Sound Forge User Manual

Revised April 3, 2007
After Sound Forge software is installed and you start it for the first time, the registration wizard is displayed. This wizard offers easy steps
that allow you to register the software online with Sony Media Software. Alternatively, you may register online at http://www.sony.com/
mediasoftware at any time.
Registration assistance
If you do not have access to the Internet, registration assistance is available during normal weekday business hours. Please contact our
Customer Service Department by dialing one of the following numbers:
Telephone/Fax
Country
1-800-577-6642 (toll-free)
US, Canada, and Virgin Islands
+608-204-7703
for all other countries
1-608-250-1745 (Fax)
All countries
Customer service/sales
For a detailed list of Customer Service options, we encourage you to visit
http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/support/custserv.asp. Use the following numbers for telephone support during normal
weekday business hours:
Telephone/Fax
Country
1-800-577-6642 (toll-free)
US, Canada, and Virgin Islands
+608-204-7703
for all other countries
1-608-250-1745 (Fax)
All countries
Technical support
For a detailed list of Technical Support options, we encourage you to visit
http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/support/default.asp. To listen to your support options, please call 608-256-5555.
About your rights in Sound Forge software
Sound Forge software is licensed to you under the terms of the End User License Agreement. The End User License Agreement is first
presented to you when you install the software. Please review the End User License Agreement carefully as its terms affect your rights
with respect to the software. For your reference, a copy of the End User License Agreement for Sound Forge software is located at http:/
/www.sony.com/mediasoftware.
About your privacy
Sony Media Software respects your privacy and is committed to protecting personal information. Your use of the software is governed
by the Software Privacy Policy. A copy of this policy is incorporated into the registration process and you are asked to agree to its terms
prior to accepting the terms of the End User License Agreement. Please review its contents carefully as its terms and conditions affect
your rights with respect to the information that is collected by the software. For your reference, a copy of the Software Privacy Policy is
located at http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/corporate/privacy.asp.
Proper use of software
Sound Forge software is not intended and should not be used for illegal or infringing purposes, such as the illegal copying or sharing of
copyrighted materials. Using Sound Forge software for such purposes is, among other things, against United States and international
copyright laws and contrary to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement. Such activity may be punishable by law
and may also subject you to the breach remedies set forth in the End User License Agreement.
Legal notices
Vegas, Vegas+DVD, DVD Architect, Vegas Movie Studio, Vegas Movie Studio+DVD, DVD Architect Studio, ACID, Music Studio, ACIDized, Super Duper
Music Looper, Jam Trax, Sony Sound Series, Chopper, Groove Mapping, Groove Cloning, Media Manager, CD Architect, Sound Forge, Audio Studio,
Cinescore, Acoustic Mirror, Noise Reduction, Wave 64, Wave Hammer, and XFX are trademarks or registered trademarks of Madison Media Software, Inc.
or its affiliates in the United States and other countries.
Thomson Fraunhofer MP3
MPEG Layer-3 audio coding technology licensed from Fraunhofer IIS and Thomson.
Supply of this product does not convey a license nor imply any right to distribute content created with this product in revenue generating broadcast
systems (terrestrial, satellite, cable and/or other distribution channels), streaming applications (via internet, intranets and/or other networks), other
content distribution systems (pay-audio or audio on demand applications and the like) or on physical media (compact discs, digital versatile discs,
semiconductor chips, hard drives, memory cards and the like).
An independent license for such use is required. For details, please visit: http://mp3licensing.com.
Microsoft DirectX programming interface
Portions utilize Microsoft® DirectX® technologies. Copyright © 1999 – 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Microsoft Windows Media 9
Portions utilize Microsoft Windows Media® technologies. Copyright © 1999 – 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Real, RealMedia, RealAudio, and RealVideo applications
2007 RealNetworks, Inc. Patents Pending. All rights reserved. Real®, Real Media®, RealAudio®, RealVideo®, and the Real logo are trademarks or registered
trademarks of RealNetworks, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
Dolby, Dolby Digital AC-3, and AAC encoding
This product contains one or more programs protected under international and U.S. copyright laws as unpublished works. They are confidential and
proprietary to Dolby Laboratories. Their reproduction or disclosure, in whole or in part, or the production of derivative works therefrom without the
express permission of Dolby Laboratories is prohibited. Copyright 1992 - 2007 Dolby Laboratories. All rights reserved.
Dolby Digital 5.1 Creator technology is not intended for use in content creation for commercial or broadcast distribution, or content that displays Dolby
trademarks and logos. Only Approved Dolby Digital Professional Encoders may be used for content that is commercially distributed or carries the Dolby
Digital trademark and logo.
Dolby®, the double-D symbol, AC-3®, and Dolby Digital® are registered trademarks of Dolby Laboratories. AAC™ is a trademark of Dolby Laboratories.
PNG file format
Copyright © 2007. World Wide Web Consortium (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, European Research Consortium for Informatics and
Mathematics, Keio University). All rights reserved. This work is distributed under the W3C Software License in the hope that it will be useful, but
WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTIBILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. http://www.w3.org/
Consortium/Legal/2002/copyright-software-20021231.
Apple QuickTime
Apple® QuickTime® application is a trademark of Apple, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
Apple Macintosh Audio Interchange File Format (AIFF) file format.
Apple® Macintosh® Audio Interchange™ File Format (AIFF) is a trademark of Apple, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
Targa file format
The Targa™ file format is a trademark of Pinnacle Systems, Inc.
Tagged Image File Format (TIFF)
Adobe Tagged Image™ File Format is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and other countries. All rights reserved.
Steinberg Media Technologies AG.
VST is a registered trademark of Steinberg Media Technologies AG.
ASIO is a trademark of Steinberg Media Technologies AG.
Gracenote
CD and music-related data from Gracenote, Inc., copyright © 2000-2007 Gracenote. Gracenote Software, copyright 2000-2007 Gracenote. This product
and service may practice one or more of the following U.S. Patents: #5,987,525; #6,061,680; #6,154,773, #6,161,132, #6,230,192, #6,230,207, #6,240,459,
#6,330,593, and other patents issued or pending. Services supplied and/or device manufactured under license for following Open Globe, Inc. United
States Patent 6,304,523.
Gracenote and CDDB are registered trademarks of Gracenote. The Gracenote logo and logotype, MusicID, and the “Powered by Gracenote” logo are
trademarks of Gracenote.
Ogg File Formats
©2007, Xiph.org Foundation
Neither the name of the Xiph.org Foundation nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
without specific prior written permission.
This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the
implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the foundation or contributors be liable for any
direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss
of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict liability, or tort (including
negligence or otherwise) arising in any way out of the use of this software, even if advised of the possibility of such damage.
Madison Media Software, Inc.
A subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America
1617 Sherman Avenue
Madison, WI 53704
USA
The information contained in this manual is subject to change without notice and does not represent a guarantee or commitment on
behalf of Madison Media Software, Inc. in any way. All updates or additional information relating to the contents of this manual will be
posted on the Sony Media Software web site, located at http://www.sony.com/mediasoftware. The software is provided to you under
the terms of the End User License Agreement and Software Privacy Policy, and must be used and/or copied in accordance therewith.
Copying or distributing the software except as expressly described in the End User License Agreement is strictly prohibited. No part of
this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or for any purpose without the express written consent of Madison Media
Software, Inc.
Copyright © 2007. Madison Media Software, Inc., a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America.
Program Copyright © 2007. Madison Media Software, Inc., a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America. All rights reserved.
Table of
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Introducing Sound Forge software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Sample files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
System requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Installing Sound Forge software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Getting help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Help on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Learning the Sound Forge Workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Using the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Using the mouse wheel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
The main window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Main window components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Floating and docking windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Docking a window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Preventing a window from docking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Floating a window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Hiding the window docking area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Window Docking Area (F11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Explorer window (Alt+1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Regions List window (Alt+2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Playlist window (Alt+3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Video Preview window (Alt+4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Time Display window (Alt+5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Channel Meters window (Alt+6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Undo/Redo History window (Alt+7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Spectrum Analysis window (Alt+8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Plug-In Chainer window (Alt+9) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Plug-In Manager window (Ctrl+Alt+0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Keyboard window (Ctrl+Alt+1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Script Editor window (Ctrl+Alt+2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Hardware Meters window (Ctrl+Alt+3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
The data window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Data window components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Displaying data window components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Arranging data windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Playbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Displaying a toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Customizing a toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Docking a toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Floating a toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Standard toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
TABLE OF CONTENTS | 1
Transport toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Navigation toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Views toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Status/Selection toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Regions/Playlist toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Process toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Effects toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Tools toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Levels toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Scripting toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
ToolTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Using ToolTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Turning off ToolTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Command descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Monitoring levels in digital audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Decibels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Digital versus analog levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Setting digital audio levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Using the channel meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Using the VU meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Using phase scopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Using the mono-compatibility meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Faders and sliders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Envelope graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Displaying the waveform on an envelope graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Multichannel files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Working with multichannel files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Selecting data in multichannel files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Creating a project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Getting media files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Using the Open dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Using the Explorer window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Peak files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Working with video files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Playing a file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Viewing the current position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Data window scrolling during playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Playing a file from a specified point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
2 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
Playing in Loop Playback mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Playing a selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Viewing selection status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Viewing selection statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Creating a new data window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Active data windows vs. inactive data windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Copying data to a new file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Working with files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Saving a file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Using the Save As/Render As dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Creating custom templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Creating custom rendering settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Saving all open audio files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Saving files as a workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Working with projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Saving the project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Saving the project path in the rendered file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Editing a media file’s source project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Editing audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Copying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Cutting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Trimming/Cropping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Mixing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Using undo and redo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Using the Undo/Redo History window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Selecting status formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Experimenting with status formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Configuring the Measures & Beats format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Publishing to the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Exporting to CD Architect software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Exporting a single audio file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Exporting all audio files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Exporting to Net MD devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Recovering files after a crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Recovering files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Deleting recovered files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Navigating, Zooming, and Selecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Setting the cursor position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Previewing audio with pre-roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Using the overview bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Understanding the overview bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
TABLE OF CONTENTS | 3
Navigating in the overview bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Playing audio in the overview bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Scrubbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Zooming and magnifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Zooming the time ruler (horizontal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Zooming the level ruler (vertical) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Using custom zoom settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Using zooming shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Using the Magnify tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Selecting audio using start and end values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Using the Set Selection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Selecting audio during playback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Fine-tuning a selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Adjusting a selection with the mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Adjusting a selection with the keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Restoring a selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Understanding snapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Turn snapping on or off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Snapping to the grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Snapping to markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Snapping to zero-crossings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Snapping the current selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Disabling auto-snapping at high magnifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Creating and using views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Displaying the Views toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Creating views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Changing File Attributes and Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Editing file attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Editing attributes in the Properties dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Editing attributes in the status bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Changing the sample rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Changing the bit depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Increasing bit depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Decreasing bit depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Understanding dither and noise shaping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Minimizing quantization error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Converting mono/stereo channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Converting from mono to stereo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Converting from stereo to mono . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Using the Channel Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Converting file formats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Save as type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
4 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
Adding summary information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Viewing and editing summary information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Viewing extended summary information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Editing extended summary information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Saving summary information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Including additional embedded information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Editing Multichannel Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Routing channels to hardware outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Opening and editing multichannel audio files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Recording multichannel audio files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Using the hardware meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Adjusting output levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Showing or hiding meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Using Markers, Regions, and the Playlist/Cutlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Why use markers, regions, and the playlist? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Rapid navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Added effects for streaming media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Multiple versions of edits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
MIDI synchronization and triggering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Using markers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Inserting markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Naming or renaming markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Changing the marker position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Deleting markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Deleting all markers and regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Deleting all markers within the selected area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Previewing a marker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Triggering a marker using MIDI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Using markers to create regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Detecting and marking clipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Using command markers in streaming media files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Defining streaming media commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Defining Scott Studios data commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Inserting command markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Editing command properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Saving command properties as a custom template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Moving the cursor to a command marker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Deleting command markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Using regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Inserting regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Inserting regions automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Naming or renaming a region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
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Selecting a region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Moving a region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Deleting a region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Deleting all markers and regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Deleting all markers and regions within the selected area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Previewing a region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Splitting regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Triggering a region using MIDI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Using markers to create regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Locking loop and region lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Creating new files from regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Using the Regions List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Displaying the Regions List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Working with the Regions List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Using the playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Displaying the playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Adding regions to the playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Arranging the playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Editing a playlist/cutlist region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Using stop points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Playing from the playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Creating a new file from the playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Configuring the playlist as a cutlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Saving a playlist/cutlist file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Opening a playlist/cutlist file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Copying the playlist/cutlist to the clipboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Recording, Extracting, and Burning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Recording audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Specifying recording and playback options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Recording manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Recording automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Choosing a recording mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Adjusting for DC offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Playing back recorded audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Synchronizing with other devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Monitoring audio input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Inserting markers while recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Automatically labeling windows and regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Changing blinking status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Extracting audio from CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Previewing CD tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Refreshing the Extract Audio from CD dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Burning CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
6 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
Correcting the sample rate for CD burning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Writing mono tracks to a CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Adding tracks to a CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Closing a CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Proper use of software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Editing, Repairing, and Synthesizing Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Overwriting and replicating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Overwriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Replicating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Repeating an operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Using drag-and-drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Dragging mono selections into multichannel destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Snapping to events in drag-and-drop operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Pasting and mixing with drag-and-drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Creating new windows with drag-and-drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Finding and repairing audio glitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Locating glitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Repairing audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Synthesizing audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Generating DTMF/MF tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Generating audio with frequency modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Generating simple waveforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Processing Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Applying presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
Using presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
Creating presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Deleting presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Resetting parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Managing presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Previewing processed audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Setting custom preview parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Bypassing a process while previewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Adjusting the data window selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Sound Forge processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Auto Trim/Crop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Using Auto Trim/Crop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Auto Trim/Crop controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Bit-Depth Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Converting a file’s bit depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Bit-Depth Converter controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Channel Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Converting a mono file to stereo (or multichannel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
TABLE OF CONTENTS | 7
Converting a stereo file to mono . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Intermixing channels in a file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Swapping stereo channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Channel Converter controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
DC Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Estimating DC Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
DC Offset controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
EQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Fade - Graphic fade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Creating a graphic fade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Creating a custom graphic fade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Graphic Fade controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Fade - Fade In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Fade - Fade Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Insert Silence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Inserting silence into a file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Invert/Flip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Muting an audio selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Normalize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Normalizing audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Normalize controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Pan/Expand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Creating a pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Creating a custom pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Pan/Expand controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Resample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Downsampling audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Upsampling audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Resample controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Reverse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Smooth/Enhance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Time Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Increasing the volume of a selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Volume control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Working with Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Adding effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Applying an effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Saving effect settings as a custom preset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Using the Plug-In Chainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
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Creating a plug-in chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Adding a plug-in to a chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Removing a plug-in from a chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Configuring chained plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Bypassing effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Selecting the processing mode for audio tail data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Saving plug-in chains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Saving individual plug-in settings as a custom preset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Loading plug-in chains or plug-in presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Using the Plug-In Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Applying a plug-in or chain to a media file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Renaming a plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Hiding a plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Organizing effects in the FX Favorites menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Using the Preset Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Automating Effect Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Adding an effect automation envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Adding a volume or panning envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Adjusting effect parameters with envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Previewing effect automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Applying effects automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Showing or hiding effect automation envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Enabling or bypassing effect automation envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Removing effect automation envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Adjusting envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Adding envelope points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Flipping an envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Setting fade properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Cutting, copying, and pasting envelope points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Copying an envelope to another data window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Using Acoustic Mirror and Wave Hammer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
What are the Acoustic Mirror effects? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
The acoustic signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
Adding an acoustic signature to an audio file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
Adjusting the acoustic signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
General tab controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
Envelope tab controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Summary tab controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Recover tab controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Creating impulse files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
What you need to create custom impulses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Recording the impulse in an acoustic space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Recording the impulse through an electronic device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
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Recovering the impulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Trimming the impulse file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Adding summary information to your impulse file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Using the new impulse file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Using impulse files in creative ways. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Processing individual audio elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Adding realistic stereo to mono recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Creating special effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Recreating spaces for foley effects and dialog replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Panning with head-related transfer functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Troubleshooting the Acoustic Mirror effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Stuttering during real-time previewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Impulses do not recover properly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Recovered impulse is too noisy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Error message explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
What is the Wave Hammer plug-in?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Displaying the Wave Hammer plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
The Wave Hammer dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Compressor tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Volume Maximizer tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Utilizing the Scripting Feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Scripting references. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Sample scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Additional scripting information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Opening the Script Editor window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Opening and running a script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Running a script from the Script Editor window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Running a script from the Scripting menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Adding scripts to the Scripting menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Creating a script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Editing an existing script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Using the Scripting toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Adding or removing toolbar buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Creating custom button images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Running a script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Using the Batch Converter script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Converting using an existing batch job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Creating or editing a batch job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Working with MIDI/SMPTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
What is MIDI? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
MIDI triggers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
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Playback versus triggered playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Triggering file playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Triggering region playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
Triggering playback from additional internal/external MIDI devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Advantages of external MIDI controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Sound Forge software and MIDI timecode synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
Playing regions using MTC from a sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
Playing regions using MTC from an external device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Using Sound Forge software to generate MTC for a MIDI sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Using Sound Forge software to generate MTC for an external device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201
Optimizing for Sound Forge Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Defragmenting your hard drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Increasing total buffer size. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Turning off the playback cursor and record counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Turning off the channel (output) meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Turning on passive updating for time and video displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
Time displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
Video displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
Synchronizing audio and video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Samplers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
External samplers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Internal samplers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Configuring the Sampler Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Creating a sampler configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
Open loop versus closed loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Saving sampler configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Sending and receiving samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Sending a sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Receiving a sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
MIDI unity note and Fine tune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Using the MIDI Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Displaying the MIDI Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Turning on the MIDI Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Configuring the MIDI Keyboard output port and channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Troubleshooting the MIDI Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Specifying instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Generating chords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Setting up MIDI/SDS hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Troubleshooting MIDI/SDS with open loop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Setting up SCSI/SMDI hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
TABLE OF CONTENTS | 11
Troubleshooting SCSI/SMDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Conflicting SCSI IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Periodic transfer failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Sampler is recognized but does not transfer reliably . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Looping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Sustaining and release loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Creating a sustaining loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Creating a sustaining loop with a release loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Looping techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Match endpoint amplitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Match endpoint waveform slope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Match endpoint sound levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Avoid very short loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Editing loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Crossfading loops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Using the Crossfade Loop tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Creating loops for ACID software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Creating an ACID one-shot file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Creating an ACID loop file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Creating an ACID 2.0 disk-based file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Creating an ACID beatmapped file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Using the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Editing loops for ACID software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Halving or doubling a loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Shifting a selection left or right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Rotating audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Setting loop tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Saving loop points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Working with Video. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Viewing video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Using the video strip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Previewing files with video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Using an external monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Attaching video to an audio file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Detaching video from an audio file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Setting video options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Video file properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Configuring your video settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Saving a video file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Using Spectrum Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
12 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
Working in the frequency domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
Fast Fourier Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
Using a spectrum graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230
Displaying a spectrum graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230
Monitoring an input and output source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
Viewing frequency and amplitude values, notes and statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
Navigating a spectrum graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Changing the graph type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Changing the zoom level of the graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Synchronizing graphs in a multichannel file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Updating a spectrum graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Viewing multiple spectrum graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
Creating and comparing snapshots of the Spectrum Analysis window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
Printing the graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
Using a sonogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
Displaying a sonogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
Displaying frequency and amplitude values, notes and statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
Updating a sonogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
Monitoring an input and output source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
Tuning a sonogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
Synchronizing sonograms in a multichannel file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
Returning to a spectrum graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
Printing the sonogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
Adjusting Spectrum Analysis settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
Saving spectrum graph settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
Customizing Sound Forge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Setting preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
General tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
Display tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
Editing tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
Labels tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
File Types tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
MIDI/Sync tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Previews tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
Status tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
Toolbars tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
Audio tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
Video tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
VST Effects tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Customizing keyboard shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Editing or creating new shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Saving a keyboard mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Deleting a keyboard mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
TABLE OF CONTENTS | 13
Importing or renaming a keyboard mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Resetting the default keyboard mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Project file commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Magnification and view commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Data window edit commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Cursor movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Selecting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Navigation and playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Record dialog keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Plug-In Chainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Regions List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Playlist/Cutlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Script Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Mouse wheel shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Additional mouse shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Microsoft Audio Compression Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Audio data compression and decompression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Transparent playback and recording of non-hardware supported audio files . . . . . . . . . . 264
SMPTE Timecode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
SMPTE 25 EBU (25 fps, Video). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
SMPTE Drop Frame (29.97 fps, Video) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
SMPTE Non-Drop Frame (29.97 fps, Video) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
SMPTE 30 (30 fps, Audio) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
SMPTE Film Sync (24 fps) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Using CSOUND, MTU, IRCAM, BICSF, and EBICSF Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
About IRCAM files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
About BICSF and EBICSF files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Opening files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
BICSF and EBICSF files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
IRCAM, CSOUND and MTU files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Saving files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i
14 | TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1 Introduction
Introducing Sound Forge software
Thank you for purchasing Sound Forge® software and for your continued support of the Sony Media Software family of
products. The software provides you with the powerful features you have come to expect, as well as a number of new
features designed to make digital audio editing quick and easy.
Sample files
Throughout the manual, you will find references to six sample audio files. The manual directs you to use these files as you
experiment with different Sound Forge features. These files are installed in the same folder as the application:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Drumhit.pca
Fill.pca
Loop.pca
Musicbed.pca
Saxriff.pca
Voiceover.pca
The files are in Perfect Clarity Audio® (PCA) format, a Sony Media Software proprietary lossless audio compression format.
System requirements
The following lists the minimum system requirements for using Sound Forge:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
500 MHz processor
128 MB RAM, 256 MB recommended
150 MB hard-disk space for program installation
Microsoft® Windows® 2000 SP4, Windows XP, or Windows Vista™
Microsoft Windows®-compatible sound card
CD-ROM drive (for installation from a CD only)
Supported CD-Recordable drive (for CD burning only)
DirectX® Media 9.0c or later (version 9.0c included on application disc)
Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 (included on application disc)
Microsoft® Internet Explorer 5.1 or later to view online help (included on application disc)
INTRODUCTION | 15
Installing Sound Forge software
The install utility, setup.exe, located on the Sound Forge application disc, creates the necessary folders and copies all files required to
operate Sound Forge software.
Note: The Sound Forge application requires Microsoft DirectX 9.0c or later and Internet Explorer 5.1 or later. The setup program alerts
you if either is not detected on your system and prompts their installation from the Sound Forge application disc.
1. Place the Sound Forge application disc in the drive. The setup screen is displayed (if AutoPlay is enabled for your CD-ROM or DVDROM drive).
Note: If you have disabled the drive’s AutoPlay feature, click the Start button and choose Run. Type D:\setup.exe, where D is the drive
letter of your CD or DVD drive, and follow the on-screen prompts to complete the installation.
2. Click Install, and follow the on-screen prompts to install the appropriate version of Sound Forge for your computer.
Getting help
To access online help, choose Contents and Index from the Help menu or press F1.
Note: To view online help, Internet Explorer 5.1 or later must be installed on your system. If you purchased the Sound Forge boxed
version, Internet Explorer version 5.1 is included on your application disc.
Toolbar
Tabs
Information
pane
The following table describes the four tabs of the Online Help window.
Tab
Description
Contents
Provides a list of available help topics. Click a closed book (
) to open the pages, and then click on a topic page (
).
Provides a complete listing of the help topics available. Scroll through the list of available topics or type a word in the Type in
the keyword to find box to quickly locate topics related to that word. Select the topic and click the Display button.
Allows you to enter a keyword and display all of the topics in the online help that contain the keyword you have entered. Type
a keyword in the Type in the word(s) to search for box and click the List Topics button. Select the topic from the list and click
the Display button.
Index
Search
Favorites
16 | CHAPTER 1
Allows you to keep topics that you revisit often in a separate folder. To add a topic to your favorites, click the Add button on
the Favorites tab.
Help on the Web
Additional Sound Forge information is available on the Sony Media Software Web site. From the Help menu, choose Sony on the Web,
and choose the desired location from the submenu. The software starts your system’s Web browser and attempts to connect to the
appropriate page on the Sony Web site.
INTRODUCTION | 17
18 | CHAPTER 1
Chapter 2 Learning the Sound Forge Workspace
This chapter provides a detailed overview of Sound Forge® toolbars and controls.
Using the mouse
The following table defines the mouse-related terms used throughout this manual.
Mouse Term
Description
Pointing
Clicking
Moving the mouse pointer over an item.
Pointing to an item and quickly pressing and releasing the left mouse button. If there is no left or right
specification, left-clicking is implied.
Right-clicking
Pointing to an item and quickly pressing and releasing the right mouse button. Right-clicking is frequently used
to display shortcut menus.
Double-clicking Identical to clicking, but instead of pressing and releasing the mouse button once, it is done twice in quick
succession. Double-clicking always indicates the left mouse button.
Triple-clicking
Identical to clicking, but instead of pressing and releasing the mouse button once, it is done three times in
quick succession. Triple-clicking always indicates the left mouse button.
Toggle-clicking Clicking the right mouse button while holding down the left mouse button. This is used to toggle options and
is a shortcut for drag-and-drop editing and using the Magnify tool.
Shift-clicking
Holding down the Shift key while clicking the mouse. Shift-clicking is typically used to skip dialogs and quickly
repeat operations.
Ctrl-clicking
Holding down the Ctrl key while clicking the mouse. Ctrl-clicking is used to modify the operation of a normal
click.
Dragging
Holding down the left mouse button while moving the mouse pointer and releasing the mouse at the desired
location. Dragging is used to quickly move sections of data between windows, as well as to adjust sliders,
scrollbars, and faders.
Slow-dragging Holding down the right and left mouse buttons while adjusting sliders and faders increases the resolution of
the movement. This is useful when making fractional adjustments to parameters.
Tip: Once you are familiar with Sound Forge basics, you may want to use mouse and keyboard shortcuts. For more
information, see Shortcuts on page 253.
Using the mouse wheel
The following table describes the available mouse wheel functionality you can use to navigate audio files.
Mouse Functionality
Description
Wheel Up
Wheel Down
Ctrl+Wheel Up
Ctrl+Wheel Down
Shift+Wheel Up
Shift+Wheel Down
Ctrl+Shift+ Wheel Up
Ctrl+Shift+ Wheel Down
Zoom in horizontally
Zoom out horizontally
Zoom in vertically
Zoom out vertically
Scroll left (in 10ths of screen width)
Scroll right (in 10ths of screen width)
Cursor left or current selection point left (if there is a selection)
Cursor right or current selection point right (if there is a
selection)
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 19
The main window
When you start the application, the main window is displayed. The main window’s workspace is where you perform all audio editing.
Menu bar
Standard toolbar
Transport bar
Channel Meters
(docked)
Workspace
Status bar
Main window components
The following table describes the major components of the main window.
Component
Description
Menu bar
Standard toolbar
Transport bar
Status bar
Displays the menu headings for the available functions.
Provides quick access to some of the most common tasks in the application (pg. 27).
Provides quick access to basic audio transport functions (pg. 27).
Help and processing information appears on the left side. The boxes on the right side display
the playback sample rate, bit depth, channel configuration, length of the active data window,
and total free storage space (pg. 83). With the exception of the free storage space box, you
can edit these boxes by double-clicking or right-clicking them. When no data windows are
open, only the free storage space box contains a value.
This is the area located behind the data windows. Audio selections dragged to the workspace
automatically become new data windows. Windows such as the Regions List and Playlist can
be docked along the edges of the workspace.
Displays the level of the output audio signal. These meters can be toggled on/off by choosing
Channel Meters from the View menu. Right-clicking the channel meters displays a shortcut
menu that allows you to precisely configure the appearance of the meters.
Workspace
Channel Meters
20 | CHAPTER 2
Floating and docking windows
With the many features in Sound Forge software, it is easy for the workspace to become cluttered. Docking windows allows you to keep
more windows open while maintaining a greater degree of organization. You can choose to float or dock the windows listed in the View
menu, including the Regions List, Playlist, and Time Display windows.
Docked channel
meters
Stacked
windows with
tabs
Docked keyboard
Docking a window
1. Drag a window to the edge of the workspace. The outline of the window changes shape as you approach the edge.
2. Release the mouse. The window docks against the edge of the workspace.
Preventing a window from docking
Press Ctrl while dragging a window to prevent it from docking in the workspace.
Tip: You can choose to reverse this behavior so that windows will not dock unless you press Ctrl. From the Options menu, choose
Preferences, and clear the Allow floating windows to dock check box on the General tab.
Floating a window
Drag the handle of a docked window away from the edge of the workspace so that it is a floating window.
Close window
Expand window
Handle
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 21
Hiding the window docking area
You can double-click the separator between the workspace and window docking area to hide the docking area. You can also use the
following shortcut keys to manage the workspace:
Shortcut key
Description
F11
Shift+F11
Ctrl+F11
Show/hide window docking area at bottom of workspace.
Show/hide windows docked on left/right sides of workspace.
Show/hide all docked windows.
Window Docking Area (F11)
Explorer window (Alt+1)
The Explorer window is used to find, preview, and open media files. From the View menu, choose Explorer to show or hide the Explorer
window.
Regions List window (Alt+2)
The Regions List window contains all regions and markers that exist in the active data window. From the View menu, choose Regions
List to show or hide the Regions List window.
Playlist window (Alt+3)
The Playlist window is used to arrange regions for playback. From the View menu, choose Playlist to show or hide the Playlist window.
Video Preview window (Alt+4)
The Video Preview window shows the video frame at the current cursor or play position. From the View menu, choose Video Preview to
show or hide the Video Preview window.
Time Display window (Alt+5)
The Time Display window displays the current cursor or play position. From the View menu, choose Time Display to show or hide the
Time Display window.
Channel Meters window (Alt+6)
Sound Forge software provides peak and VU/PPM (peak program) meters that you can use to monitor your audio levels.
From the View menu, choose Channel Meters to show or hide the channel meters.
Undo/Redo History window (Alt+7)
The Undo/Redo History window allows you to see all of your edit operations. From the View menu, choose Undo/Redo History to show
or hide the Undo/Redo History window.
Spectrum Analysis window (Alt+8)
The Spectrum Analysis window allows you to examine the fundamental frequency and overtones present in a recording. From the View
menu, choose Spectrum Analysis to show or hide the Spectrum Analysis window.
22 | CHAPTER 2
Plug-In Chainer window (Alt+9)
The Plug-In Chainer window allows you to link up to 32 DirectX and VST plug-ins into a single processing chain. From the View menu,
choose Plug-In Chainer to show or hide the Plug-In Chainer window.
Plug-In Manager window (Ctrl+Alt+0)
The Plug-In Manager window displays your plug-ins in a tree view like Windows Explorer. From the View menu, choose Plug-In
Manager to show or hide the Plug-In Manager.
Keyboard window (Ctrl+Alt+1)
The Keyboard window allows you to control internal or external synthesizers and samplers from Sound Forge software. From the View
menu, choose Keyboard to show or hide the Keyboard window.
Script Editor window (Ctrl+Alt+2)
The Script Editor window can be used to open, create, edit or run scripts. From the View menu, choose Script Editor to show or hide the
Script Editor window.
Hardware Meters window (Ctrl+Alt+3)
The Hardware Meters window allows you to monitor hardware outputs and adjust preview levels. From the View menu, choose
Hardware Meters to show or hide the Hardware Meters window. For more information, see Using the hardware meters on page 92.
The data window
Data windows contain audio data (as a waveform) as well as a number of controls and commands used to edit and process audio.
Title bar
Time ruler
Overview bar
Edit Tool
Selector
Marker bar
Level ruler
Position
scroll bar
Waveform
display
Time zoom
resolution
Time zoom in/out
Level zoom
in/out
Maximize width
Playbar
Scrub control
Selection status
boxes
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 23
Data window components
Component
Description
Title bar
Displays the file name. If title information is included in the summary of a file, it appears here instead of the
file name. Double-click to maximize and restore the window.
Displays the amplitude of the waveform. Right-click to display the level ruler shortcut menu. Drag to shift
the view up/down when zoomed in vertically.
Displays the current location in the data window. Right-click to display the time ruler shortcut menu. Drag
to scroll the data window.
Displays the position of region end points, loop end points, and markers. You can place, name, and
position markers and regions anywhere in the data window. These informational tags can serve as cues or
reminders highlighting important events in your project.
Level ruler
Time ruler
Marker bar
Right-click a marker or region tag to display a shortcut menu. Drag to edit a tag’s position. Double-click
anywhere within a region to select it.
Edit Tool Selector
Toggles through the Edit, Magnify, and Pencil tools. Right-click to display a shortcut menu that allows you
to display or hide data window elements.
Playbar
Contains audio transport buttons, including Go to Start, Go to End, Stop, Play Normal, Open/Play Plug-In
Chainer, Play as Cutlist, and Play as Sample. For more information on the playbar, please see page 25.
Selection status boxes Displays the beginning, end, and length of a selection. If no selection exists, only the cursor position
displays. Double-click the leftmost box to edit the current cursor position or selection start position.
Double-click either of the other two boxes to edit the selection end position or the selection length. Rightclick to display the status format shortcut menu.
Waveform display
Displays a graphical representation of an audio file. The horizontal axis represents time, and the vertical
axis represents amplitude. Right-click within this display to open the waveform display shortcut menu.
Scrub control
Scrolls playback of your project at varying speeds.
Position scroll bar
Scrolls forward/backward through an audio file to display sections of the file not visible in the current area
of the waveform display.
Overview bar
Allows for quick navigation and playback of any part of an audio file. The overview bar also indicates the
portion of the waveform currently depicted in the waveform display, as well as the selected region. Click to
move the cursor. Double-click to center the cursor in the waveform display. Right-click to start or pause
playback. Drag to activate the audio event locator.
Time zoom resolution Specifies the number of samples of data represented by each horizontal point on the screen. This
determines the length of time displayed in the data window. Smaller resolution values display less time.
Time zoom in/out
Changes the zoom resolution for the time (horizontal) axis.
Level zoom in/out
Changes the zoom resolution for the level (vertical) axis.
Maximize width
Resizes the data window to maximize its size within the workspace.
Displaying data window components
You can customize the appearance of individual data windows.
1. From the File menu, choose Properties or press Alt+Enter. The current file’s Properties dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Display tab.
3. Display/hide specific components by selecting/clearing the corresponding check boxes.
4. Select the Save as the default for all new windows check box if you want to set the new configuration as the default data window
display.
5. Click OK.
Tip: Right-click the Edit Tool Selector (upper-left corner of data window) to display or hide components for the selected data
window.
Arranging data windows
You can use the commands on the Window menu to arrange data windows in the Sound Forge workspace..
Tip: Press Ctrl+Tab to switch forward through the open windows, or press Ctrl+Shift+Tab to switch backward through the open
windows.
24 | CHAPTER 2
Command
Description
New Window
Cascade
Tile Horizontally
Creates a new data window
Arranges all open data windows so they overlap with the title bar of each window
remaining visible.
Arranges all open data windows top to bottom with no overlapping.
Tile Vertically
Note: This command affects only non-minimized windows.
Arranges all open data windows left to right with no overlapping.
Arrange Icons
Minimize All
Restore All
Close All
Window List
Note: This command affects only non-minimized windows.
Arranges minimized data windows at the bottom of the workspace.
Minimizes all open data windows.
Restores all minimized windows to their previous window size and position.
Closes all open data windows.
Switches focus to another data window.
Playbar
The playbar is located in the bottom-left corner of a data window. You can use the playbar to navigate and play audio files in a variety of
ways.
Go to Start: moves the cursor to the start of the
file.
Play Plug-In Chainer: previews the audio processed through
plug-ins when the Plug-In Chainer window is open.
If there is a selection, plays from the beginning of the
selection to the end of the selection.
If the Plug-In Chainer window is not open, the Open Plug-In
Chainer button (
) appears instead.
Go to End: moves the cursor to the end of the
file.
Play as Cutlist: plays the file with the regions in the cutlist
omitted. This button appears only if you treat the playlist as
a cutlist.
Stop: stops playback and returns the cursor to
its position prior to playback.
Play as Sample: plays the file with the sustaining and
release loops repeating the specified number of times. This
button appears only if you have defined a sample loop.
Play Normal: plays from the cursor to the end
of the file.
If there is a selection, plays from the beginning
of the selection to the end of the selection.
Current playback mode
When you play a file from the playbar, a small horizontal line appears beneath the selected Play button’s icon
current playback mode, which is the mode used when you click the transport bar Play
. This indicates the
button. For more information, see Transport
toolbar on page 27.
Changing the current playback mode
To change the current playback mode, click a playbar button or press X.
Optional Backward and Forward buttons
You can choose to display Rewind
and Forward
shuttle controls on the playbar. From the Options menu, choose Preferences,
and select the Show shuttle controls on Data Window transport check box on the General tab.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 25
Toolbars
Sound Forge toolbars contain buttons used to quickly execute many of the program’s commands and functions. Toolbars can be
dragged throughout the workspace, docked, resized, hidden, and customized.
You can use the Toolbars tab in the Preferences dialog to specify which toolbars you want to display. Perform either of the following
actions to display this tab:
• Choose Preferences from the Options menu and click the Toolbars tab.
• From the View menu, choose Toolbars.
Displaying a toolbar
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars. The Preferences dialog appears with a list of available toolbars.
2. To display a toolbar, select the corresponding check box and click OK.
Select a check box to
display a toolbar.
Click Customize to add, remove
or rearrange buttons on a
toolbar.
Customizing a toolbar
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars. The Preferences dialog appears with a list of available toolbars.
2. Select the check box and the toolbar name for the toolbar that you want to customize.
3. Click Customize. The Customize Toolbar dialog is displayed.
4. Use the controls in the Customize Toolbar dialog to add, remove, or rearrange the buttons on the selected toolbar. Click Reset to
restore the toolbar to its default setting.
5. Click the OK button.
Docking a toolbar
When you drag a floating toolbar to any edge of the main screen, the toolbar docks on that edge.
Floating a toolbar
When you drag a docked toolbar away from an edge, the toolbar becomes a floating toolbar.
26 | CHAPTER 2
Standard toolbar
The Standard toolbar displays by default when you start the application. The buttons on this toolbar provide quick access to many
common commands.
New: creates a new data window.
Play Clipboard: plays the audio on the clipboard.
Open: displays the Open dialog.
Trim/Crop: removes all data from the file that is not
currently selected. This command has no effect if there
is no selected data. This command does not copy data
to the clipboard.
Save: saves the current audio data.
Undo: reverses the last edit operation.
Save As: saves the current file with a new name or
format.
Redo: reverts the previously undone edit operation.
Render As: renders the current project file to a media
file.
Repeat: repeats the last operation. This command can
be used with most processing functions. The previous
operation’s parameters are repeated. To specify new
parameters, hold Shift and click this button.
Publish: opens the Publish Setup wizard so you can
upload your media file to the Web.
Edit Tool: selects the Editing tool.
