Second Class Mail Registration no. 5918, Shelburne, Ontario
The INDEPENDENT Commodore Users' Magazine
New
C-64, VIC
and PET
Products
No. 22 August 1983
The Chicago
C.E.S. Report
by Chris Bennett p.1S
New, Updated Lists of Thousands
of Public Domain Programs p_ 73
10610 BAYVIEW (Bayview Plaza)
RICHMOND HILL, ONTARIO, CANADA L4C 3N8
(416) 884-4165
C64-LINK©
The Smart 64
Call orwrite
payments
by VISA,
MASTERCARD
or BANK
TRANSFER.
Mail orders
also by
certified
check, etc.
Cartridge
Expansion Slot
Switch
•
Audio
RF Video
Serial
1/ 0
Port
RTC
Cassette Port
Users Port
Tape
VIC Modem
1541 Drive
And
1525 Printer
or VL3 Cable
IEEE Disks
(2031) (4040)
(8050) (8250)
(9090)
Many more 64s
I EEE Printers
(4022) (8023)
VL 16
(future)
Cartridge
to Parallel
(8300)
etc .
or 1515 Printer
l EE E to Parallel
Interface
IEEE to Serial
Interface
or VL4 Cable
Parallel
Dev i ces
True Serial
Devices
Modem
M other Board
Printer
to Standard
Give These Expanded
Capabilities To Your 64
U~hl
Spooling
to
Printer
POWER ®
And
PAL ©
*
*
*
*
*
Other
Cartridges
*
The ability to transfer data from any type of device to another (IEEE, Serial,
Parallel)
BASIC 4.0 which allows you to run more PET BASIC programs and gives you
extended disk and 110 commands.
The ability to have several 64s on line together - sharing common IEEE
devices such as disks or printers with Spoo li ng Capability .
Built-in machine language monitor
A built-in terminal or modem program wh ich allows the system to communi cate through a modem to many bullet in board systems and other computer
mainframes.
Compatibility with CP/M .
Contact your local Commodore dealer or RTC.
Copyrlghls and Trademark s
C64 is a co pyr ig ht of Commodore Busin ess M achi nes,
Inc . C64· Ll N K is a copyright of Richvale Tel~
communicatio ns. CPfM is a regislered tradem ar k of
Dig ital Research . POWER IS a trad em ark of Profess ional Software PAL is a copyri g ht of Brad
Templ eton .
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
2
J
4
5
7
o
9
a
15
22
27
31
32
33
39
41
44
46
51
53
54
56
63
65
66
67
68
69
73
95
96
Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editorial Page . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . .
TPUG Programming Contest Winners . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Bonnycastle
Farquharson Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N Farquharson
HELP.. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Doris Bradtey
Stick to VIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terry Herckenrath
TPUG Library Additions. . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TPUG's This and That. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doris Bradley
1983 Chicago CES Show . • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Bennett
1984 TPUG Conference Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programmers Do It In Software (Conclusion). . ...•..... Hal Chamberlin
CHIPP! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Richardson
Book Review . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terry Taller
If _ Then Branching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vince Sorensen
Non-destructive PET Reset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harold Anderson
EXECOM-80 (A review) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T. Tremmel
Tips and Tricks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian A Wright
Butterfield Box (Input Idiosyncracies) . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . Jim Butterfield
The New Business Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gord Campbell
Color 80 (A review). . . • • . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • G. R. Walter
More (less) on LIFE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edwin l. King
Papermate to WordPro Converter. . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . Thomas Henry
The Smart 64 Terminal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert A Chandler
ROMPACKER (A Review) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . William E. Wilbur
Game Reviews. . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • Bonnar Beach and David Hill
Differential Relocation of Machine Code. . . . . • . . . . . . . Harold Anderson
Hardware Hacker
. • . . . . . . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hank Mraczkowski
TPUG June Central Meeting • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian A Wright
TPUG Info and NEW Library List . . . . . • . . • • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • . . . . .
Classified. • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
•..••..•.....•....•.•...•.......•..
The TORPET
ISSN # 0821-18~'
published by
The Publisher
Horning's Mills, Ontar!(
Canada LON lJO
(519) 925-5376
Use above address for both manuscript submission and advertising
U,S. Address: The TORPET
I Brinkman Ave., Buffalo, N.Y., 14211
Bruce M. Beach, Publisher and Editor
Sandra Waugh, Associate Editor
Published monthly {except April and December;
!Jingle subscription rate - $18.00 per year
Iionorary Editorial Committee:
Jim Butterfield, Associate Editor ot Compute, Toronto, Ont.
Dave Williams, Contributing Editor of Info Age, Toronto, Ont.
Bizabeth Deal, well-known contributer to Commodore Magazines, Malvern, Pa.
Jane Campbetl, San Diego User's Group President, San Diego, Ca.
Printed In Canada
Canadian Second Class Mailing Permit Number 5918
Mailed at Shelburne, Ontario
U.S. Second-Class Postage paid at Buffalo, N.Y.
Cover Credit Graham Bailey
Cover Models: Derick Campbell Age 14; and Bradley Campbell, Age
Cover Story: Page 3
o.
POSTMASTER: Send changes of address to The TORPET, 1 Brinkman Ave.,
Duffalo, N.Y., 14211
Letters to t
"I/ow me 1:0 use th'ls opportunity to
congratulate you with the TORPET organization. There is nothing like it here in
Norway. and by being attached to your expenence I reckon my children and I will
avoid Jumping the leap in two steps.
In a short time I hope to bring you
more members tram Trondheim, as there is
a rapidly growing interest for data also
here In Norway.
Borre Sandnes 113990
Trondheim. Norway
I think you are dOing a great job with
all the new members in the club. I don'l
know now you have held it together this
long without more troubles than you have.
I think your doing "Great".
Ray W. Beardslee 114493
Camanche. Iowa
Many thanks for the great magazine.
You make up r~ally interesting stuff.
Hans-Borje Pettersson 114772
Kristianstad. Sweden
Thank you for your continued interest
In upgrading TORPET. I'm grateful for each
copy and always find something of interest.
David C. Dorward #2577
Edmonton, Alberta
Congratulations on a super conference.
Wish I could have been there both day~
and attended more sessions. Out I really
enjoyed the time I spent on Saturday. One
at the most enjoyable aspects of the conterence for me was the opportunity to
meet Doris Bradley and others from TPUG.
You are not just names in the TORPET and
unapproachable. I do wish I was closer so
I could participate more often.
I also am enjoying my issues of the
TORPET. Like other publications I've been
receiving. it improves with every issue and
just keeps growing. Keep up the good work.
Martha Rodger 113110
Dryden. Michigan
page
2
TORPET August 83
I very mucn enjoyed your conference
ana copy session held in May and look
forward to it becoming a regular feature.
The organIsers are to be commended for
their hard work and coping with the ultimate of bugs--a power failure!
John Ambrose 110129
Mississauga. Ontario
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1
TPUG Executive
Bruce Beach Editor 519-925-5376
Barb Bennett Director 416-782-9252
Chris Bennett Vice-President 416-782-9252
Mike Bonnycastle President 416-654-2381
Gord Campbell Conference 416-492-9518
Sandy Cavan Treasurer 416-962-0744
Gary Croft Recording Sec. 416-727-8795
John Easton Westside Chapter 416-251-1511
AI Farquharson Westside Chapter 519-442-7000
Gerry Gold Director 416-225-8760
Mike Hyszka C-64 Chapter 416-249-5805
Steve Punter Bulletin Boards 416-625-1786
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
TPUG OFFICE
()
~o
·
'EDITORIAL
How to start a new club!
$everal times 11 month' get a phone C<lll asking how
one shoulo go aDout starting a new users CIUD. we can
g'lve you lots or help from our experience.
As a club you may consider uSIng some of your
membership dues to order a complete copy of the TPUG
library for the club.
Step one. find other interested Commodore users.
ThIS IS easy. Photocopy the poster on page 25 ot this
roRPET and print in your name (some of those rub on
letters would make it look neat.) Then photocopy another
20 or thirty copies. These placed in computer stores,
schools, and on various communrty public bulletin boards
Will probably get you quite a number of replies.
A very good idea is to use some of the club funds
to provIde refreshments at each meeting for an informal
social period. Donuts, coffee, fruit juice are all that is needed.
Be sure to ask those persons replying to bring interested friends to the first meetings. (The old but true
saYing IS that birds ot a teather tlock together). Some
small ads In the classified section of your local paper may
also be helpful. Your local paper will probably even conSIder It newsworthy if you will send them a pIcture of
yourself at your computer along with a write-up. They may
want to do an interview. You will probably be surprised at
how many people you Will tlnd who are Interested.
Step two. Set up an Initial meeting time B.nd
locatIOn. If the location is publicly announced be sure you
have enough space for lots of drop-ins. You can usually
get space cheap if not free at a public school or in some
communIty hall. A home will probably not have enough room.
Step thr~e. Prepare an Initial program. Arrange for
about tour speakers. Have one explain some elementary
thing about programming and be Willing to answer questions. Have another speaker demonstrate some commerCIally available program. Have a third and fourth explain
some program ot their own which they are willing for the
attendees to copy for free. Put the free programs onto a
disk along with some of the public domain programs from
rpUG and let the attendees come up and copy them after
the meeting.
Step four. Plan for future meetings. Ask for volunteers to serve on an executIve. .'\ccept everyone W!lO
volunteers ana set a oate tor a DUStneSS meeting that IS
separate
trom
the
next
club
meeting.
DO NOT MIX CLUB MEETINGS AND BUSINESS MEETINGS.
Pick a club meeting night that always remains the same
such as the second Thursday of each month. Also try to
pIck a location that WIll not have to change tor a whIle.
Step five. At the executive meeting hold an election and then get volunteers tor needed POSitions lIke
secretary, IIbranan, etc. Try to get every member of the
executive to take responsibility for something. You will
soon learn who you can depend on. Keep meeting formalities to a minimum.
Fees need not be very high. $30 per year per member should cover the costs for any club. Single time attendees should be allowed to attend as many times as
they WIsh by paying $5 at the door. Start on night number
one. This will c?ver your personal start up costs for the
meeting place, advertising, refreshments, etc.
Good speakers can be found at computer stores, in
schools and universities, among students, and among those
who reply to your ad. Ask everyone who replies if they
'lave something they could tell about Hold excess names
for future agendas. Be sure not to let anyone individual
speak tor more than about twenty minutes.
A video pro jector is a real boon if you can find a
school or some other organrzation that has one. With a
large crowd of 75 or more it is a must, but up to around
fifty you may be able to make do with several monitors.
It is not necessary to start publishing a newsletter
right at the outset. We will be glad to list your meeting
dates and locations in The TORPET and will also publis!:
news Items for you. When things have settled down and
you know who can be depended upon and have a number
ot the mechanics functioning smoothly you are welcome to
use articles from The TORPET to form a nucleus tor
your own newsletter. We hope later to be able to furnish
TPUG associated clubs with additional articles for which
we did not have room in The TORPET.
The best advice I can give is to stay away from organlzitis. The idea is to have fun and share experiences,
Information, know-how, new programs, and ideas about the
computer.
G' \
( l"6 . ... 0·
(
NO
~
It-Jor
,..J
0
~ I
AG/t·/I.
v
a..
o
0
Other hints. It will be a great boon to everyone if
you set memberShIp tees hIgh enough so that you can
send $15 for each member to TPUG. For this they will
receIve a monthly copy of The TORPET and will De c.
member ot rpUG in their own right For every twenty-five
members in your club who are members of TPUG you will
receIve a free monthly disk from TPUG.
TOR PET August 83
page
3
FEATURE
TPUG CONTEST WINNERS
by Michael Bonnycastle
The results of the TPUG Programming
Contest were
announced
at the
June
meeting. The winners were as tallows:
~12S'i~5ill!'I22!iill.5m.s;illSi~:illl'l22!iill.5m.s;illSi~5ill!I<52.'iill.5llilli,
-Vince Sorenson ~ Marston City -Derick Campbell - light Cycles -Walter
lewaniak
library
Manager
-Allan Yates - Graphic Aid 4.0 -
VIC 20
C-64
Overdue
- PET
PET
[
In the games division for the VIC. tne
ontry by Vince Sorenson tram Regina called
Marsden City was the winner. This is a
dynamiC program in which you try to shoot
aown a critter before it gets to the bottom
line of the screen. There were excellent
graphics. good colour ana sound effects.
The action is fast and reasonably challenging. BUT not too hard so the judges
COUld get into it and enjoy the game. Vince
gets a VIC 20 for this game.
Also 'In the games area. a super
program for the C-64 called Light Cycles
by Derick Campbell was a winner. Derick
re-configured
the
character
set
and
provided a gOOd. two player action game.
fast enough to be challenging. and with
gOOd COlour. Congratulations and a VIC 20
tor DeriCK.
On the Business side. several students
Cardnal Newman High School
in
Hamilton submitted programs which were
Ul:ieTUI In me aamlnlstratlon or me scnool.
While we dldn't test them exnaustive,y.
LIBRARY OVERDUE MANAGER by Walter
Lewanlak was outstanding. It ran well. had
gooa
aocumentatlon.
ana
penormea
a
highly useful function which was fairly complicated. as these applications tend to become. Congratulations to Walter. he wins a
page 4
TORPET August 83
trom
Toronto, Ont.
VIC 20 for this submission.
Finally.
Tor
a program
so
unique.
usetul. well thought out and well docurn e me a tn a t we co u Ion at n e Ip 0 ut p rov I a e
a speCial award. Allan Yates wins a VIC 20
for GRAPHIC AID 4.0. Running on a 40
COlUmn PET. this series at machine langlJage subroutines entarges me structure or
BASIC 4.0 to include 17 additional commands. These include commands that position the cursor anywnere on tne screen.
draw hOrizontal ana vertical lines. define
frames or boarders. scroll areas across tne
~creen lor up or down). draw bar graphs
and place large letters on the screen uSing
quarter
square
graphics.
The
user
aoclJmentatlon
was
excellent.
and
tne
maChine cooe was so well presented that
we could not help but provide an award
for P""s entry. Congratulations. Allan.
There were many other fine programs
and these arQ finding their way
into the library. Three special Contest Disks
- one PET. one ViC and one C-64 were
available at the TPUG Conference last
month at George Brown. and can be obtained by contacting the TPUG office.
~ubmitted
Several programs are worth specIal
mention. David Francis submitted a fasCinating series of hi-res graphic items on
the C-64. woven together in a series called
VOYAGER. Scott Allan sent in nine games
on a disk. all good. but all different. A VIC
game
called
HELLICOPTER
by
Michael
Sigmundt came a very close second to the
wmner. and there was an excellent truck
ariving
game
called
SEMI
by
Gerid
Schwartz at Michigan for the PET in which
you guioe a trUCK up a mountain pam fUll
of obstacles. I.A. Wright of Toronto. Ont.
sent In a super Simulation of open pit
FEATURE
mining, called PITS!.
Some
comments
on
me
prograrns..
Firstly the lack of documentation was very
frustratmg, particulariy if the program reqwrea somemlng special sucn as Joystlcl<s.
Several programs needed them, but it was
not mentioned anywhere. Several people
~,ent
m notes with their programs, but
tnese gOt mlsplacea In the Juaglng, ana an
instruction file, or rem statements in front
at the program would have served far betler and kept the entire thing intact.
Secondly, some at the programs were
well conceived and well presented, and
they ran all right. but in some, seldom
used subroutine they crashed!!!! - That was
100 bad, because we took a lot of points
otf for that.
We also had our share of load errors
Why didn't you put two copies of the
program on the tape or dlSK·t JUSt In
case!! Some at the games worked awfully
~;Iowly. And that's typical of BASIC. I would
nave liked to have seen some BASIC
programs with a few machine language
GUorOUlines to pUSh tnem along when they
got SlOW.
By and large. we had an excellent
group aT entries, ana my manKS go to all
or you who worked so hard to get those
entries in. Look in the mail soon, as I will
get back to all of you eventually with
copies at tne appropriate OISK Tor your
library. If you sent In a VIC entry. we'll
sen a YOlJ a VIC tape at the contest
entries. If you sent in a disk, we'll send it
back with the Pet entries. Thanks again,
and nave a gooa summer.
••••••••••••••••••
Thirdly. sometimes it was hard to figure
Out me oOJect or me prograrn.
~
~~
Farquharson Features...
by AI Farquharson
PEEKS AND POKES
Those betore computers would consider thiS "
be a story about some mustachioed, top-hatted
character In black who would peek around the curtain
and run out to poke someone in the nose. Us c.o.'s
(clever one's) with computers know better. The concept is very Simple.
PEEKS
Some of us have seen a hotel clerk's counte:
With a large number ot boxes located behind the
clerk on the wall. Some of the boxes contain door
keys and messages, letters, etc. You may ask the
clerk, "Is there any mall for me?" He Will likely reply
With a question. "What is your room number sir?"
You say room 212. The clerk and yourself will bott',
look up to box 212 to see if any mall is there. There
may be hundreds of boxes but you are only interested in one, room 212.
This is precisely the way a computer handles a
peek. What number is located in memory location
212? The answer IS always a number from 0 to
255. So what good is that? It may represent many
t,)lngs when interpreted by the computer and/or you
but it is only a number. If you wish a different value
to be stored there, you may change it PEEKING
DOES NOT CHANGE COMPUTER VALUES STORED IN
.\NY LOCATION.
POKES
You have a letter tor me and the clerk says
am not In my hotel room at the moment He will
"poke" the letter into room 212 and I may pick it up
later. Poking to a location (a memory address) will
destroy or change the former value of the number
at location 212 and place in it the new value: some
new number. Try to keep the number no greater
than 255 or the computer will tell you about your
Sin: syntax error .
•••••••••••••••••••••
TORPET August 83
page
5
·F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....o. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....cr
. . .............................................................................................
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I ~ Hewitt's
~
S
88
~
8
~
...o-..r~
Nati,ulat lYItotesate 1~':·\I.-n
Gommodore 64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S 242.95
VIC 20 .' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..S 99.95
1541 Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S 335.00
16K RAM
$ 65.95
Cardco printer interface .••.....•••.$
Cassette interface .............$
3- I t expansion
$
so. . • . •. . . . . . . • • .
Scientific
Data
~;c~
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6-slot buffered
expansion w-pur
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Ser:~!!rt:~~er:.ic'abie·
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NEC 12: eolor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S
T
axan 12: Ambe r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S
USI 12" Amber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89.00
SoftwareBrown
44.95
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299.00
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g;7a:~~~~r ~ .:::::::::::::::::
S I\~
If.' l' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ·S 599.50
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rna er
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JOy
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20.00
12.00
40/80 Video Pak ...........S 214.50
80 Video-Pak (64) .............$ 286.00
Z80 Video Pak (64) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 128.95
8
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55.00
'0.50
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Quick
Fox .•.••....•.•••...s
Tronix swarm ...............•....$ 19.95
Sidewindr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 19.95
C
r Ch plitt
$ 28.95
reaAlVei
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pp e-paniC . .. .. .. . . . .. . • . • . . ' - '
UMI Outworld
$ 32.95
Satellites &. 'M~~rib,~' : : : : : : : :
32.95
::$
HES Hesmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$
VIC Forth . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . • .$
Micro-ED Math Bid ...•.••.•....••.$
VAP INVADERS •.••....••••....$
~~~ ~~ ~..: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$
Hewitt's NatiQnal Wholesale of Albuq.
2441 Menaul NE, Albuq'.r. N. Mex . [SUS) 883' D9B4
1-800-1121-9211
~W
31.50
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65.00
Prices subject
to change
without notice
.
Prices in U.S. dollars
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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....r..r...r
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...............r...r...r...r...r......
...r...r..-ooooooooc:r
.........r...r
................r...r...r...r...r...r...r...o........r...r...r~...r...r...r.................o-...r...o-...r...oJ
DES-SOFTTM
division of Data Equipment Supply Corp.
Quality Softwal'e For CollUDodol'e@ Computers
Vic-2()@
Commodore~
Pet 4064~
C-128@
B·7()()@
SHIFIY (C) By Kavan
Watch the maze change as you pass through
the revolving doors. Can you keep ahead of the
bandits? "Shifty is really nifty" and a lot
tougher than it looks. Machine language.
Keyboard or joystick. llK+.
Cassette .............................. $20.00
Prices in U.S. dollars
This and other great games and programs are available from DES-SOFT, home of
BONZO, HOPPER, LASER COMMAND and many other programs for Commodore Computers.
- - - S e e your L()CAL DEAiEifor oui Progra....
--
Dealen invited
page
6
TORPET August 83
Software Distribution Available
Authon Wanted
HELP
Do you have anything for this column? The three
headings are: (1) Helpful Hints (2) Who's Got the Answer?
and (3) "PET" Pals Wanted. Just send your contributions
(Including answers to any questions which have appeared)
to:
Toronto PEl Users Group
Dept. Help
1912A Avenue Rd. S~ 1
Toronm, Ontario MSM 4A 1
Please let us know if you wish your full address published.
HELPFUL HINTS
Recently I purchased a KBA disk trom TPUG tor my
Commodore 64. Every program worked tine With the ex
ceptlon ot 2 programs "Dates" and "Calendar". On these
2 programs as soon as they got to the menus the screen
began to wave back and forth and I noticed that the cassette motor started to run. Normally if the cassette IS In
wind or rewind I have the same interference. After much
checking I discovered what was causing the problem. On
both programs on line #40 It read POKE UO,O. The
problem was the first 0 was "number zero" and it should
have been "letter 0". I corrected this error and they have
been perfect ever since.
Didl Briggs #7669
Lexington. Mass.
(?) Has anyone used the AAMAX. advertised In
Compute? Ken Clybor, IIhnols
I bought one In Jan. thiS year and have been absolutely pleased with it It is well constructed and each
block of memory can be switched in or out independently
clS needed. I have used each ot the 8K blocks separately
and in different combinations and never had a memory
problem With the unit!! Even the 3K block arid block 5 'the
SWitch that turns the game cartrtdges on & off' has functioned perfectly. The game can be in either of the extra
sockets. I've found it perfect for isolating high memory tor
utility routines trom BASIC or software resets... just don't
turn power off and do another system call for the needed
routine.
George L Dennis
VanNuys" california
(?) Looking for a fix for RF interference on a standard TV hooked up to a C-64.
fry purcnaslng a large ('''-1.5'') toroid magnet from
nadio Shack and then looping the cable from your 64
around the magnet several times. For many people that
has cured the problem.
Alfred Johnson,Jr. troB4O
Cary. North Carolina
PET PALS WANTED
I would like to hear trom members who use tnel~
PET/CBM for business uses. My uses are In the clothing
retail business. Visicalc, Accts Payable, Accts Receivable,
!.lales Analysis. I'm presently truing to locate an inventory
system tor my 4032.
Jim Cleistad .2D34
James Men"s Wear Ltd.
P.O. Box 154 Mackenzie. B.C. VOJ 2CO
Writer dOing research would like to hear trom
women who make a living at home using a computer. Write:
Patricia Connel
Box 1002
Moab, utah 84532
WHO'S GOT THE ANSWER?
(;an someone tell me where I can obtain a publi"
domain VIC terminal program which will allow one to send
DASIC and Machine Language programs over the phone
uSing the VIC modem and cassette recorder. In short. I
want an inexpensive VIC terminal program which allows
tape uploading and downloading.
Alfred Johnson Jr. #0840
Cary, North carolina
I am curious about the Pet Tree for the C-64. It
would seem to be a very valuable tool, but the advertising
IS less than complete In It'S descrtptlon of the instalation
and compatability with other elements of the C-64
peripherals. I am In hopes that someone can shed some
light on the subject
Michael K. Cope • 5002
Franfonl,. West Virginia
have a Commodore 64 system with a NEC-8023AC
printer. I would appreciate it, it someone could recommend
a printer interface to enable me to get screen dumps ot
I II-RES graphiCS.
Ronald Miller
Sau~ Ste. Marie, Ontario
I am wOrktng 10 Assembly language on the 6502
processor, trying to locate detailed, technical information
on tne kernal SUbroutines, anCl other aspects of machine
language (Intormation that does more than skim the surface).
I would appreciate any Information on available
resources, names ot other programmers I could contact etc.
Sandy K. Mackey .7949
Laurel, Montana
Looktng tor techntcal draWings tor the KIM computer. Can anyone help?
Ron Clysdale
(Wortc) (416) 623-3341
.2!11138
Stnce December 1982. I have not been able to use
my VIC moClem on my VIC-20 to log on our Hewlett-Packard HP3000. I have tried evey possible configuration with
no success. Does anyone out there know the correct configuratIOn or the reason I can not log on?
Henry t".aszel
331 Penn Road
Beaconsfield. PO H9W 185
(0) 514-337-5007
TORPET Augu~ 83
(H) 514-695-2646
page
7
I have recently expanded the memory ot my VIC- 20
to 321< by purchasing a RAMAX, and am in~erested In
uSing It as a wor<2 processor. I have used WordPro 4+ and
like that program. Professional Software do not offer such
a program. Is there anyone who has modified a WordPro
program to work on the 32K VIC-20? If I can find a copy
that works on the VIC-20, I will gladly purcnase another
copy trom Professional Software so that they receive their
royalty.
Gillette. Wyommg
Gan anyone tell me how
could modify the
"LISTER" program to work properly with an EPSON MX.80FT.
Andre Rondeau
Aylmer, PO
I have a Prowriter 8510 parallel DMP, hooked up to
the serial port with a MW 302 interface. I have had no
luck In sending ASCII printer codes to the printer. I called
Commooore and they referred me to the program on 357
ot the Programmers Reference Guide. This program does
nothing except return an Illegal Quantity Error in 370
message. So now I'm left with a very good printer that I
can't do anything with. Gan one ot the members advise
me on this'?
AlSO, IS there any way to change the cursor character trom a tlashlng block to a non-tlashing line?
Bitl Crimando • 0842
carbondale. Illinois
CALENDAR OF TPUG EVENTS
Tnere are no monthly meetmgs tor the Gentral,
Westside, VIC-20 and Commodore-64 chapters in July and
August Summer Sessions (pre-registration required) for
VIC 20 and Commodore 64 owners who are new to
Call Mike Hyszka
computers Tue. Aug. 2
416-~
Mon. Aug. 22
FALL SCHEDULE
Kennet~:
CENTRAL CHAPTER - Leaside High School, 8aYVle",
& Eglinton Aves. at 7:30 p.m. In the auditorium (tentative)
tor PETICBM/SuperPet
Wed. Sept. 14
Commodore-64 CHAPTER - Earl Haig S.S.,
& Princess Aves. at 7:30 p.m. In the auditorium
VJC-20 CHAPTER
Earl Haig S.S., Kenneth 6
Princess Aves. (6 blocks north of Sheppard, 2 blocks east
ot Yonge) at 7:30 p.m, In the auditorium
Mon. Sept. 12
WESTSIDE CHAPTER
(tentatively booked at;
College, Trafalgar Rd., Oakville at 7:00 p.m. m the
cafeteria (PETICBMIYIC/C-64)
Wed. Sept 21
Tue. Sept 20
~heridan
Stick to VIC
PROBLEM_
Bruce Pyle of Akron Ohio came to us with the tollowing problem: Have been uSing the VIC TREE for a
tew months. The PET TRANSLATOR goes 'out of
memory' in line 410. Is there a cure for this?
SOl.UT1ON_
The VIC decides it has run out ot memory 'Nhen
either the pointers that the VIC uses to keep track
01 the v,mables used by the program, or the
pointers that the VIC uses to keep track of 'pertormed subroutines', show that there is not enough
memory lett to either create a new variable or to
perform a subroutine. In the first case, there really IS
no more tree memory lett for the VIC to store variables in. Bruce's problem however, is an example of
the second case. Each time a subroutine is pertormed (GOSUB) the VIC keeps track of where
processing of the program must return when the
RETURN statement is encountered. No matter how
much memory has been plugged Into the VIC, there
IS only a maximum of 256 bytes available for this.
This area is called the 'processor stack area'. The
usual cause of this problem is a missing RETURN
statement, which happens to cause the VIC to keep
performing a subroutine FROM WITHIN THAT SAME
SUBROUTINE. Bruce, to fix your problem, change line
500 to: PRINT#2,A$:RETURN.
QUESTION_
J.F.Betz of Quakertown, Pennsylvania wants to kno¥.
by Terry Herckenrath
where one can get a memory map ot the VIC.
REPLY.
Jim Butterfield has put togetner a memory map of
the VIC well over a year ago. This map has since
been published In several magazines. The one that
I'm sure of that it appeared in is the NUMBER 5
TORPET (1982). To order a copy of that issue, send
$2.00 to the TPUG office stating which TORPET you
want.
QUESTION_
Donald Weiner ot Colby, Kansas wants to kno",
whether TPUG has any program listings that can be
used to type in programs from, or whether we know
ot books with such listings.
REPlY_
We haven't been publishing program listmgs in tnt
TORPET, but other, commercial magazines usually
do. COMPUTE! is one such magazine and there are
others as well. As for books, I obtained the following
two titles from a local computer book store here in
Toronto: VIC INNOVATIVE COMPUTING published by
Melbourne and MORE THAN 32 PROGRAMS FOR
YOUR VIC 20 published by Dilithium Press. I have not
read these books and I am not ImplYing that I
recommend these books. I only want to make you
aware that such books are currently available,
This is all for this month. Please keep those
questions coming, I'll do my best to answer all of them.
~om~S&5ill525ill5252fficffim51-'icffim~SSill\t
page
8
TORPET
Augu~
83
New Additions to the TPUG Library
TPUG June 83 (p)tv
list·-me PTV.!
this deSCription for June PET group disk/tape
boggle a.p
boggleml b.p
g 0 1 f.p
train - chief.p
king.p
pogo v7.8
epldemic.4
naming cmpds.4
scllOolmarm255.p
255quest maker.p
pet agenda.4
Skl 4.f
turtle.8
scroll message.p
any wlndow SlZ.p
auto data hex.p
storywritervll.p
galactic gt.4
expanslon pres.p
graphic al.d 4.p
g.ald 4.p
graph aid inst.p
stars bas pr.8
power spectrum.p
a word search game against the pet-not easy to beat
a machine language part of the boggle a.p prog
a very good golf program-9 holes and differant clubs
a math and time estimation program
simulation of ecconomics in a game format
logo on the pet
simulation game of an epidemiC
naming chemical compounds - educational
a quiz program needs tape file from 255quest maker
program to make a question file for schoolmarrn255
program to run a 'daily agenda ( uses tape )
ski program for fat 40
turtle graphics on the B032
horizontal scroll messages
get screen windows on the 40 col similar to 8032
read a data file and get hex output
latest version of the story writer editor
galactiC war chase with screen action
info on pet/cbm expansion ports-print or screen lists
40 col pet graphics drawing program
called prog for graphic aid 4.p
instructions for graaphic aid 4.p
log heavenly objects-astronomy
calculate the power spectrum of a Signal
TPUG June 83 (v)tv
J.lst-me vtv . .l
orlve Ol.sm
crown 3d
calculate base.v
alpha. sorter.v
metric convert.v
date formater.v
speed reading.v
enrol list Bk.v
vision test.v
long division.v
one arm bandit.v
target shot.v
starship 3k.v
pl.ng/pong( t ). v
state capital.v
usa song.v
this oescription for june vic group diSK/tape
utl..ll.ty dl.Sassernb.les tne rom in dl.SK drl.ve or Vl.C
tnl.S program oemonstrates anl.matl.on on the Vl.C
thl.s program calculates blnary,hexadeCl.mal & decimal
this program sorts strings in alphabetical order
this program converts from imperial to metric
calculates relitive dates;good for use in accounting
this program tests and improves your reading speed
this gives a sample enrolment for night school
this program tests your peripheral vision
translation of game program that tests long division
translation of dutch slot machine game
translation of dutch shooting gallery game
your starship destroys stars using keyboard
translation of dutch ping/pong (breakout style) game
a quiz of the state capitals of the united states
plays american national anthem with picture of flag
TORPET August 83
page
9
·'
'.
.
New Additions to the TPUG Library
TPUG June 83 (c)tv
LIST -M[ (en v
SLiDESHOW.C
IIRSUPP.D
IIRSUPP/BASIC.C
IIRSUPP.SRC.C
IIRTEST.C
DRAGON.D
TANK.D
POLlSH.D
BLiTHER.D
UNCLE.D
3LOCKENFLUTE.D
RATRUN.C
SPACE NIM.C
BIO-COMPAT.C
BIO-PLOTER.C
BIO-PRINTER.C
IIANGMAN.C
STORY.C
SUPERMON.C
SUPERMON INST.C
SOUND HELPER.C
I
(C)TV LIST M~
SEE A SLIDE SHOW, PICK THE' PICS YOU WAf.n TO SEC
MACHINE LANGUAGE LOADED BY SLiDESHOW.C & HRTEST.C
." BASIC LOADER OF HRSUPP.C
SOURCE CODE FOR HRSUPP.C
:~ DISPLAY OF GRAPHICS. VERY NICE STUFF!
:\ PICTURE OF A DRAGON, LOADED BY SLiDESHOW.C
." PICTURE OF A TANK, LOADED BY SLiDESHOW.C
.~ PICTURE OF A POLISH COMPUTER, LOADED BY SLiDESHOW.C
." PICTURE OF A VIOLIN, LOADED BY SLiDESHOW.C
.l, PICTURE OF UNCLE SAM, LOADED BY SLiDESHOW.C
." PICTURE OF A GLOCKENFLUTE, LOADED BY SLiDESHOW. C
FIND THE CHEESE IN A COMPUTER GENERATED MAZE
AN INTERESTING NEW VERSION OF THE POPULAR GAME NIM
ARE YOU COMPATIBLE WITH THAT SPECIAL'
SOMEONE
PLOT YOUR BIORHYTHM
PRINT YOUR BIORHYTHM
(.iUESS THE WORD CORRECTLY OR KILL THE MAN
TYPE A FEW WORDS FOR THE COMPUTER, AND SEE A STORY
MACHINE LANGUAGE MONITOR, FOR ASSEMBLY BY HAND
INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUPERMON.C
LEARN HOW TO MAKE SOUND USING THE SID CHIP
1
S"h""."..."......ocY"."..."..."......cr
......
.,...................A>COeOOOOOGGO. .OOOO. .OOOIMMI.O.~
........................
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TPUG's This & That
~
~
by Doris Bradley, Assistant Business Manager
§~
New Members
Yes It did happen! Member number 8,000 wa$
registered on Tuesday, June 7th. A great big welcome to Mary Law, a Commodore 64 owner from
Cambridge, Ontario.
S
~§
t\
§
S
R
~
§
~
lS
R§
lS
§
§
S
88§
I
R
Renewals
Here's how the system works. Let's taKe as Ol"~
example someone who's membership card indicates
<In expirY date ot August 1983. We send a "first
notice" of renewal early in June, a "second notice"
at the beginning of August, and a "final notice" early
In September.
fhis member Will become Inactive
September 1, 1983 If the renewal cheque has not
been received by the end of August If this membership lapses it means (s)he will miss the October
roRPET since the mailing list for this issue IS
produced the first ot September.
New Member Survey
UIC you ever wonder now many or our
members own VIC 2Os, PETs, Commodore
SuperPets? Well we did a survey ot the 228
members who JOined during one week recently
here's what we founct
Percentage Type of Computer
50.2 Commodore 64
42.8 VIC 20
PET (2000 & 4000)
3
3
PET (8000)
1
SuperPet
na",
64s,
new
and
MemberShip NUmDers
W~ are haVing. a rash of orders without memoersnip numbers Included. PLEASE in~ur numaac.cr~"""....o"'....ooooooc:.ooOOOOl"'
page 10
TOR PET August 83
~
ber--your order can be processed more qUickly. As a
matter of fact it's not a bad idea to include your
membership number in ALL your correspondence with
the office. Thanks.
8
88
l8
S1
0
88
HAMS
All member HAMS please send In your name and
call. We plan to print a list so that you can commumcate with each other
.
Associate Club Chapters
We now have 7! (What a dltterence a month
makes.) In addition to the PET Educators Group
(Windsor), London Commodore Users Group, and
Genesee County Area PET Users Group we have the
'Indian Affairs Teachers Using Computers, Michigan's
Commodore 64 Users Group, Sacramento Commodore·
Computer Club, and Edmonton Commodore Users
G~~
~
§8
§
0
8§S
R
§
8
8g
1
S
8
Commodore OeaNtrs
We now have the Authorized Dealer List, &prmg
1983 from Commodore U.SA as well as the canadian
list updated to May 20th. If yciu'-re having difficulty
locating your nearest dealer we'll do what we can
for you from these lists.
8
S
8§S
Membership Cards
There has been a rash of lost membership, cardr
of late. If you are an associate member, al) that you
need is your membership number and we'll be glad
to supply that upon request. If you are a regular or
student member then you need your card to get into
meetings. You can obtain a replacement card for
$1.00 from the office.
S
8
J
ccooc>",
............
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..............................
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rORPET August 83
page 11
SUPER DISK
Floppy Disk Drive For'
VIC - 20 & Commodore 64
Super Disk2 is a Commodore compatible disk drive designed to interface to the various Commodore computers such
as the PET', VIC-20' and the Commodore 64'. The disk drive
is compatible to the model 4040, 2031, 1540, and the 1541
disk drives and recognizes programs generated on any of
these disk drives. The capacities are comparable to those
found on the Commodore drives, and Super Disk2
recognizes the full instruction set of the Commodore drives.
Super Disk2 offers RAM area within the disk unit, aserial and an
IEEE bus interface.
PRICE INCLUDES IEEE CARTRIDGE
Introductory Offer ... $395.00
Prices in U.S. tunds
Also Available:
Gemini-10 wllnterface
$399. V3K RAM
25.
CPI Parallel Interface
65. V8K RAM
45.
Expandoport 3 VIC
25. V16K RAM
75.
Expandoport 6 VIC
75. V24K RAM
105.
Expandoport 4 C64
65. CIE (IEEE for C64)
95.
CATALOG OF OTHER HARDWARE & SOFTWARE AVAILABLE ON
REQUEST.
