavier® PowerPC™.
Rumor has it that the G4 Macintoshes
will be multi-processor capable at
some time in the future.
Page 4
Software Installation
Synclavier® PowerPC is available on CD-ROM. Double click on the
install file to start the software installation.
Figure 1 shows a screen image of the Synclavier® PowerPC™ folder that is created by
the installation process.
Figure 1 - Synclavier® PowerPC™ Folder contents
Page 5
Software Installation Notes
• 68k Macintoshes - To a limited extent, Synclavier® PowerPC™ will run on older
68k Macintoshes. The voices and other Synclavier® hardware will not be available
and performance will be very slow. You might, however, be able to run
FORMCOPY or OPCOPY, for example, in an off-line dubbing room on an older
Mac.
• Program Linking - To use EditView® or AutoConform™ on a computer that is
networked to the computer running Synclavier® PowerPC™, you will have to turn
on Program Linking from the File Sharing control panel on the computer that is
running Synclavier® PowerPC™. You will need a
high speed network (e.g. EtherTalk) for useful results.
And of course, AppleTalk will have to be turned on
and set to "EtherNet". See more
documentation on EditView® and
SYNCnet INIT - The SYNCNet INIT is
AutoConform™ later in this manual.
a Macintosh startup INIT that is installed
You will not need to turn on Program in your Macintosh's System Folder. This
Linking if you are using EditView®
INIT has been updated for Synclavier®
only on the same computer that is
Release 4.12. Despite my best efforts,
running Synclavier® PowerPC™.
there appear to be some incompatibilities
• InterChange™ Prefs - If you have
between earlier versions of the SYNCNet
been using an early copy of
INIT and the new version that is used
InterChange™ on your computer
with Synclavier® Release 4.12 and
before
installing
Synclavier®
Synclavier® PowerPC™.
I have
PowerPC™, you likely have set up
observed system crashes when using 4.12
InterChange™ to use a Disk Image
Macintosh software (e.g. EditView®,
File or a SCSI hard drive connected
MIDINet™, AutoConform) with earlier
to your Macintosh SCSI port as W0:.
version of the SYNCNet INIT. I believe
This might cause a problem if the
there are also problems using earlier
W0: chosen in InterChange™
Macintosh software with the current
contains incompatible Synclavier®
SYNCNet INIT.
To avoid these
software (for example: a version
problems:
prior to release 4.12). You may wish
Always Restart your Macintosh
to avoid this problem by dragging
after installing Synclavier® PowerPC™
the file called "InterChange™ Prefs"
Check the 'Get Info' version of
that is located in your Preferences
your
SYNCNet
INIT and make sure it is
folder to the trash before launching
Version
4.12
or
later.
Synclavier® PowerPC™.
• Default W0: Disk Image File - If
the "InterChange™ Prefs" file has not been created, Synclavier® PowerPC™ uses a
20 megabyte Disk Image File located in the Synclavier® folder as W0:. This disk
image file will contain the latest Synclavier® Software.
You may use
InterChange™ to copy the system software from this disk image file to a real SCSI
hard drive if you wish. That is, the Synclavier® system software shipped with
Synclavier® PowerPC™ is fully compatible with the original Synclavier®
processor and will run on the original hardware if desired.
• SYNCNet INIT - See the inset above about your SYNCNet INIT System
Extension.
Page 6
Hardware Installation
The hardware components for Synclavier® PowerPC™ include
• PCI-1 - The PCI-1 interface card can plug into any PCI slot of your Power
Macintosh computer. Be sure to turn off your Macintosh and observe careful antistatic precautions when inserting the card. You will typically have to hold the card
in place as you connect the 50-conductor cable to the
PCI-1 card, so you should connect the cable to the
Warning - Always
card before closing up your Macintosh.
power
down
your
Macintosh
before
• Twisted-Pair multi-conductor cable - The cable is
installing or removing
specially constructed with 25 high-speed twisted pair
the
PCI-1
card.
conductors. Cable lengths of up to several hundred
Additionally,
power
feet are theoretically possible. Our tests at the factory
down your Synclavier®
are conducted with 50-foot cables, although a 25-foot
before installing or
(or shorter) cable will provide somewhat faster
removing the D0-PCI
operation.
card.