Cut: removes selected audio data and places it on the
clipboard. This command has no effect if there is no
selection.
Magnify Tool: selects the Magnify tool.
Copy: copies selected audio data to the clipboard. This
command has no effect if there is no selection.
Pencil Tool: selects the Pencil tool.
Paste: inserts a copy of the clipboard data at the current
insertion point. If there is a selection, this command
replaces the selected data with the clipboard data.
Envelope Tool: selects the Envelope tool.
Mix: mixes a copy of the clipboard data with the current
audio file. The mix start point is either the cursor point
or the start or end of the selection in the destination
data window.
Transport toolbar
The transport toolbar also displays by default and contains basic audio transport buttons.
Record: records data to a new or existing data window.
Stop: stops playback and returns the cursor to its prior
position.
Loop Playback: toggles Loop Playback mode on and off.
Go to Start: moves the cursor to the start of the file.
Play All: plays the entire file from beginning to end,
regardless of cursor position, selection, or playlist.
Rewind: moves the cursor backward in the current file.
Play: plays the file in current playback mode (Play
Normal, Play Plug-In Chainer, Play as Cutlist, or Play as
Sample).
Forward: moves the cursor forward in the current file.
Pause: pauses playback and maintains the cursor at its
current position.
Go to End: moves the cursor to the end of the file.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 27
Navigation toolbar
The Navigation toolbar contains buttons used to navigate within the current data window.
Zoom In Full: magnifies the selected area to a 24:1 ratio.
Go To: displays the Go To dialog and allows you to
quickly move the cursor to a specific point in a file.
Zoom Normal: resets the audio data to its original
magnification.
Cursor Center: centers the display with the cursor
displayed in the center of the data window.
Zoom Selection: maximizes the selection vertically and
horizontally.
Cursor to Selection Start: moves the cursor to the
beginning of the selection.
Custom Zoom 1: sets the audio data to a custom time
magnification level.
Cursor to Selection End: moves the cursor to the end of
the selection.
Custom Zoom 2: sets the audio data to a custom time
magnification level.
Center Sustaining Start: moves the cursor to the
beginning of the sustaining loop.
Insert Marker: drops a marker at the current cursor
position.
Center Sustaining End: moves the cursor to the end of
the sustaining loop.
Mark In: marks the “in” point of a new selection.
Center Release Start: moves the cursor to the beginning
of the release loop.
Mark Out: marks the “out” point of a new selection.
Center Release End: moves the cursor to the end of the
release loop.
Views toolbar
The Views toolbar contains buttons used to store and retrieve data window views.
Toggles views 1-8 between setting and restoring.
28 | CHAPTER 2
Stores and recalls specific selection views.
Status/Selection toolbar
The Status/Selection toolbar contains buttons used to specify a file’s status format and control snapping functions.
Samples: changes the status format to Samples.
SMPTE EBU: changes the status format to SMPTE EBU
(25 fps).
Time: changes the status format to Time.
SMPTE Non-Drop: changes the status format to SMPTE
Non-Drop (29.97 fps, Video).
Seconds: changes the status format to Seconds.
SMPTE Drop: changes the status format to SMPTE Drop
(29.97 fps, Video).
Time and Frames: changes the status format to Time
and Frames.
SMPTE 30: changes the status format to SMPTE 30
(30 fps, Audio).
Absolute Frames: changes the status format to
Absolute Frames.
Auto Snap to Zero: forces the ends of selections to the
nearest zero-crossing.
Measures and Beats: changes the status format to
Measures and Beats.
Auto Snap to Time: forces the ends of selections to the
nearest whole time division on the time ruler.
SMPTE Film Sync (24 fps): changes the status format to
SMPTE Film Sync (24 fps).
Regions/Playlist toolbar
The Regions/Playlist toolbar contains the Regions List and Playlist buttons as well as buttons corresponding to synchronization
commands and status displays.
Regions List: displays the Regions List.
Generate MIDI Timecode: configures the software to
send MIDI timecode through the MIDI output port. The
MIDI output port is specified on the MIDI/Sync tab of
the Preferences dialog.
Playlist: displays the playlist.
Pre-Queue for MIDI Timecode: opens the wave device
and preloads data for the next region to be played from
the playlist.
Trigger from MIDI Timecode: configures the software to
be triggered by MIDI commands received through the
MIDI input port. The MIDI input port is specified on the
MIDI/Sync tab in the Preferences dialog. For more
information, see Turning on MIDI input synchronization
on page 196.
Playlist Position display
Displays the current playback position of an audio file being played from the playlist. Right-clicking this box displays a shortcut menu
that allows you to specify a new format.
Sync Status display
Allows you to monitor the status of incoming/outgoing MIDI commands.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 29
Process toolbar
The Process toolbar contains buttons corresponding to all commands located in the Process menu.
Auto Trim/Crop: removes silence and automatically
fades in/out the end-points of each phrase.
Insert Silence: inserts user-configurable silence into
audio files.
Bit-Depth Converter: converts a file to a different bit
depth.
Invert/Flip: inverts (or flips) the polarity of the current
selection.
Channel Converter: converts between mono and
multichannel formats. Can also intermix the channels of
a file to create panning effects.
Mute: mutes the current selection.
DC Offset: changes the baseline of an audio file.
Normalize: normalizes the loudness of an audio file.
Graphic EQ: opens Sony Media Software’s XFX Graphic
EQ.
Pan/Expand: creates custom pans, expands, and mixes.
Paragraphic EQ: opens Sony Media Software’s XFX
Paragraphic EQ.
Resample: creates a copy of the audio file with a new
sample rate.
Parametric EQ: opens Sony Media Software’s XFX
Parametric EQ.
Reverse: reverses the current selection.
Graphic Fade: creates user-configurable fades.
Smooth/Enhance: opens Sony Media Software’s XFX
Smooth/Enhance tool.
Fade In: fades-in the selection.
Time Stretch: opens Sony Media Software’s XFX Time
Stretch tool.
Fade Out: fades-out the selection.
Volume: adjusts the volume of an audio file.
Effects toolbar
The Effects toolbar contains buttons corresponding to all Sound Forge built-in XFX™ plug-ins.
Acoustic Mirror: adds environmental coloration to your
existing recordings.
Flange/Wah-Wah: mixes a modulated delay signal with
the original signal.
Amplitude Modulation: applies a sinusoidal or squareshaped periodic gain to the input signal.
Gapper/Snipper: removes/inserts sections of silence at
regular intervals to create unusual effects.
Chorus: simulates multiple audio sources from a single
sound.
Noise Gate: removes signals below a set amplitude
threshold.
Multi-Tap Delay: creates a delay with up to eight delaytaps spaced anywhere within 2.5 seconds of the original
sound.
Pitch Bend: creates a modified sound envelope that
corresponds to increasing or decreasing the pitch of a
sound file over time.
Simple Delay: adds a delayed copy of the audio signal
to the file.
Pitch Shift: changes the pitch of a selection with or
without preserving the duration of the file.
Distortion: simulates the overloading of an amplifier.
Reverb: simulates the acoustics of different
environments.
Graphic Dynamics: applies compression, expansion,
and limiting to affect the dynamic range of an audio file.
Vibrato: creates periodic pitch modulation in an audio
file.
Multi-Band Dynamics: allows compression and limiting
to be placed on up to four different frequency bands.
Wave Hammer: acts as a classic compressor and volume
maximizer.
Envelope: forces the amplitude envelope of a waveform
to match a specified envelope shape.
30 | CHAPTER 2
Tools toolbar
The Tools toolbar contains buttons corresponding to commands in the Tools menu.
Extract Audio from CD: extracts audio from CD and
opens for editing.
Audio Restoration: removes clicks and background
noise associated with vinyl records.
Burn CD: writes the selected audio track to CD.
Crossfade Loop: mixes audio occurring before the loop
start point into the end of the loop to smooth
transitions.
Auto Region: creates regions in an audio file according
to rapid sound attacks or a specified time interval.
Sampler: allows you to transfer samples to/from the
Sound Forge application.
Extract Regions: extracts all file regions and saves them
as individual files.
telephone companies.
DTMF/MF Tones Synthesis: generates dial tones used by
Clip Detect: performs clip detection on the current file
or selection.
FM Synthesis: uses frequency modulation and additive
Find: searches for clicks and pops, volume levels, or
silent breaks in an audio signal.
Simple Synthesis: generates a simple waveform of a given
Interpolate: replaces selected audio with interpolated
audio data based on the selection’s beginning and end
samples.
Statistics: displays statistics corresponding to the
current file or selection.
Replace: replaces selected audio data with previous
adjacent data.
Preset Manager: backs up and transfers user-configured
presets from effects, processes, and plug-ins.
synthesis to create complex sounds from simple
waveforms.
shape, pitch, and length.
Copy Other Channel: replaces selected audio with a
corresponding selection from the opposite channel.
Levels toolbar
The Levels toolbar displays the audio levels in the left and right channels in the user-specified format. You can right-click to choose the
format from a shortcut menu.
Left
channel level
Right
channel level
ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar
The ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar contains buttons corresponding to commands used when creating audio loops for Sony’s ACID®
family of products. For more information, see Creating loops for ACID software on page 217.
Edit ACID Properties: displays the Edit ACID Properties
dialog.
Shift Selection Left: shifts the current selection to the
left so the current start point becomes the end point.
Edit Tempo: calculates the musical tempo (beats per
minute) based upon the current selection.
Shift Selection Right: shifts the current selection to the
right so the current end point becomes the start point.
Double Selection: doubles the size of the current
selection.
Rotate Audio: moves the current selection to the
opposite end of the file.
Halve Selection: divides the current selection in half.
Selection Grid Lines: toggles the selection grid line
display on/off.
Tempo window
The ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar also contains a Tempo window that appears to the right of the toolbar buttons. This window
calculates and displays the ACID project’s tempo as if the current selection represents a complete measure.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 31
Scripting toolbar
The Scripting toolbar allows you to show, hide, or activate the Script Editor and display the Batch Converter window.
Script Editor: Allows you to create, edit, or run scripts.
Batch Converter: Allows you to modify and manipulate
multiple audio files without having to process each file
individually.
ToolTips
Using ToolTips
Hovering the mouse pointer over a button or status bar box for longer than one second displays a small text box adjacent to the
pointer. This text, called a ToolTip, is a brief description of the item’s function. Using ToolTips is an effective way to quickly familiarize
yourself with features.
ToolTip
Turning off ToolTips
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Clear the Show ToolTips check box and click OK.
Command descriptions
When you click and hold a menu item or a button in a toolbar, a brief description of the command appears in the lower-left corner of the
status bar. If you release the mouse button outside of the menu item or toolbar, the command is not executed.
Keyboard shortcuts
The Keyboard map allows you to customize the keyboard shortcuts available in the Sound Forge interface. You can access the Keyboard
map by choosing Customize Keyboard from the Options menu.
Monitoring levels in digital audio
The Sound Forge channel meters display peak levels during playback. Use the meters to monitor levels and ensure no clipping occurs in
your file.
Decibels
The standard method for digital metering is to use the maximum possible sample value as a reference point. This value is referred to as
0 dB. Decibels are used to represent fractions logarithmically. In this case, the fraction is: sample amplitude divided by the maximum
possible amplitude. The actual equation used to convert to decibels is: dB = 20 log (amplitude/32,768)
To illustrate this, consider a sine wave with a peak amplitude of 50% of full scale. Inserting the values in the appropriate places yields 20
log (0.50) = -6.0 dB. Each time a signal’s amplitude is divided by two, its dB value is decreased by 6 dB. Likewise, doubling the amplitude
of a signal increases its dB value by 6 dB. Dividing the sine wave until its peak amplitude is equal to 1 produces lowest peak dB possible,
-90.3 dB.
Why are dBs used when talking about audio? Decibels are typically used when dealing with sound pressure levels because of the vast
range of sound (about 120 dB) that the human ear can perceive. It’s also easier to say -90 dB than 0.000030 (1/32,768).
32 | CHAPTER 2
Digital versus analog levels
When recording to an analog medium such as magnetic tape, recording engineers typically try to keep VU (volume unit) meters as close
to zero as possible. This ensures a high signal-to-noise ratio while preserving adequate headroom to keep the tape from saturating and
distorting. In addition, occasional peaks above 0 do not cause problems because the tape saturation point is not an absolute.
However, this is not true in the digital realm, where amplitudes are stored as discrete numbers instead of continuous variables. The
flexible recording ceiling of analog is replaced by the absolute maximum sample values of digital audio. Stored signals must never have
a value above these maximums, as the wave peaks are literally clipped. This clipping adds audible distortion and though it can go
unnoticed, it can also ruin an entire project. Therefore, sample with the understanding that digital audio has absolutely no headroom.
Setting digital audio levels
Because digital audio has no headroom, setting the sampling level becomes critical. If the loudest section of the audio is identified in
advance, the recording level should be set so that the peak is as close to 0 dB as possible to maximize the dynamic range of the digital
medium. If the loudest section of audio is unknown, allow 3 to 6 dB of headroom for unexpected peaks.
Tip: From the Tools menu, choose Find and use the Find dialog to identify the largest peak in your file.
Using the channel meters
From the View menu, choose Channel Meters to open or close the channel meters. By default, Sound Forge software provides peak
meters that you can use to monitor your audio levels. You can also choose to display VU/PPM (peak program) meters, a phase scope,
and a mono-compatibility meter.
The peak meters display instantaneous levels during playback to help you determine the loudest level in your audio signal and whether
the signal is clipping.
To prevent clipping, keep an eye on your peak meters. Peak levels should never exceed 0 dB. You can use the Status tab in the
Preferences dialog to calibrate the VU/PPM meters to their associated levels on the peak meters and adjust the VU meters’ sensitivity.
Mono-compatibility meter
Phase scope
Peak meter
VU/PPM Meters
Showing or hiding the Channel Meters window
From the View menu, choose Channel Meters to open or close the channel meters. You can dock the Channel Meters window on any
edge of the Sound Forge workspace.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 33
Showing or hiding meters
You can display a peak meter, VU/PPM, a phase scope, and mono-compatibility meter for each channel. To toggle the display of each
meter, right-click the Channel Meters or Hardware Meters window and choose a command from the shortcut menu.
A check mark is displayed to indicate which meters are currently visible.
• For more information about VU/PPM meters, please see Using the VU meters on page 35.
• For more information about phase scopes, please see Using phase scopes on page 36.
• For more information about mono-compatibility meters, please see Using the mono-compatibility meters on page 37.
Resetting clipping indicators
When audio levels are too high, clipping can occur. A red indicator appears at the top of the meter to show when audio is clipping. Do
any of the following to reset the indicator:
• From the Options menu, choose Channel Meters, and then choose Reset Clip from the submenu.
• Click to reset the indicator, or right-click the meters and choose Reset Clip from the shortcut menu.
Click the clipping
indicator to reset it.
Clipping
indicator
You can also detect and mark clipped audio using the detect clipping tool. For more information, see Detecting and marking clipping on
page 98.
Changing the meters’ display resolution
The peak meters display levels in dB FS. To change the resolution of the meters, do either of the following:
• From the Options menu, choose Channel Meters, choose Peak Range from the submenu, and then choose a display range.
• Right-click the channel meter, choose Peak Range from the submenu, and then choose a display range.
Note: Choosing a wide range allows you to see low-level signals at the expense of precision display at high levels.
Changing the meters’ display options
You can choose whether labels, peaks, and valleys are displayed in the meters and whether the meters are displayed on top of other
windows when they are not docked.
Do either of the following to change the meters’ display options:
• From the Options menu, choose Channel Meters, and then choose a command from the submenu.
• Right-click the meters and choose a command from the shortcut menu.
Command
Description
Expand Meters
Interleave Meters
Show Labels
Hold Peaks
Hold Valleys
Always on Top
Toggles expanded-width meters. Turning off expanded meters can conserve screen space.
Toggles interleaved or stacked display of VU/PPM meters with the corresponding channel meters.
Toggles the meter level labels on and off.
When selected, the highest peak levels are represented by a thin line on the meter.
When selected, the lowest peak levels are represented by a thin line on the meter.
When this command is selected, the channel meters will always be displayed above any other windows.
34 | CHAPTER 2
To change the layout of the meters in the Channel Meters window, right click the meters, choose Layout from the shortcut menu, and
then choose a command from the submenu.
Command
Description
Horizontal/Vertical/
Auto
Narrow Width
Interleave Peak/VU
Choose a command to change the orientation of the meters in the Channel Meters window.
Toggles narrow- or normal-width meters. Using narrow meters can conserve screen space.
Toggles interleaved or stacked display of VU/PPM meters with the corresponding channel meters.
Routing channels to hardware outputs
You can change channel assignments from the Audio tab in the Preferences dialog or the Channel Meters window (for more
information, see Audio tab on page 248). Changing the setting in either location updates your preferences and affects all open data
windows.
To change a channel’s output device using the Channel Meters window, click the channel number and choose a new output port from
the menu:
Using the VU meters
You can display volume unit (VU) and peak program (PPM) meters in the Channel Meters and Hardware Meters windows to help you
determine the perceived loudness of your audio signal (peak program meters provide faster response times to volume increases than
VU meters). For more information on the channel meters, see Using the channel meters on page 33. For more information the hardware
meters, please see Using the hardware meters on page 92.
VU/PPM meters are especially helpful when you're mastering: comparing two audio files’ VU/PPM readings will help take the guesswork
out of matching levels
Right-click the Channel Meters or Hardware Meters window and choose Show VU/PPM from the shortcut menu to toggle the display of
the VU/PPM meters.
VU/PPM readings should fall near the 0 (or reference) mark. 0 VU is merely a reference level, and your signal may exceed 0 VU. To
prevent clipping, keep an eye on your peak meters. Peak levels should never exceed 0 dB. You can use the Status tab in the Preferences
dialog to calibrate the VU/PPM meters to their associated levels on the peak meters and adjust the VU meters’ sensitivity. For more
information, see Status tab on page 247.
Choosing a VU or PPM scale
To change the scale of the meter, choose Channel Meters from the Options menu, choose VU/PPM Scale, and then choose a setting
from the submenu (you can also right-click the meter to set its options).
VU and PPM scales are most useful for displaying the average volume of the signal: the meter represents the RMS average level during
playback, and their attack nd decay are not as sensitive as the peak meter.
PPM scales are useful for monitoring peak levels. The meters use a fixed integration time (5 or 10 ms) that is sensitive to increases in
volume, but the meters are less sensitive to decreases in volume than the VU scales, which produces less meter activity and decreased
eyestrain.
Item
Description
Traditional VU
Extended VU
Logarithmic VU
The traditional VU meter is displayed with a scale of –10 dB to +2 dB. 0 dB on the VU meter equals 4 dBu.
The extended VU meter is displayed with a scale of –30 dB to +8 dB. 0 dB on the VU meter equals 4 dBu.
Displays the meters in a logarithmic scale (like the Sound Forge peak meters) instead of the linear scales traditionally associated with
VU meters.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 35
Item
Description
UK PPM
The UK peak program meter (also known as a BBC meter) is a Type II meter and is displayed with a scale of 1 to 7, which corresponds to
a range of -12 to 12 dBu:
UK Marks
dBu
7
12
6
8
5
4
4
0
3
4
2
8
1
-12
The EBU peak program meter is a Type II meter and is displayed with a scale of –12 to +12, which corresponds to -12 dBu to 12 dBu. 0
on the EBU PPM equals 0 dBu.
The EBU PPM and UK PPM respond identically to increases in volume, but the EBU PPM decays more slowly.
The DIN peak program meter is a Type I meter and is displayed with a scale of –50 dB to +5 dB, which corresponds to -44 dBu to 11 dBu.
0 dB on the DIN PPM equals 6 dBu.
The Nordic peak program meter is a Type I meter and is displayed with a scale of –42 dB to +12 dB, which corresponds to -42 dBu to 12
dBu. 0 dB on the Nordic PPM equals 0 dBu.
EBU PPM
DIN PPM
Nordic PPM
Adjusting the VU meters’ sensitivity
Unlike peak meters — which read instantaneous changes in your audio signal — the VU/PPM meters read a portion of the signal and
calculate the average level. The size of the signal that the meters read is determined by the meters’ integration time.
To set the amount of data surrounding the cursor that will be used to calculate levels in the VU meters, specify a value in the VU meter
integration time box on the Status tab of the Preferences dialog.
The PPM scales use a fixed integration time:
Scale
Integration time
UK PPM
EBU PPM
DIN PPM
Nordic PPM
10 ms
10 ms
5 ms
5 ms
Changing the meters’ display resolution
The VU/PPM meters display levels in dB VU. To change the resolution of the meters, perform either of the following steps:
• From the Options menu, choose Channel Meters, choose VU/PPM Scale from the submenu, and then choose a display range.
• Right-click the channel meter, choose VU/PPM Scale from the submenu, and then choose a display range.
Choosing a wide range allows you to see low-level signals at the expense of precision display at high levels.
Showing labels
Right-click the meters and choose Show Labels from the shortcut menu to toggle the meter dB markings on and off.
Holding peaks and valleys
Right-click the meters to access the Hold Peaks and Hold Valleys commands in the shortcut menu.
• Choose Hold Peaks to display a marker on the meters indicating the highest reading.
• Choose Hold Valleys to display a marker on the meters indicating the lowest reading.
Using phase scopes
You can display a phase scope in the Channel Meters and Hardware Meters windows to find phase cancellation among the channels in
an audio file. For more information on the channel meters, see Using the channel meters on page 33. For more information the hardware
meters, please see Using the hardware meters on page 92.
Right-click the Channel Meters or Hardware Meters window and choose Show Phase Scope from the shortcut menu to toggle the
display of the phase scope.
36 | CHAPTER 2
To change the display, right-click the Channel Meters or Hardware Meters window, choose Phase Scope Style from the shortcut menu,
and then choose a setting from the submenu:
Style
Description
Lissajous - XY Plot
Lissajous - Rotated
Displays the right and left channels plotted along the X and Y axes of the graph.
Displays the right and left channels plotted along the X and Y axes of the graph. This
setting is identical to the Lissajous - XY Plot setting, but the graph is rotated 45 degrees.
Displays the right and left channels plotted vertically on the graph.
Displays the right and left channels plotted on a circular graph.
Polar - Linear Plot
Polar - Circular Plot
Using the mono-compatibility meters
You can display a mono-compatibility meter in the Channel Meters and Hardware Meters windows to detect correlations or differences
between the channels of a file that can cause phase cancellation when downmixing to mono. For more information on the channel
meters, see Using the channel meters on page 33. For more information the hardware meters, please see Using the hardware meters on page
92.
Right-click the Channel Meters or Hardware Meters window and choose Show Mono-Compatibility Meter from the shortcut menu to
toggle the display of the mono-compatibility meter.
When the channels are similar, the right (or top) half of the meter is illuminated:
When the channels exhibit phase cancellations, the left (or bottom) half of the meter is illuminated:
Controls
A major step in mastering Sound Forge software is becoming familiar with the controls used to set and adjust feature parameters,
including faders, sliders, and envelope graphs.
Faders and sliders
Faders and sliders are frequently used to edit effect and process parameters. To use either control, drag the control to the desired
position and release.
Fader
Drag to set value
Slider
Resetting fader and slider values
Double-click to return the control to its default value.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 37
Fader and slider shortcuts
There are numerous keyboard shortcuts available when using faders and sliders.
If you want to
Then use the following shortcuts
Change the value in small increments
-or-
Change the value in larger increments
Hover the mouse over the fader or slider control and press Ctrl while moving the
mouse wheel.
Page Up and Page Down
-or-
Set the control to its maximum and minimum values
respectively
Hover the mouse over the fader or slider control and move the mouse wheel.
Home and End
Envelope graphs
Envelope graphs are used to configure the shape of frequency or amplitude envelopes applied to audio waveforms.
Envelope point
Envelope
Time axis
Amplitude or
frequency axis
Understanding the envelope graph
To use the envelope graph, you must first understand what it represents. In the previous example, the horizontal axis represents time,
with the leftmost point representing the start of the selection and the rightmost point representing the end of the selection. The vertical
axis represents either amplitude or frequency, depending upon the operation.
Moving an envelope point
1. Drag an envelope point to a new position.
2. Release the mouse button. The point is repositioned and the envelope adjusts.
Moving multiple envelope points
1. Starting in an unused area of the envelope graph, drag the mouse to create a selection box containing all points to be moved.
38 | CHAPTER 2
2. Release the button. The selected envelope points are displayed with a white square center.
3. Drag any of the selected envelope points to the desired position. The pointer displays as a multi-directional arrow and the selected
points move together.
4. Release the mouse button. The entire envelope graph adjusts.
Reposition multiple envelope points
Changing the fade curve between two points
To change the type of fade between two envelope points, right-click an envelope segment and choose a fade type (Linear Fade, Fast
Fade, Slow Fade, Smooth Fade, Sharp Fade, and Hold) from the shortcut menu.
Selecting or clearing all envelope points
Press Ctrl+A to select or clear all envelope points.
Adding an envelope point
1. Hover over the envelope.
Place the pointer on the envelope
and double-click to add a point.
2. Double-click the mouse. A point is added to the envelope graph and can be positioned as needed. For more information, see Moving
an envelope point on page 38.
Deleting an envelope point
Right-click the point to be deleted and choose Delete from the shortcut menu. The point is deleted and the envelope adjusts.
Delete all points
Delete all envelope points by clicking the Reset Envelope button.
Displaying the waveform on an envelope graph
Certain envelope graphs (such as in the Graphic Fade dialog) allow you to view the audio waveform on the graph. If the selection is
small, the waveform automatically displays. Otherwise, selecting an option from the Show wave drop-down list displays the waveform.
Displaying multichannel waveforms
The Show Wave drop-down list allows you to specify how multichannel files display in the envelope graph.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 39
Multichannel files
When a data window displays a multichannel file, all channels are shown at the same time.
Working with multichannel files
When playing, editing, or processing multichannel files, you can select a single channel or all channels. However, certain processing
tasks cannot be performed on an individual channel of a multichannel file. For more information, see Single-channel editing on page 42, or
Editing Multichannel Audio on page 91.
Selecting data in multichannel files
When editing a multichannel file, you can use the mouse to select data simply by clicking and dragging in a data window. There are
several options for data selection in multichannel files.
1. Open a multichannel file.
2. Select the Edit tool by choosing Tool from the Edit menu and Edit from the submenu.
Tip: Press Ctrl+D or click the Edit Tool button
on the Standard toolbar.
3. Select the data:
•
Drag within a channel to select that channel only.
•
Double-click a channel number to select the entire channel.
40 | CHAPTER 2
•
Drag across channels to select multiple channels.
•
Drag along the divider between channels (or the loop bar above the ruler) to select all channels.
•
Hold Ctrl and click a channel to add or remove it from the current selection.
Toggling channel selections
Once you place the cursor or create a selection in a multichannel file, you can cycle through channel options by pressing Tab.
Previewing channels
The single channel selection option allows you to preview channels in a multichannel file individually.
1. Open a multichannel file and select all data.
2. Click the Play Normal button
. All channels play. Click the Stop button
.
3. Press Tab. The first channel is selected.
4. Click the Play Normal button
. Only the first channel plays. Click the Stop button
.
5. Press Tab. The second channel is selected.
6. Click the Play Normal button
. Only the second channel plays. Click the Stop button
.
LEARNING THE SOUND FORGE WORKSPACE | 41
Single-channel editing
You have the ability to cut, copy, and paste data in single channels of a multichannel file. However, channel lengths must always remain
equal in multichannel files. For more information on cutting, copying, and pasting data, see Editing audio on page 57.
42 | CHAPTER 2
Chapter 3 Getting Started
The Sound Forge® digital audio editing tool is for users from all musical backgrounds. It is an extremely deep program,
containing features that may only be required by the most advanced or specialized users. Nonetheless, a firm grasp of
Sound Forge basics is essential. This chapter is designed to provide you with information on Sound Forge fundamentals.
Creating a project
You can use Sound Forge project files to organize and work with your media files nondestructively. When you save a
project file, two things are created: a .frg file and a subfolder that contains your media file and all of the temporary files
created while working on your project. This file is not a multimedia file, but is used to render the final file after editing is
finished. When you copy, cut, paste, and otherwise edit your project, the process is nondestructive—meaning you can
edit without worrying about corrupting your source files. Within the project file, you can also undo any past operations,
including those occurring before your last save. Once you are finished working with a project file, you can save your work
to a media file using the Render As option on the File menu.
Note: To use the advanced undo/redo capabilities mentioned above, you must have the Allow Undo past Save check
box selected on the General tab of the Preferences dialog. To access the Preferences dialog, choose Preferences from the
Options menu.
1. From the File menu, choose Save As to save the current data window to a project file. The Save As dialog is
displayed.
2. Using the Save in drop-down list, locate the folder where you want to save the project.
3. From the Save as type drop-down list, choose Sound Forge Project File (*.frg).
4. In the File name box, enter a name for the file.
5. Click the Save button. A .frg file is created with the name you specified, and a folder with a similar name
(projectname_frg, for example) is created in the same location for the temporary files.
Important: The associated project folder created by this process should not be deleted, as this will cause your project file
to be unusable.
GETTING STARTED | 43
Getting media files
The software can open a variety of audio and video files. There are two main methods for locating, previewing, and opening media files:
• From the File menu, choose Open to display the Open dialog.
• From the View menu, choose Explorer to display the Explorer window.
These methods are explained in greater detail in the following sections.
Note: To have pulldown fields automatically removed when opening 24 fps progressive-scan DV video files, select the Allow pulldown
removal when opening 24p DV check box on the Video tab of the Preferences dialog. To open your 24p DV video files as 29.97 fps
interlaced video (60i), clear this check box.
Using the Open dialog
1. From the File menu, choose Open. The Open dialog is displayed.
Tip: Click the Open button
.
.
File Information Display
Select to automatically
preview files
The Open dialog contains several features that allow you to locate and open audio files. These features are detailed below.
Feature
Description
Files of type
Use this drop-down list to specify the file format displayed in the system. A variety of file formats are supported.
Recent
Merge L/R to stereo
Tip: Choose the CD Audio (*.cda) option from this list to extract audio tracks from a CD.
Use this drop-down list to locate recently accessed folders.
Select this check box and hold the Ctrl button while selecting two mono files in the browse window. The two
mono files will be merged to the left and right channels of a new stereo file.
The first file you select will be placed in the left channel, and the second file will be placed in the right channel.
Auto play
Compressed files are not supported for merging.
Select this check box to automatically preview files as you select them in the Open dialog.
2. Locate and select a media file using the Look in drop-down list at the top of the dialog.
3. To preview the file before adding it to your project, click the Play button.
Note: If you have the Auto play check box selected, your file will automatically begin previewing when you select it.
44 | CHAPTER 3
4. Click Open. The file is opened and a data window containing the waveform is displayed.
Using the Explorer window
In addition to using the Explorer window for locating, previewing and opening media, you can drag files or regions from the Explorer
window to an open data window to paste or mix the data. Click the right mouse button while dragging to toggle mix and paste dragand-drop modes. You can also extract audio from a CD.
Previewing media
The Explorer window allows you to easily preview files before you open them. The Explorer window has a mini-transport bar with Play,
Stop, and Auto Preview buttons
. When you preview a file, its stream is sent to the channel meters on the main workspace (for
audio files) or to the Video Preview window (for video files).
Note: To preview video files, you must have the Video Preview window open. To display the Video Preview window, choose Video
Preview from the View menu.
1. Select a file in the Explorer window.
2. Click the Play button
to listen to the file.
3. Click the Stop button
or select a different file to stop previewing the file.
Tip: To automatically preview selected files, click the Auto Preview button
on the Explorer window’s transport bar.
Opening media
To open a media file into a new data window from the Explorer window, double-click the file. To open a media file in a specific data
window, drag the media file from the Explorer window to the data window.
Obtaining or editing CD information
If Sound Forge can access information about a track or CD (either from the file or CD itself or from a local cache), it automatically reads
and displays this information when you insert a CD or browse your computer. However, if this information is not available, the software
can retrieve information over the Internet from Gracenote® MusicID™.
Once Sound Forge obtains information from Gracenote MusicID, it is saved to a local cache so the information displays more quickly the
next time the tracks are displayed.
GETTING STARTED | 45
If the software cannot connect to the Gracenote Media Database and the appropriate CD information is not available on your computer,
the tracks are simply listed numerically. In this case, you can edit CD information and submit it to the Gracenote Media Database.
Notes:
• Using Gracenote MusicID requires an active Internet connection.
• For more information on using Gracenote MusicID, please refer to the Gracenote Web site at
http://www.gracenote.com/cddb2info/using.html.
Locating matching CD information using Gracenote
1. Insert a CD in your drive.
2. Browse to the CD and click the MusicID
button in the Explorer window.
Gracenote MusicID attempts to obtain matching CD information and displays artist, album, and track data:
• If the service locates an exact match, this information is automatically displayed. No additional action is necessary.
• If the service locates multiple possible matches, the Match dialog is displayed. Proceed to step 2.
3. Choose a method for completing the CD information:
•
•
If none of the possible matches is appropriate, click the Submit New button. The Gracenote MusicID Disc Information dialog is
displayed, allowing you to complete information for the CD and submit it for inclusion in the Gracenote Media Database. For
help on submitting CD information, click the Help/Guidelines button in this dialog.
When you are finished typing information, click the OK button to submit your data.
Select the appropriate match from the list and click the Accept Match button. The artist, album, and track information is
displayed based on your selection in the right side of the PC pane.
Editing and submitting CD information to Gracenote
If a CD is not currently part of the Gracenote Media Database, you can submit it for inclusion.
1. Insert a CD in your drive.
2. Browse to the CD and click the MusicID
button in the Explorer window. The Gracenote MusicID Disc Information dialog is
displayed.
3. Use the Gracenote MusicID Disc Information dialog to edit information about the CD. For help on submitting CD information, click
the Help/Guidelines button in this dialog.
4. When you are finished entering the information, click the OK button to submit it for inclusion in the Gracenote database.
Extracting audio from CD
The Explorer window allows you to easily extract audio from a CD into a data window. Each audio track on the CD is extracted into a
separate data window.
1. Use the Explorer window to browse to and select your CD drive. The CD’s audio tracks display in the right pane of the Explorer
window.
2. Select the track(s) you want to extract.
3. Drag the track(s) to the main Sound Forge workspace. The software begins extracting the selected tracks into individual data
windows.
4. To stop the extraction process, you can click the Cancel button on the status bar to stop the whole process or on the individual
data windows to stop extracting a specific track.
Tip: To extract a single audio track into a new data window, double-click the track in the right pane of the Explorer window.
46 | CHAPTER 3
Using Explorer views
You can control the information that is displayed in the Explorer window by clicking the Views button
options are explained below:
Item
Tree View
Region View
Summary View
Details
All Files
and selecting a view. These
Description
Displays all of the available drives and folders that you may choose from to find files.
Displays any regions that have been defined in the selected media file.
Displays a short description of the selected media file at the bottom of the Explorer window.
Displays the file size, date and when the file was last created or last modified.
Displays all file types in the active folder.
Peak files
When you first open a file, the entire file is scanned and a peak file is created. The peak file is stored with the same name and in the same
location as the audio file, but it is given an .sfk extension. This peak file is automatically updated whenever the original file is edited.
If you modify a file in another application, you can regenerate the peak file by choosing Rebuild Peak Data from the Special menu.
Working with video files
The Sound Forge application has the ability to open and save many video file formats. The video files cannot be edited within the
software, but this functionality allows you to attach, detach, and edit audio for the video. Once you’ve edited the audio, you can preview
the audio and video together.
When you open a media file containing video, the data window displays the video portion in a video strip above the audio.
For more information, see Working with Video on page 223.
GETTING STARTED | 47
Playing a file
After you open a file, you can play it by clicking the Play All button
on page 27.
on the transport bar. For more information, see Transport toolbar
Viewing the current position
As a file plays, the current playback position is indicated in the data window in three ways:
• A cursor travels across the visible portion of the data window.
• The current playback position in relation to the entire file appears in the overview bar.
• The first selection status box in the playbar displays the current position in the user-specified format. For more information, see
Selecting status formats on page 65.
Cursor
position
Overview bar current
position
Status box value
Data window scrolling during playback
From the Options menu, choose Scroll Playback (or press F6) to enable automatic data window scrolling during playback. When the
cursor moves off of the current window, it will quickly scroll to show another full window of data.
To enable smooth scrolling, select the Scroll Smoothly option from the Options menu (or press Shift+F6). When this option is selected,
the cursor will slowly move back to the center of the display, and the wave data will scroll past it. This allows you to view upcoming data
while the file is being played.
Playing a file from a specified point
You can begin playback from any point in a file.
1. Click to position the cursor in the data window. A flashing cursor (spanning the height of the waveform display) is displayed.
2. Click the Play button
on the transport bar. The file plays from the cursor position.
If you do not hear playback, you may have inadvertently created a small selection. To determine if you created a selection, examine
the status boxes in the bottom-right corner of the data window.
Selection status bar
•
•
If only the first box contains a value, there is no selection.
If all three boxes contain values, a selection has been created. Clear the selection by clicking anywhere in the data window.
For more information, see Viewing selection status on page 49.
48 | CHAPTER 3
Playing in Loop Playback mode
You can play an entire file or a selection in Loop Playback mode. In Loop Playback mode, the audio is played in a continuous loop.
Click the Loop Playback button
on the transport bar (or press Q) to turn Loop Playback mode on and off.
Playing a selection
You can play specific portions of audio data by creating selections in the waveform display.
1. Drag the mouse within the data window. Notice that the waveform is selected as the mouse is dragged.
2. Click the Play button
. Only the selection plays.
Selection status bar
Viewing selection status
When a selection exists, the boxes in the selection status bar in the bottom-right corner of the data window contain values. These values
indicate the start, end, and length of the selection. Double-click a box to edit the value.
No selection
Cursor position
Selection
Selection start
Selection end
Selection length
Selecting the status format
You can display status values in any supported format. You can change the format by right-clicking and choosing a new format from the
shortcut menu. For more information, see Selecting status formats on page 65.
GETTING STARTED | 49
Viewing selection statistics
Choosing Statistics from the Tools menu displays a Statistics dialog showing information about the current selection or, if there is no
selection, on the entire file.
The following table describes all statistical categories displayed in the Statistics dialog.
Statistical Category
Description
Ruler Format
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to determine the format you would like to use for the Cursor position, Minimum sample
position, and Maximum sample position. For more information, see Selecting status formats on page 65.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to specify how the left- and right-channel levels at the cursor position will display.
• Values - Displays as an integer. The range is from -8388608 to 8388607 in 24-bit audio, -32768 to 32767 in 16-bit audio and -128 and
127 in 8-bit audio.
• Decibels - Displays as decibels. A value of 0 dB corresponds to maximum absolute amplitude and negative infinity (-Inf.) corresponds
to complete silence. In 16-bit audio, -90.3 dB is the lowest possible dB value (sample value of 1).
• Percentages - Displays as a percentage ranging from -100 to 100 percent.
The cursor position (in samples) from the start of the audio file.
The actual number stored by a single sample. The maximum allowed sample value is often referred to as 100% or 0 dB.
The maximum and minimum sample values and the locations (in samples) where they occur.
These values may help determine if clipping will occur in the audio file. These values can also be used to determine the noise level of a
signal for use with Noise Gate (a built-in XFX plug-in installed with Sound Forge). For example, to determine the noise amplitude of a
file, run Statistics on a region of noisy silence.