We accept: VISA, Mastercharge, and A E
Southwest Micro Systems, In
2554 Southwell- Dallas, Texas 75229
PHONE 1-800-527-7573
PHONE 1-800-527-7573
PHONE 1-800-527-7573
In Texas call (214) 484-7836
1Trademark of Commodore Int.
page 12
TORPET August 83
2Trademark of MSD
TM
by
APROPOS
TheONLV MEMORY yourVIC-20
®
will
need
FEATURES
• A full 27k bytes of RAM
(added to VICs 5k
equals 32k.)
• Fully switchable in sections:
BlK 1 switches 8k
(Adr. 8192 to 16383)
BlK 2 switches 8k
(Adr. 16384 to 24575)
BlK 3 switches 8k
(Adr. 24576 to 32767)
BlK 5 allows/disallows your
8k ROM (games)
(Adr. 40960 to 49152)
RAM switches 3k (Adr. 1024 to 4095)
• May be used with Super Expander®
games or ANY other VIC-20
compatible cartridge.
• Built in RESET switch.
• Fuse protected.
• Totally self-contained.
• 2 duplicate extension connectors for any device
normally plugged into the expansion port.
(BlK 5 is switched to connectors)
• Very low power usage. (.150 amp max.)
• High reliability gold plated connectors.
• 6 month parts and labor warranty.
• Factory service. - Extended service always available.
THIS SUPERB PLUG-IN GIVES YOUR VIC-20
REAL POWER AND EXPANDABILITY
FOR ONLY $149.00
Shipping included
10 DAY SATISFACTION OR YOUR MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
WE ARE NOW OFFERING "RAMAX Jr." (19k),
which is identical to RAMAX in EVERY way, except the
top 8k (BlK 3) is not incorporated. Our introduction
price is $129.00, shipping included.
WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL
TO ORDER:
Send Check or Money Order For the Total
Calif. residents add 6% tax.
Phone orders: CAll (805) 482-360424 HRS.
For credit card orders, Include all information on card.
or contact your local dealer.
Psychoanalysis by computer? - well, not quite. but Dr. Floyd will
carry on a conversation with you using psychoanalytic techniques
giving the appearance of artificial intelligence. Requires 16k RAM
or more.
$14.95 shipping included.
WORDPLAY
"WORDPLAY" is a collection of programs which allow the user to
make original stories, write a form of Japanese poetry, play the fun
game of Animal (children love this one). and create I·argon. A
bonus secret messa~e (cypher) program is also inc uded. In a
word, "WORDPLAY is a bargain.
Requires 16k RAM or more.
$14.95 shipping included.
TYPE FOR YOUR LIFE
With more challenge than an arcade game. leam to type up to 75+ .words/min. (User selectable, but no FOOLING AROUND allowed). TEXT IS WlbELY VARIED SINCE IT COMES FROM THE
PROGRAM TAPE. Action color graphics with sound fix your eyes
to the screen (away from your fingers - clever!) Your man rows
your boat up stream as fast as you can type. Maintain speed and
destroy the Sea Monster; slow clown and he will get you. Runs on
the unexpanded VIC.
$14.95 shipping included.
All software is on high quality cassettes
and is replacement quaranteed .
•
TECHNOLOGy __
Foreign orders, add $15.00.
All items shipped from stock.
DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME
~APROPOS
SOFTWARE
DR. FLOYD
VIC-20 & SUPER EXPANDER are registered
trademarks of Commodore Business Machines. Inc.
350 N. Lantana Ave., Suite 821
~ca~ma~rlll~o,c_
. A~930~10~_ _~
TOR PET August 83
page 13
.~1
VIC~. and COInlnociorc 64
\O~
ARE YOU A
SMfJlT BUYER!
4~t
<
r
.,.-i
.
. · . c ; ' <1;.
'.
MINI JINI™
for
$89.95
is a smart buy!
Record Keeper
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Keep records for home, school, club, or office
better and more quickly than by hand
Hold 50-500 records on tape or disk
Have the plug in ease of a cartridge
Put addresses, books, and more in order
Track appointments, meetings, valuables
Print any number of reports and labels
Do checkbook, class or sports statistic~~S_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _....,
• Make lists for letter writing software
Available now, in plain, simple English.
Record
t\,:'i,·"..;!nl
rc;'
Available NOW in Spanish (Mini-Jini Archive Instante)
French and German versions available soon
Keeper
in 20
m mut'::,,'
C: Cii i r]'o,3 'ld er
V;C 70 and Commodore 64
Magazine
: :ote rnational
""''' ,:C ' !
Application Templates for ...
Anyone who keeps records can use
1. General Demo (69 pre-defined files)
amature radio
disll only
For the UNEXPANDED VIC
paper route
etc.
2. Organize the HAMSHAC,!< (12 files)
3. Classroom Planning (10 files)
plan lessons
analyze tests
keep attendance
library records
4. Party Plan (10 files)
birthdays
the Mini-Jini Record Keeper
i E MP LATE
Christianings
Proms
Administrators
Medical persons
Agencies
Bond Clippers
Organizations
Party Planners
Check Writers
Postal services
Collectors
Salespersons
Educators
Schools
Families
Store owners
Greeting card writers
Teams
Hobbyists
Writers
Libraries
Graduations
Weddings
Anniversaries
Etc.
• Visa - Mastercharge - C.O.D.
• Dealer inquiry welcome
Immed iate shi p ment if in stock If perso nal check is sent. all ow additio nal 2 weeks
Pr ices su bject to change. Shipment subject to availability_ Ships UPS ftt co llect.
C omm odo re 64 ond V1C- 20 o re reglsfered trademarks of Com modore ElectroniCS. lId
page 14
TORPET August 83
JIN f
SYS1" E:!\f~ S~
INC
.
NY
P,O, Box 274 • Riverdale,
10463
PHONE: (212) 796-6200
Prices in U,S. dollars
FEATURE
1983 INTERNA TIONAL
SUMMER C.E.S. SHOW
by Chris Bennett
Toronto, Ont.
The Summer Consumer Electronics Snov.
was held in Chicago from June 5th to June
8th 1983. This was the second C.E.S. show
I have attended. The first was the Winter
snow held in Las Vegas January 6 to 9th
1983 (see the report in the February 1983
Issue of the TORPET - issue # 17>'
64s. plus a few of the products shown at
the Las Vegas show. There were no new
products and suCh things as the new portabie b4 were not on display. However. we
did have an invitation to the Commodore
press conterence that night on the 'Commodore Clipper'.
My wile. Barbara. and I started out on
Saturday morning on the 500 mile drive
tram Toronto to the show. We stopped
overnignt In Michigan and started out fresh
Sunday morning for the remaining 90 mites
to our hotel. One main problem was that.
Decause we register~d fairly late. the only
hotels available were the ones at the airport. 20 miles from dcwntown Chicago. This
we tound was a one hour drive in rush
nour traffic.
.After dinner. we drove over to the
Naval Pier where the 'Commodore Clipper'.
a 300-foot yacht. was anchored on Lake
Michigan. This was where the bulk of the
new naroware ana SOHware proaucls were
being
demonstrated.
Commodore
invited
dealers. distributors and buyers to the
Commodore yacht and provided transportation to and tram the tloating exhiOit. which
was anchored a few miles from the convention centre. A free buffet was going ali
day long downstairs and the bar and
lneater were upstairs. I was not sure wnat
to expect at this 'press conference' since
Ihe two others I had attended were very
poorly run.
However.
I
was in for a
pleasant
surprise.
This
one went very
smoothly
with
various
managers
within
Commodore being introduced and presenting
the new software and hardware products.
After checking into the hotel at noon.
we then drove down to the shaw to get an
initial first day feel of what was in store
ror us. First we had to park! Next we had
a one mile walk to McCormick Place which
was the main conference centre. Since the
show gets bigger and bigger each year.
ihe exhibits spread over more than one
bUilding. The Microcomputer exhibits alone
tilled the three levels of McCormick West.
First. we visited the McCormick Place just
to get a qUick look around. This building
cover ~ many acres ana conSists aT tnree
tloors. Most of the standard electronic exhibits were here. There were suCh things
as
audiolvideo.
telephones.
calculators.
watches
piUS
many
different
types
of
rnag~:llInes
ana newspapers all relatea to
electronics. Since there was too much to
cover and I was more interested in the
computer exhiOit. we went over to McCormiCk
West and
headed straight for the
Commodore booth.
It was quite disappointing! Just a stan-
dard
mixture
ot VIC
20s
and
Commodore
One of the first major announcements
was that the prices of hardware to the
trade (dealers and distributors) ware to be
slashed by up to 25 percent. The prices
at the Commodore 64 and its peripherals
have dropped $ 100 in U.S. funds. It is now
possible in some places in the U.S.A. to
piCK up a Commodore 64 for under $200
(U.S.)
and
disk
drives.
printers
and
monitors tor. $250 (U.SJ. Commodore. at
the NCC show a week before. had drastically chopped the prices of all the business machines (Ie 8032. 4040. 8050, 8032P
etc.). This reflects how determined CommOdore is to be the leader in the home and
hobby markets.
TOR PET August 83
page 15
-.
:
FEATURE
The second announcement. and the
most important was made by Sig Hartmann
whO was recently appointed as Commodore
Software President. He announced that new
~oftware packages for the Commodore 64
are priced substantially under $ 100 and the
new VIC 20 software is priced under $30.
He predicted that Commodore soon will
reach one-half billion dollars in annual
sOftware sales ana It Will De tne top-notcn
~oftware company in the country in terms
of sales.
In all the trade
magazines.
Commodore was running one page ads with
the following text.
"LAST YEAR
WE SAID WE WERE
GOING TO BE NUMBER 1
IN COMPUTERS.
AND WE WERE.
THIS YEAR WE'RE
GOING TO BE
NUMBER 1 IN SOFTWARE.·
ihls IS a complete change from the
Commodore that I have known over the
years. They have never paid much attention
to software but have let third party software
developers do most of the work. Now.
Commodore has gone out and aggressively
:>ought out and signed up many software
products trom outside sources that will be
manufactured and distributed as Commodore
products. Let it be known. Commodore is in
the software market and in it in a big
way! They have done what many of us said
they would have to dO it they wanted to
ntay number one In tne nome computer
market. Top management in Commodore. at
that time. considered Texas Instruments to
be their only real competitor.
rhis was
before TI announced a 100 MILLION dollar
LOSS in their last quarter. Looks like
Commodore is well in first place at least
tor the time being. I also saw nothing at
the show from the competition that should
make any significant difference to this in
the next 6 months.
Now for some of the products on display.
page 16
TORPET August 83
C-1520 Plotter Pri nter
This is the same printer/plotter that I
described in the Feb/83 TORPET. it IS
$ 199.95 (U.S') with a serial connector for
cither the Commodore 64 or VIC 20. It
prints four cOlours (black. blue. green or
red) and can print text at up to
14
cnaracters per second.
rhe device can
produce either 20. 40 or 80 characters on
a line as well as producing high resolution
graphS and charts. The pen can move
nonzontally or vertically on the 4 1/2 inch
roll paper to produce high resolution piclUres or graphs. The device can also print
text sideways down the page as well as
across the page.
Executive 64 Portable Computer
Tho E:xecutive 64 IS a brietcase StYlE.
portable computer based on the CommOdore
64 and 1541 disk drives. This was called
the SX-100 when I 183t wrote about it.
t:xpected delivery is September 1983 at a
price ot $995 (U.S,). This includes the
Commodore 64 paCkaged with one disk
drive (] 541> and a 5-inch colour monitor
In:>loe a nice lOOKing carrying case. A. two
disk drive model will be available for $1195
(U.S'>. Since this device contains a standard Commodore 64 inside. all of the
~ottware
available now and in the future
will run on it. Since the 64's software base
is going to be VERY VERY large within the
next year. many people will find this a very
attractive paCkage. Like the Gommodore 64.
the Executive 64 has plugs for an external
video port for a monitor. a serial port
'printers and extra disk drives). a cartridge
port and joystiCk ports. rhe keyboard feels
better than the 64's keyboard and the
~creen while quite small is easy to read.
However. I don·t think I would want to
~pend many hours in front of such a small
~creen. so for extended periods of time. a
monitor would we needed.
Music Keyboard
Since
my
report
in
the
F-eoruar}
TORPET. Commodore's music keyboard has
undergone a few changes. The release date
IS now set tor September of, this year not
May. The unit comes with a four octave
keyboard instead of three octave. Finally,
the software written by Paul Higginbottom
nas hac some new teatures added. One of
coMMODORE INTRODUCES
MAGIC DESK
THE ULTIMATE FRIENOlV PROGRAM
Commodore ' s answer to "Lisa "
Commodore Clipper: The floating showcase
for "A Boatload of Software"
t:3arbara Bennett with C-64 Portable
(:
I ""
i
so ... r
I~
'. }
eM "
j,
Ii ~A ~ i;
Vi ;'.!
')
1 :1 f
· .,- II r. ~' ~
!A
"1
:L \ / llI f U!" , M.
4.
Commodore ' s new
(not yet an official
f~, y~, {f
i '.,
Logo demo: Logo is a programming language.
TOAPET August 83
page 17
r
FEATURE
these is the ability to lay down one track
at music in memory and then add. one
atter the other. up to three more tracks of
musiC which will play all together as It
iney were recorded at the same time. This
device will be selling for $79.95 <U.S') and
will include the keyboard, cartridge interface
ano some sottware. Since ::s more SID
chips are aaaea with this device, the system IS a twelve VOice music synthesizer.
Music can be saved onto disk for later
recall. You can tune the device up or down
7 increments of an eighth of a semitone
piuS transpose up or down several semitones.
C-1526 Printer
Commoaore was showing a new printe:'
for the VIC 20 and Commodore 64. This is
the C-1526 printer which is an 80 column,
bi-directional. dot-matrix printer identical to
the CBM 4023 printer available for the PET
and CBM lines. The only apparent Oifterence is the serial IEEE needed for the
VIC and '64. The machine prints an aX8
dot matrix at about 70 characters per
::.econa ana uses a cartridge ribbon. The
cost shOula be about $450 <U.S.).
Speech Module for the 64
tirst saw the speeCh module at the
Las vegas snow. Not much has changed
since then except mat me release date IS
now expectea to be in September. The
mOdule plugs airectly into the cartridge
port at the Commodore 64 and contains an
aaditional port Into which other talking and
non-talking. cartridges can be inserted.
Some of the games cartridges that I saw
working with this aevice included GORF and
the WIZARD OF
WOR.
Apparently,
the
Speech
Module
can
support
game
cartridges of up to 128K bytes. The module
contains a built-in vocabulary of 235 words
in a female voice. The voice speed can be
user defined as slow. normal or fast. The
words can be programmed directly from
BASIC or assembler. Many more different
worOs as well different voices (male, 'Valley
Girl'. cartoon characters and space sounds)
will be made available on disk and cartridge.
Commodore 6400 Pri nter
This new daisy wheel printer is tne
replacement tor the GI:3M 8300P. It uses
stan<lar<l Diablo print wheels and cartridge
page 18
TORPET August 83
ribbons and runs at 40 CPS - bi-directional. The cost should be well under
$2000 (U.S.>. The Canadian fist price is
$2695. One of the most impressive features
was the low noise level wt\en printing. It is
muCh quieter than most otf"1er medium
speed daisy wheel printers. It IS also mucn
nicer to look at with a low profile modern
look.
Two New Unannounced Printers
AlSO on me ooat were twO new prlOter~
that Commodore has not yet otficially announced. One was labelled the MPP-1361.
This is an 8023P printer in a new sleek
cover. Other than that. there seems to oe
no difference other than the appearance.
The other printer on display was a full-size
COlour printer that is supposed to sell for
under $600 U.S. It had a full-size 9-inch
carnage and printed in seven COlours.
NEW
SOF~ARE
PRODUCT FROM
COMMODORE
More important than the price reauc.tlons on hardware and the new products on
display. was Commodore's announcements
about software. It was the largest single
sottware introduction in the history Of me
company. with Commodore introducing more
than 70 new sottware products for the
Commodore 64 and the VIC 20. Not only
,was there a large number at new software
prOducts, but Commodore has committed to
bring them to the general public at prices
lar below anything seen so far. Since I
can't describe all the new prOducts, I will
talk about those that I saw at the show.
The Manager
One of the best software paCKages or;
the market today and one that I use in the
otfice all the time, is The Manager. This is
a data base program mat presently runs on
the CBM 8032 and cost $250 (U.SJ. In a
couple of months, this program will be
available for the '64 at $49.95 (U.SJ. This
I::; not JUSt a copy or me version tnat runs
on my 8032. but it has been extensively
improveo for the Commodore 64. The biggest prOblem with The Manager is the
::;ame problem with Visicalc. The power of
the program is limited to the imagination
of the person using it. Bill Maclean. owner
I
I
CRT image of the picture being sent to the
7 color printer
One of the many displays in the
Commodore Clipper.
TOR PET August 83
page 19
FEATURE
of BMB Compuscience (Milton, Ontario), who
IS responsible tor the development ot
fhe
Manager, expects to prOduce a large number of applicati')ns that use The Manager.
ted. This is Commodore's answer to 'LISA'
and they expect to sell it tor under $100 (U.S.).
Wordprocessors
EasyScript IS a word processing pacKagE;
nimllar in operation to the Word pro package
that most ot us have used for many years.
The
main
difference
is
that
this
'64
noftware package will also sell for 49.95
(U.S'>. At this price, there should be no
excuse trom '64 owners for not doing some
kind of wordprocessing on their machine.
Vicwriter is a wordprocessing program tor
the VIC 20.
Most of the software that Commoaore IS
releasing seems to be for the Commodore
64 with only a small percentage tor the VIC
20. I am sure that trle Commodore 64 is
gOing to be the main machine from Commoaore for the next tew years with the VIC
being phased out sometime in the future.
Spreadsheet Programs
spreadsheet programs
that Commodore will be selling for the '64.
EasyCalc will sell for 49.95 (U.S'> and Multiplan for $99.95 (U.S.>. Multiplan, developed
by Microsoft. is said to be one of the
rnOl>t powenul sonware pacKages TOr nome
computer users. The VIC 20 spreadsheet
program is called Simplicalc.
1 nere were twO
Accounting Programs
Info
Designs and
CommOdore
naVE;
:::oignea an agreement to produce a senes
ot accounting programs tor the Commodore
64. These include: General Ledger, PayrOll,
Inventory Control. Accounts Receivable and
Accounts Payable. Each of these programs
will sell for $49.95 (U.S'>. I recently saw
these products on the shelf of a Canadian
dealer tor $319 (Can), so don't buy until
the price goes down.
Magic Desk
One ot the interesting programs snowr:
at the press conference was the Magic
Desk. The main screen shows an animated,
full colour desk. There's a typewriter, index
IIle, telepnone,
calculatOr ana
flnanc.al
jOurnal on the desk and a wastebasket under the desk. There's also an artist's
easel ana a vertical file cabinet with a
digital clock on top ot it. fo use any feature of the Magic Desk, you use a joystick,
trackball or mouse to move a pOinting
finger to one of the objects on
the
:::ocreen. Atter selecting an Object, you press
the 'fire button' and that feature is selecpage 20
TORPET August 83
General Comments on Software
RANDOM RAMBLINGS
Commoaore expects to sell one MILLlO'"
CommOdore 64s this year ana three million
next year. There should bf. three MILLION
VIC 20s sold this year. One person at
Commodore suggested that the VIC production ilne would be up to 500,000 per month
by September or October of this year.
The P-500 is dead! Commodore conlirmed at th.e show that the P-'500 (C500,
PET II etc.> has been dropped from the
prOduct line. The B-500 (CBM II) has been
renamed to the Commodore B 128/256-80. I
even nave a COlOur orocnure on tnlS
prOduct so Commodor'3 will probably start
Shipping soon. This is the new 128K (oplional 256K) business computer with an 80
cOlumn by 25 line screen but no built-in
monitOr or disk drives. The top-of-the-line
machine is now being called the Commooore BX256-80. This is a 256K computer
with built In alsK arlves ana screen. It IS a
dual processor machine with both the 6509
and 8088 CPU included. Both of these
machines I believe are interim solutions
until Commodore comes out with their new
business computers built around the Zilog
Z-8000 CPU. These Z-8000 machines could
oe announced later this year.
Into Oesigns is producing a series of
consumer Oriented "how to" video training
tapes known as InfoVision (tm). Over 18
tapes will be released initially covering such
titles as: . How to use the Com modore 64'.
'BASIC
programming',
'EasyScript
Word
Processing', 'The Manager Database', plus
many more interesting titles. Each InfoVision
program IS accompanied with a VHS or
Beta videotape, instruction cara, a program
index and an optional study guide.
FEATURE
Commodore International's safes were
up 130% in the third quarter (ending March
31. 1983) over the third quarter for the
prevIous year. This is quite different from
nome orner microcomputer companies sucn
as Atari and Texas Instruments who have
reported heavy losses. Looks like the competition is fading away!
You can now buy a Commodore 64. a
1541 disk drive. a 1701 monitor and a
1525 printer in the U.S.A. for under $1000.
Combined with the low price of software.
every small business can now afford their
own computer that two years ago would
have cost $4000 .
.....
SUS
SUS
CO
COM'TAR
......
SUS
SUS
....
VIC==2D
SHAMUS (CI
PROTECTOR (CI
TORG (TI 5K
CHOPLIFTER (CI
CLOUDBURST (CI
ASTROBLITZ ICI
ROBOT PANIC ICI
DEADL Y DUCK (CI
SHARK TRAP ITI 5K
VICAT (T! 8K
HESWRITER (CI
VIC FORTH ICI
TYPE ATTACK ICI
TRASMAN (CI
SPIDERS OF MARS ICI
OUTWORLD (CI
SWARM 1T15K
C CARTRIDGE
0
129
33
15
33
23
31
29
28
17
19
29
45
29
o
33
29
29
23
0
~
DISK
NEWPORT PRDSTICK
8K RAM
CARDETTE (CASS. IN TERFACEI
PRINTER INTERFACE
STARFIGHTER JOYSTICK
VIDEOPAK WITH 8K RAM
VIDEOPAK WITH 16K RAM
VIDEOPAK WITH 64K RAM
65D2 PROF. DEV. SYS. IT! 8K
TURTLE GRAPHICS ICI
TOTL MAIL LIST IT) 13K
MARTIAN RAIDER (TJ 5K
SWORD OF FARGOAL 1T121K
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE ITI 5K
MUSIC COMPOSER ICI
SKIIER (TJ 5K
PINBALL (TI 5K
T CASSETTE
0
$69
33
45
B9
35
69
29
7
54
225
125
45
33
55
14
135
175
319
Z3
29
SUS
sus
SUS
SUS
SUS
SUS
SUS
SUS
up
.....
Universal Centronics Parallel Printer
Interface for the VIC-20'" or CBM-64.
Use any parallel printer with your
VIC-20'" or CBM-64.
CARDBOARD 3
$35.95
Economy expansion interfa(;8 for the
VIC-20')
CARDBOARD 6
$87.50
An expansion interface for the VIC-20".
Allows expansion to 40 K or accepts
up to six games. May be daisy chained
for more versatility.
CARDETTE
$30.95
Use any standard cassette player / recorder with your VIC-20'" or CBM-64
LIGHT PEN
$29_95
A light pen with programs to use with
your VIC-20') or CBM-64
19
17
Z3
28
31
17
15
• MOST ITEMS
ORDERS ONLY: 800-558-8803
or send chIck or money order. VISA. MC add
P.O. BOX 1730 GOLETA.CA93116 3%. Shlpplng-SZ lor lollware (ca" lor
(805) 964-4660
hardwarel. Calli add 6% IIX. COD add 12.50.
Prices in U.S. dollars
Commodore will be increasing the numoer ot ads on rv starting on June 30.
1983. The key targets are adult males between the ages of 18 and 49. Look for
these ads on SUCh programs as Monday
Night Football. NFL Playoffs and baseball.
CARD "?" CARD/PRINT
$76.00
AIR· SHIPPING WITHIN 2 DAYS
16K RAM ......................................
CARDBOARD (3 SLOT EXP .........................
HESCARD (5 SLOT EXP) ...........................
VIDEOPAK (40/80 COLUMNS) ......................
VIC RABBIT (EASTERN HOUSE) .....................
HES MODEM (WITH SOFTWARE) ............. . . . . . ..
HES MON ASSEMBLER (CI ........................
DUST COVER ...................................
QUICK BROWN FOX (C) ...........................
80 COLUMN PRINTER ............................
The PET emulator for the Commodore
64 has been put in the public domain.
Many of TPUG's programs for the PET/CBM
will run on the '64. Therefore. TPUG has
hired a student tor the summer to look Into
programs that will run correctly with the
PET emulator.
TOOROER
P.O. BOX 768
WICHITA. KS 67201
(316) 263-1 095
Handling charges $3 00
C 0.0 (Add $200)
Personal checks allow 3 week delivery
V1C-20'· is a registered trademark of Commodore
Prices subject to change
-
Prices in U.S. dollars
TORPET August 83
page 21
1984 TPUG Conference Survey
Last month you read Gord Campbell's report on our conterence this year held in Mat
at George Brown College, Casa Loma Campus. This month the conference committee IS
aSKing lOr your ideas and preferences tor next year, Planning tor the 1984 conference,
in late May (26th & 27th), probably at a hotel in the Greater Toronto area, is already
underway so please fill In this sheet and return to:
TORONTO PET USERS GROUP
Att'n: Conference Committee
1912A Avenue Rd .• Ste. 1
Toronto. Ontario. Canada
M5M 4Al
~-----------------------------------------------~
I 1. What Commodore machine(s) do you use? PET 40 column I / VIC-20 / I
I
I PET 80 column I / Commodore 64 I I
I SuperPET I I
I
I 2. What range of fees would you be prepared to pay for a two-day conference?
• $15 to $30 I / $51 to $70 I /
$31 to $50 I / $71 to $90 / /
3. Would you like convention-rate hotel ac-;ommodation? Yes / / No / /
4. Do you require a special suite for disabled guests? Yes I I No I I
(They are available.)
5. Would you like to bring your family? Yes / I No I /
~.
Would you like to be--near the airport? Yes I I No I / (Parking free)
. -tjowntown? Yes / / No I I (Parking extra)
7. Would you like a banquet on Saturday night? Yes I I No I /
(Increases the registration fee by $15 to $30)
O. Would you like a special room tor qUick food for delegates only, during the day? Yes I I No I I
9. Would you like to see a "Dealer Show" of computer Products? Yes I / No I /
10. What subjects would you like to see covered, and at what level?
Beginner Intermediate Advanced
~;ubject
11. Who would you like as a speaker, and (it appropriate) tor what topic?
12. Would you like a hands-on session for
a) kids? Yes I / No I /
b) yourself? Yes I I No I I
13. Did you take part in the copy session this year? Yes / / No I I
." yes, any comments or suggestions?
I
I
I
I
I
I
I 14. Would you be willing to pre-register (in January or February) and pay less at that time? Yes / I No I I
I_-- ____________________________________________ ~
Please feel free to make any other comments or suggestions that you think would be
nelpful in planning for next year. If you like. send us your thoughts about the TORPET
and TPUG as well.
page 22
TORPET August 83
COMMODORE"'::
Accounts Payable
&
Receivable
Program
• HARDWARE·
TEN KEY PAD
o thru 9 keys. plus ?
I . •. +.
Business or Home owner , keep
track of your acc o unts payable and
receivables
• 300 entries per disk
• 75 entries per cassette
• Printer option
• Automati c Sort
$79.95
- . .. and ENTER keys. Easy installation.
Requires 8K or 16K Expander
N o software reQuired. Works with any program. Also works on the VIC-20
AUDIO/VIDEO CABLE
$9.95
Disk - $35.95
Cassette - $29.95
Hook your monitor & stereo up to your 64. Instructions included on
how to run external sound into the sound chip for processing.
• SOFtWARE·
/1 1 111
ADD $1.00 FOR DISK VERSIONS
tOillPU
SEruS~: III
$14.95
SPRITE SHAPER""
See the multi-color Sprite take form as you design it.
Easy to use prQ9ram forms the Data and Poke for you.
SOUND SHAPER""
Prices in U.S. dollars
$14.95
Try different settings of ADSR. waveforms. and filters for each
of the three voices by simply pressing function keys.
TO ORDER
P.O . BOX 768
WICHITA . KS 67 20 1
(3 16 ) 2 6 3-1 095
QUAUTY
COMPUTER
801 S. VICTORIA SUITE 105
VENTURA, CA 93003
(805) 656-1330
®
H andlin g ch arges $ 3 .00
[(.·- .. ;<. V1
.
_ \ ' ___
C.O.D. (Add $200)
Prices in
U.S. dollars
Per son al ch ec k s all ow 3 w ee k deliver y
V1C- 20 '·, i s a reg is tered trademark of Comm odore
Prices subject to c ha nge
MASTERCARD • VISA • Dealer Inquiries Invited
, t 'll rf-. for ·
·,r orL >&Olj'WARBI
..
.
"
,
,
'
... .
'
. .
'.: , - _. -
.. ..
_ '
... ..
-....
.
'-'
'
for the VIC 20 ™ and COMMODORE 64 ™
WORD PROCESSING AND MAILING LIST & LABEL
now available with
CHICKSPEED
FAST PRINTING • LIGHTNING LOADS • SIMPLE COMMANDS
TOTL.TEXT 2.0 + CS VIC + 8K expansion
TOTL.TEXT 2.5 + CS VIC + 16K expansion
TOTL.TEXT 2.6 + CS Commodore 64
TOTL.LABEL 2.1 + CS VIC + 16K expansion
TOTL.LABEL 2.6 + CS Commodore 64
TOTL TIME MANAGER 2.1 VIC + 8K expansion
TOTL TIME MANAGER 2.6 Commodore 64
$25.00
$35.00
$40.00
$20.00
$20.00
$30.00
$35.00
All programs work with 40/80 column (VIC) and 80
column (64) adapters-compatible with tape or disk
systems -shipped on cassette tape- available
on disk $4.00 extra.
QwaUty You Can Alford
A".llable .t "oar loc.1 de.'er
or
piton. order
b"
time management, scheduling, reports
~
RESEARCH ASSISTANT 2.0 VIC + 8K expansion $30.00
RESEARCH ASSISTANT 2.0 Commodore 64
$35.00
key word cross-reference research tool
TOTL.BUSINESS 3.0 VIC + 16K expansion
TOTL.BUSINESS 3.6 Commodore 64
$85.00
$95.00
business programs require disk and are shipped on disk
One Megabyte Fuzzy Diskette
computer novelty pillow
Prices in U.S. dollars
$25.00
TuTL
'~1)
software inc.
)f~~555 Third Ave., Walnut Cr. .k, CA 14596
.-~(,..
.';;..~
•
E
Call (415) 943-7877
Commodore 64 and VIC 20 are registered trademarks of Commodore Electronics, Ltd .
page 23
ACCOLADE COMPUTER PRODUCTS
SOFTWARE (COMMODORE 64)
HARDWARE
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page 24
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TORPET August 83
page 25
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TORPET August 83
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· . GENERAL
Programmers Do It In Software
by Hal Chamberlin
A More Advanced Technique
Raleigh, NC
Conclusion
The
foregoing
technique
and
core
GOund generation routine was first published
in Byte magazine in 1977 and has been
the basis tor numerous musIC programs on
6502 as well as other processors. Although
they were playing with this kind of thing in
the early '605 at Bell Labs. it was quite a
breaKtnrough In me mIcro worra at tne
time. As is though. it has some limitations.
In particular. no matter what waveforms you
put into the tables. the music is always organ-like; just an infinite variety of stops.
The reason for this is that the amplitude
envelope of the tones produced is alwayc
rectangular. that is. off-on-off. just like
pressing an organ key. Even though you
may be able to obtain the waveform or
harmonic structure of a familiar instrument
:;ucn as u p,ano. me rectangular envelope
will impart an organ-like character.
The usual way of adding an envelope
to a synthesizea tone IS to use a galncontrolled
amplifier in
which the
gain
(volume) is varied according to the deSired
contour. For a piano note. the gain would
suddenly go trom zero to maximum for the
attack and then slowly decrease back to
zero for the decay. The tone input to the
amplifier would be constant. In a digital
auolo system. gain COntrOl IS usually accomplished
by
multiplying
waveform
camples
by a' gain
factor.
As
before
however. actual multiplication is too slow on
an 8 bit micrO to consider.
Another factor that contri butes greatly to
tonal variety is the fact that the waveform
ot most Instruments is not constant during
a note. In a typical case. such as a trumpet note. the tone is "brighter" (greater
proportion of high harmonics) during the
attack than during the decay. Any attempt
to synthesize a trumpet tone with a conGtant wavetorm yields a flat sound without
the characteristic "toot" of trumpet notes. In
addition. most "novelty sounds" for which a
computer music system would be expected
to
be
good
at.
have very
prominent
waveform shifts during the sound.
Both of these desirable characteristics
can be added to the software system by
USing a scheme first proposed by Frank
Covitz and Cliff Ashcraft. long-time PET and
AIM-65 owners respectively., The idea is to
use a seguence ot many waveform tables.
each differing slightly from its neighbor in
both
harmonic
content
and
overall
amplitude. By reconstructing the core sound
generation loop somewhat and using the
time ·wasted" when TEMPO is not reloaded.
it is possible to periodically Change the
third byte (the waveform table page number) of the pOinters nOiselessly for a
smooth shift from one table to the next.
For additional flexibility in programs that
actually use this technique, another set of
tables. called waveform seguence tables.
specify a list of waveform table addresses
so the sequence of wave tables actually
played need not be consecutive in memory.
Additionally. the sequence tables allow sequenCing through wave tables rapidly when
the envelope is changing rapidly. and more
slowly at other times thus conserving wave
tables and memory. The power of the 6502
instruction set really shows in the double
indirect-indexed addressing required to implement this idea.
Although the scheme just described
really didn't look very promising on paper.
the results when actually implemented in
1979-1980 were spectacular. Residual noise
when switching from table to table was less
than
expected
and
fewer
tables
were
needed for smooth sounding envelopes than
were expected. It was found that generally
16 to 32 tables requiring 4K to 8K was
sufficient for most instrument sounds. Thus.
in a 32K machine. there is sufficient space
for 3 to 6 "instrument definitions" with.8K
left for the score and music playing
program.
Experiments
with
pubflshed
TORPET August 83
page 27
GENERAL
analyses of instrument sounds, such as
string, horn, and piano tones produced
surprisingly accurate reproductions within
the 3.5KHz frequency limits of the sustem.
At the opposite extreme, the oddball sounds
never stopped; just about anything that was
put into the waveform computation routine
prOduced some kind of unique tone color.
Filling the Waveform Tables
So far nothing has been said about
actually filling the waveform tables with data
representing desirable sounds. In theory,
just about any list of numbers will produce
a recognizable tone when scanned but the
sound is likely to be raucous and grating.
One obvious method is to draw one
cycle of the waveform on graph paper and
then laboriously read off 256 sample vaiues
and enter them into the table. The drawn
Shape could come from an oscilloscope
photo of a musical instrument sound or
from imagination. Besides the effort involved, the drawn shape must span exactly
256 grid lines in exactly one cycle to be
valid. One could also make use of a light
pen or graphic digitizer in conjunction with
a drawing program to do the same thing
with much less effort. The biggest problem
when using imagination is that there is no
simple relation between the appearance of
the drawn shape and the resulting tone
color. Thus, if a particular shape produces
a sound that is close to what is desired,
there is no way to know what must be
changed to make it sound even closer.
Probably the best way to fill waveform
tables is to write a program that accepts
harmonic speCifications, computes the corresponding waveshape, and automatically
enters it into memory. There is a very
definite correlation between the harmonic
makeup of a tone and its timbre. One can
also occasionally find published harmonic
analyses of musicai instrument tones, particularly organ pipes. Figure 8 shows the
listing of a very simple BASIC program that
can be used to create waveform table data
and POKE it directly into memory. The
page 28
TORPET August 83
statements
starting
at
line
2000
first
amplitude normalize the waveform, convert
the samples into integer form in the range
of 0 to 63 (to aVoid overflow when 4 are
added
up)
and
then
poke
them
into
memory.
FIG 8 Waveform Table Fill Program in BASIC
1000 REM WAVEFORM TABLE FILL PROGRAM
1001 f~EM SELECT RANDOM OR SPECIFIED PHASE REM
1002 ENTER
HARMONIC
NUMBER
FOLLOWED
BY
nELATIVE AMPLITUDE
1003 REM HARMONIC NUMBER =0 FILLS THE TABLE AND
EXITS
1010 DIM W(255): Z=6.283185/256
1020 FOR I =0 TO 255: W(I) =0: NEXT I
2000 PRINT "RANDOM PHASE ANGLES? (YIN) ";: INPUT AS
2010 PRINT "ENTER HARMONIC NUMBER ";: INPUT N
2020 IF N =0 GOTO 3000
2030 PRINT" ENTER RELATIVE AMPLITUDE ";: INPUT A
2040 P =RND(1)
2050 IF AS ="Y" GOTO 2070
2060 PRINT "ENTER PHASE ANGLE ";: INPUT P
2070 P =6.28318*P
2080 FOR I =0 TO 255: W(I) =W(I)+A*SIN(N*I*Z+P): NEXT I
2090 GOTO 2010
3000 M =0
3010 FOR I =0 TO 255
3020 IF ABS(W(I))>M THEN M =ABS(W(I»
3030 NEXT I
3040 M =M+.OOOO1: REM MAKE ALL TABLE ENTRIES<1.0
3050 A =0
3060 FOR 1=0 TO 255
3070 W(I) =W(I)/M
3080 A =A+W(I)*W(I)
3090 NEXT I
31W PRINT "RMS AMPLITUDE IS "; SQR(Al256)
9999 STOP
The biggest advantage of using harmonics to specity waveforms is that alias
distortion can be readily aVOided. Alias
distortion occurs whenever any frequency
component of a waveform exceeds 1/2 of
the sampling frequency. This can easily
happen with high notes using waveforms
rich in harmonics. For example, if one attempts to play high C (523Hz) using a
waveform
with
10 significant harmonics
through an 8KHz sample rate system, the
8th, 9th, and 10th harmonics will alias
since they will all be above 4KHz. Aliasing
means that intended frequencies are altered
("reflected" off the 1/2 sample rate ceiling)
and usually produce an objectionably harsh
sound. Thus waveform tables used to play
high notes should have their upper harmonics restricted while those for low notes
may have dozens of significant harmonics
if desired.