I strongly
• D0-PCI - The D0-PCI interface card can plug into
recommend that both
any slot in your Synclavier® computer interface bin.
machines should be
A short flat cable adapts the flat-cable-connector on
powered down whenever
the D0-PCI card to the shielded connector at the end
you plug or unplug
of the twisted-pair cable.
either end of the twistedpair cable.
Hardware Installation Notes
• Diagnostic Software - Some Macintosh diagnostic Software is installed in the
Synclavier® folder in a folder called 'PCI-1 Test Software'. This software is
extremely important and verifies the data integrity of your system and cable. Please
refer to the documentation on the PCI-1 Test Program later in this manual.
• Parameter RAM - I have seen situations where the Macintosh 'Parameter RAM'
gets corrupted when a new PCI hardware module is installed. The symptoms of a
corrupted Parameter RAM are that the Macintosh fails to boot (e.g. "it's dead!").
Clearing the Parameter RAM is accomplished by 1) Make sure 'CAPS LOCK' key
is not activated; 2) Make sure the Mac is powered off; 3) hold down the p, r,
command, and option keys simultaneously; 4) press the power on key; 5) keep
holding the p, r, command, and option keys until the Mac restarts several times on
its own. Newer Macintoshes (such as the G3 models) have a different method of
clearing the Parameter RAM that is described in their user manuals.
Page 7
Launching Synclavier® PowerPC™
Figure 2
Launch Synclavier® PowerPC™ by dragging the
WINBOOT file (e.g. the "Winchester Bootload Diskette") and
dropping it on top of the Synclavier® PowerPC™ application
program. Similar in concept to inserting the Winchester
Bootload Diskette into the SuperFloppy Drive and pressing the
"Load" button, but with a more contemporary flavor...
Note:
Launching
Synclavier® PowerPC™
causes the Macintosh to
'take
over'
your
Synclavier®. If you were
in the middle of working
with your Synclavier®
using the conventional
software, that work will
be lost when you launch
Synclavier® PowerPC™!
Synclavier® PowerPC™ includes an 'intelligent' Quit
menu item. If you are running an application such as
FORMCOPY, selecting Quit will return you to the MONITOR
(the Quit menu item will read 'Quit FORMCOPY' in this case).
If you are running the Real Time Software, selecting Quit will
first return you to the main menu, and a second Quit will return
you to the MONITOR. This operation of the Quit menu is similar to the <BREAK> or <CRTLSPACE> key operation in earlier versions of the Synclavier® Real Time Software.
Quitting Synclavier® PowerPC™ will cause your original Synclavier® software to
reboot, provided the Winchester Bootload Diskette is installed in the floppy drive.
Note: Do not power down your Synclavier® tower while Synclavier® PowerPC™ is
running on your Macintosh. The Macintosh will invariably perform a hard crash in this case, and
can only be restarted by removing and then reconnecting the AC power to your Macintosh.
If you experience trouble launching Synclavier® PowerPC™, it is likely that you have
selected a W0: using the setup portion of InterChange™, and the selected W0: contains
incompatible system software. When in doubt, delete your 'InterChange™ Prefs' from the
Preferences Folder (within your active System Folder') and try again. You do not need to restart
your Macintosh when you change or delete your 'InterChange™ Prefs' file.
Page 8
Setting the Cable Length and Bus Loading Settings
Figure 3
The "Settings..." selection from the Edit Menu activates the dialog shown in figure 3.
Why set the Cable Length and Bus Loading?
The interface cards in the Synclavier® computer
bin are interconnected using an asynchronous data bus.
When two cards are exchanging data over this bus, a
special signal called the SYNC signal is sent by the
receiving card to the sending card at the end of each bus
transaction.
Many different configurations of
Synclavier® Systems are in use
today. They were manufactured
over an extended period of time
using different revisions of the
processor and interface cards. For
this reason, I can't just use one Bus
Loading setting in the software.
As we gain experience with PCI-1
installations, I hope to offer more
specific guidelines in the future.
The PowerPC processor in your Macintosh can
respond extremely quickly to SYNC. This may cause the
PCI-1 interface card to latch the received data before it
has thoroughly settled on the bus and the interconnecting cable.
Page 9
The Cable Length and Bus
Loading dialog shown in Figure 3 provides you with the ability to use slower timing signals for
large, heavily loaded systems, or faster timing signals with short cables or a small, lightly loaded
system.