The Root Mean Square of the sample values relative to the RMS value of a maximum-amplitude square wave (the loudest possible
recording).
On short intervals, this value relates to the volume level of the audio file. If used on a large selection with large volume variation, this
value becomes less meaningful.
The sum of all sample values in the selected region divided by the number of samples. If this value is not zero, it usually indicates a DC
offset in the recording process.
The number of times per second that the waveform fluctuates from a negative to a positive value.
This value can be used as a rough estimate of the frequency of the audio data for very simple waveforms.
Copies all contents of the Statistics window to the clipboard. This can be useful if you want to compare statistics of multiple files in a
spreadsheet.
Note: To copy specific data or cell, select the cells that you want to copy and press Ctrl+C.
Level Format
Cursor position
Sample value at cursor
Maximum/minimum sample
position and sample value
RMS level
Average value
Zero crossings
Copy to Clipboard
50 | CHAPTER 3
Creating a new data window
1. From the File menu, choose New. The New Window dialog is displayed.
2. Complete the New Window dialog:
a. From the Sample rate drop-down list, choose a sample rate.
b. From the Bit-depth drop-down list, choose a bit depth.
c. Choose a setting from the Channels drop-down list to select the number of channels stored in the file.
For more information, see Editing file attributes on page 83.
3. Click OK. A new data window with the specified attributes is displayed.
Tip: New windows are automatically named for you. You can customize this automatic naming feature to suit your needs. For more
information, see Customizing marker labeling on page 97.
Active data windows vs. inactive data windows
When multiple data windows are displayed on the workspace, only the window currently being edited is active, and all operations affect
this window exclusively.
Activating a window
To activate a data window, click anywhere within it. The title bar changes to the color defined as the active window color and the
previously active window is deactivated.
Note: Choosing Focus to Data Window from the View menu also results in the focus being returned to the current data window.
GETTING STARTED | 51
Copying data to a new file
You can create new audio files by copying data to a new data window.
1. Open an audio file and create a selection.
2. From the Edit menu, choose Copy (or click the Copy button
). The selection is copied to the clipboard.
3. Create a new data window. For more information, see Creating a new data window on page 51.
4. From the Edit menu, choose Paste (or click the Paste button
). The selected data is pasted in the new data window.
Working with files
You can save a file in a variety of formats, including popular audio formats such as WAV and AIFF, and streaming media formats such as
Windows Media® Audio and RealMedia™. You can save a file using a standard template, or you can customize the settings to suit your
needs. Once you create custom settings, you can save those settings as a template.
You have the option to save all open files at once or to save all open files as a workspace file.
Saving a file
1. Click anywhere in the data window to select it.
2. From the File menu, choose Save.
Note: When saving a new file, the Save As dialog is displayed. If the file was previously saved, choosing Save automatically saves the file
without your input.
Using the Save As/Render As dialog
The Save As dialog allows you to save an audio file with a new name, in an alternate format, or with new attributes.
The Render As dialog allows you to render a file using a standard template, or you can customize the settings to suit your needs. Once
you create custom settings, you can save those settings as a template.
Select file type
Select recent directories
Select template
Template description
Select saving metadata option
Select video options
52 | CHAPTER 3
1. Click anywhere in the data window to select it.
2. From the File menu, choose Save As to display the Save As dialog.
If you’re working with a Sound Forge project file, you can use the Save As dialog to save your project to a different name or location.
Choose Render As to save your project as a media file.
3. Select the folder where you want to save the file:
a. From the Save in drop-down list, choose a drive and folder.
--or-b. From the Recent drop-down list, choose a folder where you have previously saved files.
4. In the File name box, enter a name for the file or select a file in the browse window to replace the existing file.
5. From the Save as type drop-down list, choose a file format.
If the selected file type supports it, you can choose an encoding template from the Template drop-down list, or click Custom to
create a new template. For more information, see Creating custom rendering settings on page 54.
If you know that the file format is unsupported, select Raw Audio and click the Custom button to display the Custom Template
dialog, where you can specify format parameter. For more information, see Creating custom templates on page 54.
6. In the Template drop-down list, choose a setting that will be used to save your file, or click the Custom button to create a new
template. For more information, see Creating custom templates on page 54.
Notes:
• When you convert from mono to stereo, the data will be stored in both channels. When converting from stereo to mono, the data from
both channels will be mixed to a single channel.
• When determining bit rates, 1K=1024.
7. If you want to preserve metadata (such as embedded data from other applications, regions, markers, commands, playlist, and
sampler information) in your file, select the Save metadata with file checkbox. For more information see Using Markers, Regions,
and the Playlist/Cutlist on page 95, Adding summary information on page 88, and Saving loop points on page 221.
If the check box is not selected, the data will be ignored when you save the file.
Note: If the file type selected in the Save as type drop-down list doesn’t support metadata, you are prompted to save the metadata in an
external file with an .sfl extension (using the same name as your media file). Metadata can be saved internally for the following file
formats: MP3, Windows Media Format (WMA and WMV), WAV, WAV64, SFA, PCA, Scott Studios.
8. If you are saving to a format with a different aspect ration than your source media settings, then select the Stretch video to fill
output frame (do not letterbox) check box.
Note: When this check box is not selected, black bars may appear at the top and bottom (letterboxing) or sides (pillarboxing) of the
frame to preserve the aspect ration. For more information, see Saving a video file on page 228.
9. If you see unacceptable video artifacts in the rendered video (these artifacts are most obvious with MPEG and streaming formats),
then clear the Fast video resizing check box.
Note: Turning this option off can correct the artifacts, but your rendering times will increase significantly. For more information, see
Saving a video file on page 228.
10. Click the Save button.
GETTING STARTED | 53
Creating custom templates
If the file type you select supports it, you can create custom settings for saving files by clicking the Custom button.
Note: If a file type supports custom templates, a Custom button displays next to the Template drop-down list after you choose the file
type.
When you click the Custom button, a Custom Template dialog is displayed. Adjust the settings for the different template properties as
needed. For help on the different settings, click the Help button
or press Shift+F1.
When you are finished editing the template properties, click the OK button.
Saving custom templates
You can save a custom template to use again by entering a template name in the Template box (in the Custom Template dialog) and
clicking the Save Template button
.
Deleting custom templates
You can delete a custom template by selecting the template from the Template drop-down list (in the Custom Settings dialog) and
clicking the Delete Template button
.
Creating custom rendering settings
The Custom Template dialog appears when you click Custom in the Render As dialog. You can use the Custom Template dialog to
create custom encoding templates for many of the file formats available in the software.
1. From the File menu, choose Render As. The Render As dialog is displayed.
2. Choose your preferred file format from the Save as type drop-down list. If the format allows you to create custom settings, the
Custom button becomes active.
3. Click Custom. The Custom Template dialog is displayed.
4. Make the appropriate setting changes for the chosen file format. For help on individual settings, click the Help button.
Tip: To save the custom settings for future use, enter a name for the template in the Template box and click the Save Template button.
5. Click OK. The Custom Template dialog closes.
Saving all open audio files
Choosing Save All from the File menu automatically prompts you to save all open audio files on the current workspace.
Note: Pressing Shift while choosing the Save All command automatically saves all open files without prompting you to approve each
save.
Saving files as a workspace
To accommodate complex editing scenarios, you can save the entire workspace as an alternative to saving individual files. Workspaces
are saved as Sound Forge Workspace (SFW) files. When you open a workspace file, all files are restored to their previous sizes, positions,
and magnification. In addition, each file’s current cursor position, custom views, and plug-ins in the Plug-In Chainer are restored. For
more information, see Creating and using views on page 82 and Using the Plug-In Chainer on page 160.
54 | CHAPTER 3
Saving the current workspace
1. From the File menu, choose Workspace, and choose Save As from the submenu. The Save Workspace dialog is displayed.
2. Browse to the folder where the file will be saved.
3. Enter a name for the file in the File name box and click Save.
Opening a workspace
1. From the File menu, choose Workspace, and choose Open from the submenu. The Open Workspace dialog is displayed.
2. Browse to the folder containing the desired SFW file.
3. Select the desired file and click Open.
Working with projects
Projects are new to Sound Forge software; however, if you’ve used ACID or Vegas software, then you’ll be quite familiar with how to use
Sound Forge projects. You should note that Sound Forge projects do function slightly different than ACID and Vegas projects.
A project file is not a multimedia file. It contains pointers to the original source files, so you can edit your project nondestructively
without changing your source files. When you edit a Sound Forge project, you can undo edit operations even past your last save. For
more information, see Using undo and redo on page 62.
Saving the project
1. Click anywhere in the data window to select it.
2. From the File menu, choose Save As to display the Save as dialog.
3. Select the folder where you want to save the file from one of the following locations:
•
•
From the Save in drop-down list, choose a drive and folder.
From the Recent drop-down list, choose a folder where you have previously saved files.
4. In the File name box, enter a name for the file or select a file in the browse window to replace the existing file.
5. From the Save as type drop-down list, choose Sound Forge Project File (*.frg). Sound Forge software creates a .frg file in the folder
you specified and creates a subfolder to store your sound and temporary files.
Note: Since a Sound Forge project contains all your original sound data plus all PCM temporary files, they can take some time to create.
Warning: Deleting a project’s [filename]_frg folder will break the project.
GETTING STARTED | 55
Saving the project path in the rendered file
1. Save your Sound Forge project. The project must be saved before you can embed the project reference in the rendered file.
2. Follow the steps in Using the Save As/Render As dialog on page 52 to choose the file type and location for rendering your files and
then select the Save project as path reference in rendered media check box.
Note: This check box will be unavailable if you did not save your project or if you are rendering using a third-party file-format plug-in.
3. Click Yes if you would like to open the file in a new window or click No if you would like to close the dialog and return to the Sound
Forge window.
Note: If you modify the project file after rendering, the project data will no longer match the rendered file. To edit a project using a path
reference, the project file and all media must be available on your computer.
Editing a media file’s source project
When your Sound Forge project uses source media files that are rendered with an embedded project path reference, you can easily
open the source project in the associated application if you need to edit the media. By saving your project path reference when you
render files in ACID, Sound Forge, or Vegas, you can quickly access the media from Sound Forge via the Edit Source Project shortcut
menu.
Note: The project information in the rendered file is only a reference to a project file. If you modify the source project file after rendering,
the project data will no longer match the rendered file. To edit a project using a path reference, the project file and all media must be
available on your computer.
1. Right-click one of the following items:
•
•
the waveform in a data window
a media file in the Explorer window
2. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit Source Project. An ACID, Vegas, or Sound Forge window will open with the source project.
If you are editing a source project using a computer other than the computer where the project was created, then the editing
computer must meet the following requirements:
•
•
•
•
The software that was used to create the project must be installed and the project file extension (.acd, .acd-zip, .veg, or .frg)
must be registered on the editing computer.
The editing computer must have the same version (or later) of the software as the computer where the project was created.
The project file must exist on the editing computer using the same file path as on the computer where the project was created.
The project’s source media must exist on the editing computer. If the media files do not use the same file path as on the
computer where the project was created, you will be prompted to choose a new folder or replacement files.
3. Edit the project as necessary.
4. Render the edited project using the same name as the original media file and close the editing application.
Note: If you are editing an existing track, your project will automatically be updated with the latest rendered media file.
56 | CHAPTER 3
Editing audio
New Sound Forge users should remember that even the most complex editing is derived from a few simple operations: copy, paste, cut,
delete (clear), trim/crop, and mix. The following table provides a brief description of the basic editing operations.
Editing Operation
Description
Copy
Paste
Copies data from the window to the clipboard.
Inserts the contents of the clipboard into the window at the current cursor position. If a selection exists in the data
window, the pasted data replaces the current selection.
Deletes data from the window and copies it to the clipboard.
Deletes data from the window, but does not copy it to the clipboard.
Deletes all data in the window with the exception of the selection.
Mixes data from the clipboard with the data in the current window, starting at the current cursor position or the start of
the current selection.
Cut
Delete (Clear)
Trim/Crop
Mix
Copying
You can copy audio data from a data window to the clipboard without changing the original file. Once audio data is on the clipboard,
you can paste it into existing files or use it to create new files.
Copying data to the clipboard
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file. This file is located in the same folder as the application.
2. Create a selection containing “Wow.”
3. From the Edit menu, choose Copy (or click the Copy button
). The selected data is copied to the clipboard, but the waveform is
unchanged.
Previewing clipboard contents
To preview the contents of the clipboard, choose Clipboard from the View menu, and choose Play from the submenu.
Tip: You can display detailed information on the size and attributes of the clipboard contents by choosing Clipboard from the View
menu and Contents from the submenu.
Recycling clipboard contents
Once audio data is on the clipboard, you can paste or mix it into an infinite number of windows. Data remains on the clipboard until you
replace it with new data. Pasting
Once audio data is on the clipboard, you can paste or mix it into an existing data window or use it to create a new data window.
GETTING STARTED | 57
Pasting data in an existing data window
Notes:
• Pasting into a multichannel file will insert data to all channels — the channels in a multichannel file must always be equal in length.
Silence is pasted to the unselected channel. If multiple channels were selected, the same data would be pasted to all selected channels,
and silence would be pasted to the unselected channel. If no channels were selected, the same data would be pasted to all channels.
• Pasting data of different sample rates will cause the data in the clipboard to play at the same rate as the rate of the window in which the
data is pasted.
• If any regions, markers, or loops are present in with the original sound data, they will also be pasted into the destination sound file. To turn
this feature off, turn off the Paste Events command on the Options menu.
1. After you have cut or copied your data, move the cursor to the beginning of the Voiceover.pca file by clicking the Go To Start
button
in the playbar. For more information on cutting or copying data, see Copying on page 57 or Cutting on page 59. For more
information on the playbar, see Playbar on page 25.
2. From the Edit menu, choose Paste (or click the Paste button
). The clipboard data is inserted into the file and the data for “Wow”
appears on the left side of the waveform.
Note: If there is a selection, the Paste command deletes the selected data before inserting.
3. To confirm that the data has been pasted into the file, click the Play All button
. “Wow. Wow. Sound editing just gets easier and
easier” plays back.
Pasting by dragging and dropping a selection
1. Choose the Edit tool
.
2. Drag the mouse in the data window to create a selection anywhere in Voiceover.pca.
Tip: If the Always open dropped files in new window check box on the General page of the Preferences dialog is cleared, you can also
hold Ctrl while dragging a file (or region) from the Explorer window to a data window to paste sound data. When the check box is
selected, dropping a file on the Sound Forge workspace always creates a new data window.
3. Hold Ctrl and drag the selection to the location where you want to paste the data. The cursor is displayed as a
, and a vertical
line is displayed to show you where the paste will occur.
Tip: When dragging a selection to paste sound data, drag up or down before moving the mouse left or right. Dragging left or right before
moving the mouse vertically adjusts the selection length.
4. You can click the right mouse button while dragging to toggle mix and paste drag-and-drop modes.
Pasting in a new data window
To use data from the clipboard to create a new data window, go to the Edit menu, choose Paste Special, and choose Paste to New from
the submenu. A new window containing the clipboard data in a single step is created.
58 | CHAPTER 3
Cutting
Cutting allows you to remove a section of sound data from a data window and store it on the clipboard until you paste or mix it into
another file. Cutting sound data replaces the previous contents of the clipboard. When deciding between cut and copy, consider the
following information:
• Copying data has no effect on the original file.
• Cutting data modifies the original file.
Cutting data from a window
Note: If you cut data from individual channels of multichannel files, the waveform will contain silence at the end of the cut channel. The
channels in a multichannel file must always be equal in length.
1. Create a selection containing the second “Wow” (there should be two if you are following the examples) in Voiceover.pca.
2. From the Edit menu, choose Cut (or click the Cut button ( ). The selected data is removed from the file and placed on the
clipboard.
3. Click the Play All button (
). “Wow. Sound editing just gets easier and easier” plays back.
Previewing a cut
You can preview cuts prior to performing the edit. This option allows you to determine if you made the selection accurately and if the
results are desirable by playing the data before and after the current selection.
1. Create a selection anywhere in Voiceover.pca.
2. From the Edit menu, choose Preview Cut/Cursor (or press Ctrl+K). The selection is ignored and the audio before and after the
selection is played to allow you to preview the cut.
Notes:
• To set the amount of pre- and post-roll that will be played when you preview a cut, choose Preferences from the Options menu and
choose the Previews tab. Enter values in the Pre-roll and Post-roll boxes in the Cut preview configuration section of the dialog.
• If there is no selection, the playback will pre- and post-roll around the cursor position.
GETTING STARTED | 59
Configuring cut pre-roll and post-roll lengths
Frequently, the default pre-roll and post-roll lengths are insufficient to evaluate the accuracy of an edit. For this reason, you can
configure pre-roll and post-roll lengths.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Previews tab.
3. Configure the Pre-roll and Post-roll values in the Cut preview configuration area of the dialog and click OK.
Deleting
Deleting a selection permanently removes it without placing it on the clipboard. To delete data, choose Delete (Clear) from the Edit
menu (or press the Delete key).
Notes:
• If you delete data from individual channels of multichannel files, the waveform will contain silence at the end of the deleted channel.
The channels in a multichannel file must always be equal in length.
• If the Treat as Cutlist command (available in the Special menu, Playlist/Cutlist submenu) is selected, deleting a selection creates a
region in the Cutlist window, but does not remove the selection. For more information, see Configuring the playlist as a cutlist on page
111.
Trimming/Cropping
Trimming allows you to retain a selection while deleting all surrounding data.
1. Create a selection containing “Wow, sound editing just gets easier” in Voiceover.pca, but do not select the second “and easier.”
2. From the Edit menu, choose Trim/Crop (or press Ctrl+T). Only “Wow, sound editing just gets easier” remains in the data window.
Mixing
Mixing is a powerful editing function that allows you to mix a copy of the clipboard contents at the current cursor position.
Mixing by dragging and dropping a selection
1. Open and play the Drumhit.pca file. The file contains a snare drum and crash cymbal sound.
2. Choose the Edit tool
60 | CHAPTER 3
.
3. Drag the mouse over the data window to select the entire waveform.
Tip: If the Always open dropped files in new window check box on the General page of the Preferences dialog is cleared, you can also
drag a file (or region) from the Explorer window to a data window to paste sound data. When the check box is selected, dropping a file on the
Sound Forge workspace always creates a new data window. For more information, see General tab on page 240.
4. Drag the selection to the beginning of the Voiceover.pca file. The cursor is displayed as a
, and a shaded selection box is
displayed to show you where the mix will occur.
You can click the right mouse button while dragging to toggle mix and paste drag-and-drop modes.
Tip: When dragging a selection within the same data window, drag up or down before moving the mouse left or right. Dragging left or
right before moving the mouse vertically adjusts the selection length.
5. When you release the mouse button to drop the selection, the Mix/Replace dialog is displayed. Choose a setting from the Preset
drop-down list, or adjust the controls as needed:
Item
Description
Source
Drag the Source fader to adjust the volume of the selection you want to mix.
Changing this setting has the same effect as dragging the sustain portion of the wet gain envelope in the data window.
Destination
Select the Invert Data check box to invert the source audio at the baseline (reverse the phase). Inverting data can help
match transitions and compare the phase relationship of the two sound files.
Drag the Destination fader to adjust the volume of the selection you want to mix over.
Changing this setting has the same effect as dragging the sustain portion of the dry gain envelope in the data window.
Fade In
Select the Invert Data check box to invert the destination audio at the baseline (reverse the phase). Inverting data can
help match transitions and compare the phase relationship of the two sound files.
Type a value in the Fade In box (or use the spinner) to set the length of the fade in between the source and destination
audio.
Changing this setting has the same effect as dragging the attack portion of the envelope in the data window.
Click the Fade Curves button
Proportional Fade
Lengths
Fade Out
and choose a curve type from the menu to set the speed of the fade in.
Select the Proportional fade lengths check box if you want to specify fade lengths as a percentage of the selection.
Type a value in the Fade Out box (or use the spinner) to set the length of the fade out between the source and
destination audio.
Changing this setting has the same effect as dragging the attack portion of the envelope in the data window.
Click the Fade Curves button
More
and choose a curve type from the menu to set the speed of the fade out.
Click to display additional controls at the bottom of the dialog that you can use to change the selection you want to
process.
6. Click the OK button to apply the mix.
Mixing audio from the clipboard
1. Open and play the Drumhit.pca file. The file contains a snare drum and crash cymbal sound.
2. Verify that the Drumhit.pca window is active and choose Select All from the Edit menu. The entire waveform is selected.
3. From the Edit menu, choose Copy (or click the Copy button
).
4. Activate the Voiceover.pca data window and click the Go To Start button
on the playbar. The cursor moves to the start of the
file.
5. From the Edit menu, choose Paste Special, and choose Mix from the submenu (or click the Mix button
). The Mix/Replace dialog
is displayed.
GETTING STARTED | 61
Set both faders to 0dB
6. Verify that the Source and Destination volume faders are set to 0 dB and click OK. The drum hit is mixed equally with the spoken
passage.
Both waveforms are combined
Preview the file and notice that mixing does not change the length of the file.
Using undo and redo
You can easily undo/redo edit operations, even prior to your last save operation.
• You can undo any edit operation by choosing Undo from the Edit menu (or click the Undo button on the Standard toolbar).
• You can redo any undone edit operation by choosing Redo from the Edit menu (or click the Redo
button on the Standard toolbar).
Important: The ability to undo past save is disabled by default. To enable this functionality, choose Preferences from the Options
menu, click the File tab, and select the Allow Undo past Save check box. When this option is enabled, your undo/redo history is retained
until you close the file or exit the software.
Using the Undo/Redo History window
The Undo/Redo History window may seem confusing at first, but you will find it invaluable once you have mastered it. This window
allows the audio file to be auditioned in various versions by undoing/redoing multiple operations.
To display the Undo/Redo History window, choose Undo/Redo History from the View menu (or press Alt+7).
Note: The undo/redo history for an audio file is retained until you close the file or exit the software. If you want to retain undo/redo
history indefinitely, you should work with a Sound Forge project (.frg) file.
62 | CHAPTER 3
Play
button
Performed operations
Undone operations
Undoing and redoing
1. Verify that the Voiceover.pca data window is active and choose Undo/Redo History from the View menu. The Undo/Redo History
window is displayed. If you have performed the previous procedures, the window should look like the figure below:
Notice that the Mix operation appears at the top of the Undo pane. The most recent operations always display at the top of the
appropriate list.
In the Undo pane, click the
corresponding to the Mix operation. The audio file plays without the drum track.
2. Select the Mix operation and choose Undo from the Edit menu. The drum track is extracted from the Voiceover.pca data window
and the Mix operation moves to the Redo pane.
GETTING STARTED | 63
3. In the Redo pane, click the
corresponding to the Mix operation. The audio file plays with the mixed drum track.
4. Select the Mix operation again and choose Redo from the Edit menu. The drum track is remixed into the Voiceover.pca waveform
and the Mix operation is returned to the Undo pane.
5. Select the Trim/Crop operation in the Undo pane and click
. Only the Mix operation is undone and moved to the Redo pane.
This is due to the fact that operations can only be undone or redone in the order originally performed.
6. Double-click the Cut operation in the Undo pane. The Cut and Trim/Crop operations are both undone in the waveform and moved
to the Redo pane.
Tip: To quickly undo/redo operations in the Undo/Redo History window, double-click the operation.
Clearing the Undo/Redo History for the current file
Clearing the current file’s Undo/Redo History frees up disk space by deleting the file’s temporary undo/redo files. However, deleting
these temporary files prevents you from undoing changes made to the file since it was last saved (or beyond, if you have the Allow
Undo past Save check box enabled on the General tab of the Preferences dialog). To clear the undo/redo history for the current file, go
to the Special menu, choose Undo/Redo History, and choose Clear from the submenu.
Note: A file’s undo/redo history is also automatically cleared when you close the file or exit the software.
Clearing the Undo/Redo History for all open files
You can simultaneously clear the undo/redo history for all open files. Once again, however, you cannot undo any previous changes once
these histories are deleted. To clear the undo/redo history for all open files, go to the Special menu, choose Undo/Redo History, and
choose Clear All from the submenu.
64 | CHAPTER 3
Selecting status formats
The status format determines how a file’s position and length information is displayed. The following table briefly describes supported
status formats (hh=hours, mm=minutes, ss=seconds, and ff=frames). For more information, see SMPTE Timecode on page 265.
Format name
Description
Format
Samples
Time
Seconds
Time & Frames
Absolute Frames
Number of samples
Hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds
Seconds and fractions of seconds
Hours, minutes, seconds, and frames.
Frames and fractions of frames
Measures & Beats
SMPTE Film Sync (24 fps)
Measures, beats, and quarter beats
SMPTE at 24 frames per second for
synchronizing with film
SMPTE at 25 frames per second for
European Broadcasting Union
SMPTE at 29.97 frames per second
SMPTE at 29.97 frames per second using
dropped frame numbers
SMPTE at 30 frames per second
Numbered (starting with zero)
hh:mm:ss.sss
sssss.sss (to three decimal places)
hh:mm:ss.ff
Numbered (starting with zero, to
three decimal places)
measures:beats.quarters
hh:mm:ss:ff
SMPTE EBU (25 fps, Video)
SMPTE Non-Drop (29.97 fps, Video)
SMPTE Drop (29.97 fps, Video)
SMPTE 30 (30 fps, Audio)
hh:mm:ss:ff
hh:mm:ss:ff
hh:mm:ss:ff
hh:mm:ss:ff
Experimenting with status formats
You can experiment with the Voiceover.pca file to see how status formats affect values in the selection status bar display boxes.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. From the Options menu, choose Status Format, and choose Samples from the submenu.
3. Select all data in the Voiceover.pca window by choosing Select All from the Edit menu. Notice the selection status boxes.
•
•
•
The first selected sample is sample 0.
The last selected sample is 220,507.
The total number of samples in the selection is 220,507.
4. From the Options menu, choose Status Format, and choose Time from the submenu. Notice that status values change from
samples to hours, minutes, and seconds.
5. From the Options menu, choose Status Format, and choose SMPTE Non-Drop (29.97 fps, Video) from the submenu. Notice that
status values change to hours, minutes, seconds, and frames.
6. Experiment with each status format and make note of how each format displays.
Notes:
• Selecting a new format changes the status format for the current data window only.
• To quickly change a file’s status format, right-click any of the data window’s status display boxes and choose a new format from the
shortcut menu.
Configuring the Measures & Beats format
Choosing the Measures & Beats format allows you to specify the beats per minute and beats per measure values used to calculate
measures and beats.
GETTING STARTED | 65
Changing a file’s beat values
1. From the Special menu, choose Edit Tempo. The Edit Tempo dialog is displayed.
2. Enter an appropriate value in the Tempo in beats per minute box.
3. Enter an appropriate value in the Number of beats in a measure box and click OK.
Alternately, you can make a selection in the file equal to one measure, and then enter the number of beats in the sample measure in the
Selection length in beats box. The Tempo in beats per minute value is automatically calculated based on the selection length and
number of beats.
Changing the default beat values
The previous procedure changes the beat values for the current audio file only. Use the following steps to change the Sound Forge
default beat values.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Status tab.
3. Enter an appropriate value in the Default beats per measure box.
4. Enter an appropriate value in the Default beats per minute box and click OK.
Publishing to the Web
You can share your media file with others by publishing it to the Web from within the software. You can upload your file to
ACIDplanet.com or another publishing provider. From the File menu, choose Publish and follow the instructions to set up your
publishing provider(s) and upload your content.
Exporting to CD Architect software
You can export your Sound Forge audio files directly to CD Architect 5.2 software.
Exporting a single audio file
This feature allows you to add your Sound Forge audio files to the CD Architect timeline one file at a time.
1. Open the file that you want to add to your CD Architect project.
2. Click anywhere in the data window that you want to export to establish focus.
3. From the File menu, choose Export to CD Architect.
•
•
If CD Architect software is not running, the application will be started and the audio file will be added to the timeline and
Media Pool of a new project.
If CD Architect software is running, the audio file will be added to the timeline and Media Pool of the open project.
Note: A separate CD track will be created for each region in the media file.
4. Use CD Architect software to edit your CD project as needed.
66 | CHAPTER 3
Exporting all audio files
This feature allows you to add all of your open Sound Forge audio files to the CD Architect timeline.
1. Open the file that you want to add to your CD Architect project.
2. From the File menu, choose Export All to CD Architect.
•
•
If CD Architect software is not running, the application will be started and all open audio files will be added to the timeline and
Media Pool of a new project.
If CD Architect software is running, all open audio files will be added to the timeline and Media Pool of the open project.
3. Use CD Architect software to edit your CD project as needed.
Exporting to Net MD devices
You can export your Sound Forge audio files to your Net MD device.
1. From the File menu, choose Export to Net MD.
2. Type information about your project:
a.
b.
c.
d.
In the Name of track box, type the name you want to use to identify your audio file on your Net MD device.
In the Name of artist box, type the artist name you want to associate with this track on your device.
In the Name of genre box, type the genre you want to associate with this track on your device.
In the Comment for track box, type any comments you want to associate with this track on your device.
3. Click the Export button. Your project is converted to the appropriate format for your device and begins transferring when
conversion is complete.
Recovering files after a crash
If Sound Forge software terminates improperly, you can recover all open and unsaved audio files not opened in read-only mode. When
a file is opened, it automatically creates temporary files that it uses to save any changes made to the file. The original file remains
unchanged until it is saved. If the software terminates improperly, the temporary files remain on your hard drive and can be used to
recover any unsaved changes made prior to the crash.
Tip: You can specify the folder used to store temporary files by choosing Preferences from the Options menu and designating a
Temporary files and record folder location on the General tab.
Recovering files
Click the Recover button to restore the changes and undo history for the files listed in
the Files that can be recovered list.
Deleting recovered files
Click the Cancel button to delete the temporary files. The original media files remain
unchanged.
GETTING STARTED | 67
68 | CHAPTER 3
Chapter 4 Navigating, Zooming, and Selecting
This chapter introduces some of the Sound Forge® navigation and selection features.
Setting the cursor position
While you can click anywhere in the waveform to position the cursor, there are times when you may need to position the
cursor more precisely. You can use the Go To dialog to move the cursor to a specific point in an audio file and center it in
the data window.
Tip: You can also use a variety of keyboard shortcuts to position the cursor. For more information, see Cursor movement on page 256.
1. Choose Go To from the Edit menu.
Tip: You can also use the following methods:
• Right-click the waveform, choose Cursor, and choose Go To from the submenu.
• Press Ctrl+G.
2. Set the cursor position using one of the following methods:
•
•
From the Go To drop-down list, choose a preset.
From the Input format drop-down list, choose a format and enter an appropriate value in the Position box.
3. Click OK. The cursor is placed at the specified position in the data window.
Previewing audio with pre-roll
Many audio editing operations depend upon accurate placement of the cursor in the data window. The Pre-roll to Cursor
command allows you to preview audio data leading up to the current cursor position. This command is extremely useful
when recording punch-ins. For more information, see Choosing a recording mode on page 119.
A 1.5 second pre-roll is automatically designated. However, you can change this value if necessary. For more information,
see Configuring cut pre-roll and post-roll lengths on page 60.
1. Place the cursor anywhere in the data window.
2. From the Edit menu, choose Pre-roll to Cursor (or press Ctrl+Shift+K). The Sound Forge software plays the audio
leading up to the cursor and stops at the cursor.
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 69
Using the overview bar
When navigating or editing a file, the overview bar changes to reflect the current position in the file.
Title bar
Overview bar
Time ruler
The overview bar represents the length of the entire file zoomed out to its maximum position. By observing the overview bar, you can
determine the following items:
• The section of the audio file currently displayed in the data window.
• The location and size of a selection in relation to the audio file and data window.
• The current cursor location.
Understanding the overview bar
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file and verify that the waveform display is zoomed completely out (1:512 in this case).
The entire overview bar is bracketed
Notice that the entire overview bar is bracketed, indicating that the entire file appears in the data window.
2. Place the mouse pointer over the word “Wow,” and click. A small vertical marker, representing the cursor, appears in the overview
bar.
3. Create a selection containing the word “Wow.” A shaded block, sized in relation to the size of the selection within the entire audio
file, appears in the overview bar.
70 | CHAPTER 4
4. Click the Zoom In button
twice. The bracketed area in the overview bar becomes incrementally smaller as less of the waveform
appears in the data window.
Zooming in on a selection decreases the size of the bracketed area
However, the selection remains the same size and does not move. This allows you to quickly locate a selection, even when another
section of an audio file is displayed.
Navigating in the overview bar
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Click the Zoom In button
until you reach a 1:32 zoom ratio.
3. Click outside the bracketed region in the overview bar. The cursor position changes, but the cursor is located beyond the scope of
the data window.
4. Double-click anywhere in the overview bar. The cursor position updates and centers in the data window.
Playing audio in the overview bar
To make navigating a file from the overview bar easier, you can start audio playback from the overview bar.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Right-click the overview bar. Playback of the file begins from the cursor location.
3. Right-click the overview bar again. Playback pauses.
4. Right-click the overview bar once more and immediately left-click at several random positions in the overview bar. Each time you
click the mouse in the overview bar during playback, the cursor jumps to the new location and playback continues. The feature is
useful for quickly navigating a file and locating general events.
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 71
Scrubbing
Scrubbing is a type of timeline playback that gives you precise control over the speed and direction of playback. Both linear and
logarithmic scale scrubbing are allowed.
Tip: Choose a setting from the JKL/shuttle speed drop-down list on the Editing tab of the Preferences dialog to control the scrub speed
and range when using the keyboard or multimedia controllers.
Scrubbing with the scrub control slider
The scrub control slider
, located at the bottom of the data window, can be dragged back and forth. The farther from the center
that the slider is dragged, the faster the playback, both forward and in reverse.
Note: You can also drag the Normal Rate indicator
, which is located below the scrub control, to adjust playback speed or
double-click Rate and type a playback rate.
Scrubbing on the timeline
You can scrub the project by using the timeline.
1. Position the cursor on the timeline, hover the mouse pointer over the cursor and press Ctrl. The
mouse pointer changes to a speaker icon.
2. Left click and drag the mouse left or right to scrub the timeline. The cursor changes again to a
pan/scrub icon.
Left-click and
drag to scrub
Press Ctrl over
timeline cursor
Scrubbing with the keyboard
Three letters (JKL) are used as a keyboard scrub control.
•
•
•
Press J for reverse playback. Press again to accelerate the playback rate.
Press L for forward playback. Press again to accelerate the playback rate.
Press K to pause playback.
There are several ways to adjust the playback speed:
•
•
•
Keyboard scrub letters
J
K
L
Reverse
Pause
Forward
Hold K while pressing J or L to emulate a shuttle knob mode.
Press K+J to turn the knob to the left or K+L to turn the knob to the right.
Press K again or Space to return to normal mode.
Scrubbing with the audio event locator
Dragging the mouse within the overview bar initiates playback of small audio loops adjacent to the cursor position. This is not
technically a scrub function, but it serves a similar purpose. It allows you to audition brief audio segments and quickly locate specific
events within a file. Playback stops when the mouse button is released.
Configuring the audio event locator
You can set the amount of pre-roll and loop duration for the audio event locator.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Previews tab.
3. In the Audio event locator section, edit the Pre-roll and Loop time values as desired and click OK.
72 | CHAPTER 4
Zooming and magnifying
Since there are considerably more samples in a sound file than horizontal points (pixels) on the screen, many data samples must be
represented by each horizontal point when audio data displays in the data window. Depending upon the editing operation, you may
want to view the entire file at once or a small portion of data in greater detail. For this reason, you can utilize two varieties of zooming:
time ruler zooming and level ruler zooming.
Zooming the time ruler (horizontal)
The current time ruler magnification ratio appears in the lower-right corner of the data window above the status boxes.
Zoom out
Zoom out
Maximize width of
window
Zoom ratio
Understanding the zoom ratio
The zoom ratio determines the number of samples represented by each horizontal point on the screen. The zoom ratio is a value of X:Y,
where X is the number of horizontal points and Y is the number of samples. If the ratio is 1:1, each point on the screen represents one
sample. At this zoom ratio, a brief but detailed selection of time is displayed.
Waveform at 1:1 zoom ratio
Conversely, if the zoom ratio is 1:1024, 1,024 samples are represented by each point on the screen and a greater length of time is
displayed.
For very precise editing, you may want to zoom in more tightly than a 1:1 ratio. Sound Forge allows up to a 24:1 ratio, where 24 points
on the screen represent one sample. This high level of zoom may be useful when editing with the Pencil tool. For more information, see
Repairing audio glitches manually with the Pencil tool on page 134.
Waveform at 24:1 zoom ratio
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 73
Changing the zoom ratio
To edit the zoom ratio, use the Zoom In/Out spin control located adjacent to the zoom ratio display.
• Clicking the plus/minus buttons increases/decreases the zoom ratio by single-step increments.
• Dragging the spin control increments the zoom ratio quickly in the corresponding direction.
Notes:
• When a file is opened, the horizontal magnification is set to the value specified by the Normal zoom ratio setting in the Display tab in the
Preferences dialog. To access the Preferences dialog, choose Preferences from the Options menu.
• Right-clicking the waveform display allows you to quickly access time ruler zoom commands from the shortcut menu.
Using zoom time commands
If you prefer using commands, you can control the time magnification from the View menu. The following table briefly describes the
available time zoom commands. You can access these commands from the View menu by choosing Zoom Time and choosing the
desired command from the submenu.
Command
Description
In Full
Normal
Out Full
Selection
Custom Zoom X:Y
Increases the zoom ratio to represent each audio sample with 24 screen pixels (24:1 zoom ratio).
Returns the file to its default zoom ratio.
Changes the zoom ratio to display the entire file within the data window.
Changes the zoom ratio to maximize the display and center the selection within the data window.
Sets the zoom ratio to a custom setting. For more information, see Using custom zoom settings on page 75.
Zooming the level ruler (vertical)
Zooming along the level ruler displays a larger vertical waveform and allows for more precise editing at low audio amplitudes.
Level ruler zooming controls
Zoom in
Zoom out
Changing the level zoom
To edit the level ruler zoom, use the Zoom In/Out spinner control located above the playbar.
• Clicking the plus/minus buttons increases/decreases the level ruler zoom by single-step increments.
• Dragging the spin control increments the level ruler zoom quickly in the corresponding direction.
At high zoom levels, only low-level samples are visible because the peaks of the waveform move beyond the vertical scope of the data
window. Consider the following data windows.
74 | CHAPTER 4
Level zoom out maximum
Level zoom in maximum
Both data windows display the same audio file at a 1:1 zoom ratio. The window on the left shows the level ruler zoomed to its maximum
out position. The window on the right shows the level ruler zoomed to its maximum in position. Notice that wave peaks clearly visible in
the left window are out of display range in the right window.
Using zoom level commands
If you prefer using commands, you can control the level magnification from the View menu. The following table briefly describes the
three available zoom level commands. You can access these commands from the View menu by choosing Zoom Level and choosing
the desired command from the submenu.
Command
Description
Out Full
Window
Selection
Decreases the zoom level to minimize the display of the file’s amplitude.
Changes the level zoom to display the entire waveform amplitude in the data window.
Maximizes the display of the selection (vertically and horizontally) in the data window.
Formatting the level ruler
You can configure the level ruler to display in decibels or percent by right-clicking the ruler and choosing Label in Percent or Label in
dB from the shortcut menu.
Using custom zoom settings
You can create two custom time zoom settings for quick access to time magnification levels that you use frequently.
Creating custom zoom settings
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Display tab.