=
·
GENERAL
Figure 7. Complete 4 Voice Sound Generation Routine
PLAY
LOY I{)
LOX TEMPO
you
specify
an
amplitude
envelope
for
each individual harmonic as a series of
straight-line
segments
as
in
Moorer's
; SET Y TO ZERO FOR STRAIGHT INDIRECT
;SET X TO TEMPO COUNT
; COMPUTE AND OUTPUT A COMPOSITE SAMPLE published analyses. The program then will
; ClEAR CARRY
compute a wnole series of tables automatiPLAY 1
CLC
cally from just the envelope specifications.
LOA (V1PT+l),Y ; ADD UP 4 VOICE SAMPLES
ADC (V2PT+l),Y ; USING INDIRECT ADORESSING THROUGH VOICE
.
ADC (V3PT+1),Y ; POINTERS INTO WAVEFORM TABlES
Conclusion
ADC (V4PT+1),Y ; STRAIGHT INDIRECT WHEN Y INDEX =0
;
SEND
SUM
TO
DlGITAl-To-ANAlOG
CONVERTER
STA X'1700
; ADD INCREMENTS TO POINTERS FOR
LOA V1PT
Although
the
discussion
of
software
; THE 4 VOICES
ADC VllN
; FIRST FRACTIONAl PART
STA V1PT
musIc syntnesis nas necessarily been brlet.
LOA V1PT+1
I hope that it is now apparent that purely
'ADC VlIN+1
; THEN INTEGER PART
STA V1PT+1
software synthesis still claims
many ad; VOICE 2
LOA V2PT
ADC V2IN
vantages over even tne most sophisticated
STA V2PT
music synthesis chips currently available, at
LOA V2PT+l
ADC V2IN+l
least on 6502 processors. The techniques
STA V2PT+1
presented
are being further refined on the
;
VOICE
3
LOA V3PT
ADC V31N
6502 based MTU-130 computer (a full-blown
STA V3PT
music compiler is now available for that
LOA YaPT+l
ADC V31N+l
system) and being extended to the 68000
STA V3PT+1
microprocessor which among the new 16
; VOICE 4
LOA V4PT
ADC V4IN
bitters
is
best at
synthesis
calculations.
STA V4PT
LOA V4PT+1
Progress
is
being
made
in
delayed
ADC V4IN+1
playback
synthesis
using
8"
floppy
disks
for
STA V4PT+1
OEX
; DECREMENT & CHECK TEMPO COUNT
sample storage which has the potential for
BNE TlMWAS ; BRANCH TO TIME WASTE IF NOT RUN OUT
prOfessional sound quality. Following is a
DEC DUR
; DECREMENT & CHECK DURATION COUNTER
BEQ ENDNOT ; JUMP OUT IF END OF NOTE
list of references for further study into this
LOX TEMPO
; RESTORE TEMPO COUNT
fascinating software area.
BNE PLAYl
; CONTINUE PLAYING
TIMWAS BNE *+2
; 3 WASTE 12 STATES
REFERENCES,
BNE *+2
; 3
BNE *+2
.; 3
Refer to the following articles for a more detailed
BNE PLAY1
; 3 CONTINUE PLAYING
ENDNOT RTS
; RETURN
description of software synthesis and additional sample
; TOTAl LOOP TIME =114 STATES =8770 HZ
routines and programs.
; THE FOLLOWING VARIABLES SHOULD BE IN PAGE ZERO
1. Chamberlin, Hal, "A Sampling of Techniques for
V1PT
.BYTE 0
; VOICE 1 WAVE POINTER, FRACTIONAl PART
Computer Performance of Music", September, 19n, BYTE.
.WORD WAV1TB ; INTEGER PART AND WAVE TABLE BASE
V2PT
.BYTE 0
. VOICE 2
.WORLJ WAV2TB •
2. Chamberlin, Hal, "Advanced Real-Time Music SyntV3PT
.BYTE 0
; VOICE 3
hesis Techniques ", April, 1980, BYTE.
.WORD WAV3T8
V4PT
.BYTE 0
; VOICE 4
.WORD WAV4TB
3.
Chamberlin,
Hal,
"Simulation
of
Musical
Instruments",
January,
1981,
Kilobaud
Microcomputing.
VOICE
1
INCREMENT
(FREQl'ENCY
PARAMETER)
;
.WORD
0
VilN
; VOICE 2
.WORD 0
V2IN
; VOICE 3
.WORD 0
VaIN
4. Chamberlin, Hal, "Software Techn)CIues of Digital
; VOICE 4
.WORD 0
V4IN
MUSIC Synthesis", April, 1981, Creative Computing.
DUR:
TEMPO
.BYTE 0
.WORD 82
5. Moorer, J. and J. Grey, "Lexicon of Analyzed
; DURATION COUNTER
TEMPO
TYPICAlDUR=64
VALUE FOR r ones,
"Co mpu t er MUSIC
. J ourna,I vo.I I and succeeding is;; 3:4
TIME,CONTROL
100 BEATSVAlUE,
PER MINUTE,
; DESIGNATES A QUARTER NOTE
sues, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA
Although
the
Figure
7 program can
be used to compute waveform tables. most
of the OAC synthesis music programs available for 6502 computers include machine
language routines for computing waveforms
tram harmonic specification in much less
time
(typically
less
than
1 second per
table), The more advanced programs using
sequences of waveform tables actually let
6. Mathews, Max, The Technology
Music, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1969.
of
Computer
7.
Chamberlin,
Hal,
Musical
Applications
ot
Microprocessors, Hayden Book Co.. Rochelle Park, NJ, 1980.
Note: Reprints of references 1 and 2 and copies ot
reference 7 are available from Micro Technology
Unlimited, Box 12106, Raleigh, NC 27603, USA DAC boards
and the more advanced music program for PET computers
are also available from MTU.
TORPET August 83
page
29
GENERAL
HAl CHAMBERLIN: The series by Hal Chamberlin is concluded in this issue. He holds an MS (1973) aegre€
Electrical Engineering from North Carolina University. While in school he worked part time for IBM in speech
recognition and synthesis research. He also had the opportunity during this time to use a signal processing computer for musIc generation expenments uSing his own programs.
In
He IS an active speaker at computer shows on the topics of computer graphics and music and is the author
ot numerous articles on computer music synthesis and microprocessor circuit design. He has recently written a
comprehensive book titled Musical Applications of Microprocessors which is published by Hayden Book Company
and has enjoyed uniformly favorable reviews and strong sales.
lie IS presently single and lives in the country near Wake Forest, North Carolina.
in our next issue we shall continue our music series with an article by Dr. Frank
PJ.t:t;~D.3:.EI~D2XX3Ea
\r
MICRO
EXPERTS
SINCE
Iq83
by Mike Richardson
~e:
fOR EXRMA.E;
S10P $lmEMENT
CFlJSES A f'RCX7RAM -m
BREAK OR 6'ltf' FfT
WHAtEVeR fOINT IT IS
PLACED.
5 ?"CUJPP"
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15 ?"8ANANA" ~~-
caupp
BREAK IN 10
".'
R£Ra(.
-1lfE PRQ;RAM ~RS
$'iQfiO Irr LINE 10.
-
!HE STOP ·STff1EMENT
CAN BE USED AS R
(RnER CRRR'fINQ OUT
DEBUGGING TOOL IN·
EVEIZ'f ~ctS lRI:tmiOtlJ YOUR OWN PROGRAMS.
IF1J4EPE IS NO PASCH You MAY -mEN ClecK
UP UNT1L -".,E ~M -me NE)lI'" s:cnON OF
11.te ~ 9r' 1WiNG
BREAKS , 1UEN -nlE
MJSmI(! IS RF'IER -nlE: "CONT" f*D HITTING
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CbNTINUE. BlIT YOU
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BEFORE 'IbU 1'IfJI..
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TOR PET
Augu~
83
page 31
GENERAL
BOOK REVIEW Programming:
A Complete Course
Reviewed by Terry Taller
Kanata, Onto
As
500n
as
one
purchases
a
microcomputer there IS usually the shocking
discovery that the thing doesn·t worK by 11~elf.
There fa Haws a sometimes sizeable
expenditu re for software (and that's after
the monitor. tape player or disk, printer.
etc.). Once one uses the software there
follows the second shocking discovery that
the commercial software is meant for the
average computer user in Madison Heights,
Michigan
but doesn't
have
much
applicability in Hornepayne. That leads to the
conclusion that one has to learn to program
the little devii.
HaVing come to that conClUSion there
follows the inevitable trip to the computer
bookstore where one is met with a blizzard
ot books on programming in BASIC. So the
unsuspecting
novice
computerphllE>
purChases the first book in BASIC only to discover that the book is machine specific for
a brand of computer that one doesn't own.
So, back to the computer bookstore. This
time you purchase a book which appears to
be suitable for your machine only to discover that in order to use it. you need a
post-graduate degree in mathematics. And
on it goes. What I would have given for
somebody who had actually used a book.
whose primary interest is in reading history
novels rather than the Challenge of complex
mathemaical formulae. and had actually
learned to program successtully by using
the book.
what I consider the definitive book on getting started in, and being comfortable with.
BASIC. It's nice to know that a Canadian
has written such an outstanding text and
that it is being marketed around the world!
Why is her book so good? Because It
assumes that one is a pure novice from
the outset. She assu,mes that you are not a
mathematician (certainly she expects--and
has every right to--that you can add, subtract. multiply and divide). One never sees
anything resembling some complicated algebraic formula to solve (as opposed to
BASIC BASIC from Hayden).
She is very much aware that there are
various kinds ot microcomputers in people's
hands so she ensures that each concept
taught is self-contained. For those who
have TRS-80's she provides a session on
PRINT USING and IMAGE; however. material
which follows is not dependent on that
concept.
The
same
is
true
of
MAT
junctions; for those who have it she deals
with it. If you don't have MAT she tells you
to go on to the next session. Also when
she provides problems she sets them out
tor those who do have. for instance.
PRINT USING and those who don't.
I
The book is written by someone who
has obviously struggled to teach programming to people who want it but who are
unsure of their ability to master it. In the
text portion she gives ample examples of a
Sitting here in my computer room/study particu lar topiC then she carefu lIy explains
I can actually count 13 books which have what It means and gives more examples.
titles like INTRODUCTION TO BASIC. BASIC She sets out her problems with an apBASIC, A BIT OF BASIC, LEARNING BASIC proaCh which allows one to feel successful
FAST, BEGINNING BASIC. While they are right from the start. In the first category of
all very interesting, none of them proved problems she provides simple ones; if one
useful. Each one had a particular strength is honest and attempts to solve it (without
but none managed to help me through the looking) she then provides both the answer
tormidable task of being completely comfortable.
and the flow chart for the answer. By
carefully following her. one becomes quickly
And
then
along
came
Margaret comfortable with each concept. The second
McRitchie from Winnipeg who has written set of problems closely parallels each of
page 32
TORPET August 83
MACH INE LANGUAGE
the problems from the first part--only this
time she doesn't provide the answer. What
she does provide is a printout of what the
answer will look like after you have solved
it correctly.
She also has problems which carryon
through the chapters. This is a subtle way
of showing how each new programming
concept is tied to the last one. Certainly
when I started with her book I taught
myself from start to finish and found that I
was able to deal with all Of BASIC without
any difficulty.
If I had any recommendation for the
next edition it would be that she spend a
little more time on string handling. She
goes a little too quickly through STR$.
LEN. and VAL: I found that when I wrote a
Assembly Language
by
program which had to manage all of the
teachers of certain subject areas and what
they taught that I needed to use these
BASIC functions a great deal. However. let
that not detract from the incredible overall
quality of the book; that's just a prot.:em I
faced.
The book is a little more expensIve
than most ($25). but by the time you have
bought your third book before you find
McRitchie's book you will have spent that
amount at money anyway.
So. If you are going to buy a book for
yourself in order that you can master this
thing called BASIC. why not buy what I
consider to be the best on the market and
make a Canadian a little bit richer?
"If ... then
II
Statements
Branching
Vince Sorensen
Regina, Sask.
After the ML beginner has understood
how to say "LET" and ·STORE" (LOA and
STA). the next thing he'll probably want to
learn Is how to say ~IF ... THEN". With these
commands. most applications can be accomplished. However. saying "IF ... THEN" in
ML involves many more commands than
just an "IF" statement and a "THEN"
statement. and this is where many beginners can be led astray. It has happened to
everyone I know just starting out. including
myself.
negatives. zeros. carries. This is what I
mean Oy the last number referenced. Your
eight commands for these possibilities· are:
The thing to remember is that there
are eight conditions which can oe usea as
part Of the ML "IF" ... THEN" or branch
statement. If there Is or Isn't a carry left
over. If the iast number referenced to was
or wasn·t a zero. It It was or wasn't
negative: or if there was or wasn't an
overflow. you can check for It. When you
load a register or accumulator (your three
ML variables are A for accumulator. X for
the X register. and Y for the Y register).
the result Is examined for negatives. or
zeros. When you compare. increase. or
decrease. the result is again checked. for
Along with these branch commands. you
commands
will
usually use comparison
(when in doubt. check or compare again).
To compare. you will use CMP. CPX. and
CPY. In my examples. I will use immediate
mode. where the register is compared with
what immediately follows.
BCC
BCS
BEQ
BNE
BMI
BPL
BVC
BVS
-
Branch
Branch
Branch
Branch
Branch
Branch
Branch
Branch
if the carry is clear
if the carry is set
if
if
if
if
if
if
equal (last result was zero)
not equal (not zero)
minus (negative)
piUS (not negative)
overflow clear
overflow set
Due to the fact that I believe that you
learn more from demonstration. here is an
example of a typical branch:
LOA $A2
Load the accumulator with the
low byte of VIC's clock.
page 33
TORPET August 83
MACHINE LANGUAGE
CMP #$10
Compare it with 10. If it is 10.
then the ZERO or equal bit will
be set. and the negative bit
cleared. If the accumulator is
less than 10. the negative bit is
set. and the carry register is
cleared. as well as the zero. If
it is more. then the negative bit
is cleared. the zero bit cleared.
and the carry bit set.
BEQ EQUAL If the zero bit is set then goto
the EQUAL routine.
BCC LESS
If the carry is clear. then goto
the LESS routine.
BCS MORE It the carry is set. then goto the
MORE routine.
In place of BCC. BMI could have been
usea. In place of BCS. BPL could have
been used. However. BEQ should be tne
first operation. since the fact that zero is
considered positive could have you going
to the MORE routine if you're not careful.
Already. you have the BASIC branch
statement
under
control.
After
you
programs get longer, however. you'll have
to watch how far away you are branching
to. Since branches use relative addressing
(that is to say. they go to a certain spot
a certain number of bytes away from
themselves), they can only go so far. If
you wish to branch further than 128
bytes in either direction. you are unable
to. The solution to this is to use absolute
addressing. where saying goto $4000 will
take you to location $4000. instead of
$4000 bytes up. An example of this coding:
EQl
LEl
MOl
LOA
CMP
BEQ
BCC
BCS
JMP
JMP
JMP
$A2
#$10
EQ1}
Branches to correct
LE1
jumping point
MOl
EQUAL} Jumps to correct
LESS
routine
MORE
The command JMP says to go to a
location. no matter what. Thus you can use
page 34
TORPET August 83
branches as an "IF ... THEN" statement. and
the JMP command as a "GOTO" statement.
At this point, we run into the problem that
beginners keep straying into. They try this
coding:
LOA $A2
CMP #$10
JMP ITS10
Gorry. it's less work. but it doesn't
work at all. When the JMP statement is executed. it doesn't care if you're comparing
or not. The proper way to code this is:
LOA
CMP
BNE
JMP
. CaNT
$A2
#$10
CaNT
ITS10
•••••••
With this kind of coding. you'll notice
that the only time the JMP statement is run
into is when the accumulator has $10 in
it. Otherwise. your program carries on at
CONT. What I am trying to emphasize here
is that if you give your computer a chance
to make a mistake. it will. Alway!> make
sure that you have compared what you
wanted to compare. and then use that
comparison. Then you are well on your way
to becoming a good ML programmer.
Further reading on Assembly Language
Programming:
6502 Assembly Language Programming
- by Lance. Levanthal (Osborne/McGraw Hill>
VIC & C-64 Programmer's Reference
Guide from Commodore (Howard 'w. Sams &
Co., Inc,)
Compute!
Publications)
Magazine
(Small Systems
These should be available at your local
Commodore dealer's.
-In ML. negative numbers are those
that are from 128 to 255. This is due to
the way that numbers are stored. as bits.
~u~~~c:~~~~~~:~~:2:~S~;~·I................•
Why electronic spreadsheet programs?
Electronic spreadsheet programs allow the user to create a gridsheet,
spreadsheet, worksheet, or any other table of Information, using the
memory of the computer as pencil and paper. The computer display or
terminal acts as a window through which the user views the information
as it is entered. Textual information (such as headlngs~ numerical values,
and formulas can easily be entered into the spreadsheet.
~
G
"
'\."-
~O~V
~~!!!,~~ti~"'J~~0~ ~
~V \0 ~ U
t:i
O~
O~ .,,~o.,
For Commodore 64
For Commodore VIC 20
r
For Commodore PET/CBM 40 columns V
For Commodore CBM 80 columnlSuperPet
~~~~ ~~
.0
-\",
....
"-
c. ~ ~
,,~
BUSICALC Your Computer Drone for Repetitive Calculations
The outstanding advantage of using a computer Is that It acts not only
as a pencil and paper but as a perfect eraser and an automatic calculator.
The user can quickly and easily make any number of alterations to the
data within the table. The BUSICALC will evaluate any formula using the
data that has been entered. Further, it retains the formulas and displays
the resulting value. With BUSICALC controlling the entry of data, providing a comprehel')sive memory, and performing arithmetic, the preparation
of a spreadsheet is faster and more accurate than If it were prepared
by hand.
~~~t\
~~~"
~~
BUSICALC With the Sting Removed from the Prices
BUSICALC 20 .................................... only $49.00 for the VIC 20
BUSICAlC 64 .................................... only $69.00 for the CBM 64
BUSICAlC 40 ................... only $79.00 for the original 40 column PET/CBM
BUSICAlC 80 ......... only $89.00 for the original 80 column CBMs and SuperPets
BUSICALC AVAILABLE NOW FROM YOUR LOCAL DEALER
(800) 227 -9998
FOR THE NAME OF YOUR NEAREST DEALER
California, Canada, Alaska and Hawaii please call (415) 965-1735
Skyles Electric Works
231G South Whisman Road
Mountain View, CA 94041
Europe please comact Supersoft, Winchester House, Canning Road, Harrow Wealdstone, Mlddle_. England HA3 7SJ. Tel. 01
Prices in U.S. dollars
TORPET August 83
.1 1.
page 3S
SOFTWARE FOR
VIC
* COMMODORE 64 * PET
FROM KING MICROWARE
- Ul TRABASIC with turtle graphics and sound
NEW I - SMARTEES action packed maze game
-
SO COpy fast efficient single disc copier for the 1541
~~~~~~~~~~~
VIC TINY PILOT
SYNTHY-64
64-BUDGETEER
GRAPHVICS
VIC BUDGETEER
VIC VIGIL
PET TINY PASCAL
VIC HIRES
TINY BASIC COMPILER
VIC CRIBBAGE
64-CRIBBAGE
VIC JOYSTICK PAINTER
SKIER-64
SCREEN DUMP
64 QUICK-CHART
VIC I-CHING
SPRITE-AID
~~~~~~~~~~~
Why not cash in on the good programs that you have written?
We are actively seeking SOFTWARE AUTHORS.
We are paying above average royalties for all programs that we accept
Submit your copy on tape or disk. for VIC-2Q or C-64 with detailed operating instructions.
If you wish program returned please enclose sufficient return postage.
*~~~*"~~~***
Write for our FREE Catalogue
Dealer Inquiries Invited
Suite 210.
5950 Cote des Neiges
Montreal. Quebec H3S 1 Z6
Canadian Manufacturer and distributor for ABACUS Software Products
page 36
TORPET August 83
POWER64
PAL 64
Basic Utility for the
Assembler for the
Commodore 64
Commodore 64
~~,
• Easy to learn
• Easy to use
•
• Program faster and more
efficiently with better results
• MOREPOWER included FREE
•
•
•
•
Personal assembly language
by Brad Templeton
also available for the Commodore
4,000 - 8,000 - 9,000 series
Powerful Programmer's Utility
by Brad Templeton
Manual by Jim Butterfield
BOOKS
VIC-20 SOFTWARE
CD001 Froggee
CD002 Centipod
MD001 Snakman
CM401 Paratrooper
CS007 City Bomber & Minefield
NU2003 Krazy Kong
NU2006 Rescue from Nufon
SYN002 Crabs
SYN003 Cyclones'
CS013 Astroblitz (K)
CS017 Choplifter (K)
UMI1604 Spiders of Mars (K)
UMI1636 Cloud Burst (K)
ORM004 Crossfire
HESC307 Shamus (K)
Introduction to Basic I
Introduction to Basic II
Sidewinder
Galactic Blitz
Martian Raider
Shark Trap
• Requires 3K exp
$29.95
$29.95
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$39.95
$25.95
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Pal 64
Road Toad (Formerly Froggee) (disk)
(cassette)
Wall Street (disk or cassette)
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Supercycles (disk)
Cyclons 64 (disk)
8
Easy to learn
Easy to use
Fast
Comprehensive manual
$99.95
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Best of Transactor Vol I.
Best of Transactor Vol. II.
Pet Graphics
Library of Pet Subroutines
PET Basic
VIC 20 Prog. Reference Guide
Programming the PET/CBM
Elementary Commodore 64
C64 Prog. Reference Guide
VIC Revealed
Compute's first book of PET/CBM
JOYSTICKS
$12.00
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WICO Command Control
WICO Red Ball
Commodore Joystick
Atari Joystick
$39.95
$44.95
$19.95
$20.95
• All Joysticks will fit VIC 20 or Commodore 64 computers
ORDERING INFORMATION
Cheque, Money Order, VISA, Master Card
accepted. Ontario residents add 7% sales tax.
Add 5% for shipping (minimum charge $1.00).
COMPUTER SUPPLIES
C10 Cassette Tapes
C20 Cassette Tapes
Cassette Boxes
Verbatim Disks M0525-01
Memorex Disks 013481
K10 Disk Storage Box
Flip Sort Storage Box
Printer Paper
15 Ib 9'12 x 11 2850 sheets
20 Ib 9'12 x 11 2200 sheets
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Tel: (416) 223-8400
TORPET August 83
page 37
SECTORE'S
DISKETIES
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Commodore 64
POWER64
-easy to learn
-easy to use
-program faster and
more efficiently
with better results
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included FREE
SENTINEL diskettes SS/DD
SENTINEL diskettes DS/DD
$32.50/box 10
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DYSAN diskettes SS/DD
DYSAN diskettes DS/DD
$36.00/box 10
$49.95/box 10
PRINTER RIBBONS
Epson MX,FX,RX-80
Epson MX 100
PAPER SUPPLIES
9 1/2" x II"
9 1/2" x II"
Powerful Programmer's Utility
by Bradl empleton
Manual by Jim Butterfield
$99.95 from your local Commodore dealer.
For your nearest dealer call:
(416) 273-6350
PRO-LINE
_
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$ 9.75
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MASTERCARD
SS/DD = single side double density
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Prices in U.S, dollars - - - . . ,
CARDRAM 16
16K Memory Expansion
Cartridge for the VIC-20(~
Personal Computer
FEATURES:
• Provides the equivalent of two
8K RAM cartridges.
• Each 8K is individually switch selectable by block.
• Opening in case to provide easy
switch access.
• Uses 8 low power CMOS 2K x 8
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Handling charges 53.00
C.O.D. (Add 52.00)
Personal checks allow 3 week delivery
VIC-2()«tj is a registered trademark of Commodore
Prices subject to change
page 38
TORPET August 83
TYCOR® AC
POWER LINE
FILTERS
1. Decreased service calls
2. Decreased board repair
3., Decreased memory error
4. Decreased memory loss
5. Decreased re-run time
6. Decreased supply cost
a. discs
b.paper
c. tapes
7 _ Information reliability
8. Improved employee moral
9. Lightning protection
TORONTO BRANCH: Phone (416) 496-0406
Dealer Inquiries Invited
,
PET
Non-destructive Res et for the PET
Oakville, Onto
by Harold Anderson
NEED
Anyone who dabbles in machine language to any extent has probably installed
a reset (some people say reboot) button on
his computer. This button trips the reset
line to the 6502 microprocessor. and activates the initialization routine. which the
computer normally goes into when the
power is first turned on. Such a button is
useful for recovering from a crash. It is
easily installed. the only part needed being
a push-button switch. (For more details see
my article on page 21 of the November
J 982 TORPETJ
If the reset switch is used without any
other hardware modifications the computer
overwrites the entire program storage area
ot memory with $AA. This means that anything of use in memory is wiped out when
the reset button is pushed. This is not
necessary: you can beat the problem by
investing in a 2048 byte EPROM (about
$6.00> to replace one of the operating system ROMs.
Features of standard reset routine
First let me explain why everything gets
overwritten
with
$AA
during
the
reset
routine. When the PET is first turned on. it
goes through a s~ries of tasks often called
housekeeping. The most essential part of
this routine is the setting of the proper
values in the bottom 1024 bytes of RAM.
This area of RAM is basically the scratch
pad for the operating system. and must
contain certain values before the computer
can do anything useful such as interpret
key board input or write to the screen. One
of the minor things that the reset routine
does is to check the entire program
storage area of RAM to see if it can be
written to and read from. This is done for
two reasons:
a) It tells the operating system how
much memory is available in the machine.
0) It allows the computer to detect and
lockout bad memory locations.
In order to do this. the computer first
writes 01010101 ($55) into each locallon
and then reads it back to verify that It
reads back the same bit pattern that it
wrote into the location. The test is then
repeated with
10101010 ($AA).
In this
double test. each bit in each location is
proven to be capable of storing a 1 and a
O.
Features of modified reset routine
What is needed is a modification to the
reset routine which:
a) Does not wipe out the original contents of RAM.
b) Proves the capability of each bit In
RAM to store both a 1 and a O.
c) Does not occupy more code space
than the original routine. lit It were longer
than the original reset routine. we would
require an extra ROM. or relocation of part
of the PET operating system).
The first thing that I did was to find
the location of the RAM testing routine in
the PET ROMs. (I have level 2.0 ROMs'> A
search for the machine language command
LOA #$55 pointed me to the right section
of ROM <this instruction Is at $E16S). The
original routine is shown in disassembly
# 1. I modified the operating system between
locations $E1S0 and $E173. The modifications are shown in disassembly #2.
The modified routine assumes that the
original contents of the RAM location being
tested are storable since they are already
there. It parks the original byte in the X
register ($E 16A) and then writes the complement of the bit pattern into the location
($E16D>. After checking that the complement reads back properly ($E16F), it restores the original byte ($E15E>. I even had
one location left over hence the NOP at $Ell3.
TORPET August 83
page 39
-
PET
This routine is applied to all memory
locations from $0400 to $ 7FFF (unless it
detects a bad location. in which case it
stops and sets the top of RAM pointer to
that location). If you look at the modified
routine closely. you will see that for the
first location tested. the original contents
are not restored properly. This does not
matter since It is overwritten with a $00
later anyway.
How to use the nondestructive reset
If you are interested in a block of
memory above $0403. then pressing the
reset button will not alter the contents at
all. If you have a BASIC program In RAM.
then you will have all of the program intact after pressing the reset button. except
for the following points.
a) Locations $0401 and $0402 which
should contain the link to the second line
of the BASIC program now contain $00.
b) The page zero pointers which tell
the operating system where the program
ends are set to zero program length.
The repair work is pretty simple:
a) Break into the monitor and repair
the link at $0401 and $0402 so that it
points to the first byte of the next link.
When you drop back into BASIC you will
find that the program can now be listed.
b) The page zero pointer stili has to
be fixed. or the system will crash when you
try to edit the program. The easiest way to
do this is to use a BASIC aid package.
First. list any line. Then type delete##.
where ## is the line you listed. In the
process of the delete operation. the BASIC
package
restores
the
page
zero
aid
pOinters to their proper values. Now put the
cursor on the line which you listed and
then deleted. When you hit return. the line
will be re-entered into your program. You
are now back In business. This works with
the BASIC aid package that I use and I
would be very surprised If It did not work
with all packages.
The whole procedure mentioned above
can be done in a minute or so.
page 40
TORPET August 83
How to change your operating system
First you need to purchase a 2516 or
a single power supply 2716 EPROM and
find someone who has an EPROM burner.
(In the level 2.0 BASIC the ROM needing
mOdification is the $EOOO and up ROM.
Only locations $EOOO to $E7FF are used
since the locations $E800 to $EFFF are
devoted to the input output chips. It Is
possible that on some of the other versions
of BASIC. the modifications are required in
one of the 4K ROMs. in which case you
will have to purchase a 2532 which is a
4K EPROM.)
Next you will have to use Supermon or
similar routine to download the contents of
the proper ROM into RAM. Use the mini
assembler In Superman to alter the proper
locations. Now either burn your new EPROM
with your own eqUipment or save your new
version on tape or disk and get someone
else to burn It for you.
Caution
Don't install the EPROM backwards.
No effect on operation of computer
Since the reset routine is never called
by a program. this modification will not affect the operation of any of your programs.
In fact. if you stay out of the monitor you
wili not be able to tell that It is not the
standard operating system. The only kink.
that I can think of. occurs when you try to
find the boundaries of a program using the
monitor. Originally you could teli where the
program stopped by finding where the $AAs
started. To do this now. you will now have
to preload the RAM of your computer with
$AAs before loading the program to be
examined.
I have had this modification in my 2001
PET for about 5 months. I have been writIng a lot of machine language In that
period and it has often been very useful.
continued on page 41
- farmers will be OISKing the land. planting
RANDOM SEEDS and raising SERIALS
a Yllmaki
Disassembly .1, Original Routine
:, E152
" E154
.. E156
Of E158
.. ElSA
.. E15C
" E150
" E15F
.. E161
.. E163
" El65
.. E167
" E169
.. E168
.. E160
.. E16E
" E170
.. E172
.. E174
.. E176
.. E178
.. E17A
AO 04
8528
8429
85 11
84 12
A8
E6 11
DO 04
E6 12
30
A9 55
91 11
01 11
DO 07
OA
91 11
01 11
FO E9
A5 11
A4 12
85 34
8435
or
LOY #$04
STA S28
STY S29
STA S11
STY S12
rAY
INC S11
BNE SEl65
INC S12
8MI SE174
LDA #S55
STA (Sll),Y
CMP (S11),Y
ONE SE174
ASL
STA (Sl1),Y
CMP (Sl1),Y
DEC SE150
LOA S11
LOY S12
STA $34
STY $35
Disassembly .2 Modified Routine
:, E152 AO 04
.. E154 85 28
.. E156 84 29
.. E158 85 11
.. ElSA 84 12
.. E15C A8
.. -.E150 SA
" ElSE 91 11
" E160 E6 11
" E162 DO 04
.. E164 E6 12
.. E166 30 OC
.. El68 81 11
.. E16A AA
.. E168 .49 Ff'
.. E160 91 11
.. E16F 01 11
" E171 FO EA
.. E173 EA
.. E174 AS 11
" E176 A4 12
" E178 85 34
LOY
STA
STY
STA
STY
rAY
#$04
S28
S29
Sll
S12
TXA
STA (Sl1),Y
INC S11
ONE SE168
INC $12
OMI SE174
LOA (Sl1),Y
TAX
EaR #SFF
STA (Sl1),Y
CMP (S11),Y
8Ea SE150
NOP
LOA S11
LOY S12
STA S34
'J
•
EXECOM ..80 -- a revIew
by T. Tremmel
By now most everyone has seen tne
advertisements in COMPUTE and MICRO
magazines for EXECOM Corp.. the makers
of an 80 character conversion board for
the PET 2001 series computers,
I bought one a few weeks ago and
have been, using it since, What this board
does is convert the' 40 char, screen width
to 80, True .. ,stuffing 80 characters on one
line means making the characters narrower
but since you don't sit across the room
from your computer anyhow. It is very easy
to get used to the new display, So easy in
fact. that the original 40 wi" look odd,
I\s stated in the ads. you can sWltcn
back and forth between the 40 & 80
character modes, This can be done with a
PbK~J')ra SYS. from the keyboard or from
a prbgram. something that the 8032 can't
do. {yeO: All BASIC print statements wi"
work the same. but If you use ML or
-POKES to the screen you'" have to make
some Changes,
Racine, Wiscons in
The original
screen
locations
have
opened up and made room between themselves tor the extra screen locations. The
original screen is called block 1 and the
added screen block 2, While the first
screen location is 32768. the next is 33793
and so on, ML programmers will have use
at the extra 1024 locations in the 40 char,
mode,
The EXECOM-80 board is dual-sided
with plated thru holes. and is completely
assembled & tested ready to install (more
on that later>. it comes packed in an antistatic foam lined box (cardboard) with a
OISk containing
aemo programs to snow
some ways of programming for it. Also included are sockets. wire. a dip jumper
cable. spare 7413373. jumpered header
plug to torce 40 char, if board should have
to be removed for repair. 2 eproms. and
the 80-C board. The 80-C is a little board
with 2 sockets that plugs into $EOOO. the
original screen editor and one of the
eproms plug into it and are switched from
TORPET August 83
page 41
the EXECOM-80. The other eprom is called
the reference rom. It can plug into any
open rom socket. (be sure to specify which
one). This is used to SYS back and forth a "MUST""" have for BASIC 3.0 and nice
but not necessary for 4.0. Without it there
is no SYS to change modes(4.0 only).
There is another pad on the EXEC OM80 to allow the use of another 80-C to be
used in another rom SOCket to sWltcn
roms. Also available Is the 80-B. another
Doard that will allow 2 2K eproms to behave like a 4K.
Last. but not least. are the most important and often overlooked Instructions. I
would suggest reading them over once or
twice. There is some trace cutting and wire
sOldering to be done. If you take your time
ana aouDle cneCk your work you ShOUIO
have no troubles.
This new product should put some new
'zip' into an old but still useful computer.
especially If you're like me and can't afford
the 8032 or would rather fight than switch .
Since the 2001 series doesn't have the
window. tabs. little bell, etc. that the 8032
has. It might be worthwhile for some dedicated ML nut to come up with something
that will do it.
COMi. ON DAD! aOUI.DN'T Wi UPdo~ADi' ou~ GYSTlM?
page 42
TORPET August 83
Some programs that have been found
to work are: Fiex-File. Paper-Mate Word
Processor. McTerm. & the Neeco Source
Kit. Unfortunately Word Pro iii doesn't work
(are you listening Steve Punter?). nor do
Space Invaders or Visicalc.
One note on Visicalc is that it doesn ' t
work right in either mode. To make it work
like it should. only one change has to be
maoe. Load the first program only;(VC
STARTER). Go to the monitor and change
the 84 at location $044E to 80. Then
resave from $0400-$ 1260. This little change
wiil get it to run in the 40 character mode
like it should.
Space Invaders and most games are no
loss and might not even be worth the
trouDle of converting. with a simple POKE
at the beginning. you stiil have the original
40 character screen.
I have been told that members of user
groups wiil get a 20% discount. I am not
part of Execom nor do I have anything to
do with the operation of the business. I
paid the same price for the Execom-80
that anyone else WOUld. This board does
exist and I feel people should know about
it.
NEWp ~;,:t",1 QNEW
8.4
8.4
lh. Education Ciralit, Inc.
PO Box 333. landing, NJ 07850
Prices in U.S. dollars
PROG
MING
Tips and Tricks
by Ian A. Wright
During a 1983 Central meeting, there
was a panel consisting of Chris Bennett.
Mike Bonnycastle, Jim Butterfield. Gord
Campbell,
and
Mike
Donnegan,
who
answered questions about using Commodore
products. Due to space restrictions, this
materi?1 did not get published. but the information is still of great value tOday.
(especially it you did not make the meeting!)
Since that time, I have gathered more
data on similar topics and added them in
where appropriate. Some of these Ideas
originated from other TPUG members via
tna various Bulletin Board Systems in Toronto.
Cleaning and Maintenance
- Clean and demagnetize tape decks, but
unless you are very competent. don't take
them apart.
- Many tape-read errors result from
badly aligned heads. There have been articles about head adjustments (Compute!
1#8) or take it to your dealer.
- Some disk drive manufacturers have
stated that the various disk cleaning kits
can do more damage than they repair.
Many people are using them with no complaints.
- Cigarette ash Is the worst danger to
the keyboard and some members have already
bought
a
number
of
$75.00
keyboards. There are some things that can
be done to improve a ·tacky' board before
having to buy a new one. If you are not
prepared for the 23 tiny screws that
remove the back cover. and a lot of picky
cleaning with swabs. then take the macnme
in to the professionals. Use 111 tri-chloryl
ethane or a tape-head cleaner on the circuit board and the rubber key inserts.
Rubbing alcohol is not good enough because it leaves contaminants behind after
evaporation.
A vacuum cleaner is a valuable
maintenance tool tor keeping equipment in
operating order. I have removed dust balls,
eraser
from
various
pencils,
and
an
machines at my school. Printers seem to
be particularly apt to collect debris.
page 44
TORPET August 83
Toronto, Onto
Disk Drive Problems
- The 1541 disk drives that have trouble
writing to track I on double density disks
can be helped by not using 4040 formatted
disks. As a general rule you should format
and write on only one type of drive, although any disk can usually be read by
another drive.
- Since this problem was presented at
the meeting. I have lost one disk of files
because of writing from one drive to
another. I have three friends who have had
the same experience. Although all disk
<1rives of the 2040 and 4040 type can read
disks formatted on each other. do NOT
write between them. The problem may not
show up for months, but one day... blippo
no files! This is especially true of
single/dual drive interchanges. We have instituted a system in which all files are
kept on 4040 formatted disks. A temporary
file is written to a 2031 (or 1541) format
<1isk and then copied onto the 4040 disk
for storage and later processing.