Using the Test Software to determine Bus Loading
Unfortunately, determining the most appropriate setting for Cable Length and Bus
Loading involves some guesswork and experimentation. If you are in a hurry, set the Cable
Length for a long value (such as 100 ft/30 m) and the Bus Loading to High. This will direct the
PCI-1 card to use slower timing signals, which should work with all configurations, albeit with a
modest reduction in data rate.
If you wish to optimize your installation for faster data transfers, you can use the "PCI-1
Test Program" to perform a series of data verification tests using different timing signals.
The PCI-1 Test Software folder was installed along with the Synclavier® PowerPC™
System Software. Launch the "PCI-1 Test Program" application by double clicking on it. You
will see a window similar to Figure 4.
Understanding the Test Program output
The PCI-1 Test Program begins by making sure your Macintosh even has a PCI bus, and
then looks for a PCI-1 Interface Card installed in it. The software performs numerous error and
consistency checks; any errors or unusual conditions will be reported in the "Output" window.
Page 10
The test program continually transfers megabyte-after-megabyte of data between your
Macintosh and your Synclavier® hardware. Every 5 seconds the software updates the status line
at the bottom of the Output window to show how long the test has been running, how many
megabytes have been transferred, and how many data errors have occurred. The test will run
continuously until stopped by command-period or the "Halt Testing" menu selection under the
File menu. You can Quit the test program with command-Q.
There is a "Settings..." menu entry on the Edit menu that brings up the same Cable
Length and Bus Loading dialog that is available in Synclavier® PowerPC™. You can change
the Cable Length and Bus Loading at any time; the changes become effective as soon as the
Settings Entry dialog is closed.
The test program prints out the rate of data movement that is achieved between your
Macintosh and your Synclavier® interface cards, as well as the data rate that is achieved between
your Macintosh and the Poly Sampling memory. You will see these data rates become slower as
the Cable Length setting is increased, and as the Bus Loading setting is increased.
Page 11
If you set the Cable Length to 20 ft (6 m) and the Bus Loading to Low, you may or may
not see errors with your system. If you see any errors at all, you must increase the Cable Length
and/or Bus Loading setting until the test runs continuously without errors.
"PCI-1 Is In Use"
The PCI-1 hardware that is installed in your Macintosh can only be used by one
application at a time. For example, if the PCI-1 Test Program is running in the background when
you launch Synclavier® PowerPC™, you will see the following dialog:
The PCI-1 Hardware is In Use Dialog
If you choose the Quit Then Restart option, you will have a chance to Save any
work that you are doing in other applications. That is, it functions as does the Finder's Restart
menu.
If you choose the Continue With No Voices option, Synclavier® PowerPC™ will
start up normally, only you will not be able to access any hardware in your Synclavier® tower.
The application that is using the PCI-1 hardware (such as InterChange™ or the PCI-1 Test
Program) will not be disturbed in this case.
Page 12
What Happens if I "Force Quit"?
If you ever Force Quit an application that is using the PCI-1 hardware, you will need
to Restart your Macintosh before the PCI-1 hardware can be used again. This is also true if
an application (such as InterChange™ or the PCI-1 Test Program) that uses the PCI-1 hardware
every Quits unexpectedly.
If you ever "Force Quit" Synclavier® PowerPC™ you will
need to Restart your Macintosh to use the PCI-1 hardware again
Page 13
Using Synclavier® PowerPC™ on a Network
Synclavier® PowerPC™ includes sophisticated networking capability that can be used in
many different situations. Some examples of things you
can do include:
We are scrambling to make
run "Termulator" on one (or more) remote TransferMation available over the
Macintoshes and completely control your Network just as soon as we can.
Synclavier® from any Macintosh on your network. We are somewhat hampered by the
All capabilities including audio scrubbing appear to lack of a complete source, plus it's
work extremely well from remote Macintoshes use of the obsolete "MacAp" runwhen EtherNet (a.k.a. "EtherTalk") is used for the time environment. We expect to
have TransferMation available by
Network connection.
January.
run EditView®, AutoConform, and MIDINet
from any Macintosh on your Network. Multiple EditView® applications can be active at
the same time to provide different views of the Sequence at different scales, or from
different locations in your studio.
share one or more Disk Image Files amongst multiple Synclavier® PowerPC™
systems.