3. Select time magnification settings from the Custom zoom ratio 1 and Custom zoom ratio 2 drop-down lists.
4. Click OK.
Zooming to custom settings
From the View menu, choose Zoom Time, and choose a custom zoom setting from the submenu.
Tip: You can also click a Custom Zoom button
or
on the Navigation toolbar or press 1 or 2 on the numeric keypad.
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 75
Using zooming shortcuts
Zooming to a selection
1. Create a selection. If no selection is created, this function is not available.
2. Right-click the waveform and choose Zoom Selection from the shortcut menu. The minimum zoom ratio that allows the full
selection to display in the window is calculated, and the selection is then zoomed and centered in the data window.
Note: To reverse this function, right-click the waveform, choose Zoom, and choose Out Full from the submenu.
Zooming the window
Right-click the level ruler and choose Zoom Window from the shortcut menu. The maximum zoom level that allows the loudest portion
of the selection to display in the window is calculated and the entire sound file is adjusted.
Note: To reverse this function, right-click the level ruler and choose Zoom Out Full from the shortcut menu.
Zooming out full
To quickly display all data in a data window, right-click the waveform, choose Zoom, and choose Out Full from the submenu. This
command sets the zoom ratio and zoom level to the lowest values required to display all data in the window.
Note: To reverse this function, go to the View menu, choose Zoom Time, and choose Normal from the submenu.
Zooming in full
To quickly set the zoom factor to its maximum magnification, right-click the waveform and choose Zoom In Full from the shortcut
menu. The maximum magnification available is 24:1.
Note: To reverse this function, right-click the waveform and choose Zoom Normal from the shortcut menu.
Optimizing time and level ruler scaling
To optimize both the time ruler and level ruler display of a selection, double-click the level ruler. Double-clicking the level ruler a second
time restores both displays to their default levels.
Using the Magnify tool
The Magnify tool provides an additional way to magnify a section of an audio file. You can access the Magnify tool in three ways:
• From the Edit menu, choose Tool, and choose Magnify from the submenu.
• Click the Magnify Tool button on the Standard toolbar.
• Click the Edit Tool Selector in the upper-left corner of the data window until the Magnify tool is displayed.
When you select the Magnify tool, the cursor displays as
. You can use this tool to create a selection box indicating how audio data is
magnified. By using the Magnify tool and toggle-clicking the mouse, you can toggle between time zoom, level zoom, and simultaneous
time/level zoom. For more information, see Using the mouse on page 19.
Zooming the time ruler with the Magnify tool
1. Drag the Magnify tool on the waveform to make a small selection box.
2. Toggle-click the mouse until the selection box is the same height as the data window.
76 | CHAPTER 4
3. Drag the Magnify tool to create a time zoom selection and release the mouse button. The zoom ratio of the selection increases.
Selection box spans the height of the window
The selection is time zoomed
Zooming the level ruler with the Magnify tool
1. Drag the Magnify tool on the waveform to make a small selection box.
2. Toggle-click the mouse until the selection box is the full width of the data window.
3. Drag the Magnify tool to create a level zoom selection and release the mouse button. The zoom ratio of the selection increases.
Selection box spans the width of the window
The selection is level zoomed
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 77
Zooming both time and level with the Magnify tool
1. Drag the Magnify tool on the waveform to make a small selection box.
2. Toggle-click the mouse until the selection displays as a box.
3. Drag the Magnify tool to create a time/level zoom selection and release the mouse button. The level zoom and time zoom of the
selection increase.
Selection displays as a box
The selection time and level are zoomed
Selecting audio using start and end values
You can select audio by dragging the mouse or by using keyboard shortcuts (pg. 257). For the sake of accuracy, however, it is often useful to
create selections by entering specific start and end point values. The Set Selection dialog allows you to create selections in this way or by
choosing a preset selection from the Selection drop-down list.
1. From the Edit menu, choose Selection, and then choose Set from the submenu (or press Ctrl+Shift+D). The Set Selection dialog is
displayed.
2. From the Input format drop-down list, choose the format to be used for creating the selection. The values in the Start, End, and
Length boxes change to reflect the specified format.
3. Configure the selection by entering appropriate values in the Start and End or the Start and Length boxes.
4. If you are working with a stereo file, choose Left, Right, or Both from the Channel drop-down list, or, for a multichannel file, type
the appropriate channel number(s) in the Channel box.
5. Click OK.
Using the Set Selection dialog
The following sections briefly describe additional controls located in the Set Selection dialog.
Control
Description
Play
Play looped
Snap Zero
Clicking Play plays the current selection.
Selecting the Play looped check box allows you to play the selection in Looped Playback mode.
Clicking Snap Zero forces the Start and End values of the selected area to the next zerocrossing.
Clicking Snap Time forces the Start and End values of the selected area to a whole time division
as designated by the markings on the data window’s time ruler.
Snap Time
78 | CHAPTER 4
Zero-crossing preference
When using a Snap-Zero command, you can configure the application to snap to positive slope, negative slope, or either slope zerocrossings.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the Editing tab.
2. From the Snap to zero-crossing slope drop-down list, choose the desired slope and click OK.
Selecting audio during playback
You can create selections during playback using the Mark In and Mark Out commands. These commands place temporary markers in
the data window, which are then used to create a loop region. While you can place these markers by choosing Mark In and Mark Out
from the Special menu, the keyboard equivalents are more useful.
1. Play the audio file in the current data window.
2. During playback, press I where the selection will begin.
3. Press O where the selection will end. A loop region is created using the in and out points you identified.
Fine-tuning a selection
After creating a selection, you may discover that the start or end point has not been positioned properly. In cases like this, you can try to
reselect the data, but it can be difficult to accurately create selection points. For this reason, you have a number of tools designed to
help you fine-tune selections.
If you find that the selection jumps unexpectedly as you fine-tune it, snapping may be turned on. For more information, see
Understanding snapping on page 80.
Adjusting a selection with the mouse
You can fine-tune selection start and end points by dragging the edge of the selection to a new location.
1. Open a file and create a selection in the waveform.
2. Position the mouse pointer over one of the selection edges. The pointer displays as a bi-directional arrow
.
3. Drag the selection edge to a new position.
Drag the edge of the selection to a new position.
4. Release the mouse button. The selection updates.
Adjusting a selection with the keyboard
Using the keyboard, you can quickly and accurately select data or update a selection. For more information, see Selecting data on page
257.
Restoring a selection
If you lose a selection while editing, you can restore it by choosing Toggle Selection from the Special menu or by pressing Backspace.
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 79
Understanding snapping
If, when extending a selection, the end points seem to “jump” to a different position, an auto snap option is turned on.
Turn snapping on or off
From the Options menu, choose Enable Snapping to turn snapping on or off. When snapping is enabled, objects will snap to the
following points:
• The cursor
• Time selection edges
You can also choose to snap events to grid divisions, markers, or zero crossings.
Snapping to the grid
When snapping is enabled, you can also choose to have objects snap to whole time divisions as designated by the marks on the time
ruler above the data window.
From the Options menu, choose Snap to Grid to toggle snapping to grid lines.
Tip: To change the resolution of the grid, choose Status Format from the Options menu and then choose a setting from the submenu
(or right-click the time ruler and choose a format from the shortcut menu).
Snapping to markers
When snapping is enabled, you can also choose to have elements in the data windows snap to markers.
From the Options menu, choose Snap to Markers to toggle snapping for the following marker types:
• Markers
• Regions
• Command markers
For more information, see Using Markers, Regions, and the Playlist/Cutlist on page 95.
Snapping to zero-crossings
When snapping is enabled, you can also choose to have elements in the timeline snap to zero-crossings.
From the Options menu, choose Snap to Zero Crossings to toggle snapping to zero crossings.
Tip: To turn Snap to Zero Crossings on and off, press Ctrl+B.
Snapping the current selection
From the Edit menu, choose Selection, and then choose a command from the submenu to force the edges of the current selection to
the points you choose. Snapping helps you align your selection with items in the data window.
Note: If you want to use snapping when positioning the cursor and making selections, you can use the commands on the Options menu
to enable snapping and set snapping options.
80 | CHAPTER 4
The Selection submenu commands are explained below:
Command
Description
Snap to Grid
This option forces both edges of a selection to a whole time division as designated by the marks on the time ruler above the data
window.
Tips:
• You can also press T.
• To change the resolution of the grid, choose Status Format from the Options menu and then choose a setting
from the submenu (or right-click the time ruler and choose a format from the shortcut menu).
Snap Edge to Grid
This option forces the active edge of a selection to a whole time division as designated by the marks on the time ruler above the
data window.
The active edge of a selection is defined by the blinking cursor. Press Home or End to change the active edge.
Tips:
• You can also press Shift+T.
• To change the resolution of the grid, choose Status Format from the Options menu and then choose a setting
from the submenu (or right-click the time ruler and choose a format from the shortcut menu).
Snap to Zero
This option forces both edges of a selection to the next zero-crossing of the waveform. Performing edits at zero-crossings reduces
the possibility of introducing glitches in your sound file.
Tips:
• You can also press Z.
• The Editing tab in the Preferences dialog allows you to choose whether this is a negative, positive or any zerocrossing.
Snap Edge to Zero
This option forces the active edge of a selection to the next zero-crossing of the waveform. Performing edits at zero-crossings
reduces the possibility of introducing glitches in your sound file.
The active edge of a selection is defined by the blinking cursor. Press Home or End to change the active edge.
Tips:
• You can also press Shift+Z.
• The Editing tab in the Preferences dialog allows you to choose whether this is a negative, positive or any zerocrossing.
Extend to Next Zero
This option forces both edges of a selection to the next zero-crossing of the waveform. Performing edits at zero-crossings reduces
the possibility of introducing glitches in your sound file.
Tips:
• You can also press Z.
• The Editing tab in the Preferences dialog allows you to choose whether this is a negative, positive or any zerocrossing.
Extend Edge to Next Zero
This option forces the active edge of a selection to the next zero-crossing of the waveform. Performing edits at zero-crossings
reduces the possibility of introducing glitches in your sound file.
The active edge of a selection is defined by the blinking cursor. Press Home or End to change the active edge.
Tips:
• You can also press Shift+Z.
• The Editing tab in the Preferences dialog allows you to choose whether this is a negative, positive or any zerocrossing.
Disabling auto-snapping at high magnifications
When editing an audio file displayed at a high magnification, you may wish to turn off snapping to time or zero-crossings. This allows
you to position a selection’s start and end points exactly where you choose.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the Editing tab.
2. Select the Disable auto-snapping below 1:4 zoom ratios check box and click OK.
NAVIGATING, ZOOMING, AND SELECTING | 81
Creating and using views
Views are used to save and recall selections, zoom ratios, and waveform display positions. The Sound Forge software can retain eight
different views for any audio file, each containing any or all of the following elements:
•
•
•
•
Selection
Cursor position
Magnification
Position scroll bar placement
Tip: Views are discarded when you close the file. To save views with a file, save the file as part of a workspace. For more information, see
Saving files as a workspace on page 54.
Displaying the Views toolbar
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars.
2. Select the Views check box and click OK. The Views toolbar is displayed.
Views toolbar
Creating views
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file and create a selection containing “Wow.”
2. Click the Set button
on the Views toolbar. A view can now be created.
Click the Set button
3. Click
. The selection is saved as view 1 and
is underscored to indicate that a view was created.
The 1 button is underscored
to indicate that a view was created.
4. Create a new selection anywhere in the audio file, preferably at an increased magnification.
5. Click the Set button
followed by
. The selection is saved as view 2.
6. Click
. The view 1 selection is displayed.
7. Click
. The view 2 selection is displayed.
82 | CHAPTER 4
Chapter 5 Changing File Attributes and Formats
This chapter deals with the supported file attributes and formats in Sound Forge® software and discusses file summary
information.
Editing file attributes
When you open or create a file, its attributes display in the first four boxes of the status bar at the bottom of the Sound
Forge workspace. The file attributes are sample rate, bit depth, channels, and length.
File attributes in the status bar
Sample rate
Bit depth
Channels
Total file length
Free storage available
With the exception of the file length, you can edit audio file attributes in the Properties dialog or from the status bar.
Editing attributes in the Properties dialog
You can edit file attributes in the Properties dialog.
1. From the File menu, choose Properties. The Properties dialog is displayed.
Tip: You can also access the Properties dialog by performing either of the following actions:
• Right-click the waveform display and choose Properties.
• Press Alt+Enter.
2. Click the Format tab.
3. Edit the file attributes as needed and click OK.
Editing attributes in the status bar
You can quickly edit individual file attributes from the status bar using either of the following methods:
• Right-click the status value to be changed and choose a new value from the shortcut menu.
• Double-click the status value to be changed and type a new value in the edit box.
CHANGING FILE ATTRIBUTES AND FORMATS | 83
Changing the sample rate
The sample rate is the number of samples per second, measured in hertz (Hz), used to record audio. You can specify sample rates from
2,000 Hz to 192,000 Hz. Typical sample rates are stored as presets in the Sample rate drop-down list. In addition, you can increase or
decrease the sample rate of an existing audio file.
1. Open and play the Voiceover.pca file.
Note: This file is located in the same folder as the application.
2. Right-click the Sample Rate status box and choose 48,000 from the shortcut menu.
3. Play the file. Notice that the pitch is higher and the duration is slightly shorter.
4. Right-click the Sample Rate status box and choose 8,000 from the shortcut menu.
5. Play the file. Notice that the pitch is lower and the duration is longer.
Changing the sample rate of a file also changes the pitch and duration. To change the sample rate of a file while preserving its duration
and pitch, use the Resample command. For more information, see Resample on page 154.
Changing the bit depth
Bit depth refers to the number of bits used to represent a sound. You can increase or decrease a file’s bit depth.
Increasing bit depth
Increasing the bit depth does not improve the quality of a file, but it allows
subsequent processing to be performed with increased precision.
1. Open a file with a small bit depth.
2. From the Process menu, choose Bit-Depth Converter. The Bit-Depth
Converter dialog is displayed.
3. From the Bit depth drop-down list, choose a larger value and click OK.
Note: When increasing a file’s bit depth, the Dither and Noise shaping
controls should be set to None and Off, respectively.
Decreasing bit depth
To maximize storage space, larger sound files (24- and 16-bit) are frequently converted to smaller (16- and 8-bit) files. However,
representing a sound file at a decreased bit depth results in audible distortion referred to as quantization error.
1. Open a 16-bit file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Bit-Depth Converter. The Bit-Depth Converter dialog is displayed.
3. From the Bit depth drop-down list, choose 8 bit.
4. If desired, choose an option from the Dither drop-down list. For more information, see Dither on page 85.
5. If desired, choose a Noise shaping type. For more information, see Noise shaping on page 85.
6. Click OK.
Note: There are no rules regarding maintaining audio quality when decreasing bit depth. Experiment with the Dither and Noise
shaping controls to determine the optimum settings for each audio file.
84 | CHAPTER 5
Understanding dither and noise shaping
You can adjust Dither and Noise shaping settings when decreasing a file’s bit depth.
Dither
The Dither value determines the randomness of the dither (generated noise) used to mask quantization distortion resulting from
conversion to a lower bit depth. This drop-down list requires you to select from several shapes, each of which roughly describes the
pattern that would be produced if you plotted a graph with the dither amplitude on the X-axis and the probability of the dither values
on the Y-axis.
As is frequently the case when working with audio, you should experiment with dither values to yield the best results. However, keep
the following information in mind:
Setting
Description
Half Rectangular
Eliminates distortion resulting from conversion to a lower bit depth, but the noise level is more likely to be dependent on the
signal. This setting uses a maximum dither noise amplitude of 0.5 LSB (least significant bit).
Identical to Half Rectangular, but with a maximum dither noise amplitude of 1 LSB (least significant bit).
Eliminates distortion products as well as any noise floor modulation, but results in a slightly higher noise level. The option
typically works well in conjunction with noise shaping. For more information, see Noise shaping on page 85.
Behaves like triangular dither, but shifts its noise into higher frequencies. This is typically the best option when used in
conjunction with noise shaping. For more information, see Noise shaping on page 85.
Does not perform as well as Rectangular and Triangular dither, but may be suitable for certain audio.
Rectangular
Triangular
Highpass Triangular
Gaussian
Noise shaping
The Noise shaping value determines the aural positioning of quantization noise. Using this control, you can shift the noise into audio
registers that are less perceptible to human hearing. This lowers the perceived noise floor and creates the illusion of cleaner audio.
• High-pass contour noise shaping attempts to push all quantization noise and error into high frequencies.
• Equal-loudness contour noise shaping attempts to push the noise under an equal-loudness type of curve.
Noise shaping dangers
Noise shaping places quantization noise near the audio’s Nyquist frequency, a value equal to one-half of the file’s sample rate. Consider
the following information:
• A file with a sample rate of 44.1 kHz has a Nyquist frequency of 22.05 kHz (at the high end of human hearing). Applying noise shaping
to this file results in audio perceived to be cleaner than it actually is.
• A file with a sample rate of 22 kHz has a Nyquist frequency of 11 kHz (well within the sensitive range of human hearing). Applying
noise shaping to this file results in audio that is perceived to be noisier than it actually is. Ironically, this defeats the entire purpose of
noise shaping.
For this reason, we do not recommend using noise shaping on files with sample rates less than 44.1 kHz.
Minimizing quantization error
There are at least three methods of minimizing quantization error when decreasing a file’s bit depth: noise gating, compression, and
normalization.
CHANGING FILE ATTRIBUTES AND FORMATS | 85
Noise gating
Frequently, low-level signals become noise when a file’s bit depth is decreased. For this reason, it is preferable to have complete silence
between sounds in an audio file.
1. From the Effects menu, choose Noise Gate. The Noise Gate dialog is displayed.
Specify a noise gate
2. Choose a noise gate preset from the Preset drop-down list and click OK. A noise gate is applied to the audio, negating its low-level
signals.
Compressing
Decreasing the dynamic range of a sound file makes it easier to represent with decreased bit depth.
1. From the Effects menu, choose Dynamics, and choose Graphic from the submenu. The Graphic Dynamics dialog is displayed.
2. Choose a preset with a small amount of compression (2:1 or less) from the Preset drop-down list and click OK.
Normalizing
Normalizing a file prior to decreasing its bit depth ensures that the entire dynamic range is used. In addition, normalization lowers the
signal-to-noise ratio.
1. From the Process menu, choose Normalize. The Normalize dialog is
displayed.
2. Select the Peak level radio button.
3. Set the Normalize to fader to 0 dB (peak) and click OK.
Applying compression and normalization simultaneously
1. From the Process menu, choose Normalize. The Normalize dialog is
displayed.
2. Select the Average RMS level radio button.
3. Specify Apply dynamic compression in the If clipping occurs dropdown list and click OK.
86 | CHAPTER 5
Converting mono/stereo channels
You can convert mono files to stereo or stereo files to mono. To perform quick channel conversion without specifying the mix, use the
Format tab on the Properties dialog or right-click the Channels box in the status bar and choose 2 (Stereo) or 1 (Mono) from the
shortcut menu.
Converting from mono to stereo
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file. This file is located in the same folder as the application.
2. Right-click the Channels box in the status bar and choose Stereo from the shortcut menu. The
Mono To Stereo dialog is displayed.
3. Select the Left Channel radio button and click OK. The mono data is placed in the upper half of
the data window (left channel) and silence is placed in the right channel.
For more information, see Specifying the audio destination on page 87.
4. Play the file. “Wow, sound editing just gets easier and easier” plays in only the left channel.
Tip: If your sound card supports only mono data, stereo files can be played by specifying the Sound Mapper as the playback device. To do
this, choose Preferences from the Options menu. Click the Audio tab and specify Microsoft Sound Mapper from the Audio device
type drop-down list.
Specifying the audio destination
The Destination radio buttons in the Mono To Stereo dialog allow you to specify where the mono audio data is placed in a stereo file.
The following table describes the available data destinations.
Destination
Description
Left Channel
Right Channel
Both Channels
The mono data is placed in the left channel. The right channel is set to silence.
The mono data is placed in the right channel. The left channel is set to silence.
The mono data is copied into both channels.
Converting from stereo to mono
1. Open the Saxriff.pca file.
Note: This file is located in the same folder as the application.
2. Right-click the Channels status box (indicating Stereo) and choose Mono from the shortcut
menu. The Stereo To Mono dialog is displayed.
3. Select the Mix Channels radio button and click OK. The left and right channels combine into a
mono channel.
For more information, see Specifying the audio source on page 87.
Specifying the audio source
The Source radio buttons in the Stereo To Mono dialog allow you to specify what stereo data is used to create the mono file. The
following table describes the available data sources.
Source
Description
Left Channel
Right Channel
Mix Channels
Mono data is taken only from the left channel of the stereo file.
Mono data is taken only from the right channel of the stereo file.
Mono data is created by mixing both channels of the stereo file.
CHANGING FILE ATTRIBUTES AND FORMATS | 87
Using the Channel Converter
You can also use the Channel Converter to convert files between mono and multichannel formats. Using the Channel Converter
provides the added flexibility of independent level settings for each channel, thereby allowing you to intermix the channels of a
multichannel file to create pan effects. To use this tool, choose Channel Converter from the Process menu. For more information, see
Channel Converter on page 145.
Converting file formats
The previous sections have described changing a file’s sample rate, bit depth, and channel configuration. You can also convert a file’s
format and compression settings.
To demonstrate this, open the Voiceover.pca file and choose Save As from the File menu. Notice the Save as Type and Template dropdown lists. For more information, see Using the Save As/Render As dialog on page 52.
Option
Description
Save as type
When the Save As dialog is displayed, the Save as type drop-down list defaults to the Sound Forge project file (.frg) format.
However, using the Save as type drop-down list, you can specify any supported file type.
The Template drop-down list provides standard settings for saving your audio file. If the templates do not match your
particular needs, click the Custom button to create custom settings.
Template
Adding summary information
Specific audio file types allow you to store text fields of summary information in addition to the audio and video data. File types offering
this feature include WAV, AVI, ASF, and RealMedia™ file formats. You can view and edit these text fields.
Viewing and editing summary information
The Summary tab is used to view and edit the summary information stored in the file.
1. From the File menu, choose Properties. The Properties dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Summary tab.
3. Edit the summary information as needed and click OK.
Viewing extended summary information
1. From the File menu, choose Properties. The Properties dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Summary tab. The Summary dialog is displayed.
3. Click the Extended button. The Extended Summary dialog is displayed. The dialog
is divided into two sections: the Fields pane and the Contents pane.
The Fields pane
The Fields pane displays the following components for
each available field:
•
•
•
•
A check box to turn the field on or off.
The abbreviation of the field type.
A short description of the field.
An indication of the field’s current status.
Empty field indicator
Field description
Field abbreviation
On/Off check box
88 | CHAPTER 5
Full field indicator
The Contents pane
Located immediately below the Fields pane, the Contents pane displays the current contents of the selected field.
Editing extended summary information
1. Select the field to be edited in the Fields pane. Its contents display in the Contents pane.
2. Enter the new information in the Contents pane and click OK.
Turning summary fields on and off
Adjacent to each field in the Fields pane is a check box used to turn the corresponding field on and off when saving files in applicable
formats.
Note: If a field is turned on but contains no information, it is not saved with the file.
Setting new default summary information
Clicking the Default button in the Extended Summary dialog saves the text in the summary fields as a default setting. This default
summary information is used when you create a new file or when you click the Load button in the Properties dialog for an existing file.
Tip: The Creation date field (ICRD) is always filled with the current date for new files.
Saving summary information
You can save files containing summary information that have been edited in Sound Forge software with or without summary
information.
1. From the File menu, choose Save As. The Save As dialog is displayed.
2. Select the Save metadata with file check box and click OK.
Note: If you save to a file type that doesn’t support metadata, this check box is unavailable.
Including additional embedded information
Some file formats allow non-text data (such as embedded bitmaps and metafiles) to be embedded in files. If you use the Sound Forge
software to edit a file containing data created in another application, Sound Forge software tracks the embedded data and places it
back in the file when it is saved in its original format.
Saving additional embedded information
To save additional embedded information, choose Save As from the File menu and select the Save metadata with file check box. If the
file type does not support metadata, you are prompted to save the metadata in an external file with an .sfl extension.
CHANGING FILE ATTRIBUTES AND FORMATS | 89
Removing additional embedded information
To save a file without additional embedded information, choose Save As from the File menu and clear the Save metadata with file
check box.
90 | CHAPTER 5
Chapter 6 Editing Multichannel Audio
With Sound Forge 9, you can edit multichannel audio files in the same way you’ve always worked with mono or stereo
files.
Sound Forge supports multichannel files in the following formats:
• Wave (.wav)
• Video For Windows (.avi) – specifically DV, SDI
• Material Exchange Format (.mxf )
Note: MXF files require a video stream. If you want to save an audio-only file to MXF format, you must first attach a video
stream. For more information, see Attaching video to an audio file on page 226.
When working with MXF files, the number of channels in your source media must match the number of output channels
specified by the rendering template. If necessary, use the Channel Converter before rendering.
Render format
Number of channels
DV MXF
Always contains 4 audio channels.
IMX MXF
You can use the Channels drop-down list on the Audio tab of the Custom
Template dialog to choose how many channels will be filled with audio. For
example, if you choose 2 from the Channels drop-down list, the rendered
file will contain 4 audio channels: two channels will contain audio, and two
channels will contain silence.
Always contains 8 audio channels.
HD MXF
You can use the Channels drop-down list on the Audio tab of the Custom
Template dialog to choose how many channels will be filled with audio. For
example, if you choose 2 from the Channels drop-down list, the rendered
file will contain 8 audio channels: two channels will contain audio, and six
channels will contain silence.
Can contain 2 or 4 audio channels.
You can use the Channels drop-down list on the Audio tab of the Custom
Template dialog to choose how many channels will be rendered. For
example, if you choose 2 from the Channels drop-down list, the rendered
file will contain only 2 audio channels.
• Dolby AC-3 (.ac3) (AC-3 is available as a render format only)
• Windows Media Audio/Video (.wma or .wmv)
• ATRAC (.oma)
Routing channels to hardware outputs
If you’re working with multichannel files and have a sound card with multiple outputs,
Sound Forge provides you with a great deal of flexibility in routing the channels to the
outputs on your sound card: you can route each channel to a separate output, or you can
route all the stereo pairs to a single set of outputs to simulate a stereo downmix.
The Hardware Meters window displays a meter and gain fader for each enabled output
port. For more information, see Using the hardware meters on page 92.
You can change channel assignments from the Audio tab in the Preferences dialog or the
Channel Meters window. Changing the setting in either location updates your
preferences and affects all open data windows. For information about using the Audio tab
of the Preferences dialog to enable and map channels, please see Audio tab on page 248.
To change a channel’s output device using the Channel Meters window, click the channel
number and choose a new output port from the menu.
EDITING MULTICHANNEL AUDIO | 91
Opening and editing multichannel audio files
If you’ve used Sound Forge to edit stereo files before, you already know everything you need to know to edit multichannel files.
You can open multichannel audio files just like any other supported media type. For more information, see Getting media files on page 44.
When you open the file, you’ll notice that the data window displays the channels as stereo pairs:
You can then edit the file just as you would any mono or stereo file.
Click the Minimize button
to reduce the height of individual channels, or click the Restore button
Hold Shift while clicking a Minimize button
to restore a channel’s height.
to minimize all channels except the one you clicked.
Tip: You can use the Display tab in the Preferences dialog to change the colors used to represent each channel.
Recording multichannel audio files
With Sound Forge, you have the ability to record multichannel audio if your hardware supports this feature. For more information, see
Playing back recorded audio on page 120.
Using the hardware meters
From the View menu, choose Hardware Meters to toggle the display of the Hardware Meters window. You can use this window to
adjust the levels of your audio device’s hardware outputs for monitoring and to view a peak meter, VU/PPM meter, phase scope, and
mono-compatibility meter.
VU/PPM meter
92 | CHAPTER 6
Peak meter
Phase scope
Mono-compatibility
meter
Adjusting output levels
The Hardware Meters window displays a gain fader for each output that is enabled on the Audio tab of the Preferences dialog (for more
information, see Audio tab on page 248). You can use these faders to adjust preview levels.
Important: The faders in the Hardware Meters window are used to control preview volume only. If you want to mix channel levels, use
the Volume or Envelope plug-in.
Drag to adjust the volume of the channel. Double-click the center of the thumb to reset the fader to 0.0 dB.
If the right and left channels are set differently, you can double-click either thumb to force the other channel to match it.
Click the Lock/Unlock Fader Channels button
again to unlock the faders.
to lock (gang) the faders so the left and right channels will always move together. Click
Tip: Hold Shift while dragging a fader to temporarily override the current state of the Lock/Unlock Fader Channels button: if the button is
turned off, you can hold Shift to drag the faders in locked mode; if the button is selected, hold Shift to drag the faders independently.
Showing or hiding meters
You can display a peak meter, VU/PPM, a phase scope, and mono-compatibility meter for each hardware output. To toggle the display
of each meter, right-click the Hardware Meters window and choose a command from the shortcut menu.
A check mark is displayed to indicate which meters are currently visible.
For more information about peak meters, please see Using the channel meters on page 33.
For more information about VU/PPM meters, please see Using the VU meters on page 35.
For more information about phase scopes, please see Using phase scopes on page 36.
For more information about mono-compatibility meters, please see Using the mono-compatibility meters on page 37.
EDITING MULTICHANNEL AUDIO | 93
94 | CHAPTER 6
Chapter 7 Using Markers, Regions, and the Playlist/Cutlist
This chapter describes the use of markers, command markers, the Regions List, and the playlist/cutlist. These tools allow
you to tag and organize audio data and make audio editing more efficient. The Sound Forge® application can save
marker, Regions List, and playlist/cutlist information as metadata in most file types. You also have the option of saving
the Regions List and playlist/cutlist to an external file. For more information, see Using the Save As/Render As dialog on page
59.
Why use markers, regions, and the playlist?
There are at least four reasons for you to master the use of these features:
•
•
•
•
Rapid navigation
Added effects for streaming media
Multiple versions of edits
MIDI synchronization and triggering
Rapid navigation
The most obvious use of the Regions List is for dissecting an audio file into multiple regions. Once created, regions can be
selected and played in the data window. You are also able to tag important time positions with markers. This allows you
to navigate large files and locate important audio events.
Added effects for streaming media
Command markers allow you to add interactivity to media streamed over the Internet by inserting metadata into
streaming media files. As your file plays, any number of other actions can be triggered, including opening a Web page in
a browser or displaying caption text.
Multiple versions of edits
The playlist and cutlist allow you to try out different edits before committing to them. You can add regions to the playlist
or cutlist and then rearrange and audition them endlessly without requiring the software to perform an edit on the file.
Another advantage is that you can quickly save regions organized in the playlist or cutlist as a new file based on the
finished arrangement.
MIDI synchronization and triggering
You can trigger regions created in Sound Forge software using MIDI or SMPTE timecode. This feature is used for
synchronizing audio files to sequencers, MIDI controllers, or any other time-based media. For example, a MIDI trigger can
be assigned to an audio file in the software and triggered by a sequencer along with other MIDI instruments. For more
information, see Triggering region playback on page 236.
You can also assign SMPTE times to special effect audio files. This allows you to match audio to the action on the screen.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 95
Using markers
A marker is a tag placed in an audio file that is used as a reference point. Markers make navigating a file easier and more efficient.
Markers can be quickly selected from the list in the Go To dialog. Also, markers are displayed in the Regions List for quick playback.
Inserting markers
1. Click to position the cursor in the waveform.
2. From the Special menu, choose Insert Marker (or press M during playback). A marker is placed in the waveform at the exact
location of the cursor.
3. If you want to name the marker, right-click the tag and choose Rename from the shortcut menu. Type a name for the marker in the
edit box and press Enter.
Inserting markers during playback
To insert markers in real time during playback, press M.
Inserting markers during recording
To insert markers during recording, click the Drop Marker button
markers while recording on page 141.
in the Record dialog or press M. For more information, see Inserting
Naming or renaming markers
Right-click the marker tab
when you’re finished.
and choose Rename from the shortcut menu. Type the name of the marker in the edit box and press Enter
—or—
Double-click to the right of the marker and type a name in the edit box.
96 | CHAPTER 7
Customizing marker labeling
You can set Sound Forge to automatically label new markers as they are created.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Labels tab.
3. In the Marker labels area, adjust the labeling controls as desired:
Control
Description
Label Markers
Select this check box if you want Sound Forge to automatically name markers when you insert them during playback
or recording.
Type a prefix in the box if you want Sound Forge to assign a name to new markers when you insert a marker during
playback or recording. Clear the box if you do not want to include a prefix (if you want to number markers only, for
example).
Select this check box and type a number in the box if you want Sound Forge to number new markers when you insert
a marker during playback or recording.
Select this check box and specify a field width if you want to use leading zeros in marker names when you insert a
marker during playback or recording. For example, if you specify a field width of 3, markers numbered 1 to 99 would
be numbered 001 to 099.
Prefix
Use counter and
start at
Insert leading
zeros in field
width of
4. Click OK to close the Preferences dialog.
Changing the marker position
You can change a marker’s position by dragging it to a new location or by updating its position to the current cursor location. You can
also enter precise values to move a marker to a specific location.
Changing the marker position using drag-and-drop
1. Drag the marker tab
to a new position on the data window ruler.
2. Release the mouse button. The marker is dropped at its new location.
Note: Markers will snap to other markers, regions, and command markers. Hold Shift while dragging to override snapping.
Deleting markers
Right-click the marker tab
and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.
Deleting all markers and regions
Right-click in the marker bar, choose Markers/Regions, and choose Delete All from the submenu. All markers
removed.
and regions
are
Deleting all markers within the selected area
Right-click above the loop region, choose Markers/Regions, and choose Delete All in Selection from the submenu. All markers
regions
and
in the selected area are removed.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 97
Previewing a marker
Click a marker’s Play button
in the Regions list.
—or—
1. Right-click the marker tag
and choose Edit from the shortcut menu. The Edit Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Play button.
Triggering a marker using MIDI commands
1. Right-click the marker tag
and choose Edit from the shortcut menu. The Edit Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
2. Choose a trigger type from the Trigger drop-down list.
3. In the Channel box, specify the MIDI input channel for triggering.
4. In the Note box, specify the MIDI note that will trigger marker playback. This value can be entered as a MIDI note value such as C4
or as a MIDI note number such as 60.
Notes:
• If the Trigger from MIDI Timecode command (Options>MIDI In/Out submenu)is selected while using this dialog, you can autocomplete the Channel and Note values by pressing a key on your MIDI keyboard.
• Triggers in the Regions List function differently from triggers specified in the MIDI Triggers dialog and the Playlist. When using triggers in
the Playlist, Regions List, or MIDI Triggers dialog, be aware that they can interact to create unexpected results. Sound Forge software first
looks at the MIDI Triggers, then the Regions List, and then the Playlist when determining what to do when a MIDI command is detected. If
you only want to use the triggers in the Regions List, turn off all the triggers in the MIDI Triggers dialog and the Playlist.
Using markers to create regions
Once you have placed markers in a waveform, you can use them to create regions. For more information, see Inserting regions based on
marker positions on page 103.
Detecting and marking clipping
The clip indicators in the channel meters help you determine whether clipping occurs in your file, and you can use the Find command
to find audio that matches levels you specify. For more control, however, you can use the detect clipping tool.
From the Tools menu, choose Detect Clipping to scan a selection of audio for clipping and add markers where clipping occurs.
Markers can be quickly selected from the list in the Go To dialog. Also, markers are displayed in the Regions List for quick playback.
1. Select the audio you want to scan.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Detect Clipping. The Detect Clipping dialog is displayed.
3. Choose a setting from the Preset drop-down list or adjust the controls as necessary.
a. Drag the Threshold slider to determine the sound level you want to find.
b. Set a value in the Clip Length box to specify how many sequential samples must meet the Threshold setting to constitute
clipping.
4. Click the OK button.
The selection is scanned and a marker is added whenever there are a number of sequential samples (determined by the Clip Length
setting) with the same value above the Threshold setting.
Tip: Use Detect all clip-related plateaus from the Preset drop-down list to detect clipped peaks that may exist in your file after
decreasing the levels in the file. You can then use the Pencil tool or the Clipped Peak Restoration tool in the Sony Media Software Noise
Reduction plug-in to restore the clipped peaks.
98 | CHAPTER 7
Using command markers in streaming media files
Command markers add interactivity to media streamed over the Internet by inserting metadata into streaming media files. As your file
plays, any number of other actions can be programmed to occur. These commands are a part of the Windows Media Audio, Windows
Media Video, and RealMedia streaming formats. Most frequently, these actions add text or open a related Web site.
Command markers can also indicate when an instruction (function) occurs in a WAV file being used in a radio broadcast environment
(Scott Studios data). The following two sections define the markers for both streaming media and Scott Studios files.
Notes:
• While streaming, media files can be played on any hard drive, CD-ROM, or DVD-ROM. They require a special streaming media server
(provided by your ISP) to stream properly across the Internet.
• Windows Media Player 9 and later will ignore metadata commands unless the Run script commands when present check box is
selected on the Security tab of the player's Preferences dialog. Be sure to instruct your audience to select this check box before playing
your file.
Defining streaming media commands
In a streaming media file, command markers can be used to display headlines, show captions, link to Web sites, or any other function
you define. Some command types are exclusive to either the Windows Media files or RealMedia files.
Command
Player type
URL
Windows Media Indicates when an instruction is sent to the user’s internet browser to change the content being
and RealMedia displayed. With this command, you enter the URL that displays at a specific time during the file’s
playback.
Windows Media Displays text in the captioning area of the Windows Media Player located below the video display
area. You enter the text that displays during playback.
Text
Title
RealMedia
Description
Note: To view captions during playback in Windows Media Player 9 or later, choose Captions and
Subtitles from the Windows Media Player Play menu, and then choose On if Available from the
submenu.
Displays the entered text on the media player’s title bar.
Note: When rendering Windows Media files, title information is based on the settings on the
Summary tab of the Sound Forge Project Properties dialog or the Index/Summary tab of the
Custom Template dialog. The summary information from the Project Properties dialog will be used
if information has been specified in both places.
Author
RealMedia
To view this information during playback, choose Now Playing Options from the Windows Media
Player View menu and select the items you want to display.
Displays the entered text (Author’s name) when a user selects About This Presentation from the
RealPlayer shortcut menu.
Note: When rendering Windows Media files, author information is based on the settings on the
Summary tab of the Sound Forge Project Properties dialog or the Index/Summary tab of the
Custom Template dialog. The summary information from the Project Properties dialog will be used
if information has been specified in both places.
Copyright
RealMedia
To view this information during playback, choose Now Playing Options from the Windows Media
Player View menu and select the items you want to display.
Displays the entered copyright information when a user selects About This Presentation from the
RealPlayer’s shortcut menu or Properties from the Windows Media Player shortcut menu.
Note: When rendering Windows Media files, copyright information is based on the settings on the
Summary tab of the Sound Forge Project Properties dialog or the Index/Summary tab of the
Custom Template dialog. The summary information from the Project Properties dialog will be used
if information has been specified in both places.
To view this information during playback, choose Now Playing Options from the Windows Media
Player View menu and select the items you want to display.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 99
Defining Scott Studios data commands
For WAV files using Scott Studios data, command markers can be used to define information about the WAV file.
Command
Description
SCOTT EOM
Calculates when the next queued clip starts playing in a Scott Studios system. For more information, please refer to
your Scott Studios documentation.