- Verbatim #577 disks have had some
problems in use with 8050 drives. The
sOlution was to use a bulk eraser to clear
away spuriOUS magnetism that was between
the tracks. Verbatim #525's have been used
reliably by TPUG. and most other manufacturers have reliable products.
- There is a new 2.7 ROM set coming
for the 8050 which indicates in which drive
an error has occurred.
- Commodore is still making the 4040
dual <1rlves. but only in intermittent prOdUCtion. The new 2031 SL drive is the slim
line replacement for the original <1981>
single drive. So far there has been encouraging lack of complaints about its
operation, unlike its predecessor.
- Many disk errors can be solved by
correct centering of the disk in the drive.
Make a habit of starting the disk in motion
then slowly closing the drive door. Chris
Bennett says that he has had hundreds of
errors before learning this trick with the
2040 and 4040's. The disk copying errors
can be reduced to negligible using this
approach.
PROGRAMMING
- If a disk Is validated or collected
ana a baa file Is not removea by this
process - copy the good flies using CopyAll ana re-format the old disk. Do not
continue to use the disk.
- Sometimes a disk can be recovered
by formatting the reverse side. Although
aouble-sidlng is not a good Idea, this trick
may prove useful In some cases where you
want to retrieve material from the original side.
Here are Three Disk Rules a la Butterfield:
1. If you attempt to write on a disk
that has a write-protect tab, an error
will occur. Before continuing, re-set
the arlve by turning It off/on.
2. If a file Is not properly closed (It
has an asterisk beside It> do not attempt to scratch the tile. Leave it
alone or collect the disk. (see also above)
- A USR file Is a sequential file that
has a special protocol that may differ from
the standard ASCII. This designation allows
the catalog to show a file as 'special' In
its format.
General Information
- There are ·new· manuals and reference
gulaes available trom Commodore that were
prlntea in 1982. These Include data on the
9060 and 9090 hard drives. There Is no
aata on the sllmlines.
- Epson has a new printer manual for
the MX-80, again published In 1982. This
manual Incluaes a tutorial on various functions Including Graftrax+ use.
- Commodore can be considered to be
as good as most other manufacturers In
terms ot their program transportability between
machines. Despite our
problems,
programs that are written without 'frills' can
run on all machines. Many manufacturers
Introduce new models with no carryover,
whatsoever.
3. Don't leave two disks with the
same J.D. in the same room. The
backup tacility makes It easy to insert a backup disk with exactly the
same 1.0. into the drive without resetting It. The drive may not recognize the backup as a different disk
ana may continue writing where It
left off!
4. Don't turn off the drive with a disk
In It - ana never when the drive is
spinning . The drive may do wierd
things as It 'loses Its brains'.
- If there Is no BAM, then you can
use the tip #4 above to try to retrieve information. Initlallize a new disk with exactly
the same heaaer as the bad disk; now Slip
in the bad disk and read track and sector
if possible.
- A read error means that you cannot
aepena on the aata on the disk. A checksum error can be looked at retrieved and
re-wrltten .
- A disk can be re-set without touching the on/off switch by OPEN 1,8,15, ·U:
then CLOSE 1. This will work with the disk
In or out of the drive.
PRO
NTER'S
--~- .... IZER
COMPARE
.
THESE Fe,A'tURES:
• , . file .finition
....,....,g
~ printing with total
format .net r ecord selection
control '·
• WORDPRO
• up tID 4000
t 541
.•
co,.....n"
NCO"'
MAILPRO 64 ..·..~$1 2995
Also . . . . . . . fOf'C'oMMODQRE ' . , '"
$179 95
c.i for .... " . . ., yo ... ·.... dealer:
PRQ,.LINE
. . _ ,SOFTWARE
PRC>UI'* SOFTWARE LTD.
.'
(~16) '273-6350
iSS ·'Ilif QC..IUNSWAY EAST . UNIT 8
H/SSISP.UGA. ONTAIlIO CANADA . L4Y K5
TORPET August 83
page 45
F..r. . . . . . . . .
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Th.,e a", ,ome kInd, of ;n",mation we can'
seem to get with the INPUT statement. INPUTis a
very clever command ... sometimes too clever for its
own good. We seem to be forced to use GET to
tOhVaetrcwoemedOan~lt wthaentthingS that INPUT does for us -
INPUT "YOUR NAME":N$
and the user types in a reply such as STEVE
PUNTER, PhD. the comma "breaks" the input and the
user IS told ?EXTRA IGNORED
§S
'. .
We have a somewhat more severe problem if
we use the colon ch~racter in our input. Not only is
the EXTRA once again IGNORED, but we can't even
get the second part ot the input it we try tor it Coding:
INPUT "OATA";OS,ES
and responding with an input of ATTENTION:
JIM, JACK Will put ATTENTION into variable OS; but
JIM and JACK will be lost (we'll get another prompt
tor string ES). Annoying. This is information that we
might want to input and process.
Another problem 10 addition to the forbidden
comma and colon: we are not allowed to input
nothlOg. That sounds like bad grammar; let me restate it. We can't input "nothing" by simply striking a
carnage return. PET/CBM machines will stop. VIC and
64 computers will leave the input string with its
prevIous value. And yet "nothing" might be the correct response to various INPUT prompts (middle inItial? apartment number? name of spouse? ... you
might have no middle name, live in a house, and be
unmarried).
There is an answer to all these clumsy things.
It's simple, but it's a bit clumsy itself. Tell the user
to put his or her reply in quotation marks. In other
words, don't type STEVE PUNTER, PHD; instead type
"STEVE PUNTER,PHO", including the quotation
marks. Commas and colons will be allowed, and you
may even type in "nothing" without stopping the
computer.
The quotation marks will be removed by the
INPUT statement, which leads to the lesser problem:
you can't easily input quotation marks. But most of
everythlOg else Will straighten out
8
It 'eem, a little """" to 'squ;", the u,., to
always put in the quotation marks. Mistakes and
oversights may occur. The best answer to this
problem is buffer-stuffing. Just before giving the
INPUT command, place a quotation mark into the
keyboard input buffer, and a count ot 1 into the input buffer counter. On a recent PET/CBM, you'd do
this with POKE 623,34: POKE 158,1; on VIC or C-64,
you'd type POKE 631,34: POKE 198,1. This will cause
the leading quotes to appear on the screen and be
part ot the input. The user doesn't really need to
~c':p~n c~~~ec~'~~i;~t ~~~~~~~~t. mark;
I
I
8
by Jim Butterfield
Let's take an example. You have a program
which asks,
§
"S
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......
...crJ"J"J"J"J"
......
...crJ".....eo--J"J"
......
J",.,..
............
""O-......
,.,..
......
Input Idiosyncracies
~8
I
Butterfie Id Box
the system will
This takes care of much ot the problems of
INPUT. A series of GET statements could accomplish
the same thing and would be more bullet proof; but
there would be more coding needed, and we might
risk the danger of invoking a dreaded garbage
collection.
However we do It, we are probably setting ourselves up for the next problem. Once we get the input data safely from the keyboard, it's likely that e
Will put it on a file. Later, when we read the file,
we'll want to use the INPUT# statement And the
problem starts all over again.
One way to fix this input problem is to PRINT a
quotation mark at the beginning of each record
placed on disk or tape. So instead of saying
PRINT#6,NS we would code PRINT#6,CHR$(34);NS and
each line would start with the quotation mark.
I preter to use STRING THING to get this kind
ot input. That's a small machine language routine
that does the job without the need for the extra
quotation mark. It's been published in The Transactor, and IS 10 The TPUG library.
The important thing is to know to watch for
these INPUT problems. Once you know how to spot
them, you'" be able to think up a solution.
S
§
8
8
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§
S
§
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8
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CD
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~
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a:
03
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§
One more thing to watch when you are doing
an INPUT# from a file--you can't get more than 80
characters or so at a time, and, so when you write
the information, be sure it is broken up into suffiCiently small chunks.
INPUT and INPUT# are nice QOmmands. They are
fast and convenient But watch for these problems of
cunous characters (comma and colon) and "nUll" inputs.
18
L""~Butterfle'd BOX~D_~
page 46
TORPET August 83
RTC
MICROCOMPUTER INSTITUTE
PROGRAMMING COURSES
Assembler for the
BASIC. ADVANCED BASIC. ASSEMBLER
C·64 COLOUR, SOUND, MOTION courses
Commodore 64
PALM
$89 and $10 lab and manual fee
COMPUTER CAMP '83
- easy to learn
-easy to use
July 4, 18
August 1. 15
9:00·4:00 each day. 5 days
-fast
- comprehensive
manual
$150
Personal assembly language
by Brad Templeton
also available for the Commodore
4,CXX) - 8,CXX) - 9,CXX) series
$99.95 from your local Commodore dealer.
For your nearest dealer call:
for information and to register.
Phone Peter Gouvis 884-4165
10610 Bayview Ave .• Richmond Hill. ON
L4C 3N8
1 mi. North cf Major Mackenzie Drive
(416) 273-6350
PRO'LINE
• • • • •IIBCFTWARE
Prices quoted in U.S, dollars
7SS THE QUEENSWAY EAST. UNIT 8
MISSISSAUGA. ONTARIO L4Y 4CS
CARDETTE LETS YOU
USE ANY
CASSETTE
PLAYER/RECORDER
WITH YOUR VIC-20®
FIVE POWERFUL SOFTWARE
DEVELOPMENT TOOLS
Pills
(ll(
ttdlillg .: \l'U' BOOK
INSIDE THE COMMODORE 64"
THE BOOK
THE TOOLS
A compiete clear explanation 01 machine
language. Assembly language. Commodore 64
AssemblerlEditor/loader/Oecoder/Monrlor
Full·featured Assembler allows use 01 labela,
comments and arithmetic expressions to create
machine language programs. Create, save,
mOdify Assembly language programs with the
Editor. load and link machine language modules
with the loader, Decode machine language back
into assembly language tor study or input to the
Editor Single·step program execution with the
Monitor Combines AssemblerlEdilor tor mul·
architecture. graphIcs, joystick and sound elleel
programming. Detailed step-by-step guide 10 the
use of the development tools. How to combine
BASIC and machine language. make aulo-slart
cartridges, rnterface with the internal ROM.
based programs of BASIC and the Kernel
Sample programs lully ellplalned
With the new CARDETTE from
Cardco, Inc. you can interface with
any standard cassette player /recorder to save programs and load
them with ease into yur VIC-20"'.
No longer are you restricted to
using only the VIC Datasette. Just
add a CARDETTE and you can use
the tape unit of YOUR choice.
The CARDETTE comes with all
necessary cables and wires to
complete the hook-up. Nothing
else to buy. All you need is YOUR
tape player / recorder and your
tapes.
Price: Just $30.95
mum ease of use
ALL FOR $54.95
PLUS $2.00 POSTAGE AND HANDLING
Add $5.00 lor disk .0rsl"<I.
Send check. M.O .• VISA/MC ($2.00 S.C.) o. specify C.O.D. (add $3.00) to:
,F!.2./!..!:./!..
U
~.~ II_~,~~~
.'/(~
TO ORDER:
BOX 768
WICHIT A. KS 67201
(316) 263-1095
po
P.O. Bo. 207, Cannon Falls, MN 55009
507.263.4821
(ommodor!' 64'" II" '!'9'U!'ff'd TM 0'
Commodor!' Bu .. n!'" M .. ~h,"f" In(
Handling charges $3 00
C.O.D (Add $200)
Personal checks allow 3 week delivery
Prices quoted in U,S. dollars
VIC-20°, is a registered trademark of Commodore
Prices subject to change
TORPET August 83
page 47
RTC
NOW WITH
80 COLUMNS
$ 12 goo
WITH DATA 20 OR WITHOUT
page 48
lORPEl August 83
,,
RTC
ANNOUNCES
COLOR 80
80 COLUMNS WITH COLOR
FOR TH E COMMODORE 64
FOR ONLY
~34.95
SCRATCH PAD 64 DATA BASE $79.95
AND MAIL LIST
$50.00
TO OWNERS OF SCRIPT 64
FOR DETAILS ASK YOUR LOCAL COMMODORE DEALER
10610 BAYVIEW (Bayview Plaza)
RICHMOND HILL, ONTARIO, CANADA L4C 3N8
(416) 884-4165
TORPET August 83
page 49
Prices quoted in U,S, dollars
For your Commodore 64
For only $12.95 each, our CURSOR
64 tapes are your best buy for the
Commodore 64. They take advantage
of the color, sound, and sprites that
make the 64 such a delight to use.
Most of our packages include three
excellent Basic programs on one cassette tape. The programs are not copy
protected, so you can look at the
source code, and learn how to make
the 64 do its tricks.
We don't have room to describe all
25 of our CURSOR 64 programs here.
As a sample, you may want to order
tape 64·5 with the exciting Godzllla
program. You'll be challenged as you
try to save Tokyo from from the rampaging Godzilla. Or try tape 64-3 with
the popular Miser text adventure that
will take you hours to solve (even if you
cheat and read the program source).
We have super programs for the
VIC 20, such as Dungeon ($12.95j, a
visual adventure for 16K VICs, Our
VIXEL programs are also popular with
VIC owners. And, we still sell all 30 of
the original CURSOR cassettes for the
original PET and CBM.
Call or write for a catalog today, Be
sure and tell uswhether you have a 64,
a VIC, or a PET. We welcome credit
cards, and ship most orders the same
day they are received. Dealer inquiries
invited.
Compatible Accessories for your
Commodore PET Computer
INTRODUCING
THE EASY ROM
$89.00
Allows you to run many software
packages without opening your
computer to change ROMs
AUDIO/VIDEO INTERFACE
$75.00
Utilize a remote monitor for
screen display. Ideal for class
instruction & demonstration
I
UPGRADE KITS
Modify your FAT40 to 80 columns
Expand your 16K PET to 32K
Custom EPROM chip, all parts &
detailed instructions included
Some simple soldering required
Uses existing graphic keyboard
Runs 8032 software (eg.MANAGER
WORDPR04+ etc.)Specify ROM type
16K to 32K
4032 to 8032
4016 to 8032
CURSOR 64, Box 6905
Santa Barbara, CA 93110
805-683·1585
f~M.--~~~~~~~~~~·PED
."fO'f(
.........,......"..,....-r........:..............
'i
ITS
$50.00
$50.00
$90.00
RIKI TIKI
DEADLY MUTANT SNAKES
HAVE ESCAPED!
RIKI TIKI MUST STOP THEM
ITS FAST AND ITS DANGEROUS
BUT RIKI CAN'T STOP.
CAN YOU?
Incl. $2.00 Shipping & Handling
Allow Three Weeks for Delivery
Ont. Residents Add 7% Sales Tax
Mail Order Only From
MIS~~~~A~~:sg~~~~~oC~~;~R8
"THE
MA.N~GERc"ll$.~Etr~deNm.
aL[k.of BMB
C~fo1PUSI ENC cA
TO
t::..:::::IwOI..rli~.~rl:.y::::t,::::J~.I.U:l:re=i'::l"ii~ii~ei::w='SS=fP."r~iii-ii:.;l=J~=~.~.~.r=kv=O!lIt.[.3~=es=-~
"CBM/PET" are tradema;~ 0 '-COmmodore BUSiness
I.
1i.
Machine td.
page
50
TORPET August 83
PITS!
CINTECHS SOFTWARE
PRESENTS
PURCHASE PRICE FULLY
IF RETURNED UNDAMAGED
IDS ELECTRONICS INC
THE
a
CIS
$15.98 all inclusive
money order or check, outside
Canada remit In U.S. funds
~CINTECHS.
LO~NDON.
PO BOX 2220. STN. A.
ONTAR.IO. CANADA.N6A 4C3
B SERIES
The New Business Computer
by Gord Campbell
Part J
Commodore's new computer series tor
business applications is just beginning to
appear in the market. Tnls article describes
zome ot the features Of these machines.
and comments on conversion to them. The
information is based on extensive exposure
to prototypes. so there may be detail differences compared to the final product.
The series was announced some time
ago. and has changed names in the interim. Samples of the curtent names are
B256-80 and B128-80. As i the names imply. these are business computers with 80column screens and 256K or 128K of
memory. fhere will also be a 'BXnnn'
model. with a second processor. The only
remark I can make about that configuration
is. that the two processors appear to communicate
with
each
other,
unlike
the
SuperPET. where one processor is effectively disabled by an external switch.
There are two main variations within the
models; the 'high-profile' unit has built-in
disk drives. a tilt-and-swivel screen. and
separate keyboard on a cable. The 'Iowprofile' model is just the keyboard unit.
with the circuit board inside. A separate
monitor and disk box are required. The
case Is approximately 3 times the bulk of a
VIC-20.
PHYSICAL FEATURES
Much is new. for example:
o SID-chip for sound
o built-in speaker
o audio-Jack for external sound
o 'switching' power supply
o external reset button (in back)
o internal 'user port'
o unique cartridge port
o true RS232 port (device 2)
o 2 mega-herz clock
Toronto, Onto
The hardware is also better utilized
than in past systems. For example. the
real-time clock and the cursor are both
done in hardware instead of software.
The 'B' Series Keyboard
One of the major difterences between
the 'B' series machines and
previous
Commodore computers is in the keyboard.
and how it is used.
The keyboard
has 4 cursor-control
keys; one each for up. down. left. and
right. There is a key for NORM/GRAPH. a
key labelled 'ENTER' (functions exactly like
'RETURN'). a '00' key on the numeric pad.
a true 'control' key. and a 'Commodore'
key. The latter is not a type of shift key
(unlike VIC and 64L It causes the screen
to
freeze
upon
scrolling.
and
passes
CHR$(2) to programs.
The numeric pad also contains a 'CE'
(for clear entry) key. This one works just
like delete. unless what is being deleted is
part of number - then. the whole number
goes. Very clever.
The body of the keyboard Is arranged
in the IBM style. so it takes a while to
find the double-quote. This will only bother
silly people who routinely use five different
keyboards (like mel.
Above the main keyboard is a row of
'programmable function keys'. There are 10
keys, which may be shifted. to yield 20 different values. When the system is turned
on,
these
c~ntain
values
like
'LIST'.
'DIRECTORY'. etc. However. the values may
be changed. verY easily. A single key may
be set to 'contain' up to 255 characters.
although all the keys combined are limited
to 512 characters. To, set a key. enter in
TOR PET August 83
page
51
B SERIES
direct mode. or from within a program. the
command:
KEYn.string
where 'n' is the key number from 1 to
20. and 'string' is most often a iiteraL but
may be any legal string value, ego
"RUN"+CHR$(l3)
(which is three letters and a return).
ESC v - scroll up
ESC r - reverse whole screen
ESC n - set screen to normal
ESC q - clear to end of line
ESC p - erase to start of line
ESC a - set insert mode!
ESC c - cancel insert mode
ESC d - delete line
ESC i-insert line
ESC b - set bottom of window
ESC t - set top of window
ESC m - disable scrolling <page mode)
ESC I - enable scrolling
... and several others.
One of the handy ways of using the
function keys from within program. is to
set them to values not usually passed from
the keyboard. Then have the program interpret these values as commands.
Use of the keyboard is closely linked to
the screen editor. which has also been enhanced. Two lines on the screen may be
linked. to create one 'logical line' of up to
160 characters. The 'ESC' key plus any
letter now performs a function. such as:
ESC u - set underline cursor
ESC s - block cursor
ESC f - flashing cursor
ESC e - non-flashing cursor
ESC w - scroll down
All of these sequences may be printed
from within a program to produce the
desired environment.
Speaking from personal experience. the
number one reason I selected a PET instead of the competition was the screen
editor and keyboard. Commodore has kept
the competition in second place with the
new features for the 'B' series.
.. ..
to be continued
raJ
~~x~·"...,~.~~
-·~ -..:.:w..:oIQr:""'·
. . . ._ _•.
Quillan
Rent a Club Modem
Toronto Vicinity
TPUG Members
0 000•
0.#1<1·
• • • 00
000 0 •
o
0
00
$20 per month
11111
1111
/
"What do you mean, you've forgotten
how to switch it on?"'
(416}492-9518
D.:3D!:X".U!3.:EK:a:iD
et,..
page
52
TORPET August 83
COMMODORE-64
COLOR 80-- a revie""
by G.R.
Walter
This is a program for the C-64 which
gives It an SO column screen. It is sold by
RTC
for
$35.00
(Richvale
Telecommunications, 10610 Bayview Ave" Richmond
Hill. Ontario, Canada, L4C 3NS). Unlike
some
other
methods
of
obtaining
80
columns on the C64,
the COLOR 80
program allows you to still use all the
colors for printing that you normally could
with 40 columns.
It Is totally compatible with RTC's C64LINK. and it takes away none of the BASIC
program memory <the COLOR 80 program is
stored under the BASIC, KERNAL, and I/O
ROM areas).
Any BASIC program which just uses
PRINT statements, (and no POKEs to the
screen) will run as it normally did, except
with SO columns now instead of 40. Any
machine language program which just uses
the CHROUT routine at $ffd2 for printing,
(and no 'pokes' to the screen) will run as
it normally did. except now it has an 80
column screen.
The COLOR SO program gives you SO
columns by using the bit map mode and
Its own character sets that are half as
wide as the C-64 regular character sets
<ie. the characters are 4*S dots, instead of
8*S dots). The high res map starts at
57344 ($eOOo), and the color memory starts
at 55296 ($dSOO - this is where it normally
lives). Due to the fact that the characters
are only half as wide as normal. you need
a fairly high resolution monitor to be able
to read all of the characters. A monochrome monitor is best (you can read
everything perfectly). next in line comes the
Commoaore monitor lyou can reaa everything perfectly under most color combinations, but with a few color combinations
some of the letters are illegible), last
comes a T.V. (unless it is a very good
quality set you might have some trouble
finding
a
combination
of screen
and
character colors which will allow you to
Clearly read the entire character set>. In
other words. it is best to have a color
Proton Station, ant.
monitor or better to use this program, and
you may have to experiment to find the
best screen and character color combination.
Switching from one character set takes
a second or two, instead of the normai
nearly instantaneous. This is to be expected
because the COLOR 80 program has to
search through a SOOO byte high res map
to find the characters to change their case
<instead of the 1000 byte regular screen
that the C-64 regularily searches through).
When changing the screen lbackground)
color you have to clear the screen after
you do your color POKE in order to make
the
entire
screen
that
color.
(ie.
POKE53281,12:PRINT"[clr)">' You can change
the colors on the screen for each individual character, but before POKEing the
color into the color RAM you have to
switch out the I/O block at $dOOO.
You can switch from 80 column mode
to 40 column mode (and back again)
without turning your C-64 off. but not under program control (part of the routine
neeaed to change from 80 column mode to
40 column mode is the [RUN/STOP] and
(RESTORE] key combination).
The program is disk locked and the
disk itself is locked (ie. it is very difficult
to get a working copy ot this program off
the disk on which it came). This means
that you cannot make backups. I don't know
what RTC's policy is towards people who
damage their disk with the COLOR 80
program on it. but from the quality of the
program and from RTC's good reputation in
other matters. I assume that they will
replace (??) the damaged disk for some
small fee (less than the original purchase
price>.
All in all. the COLOR 80 is an excellant product of extremely high quality, and
I hope that RTC continues to come out
with more like it.
give it a rating of 8.5 out of 10
TORPET August 83
page
53
More (less) on LIFE
by Edwin L. King
In the June issue of TORPET, Harry
Baecker gave a rather detailed description
ot some ot the uses and tactors invoived
in a game called LIFE. For those of us
without fancy APL systems and for those
not famiiiar with the original game. let me
present a much simpler BASIC version of
this simulation. (So much simpler i hesitate
to mention Mr. Baecker and this in the
same paragraph).
Now for all the warnings: This has
nothing to do with the Milton-Bradley game
called LIFE; it has nothing to do with anything even vaguely resembling an arcade
game; it is a mathematical simulation with
very little user Input.
Originally the game went something like
this. :
You begin with a 9x9 grid. On it place
as many 'beings' as you wish .in any pattern you wish. Each generation is one time
through the entire grid.
To see what happens in one square in
any given generation, consider what is in
squares around it. It in the t:l squares surrounding it there are eight beings (he is
surrounded> then he dies from overcrowding. if all eight squares are empty then
he aies trom loneliness. Otherwise, he
makes it to the next generation. If a given
square is empty then there will be someone there in the next generation only if
there are two or more beings in the area
surrounding it.
This is LIFE. The grand APL Equations
are all variations on this basic theme. The
program that goes with this called LlFEO
does this simulation on the ViC-20. By the
way, the only thing which restricts this
program to the VIC is my 'cursor', whose
only purpose is to let the user know how
far the user has to go before the next
generation. Delete these POKEs if you wish
to run it on another machine.
page
54
TORPET August 83
Valdosta, Georgia
Also included is a program LlFEl. This
one tollows the same rules LlFEO. except
that the entities come in two sexes Instead
at the tradltionai one. (Mr. Baecker was
right. it does make the game more interesting.)
Now to the use of the programs. In
LlFEO any key except three will place an
entity at the current pOSition on the board.
These three keys are the space bar (which
leaves a block empty>, the RETURN key
(which leaves the rest of the line blank),
and the 'L' key which will load a previous
session from disk.
Once the simulation begins the'S' key
will save the grid and the 'L' key will load
a previous one. Be warned: an attempt to
load a grid which is larger than the one in
memory Will cause an error.
LlFEl operates basically the same way.
The space bar, the RETURN key. the'S'
key and the 'L' key all have the same effects and hazards as in LlFEO. The difterence is that only two keys will put our
little Ers on the grid: 'M' for males and
'F' for females (clever. huh?)
After a little 'PLAY' you will begin to
know which patterns will survive and which
will not. One hint: given enough time the
descendants of one male and one female
will conquer any sized grid.
r. . . . .
JCO'"
.....
J"
.....
....cY"."J"J"J"J"J"J"
..........
....o""
...............
J"
.....
~...co'"J"
..........
J"J"JCO'"..rJ"J"
.....
....o""....cY"....cY"...co'"..r....o""..r
.....
..r
.....
..rJ"J"
.....
J"
.....
..r....o""..r,
~
70 l.fc>7orc<2thenbS( i, j )=" ": gotoBO
§ 71 l.£f=Oorm=OthenbS( i, j )=" ": gotoBO
§ 74 l.fa$(i,j)<>" "thenbS(i,j)=aS(i,j):gotoBO
§ 75 l.frnd( 0». 5thenbS( i, j )="W" :gotoBO
§ 76 bS( i, j )="Q"
§ 80 poke38400+(i*22)+(j-l),1:poke7680+(i*22)+(j-l),
§ peek(7680+(i*22)+(j-l»-128:next:next
§ 90 {ori=ltoxx:forj=ltoxx:a$(i,j)=bS(i,j):b$(i,j)=" ":next:next:goto40
~ 100 pr:lnt" 3" : fori=l toxx: forj =1 toxx
§ 110 gelaS:ifaS="1"then250
§ 111 l.fa$<>"m"anda$<>"f"anda$<>" "andaS<>chrS(13)thenl10
§
8
~
8
8
§I
~
~
§
l.faS="m"thenaS( i, j )="Q"
§
130 l.faS="f"thenaS( i, j )="W"
~
131 l.[aS=chrS(13)thenfork=jtoxx+l:aS(i,k)=" ":next:j=xx+22:gotoI51
140 l.faS( i, j )=" "thenaS( i, j )=" "
~ 150 prl.ntaS( i, j );
151 next:print:next:return
200 open2,8,2,"@0:lifesim,s,w":print#2,chrS(xx);:fori=Otoxx+l:forj=Otoxx+l
210 prl.nt#2,aS(i,j);:next:next:close2:goto40
8 250 open2,8,2,"lifesim,s,r":get#2,xxS:xx=asc(xxS):fori=oto21:forj=oto21
R 260 get#2,aS(i,j):next:next:close2:goto40
§~
~
r-r..........J"....cY"....cY"....o"""'CO--.......J"J".........o"".....................................r............r~J"J"."J"..rJ"......"J"J"J"J"....cY"~JCO'"...co'"....cY"....cY"....o""J"J"J"..rJCO'".....J"J".....J"~
§ 120
~
§
§
§
§
§
§
§
§
S
§
8
8
- fertilizer needs will be handled with an
ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEET
- by using data flies. any farmer can be
out standing his FIELDS!
a Ylimaki
Papermate to Wordpro 4+ File Converter
by Thomas Henry
Mankato, MN
PAPERMATE (by AB Computers) and ferent methods for storing text files on disk
WORDPRO 4+ (by Professional Software and this presented something of a problem
Inc'> are two very popular word processors to me as an author. For example. recently
for
PET/CBM
computers.
PAPERMATE . I was writing a book. and half of the
doesn't
support as
many features
as chapters were in PAPERMATE format while
WORDPRO 4+ and runs somewhat slower. the other half were WORDPRO 4+ flies. I
but is quite inexpensive. As such it makes clearly needed to organize the whole book
an excellent "first" word processor for users under one format so that I could print out
who aren't exactly sure if they need a big the entire manuscript using the global print
system. WORDPRO 4+. on the other hand. command. One option was to retype all of
has just about every feature that you could the PAPERMATE chapters by hand. Into
WORDPRO 4+. This would be a long.
possible want. but costs quite a bit more.
tedious task and besides. like most writers.
have used PAPERMATE for several I'm not a very good typist! The other. more
years now. but recently changed over to sensible option, was to get the computer to
WORDPRO 4+. Needless to say. the two somehow convert the files for me.
word processors employ considerably difpage
56
TORPET August 83
Here Is a program which will do just
that! It takes any PAPERMATE text file and
converts it to WORDPRO 4+ format. Since
files
can
be quite a
bit larger on
also
splits
the
text
PAPERMATE.
it
automatically where needed into 100 line
chunks suitable for loading by WORDPRO
4+. Operation of the program is convenient:
simply specify the name of a file to be
converted and start it going. In a bit. you
will have a new file all set to load Into
WORDPRO 4+.
HOW THE CONVERTER WORKS
Even if you don't need a program like
this. you wlli still want to iook It over since
it provides some Insight Into file handling.
code conversion and disk drive methods.
Refer to the program listing. Lines 250
through 320 take care of the file name
setup. The program asks for the source file
name (the original PAPERMATE file) which
should be In Drive O. Then it asks for the
destination
file
name.
The
program
automatically tacks the characters ".WP·
onto the name so that you will know it's
a WORDPRO 4+ file. Additionally. It also
adds a number suffix <1.2.3 ... .> in case the
original file needs to be split up. Thus.
each "module" has the same name. with a
differing suffix. This allows you to organize
the modules In the proper order at a later
date.
Note In line 290 that the PAPER~ATE
text is opened as a standard sequential
file. while line 310 opens the WORDPRO
4+text as a program file. This is one of
the main differences between the two formats: PAPERMATE texts are stored as sequential files while WORDPRO 4+ texts are
stored as program files.
Another difference is that PAPERMATE
files are stored as strings of ASCII characters. whereas WORD PRO 4+ stores the text
In ·screen code" form. Screen codes are
the numbers that you POKE to the screen
to create a graphic display. ASCII and
screen codes are considerably different
types of numbers. but fortunately there Is a
mathematical formula relating the two types
of code. In line 440. you will find the for-
mula which will convert an ASCii character
(signified by A) into a screen code. B. A
Character is read from the source file.
converted to screen code form and then
l:.ent to the destination file.
Two small details still need to be taken
care at. Every line in the PAPERMATE disk
file is enclosed with quote marks. This is
due to a property of sequential files and
hence the quotes should be stripped off
before sending the line to a WORDPRO 4+
file. Line 420 does this (a quote mark is
ASCII 34). Also. the carriage return (ASCII
13) at the end of every sequential file line
is stripped off as well. this time by program
line 430.
Carriage returns are indicated In both
word processors by the back-arrow (ASCII
95). However. unlike PAPERMATE. WORDPRO
4+ pads out the rest of the screen line
with blanks. Line 460 detects the presence
of the back-arrow and if one is found.
control is sent to line 490. The variable C
has kept track of the column position so
far; to pad out the line merely requires
that 80-C more blanks be printed to the
disk. Line 490 performs this task.
Since
PAPERMATE
flies
can
often
exceed the memory limits of WORDPRO 4+.
the variable R keeps track of the number
of rows or lines that have been sent to
the destination file. When. this hits 100. a
new file Is opened and the conversion
continues. Thus one PAPERMATE file might
lead to two or three linked WORDPRO 4+ flies.
Finally. note in line 380 that a particular code is sent at the start of the
WORDPRO 4+ file. This code tells the file
where to start loading. and as such
represents an address. I found it by experimentation. It may be that other versions
of WORDPRO use a different code. so if
you're having trouble check this first.
This program was written for the CBM
8032 and 4040 disk drive. but can be
easily modified for forty column PET's and
other disk drives. For example. change
numbers 81 and 80 in lines 470 and 490
to 41 and 40. respectively. for forty column
TORPET August 83
page 57
\
PET
PET's. The disk error checks In lines 290
and 310 could be changed to the 2040
style. simply by replacing the references to
OS with the normal "open the error channel" procedure for this disk drive. Likewise.
line 58Q could access the error message
trom the channel and print it.
USING THE PROGRAM
Carefully enter the program Into your
computer using the listing as a guide. After
punching it in. save it to disk. This is a
utility program that you won't want to be
without If you're currently changing over
from PAPERMATE to WORDPRO 4+ so keep
the program handy as you get through the
transition stage.
Load the program and run It. First off.
remove the program disk from the drive.
Then insert the PAPERMATE file disk into
Drive 0 and WORDPRO 4+ file disk into
Drive 1. Now answer the file name questions as they are asked and sit back. In
about 10 minutes even your longest file
will be converted!Even though the GET#8 In
line 410 is a slow command. the results
are stili faster than retyping the document.
You will have to change the imbedded
formatting commands (left margin, right
margin, etc.>. by hand. but this only takes
a minute or so. likewise. the tab indicators. quote marks. and other trivial
characters may have to be changed. but
WORDPRO's "search and replace" command
can take care of these for you.
Since PAPERMATE and WORDPRO 4+
are such popular word processors, I have
a feeling that I'm not the only one who
was caught In the plight of wishing to
Change flies over froM one system to
another. If you're in the same boat. type
this program in and let your computer do
the work!
page.
58
TORPET August 83
PAPERMATE TO WORDPRO ... CONVERTER
100 REM
110 REM : ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
120 REM :PAPERMATE TO WORDPRO 4+ CONVERTER
130 REM:
140 REM :
THOMAS HENRY
150 REM:
TRANSONIC LABORATORIES
160 REM :
249 NORTON STREET
170 REM :
MANKATO, MN 56001
180 REM ................ •• .............................. •• ........................ •• ...... .
190 REM
200 REM
210 REM
220 REM *** FILE NAME SETUP ***
230 REM
240 REM
250 N=O: PRINT',[CLEAR]SOURCE FILE: [RVS]DRIVE an
260 PRINT"DESTINATION FILE: [RVS]DRIVE 1"
270 INPUT"[3 DOWN]SOURCE FILE NAME ";SFS
280 INPUT"DESTINATION FILE NAME ";DFS
290 OPEN8, 8, 8, "O:"+SF$+",S,R":IFDSTHEN570
300 N=N+1:CS$="1:"+DF$+".WP"+MID$(STR$(N),2)
310 OPEN7, 8, 7, CSS+",P, W":IFDSTHEN570
320 PRINT"CONVERTING [RVS]";CS$;"[OFF] NOW_"
330 REM
340 REM
350 REM *** MAIN CONVERSION LOOP***
360 REM
370 REM
380 PRINT#7, CHR$(16);CHR$(92);: R=1
390 C=1
400 IFS=64THEN590
410 GET#8, A$: S=ST: A=ASC(A$)
420 IFA=34THEN400
430 IFA=13THEN400
440 B=«(AAND128)/2)OR(AAN063»
450 PRINT#7. CHR$(B);
460 IFA=95TH EN 490
470 C=C+1: IFC=81THENR=R+1: GOT0390
480 GOT04Ql)
490 FORI=C+ 1T08Q: PRINT#7,CHR$(32);:NEXT
500 R=R+1: IFR< 100THEN390
510 CLOSE7: GOT0300
520 REM
530 REM
540 REM *** DISK ERROR CHECK***
550 REM
560 REM
570 PRINT"[RVS]DISK ERROR!!![OFF]"
580 PRINTDS$
590 DCLOSE
CS1
QUICK BROWN FOX
•
•
$55.00
The Word Processor of this decade! For the VIC-20 and C-64.
COMMODORE 64®
Write for
$43500
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Plus you receive a free aBF
Word Processor valued at
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C-64 Software
Pet Emulator
$27.95
Editor Pac
67.00
32.36
File Pac
57.00
Account Pac
Farm Management I
47.25
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Home Budget
29.95
Stock Investments
76.95
140.00
Calc Result
650Z Professional Development
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27.95
Mail List
34.95
Vic Easy Lesson & Easy Quiz
35.97
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15.95
Data Files
14.95
Research Assistant 2.0
28.00
Total Label 2.6 (Mailing
Lables)
Tape 19.95
Disk 22.00
Total Time Manager 2.6
37.00
Total Text (Word Processor) 2.6
40.00
C-64Games
Flight 64 (Flight Simulator)
Gunslinger
Spellathon
Motor Mania
Renassance
Vic Clowns
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Jupiter Lander
Temple of Apshai
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Curse of Ra
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Tape $13.95
Disk 15.95
13.95
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25.95
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2500
39.95
16.95
26.95
1995
26.95
VIC-20 & C-64 Hardware
VIC-1541
VIC-1530
VIC-1515
VIC-1 01 0
VIC-1311
VIC-1312
347.00
Disk Drive
6750
Datasette
33495
Printer
139.95
Expansion Module
9.95
Joystick
28.00
Wlco Joystick
19.95
Game Paddle,
Telephone Modem
99.95
Terminal
Emulator (84)
Tape 9.95
Disk 15.95
4Ox25 Terminal
Emulator VIC
40.95
Prices quoted in U.S. dollars
When you buy our 6 Game
Pac or 6 Finance Pack $43.00
VIC-~
21 0
VIC 3K Memory
Expander Cart.
34.95
Plugs directly mto the VIC's expansion port Expands to
8K RAM lolal
VIC-111 0
VIC 8K Memory
Expander Cart.