Types of Macintosh Networks
Apple offers many networking options for its Macintoshes. While all Synclavier®
PowerPC™ software capabilities are available with each networking option, some of the
networking options are too slow for practical use. Briefly:
The basic "LocalTalk" option which uses the Macintosh serial port hardware, might
work reasonably well for Termulator, and for EditView® in some cases. It will likely be
very cumbersome for sharing a Disk Image File.
10 Megabit EtherNet is built-in to most modern Macintoshes. It works superbly for
Termulator, EditView™, AutoConform, MIDINet, and, to a certain extent, for sharing Disk
Image Files. Loading sound files from a remote Disk Image File using 10 Megabit
EtherNet will likely be considerably slower than loading sound files directly from a SCSI
hard drive connected to your Macintosh SCSI port.
100 Megabit EtherNet is available as optional equipment for most PCI-based
Macintoshes. It should provide reasonably fast sharing of Disk Image Files. Loading
sound files from a remote Disk Image File over 100 Megabit EtherNet will approach the
performance achieved using a local SCSI hard drive.
Apple Remote Access provides the ability to dial into your Synclavier® PowerPC™
from anywhere. Due to the speed limitations of most modems, it's use will likely be limited
to Termulator.
The high speed Infrared port options in modern PowerBooks could theoretically be
used to provide, for example, "Lap-Top EditView"
Page 14
Sharing a Disk Image File
Sharing a Disk Image File is easily accomplished by using Apple's built-in File Sharing.
You must select the proper network protocol on each Macintosh (e.g. EtherNet) and enable File
Sharing on the Macintosh where the Disk Image File resides. You could, for example, make a
Disk Image File on your Macintosh available to other users within your facility, or you could
make a Disk Image File residing on a central file-server available to everyone.
Use InterChange™ to specify a remote Disk Image File for W1 using the Choose button.
You will need to use AppleShare to mount the remote volume, then choose the desired Disk
Image File.
You can use InterChange™ to copy Synclavier® files between your local Macintosh and
the remote Disk Image File. Alternatively, you can use FORMCOPY within Synclavier®
PowerPC™ to copy Synclavier® files between a remote Disk Image File and a local Disk Image
File, a local SCSI Hard Drive, or local SCSI Optical Drive.
Precautions to Observe when Sharing a Disk Image File
- You will need to Quit and re-launch Synclavier® PowerPC™ whenever you change the
W0 or W1 Disk Image File selection.
- After uploading sound files to a shared Disk Image File, the new files will not be
visible to other users until they re-launch Synclavier® PowerPC™, or until they use the
MONITOR's BOOT command.
We are working on a software
- DO NOT USE SHUFFLE or RESIZE on a feature that would use the MOUNT
shared Disk Image File while any other users are button on the B-screen to look up
running the Real Time Software. All users of a and rescan the W1 selection
shared Disk Image File should use the MONTOR's without having to leave the Real
BOOT command after SHUFFLE or RESIZE is Time Software. Keep those cards
used on a shared Disk Image File.
and letters coming!
Using "Program Linking" with EditView®, AutoConform, MIDINet
The Macintosh's built-in Program Linking capability allows you to run EditView®,
AutoConform, MIDINet and Termulator on any Macintosh on your network. All 4 applications
are both PowerPC and 68k compatible, so you could use an older 68k Macintosh for a remote
EditView® workstation if you wanted.
EditView®
AutoConform
MIDINet
Termulator
Page 15
EditView®, AutoConform and MIDINet include a "Connection" menu that allows you to
access a remote Synclavier® PowerPC™ anywhere on your Macintosh network. Termulator
includes a "Network" option under it's Terminal menu that provides a similar function.
The Mac422 entry directs EditView®, AutoConform and MIDNet to use the earlier
Mac422 Nu-Bus hardware that connects to a remote Synclavier® using the existing New
England Digital proprietary RS-422 "SyncNet" protocol. Selecting the Network... item
provides access to a remote Synclavier® PowerPC™ using your Macintosh Network.
What is Program Linking
Program Linking is a capability of Macintosh AppleTalk networks that allows two
Macintosh applications running on different computers to exchange information very quickly.
Enabling and using Program Linking is very similar to the Macintosh File Sharing capability
known as AppleShare.