Sets the beginning of a file in a Scott Studios system without performing destructive editing. For more information,
please refer to your Scott Studios documentation.
SCOTT Cue In
Inserting command markers
1. Position the cursor where you want to place the command marker.
2. From the Special menu, choose Insert Command (or press C). The Command Properties dialog is displayed.
3. Complete the Command Properties dialog:
a. From the Template drop-down list, select a custom template. For
4.
more information, see Saving command properties as a custom template
on page 100.
b. From the Command drop-down list, select the type of command you
wish to create or type a custom command.
c. Enter parameters to define the behavior of the command in the
Parameter box.
d. Specify the timing of the command in the Position box. This value is
automatically set to the current cursor position.
Click OK. The new command marker appears in the data window.
Editing command properties
Right-click a command marker and choose Edit from the shortcut menu to
open the Command Properties dialog and edit the marker.
Saving command properties as a custom template
If you plan to use a command more than once, you can save command
properties as a template. You can then reuse the command properties by selecting the template from the Template drop-down list.
1. Create a command and complete the Command Properties dialog.
2. Click in the Template box and enter a name for the template.
3. Click the Save Template button
.
Tip: Your metadata command templates are saved in the cmdtemp.xml file in the Sound Forge program folder. You can edit this file
directly to modify your templates.
Moving the cursor to a command marker
Click the command marker to place the cursor at the current command marker position.
Deleting command markers
1. Place the mouse pointer on the command marker. The pointer changes to a hand icon
2. Right-click to display a shortcut menu.
3. From the shortcut menu, choose Delete. The command marker is removed.
100 | CHAPTER 7
.
Using regions
Regions identify ranges of time and provide a way to subdivide an audio file. A region is defined as the area between two region tags.
Regions can function as semi-permanent time selections that can be saved with the file. For example, regions can be used to indicate
sections of projects such as choruses or verses, or they can be used to make notes in the project. You can also add regions to the playlist
and use regions to create new files.
The Regions List window contains all of the regions and markers that exist in the active data window.
Inserting regions
You can use multiple methods of inserting regions including a menu command, drag-and-drop, a time ruler shortcut, and a keyboard
shortcut. The following sections briefly describe the methods of creating regions. To work through these procedures, use the Fill.pca
file. This file is located in the Sound Forge folder.
Inserting regions using menu commands
1. Open the Fill.pca file.
2. From the View menu, choose Regions List. The Regions List is displayed. For more information, see Using the Regions List on page
106.
3. Create a selection containing the final drum hit near the end of the waveform display.
4. From the Special menu, choose Insert Region (or press R). The Insert Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
5. Enter a name for the region in the Name box and click OK. The selection appears in the Regions List.
In addition, notice that region tags now display in the data window. These tags indicate the region’s name and position within the
original file.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 101
Inserting regions using drag-and-drop
One of the easiest ways to insert a region is to drag a selection from a data window into the Regions List.
1. Create a selection containing the opening drum roll in Fill.pca.
2. Drag the selection from the data window to the Regions List. The Insert Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
3. Name the region and click OK.
Inserting regions using the time ruler shortcut
1. Create another selection in the waveform display.
2. Right-click the time ruler and choose Insert Marker/Region from the shortcut menu. The Insert Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
3. Name the region and click OK.
Inserting regions using the keyboard
1. Create a selection in the waveform display.
2. Press R. The region is inserted and numbered region markers
are placed at the start and end of the selected area.
3. Name the region and click OK.
Inserting regions automatically
In addition to the previously described methods, you can also insert regions automatically.
Inserting regions while recording
The most efficient way of inserting regions is to do it while recording your audio. This is especially useful when working on a project that
you will piece together from multiple takes. To create regions while recording, specify Multiple takes creating Regions from the Mode
drop-down list in the Record dialog. For more information, see Multiple takes creating Regions on page 135.
Tip: Regions are automatically named for you while recording. You can customize this automatic labeling feature. For more information,
see Customizing marker labeling on page 97.
Inserting regions based on rapid sound attacks
1. Open the Fill.pca file.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Auto Region. The Auto Region dialog is displayed.
3. Clear the Build regions using the current tempo check box if it is selected.
102 | CHAPTER 7
4. Specify a preset from the Preset drop-down list or configure a new setting using the dialog’s active parameters shown in the table
below.
Parameter
Description
Attack sensitivity
Release sensitivity
Minimum level
Minimum beat duration
Use release point for end
of region
Determines the sensitivity of the attack-detection algorithm to rapid volume increases.
Determines the minimum decrease in sound level required to create a region end point.
Determines the threshold audio level required to create a new region.
Specifies the minimum length, in seconds, that must elapse before a new region can be created.
Requires a region end when the sound level drops by the factor specified by the Release sensitivity value.
5. Click OK. Regions are inserted in the audio file based on the dialog parameters.
Note: All regions created using the Auto Region tool are automatically added to the Regions List and playlist.
Inserting regions based on musical time intervals
When you select the Build regions using the current tempo check box in the Auto Region dialog (Tools>Auto Region), regions are
inserted according to the current beats per minute setting. You can change a file’s tempo information (including the measures, beats,
and beats per minute settings) by choosing Edit Tempo from the Special menu. For more information, see Changing a file’s beat values on
page 75.
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
Note: This file is located in the same folder as the application.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Auto Region. The Auto Region dialog box is displayed.
3. Select the Build regions using the current tempo check box.
4. Enter desired values in the Measures and Beats boxes:
•
•
To create a region on every beat, set Measures to 0 and Beats to 1.
To create a region at every measure, set Measures to 1 and Beats to 0.
5. Click OK. Regions are created in the data window based on the Measures value, the Beats values, and the current beats per minute
setting.
Inserting regions based on marker positions
1. Open the Fill.pca file.
2. Play the file and drop several markers using the M key.
Markers created
in data window
3. From the Special menu, choose Regions List, and choose Markers to Regions from the submenu (or right-click the Regions List
and choose Markers to Regions from the shortcut menu). You are prompted to verify whether the markers should be used to
create regions.
4. Click Yes. Regions are created and added to the Regions List.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 103
Naming or renaming a region
Right-click the starting region marker
press Enter when you’re finished.
and choose Rename from the shortcut menu. Type the name of the region in the edit box and
—or—
Double-click to the right of the region marker and type a name in the edit box.
Customizing region labeling
You can set Sound Forge to automatically label new regions as they are created.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Labels tab.
3. In the Region labels area, adjust the labeling controls as desired:
Control
Description
Label Regions
Prefix
Select this check box if you want Sound Forge to automatically name regions when you insert them.
Type a prefix in the box if you want Sound Forge to assign a name to new regions when you insert one. Clear the box
if you do not want to include a prefix (if you want to number regions only, for example).
Select this check box and type a number in the box if you want Sound Forge to number new regions after you insert
one.
Select this check box and specify a field width if you want to use leading zeros in region names when you insert one.
For example, if you specify a field width of 3, regions numbered 1 to 99 would be numbered 001 to 099.
Use counter and
start at
Insert leading
zeros in field
width of
4. Click OK to close the Preferences dialog.
Selecting a region
Right-click the starting or ending region marker
and choose Select Region from the shortcut menu. The region is highlighted.
—or—
Double-click the start or end region marker. The region is highlighted.
Moving a region
1. Drag the desired region tag
to a new position. Both associated region tags are highlighted.
2. Release the mouse button. The region’s values update in the Regions List.
Tip: To move both region tags at once, press Alt while dragging.
Deleting a region
Right-click the region marker
and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.
Deleting all markers and regions
Right-click above the loop region, choose Markers/Regions, and choose Delete All from the submenu. All markers
removed.
104 | CHAPTER 7
and regions
are
Deleting all markers and regions within the selected area
Right-click above the loop region, choose Markers/Regions, and choose Delete All in Selection from the submenu. All markers
regions
and
in the selected area are removed.
Previewing a region
Click a region’s Play button
in the Regions list.
—or—
1. Right-click the region tag and choose Edit from the shortcut menu. The Edit Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Play button.
Splitting regions
Splitting a region divides an existing region at the current cursor position, producing two separate regions.
1. In the Regions List window (View>Regions List), select the region you want to split.
2. Position the cursor where you want the split to occur.
3. From the Special menu, choose Regions List, and choose Split from the submenu (or right-click a region in the Regions List
window and choose Split from the shortcut menu).
Notes:
• If the cursor is placed within the region you’re splitting, the region will be split at the cursor position.
• If the cursor is placed outside the region you’re splitting, a new region will be created from the closest edge of the original region to the
cursor position.
Triggering a region using MIDI commands
1. Right-click the region tag
and choose Edit from the shortcut menu. The Edit Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
2. Choose a trigger type from the Trigger drop-down list.
3. In the Channel box, specify the MIDI input channel for triggering.
4. In the Note box, specify the MIDI note that will trigger region playback. This value can be entered as a MIDI note value such as C4 or
as a MIDI note number such as 60.
Notes:
• If the Trigger from MIDI Timecode command (Options>MIDI In/Out submenu)is selected while using this dialog, you can autocomplete the Channel and Note values by pressing a key on your MIDI keyboard.
• Triggers in the Regions List function differently from triggers specified in the MIDI Triggers dialog and the Playlist. When using triggers in
the Playlist, Regions List, or MIDI Triggers dialog, be aware that they can interact to create unexpected results. Sound Forge software first
looks at the MIDI Triggers, then the Regions List, and then the Playlist when determining what to do when a MIDI command is detected. If
you only want to use the triggers in the Regions List, turn off all the triggers in the MIDI Triggers dialog and the Playlist.
Using markers to create regions
Once you have placed markers in a waveform, you can use them to create regions. For more information, see Inserting regions based on
marker positions on page 103.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 105
Locking loop and region lengths
From the Options menu, choose Lock Loop/Region Length to force the length of a region to remain constant when changing the start
or end time of a region or loop.
When this option is not selected, you can hold the Alt key while dragging region markers to lock the length of a region. To move a loop
without changing its length, drag the bar between the loop markers.
Creating new files from regions
You can quickly create a new file from each region in a file. Each region is named by appending a numerical value to a user-specified
prefix.
1. Open an audio file and create several regions in it.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Extract Regions. The Extract Regions dialog appears and all current regions appear in the Regions to
extract pane.
3. Select the regions to be extracted.
4. If the path in the Destination folder box is not appropriate, click the Browse button and browse to the desired destination folder.
5. Enter the desired prefix in the File name prefix box.
6. If desired, clear the Use long file names for destination file names check box and enter an appropriate numeric value in the Start
file counter index box.
Note: Clearing the Use long file names for destination file names check box forces file names to conform to the 8.3 naming
convention.
7. Click Extract.
Using the Regions List
The Regions List contains information pertaining to all regions in the current data window. The Regions List information can be saved as
metadata in most file types. You also have the option of saving the Regions List to an external playlist file.
Displaying the Regions List
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. From the View menu, choose Regions List (or press Alt+2). The Regions List for Voiceover.pca is displayed.
106 | CHAPTER 7
Working with the Regions List
By default, the Regions List displays the following information for each region in the current data window:
•
•
•
•
•
A small Play button
dedicated to the region.
The name of the region.
The region’s start point.
The region’s end point.
The region’s length.
Changing region order
By default, the Regions List displays regions in alphabetical order by name, but you may also specify an alternate order by clicking the
column heading to sort in ascending
or descending
order.
Saving a Regions List file
You can save a file’s Regions List to an external file. This offers the flexibility of using multiple Regions Lists for the same audio file.
1. From the Special menu, choose Regions List, and choose Save As from the submenu (or right-click the Regions List and choose
Save As from the shortcut menu).
2. Use the Save Regions/Playlist As dialog to specify a folder and filename.
3. Click Save.
Opening a Regions List file
Importing a Regions List file offers the flexibility of using multiple Regions List files for the same audio file. Opening a new Regions List
file clears the current Regions List. Make sure you have saved the current Regions List before continuing.
1. From the Special menu, choose Regions List, and choose Open from the submenu (or right-click the Regions List and choose
Open from the shortcut menu).
2. Use the Open Regions/Playlist dialog to locate an existing file.
3. Specify the type of regions you want to import from the Files of type drop-down list:
•
•
•
•
Choose Playlist File (.sfl) to import a Sound Forge regions/playlist file.
Choose Session 8 File (.prm) to import a file that supports both Session 8 and Sound Forge regions.
Choose Windows Media Script File (.txt) to import a file that includes Windows Media script commands.
Choose Wave File (.wav) to import markers and regions from another audio file.
4. Click Open.
Copying the Regions List to the clipboard
Editing a Regions List in a text editor allows you to make an annotated list that you can print for reference.
From the Special menu, choose Regions List, and then choose Copy onto Clipboard (or right-click the Regions List and choose Copy
onto Clipboard from the shortcut menu). The list is copied to the Windows clipboard.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 107
Using the playlist
Once you create regions, you can arrange them in the playlist. Unlike the Regions List, which displays its contents in alphabetical or
chronological order, the playlist displays and plays its regions in a user-specified arrangement. In addition, you can rearrange and
audition regions endlessly in the playlist without performing a destructive edit when you save the file.
As with the Regions List, you can save the playlist information as metadata in most file types. You also have the option of saving the
playlist to an external playlist file.
Displaying the playlist
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. From the View menu, choose Regions List (or press Alt+2). The Regions List window for Voiceover.pca is displayed.
3. From the View menu, choose Playlist (or press Alt+3). The Playlist window for Voiceover.pca is displayed.
Notice that the file contains regions, but the playlist is empty. You must add regions to the playlist before arranging them.
Understanding the playlist display
When you add a region to the playlist, its appearance is similar to its appearance in the Regions List, with the exception of the Count
(Cnt) column. Located to the left of the Name column, the Count (Cnt) column displays the number of times the corresponding region
plays before the playlist proceeds to the next region.
Adding regions to the playlist
You can add regions from the Regions List to the playlist using commands or drag-and-drop. You can also add regions to the playlist
directly from the data window.
Adding regions to the playlist using commands
1. Select a region in the Regions List.
2. From the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist, and choose Add from the submenu (or right-click a region in the Regions List
window and choose Add to Playlist from the shortcut menu). The region is added to the playlist.
Adding regions to the playlist using drag-and-drop
1. Select a region in the Regions List.
2. Drag the region into the playlist.
3. Release the mouse button.
108 | CHAPTER 7
Arranging the playlist
Moving regions
Once you have added regions to the playlist, you can arrange them using dragand-drop.
Replicating a region in the playlist
A major advantage of arranging the playlist is the ability to repeat a region in multiple places without actually copying the audio data.
This feature is called replicating.
1. Right-click the region to be replicated and choose Replicate from the shortcut menu. The region is replicated in the playlist.
2. Drag the replicated region to its new position in the playlist.
Tip: You can also replicate a region by holding Ctrl while dragging the region to a new position in the playlist.
Deleting a region from the playlist
You can delete regions from the playlist without affecting the audio file.
1. Select the region that you would like to delete.
2. From the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist, and then choose Delete from the submenu (or right-click the Playlist window and
choose Delete from the shortcut menu).
Changing region order
Click the column heading to sort the results in ascending
or descending
order based on the column’s contents.
Editing a playlist/cutlist region
You can edit a Playlist/Cutlist region by typing new values in the Cnt, Start, End, Length, and Name boxes or you can select a box and
press Enter to display the Edit Playlist dialog.
Displaying the Edit Playlist dialog
The Edit Playlist dialog allows you to specify the number of times a playlist/cutlist region will be played, set up MIDI triggers, and
establish pre-roll.
Note: You must add regions to your playlist before you can display the Edit Playlist dialog.
Perform one of the following actions to open the Edit Playlist window:
Option
Action
Option I
From the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist, and then choose Edit from the submenu to edit the selected region in
the Playlist window.
Right-click a playlist region and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
Select a region in the Playlist window and press Enter.
Option II
Option III
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 109
Repeating a region during playlist playback
You can specify the number of times a region repeats during playlist playback.
Type a value in the Cnt box in the Playlist window (or use the Play Count box in the Edit Playlist dialog) to specify the number of times
the playlist region will repeat before playing the next region.
Using stop points
You can attach stop points to regions in the playlist. When a stop point is encountered during playback, the corresponding region is
repeated the number of times specified by the Count value and playback is halted.
Creating a stop point
Perform one of the following actions to set the stop point for a playlist:
Option
Action
Option I
Option II
Option III
Right-click a region in the Playlist window and choose Stop Point from the shortcut menu.
Select a region in the Playlist window and press *. (Not on the numeric keypad.)
Select the Stop point check box in the Edit Playlist dialog to stop playback with the selected region.
A check mark appears adjacent to the command in the shortcut menu and a stop point (indicated by a red circle) appears in the playlist.
Note: When you play your playlist, it will continue to play through the regions until it encounters a stop point. This is useful when
triggering playback from incoming MIDI or timecode and you only want certain sections of the playlist to be played at a time.
Deleting a stop point
Perform one of the following actions to remove the stop point for a playlist:
Option
Action
Option I
Option II
Option III
Right-click a region in the Playlist window and choose Stop Point from the shortcut menu.
Select a region in the Playlist window and press *. (Not on the numeric keypad.)
Select the Stop point check box in the Edit Playlist dialog to stop playback with the selected region.
The corresponding check mark is cleared from the shortcut menu and the stop point (indicated by a red circle) is removed from the
playlist.
Playing from the playlist
The playlist displays the sequential order in which regions play. To play a region, click the corresponding Play button . Playback
begins with the selected region and continues through the end of the playlist, playing a region multiple times when instructed by the
Count value.
Note: Playback is interrupted if a stop point is present. For more information, see Using stop points on page 110.
110 | CHAPTER 7
Creating a new file from the playlist
After you have auditioned and arranged all regions in the playlist, you can create a new file based on the playlist arrangement. To create
a new file from the playlist, right-click the playlist and choose Convert to New from the shortcut menu.
Note: If the original file has both audio and video components (such as an AVI file), the new file created from the playlist contains the
audio portion only.
Configuring the playlist as a cutlist
When trimming lengthy recordings, configuring the playlist as a cutlist can sometimes decrease editing time. In Play as Cutlist mode,
the original file is played, but all regions placed on the cutlist are ignored. Click the Play as Cutlist button
Play as Cutlist mode.
on the playbar to enter
Treating the playlist as a cutlist
1. From the View menu, choose Playlist. The Playlist window is displayed.
2. Right-click the playlist and choose Treat as Cutlist from the shortcut menu. A check mark appears adjacent to the command in the
shortcut menu and the cutlist displays. The Play as Cutlist button
appears in the playbar.
Adding regions to the cutlist
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file and the cutlist.
2. Select the “Silence” region and drag it to the cutlist (or press Delete). The region is added to the cutlist and the selection area in the
waveform display is shaded.
New region is added to the cutlist
3. Click the Play Cutlist button
on the data window’s playbar. The file plays with the cutlisted region omitted.
Creating a new file from the cutlist
Once all superfluous regions are placed in the cutlist, you can create a new audio file and Regions List from the remaining region. From
the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist and choose Convert to New from the submenu (or right-click the cutlist and choose Convert
to New from the shortcut menu).
Deleting all cutlist regions
1. Select a region in the Playlist/Cutlist window. If the window is not visible, press Alt+3.
2. From the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist and then choose Delete from the submenu (or press Delete).
Reverting to playlist function
To use the cutlist as a playlist again, right-click the cutlist and choose Treat as Cutlist from the shortcut menu. The check mark is cleared
from the corresponding command in the shortcut menu and the playlist function is restored.
USING MARKERS, REGIONS, AND THE PLAYLIST/CUTLIST | 111
Saving a playlist/cutlist file
You can save a file's playlist/cutlist to an external file. This offers the flexibility of using multiple playlists for the same file.
1. From the Special menu, choose Regions List or Playlist/Cutlist, and choose Save As from the submenu (or right-click the playlist/
cutlist and choose Save As from the shortcut menu).
2. Use the Save Regions/Playlist dialog to specify a folder and filename.
3. Click Save.
Opening a playlist/cutlist file
Importing a playlist file offers the flexibility of using multiple playlists for a file. Opening a new playlist file clears the current playlist.
Make sure you have saved the current playlist before continuing.
1. From the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist, and choose Open from the submenu (or right-click the playlist/cutlist and choose
Open from the shortcut menu).
2. Use the Open Regions/Playlist window to browse to an existing regions file.
3. Specify the type of file you want to import from the Files of Type drop-down list:
•
•
•
•
Choose Playlist File (.sfl) to import a Sound Forge regions/playlist file.
Choose Session 8 File (.prm) to import a file that supports both Session 8 and Sound Forge regions.
Choose Windows Media Script File (.txt) to import a file that includes Windows Media script commands.
Choose Wave File (.wav) to import markers and regions from another sound file.
4. Click Open.
Copying the playlist/cutlist to the clipboard
Editing a playlist/cutlist in a text editor allows you to make an annotated list that you can print for reference.
From the Special menu, choose Playlist/Cutlist, and then choose Copy onto Clipboard (or right-click the playlist/cutlist and choose
Copy onto Clipboard from the shortcut menu). The list is copied to the Windows clipboard for use with a text editor.
112 | CHAPTER 7
Chapter 8 Recording, Extracting, and Burning
This chapter describes the processes for recording audio, extracting audio from a CD, and writing audio to a CD in Sound
Forge® software.
Recording audio
Sound Forge has two central methods for recording: manual (normal) and automatic. In normal recording, you choose
your settings and control your recording session while you’re sitting at your PC. With automatic recording, you can
choose your settings and set your trigger parameters for recording automatically—whether you’re at your PC or not.
Sound Forge also allows you to record multichannel audio if your audio device supports multiple inputs.
Specifying recording and playback options
Basic audio preferences
From the Options menu, choose Preferences and select the Audio tab to specify recording and playback options. For
more information, see Basic audio preferences on page 248.
Advanced audio preferences
The Advanced Audio Configuration dialog allows you to view information about and adjust settings for the playback or
recording device selected on the Preferences window (from the Options menu, choose Preferences) Audio tab. To view
advanced preferences, click the Advanced button. For more information, see Advanced audio preferences on page 249.
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 113
Recording manually
You can record into an existing window or create a new window at the time of recording. If you have an audio device that supports
multiple inputs, you can use Sound Forge to perform multichannel recording.
Tips:
• Sound Forge is not a multitrack editor — check out our Vegas and ACID family of products for full multitrack recording and editing. You
can use multichannel recording to create surround audio or capture field recordings.
• If you experience gapping or glitching when recording multichannel audio, try increasing your buffer size. You can increase the Record
buffering setting on the Audio tab of the Preferences dialog or click the Advanced button on the Audio tab of the Preferences dialog to
increase your device’s buffers.
1. Connect your audio sources to your sound card’s inputs. For more information on connecting audio sources, please refer to your sound
card’s user documentation.
2. Enable your recording inputs:
a.
b.
c.
d.
From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the Audio tab.
Choose your recording device from the Audio device type drop-down list.
Click the Record tab.
Select the Enable check box for each input you want to enable for recording, and then select a radio button to assign the input
to an audio channel.
In the following example, the signal from Analog in 1 is recorded to channel 1, Analog in 2 is recorded to channel 2, and so on.
e. Click OK to close the Preferences dialog and save your changes.
3. From the Special menu, choose Transport, and then choose Record from the submenu. The Record dialog is displayed.
Title bar
Record to new window
Recording attributes
Recording method
Recording mode
Punch-in spinners
Remote recording
Set selection
Set recording destination
window
Channel selection
Transport bar
Recording time
Click to view meters and meter reset
Pre/post roll
Prerecording buffer
MTC/SMPTE
sync settings
Input monitoring
DC adjust
Tip: You can also open the Record dialog by clicking the Record button
114 | CHAPTER 8
on the transport bar or pressing Ctrl+R.
4. From the Method drop-down list, choose Normal.
5. Choose the destination data window for your recording. By default, the application records into the active data window. If this is
not where you want to record, use one of the following methods to prepare for recording:
If
Then
You want to record into a
different data window
You want to record into a new
window
Click the Window button and choose a data window from the Record
destination window drop-down list. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
Click the New button in the Record dialog and specify the attributes (sample
rate, bit depth, and channels) for the new file. Click OK to return to the Record
dialog.
Note: The maximum number of channels recorded depends on the data window where you’re recording. For example, if you enabled six
inputs on the Record tab in Audio preferences, you need to record into a six-channel data window to record all six inputs. If you record to a
stereo data window, only two inputs will be recorded.
To route inputs to channels in the data window, click a channel number and choose a new input port from the menu.
To determine which inputs are recorded, type a value in the Channels box. For example, you could type 1-4 to record channels 1 through 4,
or type 1, 3, 4 to record only channels 1, 3, and 4.
6. Choose a recording mode from the Mode drop-down list. For more information, see Choosing a recording mode on page 119.
7. If necessary, set a start time, duration, or end time for your recording. By default, recording will begin at the current cursor position.
To record to a different cursor position, use one of the following methods:
•
•
Type a new cursor position in the Start field. If you chose the Punch In recording option in the Mode drop-down list, you can
also type values in the End or Length fields to define your recording period.
Click the Go To button
and change the cursor position. Click OK to return to the Record dialog. For more information, see
Setting the cursor position on page 69.
8. To determine which inputs are recorded, type a value in the Channels box. For example, you could type 1-4 to record channels 1
through 4, or type 1, 3, 4 to record only channels 1, 3, and 4.
9. Click the Arm button
to have recording begin as soon as possible after you click the Record button
.
Arming Sound Forge software prior to recording opens the wave device and loads all recording buffers in order to minimize the
amount of time between clicking the Record button and when the recording starts. This optional step can allow for more accurate
takes when recording in Punch-In mode.
10. If desired,click the Advanced tab and select the Prerecord buffer check box and specify the amount of time to buffer prior to
recording when the software is armed for recording. A prerecording buffer helps to ensure you won’t miss a perfect take if you’re a
bit slow to click the Record button.
When you click the Record button, recording begins and the sound data in the buffer is committed to disk. For example, if you set a
15-second buffer, recording effectively begins 15 seconds before you click the Record button.
Note: The prerecord buffer is unavailable in punch-in mode.
11. If necessary, select the DC Adjust check box and calibrate the DC offset adjustment. For more information, see Adjusting for DC offset
on page 119.
12. Click the Record button
in the Record dialog (or press Alt+R). Recording begins.
Stop button displays
Recording message
Time recorded value increases
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 115
13. Click the Stop button
to stop recording.
14. Click the Close button to close the Record dialog.
Recording automatically
In addition to the normal recording method, there are three automatic recording methods: Time, Threshold, and MIDI Timecode. These
recording methods enable you to trigger recording to begin automatically, using a specified device, with no intervention necessary,
using a timer, by detecting when audio exceeds a set threshold, or when MIDI timecode is detected.
When you’re using threshold-triggered recording, you can choose to record continuously: set a buffer size, and the recorded audio will
fill the buffer, discarding the oldest data as new data is recorded. If you want to save data from the buffer, you can save it to disk.
You can set up multiple automatic recording sessions to take place at different times, and set a session’s recurrence level for one time,
daily, or weekly. For your recording sessions to take place, the Sound Forge application must be started and armed for recording.
Triggering by time
1. From the Special menu, choose Transport, and then choose Record from the submenu.
Tip: You can also click the Record button
on the transport bar or press Ctrl+R.
2. From the Method drop-down list, choose Automatic: Time.
3. Choose the destination data window for your recording. By default, the software records into the active data window. If this is not
where you want to record, use one of the following methods to prepare for recording:
If
Then
You want to record into a different data window
Click the Window button and choose a data window from the Record destination
window drop-down list. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
Click the New button in the Record dialog and specify the attributes (sample rate,
bit depth, and channels) for the new file. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
You want to record into a new window
Note: The maximum number of channels recorded depends on the data window where you'’re recording. For example, if you enabled six
inputs on the Record tab in Audio preferences, you need to record into a six-channel data window to record all six inputs. If you record to a
stereo data window, only two inputs will be recorded.
To route inputs to channels in the data window, click a channel number and choose a new input port from the menu.
To determine which inputs are recorded, type a value in the Channels box. For example, you could type 1-4 to record channels 1 through 4,
or type 1, 3, 4 to record only channels 1, 3, and 4.
4. From the Mode drop-down list, choose a recording mode. For more information, see Choosing a recording mode on page 119.
5. Use the Time Options tab at the bottom of the Record dialog to set the timer:
a. Click the Add button
to create a timer setting. The Record Timer Event dialog is displayed.
b. Type a name in the Name field to create a name to identify the preset.
c. Choose a setting from the Recurrence drop-down list to indicate whether you want to record one time only or repeat the
selected recording day and time at a regular interval.
d. Use the Start date, Start time, and Duration boxes to indicate when you want to start and stop recording.
e. Click OK to close the dialog and return to the Record dialog.
6. Select a timer setting and click the Arm button
in the Record dialog when you’re ready to start the timer.
If you want to edit a timer setting, select it and click the Edit button
to display the Record Timer Event dialog.
If you want to remove a timer setting, select it and click the Delete button
.
If you want to remove all past timer settings, click the Remove All Past Events from List button
.
7. To end timed recording, click the Stop button
8. Click the Close button to close the Record dialog.
116 | CHAPTER 8
.
Triggering by a set threshold
When you’re using threshold-triggered recording, you can choose to record continuously: set a buffer size, and Sound Forge software
will record to fill the buffer, discarding the oldest data as new data is recorded. If you want to save data from the buffer, you can save it to
disk.
1. From the Special menu, choose Transport, and then choose Record from the submenu.
Tip: You can also Click the Record button
on the transport bar or press Ctrl+R.
2. From the Method drop-down list, choose Automatic: Threshold.
3. Choose the destination data window for your recording. By default, the software records into the active data window. If this is not
where you want to record, use one of the following methods to prepare for recording:
If
Then
You want to record into a different data window
Click the Window button and choose a data window from the Record destination
window drop-down list. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
Click the New button in the Record dialog and specify the attributes (sample rate,
bit depth, and channels) for the new file. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
You want to record into a new window
Note: The maximum number of channels recorded depends on the data window where you'’re recording. For example, if you enabled six
inputs on the Record tab in Audio preferences, you need to record into a six-channel data window to record all six inputs. If you record to a
stereo data window, only two inputs will be recorded.
To route inputs to channels in the data window, click a channel number and choose a new input port from the menu.
To determine which inputs are recorded, type a value in the Channels box. For example, you could type 1-4 to record channels 1 through 4,
or type 1, 3, 4 to record only channels 1, 3, and 4.
4. From the Mode drop-down list, choose a recording mode. For more information, see Choosing a recording mode on page 119.
5. Use the Threshold Options tab at the bottom of the Record dialog to set the audio levels at which recording will start and stop:
a. Drag the Threshold fader to set the audio level at which recording will begin.
b. Drag the Release slider to set the amount of time the audio level should be below the Threshold setting before recording will
stop.
c. Select the Automatically rearm after record check box if you want to continue monitoring audio levels and recording until you
click the Stop button
.
6. Click the Arm button
in the Record dialog. Recording will begin when the audio signal meets the threshold level and will stop
after the level falls below the threshold for the specified release time.
7. To end audio monitoring and recording, click the Stop button
.
8. Click the Close button to close the Record dialog.
Setting a prerecord buffer for threshold recording
On the Advanced tab at the bottom of the Record dialog, select the Prerecord buffer check box and type a value in the edit box to
maintain a set amount of time in a buffer when Sound Forge software is armed for recording. A prerecording buffer helps to ensure you
won’t miss a perfect take if you’ve set the threshold a bit too high.
When the prerecording buffer is enabled, recording begins when the audio input reaches the threshold level and the sound data in the
buffer is committed to disk. For example, if you set a 15-second buffer, recording effectively begins 15 seconds before the input reaches
the set threshold level.
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 117
Triggering by MIDI timecode
Note: You can specify a MIDI input port in the MIDI/Sync tab in the Preferences dialog (from the Options menu, choose Preferences).
For more information, see Synchronizing with other devices on page 120.
1. From the Special menu, choose Transport, and then choose Record from the submenu.
Tip: Click the Record button
on the transport bar or press Ctrl+R.
2. From the Method drop-down list, choose Automatic: MIDI Timecode.
3. Choose the destination data window for your recording. By default, the software records into the active data window. If this is not
where you want to record, use one of the following methods to prepare for recording:
If
Then
You want to record into a different data window
Click the Window button and choose a data window from the Record destination
window drop-down list. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
Click the New button in the Record dialog and specify the attributes (sample rate,
bit depth, and channels) for the new file. Click OK to return to the Record dialog.
You want to record into a new window
4. From the Mode drop-down list, choose a recording mode. For more information, see Choosing a recording mode on page 119.
5. Use the MIDI Timecode Options tab at the bottom of the Record dialog to set the MIDI timecode interval you want to record:
a. Select the MIDI timecode start check box and type a value in the edit box to indicate the timecode location when recording will
begin.
b. Select the MIDI timecode end check box and type a value in the edit box to indicate the timecode location when recording will
end. If you don’t indicate a stop time, recording will continue until you click the Stop button
to stop recording.
. Recording will begin when Sound Forge software detects the timecode specified in the MIDI timecode
start box and will stop when the software detects the timecode specified in the MIDI timecode end box.
6. Click the Arm button
7. To end recording, click the Stop button
.
8. Click the Close button to close the Record dialog.
118 | CHAPTER 8
Choosing a recording mode
You can choose any of several recording modes in the Record dialog’s Mode drop-down list:
Mode
Description
Automatic retake (automatically
rewind)
Automatic retake mode is the easiest method of recording. Recording begins at the position displayed in the Start box
Multiple takes creating Regions
and continues until you click the Stop button
. When you stop recording, the
when you click the Record button
start position resets to the beginning of the take, allowing for immediate review and retake.
Note: Automatic retake is the default mode when recording into an empty data window or when recording with no data
selected in the current data window.
Multiple takes creating Regions mode allows you to record several takes with each take defining a region in the
Regions List. Recording begins at the position displayed in the Start box when you click the Record button
continues until you click the Stop button
and
. When you stop recording, the stop position becomes the start position for
the next take, which can be recorded immediately. For more information, see Using the Regions List on page
106.
Multiple takes (no Regions)
Multiple takes (no Regions) mode also allows several takes to be recorded without these takes being defined as regions.
Like the previous mode, recording starts at the position displayed in the Start box when you click the Record button
Create a new window for each take
Punch-In (record a specific length)
and continues until you click the Stop button
. When you stop recording, the stop position becomes the start position
for the next take, which can be recorded immediately.
Create a new window for each take is similar to Multiple takes creating Regions, but creates a new data window
for each take. This is useful when recording audio data in which you will save each take as an individual file.
Punch-In mode is used to record over a specific selection in an existing data window. Specifying Punch-In activates the
Start, End, and Length boxes. Recording begins at the position displayed in the Start box when you click the Record
button
and continues until one of the following occurs:
• You click the Stop button
.
• The cursor in the data window reaches the position displayed in the End box.
• The length of the recorded data equals the value in the Length box.
Punch-In mode makes it possible to record over a specific section of audio without the risk of affecting the remainder of the
audio file. You can preview the punch-in region by clicking the Play button
.
Note: Punch-In is the default mode when recording with a selection in the data window.
Adjusting for DC offset
Use the Record dialog’s DC adjust check box to compensate for DC offsets generated by your system’s sound card during recording. A
DC offset of approximately 30 dB is not uncommon for sound cards (even with very low noise floors) and this displays in the record
meter as -60 dB. This does not mean that the system is losing 30 dB of resolution, but for the meters to accurately display ranges to
-90 dB, you must calibrate the DC adjust.
Calibrating the DC adjustment
Before using the DC adjust feature, you must calibrate it for the selected recording device.
1. Select the DC adjust check box. The Calibrate button activates along with displays labeled Left and Right.
Set the DC adjust check box to activate the Calibrate button
2. Click the Calibrate button. Sound Forge software listens to the selected recording device and calculates the offset.
Recalibrating the DC adjustment
If you have multiple sound cards, you should recalibrate the DC adjust each time you select a new recording device. Certain sound cards
must also be recalibrated each time the sample rate changes or when switching between mono and multichannel recording.
Tip: You can recalibrate at any time, even during recording. However, it is preferable to perform recalibration with silence at the record
inputs.
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 119
Playing back recorded audio
Audition your recorded audio by playing it back in the Record dialog. Click the Play button
to begin playback and click the Stop
button
to end playback. You can use the other buttons on the mini-transport bar in the Record dialog to navigate to different
locations in the file.
Arm
Go to start of file
Record
Go to start of last take
Play
Go to end of file
Drop marker
Go to
Adjusting pre/post-roll for punch-in and automatic retake recording playback
Once you have recorded a punch-in or an automatic retake, you can audition it with user-configured pre-roll and post-roll to evaluate
the performance. This option allows you to indicate the amount of sound data that should be played preceding or following your
recorded take when you review your takes. Reviewing with pre- and post-roll helps you review your takes in context.
1. Select the Review pre/post-roll check box in the Record dialog. The two corresponding boxes become active.
2. Enter appropriate pre-roll and post-roll values in the respective boxes.
Note: In Automatic retake mode, the post-roll control is unavailable.
3. Click the Play button
. The punch-in segment plays with the configured pre-roll and post-roll.
Note: Regardless of the data window’s current status format, pre-roll and post-roll values are measured in seconds.
Synchronizing with other devices
Sound Forge software can generate MTC/SMPTE synchronization while recording.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the MIDI/Sync tab.
2. On the MIDI/Sync tab, choose the trigger device from the Input drop-down list and click the OK button.
3. From the Options menu, choose MIDI In/Out, and then choose Generate MIDI Timecode from the submenu to enable MIDI
timecode output.
4. Click the Record button
.
5. Click the Advanced tab at the bottom of the Record dialog.
6. Select the Enable MTC/SMPTE Output Synchronization check box.
7. Select the Start check box and specify the time you want to start recording.
8. Select the Pre Roll check box and type a value in the edit box to begin SMPTE output at a specified time before recording.
9. Click the Close button.
120 | CHAPTER 8
Monitoring audio input
The input meters in the Meters tab at the bottom of the Record dialog show the level of the incoming signal. For recording purposes,
the incoming audio should remain primarily in the yellow, only occasionally entering the red.
Enabling the recording meters
Recording meters are displayed in the Meters tab at the bottom of the Record dialog so you can check your input level before recording.
Click the Meters tab at the bottom of the Record dialog to display recording meters, and then select the Monitor check box to enable
the recording meters. The peak meters represent the volume of the recording input. For best results, the peak level should be
somewhere in the yellow range with an occasional red: you want your input to be as loud as possible without clipping.
You can display a peak meter, VU/PPM, a phase scope, and mono-compatibility meter for each channel. To toggle the display of each
meter, right-click the Meters tab in the Record dialog and choose a command from the shortcut menu. A check mark is displayed to
indicate which meters are currently visible.
For more information about the VU/PPM meters, please see Using the VU meters on page 35.
For more information about the phase scopes, please see Using phase scopes on page 36.
For more information about the mono-compatibility meters, please see Using the mono-compatibility meters on page 37.
You can work with the record input meters in much the same way you do with other meters in the application. For more information, see
Monitoring levels in digital audio on page 32.
Tips:
• Click the Reset button (or press Alt+T) to reset clip indicators or held peaks or valleys.
• Right-click the meters and choose a setting from the shortcut menu to change the meters’ scale.
• If you are going to decrease the bit depth of your sound file after recording, it is particularly important that you record with the loudest
possible levels. High recording levels ensure that you will use the maximum possible dynamic range in the converted file.