52.50
8K RAM expansion cartridge plugs directly Into the VI.
24K Memory
Expander Cart.
VIC-1 011 A RS232C Terminal
Interface
CM102
119.95
39.95
Provides interface between the VIC-20 and RS232 telecommunications modems. Connects to VIC's user port.
PETSPEEDBasic C"mpller for Commodore
Vic Rabbit Cartridge
CBM 64 Rabbit
Star G-10 Printer
MuraModem
Smith Corona TP-1 Printer
140.00
35.00
35.00
360.00
120.00
650.00
CARDCO HARDWARE
CARD~OARD 6
$87.50
An expansion interface for the VIC-20. Allows expansion to
40K or ac~epts up to six games_ May be daisy~chajned for
more versatility
CARDBOARD 3
$35.95
Economy ,xpansion interface tor the VIC-20.
CARD "I?" CARD/PRINT
$76.00
Universal Centrontcs Parallel Printer Interface for the
VIC~20 or~BM.64. Use an Epson MX-80 or OKIDATA or
TANDY or j sl about any other.
CARDE TE
~~.2~ncir
$30.95
::~~4.r~ cassette player Irecorder with your
LIGHT P N
$29.95
A light pen with
orCBM·64.
SIX
good programs to use with your VIC-20
16K Memory Expander
$50.50
All CAROCO Products have a lifetime warranty
COMMODORE SOFTWARE
VIC-1211 A VIC-20 Super Expander $55.00
Everything Commodore could pack into one cartridge 3K RAM memory expansion, hIgh resolution graphics plotting. color, paint and sound commands. Graphic, text, mul ..
ticolor and music modes. 1024x1 024 dot aereen plotting.
All commands may be typed as new BASIC commands or
accessed by hitting one of the VIC·s special function keys
Includes tutorial instruction book, Excellent for all programming levels.
VIC-1212
Programmer', Aid
Cartridge
$45.99
More than 20 new BASIC commands help new and exper..
ienced programmers renumber, trace and edit BASIC programs. Trace any program line-by-line as It executes, pau ..
to edit. Spacial KEY command let. programmers rodofine
function key.
command •.
as
VIC-1 21 3 VICMON Machine Language
Monitor
$48.99
Helps machine code programmers write fast, efficient 6502
assembly language programs. Includes one line assembler /
disassembler
BASIC commands, lubroutln•• or new
VIC-20 Software
for Business & Home Applications
6502 Professional Development
System
$25.00
Vic Forth (Advance Computer
Language)
49.95
Hess Mon (Machine Language
Monitor)
34.95
Hess Writer (Word Processor)
34.95
Turtle Graphics
34.95
Tape 17.95
Total Label 2.1
Disk 22.00
Tape 28.00
Total Time Manliger 2.1
Disk 32.00
Tape 28.00
Research Assistant 2.0
Disk 32.00
Total Text 2.5
Tape 30.00
Encoder
34.95
Accl. Payable & Receivable
Tape 29.00
Disk 35.00
VIC-20 Games
Exterminator Plus (Excellent)
$17.95
Anti Matter Splatter (Disaster)
17.95
Rescue From Nufon (Great)
12.95
15.95
Tank Wars (War Game)
13.45
Simon (Great for kids)
Dam Bomber (Avoid the enemy)
13.45
7.95
Breakout
17.95
Snack Man (Pac Man)
17.95
Defender on Tri
Amok
Cart. 23.95
Cassette 19.94
17.95
Starfighter
15.95
Torg
34.95
Gridrunner
20.95
Invasion Orion
19.95
8K Backgammon
TO ORDER:
P.O. BOX 766
WICHITA. KS 67201
(316) 263-1095
Handling charges $2.00
C.O.D. (Md $2.00)
Personal checks allow 3 week delivery
VIC·2()e I•• reglltered trademark of Commodore
Prk:es subject to chango
TORPET August 83
page
59
Smith -Corona introduces the first printer *
with real character at the unreal rice of $1095.
The Smith -Corona Daisy Wheel Printer
Until now, if you wanted to include a reasonablypriced printer as part of your computer or word processing
system, you had to use a dot matrix printer. Daisy wheel
printers were just too expensive.
Not anymore. Now Smith-Corona* offers a daisy
wheel printer at such an incredibly low price, you can't
afford not to include it. That means that even the
smallest installation or business can now have letter quality
printing capabilities at every work station.
The Smith-Corona printer operates with microprocessor-controlled daisy wheel technology, and is
available with industry standard serial or parallel data
interfaces.
Best of all, it produces results identical to those of our
very finest office typewriters - printing with real character.
So it can be used to create letters or documents that have
to look perfect. As well as financial statements, inventory
reports, direct mail campaigns - anything that requires
quality printing.
And it's easy to use - just turn on the power, load the
paper and away it goes. (It works equally beautifully with
letteffieadlxmd or fanfold paper.) There are drop-in ribbon
page 60
TORPET August 83
cassettes and a choice of easy-to-change, snap-on daisy
print wheels for a variety of fonts.
So why not get your hands on a real bargain: letterperfect printing at an amazingly low price. Because,
thanks to Smith-Corona, a printer with real character is no
longer expensive.
Ask for it by name.
Smt°th - Corona
"su}.!gestrd retail pia
DIVISION OF
6,!6® (CANADA) LIMITED
r-------------------------,
I
Please send me more information on the Smith-Corona daisy
I wheel printer.
I Nam~e_____________________________________
I
Titlle.e_____________________________________
I
Business Address"----_____________________________
I Company Nam,t:.e_______________________________
I City
Provo
Postal Code________
I Type of Business..s_____________________________
I
Mail coupon or call:
I
Education Director,
I
Smith-Corona
I
29 Gervais Drive, Don Mills, Ontario M3C 1Zl
I
(416) 449-0164
T
L _________________________ J
,•
1
In
...
le:(
J:
=>
;;>
I
64
W·302: VIC· eO/54
Printer Interface,
A PRODUCTS RESOURCE GUIDE
FOR THE
COMMODORE 64 'M COMPUTER
Over 125 pages of PROGRAMS & SOFTWARE.
PERIPHERAlS, INTERFACES, BOOK TITLES,
MAGAZINES catering to the 64. $15.00 + $2.00 shipping.(Florida add !nrt).
WHAT'S FOR THE 64
Prices quoted in U.S. dollars
3494 Chick<asaw Circle, Lake Worth, Florida 33463
~6~~038bo222222~2222~
/-~
r--
r-;....<F-
COMPUTERVILLE
;>-<
-
Works with all centronics type parallel matrix &
letter printers and plotters-Epson, C.ltoh,
Okidata, Nee, Gemini 10, TP-I Smith Corona, and
most others. Hardware driven; works off the serial
port. Quality construction: Steel DIN connectors
& Shielded cables. Has these switch selectable
options: Device 4,5,6 or 7; ASCII or PET ASCII;
7-bit or 8-bit output; upper & lower case or upper
only. Recommended by PROFESSIONAL
SOFTWARE for WordPro 3 Plus for the 64, and
by City Software for PaperClip.
MW·302 . • ••
Canadian S 1 a9. 95
Micro World Electronix, Inc.
COMMODORE 64 ....... $649.00
3333 S. Wadsworth Blvd. #Cl05, Lakewood, CO 80227
(303) 987·2671
CANADIAN DEALERS
334 LAKESHORE ROAD E., OAKVILLE, ONTARIO l6J 1 J4
416-845-4988
•
* * * PRINTERS * * *
PRINTERS
Mannesmann Tally
Epson
Okidata
FlO Printmaster
Prowriter
Centronics
Smith-Gorona TP-1
Daisywriter
Diablo 630
Line Printers
MANNESMANN TALLY
~
~~a~~ Parallel Interfaces
2K Buffer and tractor
Reverse field graphics
Front panel programming
Microcomputer controlled
MT 1601 $849.
(I Correspondence Quality
COMPUTERS
MT 160l $1.095.
. ALSO
~ Epson
~ Monitors
Xerox 820 II
HX-2O
BEE II Compatible
Vle-20 $199.00
Ribbons cables etc.
All equipment. fully warranted in Canada.
Immedlate delivery. leasmg available.
GUARDIAN
(416)665-4920
ALBERTA
Computer Shop of Calgary
3515 18th SI. S.W .
Calgary, T2T 4T9
(403) 243-4356
Hindson Computer Systems, Ltd.
7144 Fisher SI. S.E.
Calgary, T2H OW5
(403) 252-9576
TJB Micro Systems, Ltd.
10991 124th S1.
Edmonton, T5M OH9
(403) 433-3161
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Conti Electronics
7204 Main Street
Vancouver, V5X 3Y4
(604) 324-0505
ONTARIO
MGI Computer Corp.
1501 Carling Ave.
Ottawa, T1Z 7M1
(613) 722-1000
Richvale Telecommunications
10610 Bayview (Bayview Plaza)
Richmond Hill, L4C 3N8
(416)884-4165
SASKATCHEWAN
Micro Shack of West Canada
607 45th St. West
Saskatoon, S7L 5W5
(306) 244-6909
TORPET August 83
page 61
s
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
D
F
T
w
A
R
E
General Ledger
Accounts Receivable
Inventory
Job Costing *
Payroll
Property Management *
Micrograph
Law Office Acct.
)q~ 1.1 <.::
employees. Cheque printing and T4
e64-FORTH
AMAZINGIII
SPELLPRO
jim Butterfield's machine language
spelling checker for
Word Pro 4 + on CBM 8032
-simple to use
-works fast; only seconds
to check every word on
a full page
-fully WordPro 4 +
compatible for quick
spelhng corrections
-Use existing Word Pro 4+
documents to easily update
the Spell Pro dictionary
-up to 80,000 word dictionary
on a CBM 8050 disk
unly $17«1.95 from your local Commodore dealer
.
For your nearest dealer call:
(416) 273-6350
PRo'LINE
_ ••••".OFTWAR.
7SS THE QUEENSWAY EAST. UNIT 8.
MISSISSAUGA. ONTARIO L4Y 4CS
page 62
for the Commodore 64
FORTH SOFTWARE FOR THE COMMODORE 64
C6~.FORrn (TM) for the Commodore 64 - $99.95
FIgrorlh:79 implementation with extensions
FuB feature scr....n editor and macro assembler
Trace feature for easy debugging
JZOx200, 2 color bit mapped graphics
16 color sprite and character graphics
Compatible with VIC peripherals including disks, data set, modem,
printer and cartridges
• Extensive 144 page manual with examples and application scr.... ns
• ·SAVETURNI<EY· normaUy allows application program distribution
without licensing or royalties
•
•
•
•
•
•
C64-XTEND(TM) FORTIi Extension for C64-FORlH - $59.95
lKequlres original C64-FORTH copy)
• Fully compatible floating point package including arithmetic,
relational logical and transcendental functions
• Roatingl'Oint range of 1E+38 to 2E-39
• String ex tensions including LEFT$, RIGHT$, and MID$
• BCD functions for 10 digit numbers including multiply, divide, and
percentage. BCD numbers may by used for DOLLAR.CENTS
calculations without the round-<>ff error inherent in BASIC real
numbers.
• Special words are provided for inputting and outputting
DOLLAR.CENTS values
• Detailed manual with examples and applications screens
(Commodore 64 is a trademark of Commodore)
TO ORDER - Specify disk or cassette version
- Check, money order, bank card, COD's add $1.50
- Add $4.00 postage and handling in USA and Canada
- Mass. orders add 5% sales tax
- Foreign orders add 20% shipping and handling
- Dealer inqUiries welcome
CIC
PERfORMANCE MICRO PRODUCTS
~
770 Dedham Street. 5-2
Canton. MA 02021
(617) 828-1209
Prices quoted In U.s. dol..,.
TORPET August 83
, COMMODORE-64
The Smart 64 Terminel
by Robert A. Chandler
Are you tired of not being able to
upload, and download from your terminal
program? Have you had bad experiences
with so called fast running programs that
actually give you enough time to get a cup
of coffee in the time it takes to print a
screen? After scrounging up the money to
buy your hardware. do you find yourself
leery of spending big bucks trying to find a
terminal program that will do what it is
supposea to ao. ana will run on your c64? Then friends what you need is the
Smart 64 Terminal program.
That may sound like a pitch from an
old medicine show. but it pretty well
describes how I felt before I found The
Smart 64 Terminal.
Now for the technical stuff. The Smart
64 Terminal is a menu driven program.
that I found to be extremely user friendly.
J grave necessity for a person with my
limited knowledge. The program is availiable
on either disk. or tape. ana is accompanied by a twenty-four 8 1/2 by 11 inch
page manual. The manual is relatively complete. ana instructs the user in the building
of a custom system aisk. Though I feel the
program was designed with Compuserve
type systems In mind. The building of a
custom system aisk allows the user to
tailor the alsk tor use with whatever system
he wishes to log on.
When you first build. and run your system alsk. you will be askea to set the
colours that you want to see
<border.screen. and character). Once set these
will be permanent. unless you choose to
Change them via the menu. Next you will
be asked to define each of four function
keys, that you can set up to print repetatlve commands. I have one disk set up with
aI/ of the passwords I use on the local
systems In my area. Once you have done
this you will be asked to set your 1.0. and
password function keys. After setting these
the 1.0. will print on the screen. but the
La Mesa, CA
password will not be seen. an added
security measure for those times when
other eyes are watching your screen. There
is also a printer option that you will be
asked to define. This is to allow the
program to be used with a 1515. or 1525
printer with upgraded ROMS
Once all of that is done you are ready
to start. After loading the program via the
boot. the screen will show the various
loading functions taking place, and when
tinally loaded you are presented with the
function menu. The menu gives the user
fifteen options to select from. They are as
follows:
1 Online: pretty self explanatory.
2 New File: this allows
open the aownloaa tile.
the
user
to
re-
3 Close
File:
ailows
closing
of
the
aownlbad file. and empties the buffer to allow for extracting. changing disks etc.
4 Print File: gives you a
what you have downloaded.
hard
copy
0:
5 Extract: this gives you the ability to
create individual files from the downloaded
text.
6 Text to BASIC: lets you create a BASIC
program from a downloaded sequential file
so you don't have to type it out.
7 BASIC to Text: the opposite of the
above. Will allow you to transmit the file in
PETSCII if you name the file with the first
letter being an ·x".
8 Editor Unk: will load an editor or word
processor to allow you to create upload files.
9 User I.D.lPassword: lets you
your password and 1.0. number.
Change
10 Function Keys: lets you' change tne
user aefined function keys.
page 63
TORPET August 83
COMMODORE-64
11
Colours:
Gives
you
the
ability
change the colours you have set.
12 Printer:
:;et up.
lets
you
change
your
to
In all honesty however. I do have to
admit that I find having to create my
upload files with an outside word processor
to oe somewhat of an inconvenience. Also
I found that not all word processors will
create the right type of files compatible
with the upload feature. I use Wordpro
3+/64. and find that it works perfectly. This
is a small inconvenience. and I feel is off
set by the many other features the program
offers.
printer
13 Modem: This is pre set to the standard defaults. but selection of this function
Will allow you to change the defaults to
whatever you need.
14 Disk Commands: selection of this glve~
you the ability to manipulate your disk with
the DOS 5.1 commands (C-64 wedge).
CUSTOMER SUPPORT: I know thiS may
oe a term that you Commodore users have
lost touch with. I can't start closing this
review without throwing in a word along
this line though. My experience in computing is still at the novice stage. and being
so. I find that at times the simplest solution to a problem can be completely out
of sight. I found the creator of Smart 64
Terminal receptive to all of my questions.
gOOd or bad. and willing to give me unlimited assistance with whatever my problem
was.
In
my
experience,
this
type
of
CUSTOMER SUPPORT is very hard to find
these days.
15 End: this is an exit from tne program.
IS necessary to use thiS to maKe sure
any open files are closed properly.
It
Well
there
it
is. Seems like a lot
doesn t it. Hold on though because there is
more.
Included in the user's manlJal is a
program that will allow the user to define
ana customize the transmit and receive
taOles used by the program. This means
you can define your keyboard to transmit
whatever you want it to. within ASCII limitations at course. and that you can set up
the program to read incoming data that
may oe exclusive to a particular system you
use. Standard control key functions are
pre-implemented but this also allows you to
change these If you wish.
At this point I was going to include a
lines
about
the
updated
version,
few
planned for release around the first of
July. However after just getting off the
phone with creator Joe O'hara. I think the
updated version . will deserve a review of
itf, own. So. for now I'll just tell you that
it will have all of power I've just told you
about and many more new and exciting
tOOls as well.
The program is compiled via PETspeed.
and in my opinion runs faster than some
at the machine language programs I have
tried. The download buffer is 28k big. and
gives you the choice of either allowing
autO-dump to the disk, or selective clearing
it you don't want to keep what you have
(Jownloaded. The buffer is also dynamic. allowing you to turn it on and off as you
desire. On is signified by a little box with
a (Jown arrow in the upper right corner of
the screen, Another little nicety. (if you are
a tightwad like me) is a timer you can
set. This counts down your online time, and
upon expiration signals you with an audible
tone. and a flashing box in the center of
the screen that says "Time To Quit".
page 64
TORPET August 83
.
On a scale of one to ten. I give The
Smart 64 Terminal eight stars.
• • • • * * * *
THE SMART 64 TERMINAL
$24.9S/TAPE-$27.95/DISK
FROM
MICROTECHNIC SOLUTIONS INC.
NEW HAVEN. CONN.
...........................................................
WORLD'S WORST COMPUTER PUN
···
··
a Ylimaki
~
If you can't figure out what the HEX:
is wrong with your M.L. program. leave
in first CRASH condition.
:
It:
.....................•.............•.•............... ...
~
~
ROM PACKER -- a review
by William E. Wilbur
ROMPACKER System and User Cartridges
From: Business Computer Systems of
New England, P.O. Box 2285. Springfield.
MA 01101, U.S.A. Tel. (413) 567-8584.
To quote from the user manual introduction; "The ROMPACKER SYSTEM was
conceived as a powerful tool to enable· the
Commodore VIC-20 computer to be used in
dedicated stand alone applications". After
several months of working with and using
this system. I' have to say that thle opening
quote was an understatement!
The ROMPACKER User Cartridge is
designed to fit into the VIC-20 memory expansion port. The cartridge measures about
5 112" by 2 3/4" with sockets for six (6)
2532 EPROMS. The cartridge is well made.
protective coated, and double-sided with
plated thru holes. The cartridge retails for
$39.95 and includes one 0) 2532 which is
programmed (1 K) with the BCS ROMPACKER
Menu and Auto-start program;· this leaves
about 3k for the first user program.
The ROMPACKER Starter System. which
retails for $179.95. includes the above User
Cartridge,
a
2532
EPROM
Programmer
which installs in the VIC-20 user port
one( 1) 2532 programmed with the EPROM
Programmer Manager Program. and one(l)
blank 2532.
One's first thought is "So what. I can't
program in machine language! What does
this. do for me?" Well. here is one of the
beauties of this system; it allows you to
BASIC.
that's
right.
BASIC.
save your
programs in EPROM. Not only that. but you
can chain. link. and overlay (while passing
variables) these same BASIC programs! the
result of this is that one can run a 23K
program in a 3.5K VIC-20. You can also
have a program load and run automatically
on power-up or system reset. The program
load and run speed must be experienced to
be believed.
Kittery, Maine
Let's
operating
purposes
are using
take a look at some of the
features of this system. For the
of this review. I'll assume that we
the full starter system.
First step is to turn off the VIC-20.
Then we install the ROMPACKER Eprom
Programmer on the VIC user port, then
plug the· User Cartride into the VIC's
memory expansion socket. Now turn on the
VIC.
The first display on your screen is the
BCS ROMPACKER Menu. At this stage of
the game we will have only two (2) selections. l-Menu and 2-BCS Copyright. Hit the
"2" key and almost instantly the Copyright
program is loaded, run, and we have a
"ready" and a flashing cursor. So far. so good.
Now comes the fun part! load your
favourite game or utility program using the
standard
VIC
loading
procedures.
Then
enter
SYS30720,
following
the
screen
prompts. install the blank 2532 Eprom in
the ZIF socket of the Eprom Programmer.
Hit "return". enter the program name. and
stand by. After a short period of time
(about 2 112 minutes for 4K) you will be
instructed to remove the Eprom from the
Programmer. Please do so.
Now turn off the VIC and remove the
User cartridge from the memory expansion
socket.
Carefully.
install
your
newly
p~ogrammed
Eprom in one of the user
Cartridge's open sockets. Re-insert the
User Cartridge.
Turn the VIC back on.
now nave three(3) items
Menu: 1 - your program, 2
- BCS Copyright. Hit the
program is loaded and run
an eye!
and you should
listed on the
- Menu. and 3
"1" key. Your
in the blink of
If your program is larger than
problem. the fully populated User
leaves Block 1 ($2000 to $3FFF)
TORPET August 83
3.5K, no
Cartridge
open so
page 65
you can Install an 8K RAM cartridge. The
User Cartridge is addressed to Blocks
2.3.and 5.
The 2532's can be programmed two(2)
different ways with this system. The first and
easiest way to make changes. is one
program per Eprom. By starting a program
on one 2532 and continuing on another.
you can
make maximum use of the
programming space available. Programming
can be in BASIC or machine language. If
the ML program is not relocatable. then
that Eprom MUST reside at the proper address on the User Cartridge! If a program
starts on one Eprom and continues on to
another. then those Eproms MUST reside in
adjacent sockets on the User Cartridge.
The uses of this system are endless
(almost>. One amateur radio group I am involved with developed a radio repeater con-
trol program. In BASIC and is using a VIC20
<tocal
discount
$149.00)
and
a
ROMPACKER User cartridge to replace a
dedicated repeater controller that cost over
$950.00111 When the group wants to alter
their program. they just erase the existing
EPROM and burn in the new program. Of
course. If you have a program In any 2532
compatible chip. all you have to do Is plug
It Into the cartridge. call up the EPROM
Manager, and tell It to duplicate that socket.
The ROMPACKER System User's Manual
is well written and full of hints and very
complete operating instructions. About the
only complaint I've heard was that the
manual was printed using a dot-matrix prlnterl
Overall. I rate this product as excellent.
This device allows you to fully exploit the
capabilities of the VIC-20 in a very easy.
simple manner.
Game Reviews
by Bonnar Beach
and David Hill
Fire
Put out the fire before It
spreads too much and before the time runs
out. Fire has really good graphic and
sound. but Is simple to play. It Is too difficult for really young players and becomes
boring for older ones.
Draw - Draw a HI-Res portrait of
anything you want.. It's as simple as drawIng a line with a pencil. We had lots of
fun with this one.
Race - It takes some skill to collect
a lot of points. This game has good
graphics and is a lot of fun for anyone.
VOL 2
Safari
Shoot
the
natives
and
animals with your camera. Isn't that nice!
This game has great graphics but the
game is so easy that It's probably a good
game for a flve-year-old.
Super Font - A great program for
designing
characters
using Joystick or
Keyboard. Results can be stored on tape.
This program is a utility for the advanced
programmer.
page 66
TOAPET August 83
Horning's Mills, Onto
Qulx - A game of memory--you must
remember a series of colour and sound
and replay them. The series gets longer
and longer. Fun for a while.
Warp - You fly a space ship through
a warp tunnel without hitting the walls.
which get closer on the way. It has good
graphiCS and good sound. a lot like ski.
and we prefer it to ski.
Fifteen - Try to get the numbers from
1 to 15 In order (fairly difficult>. Has good
sound and graphics.
Aall - WOWI This is a great game
for a party. We had lots of funl You must
control twelve switches to get a train to Its
destination. It starts wltn one train ana
ends with eight. Playing this game by yourself would be Impossible, and with four
people (to watch the screen) It Is stili
hard. It has excellent graphics and good sound.
Rail. Race and
were our favourites.
Draw.
In
that
order,
MACH INE LANGUAGE
Differential Relocation
of Machine Code
by Harold Anderson
Any person who has tried to relocate a
sizeable block of machine code without the
benefit of a source listing knows that this
can be nearly impossible. There are some
obvious fixes required. such as changing
the destination address of jump statements
so that they go to the same place in the
relocated code as they did in the original
code. You can. in fact. easily write a
program to do this for you.
In practice. most machine code contains far more subtle problem points than
this. For example. there may be a table of
destination addresses which are used in indirect jumps. The table will not even disassemble!. In the face of this or similar
prOblems. I suggest that you had better
find something more sophisticated than
brute force editing of the code.
One of the solutions which works in
some cases is what I call "differential
relocation". Given two versions of a block
of machine code assembled to run at different locations. It is possible to generate
a third version to run at any desired
location. The only limiting factor is that all
three blocks of machine code must be
separated by an integral number of pages.
For example. if one block of code starts
at an address equal to 47 + 51 x 256.
then the other blocks must start at 47 + N
X 256 where N Is an Integer. This limitation Is not a significant Impediment.
One good example of where this would
be useful Is for generating a ROM version
of
Superman.
(Superman
Is
a
public
domain. extended machine language monitor
for the PET'> This program comes with a
relocator which will allow you to generate a
version which will run anywhere In RAM.
This is not much help if you want a
ROM version to run at $9000. a location
where there Is no RAM. Use of the program
listed In this article allows you to generate
a version to run at $9000. starting from
two versions assembled to run at $7000
Oakville, Onto
and $6000. ($9000 is a ROM location
whose decimal address is 9 x 4096. $ 7000
are
RAM
locations
whose
and
$6000
decimal addresses are at 7 x 4096 and 6
x 4096'> Even better the version to run at
$9000 can be parked wherever you want it:
<in RAM) so that you can save it. and then
take it to your friendly neighbourhood
EPROM burner.
The listing is pretty well documented
with its own remark statements. A brief discussion at the philosophy may be of some
help. The program looks at corresponding
bytes In the two Initial blocks of machine
code. If the bytes are the same. (test
made In line 205). It assumes that the
value of the byte is not dependent on the
address at which the code Is assembled to
run. It then puts this byte value in the
corresponding location In the code being
generated. When the program discovers a
pair of corresponding locations. in the
initial blocks of code. that contain different
byte values. It assumes that the value at
the byte Is dependent on the address at
which the code is assembled to run. In
this case it calculates the value for the
COde being generated by using a linear extrapolation. (Extrapolation done In line 210'>
Before storing the byte. it checks that It is
a legal byte value. i.e. between 0 and 255.
This is done in line 220. If the value is
not an acceptable byte it prints unresolvable byte at ......... " on tt.d printer and the
screen. This usually indicates that the byte
Is past the end of the assembled code or
is a meaningless inclusion in the code and
can be ignored.
The listing of the program in this article is set to work with two initial blocks
of code. 1400 bytes long. starting at $7000
(7 x 4096) and $7800 (7.5 x 4096). The
code produced is parked at $5000 (5 x
4096) and also runs at that location. Edit
lines 120 to 160 to handle different configurations. The program as :lhown here
was used to generate a version of code to
TORPET August 83
page 67
MACH INE LANGUAGE
run at $5000 which happened to be impossible to do with the asembler I was using.
since it landed in the middle of the source
code.
have used this program about five
times to relocate quite sizeable blocks of
code. So far It has worked 100% of the
time. One caution: The two Initial blocks of
code must be IDENTICAL in all respects
except running location. otherwise you will
get garbage.
101') REM PROGRAM NAME =DIFFRELOCATE
106 REM WRITTEN BY HAROLD ANDERSON MARCH 18,1983
110 REM THIS PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO PRODUCE A
THIRD RELOCATED VERSION OF A
111 REM PIECE OF MACHINE CODE FROM TWO BLOCKS
PROPERLY ASSEMBLED TO RUN AT
112 REM A1 AND A2
118 POKE53,64:REM LOWER TOP OF MEMORY
119 OPEN4,4
120 ,,1 =7.0"'4096+OO:REM ADDRESS OF FIRST BLOCK
130 A2=7.5*4096+00:REM ADDRESS OF SECOND BlO CK
140 AR=5*4096+00:REM ADDRESS AT WHICH MODIFIED
CODE WILL RUN
150 AP=5*4096+00:REM ADDRESS AT WHICH MODIFIED
CODE WILL BE PUT
160 LN=l400 :REM LENGTH OF BLOCK OF CODE
200 FOR X=OTO LN-l
205 BY=PEEK(Al+X):IF PEEK(A2+X)=BY THEN 225
210 BY=BY +(PEEK(A2+ X)-PEEK(A 1+X)}*(AR-A 1)/(A~A 1)
220 IF BY>=Q AND BY<=255 THEN 225
221 PRINT#4,"UNRESOLVEABLE BYTE AT X=";X
222 PRINT"UNRESOLVEABLE BYTE AT X=";X
223 BY=O
.
225 POKE(AP+X),BY
230 PRINTX: NEXT X
240 END
READY
Hardware Hacker
by
Honk Mroczkowski
DIVE! DIVE! OOOGha-OOOGha ... The VIC-20 went
·jown again. The latest price is BELC'W $100.
Specifically, the VIC was sold for $89 from two discounters this week. Now, considering that the C-64
costs less than the VIC to manufacture ($20 to 35
are popular guesses). I speculate that the C-64 will
undergo a board change to accommodate either the
VIC-20 chip set or the C-64 chip set Then Commodore only has to stuff the printed circuit board with
the appropriate parts for the model produced. Did
you follow that?
OK then, where does that put the MAX? It's
very unlikely that Commodore, who is going through
growing pains, will divert the already short supply of
the large scale integrated circuits used in the MAX
from the C-64. Nor do they have the floor space or
the personnel to spare! The MAX can't compete with
their own VIC, Atari's 400 or the TimeX/Sinclair 1000.
I'd say MAX died.
Did you just ask where I got this preposterous
Idea of redesigning a higher end product for a lower
Priced one.• why, from Commodore, of course. They
had produced the PET 4032 and the CBM 8032 until
someone discovered that It was costing S50 more to
build a computer that sold for less! Thus, the FAT-40
was born and the PET 4032 died. Commodore
redesigned both the forty column and the eighty
column machines with one common printed circuit
board. That's why you can convert your FAT-40 to an
eighty column machine. Still following?
Houston, Texas
Continuing onward, I am taking a large
presumption by ;:,ssuming that with over one million
VICs sold, Commodore won't abandon the VIC until
there aren't any more under-Sl00 computers (or
Video game machines) competing for the bottom end
ot the market Too much high quality software and
support or the VIC forbids Commodore from dropping
this little gem. That's why they have to redesign the
board, possibly use 64K dynamic RAMs which are at
least 1/2 good (Radio Shack did itl), and still support
the VIC. This would be a perfect excuse to introduce
the "32K Super-VIC" or VIC emulator for the C-64
(only if the 64 drops below S2OO!)•.or should I say
WHEN?
HIStory seems to want to repeat itself, even
when the mud on the trail behind us hasn't even
dried. Let's see what happens and ride out a most
enjoyable storm.
HACKING, my lifestyle, widens one's viewpoint to
allow tackling problems from many different angles.
One such problem is the expense of a lousy $20
tape deck selling for S75! Retailers are strapped into
this price by Commodore's low mark-up price policy.
It's a shame that the Datasette cannot be used for
any other purpose than what it had been designed
tor.data storage and retrieval. Other folks had
commented on that very same point to me and had
also said that was holding them back from investing
in a home computer too. Pitiful excuse but a valid point!
reprint from CHUG
~~%m~~~~~~~~~~~~mm~~mm~~~~~'
page 68
TORPET August 83
CLUB ACTIVITIES
TPUG Central Meeting
by
Ian A. Wright
Toronto, Onto
The last meeting for the Central Group
of TPUG for this year started with a greeting
to
.. ,"the
GREEN
SCREEN
AFICIONADOS". Mike Bonnycastle welcomed
the newcomers and explained the monthly
disk process which was well underway at
the front of the auditorium. We now have
over 200 disks in the club library. which
comes out to more tnan one program per
member. In the two days of the May Conference over 8.000 disks copies were
made! The Conference organizers under
Gord Campbell did an outstanding job.
The date for the C-64 meeting is June
14. a Tuesday. and there will be a series
ot meetings in July and August primarily
for new users of VICs and C-64s. These
meetings will be by pre-registration and
more data is to be available in the TORPET.
TRACE is one of the oldest (1976)
computer clubs in the Toronto area and
they will be presenting ·Computerfest '83"
at Harbourtront from July 8-10. Seminars,
workshops. demonstrations, and exhibits will
appeal to a wide variety of people. 19
Toronto area clubs (including TPUm will be
participating along with other Canadian
clubs and those from MACC (the Midwest
Affiliation of Computer Clubs). This sounds
like a major event in summertime computing for only $3.00 at the gate ... for more
information call Paul Swift at 626-0115/621-9941.
The
8000'th
Canadian woman!
TPUG
June 1983
member
is
a
The first annual TPUG programming
contest has been judged, and Mike explained that the process was very difficult.
The disk of program entries was released
at the May Conference, and is available
from the library. There were a large number of cassette programs and over 20
disks submitted. Many of these submissions
had more than one program on them. In
deciding the winners, Mike said that the
judges found that there were a number of
problem areas and
suggestions:
made the following
1. Lack of documentation was a major
failing of some of the programs. Listing
would prOduce the author's name. but no
explanation of the program. Mike suggested
that rem statements be added to the start
(or end)
for this
purpose.
If
written
material was submitted, the paper was
easily mislaid. and this did not provide a
reliable source of documentation. One good
program could not be used until it was
discovered that a joystick was needed.
2. Several "business-type" programs did
not work on all their functions. Updating,
revising.
rewriting
files
must all
work
reliably in an application and it is the
responsibility of the programmer to be sure
that this is the case.
3. Some games lacked a clear objective
to aim for. Adventure games. for example
need to start out easy. and get progressively harder. One game had an impossible
first move!
4. Load errors on tape. and drive errors on disk can be avoided by sending
two verified copies of each program. A
program that cannot be loaded is very difficult to assess.
5. Some programs were expansions of
existing programs. or were judged to be
re-doing material that is already available.
This is an area that is very subjective. but
originality is important.
6. Programs were submitted that could
have used a machine-language subroutine
to speed up slow actions. One was disqualified for crediting Jim Butterfield with
part of the program.
7. Many excellent programs were submitted, and the difficulty came in picking
the winners from among these.
TOAPET August 83
page 69
CLUB ACTIVITIES
Mike then demonstrated the outstanding
features of Graphic Aid 4.0 which
is
designed to provide a series of 18 extensionsto BASIC. The program is on this
month's disk along with its instructions.
Following the presentation, Richard Bradley
suggested that since the program was entirely in machine code, it did not fit the
contest requirements. Mike countered that
the program had been so well conceived
ana presented that it was worthy of its prize.
made it sound easy! Did you know that of
the 100 pins in a PET, 54 are ground? If
you want to add a 6850 UART you will
neea to know this and a great deal more.
This information Is found in the program
called "Expansion Pres· along with a listing
of the functions of the various pinouts.
Chris Bennett had just (at break!> arrived back from three days at C.E.S. the
huge
computer
show
in
the
'States.
Although he gave lots of specific informaJust before break there were a senes tion on new proaucts and prices, that is to
OT announcements. The first business meet- be covered in a separate article. Some
ing is to be on October 6th. There is in- general statements, however, were that the
formation on a variety of computer camps Cdn. prices of many Commodore products
available at the TPUG office <782-9252). have been cut by a third (e.g. 8032 &
Submissions to the various hints, helps, and 4040) and the U.S. prices by a half.
answers columns in the TORPET should be Commodore has set itself the aim to be # 1
sent c/o Ms. Bradley, P.O. Box 100 Station in software in the coming year, and there
S, Toronto M5M 4L6.
have been more changes to the B-series.
We're looking foreward to a complete
There was tood left after the oreak! report from Chris soon.
For those that remember the Central meetings of last year, this may come as a shock.
Mike Bonnycastle ended the meeting
Gord Campbell made a presentation on
how to add hardware to the PET. Although
many found this topic beyond them, Gord
with thanks to the various executive members for a very productive and enjoyable
year. See you in September.
a Ylimaki
One has to be a sailor of the I.C.'s to
fathom the VIC-64. It's even named after a
navy man, a COMMODORE. He's in charge
of a whole fleet of CHIPS.
the 6510 CHIP is sort of a c.p.U-Boat. Its maneuvers are called SUBroutines.
Doace
ttR
Da
:or~......
aao
. .
.
~~J
---- ~
"It says we've got till Monday, then it goes on strike!"
page 70
TORPET August 83
the 6566 Video Chip carries the
fleet's colours. It's a SPRITE for sore eyes!
watch
out
for
waves
around
the
~ID CHIP. Listen to Its beautlfu1 sounds but
~on't get lost In tne high C's .
- follow a CURRENT back to PORT.
Don't collide with any FLOATING numbers.
HA E A
PIC
IC
~IC-NIC The Whole
PET
Catalog
The Word Processor
designed especially
for your
VIC-20.
You will love it.
Machine language. Files
Especially useful
ompatible with WordPro,
Paperclip and Final Word.
omes on tape and works
for new VIC owners
only $10
with uM~~af1ded VIC.
In California Contact
Northern California
,f1\t~
Southern California
S. Jrlark 1.ianderbill
COMPUSOUND
~ COMPUTER BARN
SAt_INAS
(408) 757-0788
319
MAl'" ST.
West United States
SALINAS.
(202)521-8750
Eastern U.S. Call or write tor
information or to order:
VIC-NIC Word Processor $19.95
Whole PET Catalog
$10.00
Postage paid if shipped to U.S.
STALL 2
CA 93901
DONALD E. DIETZ
4620 E. Chapman Ave.
Orange. CA 92669
(714) 639-0880
(714) 639·7511
Prices quoted in U.S. dollars
TOR PET August 83
page 71
page 72
TORPET August 83
TPUG
(Toronto PET Users Group Inc.)
1912A A venue Rd.Suite 1,
Toronto, Ont. M5M 4A 1
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Information and
August/83 Library List
Attend the annual conference
Membership Fees most2. club
disks are available.
..
where
The membership fees for 12 months
have been set as follows:
Regular member (attends meetings) $30 Can.
Student member (full-time. " " ) $20 Can.
Associate (Canada) $20 Can.
Associate (U.S.A.) $20 U.S.
Associate (Overseas) $30 U.S.
3. Find a friend or dealer etc. and
copy their disks.