Page 16
You enable Program Linking from the File Sharing control panel, as shown:
You must enable program linking on the Macintosh that is running Synclavier®
PowerPC™. You do not need to enable Program Linking on the Macintosh that is running
EditView®, AutoConform, MIDINet or Termulator.
Page 17
You also must either allow the Guest user to link to programs on your Macintosh, or you
must set up a registered user that has Program Linking privileges.
Page 18
Connecting to a Remote Synclavier® PowerPC™
Begin by launching Synclavier® PowerPC™ on the remote computer. You will need to
enable Program Linking access from the Settings... dialog under the Edit menu.
When you select the Network... menu item from EditView®, AutoConform, MIDINet
or Termulator, a dialog similar to the one shown below will let you navigate and select the
remote Synclavier® PowerPC™ you would like to communicate with.
Using "Reconnect"
Once you have established communication between two Macintoshes using the
Network... menu item, the link between the two applications remains active until either
program Quits.
The Reconnect
menu item is available to quickly re-establish
communication with a remote Synclavier® PowerPC™ when the remote computer has been
restarted, the Synclavier® PowerPC™ application has been re-launched, or for any other reason
Page 19
Using Synclavier® PowerPC™ on Multiprocessor Macintosh
Synclavier® PowerPC™ includes several internal "hooks" that enable Synclavier®
PowerPC™ to take advantage of multiple-processor Macintosh computers. Macintosh models
such as Apple's 9600MP as well as certain multiprocessor upgrade cards by third-party manufacturers, In all honesty, I can't image why
provide Macintosh users with a unique and powerful you would ever not
want
hardware platform.
Synclavier® PowerPC™ to run on
secondary processor that is
Unfortunately,
multi-processor
Macintosh the
available
multi-processor
computers are not being manufactured by any company at Macintoshes. in One
reason I
this time. Of course, the new G3 PowerPC processor that
is used in current Apple production offers speed included the Settings... option
improvements that validly question the need for a multi- to control it was so that you could
turn it off if any bugs show up
processor Macintosh platform.
only in that configuration. It also
If you are one of the lucky (courageous?) lets me test both configurations on
individuals
that has obtained a multi-processor my one MP Macintosh. There you
Macintosh, you may wish to enable the multi-processor have it!
software hooks contained within Synclavier®
PowerPC™. This is easily accomplished with part of the Settings... menu dialog:
Enabling this feature directs Synclavier® PowerPC™ to operate on the secondary central
processor in your Macintosh, leaving the main host processor completely available for screen
drawing, network communications, or other applications.
Page 20
Using Synclavier® PowerPC™
Synclavier® PowerPC™ is an operating environment that reproduces a complete
Synclavier® as accurately as possible. The few software features of the original Synclavier®
that are not available in Synclavier® PowerPC™ at this time are:
- The built-in non-synced "Smpte Generator" function
- Full access to the 5 1/4" SuperFloppy
Of course, those software features listed are still active in the software when the system is
running on the original "Model D" processor.
Accessing the 5 1/4" SuperFloppy drive
Due to numerous technical problems, Synclavier® PowerPC™ cannot reliably access the
original 5 1/4" SuperFloppy drive. These problems
derive from the inability for Macintosh applications to
If you intend to use your 5 1/4"
disable interrupts on the host PowerPC processor.
SuperFloppy
drive
with
Synclavier®
PowerPC™,
please
The SuperFloppy drive is listed in the device
I
configuration and is available for reading to a limited read this section carefully.
strongly
recommend
you
migrate
extent. Any attempt to write to a floppy will fail and
your entire floppy collection to a
report a 'write protect' error.
Macintosh hard drive at this time.
Accessing the SuperFloppy from Synclavier® Access to the SuperFloppy drive
PowerPC™ will be approximately 5 to 10 times slower may prove to be so unreliable that
than accessing the SuperFloppy from the original "Model I discontinue it in the next release.
D" processor due to numerous retries that must be In any case SAVE ALL YOUR
performed. Frequently, it will take so long to access a WORK and be prepared for your
SuperFloppy that you will think your Macintosh has Macintosh to crash whenever you
access your SuperFloppy drive
crashed.
from Synclavier® PowerPC™!