Enabling input monitoring
Click the Advanced tab at the bottom of the Record dialog and select the Enable audio input monitoring check box if you want to
route the audio received by the input device to the current output device.
Note: This check box is available only when the Monitor check box is enabled.
Inserting markers while recording
Click the Drop Marker button
recording.
in the Record dialog’s mini-transport bar (or press M) to insert a marker in the data window during
You can then use the Markers to Regions command to convert markers into regions. For more information, see Inserting regions based on
marker positions on page 103.
Automatically labeling windows and regions
Files and regions can be automatically named for you as you record. This automatic labeling feature is particularly useful when recording
in Multiple takes creating Regions mode or Create a new window for each take mode. For more information, see Choosing a recording
mode on page 119.
Right-click the Record dialog and choose Automatic Labeling from the shortcut menu to access the Automatic Labeling dialog. For
more information, see Customizing region labeling on page 104.
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 121
Changing blinking status
The Recording message located to the right of the mini-transport bar in the Record dialog can display within a flashing or solid red
frame.
To toggle between the blinking status settings, right-click the Record dialog and choose Blinking Status from the shortcut menu. A
check mark displays adjacent to the command to indicate that the frame is configured to flash.
Extracting audio from CDs
You can extract data from CD and open tracks in the Sound Forge workspace.
Tip: Double-click a .cda file in the Explorer window (or drag it to the workspace) to extract a CD track without opening the Extract Audio
from CD dialog. You can also extract audio from the Open dialog by choosing CD Audio (*.cda) from the Files of type drop-down list in
the Open dialog.
1. Insert a CD in the drive.
2. From the File menu, choose Extract Audio from CD. The system’s drive(s) are identified. The Extract Audio from CD dialog is
displayed. If the system is equipped with multiple CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drives, you must select the desired drive from the Drive
drop-down list near the bottom of the dialog.
3. From the Action drop-down list, choose the method you want to use for extracting the CD audio:
Method
Description
Read by track
Read entire disc
Read by range
Use this option to select the tracks you want to extract from the CD. Each track is extracted into a unique data window.
Use this option to automatically extract all tracks on the disc. The entire CD is extracted into a single data window.
Use this option to extract audio from a specified range of time. Type appropriate values in the Start and End (or
Length) boxes. The range of audio is extracted into a single data window.
4. If you choose Read by track or Read by range from the Action drop-down list, select the tracks or time range you want to extract.
Note: Click Play to preview your selection. During playback, the button changes to a Stop button.
5. Select extraction options as needed:
•
•
Select the Create regions for each track check box to add each extracted track to the file’s Regions List.
Select the Create markers for each index change check box to place markers in the extracted file at all points where indices
occur in the original track.
6. From the Drive drop-down list, choose the CD drive that contains the CD from which you want to extract audio.
122 | CHAPTER 8
7. Click the MusicID button if you want to obtain CD information using Gracenote MusicID.
If CD information is not available, you can click the CD Info button to display a dialog box where you can edit the CD information
and submit it for inclusion in the Gracenote Media Database. For more information, see Obtaining or editing CD information on page
45.
8. From the Speed drop-down list, choose the rate at which you want to extract audio. If you experience gapping or glitching,
decrease the speed or click Configure and adjust the Audio extract optimization setting.
Note: To eject the CD at any time prior to beginning the extraction process, click the Eject button.
9. Click OK. The data extraction from the CD begins, and a progress meter is displayed.
Previewing CD tracks
In the Extract Audio from CD dialog, select a track and click the Play button to preview a track prior to extracting it from the CD. To end
the preview, click Stop.
Refreshing the Extract Audio from CD dialog
Click the Refresh button after you insert a new CD in the system’s CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive. This allows you to view the contents of
the new CD without closing and reopening the Extract Audio from CD dialog.
Burning CDs
You can write audio to CD if your system is configured with a supported CD-R/RW drive and the necessary drivers. CDs are burned using
the track-at-once method, meaning that additional tracks can be added to the CD over a period of time. Once all desired tracks are
added, you must close the CD before it can be played in a consumer CD player. However, once you have closed a CD, you can no longer
add tracks to it.
Correcting the sample rate for CD burning
Sample rates deviating from 44,100 Hz cause CD track lengths to be miscalculated. When attempting to write a file to CD that deviates
from the 44,100 Hz sample rate, you are prompted to change the sample rate. Selecting Yes automatically resamples audio to 44,100 Hz.
In addition, you can use the Resample tool to change the sample rate of a file prior to burning the CD. For more information, see
Resample on page 154.
Writing mono tracks to a CD
If you attempt to write mono audio tracks to a CD, you are prompted to create a stereo file by copying the mono data to both channels.
Adding tracks to a CD
You should always save your audio files prior to writing them to CD.
1. From the Tools menu, choose Burn Track-at-Once Audio CD. The Burn Track-at-Once Audio CD dialog is displayed. The bottom of
the dialog displays the length of the current audio file and the amount of time remaining on the CD currently in the CD-R/RW.
Note: If there is no CD in the current drive, only the Drive and Speed drop-down menus and the Close button are
available in this dialog. If you insert a disc or select a different drive after this dialog is displayed, it takes a moment to
recognize the disc and make all options available.
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 123
2. Choose a setting from the Action drop-down list:
Setting
Description
Burn audio
Begins recording audio to your CD when you click the Start button. You will need to close the disc before it
can be played in an audio CD player.
Performs a test to determine whether your files can be written to the CD recorder without encountering
buffer underruns. Recording begins after the test if it is successful.
Performs a test to determine whether your files can be written to the CD without encountering buffer
underruns. No audio is recorded to the CD.
Closes your disc without adding any audio when you click the Start button. Closing a disc allows your files
to be played on an audio CD player.
Erases your rewritable CD when you click the Start button. You should use this option if your rewritable CD
already has data on it.
Test, then burn audio
Test only
Close disc
Erase RW disc
3. Select your burning options:
Option
Description
Buffer underrun protection
Select this check box if your CD recorder supports buffer underrun protection. Buffer underrun protection
allows a CD recorder to stop and resume burning.
Erase RW disc before burning If you’re using a rewritable CD, select this check box to erase the CD before you begin burning if your
rewritable CD already has data on it.
Close disc when done
Select this check box to close the CD after burning. Closing a disc allows your files to be played on an audio
burning
CD player.
Note: You can close the disc using a separate step later. For more information, see Closing a CD on page 125.
Eject disc when done
Burn selection only
Select this check box to eject the CD automatically when burning has completed.
Select this check box to burn only the audio within the loop region.
4. From the Drive drop-down list, choose the CD-R/RW drive that you want to use to burn your CD.
5. From the Speed drop-down list, choose the speed at which you want to burn. Max will use your drive’s fastest possible speed;
decrease the setting if you have difficulty burning.
6. Click the Start button.
Important: Clicking Cancel after the CD writing process begins renders the CD unusable.
After the audio is written to CD, the CD Operation dialog indicates whether the writing was successful.
7. Click OK to clear the message.
124 | CHAPTER 8
Closing a CD
Closing the CD allows you to listen to it in an audio CD player. However, you cannot add tracks to a CD once it is closed.
1. From the Tools menu, choose Burn Track-at-Once Audio CD. The Burn Track-at-Once Audio CD dialog is displayed.
2. From the Action drop-down list, choose Close Disc.
3. If desired, select the Eject disc when done check box to eject the CD automatically when the disc has been closed.
4. Click the Start button. The Sound Forge application begins closing the CD and displays a progress meter in the dialog.
After the CD is closed, the CD Operation dialog indicates whether the closing was successful.
5. Click OK to clear the message.
Proper use of software
Sound Forge software is not intended for, and should not be used for, illegal or infringing purposes, such as the illegal copying or
sharing of copyrighted materials. Using Sound Forge software for such purposes is, among other things, against United States and
international copyright laws and contrary to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement. Such activity may be
punishable by law and may also subject you to the breach remedies set forth in the End User License Agreement.
RECORDING, EXTRACTING, AND BURNING | 125
126 | CHAPTER 8
Chapter 9 Editing, Repairing, and Synthesizing Audio
This chapter introduces some of the Sound Forge® advanced editing, repair, and synthesis features.
Overwriting and replicating
Earlier in this manual, paste and mix were described as ways of adding clipboard contents to the current data window. As
your audio editing projects become more elaborate, you may discover the need for three more sophisticated paste
operations: overwrite and replicate.
Overwriting
Overwriting allows you to replace the current selection with the contents of the clipboard and has two basic guidelines:
If
Then
The selection is longer than the clipboard contents
Data is overwritten from the beginning of the selection for the
length of the clipboard contents only.
Data is overwritten for the length of the selection only.
The clipboard contents are equal to or longer than the
selection
Overwriting a selection
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Create a selection containing “Wow.”
3. Copy the selection. The data is placed on the clipboard.
Copy the selection
Create a second selection
4. Create a selection of approximately the same length containing the final “...and easier.”
5. From the Edit menu, choose Paste Special, and choose Overwrite from the submenu or right-click the data window
and choose Overwrite from the shortcut menu. The selection is overwritten with the clipboard contents.
Overwrite the selection
Note: If any of the selection data remains, it is because the length of the clipboard contents was less than the length of
the selection.
EDITING, REPAIRING, AND SYNTHESIZING AUDIO | 127
Replicating
Replicating allows you to overwrite your current data window selection with several copies of the clipboard contents. When replicating,
you must specify whether you want to use partial copies of the clipboard contents or only complete copies.
• Using partial copies of the clipboard content completely overwrites the selected data window area.
• Using complete copies of the clipboard content prevents a portion of the data window selection from being overwritten unless the
selection length is an exact multiple of the length of the clipboard contents.
Note: The Replicate command will paste as many copies of the clipboard as will fit in the current selection. If no selection exists in the data
window, the command is not available.
Replicating a selection
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Create a selection containing “Wow.”
3. Copy the selection. The data is placed on the clipboard.
4. Create a selection containing “Sound editing just gets easier.”
5. From the Edit menu, choose Paste Special and choose Replicate from the submenu. The Replicate dialog is displayed.
6. Select the Copy partials radio button and click OK. The selection is overwritten with multiple copies of the clipboard contents. A
partial copy of the clipboard contents is used where appropriate.
128 | CHAPTER 9
Repeating an operation
Once you perform an operation on an audio file, you can quickly repeat it with the same parameters by choosing Repeat from the Edit
menu. This allows you to reapply the same effect, process, or function to a different section of audio using the same parameters.
Note: In the Edit menu, the Repeat command displays in conjunction with the name of the previous function.
You can also repeat an operation by doing any of the following actions:
• Hold Shift while choosing the command from its menu.
• Press Ctrl+Y.
• Click the Repeat button on the Standard toolbar.
Using drag-and-drop
You can take advantage of using drag-and-drop to perform many common tasks. Drag-and-drop operations make controlling the
Sound Forge software faster and more intuitive and allow for increased editing power. The major drag-and-drop editing operations are
paste and mix.
Dragging mono selections into multichannel destinations
When pasting or mixing a mono selection into a multichannel file, you can mix the selection to both channels by dropping it on the
destination data window’s center line. Otherwise, the selection is mixed into the left or right channel exclusively.
Snapping to events in drag-and-drop operations
A major advantage of drag-and-drop editing is the ability to snap to markers, regions, time increments, or other events in the
destination window. All drag-and-drop operations can be configured to snap (or align) to points in the destination file based on the
events established within that file.
The following table describes all events that drag-and-drop selections snap to in the destination file.
Events
Description
Cursor
Selection
Start
End
Markers
Regions Start and End Markers
Time, Measures, etc.
Video Frames
Start of block snaps to cursor position.
Start of block snaps to start or end points of a selection.
Start of block snaps to start of file.
Start of block snaps to end of file.
Start of block snaps to marker.
Start of block snaps to region start or end.
Start of block snaps to labeled divisions on time ruler.
Start of block snaps to the start of video frames appearing in the video strip.
Pasting and mixing with drag-and-drop
You can drag an audio selection and paste or mix it into another data window.
Pasting
1. Open the Voiceover.pca and Drumhit.pca files.
2. Select all audio data in Drumhit.pca.
EDITING, REPAIRING, AND SYNTHESIZING AUDIO | 129
Create a selection in the
source window
Hold the Alt key and drag the
selection into the destination
window
3. Hold the Alt key and drag the selection to the Voiceover data window.
•
•
A vertical dotted line representing the leading edge of the source selection appears in the destination window.
The letter “P” appears in the box adjacent to the pointer.
Tip: When dragging a selection to paste sound data, drag up or down before moving the mouse left or right. Dragging left or right before
moving the mouse vertically adjusts the selection length.
4. Use the mouse to position the dotted line in the destination window where the source data will be pasted.
Drag the selection to the
destination window
Drag-and-drop
paste indicator
Selection is pasted into
the destination window
5. Release the mouse button. The selection is pasted into the destination window.
Mixing
1. Open the Voiceover.pca and Drumhit.pca audio files.
2. Select all audio data in the Drumhit data window.
3. Drag the selection to the Voiceover data window.
•
•
A shaded region representing the source selection appears in the destination window.
An “M” appears in the box adjacent to the pointer.
Tip: When dragging a selection to paste sound data, drag up or down before moving the mouse left or right. Dragging left or right before
moving the mouse vertically adjusts the selection length.
130 | CHAPTER 9
Drag-and-drop mix
indicator
4. Position the leading edge of the shaded region in the Voiceover data window where the mixing of the selection will begin.
5. Release the mouse button. The Mix dialog is displayed.
6. Verify that both Volume levels are set to 0 dB and click OK.
Selection is mixed into the
destination window
Toggling the Mix/Paste functions
An alternate way of specifying a mix or paste is the mouse toggle method.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca and Drumhit.pca files.
2. Select all audio data in the Drumhit data window.
3. Drag the selection to the Voiceover data window. A shaded region representing the source selection appears in the destination
window and a letter appears in the box adjacent to the pointer.
Tip: When dragging a selection to paste sound data, drag up or down before moving the mouse left or right. Dragging left or right before
moving the mouse vertically adjusts the selection length.
4. Continue holding the left mouse button while clicking the right mouse button. The letter in the box and the appearance of the
selection region change to indicate the current drag-and-drop mode.
5. Release the left mouse button. The source audio data is pasted or mixed into the destination data.
Creating new windows with drag-and-drop
Drag-and-drop also allows you to create a new data window from a selection.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Create a selection containing “Wow.”
3. Drag the selection to an empty area of the Sound Forge workspace and drop it. A new data window is created containing the
selection data with the attributes of the original file.
Tip: When dragging a selection to paste sound data, drag up or down before moving the mouse left or right. Dragging left or right before
moving the mouse vertically adjusts the selection length.
EDITING, REPAIRING, AND SYNTHESIZING AUDIO | 131
Finding and repairing audio glitches
Glitches are commonly the result of analog audio editing, analog to digital transfer, or electronic noise. Sound Forge software provides
you with a tool for locating audio glitches and three distinct tools for repairing them: channel, interpolate, and replace. In addition, you
can repair audio glitches manually using the Pencil tool.
Locating glitches
The Find tool allows you to quickly locate glitches, specific volume levels, or silence in a file. The Find tool’s glitch algorithm locates
glitches by examining the file for instances where the waveform matches the specified threshold slope and sensitivity criteria. The
cursor then moves to the location of the glitch to allow you to repair it. This tool only locates one glitch at a time. Therefore, it may be
necessary to execute this command several times on a file to locate all glitches.
1. Open any audio file containing glitches.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Find. The Find dialog is displayed.
3. From the Find drop-down list, choose Glitch.
4. Adjust the Threshold slope fader to configure the minimum slope that constitutes a glitch.
•
•
A high value detects only glitches with steep slopes.
A lower value detects glitches with both steep and more gradual slopes.
5. Adjust the Sensitivity fader to determine the sensitivity of the detection algorithm.
•
•
A high value results in any part of the waveform with a slope greater than the Threshold slope being detected as a glitch.
A lower value forces the algorithm to verify that the slope is indeed a glitch, and not simply a portion of the smooth waveform.
6. Click OK. The first glitch in the file is found and its location is marked with the cursor.
Tip: If you can hear glitches that the Find tool does not locate, decrease the Threshold slope and increase the Sensitivity.
Locating additional glitches using the same settings
Once you have configured the settings in the Find dialog, you can find the next glitch in the file without viewing the Find dialog. To find
the next glitch using the current settings, hold Shift while choosing Find from the Tools menu or hold Shift while clicking the Find
button
on the Tools toolbar.
Using the Shift key in this way is not limited to finding glitches. You can hold Shift and choose any command from a menu to repeat the
command with the same settings. For more information, see Repeating an operation on page 129.
Repairing audio
There are several ways to repair audio glitches.
Copying the other channel
For glitches in a single channel of a multichannel file, you can replace the glitched section of damaged channel with the corresponding
data from a “good” channel.
Note: This method only works if the channels contain similar audio.
1. Open the file containing the glitch.
2. Create a selection in the channel containing the glitch, three or four times longer (maximum 50 ms) than the glitch itself.
132 | CHAPTER 9
3. From the Tools menu, choose Repair, and choose Copy Other Channel from the submenu. The selected data is replaced with the
corresponding data from the “good” channel. In addition, rapid crossfades are created at the beginning and end of the replacement
selection to prevent a new glitch from being created.
Tip: If this method fails to repair the glitch, undo it and apply Copy Other Channel again, this time using a longer selection.
Interpolating new audio
This is the most basic method of repairing glitches. New audio data is simply interpolated based on the data at the beginning and end of
the selection. This method results in a straight line connecting the beginning and end of the selection. Interpolation should only be
used to repair small (less than 2 ms) glitches.
1. Open the file containing the glitch.
2. Right-click the data window and choose Zoom from the shortcut menu, and choose In Full from the submenu. The file displays at a
24:1 zoom ratio.
3. Create a selection containing the glitch.
Tip: To improve the accuracy of this feature, the selection should be as small as possible while still containing the glitch.
4. From the Tools menu, choose Repair, and choose Interpolate from the submenu. The glitch data is replaced with interpolated
data.
Data is interpolated within the
selection
Replacing audio with preceding data
The Replace tool allows you to repair audio files by replacing the damaged data with the data immediately preceding it. This repair
method is useful for repairing longer glitches such as needle drops and scratches.
1. Open the file containing the glitch.
2. Create a 5 to 50 ms selection containing the damaged audio.
Note: The maximum allowed replace time is 0.5 seconds.
EDITING, REPAIRING, AND SYNTHESIZING AUDIO | 133
3. From the Tools menu, choose Repair, and choose Replace from the submenu. The selection is replaced with the selection of
identical length immediately preceding the damaged data. In addition, rapid crossfades are created at the beginning and end of
the replacement selection to prevent a new glitch from being created.
Selection data
Replacement data
Repairing audio glitches manually with the Pencil tool
The Pencil tool is for users who prefer to repair their audio glitches manually. This tool allows you to repair waveform glitches by
redrawing the damaged waveform section. However, the Pencil tool can only be used when a file’s waveform displays at a zoom ratio of
1:32 or lower.
1. Open the file containing the glitch.
2. Zoom in tightly on the glitch.
3. Select the Pencil tool using any of the following methods:
•
•
•
From the Edit menu, choose Tool, and choose Pencil from the submenu.
Click the Pencil Tool button
in the Standard toolbar.
Click the Edit Tool Selector in the top-left corner of the data window until the Pencil tool is displayed.
4. Drag to draw a new waveform section. The new section is integrated into the original waveform, replacing the section containing
the glitch.
Repairing audio using Audio Restoration plug-in
Sound Forge software includes an ExpressFX™ plug-in called Audio Restoration that you can use to remove surface noise from old
recordings. For more information on this plug-in, please see the Sound Forge online help file (accessible from the Help menu by
choosing Contents and Index).
134 | CHAPTER 9
Synthesizing audio
You can generate custom tones and waveforms for use in your audio projects.
Generating DTMF/MF tones
You can generate standard dial tones used by telephone companies.
1. From the Tools menu, choose Synthesis, and choose DTMF/MF Tones from the submenu. The DTMF/MF Tones dialog is displayed.
2. Enter the phone number to be generated in the Dial string edit box, including pause characters.
Note: Unknown characters are ignored.
3. Use the Amplitude fader to set the peak level of the waveform.
4. Select the Tone style to generate radio button corresponding to the tone to be generated.
•
•
DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency) signals are used by standard push-button telephones and are generated using
combinations of 679, 770, 852, 941, 1209, 1336, 1477, and 1633 Hz sine waves.
MF signals are used internally by the telephone networks and are generated with a combination of 700, 900, 1100, 1300, 1500,
and 1700 Hz sine waves.
5. Specify the output length (in seconds) of each tone in the Single tone length box.
6. Specify the length (in seconds) of silence between tones in the Break length box.
7. Specify the pause length (in seconds) to be inserted for a pause character in the Pause length box.
8. Select the Fade the edges of each tone check box to help prevent glitching.
9. Specify the pause character in the Pause character box.
10. Use the Insert new tone sequence at drop-down list to specify where the generated tone is placed in the audio file.
11. Click OK.
Generating audio with frequency modulation
The Sound Forge FM Synthesis feature can be used to create complex sounds from simple waveforms using frequency modulation (FM).
In frequency modulation, the frequency of a waveform (carrier) is modulated by the output of another waveform (modulator) to create
a new waveform. If the frequency of the modulator is low, the carrier is detuned slowly over time. If the frequency of the modulator is
high, the carrier is modulated so quickly that numerous additional frequencies (or sidebands) will be created.
Using the FM Synthesis tool, up to four waveforms (operators) can be used in a variety of configurations. Depending on the
configuration, a waveform can be a carrier, a modulator, or a simple, unmodulated waveform.
EDITING, REPAIRING, AND SYNTHESIZING AUDIO | 135
Generating a waveform
1. From the Tools menu, choose Synthesis, and choose FM from the submenu. The FM Synthesis dialog is displayed.
2. Specify the length (in seconds) of the generated waveform in the Total output waveform length box.
3. Use the Configuration slider to configure the arrangement and number of operators used to generate the waveform. For more
information, see Specifying the number and arrangement of operators on page 136.
4. Modify individual operators as needed. For more information, see Modifying an operator on page 136.
5. From the Insert waveform at drop-down list, choose a position to determine where the generated waveform is placed in the file.
6. Click OK.
Specifying the number and arrangement of operators
Dragging the Configuration slider changes the graphical representation of the arrangement and number of operators used to generate
the waveform. When configuring your waveform, keep the following guidelines in mind:
• The outputs of horizontally joined operators are simply mixed. The outputs of the bottom operators are mixed to form the final
output. Mixing unique simple waveforms is referred to as additive synthesis.
• Operators joined vertically are FM carrier-modulator pairs. The bottom operator is the carrier and the top operator is the modulator.
• Operators without other operators directly above are simple waveform generators.
• When three or more operators are stacked, the top operator modulates the operator below it, which modulates the following
operator, and so on.
Modifying an operator
1. Select the Current radio button corresponding to the operator to be modified.
2. Use the envelope graph to modify the amplitude of the operator over time. For more information, see Envelope graphs on page 38.
3. From the Operator shape drop-down list, choose a waveform shape.
4. Specify the frequency of the operator in the Frequency box.
Notes:
• If Frequency is set to 0.00, a DC (zero-frequency) waveform is produced regardless of the waveform specified.
• When you choose Filtered Noise from the Operator shape drop-down list, Frequency determines the high-frequency content of the
noise.
5. Use the Feedback slider to determine the amount of the operator's output that is used to modulate itself. If the operator is also
being modulated by another waveform, the feedback path and the modulator output are mixed together to modulate the carrier.
136 | CHAPTER 9
6. Use the Amplitude fader to determine the output gain that is applied to the current operator after the amplitude envelope.
Note: If the operator is a modulator, this control (along with the envelope) determines the amount of frequency modulation applied to
the carrier. If the amplitude of a modulator is high, harsh audio may result.
Generating simple waveforms
The Simple Synthesis tool is used to generate simple waveforms of a given shape, pitch, and length.
1. From the Tools menu, choose Synthesis, and choose Simple from the submenu. The Simple Synthesis dialog is displayed.
2. From the Waveform shape drop-down list, choose a shape to specify the shape of a single period of the current operator’s
waveform.
3. In the Length box, specify the length (in seconds) of the generated waveform.
4. In the Start Frequency box, specify the frequency of the waveform.
5. If you want to sweep a range of frequencies, select the End Frequency check box and specify an ending frequency in the box.
Select the Log Sweep check box if you want to sweep the range logarithmically; when the check box is cleared, the sweep is linear.
6. Use the Amplitude fader to set the peak level of the waveform.
Note: When you choose Noise in the Waveform shape drop-down list, the amplitude is affected by the specified cutoff frequency.
7. From the Insert new waveform at drop-down list, choose a position to determine where the waveform is placed in the data
window.
8. Click OK.
EDITING, REPAIRING, AND SYNTHESIZING AUDIO | 137
138 | CHAPTER 9
Chapter 10 Processing Audio
This chapter provides descriptions of processing presets and previews as well as an overview of all functions in the Sound
Forge® Process menu.
Applying presets
Many Sound Forge dialogs contain drop-down lists of presets used to quickly apply processes and effects. Presets are
especially useful when you are learning the application, as they allow you to hear the results of processing as well as view
the control settings used to produce these results.
Note: All information regarding presets in this chapter is applicable to DirectX® Plug-Ins (effects) from Sony Media
Software.
Using presets
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Fade, and choose Graphic from the submenu. The Graphic Fade dialog is displayed.
3. From the Preset drop-down list, choose the -20 dB exponential fade out preset. Notice that the dialog’s controls
change to reflect the -20 dB exponential fade out.
4. Click the Preview button. The following actions occur:
•
•
The Preview button changes to a Stop button.
The effect previews on a brief selection of audio.
For more information, see Previewing processed audio on page 141.
5. From the Preset drop-down list, choose the -3 dB exponential fade out preset. Notice that the dialog’s controls
update to reflect the new preset and the effect automatically previews.
6. Select the Bypass check box. The original audio previews with no effects. For more information, see Bypassing a
process while previewing on page 141.
7. Clear the Bypass check box and click OK. The -3 dB exponential fade out preset is applied to the audio file.
Note: An effect or process is not applied to the audio data until you click OK.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 139
Creating presets
You can also create custom effects and save them as presets.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Fade, and choose Graphic from the submenu. The Graphic Fade dialog is displayed.
3. From the Preset drop-down list, choose the -3 dB exponential fade out preset. The dialog’s controls change to reflect the preset.
4. Drag any of the graphic fade points to a new position.
Edit the graphic fade
and click the Save
Preset button.
5. Click the Save Preset button
. The Save Preset dialog is displayed.
6. Enter a name for the preset and click OK. The new preset is saved and added to the dialog’s drop-down list.
Deleting presets
To delete a preset, choose it from the Preset drop-down list and click the Delete Preset button
.
Note: Built-in presets cannot be deleted.
Resetting parameters
To reset all dialog controls to their default settings, right-click the dialog and choose Reset All from the shortcut menu.
Managing presets
Once you have created custom presets, you can use the Sound Forge Preset Manager to back up, transfer, or delete custom presets from
any of the installed effects, processes, tools and plug-ins. You can also use the Preset Manager to manage your ACID® and Vegas®
presets. For more information, see Using the Preset Manager on page 167.
140 | CHAPTER 10
Previewing processed audio
You can preview the effect that a process has on a file by using the Preview button found in most audio processing dialogs. You can use
previews to fine-tune effect parameters without leaving the dialog. More importantly, using previews reduces wasted processing time.
Setting custom preview parameters
You can customize the preview parameters to satisfy your editing preferences. You can save custom previewing settings for the current
process alone or for all processes.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Previews tab.
3. Edit the preview parameters as desired. For more information, see Previews tab on page 246.
4. Click OK. The new preview parameters are updated and saved for all effects.
Bypassing a process while previewing
You are also able to A/B test an effect by using the Bypass check box to switch between previewing the processed and unprocessed
audio file.
• If you select the Bypass check box, the unprocessed audio file is played when you click the Preview button.
• If you clear the Bypass check box, the processed audio file is played when you click the Preview button.
The Preview button
and the Bypass check
box
Adjusting the data window selection
You can easily adjust your data window selection from within most processing dialogs by clicking the More button on the right side of
the dialog and specifying the selection parameters explained below.
Control
Description
Start
Determines the starting point for your selection in the data window. The Length field adjusts automatically according to your
input in this box.
Determines the ending point for your selection in the data window. The Length field adjusts automatically according to your
input in this box.
End
Length
Channels
Determines the length of your selection in the data window. Click the Lock Length button
to lock or unlock the current
selection length. When the selection length is locked, Sound Forge will adjust the values in the Start or End boxes to retain the
specified selection length.
Determines the channel(s) included in the data window selection. Type a number in the box to change the channel selection
while retaining the start, end, and length selections.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 141
Clicking the More button displays
additional information you can use to
adjust your data window selection. To hide
this information, click the Less button.
Sound Forge processes
The remainder of this chapter describes the functions located in the Process menu.
Auto Trim/Crop
Auto Trim/Crop removes silence from an audio file. In addition, this function automatically fades the endpoints of a phrase.
Using Auto Trim/Crop
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Auto Trim/Crop. The Auto Trim/Crop dialog is displayed.
3. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Phrase Concatenator 1 and click OK. The Auto Trim/Crop function deletes silence in the
file and creates new regions based on the preset’s parameters. For more information, see Auto Trim/Crop controls on page 143.
142 | CHAPTER 10
Auto Trim/Crop controls
The following controls are located in the Auto Trim/Crop dialog.
Control
Description
Function
This drop-down list contains five modes:
• Keep edges outside of the selection - Removes silence within the selection, but retains all data outside of the
selection.
• Remove edges outside of the selection - Removes silence within the selection and deletes all data beyond the
selection.
• Remove silence between phrases (creates regions) - Removes silence within the selection and creates regions from
individual phrases. For more information, see Minimum inter-phrase silence on page 143.
• Remove data beyond loop points - Removes all data beyond the selected loop. For more information, see
Minimum length following loop end on page 143.
• Remove data from start and limit file length - Allows you to specify an amount of sound to be deleted from the
beginning of each file and specify a maximum length for converted files. If a file is longer than this length, it is trimmed. This
preset is useful for creating sample clips.
Attack threshold
Determines the threshold level for detection of the trim/crop start point: -Inf. indicates complete silence, and 0 dB indicates
maximum amplitude level.
Release threshold
Determines the threshold level for detection of the trim/crop end point: -Inf. indicates complete silence, and 0 dB indicates
maximum amplitude level.
Fade in
Determines the length (in milliseconds) of the fade applied to a section of audio prior to the detected trim/crop start point.
Fade out
Determines the length (in milliseconds) of the fade applied to a section of audio following the detected trim/crop end point.
Minimum inter-phrase silence When you choose the Remove silence between phrases mode, the Minimum inter-phase silence value determines
the minimum amount of silence needed between phrases for a new region to be created.
Minimum length following
When you choose the Remove data beyond loop points mode, the Minimum length following loop end value
loop end
determines the number of samples that must follow a loop.
More
Click this button to view additional options that you can use to adjust your data window selection. For more information,
see Adjusting the data window selection on page 141.
Bit-Depth Converter
The Bit-Depth Converter is used to increase/decrease the bit depth of a file while concealing the resulting quantization noise.
• Decreasing a file’s bit depth decreases the overall size of the file, but results in added quantization noise, which can be masked using
dither and noise shaping.
• Increasing a file’s bit depth—while not improving the quality of the audio—allows subsequent audio processing to be performed
with greater accuracy and resolution.
Prior to decreasing a file’s bit depth, you should optimize the audio for conversion. For more information, see Minimizing quantization
error on page 85.
Note: There are no rules regarding maintaining audio quality when decreasing bit- depth. For this reason, you should always
experiment with the Dither and Noise shaping controls to determine the optimum settings for each file.
Converting a file’s bit depth
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Bit-Depth Converter.
3. From the Bit depth drop-down list, choose the desired bit depth.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 143
4. If necessary, use the Dither drop-down list to specify the type of dither used to mask the quantization noise results from lowering a
file’s bit depth. For more information, see Dither on page 144.
5. If desired, use the Noise shaping drop-down list to specify any noise shaping to be applied to the file. For more information, see
Noise shaping on page 144.
Note: When increasing a file’s bit depth, set the Dither and Noise shaping controls to None and Off respectively.
Bit-Depth Converter controls
The following controls are located in the Bit-Depth Converter dialog.
Control
Description
Bit depth
Dither
Choose a setting to specify the number of bits that should be used to store each sample.
This control allows you to specify the randomness of the dither (generated noise) used to mask quantization distortion resulting
from conversion to a lower bit depth. You can select from several shapes, each roughly describing the pattern that would be
produced if you plotted a graph with the dither amplitude on the X-axis and the probability of the dither values on the Y-axis.
As is frequently the case when working with audio, experimentation with dither values yields the best results; however, keep the
following information in mind:
Half Rectangular - Eliminates distortion resulting from conversion to a lower bit depth, but the noise level is more likely to be
dependent on the signal. This setting uses a maximum dither noise amplitude of 0.5 LSB (least significant bit).
Rectangular - Identical to Half Rectangular, but with a maximum dither noise amplitude of 1 LSB (least significant bit).
Triangular - Eliminates distortion products as well as any noise floor modulation, but results in a slightly higher noise level. The
option typically works well in conjunction with noise shaping.
Highpass Triangular - Behaves like triangular dither, but shifts its noise into higher frequencies. This is typically the best
option when used in conjunction with noise shaping.
Gaussian - Does not perform as well as Rectangular and Triangular dither, but may be suitable for certain audio.
Noise shaping
Determines the aural positioning of quantization noise. Using this control, you can shift the noise into audio registers that are
less perceptible to human hearing. This lowers the perceived noise floor and creates the illusion of cleaner audio.
High-pass contour noise shaping attempts to push all quantization noise and error into high frequencies.
More
Start
End
Length
Channels
Equal loudness contour noise shaping attempts to push the noise under an equal loudness-type of curve.
Click this button to view additional options that you can use to adjust your data window selection. These options are explained
below.
Determines the starting point for your selection in the data window. The Length field adjusts automatically according to your
input in this box.
Determines the ending point for your selection in the data window. The Length field adjusts automatically according to your
input in this box.
Determines the length of your selection in the data window. Click the Lock Length button
to lock or unlock the current
selection length. When the selection length is locked, Sound Forge will adjust the values in the Start or End boxes to retain the
specified selection length.
Determines the channel(s) included in the data window selection. Type a number in the box to change the channel selection
while retaining the start, end, and length selections.
Noise shaping dangers
Noise shaping places quantization noise near the audio’s Nyquist frequency, a value equal to one-half of the file’s sample rate. Consider
the following information:
• A file with a sample rate of 44.1 kHz has a Nyquist frequency of 22.05 kHz (at the high end of human hearing). Applying noise shaping
to this file results in audio perceived to be cleaner than it actually is.
• A file with a sample rate of 22 kHz has a Nyquist frequency of 11 kHz (well within the sensitive range of human hearing). Applying
noise shaping to this file results in audio that is perceived to be noisier than it actually is. Ironically, this defeats the entire purpose of
the Noise shape control.
For this reason, we do not recommend using noise shaping on files with sample rates less than 44.1 kHz.
144 | CHAPTER 10
Channel Converter
The Channel Converter is used to convert audio files between mono and multichannel formats. The Channel Converter dialog can also
be used to reverse the channels of a stereo file or intermix the channels of a multichannel file to create interesting panning effects.
Notes:
• To perform quick channel conversion without specifying the mix, use the Format tab on the Properties dialog (accessible from the File
menu by choosing Properties).
• If you want to apply a panning envelope to a mono file, use the Channel Converter to convert the file to stereo first.
• You can use mono files in the Pan/Expand dialog (accessible from the Process menu by choosing Pan/Expand) if you choose Pan
(preserve stereo separation) or Pan (mix channels before panning) from the Process mode drop-down list. When you click OK to
apply your changes, the file will be converted to stereo and your panning settings will be applied.
Converting a mono file to stereo (or multichannel)
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file. Notice that this is a mono file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Channel Converter. The Channel Converter dialog is displayed.
3. Choose a setting from the Preset drop-down list, or adjust the controls as needed:
a. Choose a setting from the Output channels drop-down list to indicate the number of channels in the converted file.
b. Click in the Output box for each output channel and type a gain value (or drag the fader) to adjust the amount of the original
mono file that will be mixed to the new channel.
c. Select the Invert Mix check box if you want to reverse the phase of the new channel’s content.
4. Click the OK button.
The file is converted to stereo.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 145
Converting a stereo file to mono
1. Open the saxriff.wav file. Notice that this is a stereo file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Channel Converter.
3. Choose a setting from the Preset drop-down list, or adjust the controls as needed:
a. Choose 1 from the Output channels drop-down list to create a mono file.
b. Click in the Source 1 box and type a gain value (or drag the fader) to adjust the amount of the original left channel that will be
mixed to the new mono file.
c. Click in the Source 2 box and type a gain value (or drag the fader) to adjust the amount of the original right channel that will be
mixed to the new mono file.
d. Select the Invert Mix check box if you want to reverse the phase of the new left-channel mix.
4. Click the OK button.
Intermixing channels in a file
1. From the Process menu, choose Channel Converter.
2. Adjust the controls as needed:
a. Choose a setting from the Output channels drop-down list to indicate the number of channels in the converted file.
b. Click in the Source box for each output channel and type a gain value (or drag the fader) to adjust the amount of the original
channel that will be mixed to the new channel.
c. Select the Invert Mix check box if you want to reverse the phase of the new channel’s content.
3. Click the OK button.
Swapping stereo channels
1. From the Process menu, choose Channel Converter.
2. From the Preset drop-down list, choose the Stereo to Stereo - Swap Channels preset.
3. Click the OK button.
Channel Converter controls
The following controls are located in the Channel Converter dialog.
Control
Description
Output channels
Source
Invert Mix
More
This drop-down determines the number of channels in the output file.
Determines the amount of the original channel data that will be mixed to the new file.
Select this check box to reverse the polarity of the new channel.
Click this button to view additional options that you can use to adjust your data window selection. These options are explained
below.
Determines the starting point for your selection in the data window. The Length field adjusts automatically according to your
input in this box.
Determines the ending point for your selection in the data window. The Length field adjusts automatically according to your
input in this box.
Start
End
Length
Channels
146 | CHAPTER 10
Determines the length of your selection in the data window. Click the Lock Length button
to lock or unlock the current
selection length. When the selection length is locked, Sound Forge will adjust the values in the Start or End boxes to retain the
specified selection length.
Determines the channel(s) included in the data window selection. Type a number in the box to change the channel selection
while retaining the start, end, and length selections.
DC Offset
Audio that is not centered around the zero baseline in the waveform display is said to have a DC offset. DC offsets are typically caused
by electrical conflicts between the sound card and input device. The DC Offset function (located on the Process menu) is used to
change the baseline of an audio file by adding a constant value to each sample to compensate for offsets.
Estimating DC Offset
You can estimate the DC offset of an audio file by choosing Statistics from the Tools menu.
Average DC offset value
DC Offset controls
Choose DC Offset from the Process menu to display the DC Offset dialog. The following controls are located in the DC Offset dialog.
Control
Description
Automatically detect and
remove
Adjust DC offset by
Calculates and corrects the DC offset for each channel individually.
Allows you to specify a DC offset value manually.