4. Order disks or taoes through the
mail from the club office lsee p.76).
A regular member attends monthly meetings
In the Toronto area and is the onlv tvpe
at member with voting privileges at tne annllal meeting. A student member by definition is a full-time student at a public or
high school. a community college or a
lJr'lIversny ana attenos me regular meetings
around Toronto.
In response to the many requests tram
other users groups. we now have two ways
in which other Commodore clubs can asSOCiate with TPUG.
Associate members. because of distance
and/or time restrictions. are not able to attend regular meetings. Fees are in U.S.
funds. except in Canada. where they are in
Canadian funds.
The fees for visitors attending a regular
meeting are $5 for adults and $2 for
students. Family members accompanying a
regular or student member to a meeting
pay $2 each.
All members receive 10 issues of the
TORPET annually. The TORPET (an independent
Commodore magazine published
by The Publisher) is the official magazine
at the Toronto PET Users Group.
Also. members have access to the club
ilorary at programs on disk or tape. There
are several ways of obtaining these disks
or tapes:
I. Take a blank disk to the club meetings and have that night's programs copied
onto it.
CLUB CHAPTERS
The first is to take out an associate
membership for the club at $20 per year.
In this case. the club will receive 1 issue
of the TORPET each month and the club
will have access to TPUG's library of over
3.000 programs.
The second way is to have a number
of your members join TPUG at one time
(covered by one cheque). The associate
membership fee in this case is only $15
per person. Then a copy of TORPET will
be mailed to each individual member who
will also have individual access to the
library. If 25 or more people join at one
time. then we will supply the club with one
tree monthly disk each month. This can be
either the VIC-20. the Commodore-64 or
the PET /CBM disk. If 45 or more people
jOin at the same time. then ~ free disks
are sent out. If 60 or more members are
enrolled. then all 3 monthly disks are supplied. All disks are sent Air Mail for
speedy service.
We hope that this group rate will
enable other clubs to serve their members
better. Many CIUOS are putting out tnelr own
newsletters. Each of these may have only
one very goad article written by a local
TORPET August 83
page 73
member. If. on the other hand. these articles are also sent to the TORPET all
clubs who contribute will benefit by providing a wider variety of high quality articles.
TORPET policy is that articles in the
magazine are in me puolic aomain ana can
be used by any other club for reprinting in
their own publication.
Another advantage of TPUG is the
centralized pooling of programs for all the
Commodore machines. This will result in a
much larger program library since many
gooa programs are only distributed locally
whereas the TPUG library is distributed all
over the world.
More than 350 members of the Windsor
PET Educators Group. London Commodore
users Club. Genesee County Area Pet
Users
Group
(Michigan>.
Indian
Affairs
Teachers
Using
Computers.
Michigan
Commodore 64 Users Group. Sacramento
Commodore
Computer
Club
and
the
Edmonton Commodore Users Group are
currently taking advantage of the group rate.
History of
Commodore
Commodore currently offers a highly
diversified range of microcomputers. This
was not always the case. In 1977. Commodore came out with a home computer
called the PET 2001. PET stood for Pelsonal Electronic Transactor and consisted
Of a very small calculator keyboard. a 9inch screen and a built-In cassette drive-ali in one paCkage. Also included were 8K
at RAM and a 16K BASIC in ROM. This
BASIC is now known as BASIC 1.0 or
original ROM.
Commodore
then
released
a large
keyboard PET with an external cassette.
Some small changes were made to the
BASIC to fix bugs and allow a disk drive to
be added, This BASIC is now known as
upgrade ROM or BASIC 2.0 (BASIC 3.0 in
some parts of the world>.
The next Commodore was the CBM
8032. an 80-column business compute:
with BASIC 4.0 in 20K of ROM. This improved version had some extra disk commanas aaaea ana an Improvea strtng COllection routine <garbage collect>. Along with
the CBM 8032 came the CBM 4032 compage 74
TORPET August 83
puter. a 40-column PET with BASIC 4,0 and
a 9-inch screen. A little later. the 4032
arrived with a 12-inch screen (this is now
called the FAT 40). There are subtle dlfterences between the two versions of the
4032.
mostly
with
programs
that
use
machine language. The final release of this
series is the SuperPET, an 8032 with an
additional 6809 processor. 96K and five
programming languages.
The VIC 20 was Commodore's entry
into the mass marketing of home computers. With a 22-column screen and only
5K of memory. many at us did not take it
seriously. However. now it is the largest
selling computer in the world with over one
million sold in 1982 and two million to be
sold in 1983. This machine comes with
SASIC 2.0 similar to the old 'upgrade' ROM
PETs. This means no built-in disk commands and the return of slow 'garbage
collection' .
In 1982. Commodore introduced the
Commodore 64 which. like the VIC 20.
has BASIC 2.0. but comes with a full 64K
ot RAM. Also new is the "S" series which
is Commodore's latest generation of computers. These machines contain either 128K
or 256K of RAM and an extended BASIC 4.0.
Programs that run on one machine do
not necessarily run on another. Secause of
this fact. our library has been divided into
5 sub-libraries:
·C" Commodore 64 "V· VIC-20
.p. PET/CBM
"S· SuperPET
"0" Old TPUG prior to March/83
It you wish to order disks or tapes from
our library. please make sure that the
programs you oroer are compatlole Wltn tne
macntne you own.
DISK IDENTIFICATION
The diSkS within a liorary are organized
according to a two-character code. The
first character is the CATEGORY code (8
for business. U for utility. etc.> The second
character
IS
a
sequence
number
to
~eparate all the disks in the same group.
For example. E1 is Education disk number
one. G9 is Games disk nine and GA is
Games disk ten. The L1SRARY to which a
disk belongs is indicated by a library code
in brackets. For example (C)B3 would be
the 3rd Susiness disk in the Commodore-64
library.
The Category Codes are:
A Assembler/Machine language
B Business
C Communications
o Misc. Commodore 64
E Education
G Games
L Language
N Mathematics/Science
S Music
T TPUG Monthly Releases
U Utilities
X Best of Series
Z Miscellaneous
To further document programs on disk
or tape. there are PROGRAM CODES on all
the releases since February 1983. A period
plus the program code is appended to the
Ond of each program name on the disk or
tape.
The Program Codes are:
.z All Commodore machines or unspecified
.P All PET/CBM machines
.4 40-column PET /CBM. 9" screen
.F Fat Forty. 40-column PET/CBM 12"
:Jcreen
.8 80-column CBM
.S SuperPET /S9000
.V VIC-20 program
.C C-64 program
.B B series (available soon)
.0 Data or Sequential files
.L List-Me file (one-line documentation)
.W Word processing files
/-\11
OISkS oescnDea
In tnlS
catalogue
tollow these conventions except for the
Commodore Educational disks/tapes (see p.
87),
Format of
Commodore disks
Over the last few years. CommodorE:
has released a number of disk drives for
their wide variety of computers. These include the 2040. 4040. 2031. 8050. 1540.
1541. 8250 and 2031 SL.
These drives can be divided into two
major groups. One is the 35-track. 170K
disk drive found In the 2040. 4040. 2031,
1540 and 1541.
track. 50uK disk
and 8250.
The second is the 77drive found in the 8050
The 8250 is a double-sided version of
the 8050 and the 8250 can read an 8050
disk. Since the 8250 disk takes twice as
long as the 8050 disk to format. WE ONLY
DISTRIBUTE 8050 DISKS IN THE 77- TRACK
FORMAT.
The 2040 disk drive is the original ver~ion available for the PET. It contained DOS
version 1.0. The 4040 came out next with
DOS 2.0 and uses 6 less sectors than the
2040. THIS 4040 FORMAT IS NOW THE
STANDARD WHICH WE USE IN COPYING
DISKS AND CAN BE READ BY THE 2031,
1540. 1541 AND 2031SL. However. it is
possible that some of these single disk
drives MAY not be able to WRITE programs
onto one of our disks because of a difference in timing. They should all be
read-compatible .
TAPE/DISK OF THE MONTH CLUB
There are now three libraries whlcn
have monthly additions:
VIC-20,
Commodore-64. PET/CBM
<The SuperPET library often
has a
monthly release as well.)
At each club meeting there is a copy
Gession for 4040 disks so that members
may acquire me programs demonstratea
that evening. Also included on that disk is
a selection of programs submitted by members from all around the world. (At the
VIC-20 meeting a taped version is available
10r $5.00'>
These tapes and disks of the month
may be obtained individually by members
trom the club office. To save the necessity
Of constantly having to order the current
monThly al~K/tape. memoers can order any
number of months in advance and the
disks or tapes will be sent automatically.
The request must include:
1. Whether tape or disk is desired (format Of disk)
2. Which library is desired.
3. Sufficient payment for the # of disks
or tapes ordered.
TORPET August 83
page 75
These monthly disks/tapes are coded
with a "T". The series from T1 through T J
covered meetings up to May 1982 and have
now been retired and their contents merged
into the appropriate category disks.
To
order
PET/CBM.
SuperPET
or
Commodore Educational Series tapes. check
tirst with the disk/tape listings. TWO tapes
are required for each listing unless the
listing indicates "(one tape)". Send $6.00
per tape required.
HOW TO SUBMIT PROGRAMS
Send all orders to:
Programs for the PET. CBM. VIC ana
Commodore 64 can be sent to us either
on disk or tape. It you submit a disk. it
will be returned to you containing "the disk
ot your choice" from the TPUG library. If
you submit a tape. "the tape of your
choice" will be sent. It is a good idea to
put your membership number directly on
the tape or disk you submit just in case it
gets separated from its letter or envelope.
Send all submissions to:
TORONTO PET USERS GROUP
1912A Avenue Road. Suite #1
Toronto. Ontario. Canada
M5M 4A1
TORONTO PET USERS GROUP
1912A Avenue Road. Suite #1
Toronto. Ontario. Canada
M5M 4A1
Include:
1. Membership number.
2. Return address.
3. Computer (disk drive).
4. Payment by cheque or money order.
TORPET BACK ISSUES
ORDERING INFORMATION
Disks
To order club disks by mail. send $10
for each 4040 / 2031 / 1540 / 1541 disk
and $12 for each 8050/8250 disk (payable
in advance>. This Includes the price of the
diskette. the labour involved in copying it.
and all postage and packaging charges. Do
not send us diskettes.
Tapes
To order VIC-20 or C-64 library tape~.
:.:>end $6.00 for each tape. Do not send us
tapes.
Back issues of the TORPEl are available for $2.00 each from the club office
(except for issues # 1. #2. and #3 which
are $1.00 and issues #7. #12 and #14
which are $3.50>. Our first issues were
relatively small:
# 1.#2 and
#3
4
pages: #4 - 8 pages: #5 - 16 pages.
All the rest include 24 or more pages.
As
issues
mailed
month.
will be
of July 1983. there have been 21
of the TORPET. New issues are
out about the 15th of the previous
The September 1983 Issue (#23)
sent approximately August 15th.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PET/CBM Libraries "0" and "P"
librarian - Mike Donegan. 4161632-0392
Programs for the PET
The majority of the programs currently in the "0" and "P" libraries will run on a 4O-column PET. It you read
the HISTORY OF COMMODORE in this catalogue, you will note that there are the following four different versions of
the PET:
1. PET 2001 - B.A.SIC 1.0 original ROM. This is the version of BASIC that came with the small keyboard PET in 1977.
2. PET 2001 - BASIC 2.0 upgrade ROM. The first large keyboard PET had BASIC 2.0 inside. The original PET
could be upgraded to BASIC 2.0 by changing the ROM set
J. CBM 4032 - BASIC 4.0. This version of the PET had a 9-inch screen with BASIC 4.0. Previous large keyboard
machInes can be upgraded to BASIC 4.0 from BASIC 2.0. The original small keyboard PET can not be upgraded to
BASIC 4.0.
4. CBM 4032 - FAT 40, BASIC 4.0. This version of the PET has a 12-inch screen and a slightly different version
ot BASIC 4.0. This machine also has the same screen controller as the 8032.
page 76
TORPET August 83
Most of the programs In the "0" PET library will work on all of the above machines. However, programs written
In machine language or programs with PEEKs and POKEs to the operating system, will only run on the machine for
which they are written. These special programs are divided into three groups. These are: BASIC 2.0, BASIC 4.0 and
DASIC 4.0 (FAT 40). MOST DISKS CONTAIN VERSIONS FOR EACH TYPE OF COMPUTER. The one exception is the
DEST OF TPUG series for the PET (X). X3 is only for BASIC 2 machines. X4 is only for BASIC 4 machines, X7 is only
tor BASIC 4, FAT 40 machines.
Programs on disks and tapes in the "P" library (released since February 1983) have a Program Code. A period
pius the Program Code is appended to the end of each program name on the disk. See page 75 to complete list
.~Iso,
please note that the "K" series of Commodore Education programs will all run on all BASIC 2.0 and 4.0 PETs.
Programs for the CBtJI 8032
Many of the programs in the TPUG library will run on the CHM 8032.
tor example, are available In an 8032 version. These include Basic Aid
Adventure on X5. Many of the games written for the 40-column PET can
column simulator found on Xl (CBM 4032 v2.1). Just load in CBM 4032 v2.1
screen on your 8032.
Some ot the macnlne language program.:.
(BAID480A & BAID480P) on disk Xl and
run on the 8032 but will require the 40and RUN. You now will have a 40-column
Programs that Will NOT run on the CBM 8032 include the follOWing:
1. Many of the programs written in machine language.
2. Most VIC and Commodore-64 programs.
Some good choices of disks for the 8032 include: B2,Cl,C2,G7,Nl,N2,N3.Xl.X2,X5,X6 or Zl.
v2.1
Also, please note that the "K" series of Commodore Educational programs will all run on the 8032 (CBM 4032
included with each disk).
IS
Assembler
(O)A1 - ASSEMBLER 1
;l tapes
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
COpy ALL
MAE/DOS
EXTRAMON.EXE9.0B
EXTRAMON.EXE9.0G
DOS.ASM
MAE/DOS.ASM
MLMACROS.MLlB
PET.LlB
IEEE.LlB
KEYSORTASM
SECTOR.CTL
SECTOR.PGM
SECTOR.EXE
L.C.LlSTER.ASM
PET16.ASM
PET16.MAC
UART.CT
UART.MOl
LEARNING.AIDl
LEARNINGAID2
LEARNINGAID3
LEARNINGAID4
LEARNINGAID5
LEARNINGAID6
LEARNINGAID7
UNASSEMBLER/CBM
UNASSEMBLER/MAE
CBM.TO.MAE
MAE.TO.CBM
EPROM.PRGMASM
EPROM.PRGM.EXE
EPROM.PRG M.INS
3D.PLOT.ASM
FREQ.CTRASM
UART.M02
UART.M03
EXMON.CT
EXMON.MOl
EXMON.M02
EXMON.M03
EXMON.M04
EXMON.M05
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INVENTION #5
INVENTION #8
INVENTION #11
INVENTION #14
JESU/JOY
JET PLANE
JINGLE BELLS
LE TAMBOURIN
LOVE STORY
MAPLE LEAF
MARCHE MILITAIRE
MIN.lN D
MINUTE WALTZ
MNT.GREENERY
MUSETTE
MUSIC BOX DANCER
OB-LA-DI
OCTOPUS
ORGAN FUGUE
PALINDROME
POLONAISE IN BFL
PRELUDE&FUGUE
PRISCILLA
PROMENADE
REED FLUTES
REEL
RICH MAN
SILENCE
SINFONIA
SINFONIA #1
SINFONIA #2
SINFONIA #3
SINFONIA #10
SINFONIA B FL
8KHETON ONCE
SONATA L.82
SONATA RONDO
SONATIN/J..
SPINNING SONG
SPRING SONG
STAIRWAY
STARSPGL BANNER
SYNC. CLOCK
TARENTELL/J..
TEN XMAS SNGS
THE ENTERTAINER
THREE TUNES
TWO GUITARS
VALSE TRISTE
WATER MUSIC
WEE MAN
WELL TEMPERED
WELLS FARGO
WHEN I'M 64
WONDERLAND
YAKKITY SAX
YELLOW SUB
YESTERDAY
TPUG Afonthly Releases
(onJ - JUNE 82
COPY/ALL
FILE RETRIEVER
5TH SCOTTE.lNST
5TH SCOTTE
TEDDY-APRIL82
DAISY-APRIL82
TEDDY.lNSTR
DAISY.lNSTR
TINY FORTH NOTES
TINY 4TH TCHR4.0
TlNY.PILOT.lNSTR
TlNY.PILOT.OBJ
TEDDY.RENUM
-DAVE WILLIAMS-DOUBLEPROG REL
ML STOPKEY
SEQ- >PRG/MERGE
DYNALOGIC
FUNCTION GRAPH
EQUATION SOLVER
COMPUDATE
STRUCTURE BASIC
RELATION SKETCH
RELATION GRAPH
LISTER (SUPER PEn
PHONE NUMBERS
TAPE PHONO-PHILE
DISK PHONO-PHILE
TABLE MATH
DATA GENERATOR
DISKLISTAPL (SUPER
PETl
{O}TK - SEPT 82
-BASIC 4.0 F40INVADERS 4.0
FAST INVADRS 4.0
ACROBAT F40
CAR RACE F40
MISSION IMP F40
NIGHT DRIVER F40
BACKGAMMON F40
--- SEPT 82 --DISK MASTER V2
5TH SCOTTE.I~JST
5TH SCOTTE
STRING THING
T.APE PHONO-PHILE
DISK PHONO-PHILE
PHONE NUMBERS
VIC TAPE INDEX
MASTER TAPE LlBR
WWV
WWVI
WWVII
WWV II I
WWIX
WW WORD LIST
CMPR MOSER SRCE
STRING THING 64
SUPERS PEED SORT
MARKSCALER
FIXFILE
POINTER SORT
FILE
ML DATA MAKER
WWI
WWII
WWIII
WWIV
SUPERMON64.V1
COMM64
(O}TL - OCT 82
COPY-ALL
HOL YHAL TER 2
TERMINAL.SERIAL
TERM.SERIAL
VIC KEYSORT
VIC SORT.DEMOl
VIC SORT.DEM02
RELREAD
SOUP
SPACEWAR 1
SPACEWAR 2
VIC JASPER
VIC COLOR ROOS
VIC POOKY
VIC GARFIELD
DEMONSTRATIE.HI
VIC TRSHY PIC
VIC DESIGN
VIC DESIGN 2
VIC DESIGN 3
VIC DESIGN 4
VIC VIC
DIGICLOCK
HIRESFOURIER
USA SONG
SWAP 16/32K
SWAP 8K
MOCKINGBIRD HILL
FINANCE 1.4
GASSER
TlMETABLE(8032)
BUTTERFIELD
MUSIC LESSON
MUSIC LESSON 2
40 ELEMENT QUllZ
80 ELEMENT QUill
VIC AID4.REL
VICMUSICSl201
V 76TROMBONES
V ENTERTAINER
V WONDERLAND
STRING THING 64
BRKOUT.PADL
64 MEMORY CHART
COPY-ALL64
NOS TRANSLATOR3
PACMAN
MUL THNVADERS!
C-64 VICDISKFIX
C-64 GRAPHER
64 H-R PLOT MIL
BAS&ML COMBINER
(OnM - NOV 82 PET
COPY-ALL
INSTRUCTIONS
PILOT TRANSLATOR
WATERMELON
FOOD
MAGIC SQUARE
SPREAD SHEET 40T
PRINT USING
TOR PET August 83
page 81
PRINT USING&TEST
WATCHMAN-4Q
SPREAD SHE~800T
PRNT USIN(S"" ML
SCREEN ROUTINES
BAS&ML COMBINER
QUIET AFTERNOON
Q-BACK CHALLENGE
PIZZA
CLASS ORGANIZER
CM-CSP403
CN-CSP403
CH-CSP403
CHEMDRILL2
CHEMDRILLl
BACKUPDRILL2
BACKUPDRILL 1
MULTI-INVADERS!
(O)TP - DEC 82
COPY-ALL
COSMIC FIGHTER
MUSIC INSTR
FRERE JACQUES
YANKEE DOODLE
CHRISTMAS
CHRISTMASMUSIC
CHRISTMASCODE
CHRISTMASROOT
KEYBOARD RECORD
NEW ROM MUSIC
OLD ROM MUSIC
76 TROMBONES
JINGLE BELLS
TEN XMAS SNGS
JINGLE2
BOOT
CHG LD ADDR V1.2
HEX DUMPER 80
FACE INSTRUC
FACE LOADER
FACE OBJ
FACE DRIVER
PEDIGREE CHARTS
MOVABLE FEASTS
DRAGON
DRAGON DRUGGIN
VECTOM
BIT MAP PLOT 64
BUGS 64
SPRITE MAKER 64
PI HUNT 64
PI HUNT 64.2
MULTI-DICE
FIZZBIN
FIZZBIN 8K RULES
FIZZBIN SK GAME
SPET 8050-2031
BANK SELECT 6502
PPORT COMMUN.
FACTORS.PET
FACTORS.VIC64
CONTEXT INDEXER
COLOR TEST
(O)TO - JAN 83
(O)TR - FEB 83
PUKMAN
STAR SYSTEM
N.z.aUIZ
WARLORDS INSTR
WARLORDS GAME
BLOCKADE
ALIEN BLASTER
OUTPOST -ML3
OUTPOST
TOLL BRIDGES
GERMAN(64)BOMBER
LONE(64)RANGER
DOCTOR 8032
DOCTOR.lNS
REVIVE
BUDGET
VIC.BUDGET
BOWLING
BALANCE ADD/SUB
CUBE
PGMABLE CHAR SET
CHAR DISPLAY C64
DRAW POKER C64
REVERSE C64
ENTERPRISE C64
WEAVE
CHARACTER GEN 64
PETALS ARND ROSE
DOMINOES
M.B.INSTRUCTIONS
MillE BOURNE
SPADE.INSTRUCTS
SPAQES
LABYRINTH
TOMBS C64
COPY-ALL
TAX 82 ONT Vl.0
IN VOICER
BAS-PATCH.GEN
IRQ--PATCH.GEN
~~STAICTOR.4
EAR
EYE
REACTION
HIGH a
MINEFIELD 2
STAR LANES
WORD-SEARCH
TV SATElliTES
BILLBOARD
V JIM IN COLOUR
VIC LOTTARIO
VIC REl WRITE
VIC PRG CHARS
V CHARS@$lCOO
VIC FUNCTION KEY
VIC ZIG ZAG
V ADDITION PRACT
V MULTIPLY PRACT
V SUBTRACT PRACT
V ADDRESS FILE
VIC GRAPH PLOT
VIC UXB 1
VIC UXB 2
V BACKGAMMON '"
VIC-POLY-TURTl
V ZAP
VIC CHECKBOOK
V MAILING EDlloR
V COMPLEX MATRIX
V 555 TIMER
VIC FINANCE
V LO PAS$."FILTER
VIC FREE-~All
C64 PET -SCREEN
COL.PICT.BOOT
DIANE.C64
DIANE.CDATA
VISIBLE PET
VISIBLE VIC
VISIBLE C64
fNDERA
COLOUR.PICT
DIANE.C64
DIANE.CDATA
PETLOAD 64 PRGM
EASY DLoADER
(P)TS .~ MARat 83.P
.~TODISK
BOOT:z.
WARLORDS INSTR.4
W~RLORDS GAME.4
CUBE.4
LlST-ME.L
GRADEBK-NAMES.z
GRADEBK-GRADES.Z
DP106-3.Z
SIMCAl INSTR.W
SIMCAL.Z
LOAN AMORT.S
LlST-ME2.W
HIBYTE DEMO.G
SCOPY5.S
SCOPY INSTR.8
80 COLUMN TAX.8
40 COLUMN TAX.4
COPY-ALL+.G
LIST-ME -LIST -ME
FUNCTION GRAPH.G
(P)TT - APRIL 83.P
FAST INVADERS.8
CRYPTOGRAMS.P
TURTLE.S
CBM 4032 V2.P
COPY-ALL.P
WP BUSTER/PET.P
LIST-ME APR83.W
LIST -ME-LIST -ME
DISK LOGGER.P
SUPERMON INST.P
SUPERMON1.REL.4
SUPERMON4.REL.P
SUPERMON2.REL.P
INITIALIZER
SCREEN TO WORK
CBM8010.Z
LST TRUE ASCnZ
PRINT USING.Z
IEEE WATCH 2.Z
MORTGAGE.Z
DISASSEMBlEA.P
STRING THING.Z
PROG CONVERTEA.Z
LIST -ME PTT.L
WORK AREA - CRT
STORY WRITERIV10
K
MANPLOT
MACTABlE
MUSS
BOOT KONG
8OKONGTUCK/POTT
SCREENl SAVER
255QUEST MAKER.P
PET AGENDA.4
SKI4.F
TURTLE.S
SCROLL MESSAGE.P
.6,NY WINDOW SIZ.P
AUTO DATA HEX.P
STORYWRITERV11.P
GALACTIC GT.4
EXPANSION PRES.P
GRAPHIC AID 4.P
GAID 4.P
GRAPH AID INST.P
STARS BAS PA.S
POWER SPECTRUM.P
(P)TV - JUNE 83.P
LIST-ME PTU.L
BOGGLE A.P
BOGGlEMl B.P
G 0 L F.P
TRAIN - CHIEF.P
KING.P
POGO V7.S
EPIDEMIC.4
NAMING CMPDS.4
SCHOOLMARM 255.P
PET Utilities
(O)Ul - UTILITIES 1
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
COpy ALL
AID 2.1
SUPERMON2.REL
SUPERMON4.REl
SUPERMON 1.REL
SUPERMON1 12I41NS
E:>'TRAMON9GIS1000
EXTRAMON9B@$1000
EXTRAMON INST
APPEND/RENUM.REL
ROM TEST--BTFLD
page 82
TRACE.REL(BASIC)
RA~fiEST@$500
SCREEN PRINT
UN-NEWISYS826
KEYSORT 2$7454
KEYSORT2-20EMO
KEYSORT2-1 DEMO
KEYSORT2$1C54
LOW CASE LIST
DISK APPEND
DISK MODlVl
DISK 10 CORRCTOR
DISK PEEK
VIEW BAM
TORPET August 83
BLOCK GET 1.0
BL GET @$033A
KEYPRINTIS26
DISK NAME (R)
COPYPROG
KEYMAKE
COPYDISK/SYS973
TAPE TEST #
TAPE WRITE (#)
COPVCAT!SYS934
COPYCArSYS934
.6,10 INSTR7.6
(32K)BASIC-AID
DISK LOGGER
CATALOG
SEARCH
UTINSEL.REL
AID4
COMPACTOR
CASSETTE.TO.DISK
DATAMAKER
KEYSORT.EXE16/32
KEYSORT.DEMO 1
KEYSORT.DEMO 2
KEYSOAT.EXESK
CROSS-REF
BASICAID.EXE
DISK APPEND-M.B.
PRINT USING
DISK VIEW
READ.LlNK
READ-WRITE.S/R'S
DIRACCESS.S/R'S
PORT.DISPLAY
DESCENDERS/2022
FLOPPY.DISPLAY
JOYSTICK.CTlA.
JOYSTICK.CRSRS
EXTRAMON.4.0B
EXTRAMON.4.OG
MAE/DOS FOR 4.0
USER.COOKBOOK
~
ARE YOU A
LABORATORY INTERFACES
SMART BUYER!
FOR COMPUTERS
$89.95
Por
this is a smart buyifyou'reIooking fora place
to store your computer, peripherals, and accessories without
spending a fortune.
ANAlOG AND DIGITAl ·
INPUT/OUTOUT
The BUSSter interfaces provide
ana log and digital connections
between any computer with an
lEE E-488 or RS-232 interface
and real world events. Each
BUSSter product is self-contained , with its own case and power
supply. They allow data acquisi tion while your computer is busy
with other tasks. Built-in timer
operates from .01 seconds to 48
hours.
• BUSSter A64 64 channel digital input module
to read 64 digital signals. Built- in
buffer . ... . ... . . .... .... $495.00
• BUSSter B64 64 channel digital output module
to output 64 digital signals
.
.. . .. . . . . . ......... . .. .. $495.00
• BUSSter C64 64 channel digital in put/output
module to input 32 and output 32
digital signals. Built-in buffer
... . . . .... ... . . . . . ...... $495.00
• BUSSTER D16 16 c hannel analog input module
to read up to 16 analog signals
with 8 bit resolution (114%). Built-in
buffer . .
. . . $495.00
• BUSSter D32 32 analog channel version of the
016.
. . . . ... . .. $59500
Add the suffix -G for IEEE-488
(GPIB) or -R for RS-232.
All pri ces are USA only. Prices
and specifications subject to
change without notice.
30 DAY TRIALPurchase a BUSSter product ,
use it, and if you are not completely satisfied, return it within
30 days and receive a full refund.
US Dollars Quoted
$10.00 Shipping & Handling
MASTER CARD / VISA
r~
Prices In U.S. dollars
The CS 1632 computer storage
cabinets compact yet functional
design fits almost anywhere while
housing your computer monitor.
joysticks, software, books and
peripherals all for only $89.95.
The slide out shelf puts the
computer at the right height and
position for easy comfortabl"
operation .
The fold up locking door keeps
unwanted fingers off the key
board when not in use.
To storejoysticksjust tum them
upside down and slide them into
the inverted storage rack.
Twist tabs on the back of center
panel allow for neat concealed
grouping of wires. while power
packs rest hidden behind center
panel on shelf.
The slide out software tray has room for 14 cartridges or cassettes
and up to 30 diskett"s. Most brands of software will fit between the
adjustable partitions with a convenient hook for the spare key at rear.
Stand fits Atari 400 lit 800, Commodore 64 lit VIC 20, n 99/4A
andTRS-80.
Cabinet dimensions overall 36" high x 33-7/f!/' wide x 16" deep.
Cabinet comes unassembled. Assembly requires only a screwdriver.
hammer, and a few minutes of your time.
Choice in simulated woodgrain. ofwarm golden oak or rich natural
walnut finish.
To ()rderCSl632, send $89.95 to,
P.O. Box 446 West Linn. OR W068
UJTt:I"'" For Fast Phone Orders Call
"-1 T I ~ Toll Free J..IOO.I47-3100
-11'1'4M.- Inside Oregon Call (503) 635-6667
Name _____________________________________
H
Address _____________________________
State
Zip ______
D Natural walnut finish
D My personal check, cashiers check or money order is enclosed.
D Bill my VISA #
Exp. Dat~ - - - D Bill my Mastercard #
Exp. Date - - Card Holders Signature_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
City
D Golden oak finish
Connecticut microComputer, Inc.
INSTRUMENT DIVISION
36 Del Mar Drive
Bro okfield , Ct.06804
(2 03) 775 -4595 TWX 710-456-0052
Immedial. shipmc>U if in stoell. If pcroonaI chccI< io sent. allow _
2 wccb.
Prices subjeClIO chan8c. ~ subjoCllO 0Y0iI0biIiIy. CabinoI shipped unasscrnblcd in
2 cartons. Ships UPSIrt. coIIccIFOB_ Oreton-
Prices in U.S. dollars
TORPET August 83
page 83
NEWS FLASH!
VIC-20
CBM-64
INTERESTING SOFlW ARE
GRAFDOS NOW
AVAILABLE FOR CBM-64
After a year
(If
de ..'elopment, GRAF-
DOS, an enhanced new di sk operalmg.
syste m will make life c:a~ler for
thousands of disk owners . No longer do
you have 10 use the cumbersome wedge.
GRAFOOS provides over 40 new com,
mands for both OOS and BASIC Belo ....,
IS a list of new commands
OOS COMMANDS
LOAD"flle name"
SAVE"filename"
RUN"fllename "
BLOAD"fllename"
BSA VE"fllename"
AUGUST 1983
addcd honu.... GRAFDOS
the MINI-MON, a powerful
PROTECT VOl'R INVESTMENT
WITH ATTRACTIVE DLST COVERS!
PEN P_A -L. HELPS
PROGRAMMERS
lan!!Uagl' n)(lnllnr and mlnla~'il'm bler with 20 l'olllm a nd !\~
!See
dc.,cnptlun hell'\'\' , I
The di"l a).,o cnme~ With ,ample
After in\lc:~tln~ ,evcTal hundred dollar:a , : umputr:T or dl~k dnve. pmlt'c1 II
trum harmful dU ~ 1 or Illjuid ~plll" Du,1
l"OVe r~ afe made of JUfaOie, walr:r fr:~l'­
tant . bmwn t:anva,
P.A I.
whH.'h :>.[and .. hlf Pro!!ram Iller .. Aid .. and 1..4.1g:-.. I' a rerfect comple-
Ill'Khlr.t'
pnlgra rm, and
dt'rno~
Im:ludlng a mu.,ir
generator'
rhi~
I"
a DOS that CWfY CBM-64
(lwncr .,houlJ have on eve r) d.,k'
ORDER NOW! ONLy
....... $39.95
CATalog
INIT
WATCH
OFF
STAT
CHAIN
RENAME
DELETE
BASIC COMMANDS - HIRES
PLOT
HGR
SCREEN
All
NORM
FLIP
WCHAR
DRAW
COPY
PI C
PSAVE
LORES
HUN
VLlN
KEY
"or compuler or disk
$7.95
Old slyle datasette
$5.9S
New st)le datasette ............. $5.95
MORE
BOOKS
BECOME
AV AILABLE FOR VIC-20
'-l'lectHJn lit hook .. J~ hel'(lllllng
larger wlIh "pec lal dl "C\lunt, lor \JUT l"U"
l(lrn eT"~
MINI-MONITOR
NOT SO MINI!
puwl'rlul
which i"
nOl ~o
mal'hlOe (ode mOnitor
mmi
ha~
20
0 \, 1l.
I'lun
I ~ 'I~
II~ r
KillS .'\NJ) HH VI(
\IC ~(l l 'S ER S {il :JIlt
l'nm mand~
\0 '
()i~a~~emble 65()~ code
E,amine: IllClTlllr)
Text dump
Move memory
Hunt memory for a string
Fill memory with any by Ie
HEX - DEC conver~itln
Edil code
III
I~
\1(" (jRAPHICS
J:
VIC RI'\'r, AI.H )
I
ST 1M I'L" TIN{j
SIMl iI.ATI()NS
I SI'FA K IiASI(
TO MY \i ll
')~
'j~
II
'j~
"
t>
ment
With
the
l l...cr,
and
Reference
rn,muah It prmJloe" l}.'i page .. of color
nxkJ lear-out work,heth HlI.:l udmg
REFLRENCE chart ..
CHARACTER worbhn:h
S(,Rl:J:,~ layoub
FZ (jR·\PH graph'l' aid . .
FLOW CHARTIN(j dl tb
TR;(,KS AND HINTS
rAPE CASSETfE I"g hook
BASil ' dictionary
Thl ~ I'
tor
~ lur
,un: It) h.:nlOlt' a M UST Item
prll!!ramrnc:r N.cgularly $1,1 ,95,
prH,'l' I~ onl y $7 4."
l'HT)
STELLAR TRIUMPH
~ '1~
~(I
~ '1~
t>
7~
SUPER FAST GAMES FOR
THE VIC 20
Ne" allem. ha ve ht:en f{lund in\oaJlng
of VIC' s . The) come in all
shape .. and ~1/_e~ terr{lTlnng VIC 1l\I.·ners
everywhere _ Now . you Ion. can shoot il
OUI with Ihese menaces 1
1h{lu~and~
Mim -assemhler
MISe. COMMANDS
In
OUf
A
LliR
LCOL
LPLOT
an
A"
i ndude ~
A great n~w, a ll mac hine coJe gan1l' IS
nIl"'" availaole
fnr yo ur CBM-M
Feature, exulmg h1Tt'~ l',llor graphiCS
and ~pectacular sound effect.. . A Iwo
player game wilh many ... an ali{ln~ such
a~ re ver~e gravity. oounee bat:k. speed
L'l!lllroL and more , Prepare yourself 1010
an all -ou1 "pace baltk .
From H_A.L Lahs
$X95
Ol ;R
Switch kemal to RAM
Switch BASIC 10 RAM
SOUND
HOME
TRAP
VTAB
HTAB
HIMEM
SPEED
The only thing mim In 'hi" monitor , ~
the price! VIC-20 version requires 8K
expansion
TEXT
EXIT
BASIC
CTRL-G
C ....tt. , .... , ........ .. , .......... S15.95
Disk , ... , .. ... .. ........••.. , .. , ... S19.95
SCORPION
DEADLY SKIES
GOLD FfV ER
eRA TER RAIDER
('yeLON
SIDEWINDER 11K
SWARM
GA.LA.Ci1C BUTZ
QCA.CKERS
LIST
PRICl
w'I5
1'1'15
~'1 '1 .~
.14 '1~
~'1 '1~
:14
'1_~
UI.'1~
\4'15
2'1'15
~t. _ '1~
~'1 '1_~
1'1
Q~
~'1 'I~
1'1
'1,~
2495
, ~ ~5
16.'1~
11 .'15
INTERESTING SOFTWARE
21101 S . Harvard Blvd.
Torrance, CA 9050 1
(213) 328-9422
Visa'MCiChecklMoney Order - Add 52_00
CA residents add 6'12% sales tax
Dealer inquiries invited
g~DUO
The CP Numeric Keypad is the best friendly
companion of your Commodore 64 and VIC-20.
It lets you enter the numeric data comfortably,
quickly and more correctly than ever before.
Now you can zip through your numeric work
sheet faster and more easily than ever at only
$69.95
- - Computer
--
Place
The CP VIC-20 Expander is the one you have
been waiting fOL It incorporates all the features
you've ever asked for. For '~4 95 ,the CP
VIC-20 Expander gives you: Four high quality
connector slots with keys; Gold plated contact
fingers for positive and long-lasting connection;
On board master reset button; Four convenient
ON-OFF individual slot control switches;
External power supply hook-up provision with
two-way power switch and overload fuse block_
(213) 325-4754
23914 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance, CA 90505
Dealer inquiries welcome.