Performing a simple CAT of the floppy contents
(either from the Monitor or Sequence Recall screen) is perhaps the most straightforward and
reliable operation and will generally work. Accessing small sequence or patch files (e.g. up to
several hundred sectors long) located on a nearly empty floppy also may work to a limited
extent, albeit very slowly. Accessing large files on a floppy, or accessing any file on the inner
most region of the disk, will likely hang your Macintosh for long enough that you will choose to
restart it.
Of course, you can reboot your Synclavier® using
any time simply by Quitting the Synclavier® PowerPC™
application and using an original Winchester Bootload
diskette. The floppy drive can then be accessed by the
Model D processor as before.
the original "Model D" processor at
The SuperFloppy drive seems to
work somewhat better on multiprocessor Macintoshes. Painful,
not utterly painful...
Perhaps now is a good time to migrate your entire
SuperFloppy collection to a Synclavier® hard drive or to
a Macintosh hard drive or network. There are several ways you could approach this situation:
-
You could copy the contents of each floppy to a subcatalog on a Synclavier® SCSI hard
drive
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or -
You could copy the contents of each floppy to a subcatalog stored in a Disk Image File
located on your Macintosh
You could import your entire floppy collection to a series of Macintosh Files and Folders
using InterChange™
Using InterChange™ to import your floppy collection to Macintosh files and folders will
allow you to use the Macintosh "Find" capability to quickly locate a particular Floppy or any file
thereon by name. Additionally, importing your floppy collection in this way will reduce the
actual storage taken up your collection to the smallest amount possible. Further savings in
storage space could also be achieved by using an archive utility such as StuffIt, although by
doing so you will lose the Macintosh "Find" capability.
Of course, this current version of Synclavier® PowerPC™ can only access Macintosh
files that are in the Disk Image format; it cannot access individual Patch, Sequence, Sound or
Data files stored in the Macintosh format. This means you will generally have to use
InterChange™ to re-export the Macintosh-resident copy of a floppy to a Synclavier® hard drive
or a Disk Image File before actually using a file from that floppy.
All things considered, here is perhaps the best method to migrate your SuperFloppy
library to your Macintosh:
-
-
Boot your Synclavier® from it's Model D processor
Create a subcatalog 2400 sectors long for each floppy you wish to archive. You could
use either W0 or W1 for these subcatalogs. To simplify importing these subcatalogs into
your Macintosh, you may wish to first create a very large super-subcatalog that will hold
up to 128 of these floppy subcatalogs. 1.2 megabytes of hard drive storage will be
required for each floppy subcatalog.
Use FORMCOPY to copy each floppy into its subcatalog
Use InterChange™ to import either the entire device, the entire super-subcatalog, or each
floppy subcatalog to your local Macintosh hard drive or network.
Please refer to the InterChange™ 1.1 User Manual for more information on importing
Synclavier® files to your Macintosh.
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Metronome Calibration
Different models of Apple Macintosh computers use very different internal methods to
provide precise timing information to Synclavier® PowerPC™.
With certain model
Macintoshes using certain Macintosh Operating Systems the timing information that
Synclavier® PowerPC™ uses to create the Click Track Output is inaccurate.
The Calibrate Metronome button in the Settings... window provides a
mechanism to accurately measure the Macintosh's processor clock against its time-of-day clock.
Metronome calibration takes 30 seconds and produces extremely accurate results. The results of
the measurement are written to the 'Synclavier® PowerPC™ Prefs' file.
You should perform a metronome calibration any time you change computers.
Synclavier® PowerPC™ will automatically ask for a new calibration during startup whenever
the 'Synclavier® PowerPC™ Prefs' file is deleted.
Creating M512k Memory
Classic Synclavier® systems used circuit cards called 'M512k Memory' to store recorded
sequence information. The amount of this memory available to a classic Synclavier® was
determined by the number of M512k cards in the system.
Synclavier® PowerPC™ allocates Macintosh memory that is then used to simulate
M512k card memory. A menu option in the Settings... window lets you control the amount
of Macintosh memory that is allocated for this purpose.
The following table identifies the number of sequencer notes that are available for each setting.
M512k Cards
3 M512k Cards
4 M512k Cards
5 M512k Cards
10 M512k Cards
Notes Available
175,194 Notes
409,098 Notes
661,002 Notes
1,920,522 Notes
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