• -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 for 32-bit data
• -8,388,608 to 8,388,607 for 24-bit data
• -32,768 to 32,767 for 16-bit data
• -128 to 127 for 8-bit data
Compute DC offset from first Selecting this check box specifies that only the first five seconds of a file are analyzed when measuring the DC offset. Be aware
5 seconds only
that five seconds is not sufficient if the beginning of a file has a long fade-in or mute.
EQ
Three EQ options are available in the Process menu: Graphic, Paragraphic, and Parametric. Each of these options launch the
appropriate XFX effect. For more information on using the XFX EQ effects, click the
button in the effect dialog.
Fade - Graphic fade
Graphic fade allows you to create custom fade envelopes to apply to audio data. You can use up to sixteen envelope points to create
complex graphic fades.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 147
Creating a graphic fade
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. Select the last half of the audio (approximately 5 seconds).
3. From the Process menu, choose Fade, and choose Graphic from the submenu. The Graphic Fade dialog is displayed.
4. From the Show wave drop-down list, choose Mono source. The Musicbed.pca waveform displays in the graph. For more
information on the dialog controls, see Graphic Fade controls on page 149.
5. From the Preset drop-down list, choose -6 dB exponential fade out. The fade’s envelope displays in relation to the waveform in
the graph.
Full volume at start of selection
Zero volume at end of selection
6. Click OK. The specified fade is applied to the selection.
Musicbed.pca with a -6dB
exponential fade out
Creating a custom graphic fade
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. Select the first half of the audio (approximately 5 seconds).
3. From the Process menu, choose Fade, and choose Graphic from the submenu. The Graphic Fade dialog is displayed.
4. From the Show wave drop-down list, choose Mono source. The Musicbed.pca waveform displays in the graph. For more
information on the dialog controls, see Graphic Fade controls on page 149.
5. Edit the fade envelope using the following controls:
•
•
•
•
Click the envelope to create a new point.
Drag a point to move it to a new position.
Double-click or right-click a point to delete it.
Right-click an envelope segment and choose a new fade type from the shortcut menu.
For more information, see Envelope graphs on page 38.
6. Click OK. The custom graphic fade is applied to the selected audio.
148 | CHAPTER 10
Graphic Fade controls
The following controls are located in the Graphic Fade dialog.
Control
Description
Maximum Gain
Show wave
Select a radio button to adjust the range of the envelope graph.
The Show wave drop-down list provides several settings for drawing the current selection’s waveform on the envelope
graph. This function is available only for small selections.
Clicking the Reset Envelope button clears the envelope of all points except the original two.
Reset Envelope
Fade - Fade In
The Fade In command is used to linearly fade a selection from a volume of -Inf. to a volume of 0 dB. The size of the selection determines
the length of the fade.
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Fade, and choose In from the submenu. The fade is applied, and volume increases over the length
of the entire file.
Audio file fades in from -Inf.
to 0 dB
Fade - Fade Out
The Fade Out command is used to linearly fade a selection from a volume of 0 dB to a volume of -Inf. The size of the selection
determines the length of the fade.
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file and select all audio data.
2. From the Process menu, choose Fade, and choose Out from the submenu. The fade is applied, and the volume decreases over the
length of the entire file.
Audio file fades out from 0 dB
to -Inf.
Insert Silence
The Insert Silence command allows you to place sections of silence in audio files.
Inserting silence into a file
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Insert Silence. The Insert Silence dialog is displayed.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 149
3. Perform one of the following actions:
From the Preset drop-down list, choose a preset that has been stored for the plug-in.
Specify the length of silence that you want to add in the Insert box and choose a setting from the at drop-down list to specify
where the silence should be inserted.
•
•
Setting
Description
Cursor
Start of file
End of file
Inserts silence at the current cursor position.
Inserts silence at the beginning of the file.
Inserts silence at the end of the file.
4. Click the OK button.
Invert/Flip
The Invert/Flip command inverts the audio selection at its baseline, in effect reversing its polarity. Inverting a file, while creating no
audible difference, is occasionally useful for matching sample transitions when executing certain pastes, mixes, or loops.
1. Create a selection in the data window.
2. From the Process menu, choose Invert/Flip. The selection is inverted.
Mute
The Mute command forces the selection to a volume of -Inf. dB (silence).
Muting an audio selection
1. Create a selection in the data window.
Create a selection in the data window
2. From the Process menu, choose Mute. The selection is muted.
150 | CHAPTER 10
Selected audio is muted
Normalize
The Normalize command maximizes the overall volume of a file without introducing clipping. When you normalize a file, the entire file
is scanned and a constant gain is applied to raise the file’s level to a specified value.
Normalizing audio
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Normalize. The Normalize dialog is displayed.
3. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Normalize RMS to -16 dB (music) and click OK. The file is normalized and its overall
“loudness” is increased.
Normalized file
PROCESSING AUDIO | 151
Normalize controls
The following controls are located in the Normalize dialog.
Control
Description
Normalize using Peak level
This radio button normalizes the audio file using the maximum (instantaneous) sample values detected. A constant gain is then
applied to the audio.
Normalize using Average RMS This radio button normalizes the audio file using the detected average RMS value of the audio file. This is helpful for matching
level (loudness)
the apparent loudness of a number of individual recordings.
Normalize to
This fader specifies the level to which the highest peak should be set.
With Peak level, if the peak level is -10 dB and the Normalize to value is -3 dB, a constant boost of 7 dB is applied to the
entire file.
With Average RMS level, normalizing to 0 dB means boosting the signal until it has the same apparent loudness as a 0 dB
square wave. This results in all the dynamic range of the signal being flattened and all peaks being either clipped or seriously
compressed.
Ignore below
Attack time
Release time
Use equal loudness contour
Scan Levels
Note: As a rule, normalizing using Peak levels to 0 dB is acceptable, but normalizing using Average RMS level to anything
above -6 dB is not recommended.
Determines the level of audio data included in the RMS calculation. Data below the threshold is ignored, effectively eliminating
silent sections from RMS calculation. The Ignore below fader should be set a few dB above perceived silence. If Ignore
below is set to -Inf., all audio data is used. However, if the value is set too high (above -10 dB) the RMS value may never rise
above the threshold. In this case, normalization cannot occur. For this reason, you should evaluate the threshold by clicking the
Scan Levels button.
Determines how quickly the scan responds to transient peaks.
Determines how quickly the scan should stop using transient peak material after it begins to drop in level. Slower release times
result in more data being included in RMS calculation.
Allows the scan to compensate for the Fletcher-Munson Equal Loudness Contours. The Fletcher-Munson Equal Loudness
Contours illustrate that very low- and high-frequency audio is less perceptible to the human ear than mid-range audio.
Therefore, selecting this option forces the scan to factor this into RMS calculation.
Clicking Scan Levels initiates Peak and RMS scans on the audio and displays the RMS level and the highest peak level
detected. When previewing a normalize effect, the entire file must be scanned to preview even a small selection. Clicking Scan
Levels saves the current Peak and RMS values and allows you to preview different Normalize to settings without re-scanning
the entire file.
Current Peak and RMS levels
An asterisk adjacent to a level value indicates that the value is not current. This occurs when the selection is updated or the
dialog is initially opened. To update values, click Scan Levels.
Noncurrent Peak and RMS levels
If values have never been calculated, two dashes display. Click Scan Levels to calculate values.
Nonexistent Peak and RMS levels
If clipping occurs
Note: If the RMS level never reaches the Ignore below threshold, a value of -96 dB displays. If this occurs, decrease the Ignore
below threshold level and rescan.
The If clipping occurs drop-down list is used to specify how the normalize function handles clipping that may occur when an
audio file is processed using the RMS option. This list provides four options:
• Apply dynamic compression - Audio peaks that will result in clipping are limited below 0 dB using non-zero attack and
release times to minimize distortion. This mode is useful for getting loud and clear audio during mastering.
• Normalize peak value to 0 dB - The selection’s peak amplitude level is normalized to 0 dB, thereby allowing the maximum
possible constant gain without clipping the selection. However, less gain is applied than would be necessary to achieve the
Normalize to RMS level.
• Ignore (saturate) - Audio is permitted to clip and distort.
• Stop processing - Audio peaks that will result in clipping force the normalize function to cease processing and alert you that
clipping will occur at the current level.
Note: When normalizing multichannel audio, normalization is computed on the loudest sample value found in a channel and
identical gain is applied to all channels. If a single channel is selected in a multichannel file, normalization processes only that
channel.
Use current scan level (do not When you select the Use current scan level check box, the current scan levels are used without initiating a new scan. This is
scan selection)
useful when applying scan levels from a different selection or file to the current selection, thereby allowing identical gains to be
applied to multiple files. This option can also be used to scan a selection of an audio file containing the loudest or most constant
levels and then apply that scan to normalize the entire file.
152 | CHAPTER 10
Pan/Expand
Pan/Expand allows you to create panning effects and stereo compression/expansion in selections.
Creating a pan
A pan is used to control the apparent position of a sound between the left and right channels of a stereo file.
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Pan/Expand. The Pan/Expand dialog is displayed.
3. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Left to right (linear). The pan envelope displays on the graph.
Hard left at start of audio
Hard right at end of audio
The pan envelope displays
on the graph.
4. Click OK. The file is converted to stereo and a left-to-right pan is added.
5. Play the file. The audio source seems to move from the left channel to the right channel during playback.
Note: A pan, by nature, cannot be created in a mono file.
Creating a custom pan
You can create complex custom panning effects using up to sixteen envelope points.
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. In Sound Forge Pro software, choose Pan/Expand from the Process menu. The Process dialog is displayed.
3. Configure the pan envelope using the following controls:
•
•
•
•
Click the envelope to create a new point.
Drag a point to move it to a new position.
Double-click or right-click a point to delete it.
Right-click an envelope segment and choose a new fade type from the shortcut menu.
For more information, see Envelope graphs on page 38.
4. Click OK. The custom pan is applied to the file.
PROCESSING AUDIO | 153
Pan/Expand controls
The following controls are located in the Pan/Expand dialog.
Control
Description
Process mode
The Process mode drop-down list contains the following options:
Output gain
Show wave
Reset Envelope
• Pan (preserve stereo separation) - Applies the pan effect without mixing the channels, thereby simulating the spectral
positioning of stereo recordings.
• Pan (mix channels before panning) - Mixes the left and right channels prior to applying panning effects.
• Stereo expand - Allows you to contract or expand the image of stereo audio from dead center (mono) to completely
panned wide (no center channel).
• Mix mid-side (MS) recording to left and right channels - Simulates a recording technique in which one microphone
is pointed directly at the source and used to record the center (mid) channel, and a second microphone is pointed 90
degrees away from the source (side) and used to record the stereo image.
For proper playback on most systems, MS recordings must be converted to standard left/right orientation.
To convert an MS-recorded track to a left/right track, first ensure that the center channel is in the left track and the side
channel on the right. The MS mix function is then used to set the width of the stereo image for the converted track.
Determines the amount of gain applied to the signal following pan/expand processing.
The Show wave drop-down list provides several settings for drawing the current selection’s waveform on the envelope graph.
This function is available only for small selections.
Clicking the Reset Envelope button clears all but the two original envelope points.
• For the Pan modes, these two points prevent unintended panning.
• For the Stereo expand and Mix Mid-Side modes, these two points prevent unintended expansion.
Resample
The Resample command allows you to change the sampling rate of a file
without altering its pitch or duration.
• Resampling to a lower sample rate results in less frequent samples and a
decreased file size, but adds aliasing noise to the audio. For more
information, see Apply an anti-alias filter during resample on page 155.
• Resampling to a higher sample rate results in extra samples being created
through interpolation and an increased file size. Like increasing bit depth,
up-sampling does not improve the quality of an audio file, but permits
subsequent audio processing to be performed with greater precision.
Downsampling audio
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. Right-click the data window and choose Properties from the shortcut menu. The Properties dialog is displayed. Notice that this file
has 44,100 Hz sample rate and a file size of 0.48 MB.
3. Click OK.
4. From the Process menu, choose Resample. The Resample dialog is displayed.
5. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Resample to 8,000 Hz with anti-alias filter and click OK. The audio is resampled at
8,000 Hz.
6. From the File menu, choose Save As. Save the resampled file with a new name and close it.
7. Open the resampled file and view its Properties dialog. The sample rate is lower (8,000 Hz) and the file size is smaller.
8. Play the file. Notice the obvious decrease in audio quality.
Note: Use this new file to perform the following up-sampling procedure.
Upsampling audio
1. Verify that the file created in the previous procedure is the active data window.
2. From the Process menu, choose Resample. The Resample dialog is displayed.
3. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Resample to 48,000 Hz with anti-alias filter and click OK. The audio is resampled at
48,000 Hz.
154 | CHAPTER 10
4. From the File menu, choose Save As. Save the resampled file with a new name and close it.
5. Open the new file and view its Properties dialog. Notice that the sample rate is higher (48,000 Hz) and the file size is larger.
6. Play the file. Notice that resampling to a higher sample rate produces an audio quality at 48,000 Hz that is indistinguishable from
the quality at 8,000 Hz.
Resample controls
The following controls are located in the Resample dialog.
Control
Description
New sample rate
Determines the sample rate (in Hz) at which the file is resampled.
Interpolation accuracy
Tip: Processing is quicker when downsampling by an even multiple (such as when going from 44 kHz to 22 kHz).
The Interpolation accuracy value determines the complexity of the interpolation method used during resampling.
Interpolation accuracy is most apparent in high frequencies, but the audible difference between the values is subtle and often
undetectable without the use of test tones.
A value of 1 is suitable for general-purpose audio.
A value of 2 or 3 is good for high-end audio applications.
Apply an anti-alias filter
during resample
Set the sample rate only (do
not resample)
A value of 4 results in professional-quality audio, but requires substantial processing.
Selecting this check box applies an anti-aliasing filter during the resampling process. Remember that the maximum frequency
that can be represented by a sample rate is one-half of the sampling rate (the Nyquist frequency). Therefore, high frequencies
cannot be accurately represented when downsampling. The anti-aliasing filter prevents high frequencies from becoming lowfrequency distortion.
Tip: It is also advisable to apply an anti-aliasing low-pass filter to an audio file prior to resampling to a lower sample rate.
If this check box is selected, the playback rate is changed without resampling the data. This means that the pitch of the original
file is not preserved. For this reason, this option is only useful for quickly converting between two similar sample rates.
Reverse
The Reverse command reverses the audio selection.
1. Open the Musicbed.pca file.
2. From the Process menu, choose Reverse. The reversed audio data displays in the data window.
Original audio data
Reversed audio
Smooth/Enhance
To start Sony Media Software’s XFX Smooth/Enhance plug-in, choose Smooth/Enhance from the Process menu. For more information
on using the XFX Smooth/Enhance plug-in, click the
the Help menu, choose Contents and Index).
button in the Smooth/Enhance dialog or refer to Sound Forge online help (from
Time Stretch
To start Sony Media Software’s XFX Time Stretch plug-in, choose Time Stretch from the Process menu. For more information on using
the XFX Time Stretch plug-in, click the
choose Contents and Index).
button in the Time Stretch dialog or refer to Sound Forge online help (from the Help menu,
PROCESSING AUDIO | 155
Volume
The Volume command alters the volume of an audio selection.
Increasing the volume of a selection
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Create a selection containing the word “Wow.”
3. From the Process menu, choose Volume. The Volume dialog is displayed.
4. From the Preset drop-down list, choose 6 dB boost (200%) and click OK. The specified boost is applied to the selection.
5. Play the file. The “Wow” data clips and distorts upon playback.
Exercise caution when using the Volume command. Unlike Normalize, Volume performs no pre-processing scans and offers no
options for clipping audio data.
Create a selection
Audio following volume increase
Note: Once audio data is clipped, it cannot be restored by performing a second Volume operation. The initial Volume operation must be
undone.
156 | CHAPTER 10
Volume control
The Volume dialog contains only one control: Gain. The Gain fader determines the new volume of a selection. Negative decibel values
decrease the selection’s volume, while positive decibel values increase the selection’s volume.
Note: A value of -Inf. corresponds to mute (0%).
PROCESSING AUDIO | 157
158 | CHAPTER 10
Chapter 11 Working with Effects
Effects, or plug-ins, can be used to improve the quality of the audio or to create special artistic effects. Additional DirectX®
and VST plug-in effects, both from Sony and other third-party vendors, can also be used.
Adding effects
You can choose an effect from the Effects menu to apply to a file or just a portion of a file. If you’ve added an effect to the
FX Favorites menu, you can select it from that location as well. For more information, see Organizing effects in the FX
Favorites menu on page 166.
Applying an effect
1. Select the data you want to process. If no data is selected, the effect is applied to the entire file.
Note: When you’re working with multichannel files, only the selected region in the selected channel is processed. Most
functions can be applied to the individual or all channels. However, since the channels in a multichannel file must be equal
in length, functions that affect the length of the data cannot be performed on individual channels. These functions include
Insert Silence, Resample, Time Stretch, Gapper/Snipper, Pitch Bend, and Pitch Shift (without preserving duration).
If you want to apply one of these processes in a single channel, convert the file into separate mono files (you can select a
channel and drag it to the Sound Forge workspace to create a new file quickly), apply the process, and merge the files into
a new multichannel file.
2. Choose a command from the Process, Effects, or FX Favorites menu. The dialog for the selected effect is displayed.
Preset
Plug-In
online help
Effect
controls
Preview/Stop
3. Choose a preset from the Preset drop-down list and adjust the parameters in the dialog to achieve the effect you
want. For help on the different controls in the effect dialog, click the Help button (
).
4. Click the Preview button to test out the effect. Adjust the settings as needed and click Stop to end the preview.
Tip: If the selection you made in the data window needs to be adjusted, click the Selection button to adjust the selection.
5. Click OK. During processing, a progress meter is displayed at the bottom of the data window. You can cancel the
operation at any time by clicking the Cancel button to the left of the progress meter, or you can press the Escape
key.
Saving effect settings as a custom preset
Once you have adjusted the parameters in the effect dialog, you may want to save your settings as a custom preset for
later use. You can select the preset from the Preset drop-down list to apply the same settings at a later time.
WORKING WITH EFFECTS | 159
1. Adjust the parameters in the effect dialog to achieve the effect you want.
2. Click Save As. The Save Preset dialog is displayed.
3. Enter a new preset name and click OK. The new preset is added to the Preset drop-down list.
Using the Plug-In Chainer
The Plug-In Chainer allows you to create a chain of 32 DirectX® and VST plug-ins. You can preview each plug-in in the chain
simultaneously in real time as long as your computer has adequate processing power.
You can switch between the Plug-In Chainer window and data windows without leaving the Plug-In Chainer. This means you can
change your selection in the data window or even switch to another data window—all without closing the Plug-In Chainer window.
Because the Plug-In Chainer offers these advanced features, you may want to use the chainer to create a single-effect chain instead of
applying an effect from the Effects or FX Favorites menu. For more information, see Adding effects on page 159.
Add Plug-Ins to Chain
Preview
Process
Selection
Remove Selected Plug-In
Chain preset
Effects chain
Effect preset
Effect controls
Creating a plug-in chain
1. Select the data you want to process. If no data is selected, the effect chain is applied to the entire file.
2. From the View menu, choose Plug-In Chainer or click the Open Plug-In Chainer button
on the data window. The Plug-In
Chainer window is displayed.
3. To use an existing chain preset, choose the chain from the Chain Preset drop-down list. For more information, see Saving plug-in
chains on page 163. Otherwise, add the desired plug-ins to a new custom chain. For more information, see Adding a plug-in to a chain
on page 161.
4. Configure the parameters of each plug-in. For help on the different plug-in controls, click the Help for Plug-In button
control and press Shift+F1.
160 | CHAPTER 11
or click a
5. Click the Preview button
to test the effect chain. If needed, you can select different parts of the audio in the data window to
preview different sections before applying the effect chain. You can also click the Bypass button
to temporarily bypass the
effect. For more information, see Bypassing effects on page 162.
Tip: You can also click the Play Plug-in Chainer button
button
on the data window to preview the effects chain. Use the Play Normal
to bypass the effects.
6. If the effect changes the duration of a sound (for example, Reverb or Simple Delay), choose how the audio tail created by the effect
should be processed. For more information, see Selecting the processing mode for audio tail data on page 163.
Note: The Insert Tail Data and Mix Tail Data commands may not function when using third-party reverb plug-ins.You can use the
Insert Silence command to make room for the tails or apply the reverb in a new data window that has room for the tails and then mix the
processed audio back into your source file.
7. Click the Process Selection button
(or press Ctrl+Shift+P) to apply the effect chain.
Adding a plug-in to a chain
You can add plug-ins to a chain in the Plug-In Chainer in several ways.
1. Click the Add Plug-Ins to chain button
on the Plug-In Chainer window (or press Ctrl+E). The Plug-In Chooser dialog is
displayed, listing all available DirectX plug-ins installed on your system.
2. Select the desired plug-in(s).
3. Click Add. The selected plug-ins are added to the chain and can be configured and arranged as needed.
Tip: You can also double-click a plug-in to add it to the chain.
WORKING WITH EFFECTS | 161
Removing a plug-in from a chain
To remove a specific plug-in from a chain, select it and click the Remove Selected Plug-In button
remaining plug-ins are adjusted.
. The plug-in is removed and the
Tip: You can also remove plug-ins by performing one of the following actions:
• Press Ctrl+Tab to select the next plug-in or Ctrl+Shift+Tab to select the previous plug-in, and then press Ctrl+Delete to remove the selected
plug-in from the chain.
• Right-click a plug-in in the chain and choosing Remove from the shortcut menu.
You can arrange the order of plug-ins in the chain in either the Plug-In Chainer or the Plug-In Explorer.
Note: The order of plug-ins in a chain can have a dramatic effect on the final product of audio signal processing.
Arranging plug-in order in the Plug-In Chainer
In the Plug-In Chainer window, drag an effect to a new location in the chain.
Drag a plug-in in the Plug-In Chainer to a
new location in the chain.
Tip: You can also change the plug-in order by right-clicking a plug-in in the chain and choosing either Move Left or Move Right from the
shortcut menu.
Arranging plug-in order in the Plug-In Explorer
You can drag an effect to a new location in the chain in the Plug-In Explorer in the same way you can in the Plug-In Chainer. In addition,
you can rearrange the chain by selecting a plug-in and clicking the Shift Plug-In Left button
or the Shift Plug-In Right button
move it forward or backward in the chain. To access the Plug-In Explorer, click the Add Plug-Ins to chain button
Chainer window.
to
in the Plug-In
Configuring chained plug-ins
To configure the parameters of specific plug-in, select it from the chain. The plug-in’s parameters display, allowing you to adjust all
controls as needed. For help on the different plug-in controls, click the Help for Plug-In button
Bypassing effects
You can bypass single effects or all effects in a chain while previewing the file.
162 | CHAPTER 11
or click a control and press Shift+F1.
Bypassing a plug-in on a chain
To bypass a plug-in, clear its check box in the Plug-In Chainer window. A
bypassed plug-in does not process the audio signal, allowing you to preview the
effect of the remaining plug-ins.
Notes:
Bypassed plug-in
• You can bypass multiple plug-ins.
• You can also bypass the plug-in by right-clicking a plug-in in the chain and
choosing Bypass from the shortcut menu.
Bypassing the plug-in chain
To bypass the entire chain, click the Bypass button
restore the chain’s processing of the audio.
(or press Ctrl+B) in the Plug-In Chainer window. Click the Bypass button again to
Selecting the processing mode for audio tail data
Some effects, such as Reverb or Simple Delay, create a “tail” at the end of the selected audio. This tail consists of the echo or reverb
created by the effect that lasts beyond the end of the selection. When you select a portion of a file and apply the effect using the Plug-In
Chainer, you can select one of three buttons to determine how the audio tail is processed:
If
Then
You want to ignore the tail
Select the Ignore Tail Data button
.
The effect ends abruptly at the end of the selection.
You want to mix the tail into the adjacent
material
Select the Mix Tail Data button
You want to insert the audio tail
Select the Insert Tail Data button
.
This is the most natural-sounding option.
.
All audio to the right of the tail moves over to accommodate the extra audio.
Notes:
• Press Ctrl+T to toggle through the three audio tail data processing modes.
• The Insert Tail Data and Mix Tail Data commands may not function when using third-party reverb plug-ins.You can use the Insert
Silence command to make room for the tails or apply the reverb in a new data window that has room for the tails and then mix the
processed audio back into your source file.
Saving plug-in chains
Once you’ve set up an effect chain, you may want to save it for later use. When you save a plug-in chain, you not only save the order of
the effects in the chain but also the parameters of each individual effect.
1. Create an effects chain in the Plug-In Chainer window.
2. Enter a name for the new chain in the Chain Preset box.
3. Click the Save Chain Preset button
Enter a name in the
Chain Preset box.
. The new chain is saved in the Chain Preset drop-down list.
Click the Save Chain
Preset button to save
the new chain.
Tip: You can also save a chain preset by pressing Ctrl+S, entering a name for the preset, and pressing Enter.
WORKING WITH EFFECTS | 163
Saving individual plug-in settings as a custom preset
Once you have adjusted effect parameters in the Plug-In Chainer window, you can save your settings as a custom preset for later use.
You can select a custom saved preset from the Preset drop-down list to apply the same effect settings at a later time.
You also have the option of saving the entire chain as a chain preset. For more information, see Saving plug-in chains on page 163.
Note: Effect automation envelope points are not saved with presets. If you are using effect automation envelopes and save a preset
during playback, the effect’s settings at the playback cursor position are saved.
Saving a preset for an individual Direct X plug-in
1. Adjust the effect parameters in the Plug-In Chainer window to achieve the effect you want.
2. Enter a name for the new preset in the Preset box.
3. Click the Save Preset button
. The new preset is saved in the Preset drop-down list.
Saving a preset for an individual VST plug-in
1. Adjust the effect parameters in the Plug-In Chainer window to achieve the effect you want.
2. Enter a name for the new preset in the Preset box.
3. Click the Save VST Preset As button
. The VST Preset dialog is displayed.
4. Browse to the folder where you want to save the .fxp file and type a name in the File name box.
5. Click the Save button. The current plug-in settings are saved in the .fxp file.
Saving a bank of VST plug-in presets
1. Adjust the effect parameters in the Plug-In Chainer window to achieve the effect you want.
2. Click the Save VST Bank As button
. The Save VST Preset Bank dialog is displayed.
3. Browse to the folder where you want to save the .fxb file and type a name in the File name box.
4. Click the Save button. All presets for the current plug-in are stored in the bank.
Loading plug-in chains or plug-in presets
Once you have saved a plug-in chain, you can easily load it into the Plug-In Chainer.
Loading a plug-in chain preset
Choose a setting from the Chain drop-down list. The preset chain loads into the window using the saved settings for each DirectX and
VST plug-in in the chain.
Loading an individual DirectX plug-in preset
Choose a setting from the Preset drop-down list. The plug-in settings stored in the preset are loaded.
Loading an individual VST plug-in preset
1. Click the Open VST Preset button
. The Open VST Preset dialog is displayed.
2. Browse to the .fxp file that you want to use.
3. Click the Open button. The current VST preset is replaced with the settings stored in the .fxp file.
164 | CHAPTER 11
Loading a bank of VST plug-in presets
1. Click the Open VST Bank button
. The Open VST Bank dialog is displayed.
2. Browse to the .fxb file that you want to use.
3. Click the Open button. All presets for the current VST plug-in are replaced with the settings stored in the .fxb file and the first preset
in the bank is loaded by default.
Using the Plug-In Manager
You have several tools to help you manage your plug-ins, including the Plug-In Manager, FX Favorites menu, and the Preset Manager.
The Plug-In Manager window not only allows you to add plug-ins and saved plug-in chains (pg. 165), but it provides a way to manage
your plug-in files—to rename plug-ins, hide plug-ins, create folders, add plug-ins to a FX Favorites folder, and perform other standard
file management tasks.
Views
Delete
New Folder
Refresh
Up One Level
Plug-In Manager window
Applying a plug-in or chain to a media file
You can add a plug-in to a chain in the Plug-In Chainer by dragging an effect from the Plug-In Manager window.
1. From the View menu, choose Plug-In Manager. The Plug-In Manager window is displayed.
2. Select the data you want to process. If no data is selected, processing will be applied to the entire file.
Note: When you're working with multichannel files, only the selected region in the selected channel is processed. Most functions can be
applied to individual or all channels. However, since all channels in a multichannel file must be equal in length, functions that affect the
length of the data cannot be performed on individual channels. These functions include Insert Silence, Resample, Time Stretch, Gapper/
Snipper, Pitch Bend, and Pitch Shift (without preserving duration).
If you want to apply one of these processes in a single channel, convert the file into separate mono files (you can select a channel and drag
it to the Sound Forge workspace to create a new file quickly), apply the process, and merge the files into a new multichannel file.
WORKING WITH EFFECTS | 165
3. Select the desired plug-in(s).
Note: Effects chains—including packages created in Sony Vegas or ACID—are displayed in the DirectX Chains folder in the Plug-In
Manager.
4. Drag the plug-in(s) from the Plug-In Manager window to the Plug-In Chainer window. The selected plug-in(s) are added to the
chain.
Tip: You can also drag plug-ins or a plug-in chain from the Plug-In Manager window to a data window. The Plug-In Chainer window is
opened with the selected effects in a new chain.
5. Use the Audio Plug-In Chainer to preview your effects and adjust settings as needed. You can select the Bypass button
to hear
the original, unprocessed audio.
6. When you are satisfied with the chain, click the Process Selection button
in the Plug-In Chainer to apply the effect.
Renaming a plug-in
You can customize the names of plug-ins within the software.
1. Right-click a plug-in in the Plug-In Manager and choose Rename from the shortcut menu.
2. Type a new name and press Enter.
Hiding a plug-in
All DirectX plug-ins on your system are automatically available to you. You may want to hide a plug-in within the software without
removing the plug-in from your system.
1. Right-click a plug-in in the Plug-In Manager and choose Hide from the shortcut menu. You are prompted to confirm that you want
to permanently hide the plug-in.
2. Click Yes. The plug-in no longer appears in Sound Forge software.
Tip: To restore hidden plug-ins, you can force Sound Forge to rescan your system for plug-ins by deleting the
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Sony Media Software\Sound Forge\9.0\FXCache key in the Windows Registry.
Organizing effects in the FX Favorites menu
The FX Favorites menu provides easy access to the plug-ins you use most frequently. You can add and remove plug-ins and folders to
organize the menu however you like. You can also automatically add all plug-ins on your system to the menu. For more information, see
Automatically adding and organizing plug-ins on page 167.
Once you add a plug-in to the FX Favorites menu, you can apply the plug-in to a file by selecting it from the menu. For more information,
see Adding effects on page 159.
1. From the FX Favorites menu, choose Organize. The Organize Favorites dialog is displayed.
2. Organize your plug-ins:
•
•
•
Drag plug-ins to the FX Favorites folder to add them to the FX Favorites menu.
Create submenus in the FX Favorites menu by clicking the FX Favorites folder and clicking the Create New Folder button
.
Once you have created a new folder, drag plug-ins to the folder to add them to the submenu in the FX Favorites menu.
Remove plug-ins or folders from the FX Favorites menu by selecting the plug-in or folder and clicking the Delete button
.
Deleting a plug-in from the FX Favorites folder removes it from the FX Favorites menu but does not delete the plug-in from
your system.
3. Close the Organize Favorites dialog. The new plug-ins and/or submenus appear in the FX Favorites menu.
Tip: You can also add plug-ins to the FX Favorites menu using the Plug-In Manager.
166 | CHAPTER 11
Automatically adding and organizing plug-ins
You can automatically add all the plug-ins on your computer to your FX Favorites folder and organize them by the first word in the plugin name (usually the company name). This replaces any menu structure you may have created with a rebuilt FX Favorites menu.
1. From the FX Favorites menu, choose Recreate by Plug-In Name. You are prompted to confirm the reorganization of the FX
Favorites folder.
2. Click Yes to continue.
Folders are created and the plug-ins are organized based on the first word in the names of the plug-ins.
Using the Preset Manager
Once you have created custom presets for effects or effect chains, you can use the Sound Forge Preset Manager to back up, transfer, or
delete custom presets from any of the effects, processes, tools and plug-ins installed in the software. The Preset Manager also functions
as a standalone application, meaning that you can use the Preset Manager outside of Sound Forge software to manage ACID and Vegas
presets as well.
To display the Preset Manager, choose Preset Manager from the Tools menu. In the Preset Manager, choose Contents and Index from
the Help menu for instructions on how to manage your presets.
Automating Effect Parameters
When you add an effect that supports automation to the Plug-In Chainer, a list of the effect’s automatable parameters is displayed on
the right side of the window. You can use these controls to add, show/hide, and enable/bypass automation envelopes.
Plug-in parameters can be edited using the automation envelope in the data window.
Note: Choosing a new effect chain preset will clear the current effect automation settings.
Adding an effect automation envelope
1. In the Plug-In Chainer, select the button
for an effect that includes automatable parameters. The plug-in's controls are
displayed, and a list of the effect’s automatable parameters is displayed on the right side of the Plug-In Chainer.
Tip: The Parameter Chooser is displayed on the right side of the Plug-In Chainer window when you add a plug-in that supports
automation. Click the Show Parameter Chooser button
or press Ctrl+H to show or hide the chooser.
2. Select the Automate check box for each parameter you want to control with an envelope. An envelope is added to the data
window for each selected check box.
Adding a volume or panning envelope
Panning envelopes will have no effect on mono source data. Convert mono sound data to stereo before adding a panning envelope.
1. Click within a data window to give it focus.
2. Press V to add a volume envelope, or press P to add a panning envelope.
An envelope is added to the data window and the Sound Forge Volume or Sound Forge Pan plug-in is added to the Audio Plug-In
Chainer. If the Plug-In Chainer is not visible, it will be opened.
Note: If a data window already has a volume envelope, pressing P or V will hide the envelope.
3. Adjust volume or panning with the envelope in the data window.
WORKING WITH EFFECTS | 167
Adjusting effect parameters with envelopes
An envelope is displayed in the data window for each effect parameter that you've chosen to automate. Envelope points represent
plug-in parameter settings at a specific point in time.
You can add points, adjust their positions, and change the fade curves between points to modify effect parameters and the transitions
between them.
Note: When you automate an effect’s frequency parameter — such as the modulation frequency parameter in the amplitude
modulation effect — you may notice that the frequency changes are more apparent when moving through the lower frequencies. This is
because frequency scales plug-ins use a logarithmic scale, but effect automation uses linear interpolation.To make the automated
frequency changes sound more natural, change the fade curve types to change the interpolation rates between envelope points. For highto-low frequency sweeps, use a fast fade curve; for low-to-high frequency sweeps, use a slow curve.
Previewing effect automation
To hear the results of your effect automation without applying it to the sound file, click the Preview button
window.
You can select the Bypass button
bypass individual effects.
in the Plug-In Chainer to bypass all effects in the chain, or clear an effects check box
You can also click the Play Plug-In Chainer button
Click the Play Normal button
in the Plug-In Chainer
to
in a data window’s playbar to hear the effects of a chain on the data window.
in the playbar to hear the unprocessed sound.
Applying effects automation
To apply effect automation to a data window, click the Process Selection button
in the Plug-In Chainer window.
Showing or hiding effect automation envelopes
1. In the Plug-In Chainer, select the button
for an effect that includes automatable parameters. The plug-in’s controls are
displayed, and a list of the effect’s automatable parameters is displayed on the right side of the Plug-In Chainer.
2. Select the Show check box to display a parameter’s envelope, or clear the check box to hide it. Hiding an envelope simply removes
the line from the data window while it retains the playback properties.
Enabling or bypassing effect automation envelopes
1. In the Plug-In Chainer, select the button
for an effect that includes automatable parameters. The plug-in’s controls are
displayed, and a list of the effect’s automatable parameters is displayed on the right side of the Plug-In Chainer.
2. Select the Enable check box to apply an automation envelope to your audio signal, or clear the check box to ignore it.
When the check box is cleared, an effect automation envelope is ignored and the effect’s initial state is used for the duration of the
data window.
Bypassed envelopes are drawn with a dashed line in the data window.
Removing effect automation envelopes
Click the Automate None button
in the Plug-In Chainer to remove all automation envelopes for the selected plug-in.
Choose (Empty Chain) or another preset from the Chain Preset drop-down list at the top-left corner of the Plug-In Chainer to clear the
plug-in chain and remove all effect automation envelopes.
168 | CHAPTER 11
Adjusting envelopes
When the Envelope tool
automation envelopes.
The Edit tool
on the main workspace is selected, you can add, remove, select or adjust envelope points on effect
allows you to add, remove, or adjust envelope points, but you cannot select envelope points with the Edit tool.
By default, a new envelope will contain a single envelope point. If you want to adjust the overall level of an envelope, drag the envelope
up or down. A floating ToolTip will show you the envelope’s current setting.
If an envelope has multiple points, you can drag each point, or you can drag envelope segments up or down.
Tips:
• Hold Ctrl while dragging an envelope point or segment to adjust the value in fine increments without changing the envelope points'
horizontal positions.
• Hold Ctrl+Alt while dragging an envelope point or segment to adjust the value in normal increments without changing the envelope
points' horizontal positions.
• Hold Alt while dragging an envelope point to move the point's horizontal position without changing its value.
With the Envelope tool, you can drag horizontally to select multiple envelope points in the selected data window.
Adding envelope points
To create more complex envelopes, you will need to add points. To add an envelope point, double-click the envelope. You can then
drag and position the point as necessary.
To delete a point, right-click it and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.
Flipping an envelope
You can flip an envelope to invert the envelope around its center. Volume, panning, and effect automation envelopes can be flipped.
Flipping all points
1. Right-click an envelope or a point. A shortcut menu is displayed.
2. Choose Flip All Points from the shortcut menu.
Flipping selected points
1. Create a time selection with the Envelope tool
to select the points you want to flip.
2. Right-click an envelope in the time selection. A shortcut menu is displayed.
3. Choose Flip Selected Points from the shortcut menu.
Setting fade properties
You can adjust the fade curve for each envelope segment individually. To change the fade curve, right-click an envelope segment and
choose a fade command (such as Linear Fade or Fast Fade, for example) from the shortcut menu.
Cutting, copying, and pasting envelope points
1. Select the Envelope tool
.
2. Click within a data window to select it.
3. Drag horizontally in a data window to select envelope points.
4. From the Edit menu, choose Cut or Copy.
WORKING WITH EFFECTS | 169
5. Click to position the cursor where you want to paste envelope points.
Tip: Click within a different data window if you want to paste envelope points across data windows.
6. From the Edit menu, choose Paste.
Copying an envelope to another data window
1. Select the Envelope tool
.
2. Click within a data window to select it.
3. From the Edit menu, choose Select All.
4. From the Edit menu, choose Copy.
5. Click within a data window to select it.
Tip: You can paste envelope points to a different envelope type by selecting the envelope where you want to paste.
6. Click Go to Start
if you want the envelope to appear exactly as it was in the original data window, or click to position the cursor
where you want the envelope to start.
7. From the Edit menu, choose Paste.
170 | CHAPTER 11
Chapter 12 Using Acoustic Mirror and Wave Hammer
This chapter is designed to familiarize you with the Sound Forge® Acoustic Mirror™ and Wave Hammer™ effects. The
Acoustic Mirror effect is a powerful digital signal processing tool that allows you to add environmental coloration to your
existing recordings. The Wave Hammer effect is an audio mastering tool that features a classic compressor and volume
maximizer.