Prices in U.S. dollars
Commodore 64 and VIC-20 are trademarks of Commodore Business Machines, Inc.
page 84
TORPET August 83
UTILITY 2.0
UTILITY 4.0
DEMO
LIST LT2
LIST LT2X
LIST GP2
LIST LP2
LIST LP2X
LIST LP4
INS/DEL DEMO
V40.2.B
V40.4.B
V80.4.B
TAPE.TO.DISK
RELREAD
DUMP SEa FILE
WP TO UPPER
(0)02 - UTILITIES 2
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
COPY ALL
MINI-COMPILER
TlNY.PILOT.EXE
TlNY.PILOT,INS
SUPERMON2.REL
SUPERMON4.REL
SUPERMON 1.REL
SUPERMON1/214INS
LISTER
SCREEN DUMP
TAPE GRAPH 21S
UNLIST
TAPE GRAPH# ROM
BAM MAP CBMDSK
TINY FORTH TCHR
DISC MERGE/BASIC
TINY FORTH NOTES
LOWER CASE LIST
SHIFT UP-LOW CAS
GRAPHIX INSTR
GRAPHICS-LOADER
GRAPHICS-DEMO
ERIC ASSM
8K
MICROMON,INS
BAID'xS9000@2000
BAID4,1NS
MICROMON@4096
BAID4B@S7000
MICMON4B@4096
MICMON4B9@1
BASIC AID 4
AID INSTRUCTIONS
CBM 4032
RELREAD
DISK LOGGER
UNASSEMBLER.MAE
UNASSEMBLER.CBM
KEYPRINT2
KEYPRINT4@826
DUMP2
DUMP4
LOCKSMITH
(0)U3 - unLmEs 3
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
COPY ALL
EASY EDIT/TAPE
EASY EDIT/DISK
EASY EDIT/C
PAGEl EZE EDIT
PAGE2 EZE EDIT
PAGE3 EZE EDIT
PAGE4 EZE EDIT
PAGE5 EZE EDIT
PAGE6 EZE EDIT
FAST SKIP 2022
STRINGTHING.BIN
CONTENTS
SIGNON
EXEC HELLO
HELLO
BUILD HELLO
NECCL
MXCL
CROSS REF
CRUNCH
APPLESOFT LOADER
ERIC ASSM
8K
CATALOG+6
DISK DOCUMENTER
LIST DUPLICATES
MASTER+6
MASTER+6D
SEARCH+6
STACK SNIFFER
WPRO BUSTER
.<\X-REF/SYS24576
EXTRA INSTR.
EXTRAMONSB(4)
EXTRAMONSG(4)
EXTRAMONSG(2)
EXTRAMONSB(2)
USEIZE.WP
L1TILEMON,INS.wP
CHANGE/LADR.BAS
SYMBOLlC.DISASS
INSIDE.DOS1&2
MICROMON8@S1
MICROMONB,INS+
BAID4.EXE9@4
BAID4,1NS
CRUNCH2
CRUNCH4.0
TINY MUSIC
DEC->FLOATING PT
aUADRA-PET
DEFINE PTR. CHAR
JEM,INS
JEM SYS4111%
DISK DOCTOR
LC LISTER INST
(0)U4 - UTILITIES 4
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
COPY ALL
VIA SCANNER
CASS.LABELER
VARIABLE RANDOM
KUSTOM KEY
HI MEMORY106
INSTRUCTIONS#7
WORD P DEMO
WP TAPE2058
READ WP TAPE2040
WORD COUNT S.O
WORD COUNT BASIC
IEEE VIEW
MICROMON@Sl000
MICROMON@S7000
MICROMON80@S1000
MICROMON80@$7000
BACKUP 2031 1.0
(0)U6 - UTILITIES 6
(0)U5 - UTILITIES 5
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
COPY ALL
COPY/ALL
BASIC-AID,INST 1
BASIC-AID,INST 2
BAID4F4OC
BAID4F4OA
BAID440C
BAID440A
BAID240C
BAID240A
BAID480C
BAID480A
EP4 SYS32000/1
EP4XSYS32000/1
DELETE ALL
EXTRA INSTR.
EXTRAMON9B(4)
EXTRAMON9G(4)
EXTRAMON9G(2)
EXTRAMON9B(2)
CBM 4032 V2
DIR LOADER 2.0
DIR LOADER 4.0
DIR CATALOG
DIR UPDATE
DIR PRINT
DIR MERGE
POWER MOD
TAPE-DISKIREL
MERGE 4.0 INST
MERGE 4.0
SET/RESET.REL
SET/RESET DEMO
WORD PRO TH2058
READ WP2040
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
MICROMON.INS 1
MICROMON.INS2
MICROMONADD
MICROMONC@S1000
MICROMONC@S7000
MICROMON++@$5BOO
MEMSEE.DEMO
WORD PRO PRINTER
CHANGE DISK
DISK CHECK
DISK VIEW
DISK MOD
DATABASE 2.0/4.0
UNDLOAD EASIER
DLOAD EASIER
WP LIST/SCREEN
SUPERCAT@32000
SHL -MTZ LIB V2
SHL -MTZ LIB 2.0
LIBRARY INST
SUPER1 V1.1
SHOW TOKENS
CHEEP PRINT
CHAR.SET.DEFN
STUFFIT
UNCOMPACTOR
EASY EDIT/MX-80
EASY.EDIT.MX-82
MX-82.CHAR.DEFN
MX82.PET.PRNT
VICLOAD4.REL
VICLOAD2.REL
SET-UP
MARCH6
GRAPHIC EDITOR
PRINT EDIT INFO
AUTO DISK BOOT
CBM 4032 V2.1
DATA WRITER
LOCK DISK
FLOADER
MLOADER
INS WATAID 4
F32 WATAID 4
F16 WATAID 4
S32 WATAID 4
S16 WATAID 4
8032 WATAID 4
POWAID4.RUN
POWAID2.RUN
(0)U7 - UTILITIES 7
COPY-ALL
PROCEP.EDITon
PROCEP,EXAMPLE
PROCEP.INS1.wP
PROCEP.I NS 2. WP
RELREAD
SOUP
KEYWORD
BASIC-AID,INST1
BASIC-AID.INS12
CBM EDITOR.INST
E-ROM.MON,I1
E-ROM.MON.12
POWER-AID.INST
TEDDY-APRIL82
TEDDY.INSTR
DAISY-APRIL82
DAISY.INSTH
5TH SCOTIE,INST
5TH SCOTIE
ML STOPKEY
TAPE PHONO-PHILE
DISK PHONO-PHILE
PHONE NUMBERS
MASTER TAPE L1Bn
DATABANK.31!
SUPERSPEED SORT
FIXFILE
POINTER SORT
FILE
STRING THING
SUPERMON64.V1
STRING THING 64
NOS TRANSLATOR3
TPUG Best of PET/CBM
BAID4F4OA
(0»(1 - BEST unu
TIES 1 BAID440C
BAID440A
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
BAID240C
COPY ALL
BAID240A
COPY/ALL
BAID480C
BAID4F4OC
BAID480A
BASIC-AID,INS11
BASIC-AID,INST 2
AID4
AID2
CHANGE DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
MOD
CHECK
VIEW
NAME (R)
10 CORRCTOR
PEEK
BAM MAP
.A.PP/REN24.REl
CASS.LABELER
DISK FILE RECVRY
KEYPRINT2@826
KEYPRINT 4@826
TOR PET August 83
page 85
PEn.iAN 5
JOYSTICK INV 2.0
BLOCKADE
BASEBALL 7.3
OSC LUNAR
SUPER STARTREK
STAR WARS
MASTERMIND
REVERSE-PUNTER
ARROW
BLACK BOX!
BLACK JACK
BOMBER
ROBOT CHASE!
SNAKE 2
YAHTZEE
MOVMAZE2
ADVF 29
WP3/4 INST1
PRINT USING&TEST
ADVF 31
WP3/41NST2
PRNT USING ML
.ADVS 0
SCREEN ROUTINES
.A.DVS 1
(0»(7 - BEST GAMES 4 BAS&ML COMBINER
ADVS 2
QUIET AFTERNOON
ADV93
-BASIC 4.0 F40Q-BACK CHALLENGE
ADVS 4
INVADERS 4.0
COSMIC FIGHTER
ADVS 5
FAST INVADRS 4.0
HEX DUMPER 80
ADVS 6
ACROBAT F40
FIZZBIN
.A.DV9 7
CAR RACE F40
FIZZBIN SK RULES
ADVS S
MISSION IMP F40
FIZZBIN SK GAME
ADVS S
NIGHT DRIVER F40
PUKMAN
ADV9 10
BACKGAMMON F40
STAR SYSTEM
ADV9 11
OTHELLO
WARLORDS INSTR
ADV9 12
BREAKOUT
WARLORDS GAME
,.DVS 13
ASTEROIDS
BLOCKADE
A.DV9 20
PINBALL
ALIEN BLASTER
ADV9 21
PET MAN 5
OUTPOST -ML3
(0»(4 - BEST GAMES 2 A.DV9 22
JOYSTICK INV 4.0
OUTPOST
ADVS 23
BLOCKADE
LIST -ME PXS.L
ADV9 24
BASEBALL 7.3
- - BASIC 4.0 -MINEFIELD 2
.ADV9 25
OSC LUNAR
INVADERS 4.0
SUPER STARTREK
ADV9 26
FAST INVADRS 4.0
(P)XA - BEST MIsc.P
STAR WARS
ADV9 27
ACROBAT 4.0
MASTERMIND
ADV9 28
CAR RACE 4.0
VISIBLE PET
REVERSE-PUNTER
ADV9 29
MISSION IMP 4.0
TOLL BRIDGES
ARROW
ADV9 31
NIGHT DRIVER 4.0
STAR LANES
BLACK BOX!
ADVKEYS
BACKGAMMON 4.0
TV SATELLITES
BLACK JACK
ADVSHOR
OTHELLO
BILLBOARD
BOMBER
ADVSHS
BREAKOUT
DOCTOR 8032
ROBOT CHASE!
ADVMAP
ASTEROIDS
DOCTOR.lNS
SNAKE 2
ADVITM
PINBALL
BOWLING
YAHTZEE
ADVENTURE
PETMAN 5
SIMCAL INSTR.W
MOVMAZE2
JOYSTICK INV 4.0
ADVENTURE80
SIMCAL.Z
(0)X2 - BEST UT1LITIES BLOCKADE
QUEST 3.0
LOAN AMORT.S
(P)X8 - BEST MISC.P
OHARE'S #3
2 BASEBALL 7.3
SCOPYS.S
SUPERMON4.REL
OSC LUNAR
SCOPY INSTR.8
(0»(6 - BEST MISC 1 INVADERS 4.4
SUPERMON 2.REL
SUPER STARTREK
FAST INVADERS.S
FAST
INVADRS
4.4
SUPERMON 1.REL
STAR WARS
CRYPTOGRAMS.P
ACROBAT.F
EASY EDITIT APE
SUPERMON 1/214INS
MASTERMIND
TURTLE.S
CAR RACE.F
EASY EDIT/DISK
EXTRAMON4@$7000
REVERSE-PUNTER
CBM 4032 V2.P
MISSION IMP.F
EASY EDIT/C
EXTRAMON4@$1000
ARROW
WP BUSTER/PET.P
NIGHT DRIVER.F
EASY EDIT/MX-SO
EXTRAMON2@$7000
BLACK BOX!
DISK LOGGER.P
BACKGAMMON.F
EASY.EDIT.MX-S2
EXTRAMON2@$l000
BLACK JACK
SUPERMON INST.P
DISK
MASTER
V2.P
PAGE 1 EZE EDIT
EXTRAMON.lNS9.3
BOMBER
SUPERMON 1.REL.4
STH SCOTTE-INST.
MICROMONC@$l000
PAGE2 EZE EDIT
ROBOT CHASE!
SUPERMON4.REL.P
STH SCOTTE.P
MICROMONC@$7000
PAGE3 EZE EDIT
SNAKE 2
SUPERMON 2.REL.P
ML
STOPKEY.P
MICROMON++@$SBOO
PAGE4 EZE EDIT
YAHTZEE
MORTGAGE.Z
TAPE
PHONPHILE.P
PAGES EZE EDIT
MICROMON.lNSl
MOVMAZE2
DISASSEMBLER.P
DISK
PHONPHILE.P
PAGE6 EZE EDIT
MICROMON.lNS2
PROG CONVERTER.Z
PHONE NUMBERS.P
(0»(5 - BEST GAMES 3 WORD PRO TH2058
MICROMONADD
STORYWRITRIV10.P
WWV.8
0 • • onlY
TINYMON1 FOR VIC
READ WP2040
LIST-ME PAAL
WWVI.S
ADVBOOT
TINYMON INST
HI MEMORY106
WWVII.8
.ADVF 0
SUPER VICMON 2
INSTRUCTIONS#7
(P»(B - BEST EDUC.P
WWVIII.S
ADVF 1
WORD P DEMO
SK
WWIX.S
ADVF 2
ERIC ASSM
WP TAPE205S
SCREEN PRINT
WW WORD LlST.D
ADVF 3
UNASSEMBLER.MAE
READ WP TAPE2040
FILE MAKER
WWl.4
.A.DVF
4
UNASSEMBLER.CBM3
TAX Sl ONT V1.0
A
WWII.4
ADVF 5
DATA WRITER
GRAPH.PRINTER
B
WWIII.4
.A.DVF 6
WP LIST/SCREEN
GRAPHIX INSTR
C
WWIV.4
,.DVF 7
GRAPHICS-LOADER
D
SUPERSPEED SORT.
(0»(3 - BEST GAMES 1 ".DVF S
GRAPHICS-DEMO
E
LIST-ME
PXS.L
,.DVF 9
MAIL LIST 4040
F
NOS TRANSLATOR3
mVF 10
-- BASIC 2.0 -4040 UPDATE
H
FINANCE 1.4
ADVF 11
INVADERS 2.0
4040 FORMAT
I
MUSIC
LESSON
FAST INVADRS 2.0
ADVF 12
4040 PRINT
J
MUSIC LESSON 2
ADVF 13
.A.CROBAT 2.0
4040 MENU
K
.A.DVF 20
MAIL LIST S050
CAR RACE 2.0
L
(P))(9 - BEST MIsc.P
ADVF 21
8050 FORMAT
MISSION IMP 2.0
M
,.DVF 22
8050 UPDATE
NIGHT DRIVER 2.0
N
COPY-ALL
.ADVF
23
8050 MENU
BACKGAMMON 2.0
0
MUL THNVADERS!
ADVF 24
8050 PRINT
OTHELLO
P
WATERMELON
ADVF 25
V4O.2.B
BREAKOUT
Q
SPREAD SHEET 40T
ADVF 26
V4O.4.B
R
ASTEROIDS
SPREAD SHEET80DT
mVF 27
V80.4.B
S
PINBALL
PRINT
USING
mVF 28
E.G SET-UP SOCOL
T
TAPE.TO.DISK
X-REF 24S76.ML
WORD COUNT S
DISK MASTER V2
DELETE ALL
CP4 SYS3200011
CP4XSYS32000/1
VICLOAD4.REL
VICLOAD2.REL
VIC WEDGE
BACKUP 2031 1.0
SET-UP
.A.UTO DISK BOOT
CBM 4032 V2.1
WORD PRO PRINTER
WP LIST/SCREEN
DATA WRITER
LOCKDISK
LOWCASE LIST V3
UN-NEW /SYSS26
COPYCAnSYSS34
COPYCAT'SYS934
COMPACTOR
UNCOMPACTOR
CROSS-REF
DISK APPEND-M.B.
DUMP2ISYSS26
DUMP4/SYSS26
STRINGTHING.BIN
WPRO BUSTER
UTILITY 2.0
UTILITY 4.0
DEMO
page 86
TORPET August 83
FilE MAKER II
HIGH WRIST
lOW WRIST
SHIFT LOCK
U
v
W
x
~'{;lN
y
fI:
1
$ SIGN
% SIGN
NUMBERS 1-5
NUMBERS 6-0
EACH NUMERAL
ALPHA PROGRESS
SCREEN
HOME ROW
ALL ROWS
G
FLASH
DUM 3.4
KEYBOARDING
COVER
LIST -ME PXB.L
Miscellaneous
{O)Z1 - MISC PROG
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
KALEIDOSCOPE
SCRAMBLE-BTTRFlD
PATTERN MAKER
MYSTERY-BUTTRFlD
PEOPle
MAZE
PET CHARACTERS
NIGHTMARE
SCAN
PHUZZY & WHUZZY
DISPLAY LEITERS
DRAGON
LOVE
HAllOWE'EN
ABACUS
CANARY
FORMAT
CALENDAR-LOWNDES
HALLOWE'EN 2
CARTOON!
HEART DRIVER
MELODY CHANGES
BAA.GRAPH.AL1
CALENDARAL T
SNOOPY.DANCING
DARTH.VADEA.PIC
ETCH-A-SKETCH
SCRAMBLED.MSG
JULIAN CALENDER
GRAPH.PRINTER
PATTERNS
CASCADE
BIG LETTEn ADS
GRAPHIX INSTR
GRAPHICS-LOADER
GRAPHICS-DEMO
ONELINE SQUIGGLE
MEMORY CALENDAR2
CANNAT.o\
MEMO CALENDAR
CANBAL&MISSY.SOl
MEMORY MONITOR
TIMES SQUARE
BASIC.HUMOROUS
{O)Z2 - MISC 2
UNIVERSAL WEDGE
GRAPHICS
GRAPH SUBS
E-ROM DEMO
TWENTY QUESTIONS
WOTAG
RECIPE
SAUCE
INSULTER
GRAPHIX SORl
PEARL HARBOR
CLOCK
CLOCK 8032
PHONE SOUNDS
PI DEMO 8032
SCROLL DEMO
FINE-PLOT DEMO
BANNER/R
NEW LOTI,A.RIO
ESf'
WORLD CLOCK
SCUBA ADVENTRUE
MEMOCAL 2.2
Contest
(P) CONTEST
GRAPHIC AID 4.0
I3AID 4.0
DOS HEX DUMPER
DOS DISSASSEM.
DISK HEX DUMPER
orts
CHANGE LOAD ADD.
HEADER CHANGER
GAID PROG#l.PAl
GAID PROG#2.PAL
GRAPHIC AID.lNST
I WRIGH1------PITS!
SCOTT ALLAN---SAFARI
QUEST
MAZE MAN
TRIPLE YAHTZEE
INTERCEPTOR
MISSILE COMMAND
CENTURION
I.IL fR.A. .ZAP
ESCAPE
W LEWANIAK----LIBRARY OVERDUE
LIB TEACH EDIT
L1BTCH 821S2
LIB MARCH 16
R GERRARD------
PIRATE ADVENTURE
STOCK TICKER
G SCHWARTZ----sEMI
sEMI DOCUMENT.
F ROSENTHAL --CYCLE!
............................................
..
Commodore Educational Software
(works on PET and C-64)
In September of 1982, TPUG received from Commodore Canada, a series of 642 educational programs. These'
programs are stored on 50 diskettes and are Identlhed, In our library by a three-character 10 starting with the letter
K.
These programs are a subset of those worked on by the school boards in the Metro Toronto area. Many of them
are updated versions of programs already in our library. ALL these programs have been modified to work on the following computers:
rET 2001 (BASIC 2.0), PET 4000 (BASIC 2.0 OR 4.0, 9 and 12-inch screens) CBM 8032 (use CBM 4032 v2) and
the Commodore 64. The documentation for all of these programs is in rORPET #14 (S3.50 from the office).
Oy the Fall, Commodore Canada will have upgraded and enlarged the series by one third, so unless you are in
a hurry to get a specific disk, it might be advantageous to wait until then.
KAA - ADMINISTRATION EXAM 2.C2
FIGHT.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
GRADES.C2
ANALYSIS 1.C2
LETTER.C2
ANALYSIS 2.C2
MARKS.C2
ANSWER BOX.C2
MRK STATS.C2
BONDS.C2
NOTES.C2
SEX ED.C2
DOG.C2
KBA - BUSINESS
CBM 4032 V2.1
ACCOUNTING.C2
AMORT'N TABLE.C2
BONDS.C2
BUDGETACCOUNT.C2
CALENDAR.C2
CREDIT UNION.C2
DATES.C2
DEPRECIATION.C2
FlFO.C2
GROSS PAY.C2
HISTORY QUIZ.C2
ICE CREAM.C2
INVESTMENTS.C2
LEMONADE.C2
LIFE TABLES.C2
KB8 - BUSINESS
1 fIIpe
caM ,4032 V2.1
MARKET.C2
MONEY FLOW.C2
TORPET August 83
page
87
MORTGAGEC2
OBJECTlVE1.1.C2
PORTFOLlO.C2
SCHOOL-MARM.C2
SlMULATlON.C2
STOCK MARKET2.C2
TAX ONT81V1.C2
KCA - COMPUTER
SCIENCE
CBM 4032 V2.1
BIG BINARY,C2
COMMANDS,C2
COMP, CONCEPT.C2
COMPUTING,C2
DISK CMD.C2
DISK L1STER.C2
FEATURES QUlZ.C2
GRAPH SUBROUT,C2
HEX DEC,C2
HEX DEMO,C2
HISTORY QUlZ,C2
HYPO, AUTO,C2
KEYBOARD.C2
PLOTTING.C2
PRGM, LlSTER.C2
KEC - ENGLISH
KEG - ENGUSH
CBM 4032 V2.1
MM ADVBFORMS2.C2
MM CRCOMP.C2
MM DARK WOOD.C2
MM HOMONYMS,C2
MM LADVF,C2
MM MUGS 2WM,C2
MM MUGS WM,C2
MM PUNCTUAT'N.C2
MM SADSTORY 2.C2
MM SHARE TIME,C2
MM VB FORMS 1,C2
MM VB FORMS 2.C2
MM VB FORMS 3,C2
MM VB FORMS 4,C2
MM VB FORMS 5.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
SPELL MEAN 7.C2
SPELLING BEE2.C2
SPELLlNGTUTOA.C2
SWAP NEW ROM,C2
SYLLABLE,C2
SYNONYMS,C2
T-HYPHEN,C2
T-SPELL.C2
THEWORDMARKET,C2
TWENTY QUEST,C2
TWO TO TOO,C2
UNSCRAMBLE.C2
VOCAB.C2
VOCABULARY 3.C2
KED - ENGLISH
KCB - COMPUTER
1 tape
SCIENCE
CBM 4032 V2.1
RND GENERATOR.C2
SIMULATION,C2
SOUND SUB.C2
STRINGS,C2
TURTLE 1.C2
TURTLE 2.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
MM VB FORMS 6,C2
MM VB FORMS 7.C2
MM VB FORMS 8.C2
MM VB FORMS 9,C2
MM WORD MEANS,C2
NEW TACHISTO,C2
NOUNS,C2
P'BLEM P'NOUN,C2
PARTS SPEECH,C2
PETPITPATPOT,C2
PLURALS,C2
PRGM. LlSTER.C2
READ LEV&EVAL.C2
READER.C2
REMEMBERING,C2
KEA - ENGUSH
1 tape
KEE - ENGLISH
CBM 4032 V2.1
A OR AN.C2
A STORY,C2
ALPHA BETTER.C2
ALPHABETIZING,C2
ANTONYMS.C2
.A.PHORISMS,C2
B'BALL MADLlB.C2
COMP, POETRY,C2
CONC. WORDS.C2
CONCENTRATION.C2
DEFMATCH,C2
ENG. MONSTER.C2
FLASHER.C2
GRAMMAR 1,C2
HAIKU,C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
RHYMECONC,C2
RHYMING.C2
ROMEO&JULlET,C2
S'PG ERRORS 4,C2
S'PG ERRORS 5.C2
S'PG ERRORS 6.C2
S'PG ERRORS 8.C2
S-HYPHEN,C2
S-SPELL.C2
SCHOOL -MARM,C2
SCRAMBLE 4,C2
SCRAMBLE 5,C2
SCRAMBLE 6,C2
SCRAMBLE 7,C2
SCRAMBLE 8,C2
KEB - ENGUSH
KEF - ENGLISH
CBM 4032 V2.1
HANGMAN 2.C2
HANGMAN 1.C2
HANGMAN 3.C2
HOMOCONC.C2
IN IT DIGRAPH.C2
JOTTO,C2
LETTER SQUARE.C2
LETTER.C2
MACBETH QUlZ,C2
MADLlB,C2
MATCHING,C2
MEDIAL VOWELS,C2
MISSPELLING 5.C2
MISSPELLING 6.C2
MM 2LADVF.C2
page 88
CBM 4032 V2.1
SHAKESPEARE a.C2
SNOWYDAYNOUNS,C2
SPD SPELLING2.C2
SPD SPELLlNG3,C2
SPD SPELLlNG4,C2
SPD SPELlING5,C2
SPD SPELLlNG6.C2
SPD SPELLlNG7,C2
SPD SPELLlNG8,C2
SPEED READ 2.C2
SPELL MEAN 5.C2
SPEll. MEAN 6.C2
TORPET August 83
KEH - ENGLISH
1 tape
CBM 4032 V2.1
VOCABULARY 4,C2
VOWEL MAGIC.C2
WORD GAME,C2
WORD HUNT,C2
WORD LADDER.C2
WORD POWER.C2
WORD SEARCH 1.C2
KFA - FRANCAIS
CBM 4032 V2.1
DATES,C2
fA. SENTENCES,C2
FRENCH AID #1,C2
FRENCH AID #2.C2
FRENCH DRILL,C2
FRENCH FWC,C2
FRENCH QUIZ,C2
FRENCH TEST,C2
FRENCH VERBS,C2
FRENCH VERBS .C2
MELI-MELO.C2
SERlE 1,C2
SCHOOL -MARM,C2
KGA - GAMES
CBM 4032 V2.1
.A. BLOCKC2
A-MAZING,C2
ABSTRACT,C2
ACCELERATION,C2
.A.FO,C2
,b,PPAREIL JET.C2
.b,RROW!,C2
ARTILLERY.C2
,b,TARI n,C2
BAGEL.C2
BATTLESHIP.C2
BIORHYTHM,C2
BLACK BOX,C2
BLACKJACKE.C2
BREAKOUT,C2
KGB - GAMES
CBM 4032 V2.1
CHASE.C2
CIVIL BATTLES.C2
CRAPS.C2
CRAZY BALLOON.C2
CYLON BATTLE.C2
DAM BUSTERS.C2
DUCK SHOOT.C2
ENGGAME2.C2
FLECHE.C2
FOX AND HOUND.C2
FROG RACE.C2
GAME 4.C2
GOLlWOG.C2
GUNNER 2.C2
HAMLET.C2
KGC - GAMES
CBM 4032 V2.1
HAMURABI.C2
HANGMAN 1,C2
HANGMAN 3.C2
HANGMAN 2.C2
HANG MATH 1.C2
HANG MATH 2.C2
HELLO,C2
HI-a.C2
IN ORDEA.C2
JOTTO.C2
LAKES-ENG,C2
LE PERDU,C2
LOGIBLOCKS,C2
MAGIC SQUARE.C2
MASTER MIND1,C2
KGD - GAMES
CBM 4032 V2.1
MASTERMIND2.C2
MASTERMIND3.C2
MATCHES,C2
METEOR.C2
MISSION IMPOS,C2
MOUSE MAZE,C2
MUGWUMPS.C2
PETALS & ROSE.C2
PICTURES,C2
PIZZA.C2
PLANET PROBE.C2
PONG,C2
PUB SILLINESS,C2
PUZZLE.C2
KGE - GAMES
CBM 4032 V2.1
RAGING ROBOTS.C2
ROAD TRACKC2
ROTATE 1.C2
SNAKES,C2
SNARKC2
SNERD,C2
SNOOPY,C2
SPACE PILOT.C2
SPACE WEIGHTS.C2
STARTREK 2.C2
STARWARS,C2
STARTREK.C2
STARTREK IV.C2
SUPERDRAWLC2
KGF - GAMES
1 tape
CBM 4032 V2.1
TlC-TAC-PRO.C2
TORP BOMBER.C2
TOWER.C2
TURTLE 1.C2
TURTLE 2.C2
rwENTY QUEST,C2
UP THE LADDER.C2
WAREHOUSE.C2
WESTWARD HO.C2
YELLOW LlGHT,C2
KHA - HISTORY
1 tape
CBM 4032 V2.1
ANCIENT HIST.C2
ELECTION.C2
FAMOUS PEOPLE.C2
HISTORY QUIZ,C2
MEDIEVAL HIST,C2
MODERN HISTOR.C2
PRESIDENT QUIZC2
TREND LlNE,C2
WORLD WAR II,C2
WORLD WARS,C2
KMA - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
.A.DD DRILL.C2
.A.DD & SUB,C2
.A,OPITION RACE,C2
.A.DDITION,C2
ADDS AND SUBS,C2
AGENT BLOTTO,C2
.A.LG, VECTORS,C2
AMORT'N TABLE,C2
ANALYSIS 1,C2
ANAL YSIS 2.C2
.A.NKOVA.C2
AN OVA.C 2
ARITHMETIC,C2
.A.RTILLERTY.C2
.A.STERIOD ADD.C2
KMB - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
.A.UTO ADD TCHR.C2
B,T,C. ADD,C2
B.T.C, DECIML,C2
B,T,C. DIVIDE.C2
B,T.C, FRAC.C2
B,T,C. MUL T,C2
B.T,C, PERCNT,C2
BAIRSTOW NTH,C2
BALANCE.C2
BASE CHANGE,C2
BASIC STATIST.C2
BATTLESHIP.C2
BEADS IN A JA.C2
BIG ADD,C2
BIG BINARY,C2
BIG DIVIDE,C2
KMC - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
BIG MULTIPLY,C2
BIG SUBTRACT,C2
BIGTIME,C2
BINOMIAL DRIL.C2
BODMAS,C2
BOMB ADD,C2
BONDS.C2
BRAIN CRANE X.C2
BRAIN CRANE +,C2
BRAIN CRANE -.C2
BRAIN CRANE I.C2
CAR RACE MUL T.C2
CHANGEMAKER.C2
CHOICES.C2
KMD - MATHEMATICS
KMH - MATHEMATICS
KML - MATHEMATICS
KMT - MISCELLANEOUS KSC - SCIENCE
CBM 4032 V2.1
CLOCK.C2
CO-ORDINATES .C2
COLLECTERM 1.C2
COLLECTERM 2.C2
COUNT 1 TO 10.C2
COUNT TEN.C2
COUNT-FIVE.C2
CURVE FIT 2.C2
DART.C2
DATES.C2
DECOMPOSITION.C2
DEPRECIATION.C2
DERIV POL Y.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
INTEGERS.C2
INTEGRATION.C2
INTERSECT L1N.C2
IQ TEST.C2
LADDER MUL T.C2
LAST BOTILE.C2
LAZER MATH.C2
LIMIT CIRCLE.C2
L1MITS.C2
LINE GRAPH.C2
LINE OF BEST.C2
LINEAR EQUAC2
LINEAR SYS.C2
LONG DIVISION.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
PRIME-FACT.C2
PRIME NUMBER.C2
PROBABILlTY.C2
PROJ-PLOT.C2
QUIZ ADD.C2
QUIZ MUL T.C2
R-PLOT.C2
RATE 4.C2
REDUCING FRAC.C2
RESULTANTS.C2
ROLLS TIL ONE.C2
ROMAN NUMERAL.C2
ROOT FINDER.C2
ROOTS QUIZ.C2
SAUCER MUL T.C2
SC-NOTATION.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
L1FESTYLES.C2
METEOR.C2
REFLEX TIMER.C2
STADIUM QUIZ.C2
MM ADVBFORMS1.C2
KME - MATHEMATICS
KMI - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
DICE THROW.C2
DIVISION DRIL.C2
DRILL SI.C2
DRILl.C2
DRILLS.C2
ELLIPSE-TRANS.C2
ENGGAME.C2
EQN MANIPULAT.C2
EQUAIONS 1.C2
EQUATIONS 2.C2
EXPONENT MUL T.C2
EXPONENTS.C2
FACTEUR.C2
FACTOR TRINO .C2
FACTOR TRINOM.C2
KMF - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
FACTOR WHOLES.C2
FACTORS.C2
FAST MATH.C2
FLIP PROBLEM.C2
FOIL PRACTICE
FRAC ESTISOUN.C2
FRACTION GAME
FUN MACHINE.C2
FUNC PlOT.C2
FUNCTION PlOT.C2
GAUSS REDUCT.C2
GEOMETRY.C2
GEOMETRYTERMS.C2
GRAPH PLOT.C2
GRAPHIQUE1.C2
KMG - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
GUNNER.C2
HANGMATH.C2
HANGMATH 2.C2
HEXDEC.C2
HI-GALC.C2
HI-LO.C2
HOW LONG.C2
HOW MANY.C2
HURKlE.C2
HYPERBOLAC2
INT. ADD FAST.C2
INTEGER & DEC.C2
INTEGER ADD.C2
INTEGER ARITH.C2
INTEGER L1NES.C2
CBM - 4032 V2.1
MAGIC SQUARE.C2
MAKING CHANGE.C2
MATH DICE.C2
MATH DRILL.C2
MATHPACK.C2
MATH QUIZ.C2
MATH TUTOR.C2
MATRIX.C2
METER READING.C2
METRIC(ECCO).C2
METRIC CON.C2
METRIC.C2
KMJ - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
MICROMATH +-.C2
MICROMATH.C2
MISSING NUMBR.C2
MIXED NUMBERS.C2
MLA ARITH.C2
MONOMIAL MUL T.C2
MONSTER MUlT.C2
MORTAGE.C2
MUNCHKIN MULT.C2
NUM RECOGNTN.C2
NUMBER GUE5S.C2
OPERATIONS.C2
ORDERED PAIR.C2
PARABOLAC2
KMK - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
PERCENT DRILL.C2
PERCENT.C2
PERIMETERS.C2
PI CALCULATOR.C2
PIZZAC2
PLACE VAlUE#4.C2
PLANES.C2
PLOT.C2
PlOTIING.C2
POINTS.C2
POLAR COOR.C2
POLICE SUBT.C2
POLY PLOT BAS.C2
POL YGON SECT.C2
POWER-FACT.C2
1 tape
KMM - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
SHAPES.C2
SIEVE.C2
SIG-DIGITS.C2
SIGNIFCNT DIG.C2
SIMEQ. SOL VER.C2
SIMPLE SUBST.C2
SINE GRAPH.C2
SKIER.C2
SLOPE AND INT.C2
SLOPEIINTERCT.C2
SMALL MATH.C2
SNOOPY.C2
ST LINE PlOT.C2
5TATISTICS.C2
SUBTRACTION.C 2
KMN - MATHEMATICS
CBM 4032 V2.1
TABLES.C2
TIC TAC PET.C2
TIMES TABLE.C2
TlMES.C2
TRANSLATION.C2
TREASURE ADD.C2
TRI. SOL VING.C2
TRI.CLASS-ANG.C2
TRIANGlES.C2
TRINOMIAL FAC.C2
UP THE LADDER.C2
VECTOR.C2
VERNIER SCALE.C2
ZERO IN.C2
KRA - GEOGRAPHY
CBM 4032 V2.1
ASIAC2
CANADA QUIZ.C2
CANADA.C2
CAPIT ALS.C2
CO-ORO DIST.C2
ENGLAND MAP.C2
FRENCH TOPICS.C2
GEOG TEST.C2
GEOG.C2'
GEOGRAPH QUIZ.C2
GEOGRAPHY.C2
ITALIAN QUIZ.C2
.~FRICA &
KRB - GEOGRAPHY
CBM 4032 V2.1
ELEMENT.C2
ELEMENTS.C2
ENERGY.C2
ENV. PROFILE.C2
ENZYME.C2
EQUATIONS.C2
EQUIVALENTS.C2
FAMILY.C2
FISHERY.C2
FORCE CONV.C2
FOURIER PLOT.C2
FUSE.C2
GAS EQUATIONS.C2
GEIGERCOUNTER.C2
KSD - SCIENCE
KSA - SCIENCE
CBM 4032 V2.1
GRAVITY QUIZ.C2
HALF L1FE.C2
HARMONICDSPL Y.C2
HEAT SOLVER.C2
INORG CHEM.C2
INTERFERENCE.C2
ION.C2
KINEMATICS.C2
LOCKEY.C2
MALARIAC2
MARBLE STAT.C2
METER READING.C2
METER READ.C2
METRIC VOLUME.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
KSE - SCIENCE
1
tape
CBM 4032 V2.1
KOPPEN.C2
LAKES-ENG.C2
MILEAGE.C2
MILEAGE .C2
NORTH EAST.C2
OCEAN QUIZ.C2
SLOPE(G EOG).C2
STATES & CAP.C2
STATES & REG.C2
WORLD CAPTALS.C2
.'~CCELERATION.C2
ACTINIUM DECAC2
AVORM.C2
AZIMUTH & Al T.C2
B..\LANCE CHEM.C2
BALLISTICS.C2
BERNIE TOWER.C2
BOHR ATOM.C2
BOYLE'S lAW.C2
BUOYANCY.C2
CAl MOMENTUM.C2
CASCADE.C2
CHARGE.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
MICROSCOPY.C2
MITOSIS.C2
MOLAR.C2
MOLECULE RACE.C2
MOLECULES 2.C2
MOlECUlES.C2
MOMENTUM II.C2
MOTION PROB.C2
MOTORCYJUMP.C2
MUL TIMICRO.C2
MUTANT.C2
KSB - SCIENCE
KSF - SCIENCE
KMS - MISCELLANEOUS CBM 4032 V2.1
CBM 4032 V2.1
A OR AN.C2
BILINGUALSPEL.C2
FINGERSPELL.C2
LATIN 123.C2
SWAP NEW ROM.C2
SWEDISH QUIZ.C2
COMPOSE.C2
MUSIC THEORY.C2
PETUNIA INST.C2
EXPECTANCY.C2
HAMURABI.C2
CHILD ABUSE.C2
HOCKEY aUIZ.C2
CHEM 12.C2
CHEM EQUAC2
CHEMIST QUIZ.C2
CHEMIST.C2
CIRCUITS.C2
COMPOUNDS 1.C2
COMPOUNDS 2.C2
CYLINDERS.C2
DEFECT.C2
E.M.T.C2
ELECTRICAL PR.C2
ELECTRO MAG 2.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
NICHE.C2
NOMENCLATURE.C2
OHM2.C2
PEND 1.C2
PEND 2.C2
PERCENT.C2
PERIODIC PROB.C2
PERIODIC TABL.C2
PET NCL REACT.C2
PH PROBLEMS.C2
PHOTEL.C2
PHOTOSYNTHES.C2
TORPET August 83
page 89
KSG - SCIENCE
KSH - SCIENCE
CBM 4032 V2.1
POLLUTION.C2
RATE 4.C2
REFLEX TIMER.C2
REG PWR SUP.C2
REMDL NOMENCL.C2
RESISTORS.C2
RESOLV'N TIME.C2
RESONANCE.C2
RUTHERFORD.C2
SC-NOTATION.C2
SHEILD EXPT.C2
CBM 4032 V2.1
S.1. CONV.C2
SIG-DIGITS.C2
SMPLEPENDULUM.C2
SPECIFIC HEAT.C2
STOICH .C2
TEMP. CONVERT.C2
TITRATION.C2
TWENTY QUEST.C2
USPOP.C2
VERNIER SCALE.C2
WATER II.C2
WAVES 3.C2
WEATHER MAN.C2
YOUNG.C2
KTA - TECHNOLOGY
CBM 4032 V2.1
BIG OHM'S LAW.C2
CIRCUIT 1.C2
CIRCUIT 3.C2
CIRCUIT 4.C2
CIRCUITS.C2
DFW RESIST.C2
DRIVER EDUCAT.C2
ELECTRICAL PR.C2
FUSE.C2
METER READ.C2
MORSE CODE.C2
MORSE.C2
OHM2.C!
PHOTO LOG.C2
KTB - TECHNOLOGY
1 tape
CBM 4032 V2.1
RESIST TEST V.C2
RESISTORS.C2
SIMULATION.C2
KUA - UnLmES
CBM 4032 V2.1
ANALYSIS 1.C2
ANALYSIS 2.C2
BAIRSTOW NTH.C2
CHECK DISKC2
COPY 0 FILES.C2
DISK L1STER.C2
DUM 5.0.C2
FEATURES QUIZ.C2
GRAPH PRINT.C2
GRAPH SUBRTN.C2
HOME ENERGY.C2
PLOT.C2
PRGM. L1STER.C2
......................................... 0 0 .. ,
Commodore 64 Library
librarians - David & Richard Bradley. 782-8900" 782-7320
The following disks and tapes are specifically for the C-64. In March, 1983, we started releasing a monthly C-6~
disk and tape to COinCide with our monthly C-64 meetings. Though the C-64 has been available for only a short
time, the program library is building quickly. See p.75 tor the complete list of disk and program codes.
NOTE Only ONE TAPE is required for each C-64 listmg.
All 50 disks of the K-series (see Commodore Educational disks and tapes p. 87) work on the C-64. Also the
Best of TPUG disk X5 will run on a C-64 equipped with a disk drive. NOTE: The K-series is being upgraded anc
expanded this summer-- more details in September.
Contest
o
(C) CONTEST
D CAMPBELL----LIGHT CYCLES 64!
FRANCIS-----VOYAGER VI
40 RADIUS
60 RADIUS
SPHERE.l
10 DEGREES
20 DEGREES
30 DEGREES
45 DEGREES
60 DEGREES
70 DEGREES
80 DEGREES
90 DEGREES
120 RADIUS
150 RADIUS
180 RADIUS
ET.PLOT
GLOBE
Dealer/Demos
(C)01 - C64 DEALER
DISK
C64 CDN DEMO
BOUNCE
SPRITEDATA
SOUND11.'
SOUND/RING MOD.1
SOUND/PHASE.1
COLOUR TEST
DEMO.BOOT
DEMO.COOD
DEM013
DEMO.GUTS1
C64-8023P.BAS
C64-8023P.B
KAREN
SUPERMON64.V1
SAMPLE SPRITES
SPRITE INSTR.
CHAR BOOT
CHAR EDITOR
ROTATE.DATA
STAN DAR D.SET
CHAR INSTR.
COMPUTER.SET 5
NUCLEAR DEMO
DEMO.COOO
BYTS AND BITES
BYTSPRITES
C64/REV3
BOUNCE
SPRITE.DATA
SOUND11
SOUND/RING MOD
COLOUR TEST
C64.MENU
(C)D2 - COMMODORE 64 DISK BACKUP
SPRITE BOOT
SPRITE EDITOR
SCROLL.DATA
page 90
TORPET August 83
(C)03 - 64 DEMOES
C64.MENU
aOOT.UKl
800T.UK2
OOS BOOT
COPY/64
1541 BACKUP
DIRECTORY
JACK
DEMO.GUTS1
DEM013
DEMO.COOO
DOS 5.1
BAR CHART
DEMO FIN
BOOT 2
SPRITES
SCROL
KEY
HUFO
MUSIC2
MUSIC
MATH
LAND
DEMO
BOOT.CLYDE
MONOPOLE
MAZE
CHAR DISPLAY.C
DRAW POKER.C
REVERSE.C
ENTERPRISE.C
OOMINOES.C
MILLE BOURNE.C
SPADE.lNSTRUCT.C
SPADES.C
LABYRINTH.C
TOMBS.C
TAX 82 ONT Vl.0.C
(C)D4 C 64 PROGRAMS INVOICER.C
CONSTRICTOR.C
LIST-ME D4.L
EXPANDER.C
STRING THING.C
COPY-ALL.C
BIT MAP PLOT.C
BUGS.C
SPRITE MAKER.C
PI HUNT.C
VISIBLE.C
FACTORS.C
GERMAN BOMBER.C
LONE RANGER.C
Education
(C)El - TllTORIALS.C
LIST ME (C)El.L
PONZO TUTOR-l.C
PONZO TUTOR-2.C
PONZO TUTOR-3.C
PONZO
PONZO
PONZO
PONZO
TUTOR-4.C
TUTOR-S.C
TUTOR-6.C
TUTOR-7.C
(C)E2 - TUTORIALS.C
LIST ME (C)E2L
SPRITES TUT-l.C
SPRITES TUT -2C
GRAPHIC TUT-l.C
GRAPHIC TUT-2C
Games
(C)Gl - PICTURES 1.C FIG3
MOUND2
LIST-ME CG1.L
EYES
CONT.LDR.ML
FRIENDS
HI RES LOADER
SINCOS2
SCREEN
SATELLITE
GONT.LDR.PAL
DONALD. DUCK
SPIRAL.l
VM.THINGS
SUE
SESAME.ST
KAREN
NUDE.REV
SNOOPY
VIS.ROSETIE
.o\LBERT
(C)G3 - EMULATOR
DOLLAR
1 tape
GAMES 1
DIP
PET EMULATe.
SNAIL
L1ST-ME.L
DES.l
OSC LUNAR
7-3HILL
STAR WARS
MUSIC
STAR TREK
MAP
LUNAR LANDER 1
DIANE
LUNAR LANDER 2
WILLY
SUPER STAR TREK
RACCOON
ELIZA
SINCOS1
KLINGON CAPTURE
WATCH
EASY DUNGEON
WINSTON
PLANET PROBE
MICROMETER
AFO WITH SOUND
NUDE
ATARI II
STAR WARS TRANIN
(C)G2 - PICTURES 2C DEEPS PACE
LIST-ME CG 2L
CONT.LDR.ML
HI RES LOADER
SCREEN
CONT.LDR.PAL
SQUEEZE
rEX
HOPALONG
GUY
FIGl
FIG2
4HILL5
XMAS. CARD.1
HANGMAN 2
HANG MATH
MATH IQ
ANDROID NIM
REVERSE
3D TlC-TAC-TOE
NIM
BAGELS
REVERSE #S
BINGO
BAGELSX2
STARS
MASTERMIND
CRYPTO
KENO
MAGIC SQUARE
BLACK JACK 2
BLACK JACK 3
SOLITAIRE
(C)G6 - EMULATOR
GAMES 4
OTHELLO
TaKER
KENTUCKY DERBY
RACETRACK
CHECKERS 1
CHECKERS 2
MOTORCYCLE
PETALS ARND ROSE
CHASE ROBOT
SNAKES
TARGET
(C)G5 - EMULATOR
GO-MOKU
GAMES 3 ROULETIE
PET EMULATOR
AWARI
LlST-ME.L
LIFE WAR
BRAIN STRAIN
FLIGHT SIMULATOR
PIGS
BLACK BOX
CRAPS ODDS
BOMBER
LETIER 15
PRO FOOTBALL
CONCENTRATION
SKI
FAMOUS PHRASES
PINBALL
GUESS IT
DUCKSHOOT
TIC-TAC-TOE
JOTIO
(C)G7 - EMULATOR
HORSE RACE
(C)G4 - EMULATOR
GAMES 5
GAMES 2 ARROW
PET EMULATOR
POKER
PET EMULATOR
LIST ME.L
L'EFLECTION
LIST-ME
STOCK
BATILESHIPS
HUNTER SATELLITE
CRAZY 8'S
BREAKOUT
STARBASE&UFO
KILLER BUNNIES
ROBOT CHASE
SPACES HOOTER
FAWLTY
DAMBUSTERS
SUPERLANDER
CARD SNAP
LABYRINTH
C.C.STARWARS INS
DEPTH CHARGE
BOWLING
C.C.STARWAR
CARDS UTILITY
BLACK
JACK
1
HANGMAN 1
GRUNGY TOWERS
(C)81 - MUSIC/SOUND YESTERDAY.C
1.C
BACH DUET.C
LIST-ME CS1.L
ORGAN.C
THE KANON.C
DIXIE.C
BACH FUGUE
TWINKLE.C
ENTERTAINER.C
YANKEE.C
BREAKOUT
DRAW.POKER
SUBMARINE!
BILLIARDS!
CLUE
DRAGON.MAZE!
GUNNER
DICE. PIG
OSERO
(C)G8 - EMULATOR
GAMES 6
PET EMULATOR
LIST ME.L
YAHTZEE
BOWLING
BLACKJACKAL T
HORSES
BRIDGE BID TRAIN
SO LITAIRE POKER
WUMPUS.ALT
SLOTS/JACKPOT
TREES
KNIGHT.TOUR.SOL
ARTILLERY TRAP
CHECKERS.AL T
BASKETBALL
MUGWUMP
SINNERS
GOLF
Music
GUNFIRE.C
PONG.C
RAYGUN.C
SIREN.C
.A.LIEN.C
BELL.C
BOMB.C
CLAP.C
PIANO.C
TORPET August 83
page 91
Monthly Releases
(C)TS - TPUG MARCH
sac
LIST-ME CTS.l
MONTANAC
MONOPOlE.C
LABYRINTH.C
PIANO.C
DISKVIEW.C
SPRITE-BOOT.C
+SCROll.C
+SPRITE ED.C
DOS.BOOT.C
+DOS 5.1.C
+DOS.lNST.l
COPY-ALL.C
1541 BACKUP.C
SUPERMONV1.l.C
SPRITE MANIP.C
TERMINAL.C
TERM.C
•
..
.en
...
(c}n - TPUG APRIL
'83
LIST ME cn.l
PONZO TUTOR-l.C
PONZO TUTOR-2.C
PONZO TUTOR-3,C
PONZO TUTOR-4.C
PROG CONVERT.C
PADDL TEST.C
PRNT PADDLES.C
TERMINAL DOC.C
LlSTER.C
1525 CHAR.EDIT.C
KAT $ MOUSE.C
CLlFFY.C
MIN2.INS.C
MINOTON 2.C
TIME VEN INST.C
TIM VEN SETUP.C
TIME ADVENTURE.C
rte
de
de
de
(C}1V - TPUG JUNE
(C)TU - TPUG MAY
'83.C
LIST ME CTU.L
PONZO TUTOR-5.C
PONZO TUTOR-6.C
PONZO TUTOR-7.C
BACH FUGUE.C
eNTERTAINER.C
TERMINAL.S4.2.C
TERM,64.C
NIGHTMARE PARK.C
WHEEL FORTUNE.C
YESTERDAY.C
C-64 GRAPHER.C
64 H-R PLOT MIL
BLACKJACKC
BIRTHDAY.C
TWIN BAGELS.C
SUBMARINES.C
lefts
..
...
de
LIST-ME (C)TV.l 83.C
SLiDESHOW.C
HRSUPP.D
HRSUPP/BASIC.C
HRSUPP.SRC.C
HRTEST.C
DRAGON.D
TANKD
POLlSH.D
BLiTHER.D
UNCLE.D
GLOCKENFLUTE.D
RATRUN.C
SPACE NIM.C
BIO-COMPAT.C
BIO-PLOTER.C
BIO-PRINTER.C
HANGMAN.C
eM
Cs
...
de
P<. STORY.C
SUPERMON.C
SUPERMON INST.C
SOUND HELPER.C
sb
. .
..,
de.
VIC 20 Library
Librarian - Craig Bonner, 4161663-4025
The following disks and tapes are specifically for the VIC 20. Please see p.7S tor complete list of codes.
NOTE: Some VIC programs require an 8K/16K/3K memory expander (as indicated). others require the Super
Expander (coded SX) for the music and graphic commands. Only ONE TAPE is required for each VIC listing.
Contest
M CONTEST
FALLING STAR
THE HELICOPTER
HEll. PART 2.
FORT. HUNT.lNST.
FORTUNE HUNTER
UXB PART 1
MINER-SK-INTRO
MINER-8K-GAME
SKI MEET
CANADIAN MORTGAG
STAR DESTROYER
VIC ARTIST
MATHOFF
POKER! INSTRNS
UXB PART 2
MINESLIDE
SUB-SINK,INST
SUB-SINKMAIN
INDEX
VIC TEXT EDITOR
VIC-DATA BASE
VIC SPIRAL
U.RZON BASE
SNAKES & LADDERS
PLOW BY NUMBER
DIANE'S NUMBERS
• TYPING TUTOR
MARSTON CITY
LUNAR LANDER
MUSIC
MUSIC - J.B.
POKER - VIC
VIC ALARM CLOCK
LABEL MAKER V3
Demos
V3 - VIC DEMOS 1
MERRY VIC-MAS
VIC SOUND DEMO
FRERE JACQUES
GRAPHICS+SOUND
DEMO
SOUNDS
VIC KEY
GRAPH DEMO
GRAPHDEMl
GRAPHDEM3
VIC-DEMO
GENERAL DEMO
VIC-KALEIDOSCOPE
LIGHT SHOW
KALEIDOSCOPE
COLOUR BARS
VIC SIL. NITE
HIRES PLOT
CIRKELDEMO
MIAUW
BUMBLEBEE
ROBOTS
MOSAIC
KAL EI DOSCOOP
SNOOPY HIRES
HIRES DEMO 1
SOUND DEMO
KEYBOARD DEMO
MORSE
BIRDS DEMO
PIANO
DRAGON
GRAPHIC DEMO 1
HANDIC DEM03
CUMMODORE SYMBOL
LOG & LOGO
HI-RES CLOCK
CALCULART
VIC CLOCK
VIC LISSAJOUS
CANADIAN FLAG
KINETIC ART
TRIG PLOl
BAR GRAPH
V6 - VIC DEMO 2
VIC JASPER
VIC COLOR ROOS
VIC POOKY
VIC GARFIELD
DEMONSTRATIE.HI
VIC TRSHY PIC
VIC DESIGN
Education
MEl - EDUCATION.V
-LIST-ME (V) ElVICABl SK.V
VlCAB2 SKV
page 92
VICAB3 SKV
VICAB4 SKV
VI CABS SKV
ARITH CHALLENG.V
MATH SKILLS.V
TORPET August 83
GLOBE QUIZ.V
VIC HANGMAN.V
ALPHA COMMAND.V
VIC DESIGN 2
VIC DESIGN 3
VIC DESIGN 4
VIC VIC
DIGICLOCK
HIRESFOURIER
USA SONG
Games
ROCKET COMM.A.ND
INVADERS
ARTILLERY
DAM BUSTERS
DEPTH CHARGE
MASTERMIND
OTHELLO
CHECKERS
RACE
,A.RROW
GRAND PRIX
PINBALL
STAR CHASER
SAMU
TRAP
BLACKJACK
BUSH TRAIL
UFO
KILLER COMET
LUNAR LANDER
BREAKOUT
RUGBY
MUKADE
DEFLECTION
VIC SNAKE
DRM BREAKOUT
STAR WARS
DRAGON MAZE
FOREST DRIVER
MAANLANDER
TANK-UFO
CAR RACE
,A.AROW 2
RIJTEST
BARRICADE
MEMORY
SCHUIFSPEL
REACTION TEST
LONG DIVISION
BANDIT 1
FIRING TANK
PING PONG
BIORHYTHM
PISTOLEN PAULTJE
VIC FREIGHTER
VICBREAK/PADL
MOONLANDER
V4 - VIC GAMES 2
BRKOUT.PADL
MINIATURE GOLF
TANK VS UFO JOY
SPACEWAR 1
SPACEWAR 2
TANK VS UFO KEY
SHOOTER JOY
VIC CHASE JOY
VIC CHASE KEY
BREAKOUT KEY
STEAL MONEY
PING-PONG
SUPEREVERSE VIC
VIC 3 OF KIND
WALL DESTROY VIC
CHUCKALUCK VIC
LETIERSQUARES
VIC SQUIGGLE
SLO VIC MAN KEYS
MASTERMIND
CRAZY BALLOON
ALIEN WASTER
ASTEROIDS
OUTPOST
Monthly Releases
MTN -
NOVl82 VIC
COPY-ALL
MINIATURE GOLF
TANK VS UFO JOY
TANK VS UFO KEY
SHOOTER JOY
VIC CHASE JOY
VIC CHASE KEY
BREAKOUT KEY
STEAL MONEY
PING-PONG
SUPEREVERSE VIC
VIC 3 OF KIND
WALL DESTROY VIC
CHUCKALUCK VIC
LETIERSQUARES
VIC SQUIGGLE
SLO VICMAN KEYB
MASTERMIND
CRAZY BALLOON
,A.LIEN WASTER
ASTEROIDS
VIC MAIL
OUTPOST
BUDGET
SEPT 30 RANDOM
WORDPRO 2
VICTERM
CAT
WIZZACALC
DISKMEM B-RR1
DISKMEM INSTR.
VICWORD
VIC CONTROL KYBD
VIC TRIANGULATOR
JOYSTICK TEST
V7 - VIC DEC/82
GUESSING GAME
WORD HUNT 8K
VIC TAPE INDEX
VIC KEYSORT
VIC SORT.DEMOl
VIC SORT.DEM02
VIC JASPER SX
VIC COLOR ROOS S
VIC POOKY SX
VIC GARFIELD SX
DEMO.HI SX
VIC TRSHY PIC SX
VIC DESIGN SX
VIC DESIGN 2 SX
VIC DESIGN 3 SX
VIC DESIGN 4 SX
VIC VIC
DIGICLOCK
VIC AID4.REL
VICMUSICSl20l
V 76TROMBONES
V ENTERTAINER
V WONDERLAND
OUTPOST -LOAD
OUTPOST
VB - VIC FEBl83
VIC DT
ZAPEM
MALE-CHASE
GUESS THE NUMBER
HIRES INSTR.
HIRES HARDCOPY1
HIRES HARDCOPY2
HIRES HIC DEMO
CUSTOM CARDS
V JIM IN COLOUR
VIC LOTIARIC
TURTLE BOOT DISK
TURTLE BOOT TAPE
PLOT ML
TURTLE PROTO
TL]FOTI
TL]STAR
VIC FUNCTION KEY
V-TERM 5K INST
V-TERM SK
MTS TPUG MAR
sav
VIC SLOTS
V TAX 82 ON Vl.0
V TAX PART 2
V TAX PART 3
V 8K TAX 82
V RHINO
V 8K-LOAD
V SK VICABl
V 8K VICAB3
V 8K VICAB4
V 8K VICABS
V BOMBER PILOT
V PAINT BY PEN
V CHINESE C'BOOK
V THUNDERBIRD
V ARITH CHALLENG
V NOTONE
V DRUM MANIA
V VICAB2
V BUSINESS DEMO
----LIST ME---MTT -TPUG APR
sav
2 JOYSTICK VIC.V
AIR GUNNERS.V
?7????QQoo
SCROLLING INST.V
SCROLLlNG.V
LABEL MAKER 8K.V
VIC DT
MAKE-A-SKETCH.V
HIDDEN MAZE JOY.V
SNAKE.V
..6,UTO L1NE#.V
MATH SKILLS.V
LOAN PROJECT.V
LOTIO.V
CAR COSTS.V
CALENDEA.V
NIM.V
GRUNGY TOWERS 8K
GOLDRUSH.V
(V)TV -TPUG JUNE 83.V
LIST-ME VTV.L
DRIVE DISM
CROWN 3D
CALCULATE BASE.V
ALPHA. SORTEA.V
METRIC CONVERT.V
DATE FORMATER.V
SPEED READING.V
ENROL LIST 8K.V
MTU ·TPUG MAY/83.V VISION TEST.V
LONG DIVISION.V
LIST-ME VTU.V
ONE ARM BANDIT.V
DR DEMENTIA IN.V
TARGET SHOT.V
DR DEMENTlA.V
STARSHIP 3K.V
MORTGAGE.Z
PING/PONG(T).V
PRINT USING.Z
STATE CAPITAL.V
ASTRO WARS.V
USA SONG.V
DYNAMITE!.V
BRAIN WARP.V
GLOBE QUIZ.V
VIC HANGMAN.V
VIC X/O'S 8K.V
VIC EDITYPE 8K.V
TINY PLAN SK.V
A.B. SPEEDWAY.V
VIC G.I.A. INS.V
VIC G.I.A.V
CAR RACE(T)3K. V
.A,LPHA. COMMAND.V
VIC PILOT 3K.V
OVER THE R'BQW.V
G REENSLEEVES.V
ZIPPITYDOO-DA.V
VIC ORGAN.V
TPUG Best of VIC 20
MX1 - BEST UTILV
-LIST-ME (V) X1VIC AID4.REL.V
HIRES INSTR.V
HIRES HADCOPY1.V
HIRES HRDCOPY2.V
HIRES H/C DEMO.V
CUSTOM CARDS.V
TURTLE BOOT DISK
TURTLE BOOT TAPE
PLOT ML
TURTLE PROTO
TL]FOTT
TL]STAR
FUNCTION KEY.V
TERM 5K INST.V
TERMINAL 5K.V
VIC DT
CATALOG.V
VICWORD
JOYSTICK TEST.V
LABEL MAKER 8K.V
TINYMON1 FOR VIC
TlNYMON INST
VIC DIS1
VIC DIS2
VIC DIS3
DISASM
SUPER VICMON2
TORPET August 83
page 93
(V)X2 - BEST MUSIC.V
-LIST-ME (V) X2OVER THE R'BOW.V
GREENSLEEVES.V
ZIPPITYDOO-DAV
MERRY VIC-MAS
FRERE JACQUES
VIC KEY
VIC SIL. NITE
BUMBLEBEE
PIANO
VIC ORGAN.V
V DRUM MANIA
VICMUSICO 1201
V 76TROMBONES
V ENTERTAINER
V WONDERLAND
USA SONG
Utilities
V2 - VIC UTILITIES 1
TINYMON1 FOR VIC
TlNYMON INST
PROGRAMBLE CHAR
VIC CHAR GENR
VIC CHAR DEMO
BUTTERFIELD DEMO
HISTOGRAM
VICLOAD4.REL
VICLOAD2.REL
BASICODE READ
BASICODE SEND
.A.DDRESSES
VIC 0181
VIC 0182
VIC 0183
DISASM
DIR
VIEW BAM
DISPLAY T&8
CHECK DISK
PERFORMANCE TEST
SEQUENTIAL FiLE
"7" . . ... .., .., . .
aCe
RANDOM FILE
VIC WEDGE
SUPER VICMON2
V5 - VIC UTll 2
TERMINAL.SERIAL
TERM.SERIAL
VIC KEYSORT
VIC SORT.DEMOl
VIC SORT.DEM02
de
...
aCe
...
VICWORD
VIC CONTROL KYBD
VIC TRIANGULATOR
JOYSTICK TEST
VIC AID4.REL
VIC MAIL
VIC TAPE INDEX
BUDGET
SEPT 30 RANDOM
VICTERM
CAT
WIZZACALC
..,
de
... , de
DISKMEM B-RRl
DISKMEM INSTR.
..
zh
. .
...
aM
SuperPet Library
Librarian - Gerry Gold. 4161225-8760
It you own a CBM 8096 or a SuperPet, you can use the disks designed for the CBM 8032 in the "0" and "P"
libraries, (see p. n) as well as those list~d. below.. When using programs for the 4O-column PET in conjunction with
program CBM 4032 v2.1, you Will have difficulty with the programs activated by the number pad On the SuperP t
.
e
and CBM 8096, the equivalent keys may be anywhere on the keyboard.
NOTE: The following listings are not available on tap€:.
(8)Tl - 8P-APLS
(8)T2 - SPASMIBASI
BYTEAPR81 PAL94
SCANS
ETlMAR79PAGE24
HELP
TUTORIAL
PUBLICATIONS
BYTEOCT80PAL92
BYTEJUL81PA331
APLINDEX
APL.EXAMPLESl
APL.EXAMPLES2
APL.EXAMPLES3
".PL.FILES
APL.DOS
".PL.MASTERMIND
WSCREATE
WSCONV.APLOLD
DFCONV.APLOLD
SEP27
PRINT
PERT
MATRIX
APL.PLOT
riLES-WATERLOO
MNEMONICS
DIRECTIVES
DEVELOPMENT
DISASASM
DISAS.CMD
CRTASM
CRT.B09
DISAS.B09
CRT.LlST
DISAS.LSI
DISAP.MAP
DISAS.MOD
DISAS.EXP
SCREEN DUMP
GET-KEYBOARD
SCREEN-DUMP
PLOT -8300P.WP
PLOT-8300P
CHECKSUMS
CHECKSUM-RESULTS
SMOOTH. OAT
PRINT.FILE
page 94
,FTN.S
TORPET August 83
RESAMPLE.FTN
PERIODIC.FT N
REGRESSION.FTN
PERIODOGRAM.FTN
SPECTRUM.FTN
INTEGRATION.FTN
(S)13 - SP.EDS4P
APLSORT
MASTERAPL
UTILITYAPL
STATSAPL
PRIMESAPL
TELECOMMAPL
".PLCOPY
RAPL
SPETRS232
APL -ARTICLE-E
TOTALCOBOL
FORTRAN PLOT
PRIMEFORTRAN
REALDIRECT
IMAGDIRECT
(S)14 - SP 3/83.S
ASTRO
DRIVER
SCRAMBLE
START
BAlDS
EDIT9
MENU9
MMON9
BAlD INSTRUCTION
MICHOMON INS
APL CHARS
LlSTER.BAS
QUICKSORT.BAS
KNIGHTS-TOUR.BAS
CONCENTRATE.BAS
BLACK-JACK
TlC-TAC-TOE
FIBASM
FIB.CMD
FliIB.BOS
FIB.MOD
TREESORT.PAS
HANOI.PAS
FIB.PAS
FACT. PAS
DIRECTORYASM
DIRECTORY.CMD
DIRECTORY.LST
DIRECTORY.80S
DIRECTORY.MAP
DIRECTORY
DIRECTORY.EXP
OIRECTORY.INS.WP
SUPERCAT@32000
DIRECTORY.MOD
INSANE
CLASSIFIED ADS
5 Cents per word, with $1.00 Mintmum.
Payment in advance to:
TORPET CLASSIFIED
P.O. Box 100
Station "S" Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5M 4L6
-----------------------------------FOR SALE
--------------------------------------PET <1032 (321< w/FAT 40 and Sound Interface) 404<'
Dual Disk Drive, 4022 P Dot Matrix printer, plus all' cables
manuals. All in excellent condition. $2700. Call Neil,
(416)789-4511,days; 636-8927, evenings.
--------------------------------~------
1525 VIC GRAPHIC PAINTER for VIC or C-64. Like new,
$375. or best offer. 'Phone Bob Scott, (519) 756-9362 or
(519) 471-3328.
VIC-2OI64 DIGITIZER and GRAPHICS TABLET witr:
lS"X2O" drawing board. Connect THE HELPING HAND to
t~e game port and use It to draw or to trace trom paper
directly onto your screen. A friendly alternative to the
keyboard, the Helping Hand is more versatile than a joystick or paddles, and is a powerful mate for the VIC Super
Expander cartridge. Two programmable function keys are
mounted directly on the drawing board, so you can carry
out additional operations like clearing the screen without
uSing the keyboard. Includes demonstration programs, and
IS shipped in eay-to-assemble form (no soldering). $39.95
plu.- $6.00 shiPPing and handling trom Persimmon
I"eri~herals, Route 2, Box 2306A- TO.Clayton, GA 30525.
CBM 8032 with Waterloo BASIC Chip. Next to branc
new.WiII not sell separately. Asking $2100.or any
reasonable price. 'Phone (in Toronto (41S)686-1868 between 9 - 5) ) or write Todd Wright. RR#l, ASHBURN,
Ontario, CANADA LOB lAO.
Commodore Business System CBM 8032, CBM 8050,
CBM 4022, BPI General Ledger, Paperclip Word Processor.
Excellent condition with cables and manuals. David Fitkin
1428-29th. Sl,N.E. CEDAR RAPIDS, IA 52402, (319)3631298. COmplete system $2995.
I HAVE A NEW BABY. AND GOTTA SELL THIS STUFF!
McTerm software, ROM, and PET to modem cable:
$l25.(cost me $195.). BPI General Ledger and Accounts
Receivable:S400.(cost me S6OO.). Interlink Mail-Er mailing
list software: $50.Ccost me $95.). Edco Soft-Rom (save roms
to disk and then be able to use more than one rom in
AOOO or 9000): $2!i.(cost me $35.). All software is on the
onglnal disk, used only to make a working back-up. Call
me at home (616) 471-5759, and use your VISA or
MASTERCARD, or write to; Ric Bermele, 7:14 Cherry Sl,
BERRIEN SPRINGS, MI 49103, U.SA and enclose a money
order. Canadian funds are ok.
2 DOUBLE MUPETS - OLD MUPET system - $l00.eac!:.
Sieg Deleu, President, Kobetek Systems Limited. 1113
Commercial St, NEW MINAS, N.S., CANADA B4N 3ES,
(902)678-9800.
Commodore 8032 computer with 2031 single disk drive,
Manuals, including "Programming the PET/Com", cable and
dust cover included. $1700. Call Roy at (41S)247-9791.
PET 3JOl Series 8K, plus 1SK Expanded. Skyles 24 Pm
updated BASIC, # signs Skyles big Keyboard. BASIC
I"rogrammers' Tool kit (PLLO Alto IC'S) Number 2 cassette
recorder. 2022 Tractor Feed Printer and 1/2 box paper
$1500. U. S. Will ship to border town; you get from there.
Call (714)683-7027, RIVERSIDE, CA
VIC 20 and Commodore 64 educational software
designed by teachers and tested by kids. Send for FREE
CATALOG. One example is ALGEBRA The program teaches
a method of solving AXB=C for X, and then gives a quiz.
5K
VIC
$6.95,
64
$8.95,
Shipping
$1.50.
.~THENA
SOFTWARE, 727 Swarthmore Dr., Dept T,
NEWARK, DE 19711 U.SA
SuperPET.List from APt. on the 8023p printer APL functions complete with all the special APL symbols, print APL
results, secondary addresses, printer commands for enhanced inverse, etc. Send $29.95 for 8050 disk to J. Bos,
187 Dufferin Ave.. Brantford, Ont, CANADA N3T 4R4.
"Commodore 8032 CBM - 90 days old and Commoaore
4040 90 days old disk drive for sale - $3000 for both some software available at extra cost. TELEPHONE CHUCK
(514)683-8440 or 683-2291 day or night."
WANTED
Software: Inventory Control System with "point of sale:
format" for a retail store. The system is required for a
PET 4032 with 4040 Disk and 4022 Printer. Contact Jim
Clefstad, Box 154, Mackenzie, B.C. VOJ 2CO
Has anyone seen or heard trom Dr. Daley? Has anyone
experienced and solved problems with Dr. Daley's Mail List
version A4 or newer? We invite correspondence in an eftort to retain the utility of this versatile software. Call collect (201) 658-3133 or write L. K. Shick, Stampsoft, P.O.
Dox 125, Pluckemin, NJ 07978.(1)
CREAT1VE PROGRAMMERS! Original VIC 20 and (;orr.modore 64 programs required by new software company.
I"rograms of all kinds may be submitted on tape or 1541
disk with documentation and stamped, self-addressed
mailer to: The Cintechs Company, P.O. Box 2220, Station
A, LONDON, Ontario CANADA NSA 4C3. All submissions
Will be answered.
Learn the power of your C-64 Sid Chip! "Sounde:-"
gives a menu-driven, easily used control of all functions.
$11.95 Tape, $12.95 Disc from: Superior Shores Software,
Inc.,P.O. Box 323, Grand Marais, MI 49839
One Word Pro 4 Plus complete package, hardly used,
$320. Call John Irvine or Joe Di Trapani at Bishop Ryan
High School 166 Queenston Road, Hamilton, Ont 5472125. After 6P.M. call 388-5020."
"FOR
SALE":
COMMODORE
8032
microcomputer
and
0050 dual disk drive (one megabyte capacity). like new.
$2500.00 for the pair. Will not sell separately. Write CS
Design Inc. Box 602. Waterl60, Ontario, N2J 488."(1)
---------------------------------------
TORPET August 83
page 95
Are you a C-64 owner in need ot AID? Well, we've got
one for you. The C-64 programmers aid package adds 6
DOS wedge commands. (>@ / \ ) A simple extended M.L.
mOnitor (:;RMGXLSFTHDP,A) plus 27 other additional
programs and system management commands (Find, Change, PET, SETUP, COLOR SCREEN, DUMP, CONVERT,
APPEND) to name only a few. RTC Link compatible. If you
are Interested In learning more about this program, send
$1.00 (refundable on purchase) to G.A. Walter, General
Delivery, Proton Station, Ontario, Canada, NOC 1LO. if from
outside Canada, send U.S. funds. Or if you want to get AID
fight away, send $40.00 check or money order.
CATALOGS
PET/CBM ADDS-ON FREE CATALOG. ECX COMPUTEr:
COMPANY has over 20 new add on circuits and software
tor your PET/CBM computer and peripherals. For a FREE
CATALOG, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to
ECX COMPUTER COMPANY, 2678 North Main Str.. Walnut
Creek, California, 94596
Advertisers Index
ACCOlade Gomput8f' ProcJucts .•••••••.•••••.•••. l!4
Apropos Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . .12
Beacon Software . . • • • • • • • . • • . . . • • • • • . . . • . . ••62
Cintechs •.••••.•••••••.•....••••••..••• • .50
Compu Sense •• • • . . . . • • • • • . . • • • • .19.23.26.38.47.59
Compuaound ••••.••.•..••...•.•••••.•••..••71
page 96
TORPET August 63
Computer Bam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Computer Place ............................84
Computerville •.•.••••...••••••........••..•61
ComStar •.••...••..•••..•••••••••.••.••••19
Connecticut microComputer ....................83
CURSOR ••••.••••••••••••••.•••••.••••.••50
Des-Soft ..••....•.•••...•.•.••....•..•••• 6
Education Circuit . • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • . • .43
Electronics 2001 ............................37
French Silk .•.••.•....•.••••••••••.•.•24,216.47
George Brown College ••.•.••.•.••....•..•••• 26
Guardian •..•.••••••.•••••••....•••..••..•61
Hewitt"s National Wholesale •..•.••••.•..••.•••• 6
Hytec Systems . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .•83
IDS .••.•....•••••.••••••••••..•....••.. .50
Interesting Software .........................84
Jini Micro Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .14
King Microwre .•....•••....••.•••.•.••.••• .36
Memorex •.••...•••••••.•....•••...•.••.• .30
Micro World EIectronix •••.............•..••• .61
Mirage Concepts ••.•.......••••.••••••.•.... 11
Perrormance Micro Products ••••••••••••••••.• .62
ProLine . • . . • . • . • . . • • • • . • • . . . • • • • .26,,38.45,47,62
Quality Computer ....•.•.•.•..••••...•.••••• 23
RTC .••••.••••••....••••••••••.••••••47,48,49
Sedore's .................................38
SIM .•.••....•.•••••.•••••••.•.•••..••.• .96
Skyles Electric Works ........................35
Smith-COrona • • • . . . . • . • . • . • • • • • • • . • . • • . • . • .60
Southwest Micro Systems ••.•••••••••••••.• ••• 13
TORPET . . . . . . . . . • • . . . • • . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
TOTl . . . • . . . . . . . • • . . . . . • • • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . 23
TPUG
..•...•...•.........••.•..•...•. .25,.52
T)I'COf' • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
.38
..
That's an easy one: HesWare™ educational software.
The children witt) the most answers in school are usually the children who enjoy learning.
HesWare helps develop your child's interest in learning by making it fun. And along the way, develop
familiarity and proficiency with computers-a skill that IS becoming more and more essential to success.
HesWare educational software combines enjoyment with a creative learning experience. Unlike
video games, HesWare educational programs involve your child-and that keeps their interest. Whether
it's creating colorful and artistic pictures with Turtle Graphics,
making up funny faces with Facemaker,TM or helping America's
favorite canine, Benji, save kidnapped scientists (and learn
about the solar system in the process,) or any of the programs
in our education library, HesWare gives your children a positive
attitude toward learning and technology.
It's not expensive to give your child a headstart on the
future. HesWare programs are available for most popular home
computers, including the Commodore VIC 20;M Commodore 64;M
Atari~ and IBM~
HesWare educational software. Just one of the
ways HesWare is expanding the computer experience. And UIM.
expar:ding your child'? horizons. Look for them at your
,-;BSrrS'SM
favorite software retailer.
Pleases the
toUgh
customer.
Human Engineered Software, 150 North Hill Drive, Brisbane, CA 94005
800-227-6703 (in California 800-632-7979) Dept. C20
HesWare and Facemake~ are lrade m ~~ks of ~uma n Engineered sottw~ re. VIC 20 .and Co.mmodore 64 are trademarks.
.
of Commodore Elec trOnics Ltd. Ata rll s a registered trademark of Ala rl, Inc. IBM 15 a registered t rademark of Intl?:rnatlonal BUSi ness Machines.
© 1983