What are the Acoustic Mirror effects?
The Acoustic Mirror effects represents an advance in reverb technology in that it incorporates the acoustical responses of
a given environment or venue into your audio files. You may never play Carnegie Hall, but that does not mean that your
recordings can’t sound like it. Taking this concept even further, this effect allows you to simulate the signal response of
vintage musical equipment. Imagine the money you’ll save not having to buy those paired U-47s.
The acoustic signature
Acoustic Mirror effects use the environment’s acoustic signature, or impulse response. These acoustic signatures are
saved as impulse files and given the extension .wav or .sfi. An extensive library of high-quality impulse files are included.
In addition, you can collect your own acoustic signatures and create custom impulse files.
Adding an acoustic signature to an audio file
1. Open and play the Saxriff.pca file.
Note: This file is located in the same folder as the application.
2. From the Effects menu, choose Acoustic Mirror. The Acoustic Mirror dialog is displayed.
Note: You must have an active file in the Sound Forge workspace to start the Acoustic Mirror tool.
3. Click the Browse button located next to the Impulse field and locate the Acoustic Mirror Impulse Files folder on the
Sound Forge CD.
4. Double-click the folder. Several impulse subfolders display.
5. Double-click the Large venues folder. Several impulse files display.
6. Double-click Stadium, Camp Randall 50 yrd line.sfi. This impulse file’s acoustic signature is added to the Saxriff.pca
file and you are returned to the Acoustic Mirror dialog.
7. Click Preview. The processed file plays and the sax riff is virtually placed in a football stadium-sized venue.
8. Select or clear the Bypass check box to toggle between the processed and unprocessed audio.
Adjusting the acoustic signature
Once you add an acoustic signature to a file, you can use the controls of the Acoustic Mirror dialog to precisely configure
the reverb effect. More importantly, you can preview configuration changes as quickly as you make them.
1. Open a file and display the Acoustic Mirror dialog.
2. Verify that the Real-time check box is selected.
3. From the Impulse drop-down list, choose the desired impulse file and click Preview. The processed audio file plays.
Notice that all dialog controls are set to their default values.
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 171
4. Drag the Dry Out fader up. Notice the audible change in output as the balance between the Wet Out and Dry Out values changes.
Tip: If you are experiencing difficulty previewing processing in real-time, decrease the Quality/speed value.
5. Drag the Response delay slider to the right. Notice the audible change in the reverb’s delay.
The Acoustic Mirror dialog contains four tabs: General, Envelope, Summary, and Recover. Each tab contains controls that allow you to
precisely configure the effect as well as recover custom impulses. Notice that the Acoustic Mirror dialog contains the preset and preview
controls found in all of the Sound Forge process and effect dialogs. For more information, see Applying presets on page 139 and Previewing
processed audio on page 141.
General tab controls
The following sections describe all controls located in the General tab.
Control
Description
The Impulse drop-down list allows you to specify an impulse file from a list of those previously
used. Clicking Browse displays the Open Impulse File dialog and allows you to locate an
impulse file from your local system or network.
Response width
You can use the Response width slider to create some simple stereo expansion and stereo
collapsing effects. This control’s default setting of 50 represents normal stereo operation and is
recommended to maintain the stereo field of the impulse response. A higher setting expands
the stereo field, but may result in an unnatural sounding effect. Lowering this setting narrows
the stereo field. A setting of 0 is essentially mono.
Response delay
The Response delay slider controls the time, in milliseconds, that elapses between the dry
signal and the processed output. This control can be used to create interesting effects and add
new dimensions to an acoustic signature. Configuring this control with a positive value results
in the processed output following the dry output. A negative value results in the processed
output preceding the dry signal, or a pre-delay.
Pan (left to right)
The Pan slider controls the balance between the left and right channels in stereo files. The
default value is 0 and indicates a typical center position.
Dry Out
The Dry Out fader controls the amount of unprocessed signal mixed into the output.
Wet Out
The Wet Out fader controls the amount of processed signal mixed into the output.
Apply envelope and limit decay When you select this check box, the length of the impulse is limited to the time specified in the
to (seconds)
adjacent box. Limiting the length of an impulse file shortens the decay of the reverberation and
decreases the amount of processing required.
Impulse
In addition, selecting this check box results in the impulse fading according to the Envelope
Graph configured on the dialog’s Envelope tab. For more information, see Envelope Graph
on page 173.
Low-shelf start frequency/High- Acoustic Mirror high- and low-shelving filters to allow you to tailor the frequency response of
shelf start frequency
the impulse. Notice that you can adjust the cutoff frequency and boost/attenuation of each
filter independently.
Convert mono to stereo
Selecting the Convert mono to stereo check box converts a mono signal to stereo output. If
the impulse file is in stereo, selecting this check box imparts a pseudo-stereo effect on the
mono input.
Quality/speed
The Quality/Speed slider allows you to strike a balance between the quality and speed of the
audio processing. Lowering this value immediately affects the frequency response of the
impulse. The processed signal sounds dull and high frequencies sound unnatural. At very low
values, the length of the impulse is shortened. When this control is set to a high value, the audio
quality is excellent, but the processing takes longer.
If you are experiencing difficulty previewing processing in real-time, decrease the Quality/
speed value. However, you must return this value to 5 prior to actually processing the file to
output the highest possible quality.
172 | CHAPTER 12
Envelope tab controls
The following sections describe all controls located on the Envelope tab.
Control
Description
Impulse
This control is identical to the Impulse drop-down list on the General tab. This allows you to
view the envelope graphs for the specified impulse file. For more information, see Impulse on
page 172.
Dry Out
This control is identical to the Dry Out fader on the General tab. For more information, see
Dry Out on page 172.
Wet Out
This control is identical to the Wet Out fader on the General tab. For more information, see
Wet Out on page 172.
Apply envelope and limit decay This control is identical to the Apply envelope and limit decay check box on the General tab.
For more information, see Apply envelope and limit decay to (seconds) on page 172.
Envelope Graph
Selecting the Apply envelope and limit decay check box turns on the Envelope Graph. You
can use the envelope graph to decrease the length of the specified impulse file, which
consequently decreases the reverberation decay time and processing time. You can also use
the envelope graph to apply fades to the specified impulse file.
The horizontal axis of the graph represents the time of the impulse file and the vertical axis
represents peak amplitude in dB. Specifying an impulse file from the Impulse drop-down list
automatically displays its envelope in the graph.
Envelope points
Note: If the impulse file is greater than 6 seconds in length, it does not display in the envelope
graph.
Envelope points are used in the envelope graph to specify a fade curve. The fade amount can
vary from 0% to 100%. You can create, delete, and arrange envelope points just as you can in all
of the Sound Forge envelope graphs. For more information, see Envelope graphs on page
38.
Reset
Package Impulse into Preset
Note: The fade value at any point in a curve does not use the same vertical logarithmic (dB)
scale used for displaying the impulse file.
Clicking this button resets the envelope points to 100%, indicating no fade.
Clicking this button creates a link between the current preset and the selected impulse file,
along with encoding the impulse information. You can use the Preset Manager to share presets
and the accompanying impulse files between computers without losing information. For more
information, see Using the Preset Manager on page 167.
Adjusting the impulse length
Drag the vertical Envelope Endpoint line to the desired location. The Envelope Endpoint repositions and the length of the impulse
adjusts.
Repositioning the
envelope endpoint line
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 173
Summary tab controls
The Summary tab provides information about the impulse file. The following section describes all controls located on the Summary
tab.
Control
Impulse
Description
This control is identical to the Impulse drop-down list on the General tab. For more
information, see Impulse on page 172.
Dry Out
This control is identical to the Dry Out fader on the General tab. For more information, see
Dry Out on page 172.
Wet Out
This control is identical to the Wet Out fader on the General tab. For more information, see
Wet Out on page 172.
Quality/speed
This control is identical to the Quality/speed check box on the General tab. For more
information, see Quality/speed on page 172.
Recover tab controls
The Recover tab is used in creating your own impulse files. For more information, see Creating impulse files on page 175. The following
section describes all controls located on the Recover tab.
Control
Recorded file
Test file used
Impulse output
Remove very low frequencies
Recover Impulse
Impulse recovery mode
Description
The Recorded file box allows you to select the file containing the test tone recorded in the field.
You can enter the path directly into the box or click Browse to locate and select a file.
The Test file used box allows you to select the file that was used as a test tone. You can enter
the path directly into the box or click Browse to locate and select a file.
Note: You should use one of the test files included in the Acoustic Mirror Impulse Files\Test
Tones folder on the Sound Forge application disc.
The Impulse output box allows you to specify where the recovered impulse response file is
saved. You can enter the path directly into the box or click Browse to locate and select a folder.
When you select this check box, very low frequencies (which are typically comprised of noise)
are removed from the impulse response. This increases the impulse response’s signal-to-noise
ratio.
Clicking the Recover Impulse button starts the impulse recovery process. After the process is
complete, an impulse file is created and saved in the folder specified in the Impulse output file
box.
You can choose from three Impulse recovery mode options to determine the method used to
recover the impulse: Use the start and end of the recorded file as timing spikes, Auto-detect
timing spikes, or Do not use timing spikes. Each of these modes is described below.
• Use the start and end of the recorded file as timing spikes - This option specifies that the
beginning and end of the recorded file are used as timing spikes. This option is
recommended for the best results during impulse recovery.
You must trim the file as close to the timing spikes as possible for this method of recovery to
work most effectively. The first sample of the file should contain the start of the first spike
and the last sample of the file should contain the start of the second spike. Therefore, most of
the second spike is deleted.
• Auto-detect timing spikes - This option specifies that the timing spikes exist near the start
and end of the recorded file and that they should be auto-detected. Timing spikes are used
to correct for clock or tape speed mismatches. If you have not trimmed the recorded file so
that the timing spikes are at the very beginning and end, select this option for the best
results.
With this option, you need only ensure that the first spike occurs within one second of the
start of the file and that the second spike exists in the file. To improve detection accuracy,
you can also boost the level of the start and end spikes in the recorded file.
Tip: If the spike’s level is close to the noise floor, select the Use the beginning and end of the
recorded file as timing spikes option.
• Do not use timing spikes - This option specifies that no timing spikes are used. This is the
least desirable option as no timing information is used. To use this option, you must trim the
recorded file so that the test tone starts and ends at the start and end of the file, with no
blank audio before or after. This option should only be used if the timing spikes are lost in the
recording or if you are certain that the play and record clocks are synchronized (such as when
using an ADAT).
174 | CHAPTER 12
Creating impulse files
You can obtain impulse responses from anything that accepts test tone input and supports recording the output. This includes physical
spaces as well as electronic audio equipment. Creating custom impulse files requires planning, work, and additional audio equipment.
Note: Impulses derived from electronic devices that produce nonlinear effects such as overdrives, distortion pedals, pitch shifters,
harmonic enhancers, chorus pedals, or flange pedals cannot be modeled using the Acoustic Mirror tool. While they produce interesting
effects, the acoustic signature cannot be correctly replicated.
What you need to create custom impulses
The equipment required to create custom impulses depends upon whether you want to create the impulse from a physical acoustic
space or from a piece of equipment. Regardless of the method, you need a playback device that reproduces test tones and a recording
device that has microphone or line-level inputs. Be aware that the quality of the impulse is directly affected by the quality of your
playback and recording devices. The flatter your system’s response, the more accurate the impulse response.
Recovering an impulse from an acoustic space
To recover an impulse from an acoustic space, you need the following equipment:
• A playback device and speakers
• A stereo pair of microphones to record the test tone
• A recording device for recording the signal captured by the microphones
Recovering an impulse from an electronic device
To recover an impulse from an electronic device, you need the following equipment:
• A playback device that connects to the device’s inputs
• A recording device that connects to the device’s outputs
Recording the impulse in an acoustic space
Once you have assembled the required equipment, you are ready to begin recording the impulse. The following sections describe the
typical impulse recording procedure.
Transferring the test tone
The first step in recording the impulse is to transfer the desired test tone to your playback device. The Sound Forge application disc
contains two test tones: a 24-second test tone and a 48-second test tone. We typically recommend that you use the 24-second tone
because longer tones result in greater signal-to-noise ratios. The 48-second tone should be used in particularly noisy environments or
when the decay time of the acoustic space is greater than six seconds.
Tip: There are spikes at the beginning and end of each test tone. You should include the spikes in the recording to simplify the recovery of
the impulse in the later stages of the process.
Placing equipment
When recording the test tone in an acoustic space, you must determine where to place your playback system, speakers, microphones,
and recording system to produce optimal results. Microphone placement is crucial to the quality of the impulse. The distance between
the speakers and the microphone is the perceived distance of audio processed with the impulse you create. For example, if you record
the test tone with the speakers positioned 100 feet from the microphones, all sounds processed with the resulting impulse sound as if
they are originating 100 feet from the listener.
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 175
Setting levels
After the devices are positioned, you should begin playback of the test tone. The test tone should be played as loudly as possible (or
practical) to produce the best signal-to-noise ratio. With the test tone playing at optimum volume, set the levels on the recording
device. Recording devices levels should also be set as high as possible, but not permitted to clip or distort. Safe levels are determined by
whether you are recording to an analog or digital medium.
Recording the test tone
Begin recording on the recording device and begin playback of the test tone. Remember to include the spikes at the beginning and end
of the test tone. Record the test tone several times using the initial setup, then move the microphones and record the test tones several
more times. Continue moving the microphones and recording until you have exhausted the space’s acoustic possibilities. Recording
impulses in this manner provides you with several distinct impulses for each space.
Recording the impulse through an electronic device
The recording process is similar if you are recording the output of an electronic device, but there are no speakers or microphones to be
placed.
Using the appropriate cables, connect the playback system’s outputs to the electronic device’s inputs and the electronic device’s
outputs to the recording system’s inputs. Once the devices are connected, play the test tone through the electronic device and record
its output on the recording system.
Other impulses
Any number of methods can be used to create an impulse, including starter pistols, clap boards, or even a sharp hand clap. The
drawback of these “impulse generators” is that they add their own coloration to the sound. For best results, we recommend using the
test tones included on the Sound Forge application disc.
Recovering the impulse
Once you have recorded your test tones, they must be processed and converted into impulse responses. The following sections
describe the typical impulse recovery procedure.
Trimming the test tone
1. Open your test tone file (the “room processed” output test tone) in the software.
2. Locate the first timing spike and delete all audio before it. Cut as close to the beginning of the timing spike as possible, but do not
delete the spike itself.
3. Locate the second timing spike and delete all data from the start of the second spike to the end of the file. Again, cut as close to the
start of the timing spike as possible.
You should now have an audio file with a spike at the beginning, a test tone, and silence.
4. Save the test tone file.
Naming, configuring, and recovering the impulse
1. From the Effects menu, choose Acoustic Mirror. The Acoustic Mirror dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Recover tab.
176 | CHAPTER 12
3. Enter the name and path of your impulse file in the Recorded File box or click Browse and locate the file.
4. Enter the name of the original test tone file in the Test file used box.
5. Enter the desired name for the impulse response file to be created in the Impulse output box. If necessary, click Browse and specify
the folder in which the impulse file will be saved.
6. Select the Remove very low frequencies check box.
7. If the recorded file was trimmed exactly to the start and end spikes using the procedure described previously, choose Use start and
end of the recorded file as timing spikes from the Impulse recovery mode drop-down list. For more information, see Trimming the
test tone on page 176.
8. Click the Recover Impulse button to begin recovering the impulse.
After processing is complete, you can open the impulse file in the Sound Forge software and perform any necessary trimming or
editing. For more information, see Trimming the impulse file on page 177.
Trimming the impulse file
After the impulse file is recovered, it may still require minor trimming. In general, you should try to make the impulse response as short
as possible to increase processing speed when using the Acoustic Mirror tool. Impulse files greater than 131,071 samples (about 3
seconds) in length require substantial processing time. When possible, trim the impulse response to less than 65,535 samples (about 1.5
seconds). In addition, we recommend fading the tail of the impulse. Of course, this is not always an option when dealing with spaces
that produce extended reverberations.
1. Open the recovered impulse file in the Sound Forge software and play it.
2. Delete any silence or low-level noise that occurs before or after the actual audio data. Typically there are between 900 and 1100
samples of data at the beginning of the impulse that should be removed.
3. Save the trimmed impulse response file using the standard WAV format.
Tip: To prevent phase problems when mixing the dry and wet signals, you may also want to verify the phase of the impulse file. The file
should begin by going positive (above the centerline). If the impulse file has a negative (below the centerline) phase, choose Invert/Flip
from the Process menu.
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 177
Adding summary information to your impulse file
If you plan on sharing impulses with other Sound Forge users, we recommend adding summary information and BMP images to your
files.
1. Open the impulse file in the software.
2. From the File menu, choose Properties. The Properties dialog is displayed.
3. Click the Summary tab.
4. Enter the appropriate information in each box.
5. Click the Picture button. The Open Picture dialog is displayed.
6. Locate the desired image and click Open. The image is linked to the impulse
file.
7. Click OK.
Note: If you are using a palletized display setting (256 colors or less) and attach
a bitmap to an impulse file, the bitmap colors are distorted when viewed in the
Acoustic Mirror tool. This is because the bitmap is converted using the default
palette at the time of attachment, which is not optimal. For this reason, you
should set the display settings to at least a 16-bit palette prior to attaching
bitmaps to impulse files.
Using the new impulse file
Properties dialog with an attached image
To use your new impulse file, open the Acoustic Mirror dialog and choose it from
the Impulse drop-down list as you would any other impulse file. If you performed
the previous procedures properly, the custom impulse file should realistically recreate the reverberation characteristics of the electronic
device or acoustic space.
Using impulse files in creative ways
Now that you understand the use and creation of impulse files, you may want to begin using the Acoustic Mirror tool in more
interesting ways than simply applying an impulse to an audio file. The following sections describe some creative and advanced uses for
Acoustic Mirror technology that can contribute to the professionalism of your work.
Processing individual audio elements
Instead of applying an impulse file to an entire song, try applying an impulse to individual elements of the song. Applying an impulse to
specific notes, chords, riffs, or phrases can quickly change the dynamics of a song. This technique is possible because the tail of
processed audio is automatically mixed with the adjacent unprocessed audio.
Adding realistic stereo to mono recordings
You can give mono recordings realistic stereo characteristics by selecting the Convert mono to stereo check box in the General tab of
the Acoustic Mirror dialog when applying the specified impulse file. The stereo image produced using this method is virtually
indistinguishable from an actual stereo recording.
If you choose to use the Acoustic Mirror effect for stereo simulation, you may find the output too reverberant. If this is the case, decrease
the Apply envelope and limit decay value. Frequently, setting this value to as little as 0.1 seconds provides stereo realism without
adding a distracting amount of reverb.
178 | CHAPTER 12
Creating special effects
Processing an audio file using a non-impulse WAV file can produce any number of unexpected and interesting special effects. To
demonstrate this concept, create several short (less than 12 seconds) audio files using the FM Synthesis tool and save them as
individual WAV files. Now choose any of these files from the Impulse drop-down list and preview the results.
We have included several short files on the Sound Forge application disc to allow you to experiment with this technique. After some
experimentation, you should begin to notice a few general rules regarding this use of the tool:
•
•
•
•
Impulse files that cover the entire frequency spectrum prevent the output from sounding too filtered.
Using a frequency sweep as an impulse creates a frequency-dependent delay effect.
Panning within the impulse causes the stereo image of the output to flutter between channels.
Using staccato sounds (such as drum hits) creates a variety of echo effects.
Recreating spaces for foley effects and dialog replacement
Frequently, dialogue recorded in the field is rendered unusable by ambient noise. If you are shooting in the field and realize that
overdubbing will be necessary, you should create an impulse in each filming location. This allows you to overdub dialog during postproduction that is indistinguishable from dialog recorded on location.
If you intend to use the Acoustic Mirror effect as a film/video post-production tool, there are some factors to keep in mind:
• Distance information is determined by the distance between the source and the microphone when creating the impulse. Record
multiple impulses at various distances for each location to create realistic dialog effects when matching audio processing to
approximate camera positioning.
• The frequency response of the human ear changes as the volume of a sound increases. As a result, impulses created from a significant
distance may sound unusual at high volumes.
• Placing a microphone off center allows you to create directional information in the recovered impulse. For example, placing a
microphone to the left of the speaker produces an impulse that approximates a source located on the left side of the screen.
Panning with head-related transfer functions
A head-related transfer function (HRTF) contains the frequency and phase response information required to make a sound seem to
originate from a specific direction in a three-dimensional space. The Acoustic Mirror Impulse Files\HRTF Impulses folder on the Sound
Forge application disc contains a collection of impulse files that contain directional cues.
To achieve optimal results using these impulse files, the original file should be mono and playback should be monitored using
headphones. To begin, convert the mono file to stereo by replicating the mono signal in each channel. After the audio is converted to
stereo, choose an impulse file from the HRTF Impulses folder. You will notice that the HRTF Impulses folder is further divided into Left
and Right directories. Opening the desired folder displays the available impulse files, all of which are named based on their elevation
(up or down) and azimuth (left or right) angles in degrees. The following table provides some examples:
File Name
Impulse positioning
0E000L
0E090L
0E090R
90E000L
0E180L
-20E120L
Straight ahead
Far left
Far right
Directly above your head
Directly behind you
Below, behind, and to your left
Note: Refer to Readme.doc in the HRTF Impulses folder for more information.
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 179
Troubleshooting the Acoustic Mirror effect
The following sections describe problems that may be encountered when working with the Acoustic Mirror tool.
Stuttering during real-time previewing
It is not uncommon to experience problems when previewing processing in real-time. The following sections contain several
suggestions to remedy the situation.
Lower the Quality/speed setting
Lower the value of the Quality/speed control on the General page. When previewing lengthy impulse responses, a setting of 1 or 2 may
be necessary; however, the quality suffers. This setting should always be returned to 5 prior to processing to maintain effect quality.
Increase the DirectX buffering size
1. Open the Acoustic Mirror dialog.
2. Right-click an empty area of the dialog outside of the four tabs and choose Configuration from the shortcut menu. The Real-Time
Preview Configuration dialog is displayed.
3. Reconfigure the Buffers to process per second and Total playback buffers controls. Typically, lowering the Buffers to process per
second value and increasing the Total playback buffers value reduces gapping during real-time previewing.
Close all memory-intensive applications
Real-time previewing may be limited by any additional applications operating on the desktop. To avoid this situation, close all memoryintensive applications prior to using this effect.
Add additional RAM to the system
We recommend at least 64 MB of RAM to operate Sound Forge software and its related tools.
Add a faster floating point arithmetic processor
Many high-speed processors are still lacking in speed when processing floating point arithmetic. We recommend using high-speed
processors that provide exceptional floating point arithmetic for reliable real-time previewing.
Impulses do not recover properly
If you experience problems recovering custom impulse recordings, verify each of the following:
a. Verify that you have trimmed the recorded test tone based on the mode chosen from the Impulse recovery mode drop-down
list. For more information, see Trimming the test tone on page 176.
b. Verify that the second spike is present in the recorded test tone if the Auto-detect timing spikes options is specified.
c. Verify that the file specified in the Test file used box is the exact test tone used to make to field recording and that neither its
length or data has been changed.
d. If the impulse still does not recover properly in Auto-detect timing spikes mode, normalize the spikes in the recorded test tone
file. This should aid the auto-detect algorithm in detecting the timing spikes and recovering the impulse.
Recovered impulse is too noisy
To maximize the impulse’s signal-to-noise ratio, you should verify that the field recording’s noise floor is not too high. When recording
in noisy environments, increase the test tone’s amplitude until the test tone is at least 25 dB louder than the noise floor. At least 40 dB of
signal-to-noise is recommended for optimal impulses. If you cannot avoid noise when recording in the field, Sony Media Software’s
Noise Reduction tool can salvage a session.
180 | CHAPTER 12
Speaker nonlinear distortion can also cause noisy impulses. The most common source of nonlinear distortion is loudspeaker harmonics.
Most speakers display substantial harmonic distortion at low frequencies. For example, when you play a 60 Hz tone, the speaker
vibrates at 60 Hz, but also outputs lower-level audio at multiples of 60 Hz (120, 180, etc.). The impulse recovery method greatly
minimizes these low-frequency distortions; however, inexpensive tweeters often display substantial high-frequency distortion that can
disrupt the recovery process. When possible, use high-quality components and do not overdrive the speakers.
Error message explanations
The following sections briefly describe Acoustic Mirror error messages that you may encounter.
The selected file is not a valid test file
The file specified in the Test file used box is not a test tone file included on the Sound Forge application disc.
The level of the first spike is low. Do you wish to use it as a timing spike?
This typically means that no actual timing spike was detected. Verify that the first spike is within one second of the start of the recorded
file. If the recording is noisy and the spike is not very pronounced, you can aid detection by muting the audio immediately before and
after the spike.
An error occurred reading the test tone file
Either the test tone file was not found or is not a valid test tone file. Always use a test tone file provided on the Sound Forge application
disc.
The selected Recorded file is much smaller than the test tone size
This may indicate that the test tone or the recorded file specified in the Recover tab is not correct. Verify that the length of the recorded
file roughly the same size as the test tone file.
The end spike was not found
Verify that the spike following the test tone is present in the recorded file when recovering impulses in Auto-detect timing spikes
mode.
What is the Wave Hammer plug-in?
Sony Media Software’s Wave Hammer DirectX plug-in is an audio mastering tool consisting of a classic compressor and a volume
maximizer.
The Wave Hammer tool can be used in any Microsoft DirectX-compatible host application (for example, Sound Forge and ACID® Pro
software), and the quality and functionality of the Wave Hammer plug-in is the same in each host application; however, the method of
previewing effects is different. Consult your host application’s documentation to determine the available previewing methods.
Displaying the Wave Hammer plug-in
To display the Wave Hammer tool, choose Wave Hammer from the Effects menu.
The Wave Hammer dialog
The Wave Hammer controls are divided into two tabs: Compressor and Volume Maximizer.
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 181
Compressor tab
The controls on the Compressor tab are used to compress the audio signal. When applied properly, compression reduces the dynamic
range of audio and allows you increase overall loudness. Compression has various uses. For example, applying heavy compression at a
low threshold to electric guitar produces distortion. The controls are explained below.
Control
Description
Threshold
The Threshold fader is used to adjust the audio level at which compression is applied. Audio
with levels higher than the Threshold value are compressed, while audio at levels lower than
this value pass through the compressor uninterrupted.
The Ratio slider determines the amount of compression applied to audio signals surpassing the
threshold. A ratio of 1:1 applies no compression to audio surpassing the threshold, while a ratio
of 2:1 requires a 2 dB increase in actual volume to raise the processed volume 1 dB. A ratio of
Inf:1 is considered a limiter.
The Output gain fader allows you to determine how much the audio signal is boosted
following its compression.
The Attack time slider allows you to determine how soon after rising above the threshold the
audio signal is attenuated.
The Release time slider allows you to determine how soon after falling below the threshold the
audio signal attenuation is interrupted.
The Smart Release slider allows you to configure the compressor to automatically increase the
release time for sustained notes and decrease the release time for sharp transients. Setting this
value higher increases the internal variability of the specified Release value.
Ratio
Output gain
Attack time
Release time
Smart release
Scan mode
Auto gain compensate
Use longer look-ahead
Smooth saturation
Input/Output meter
Attenuation meter
182 | CHAPTER 12
Generally, louder overall audio levels can be achieved with lower Release values. However, low
Release values can also lead to an increase in “pumping” artifacts. Configuring a Smart Release
value increases the release time during sustained sounds, thereby preventing release changes
from occurring too rapidly.
The Scan mode radio buttons allow you to specify whether Peak or RMS mode is used to
determine the loudness of an audio file, which in turn determines the amount of compression
that is applied. When compressing in Peak mode, the compressor applies compression where it
detects audio signal peaks that surpass the threshold.
However, when compressing using RMS mode, the compressor processes the audio using the
detected average RMS value of the entire file. The Root Mean Square (RMS) of audio is a
measure of its intensity over a period of time. Therefore, the RMS level of audio corresponds to
the loudness perceived by a listener when measured over small intervals of time. As a result,
rapid transient peaks may not be processed when compressing in RMS mode.
When you select the Auto gain compensate check box, the compressor output is boosted by a
constant amount derived from the Threshold and Ratio settings. This option prevents a loss in
overall level when compressing audio.
Tip: When using the Auto gain compensate option, the Output gain fader should be used to
fine tune the signal output level.
When you select the Use longer look-ahead check box, the compressor scans farther ahead in
the incoming audio to determine how much compression is needed. This results in
compression being applied before the threshold-surpassing audio actually occurs, thereby
allowing for a slower Attack time value. However, the pre-compression effect (fades that occur
prior to attacks) of this option may be distracting.
Selecting the Smooth saturation check box lowers the amount of distortion caused when
applying heavy compression. When this option is turned on, the compressed audio sounds
warmer and not overly bright.
This meter allows you to monitor the level of the incoming and outgoing signals. When the
Input button is displayed, the meters display the incoming signal level. Clicking Input toggles
the button to an Output button and displays the outgoing signal level. Clicking Output returns
you to the incoming signal display.
This meter allows you to monitor the audio signal attenuation derived from the current
settings.
Volume Maximizer tab
The controls on the Volume Maximizer tab are used to limit the peak amplitude of an audio file or to boost the overall level without
clipping the waveform and distorting the audio. These controls are explained below.
Control
Description
Threshold
The Threshold fader is used to adjust the audio level at which the volume maximizer activates.
Audio with levels higher than the Threshold value are affected, while audio at levels lower than
this value pass through the volume maximizer uninterrupted.
The Output level fader allows you to determine the level to which peaks above the Threshold
setting are boosted or cut.
The Release time slider allows you to determine how soon after falling below the threshold the
audio signal attenuation is interrupted.
When you select the Use longer look-ahead check box, the volume maximizer scans farther
ahead in the incoming audio to determine the amount of limiting that is needed. This results in
limiting being applied before the threshold-surpassing audio actually occurs. However, the prelimiting effect (fades that occur prior to attacks) of this option may be distracting.
This meter allows you to monitor the level of the incoming and outgoing signals. When an
Input button is displayed, the meters are displaying the incoming signal level. Clicking Input
toggles the button to an Output button and displays the outgoing signal level. Clicking Output
returns you to the incoming signal display.
This meter allows you to monitor the audio signal attenuation derived from the current
settings.
Output level
Release time
Use longer look-ahead
Input/Output meter
Attenuation meter
USING ACOUSTIC MIRROR AND WAVE HAMMER | 183
184 | CHAPTER 12
Chapter 13 Utilizing the Scripting Feature
You can use scripting to streamline repetitive tasks and implement customized features. When the Script Editor window
displays, you can use it to create, edit, or run scripts.
Sound Forge® software can use scripts written using JScript, VBScript, or C# as well as scripts that have been compiled as
DLLs.
Scripting references
Sample scripts
You can find the most recent scripting API (application programming interface) and sample scripts on our Web site http:/
/www.mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/download/step1.asp?catid=15 in the Plugin Development Kits section.
Additional scripting information
For additional information about scripting, we encourage you to check out the Sound Forge scripting forum on our Web
site: http://www.mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/forums/ShowTopics.asp?ForumID=27
UTILIZING THE SCRIPTING FEATURE | 185
Opening the Script Editor window
From the View menu, choose Script Editor to display the Script Editor window. You can use the Script Editor window to open, run,
create, or edit scripts.
Script area
Splitter panel
Output area
•
•
•
Script area - Displays the current scripts written code.
Output area - Displays text results for the current script.
Splitter panel - Allows you to adjust the size of the output area window by dragging it up or down.
The Script Editor toolbar displays by default when you open the Script Editor window.
Open: opens the Open Script dialog.
New Script Template: opens a basic C# or
JScript template needed to write a script.
Save: saves the current script.
Run Script: runs the current script.
Save As: saves the current files with a new
name or format.
Compile Script: compiles and tests your
script.
186 | CHAPTER 13
Opening and running a script
You can open and run a script that has already been developed.
Warning: Scripts can pose a security risk to your computer. A script has the power to delete files, read files, write files, execute programs,
access the Internet, access files on your network, and so on. Always examine the contents of a script before running it. If you don't
understand the script, do not run it unless it comes from a trusted source. In general, take the same precautions you would take for any
program you download from the Internet or receive in an e-mail attachment.
Running a script from the Script Editor window
1. Click in the data window where you want to apply the script to establish focus.
2. From the View menu, choose Script Editor to display the Script Editor window if it isn’t already displayed.
3. Click the Open button
in the Script Editor toolbar. The Open Script window is displayed.
4. Select the script file (.vb, .js, .cs, or .dll) that you want to run. The script data is displayed in the top portion of the Script Editor
window.
5. Click the Run Script button
.
Running a script from the Scripting menu
1. Click in the data window where you want to apply the script to establish focus.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Scripting.
3. Choose a script from the submenu or choose Run Script from the submenu to browse to the script file (.vb, .js, .cs, or .dll) that you
want to run.
Adding scripts to the Scripting menu
When you start the program, Sound Forge software looks at the Script Menu folder in the Sound Forge program folder to determine
which scripts appear in the Scripting submenu. This folder is C:\Program Files\Sony\Sound Forge 9.0\Script Menu by default.
1. To change the contents of the submenu, add or delete scripts in the Script Menu folder.
Tip: To prevent duplication of script files, you can use shortcuts in the Script Menu folder.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Scripting and then choose Rescan Script Menu Folder to update the menu.
UTILIZING THE SCRIPTING FEATURE | 187
Creating a script
Sound Forge scripting uses the Microsoft .NET framework for scripting. You can write scripts in JScript, Visual Basic .NET, or C#.
1. From the View menu, choose Script Editor to display the Script Editor window if it isn’t already displayed.
2. Click the New Script Template button
and choose
C# or JScript. A new script is displayed in the Script Editor
window, with what is needed to write a script.
3. Replace the /*begin here*/ text with your script.
4. Click the Compile Script button
to compile and test
your script. If there are any errors, they will be displayed at
the bottom of the window.
5. Click the Save button
to choose the file name and
location that you want to use to save your script.
Editing an existing script
Editing a script in the Script Editor window should not be very
difficult as the scripts that are included with Sound Forge
software are fully commented to help you find and edit the
parameters you need.
1. From the View menu, choose Script Editor to display the Script Editor window if it isn’t already displayed.
2. Click the Open button
in the Script Editor window, choose the script you want to edit and then click Open. The script data is
displayed in the top portion of the Script Editor window.
Note: You cannot edit scripts that have been compiled as DLLs.
3. Edit the script as necessary. The comments in the script will help you find the parameters you need to edit.
Note: Comments are indicated with double forward slashes: //.
4. Click the Compile Script button
to compile and test your edited script. If there are any errors, they will be displayed at the
bottom of the window.
5. Click the Save button
to replace the script you edited or click the Save As button
name or in a different location.
188 | CHAPTER 13
to save the edited script with a different
Using the Scripting toolbar
Adding or removing toolbar buttons
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars. The Preferences dialog appears with a list of available toolbars.
2. Select the Scripting check box.
3. Click Customize. The Customize Toolbar dialog is displayed.
4. Use the controls in the Customize Toolbar dialog to add, remove, or rearrange the buttons on the selected toolbar. All scripts from
the Script Menu folder are listed in the Available tools column.
If you want to
Then
Add a script to the toolbar
Select a script in the Available tools column and click the Add button.
Remove a script from the toolbar
Rearrange the buttons
Restore the toolbar to its default setting
Note: The script will appear before the currently selected button.
Select a script in the Current tools column and click the Remove button.
Select a script in the Current tools column and click the Move Up or Move
Down button.
Click the Reset button.
5. Click the OK button.
UTILIZING THE SCRIPTING FEATURE | 189
Creating custom button images
You can display custom button images for the scripts that you have added to the toolbar by adding .png files to your Script Menu folder.
As an alternative to creating your own custom button images, you can use the default Script*.cs.png files, which were installed by
default in your Script Menu folder.
1. Create a PNG file with the icon that you want to use.
Note: Icons should be 16x16 pixels and transparency is supported.
2. Save the PNG file in your Script Menu folder using the same name as the name of the script that you want it to represent (i.e. to
assign a custom icon to the HelloWorld.js script, the icon should be saved as HelloWorld.js.png)..
Note: The Script Menu folder can typically be found in the following location: C:\Program Files\Sony\Sound Forge 9.0\Script Menu.
3. Customize the toolbar as needed. The custom icons will display on the Scripting toolbar the next time you start the application.
Running a script
You can run scripts using a single click if you have customized the Scripting toolbar to include buttons for scripts that you have created.
1. Click in the data window where you want to apply the script to establish focus.
2. Click the button of the script that you would like to run on the Scripting toolbar.
Tip: You may need to hover a button to display a ToolTip, which displays the name of the script associated with the button.
190 | CHAPTER 13
Using the Batch Converter script
You can use the Batch Converter script to modify and manipulate audio files without having to process each file individually.
Converting using an existing batch job
1. From the Tools menu, choose Batch Converter. The Batch Converter window is displayed.
2. Open the batch job that you want to run.
a. Click the Open Job button
. The Open dialog is displayed.
b. Browse to the folder where your batch job (.bj) file is saved.
c. Select a batch job and click the Open button.
3. Select the Files to convert tab and add the files that you want to process. When you start Batch Converter, any open data windows
will be included in the list.
If
Then
You want to add individual files
You want to add all files within a folder
Click the Add File button, browse to a file, and click the Open button.
Click the Add Folder button, select a folder, and click the OK button.
You want to add files by dragging
Note: Subfolders are not included when selecting a folder.
Drag files from the Windows Explorer to the Files to convert tab.
4. Select the Process tab and verify the processing settings. For more information, see Creating or editing a batch job on page 192.
Tip: When you convert files to a compressed format such as MP3, peaks that are at or near 0 dB may be clipped by the compression
process. You may want to consider normalizing first to reduce the possibility of clipped peaks (normalizing to a peak level of -0.9 dB is
a good starting point).
5. Select the Metadata tab and type values for any metadata (file information) that you want to save in the output files.
If
The Overwrite check box is not selected and the
destination file already includes information for a
metadata item
The Overwrite check box is selected and the destination
file already includes information for a metadata item
Then
The existing information is preserved (keywords;
however, will be appended).
The existing information is overwritten with the
information from the Metadata tab (existing information
will be erased if the box is blank).
Note: If a metadata type is not supported by the output format, it will be ignored.
UTILIZING THE SCRIPTING FEATURE | 191
6. Select the Save tab and verify the file output settings. For more information, see Creating or editing a batch job on page 192.
Note: If you want to convert to multiple formats at once, click the Add Save Options button to create a setting for each file type
that you want to convert.
7. Click the Run Job button to start processing. The Batch Converter will then display the Status tab to allow you to monitor the
progress of your batch job.
Creating or editing a batch job
1. From the Tools menu, choose Batch Converter. The Batch Converter window is displayed.
2. Create a new batch job or open the batch job that you want to edit.
If
Then
You want to create a new batch job Click the New Batch Job button
.
You want to edit an existing job
Click the Open Job button
, select a batch job and click the Open button.
3. Select the Process tab to choose the processing settings that you want to apply.
Tip: When you convert files to a compressed format such as MP3, peaks that are at or near 0 dB may be clipped by the compression
process. You may want to consider normalizing first to reduce the possibility of clipped peaks (normalizing to a peak level of -0.9 dB is
a good starting point).
a. Choose a plug-in from the Select drop-down list and click the Add Effect button to add it to the end of the list. The plug-in
dialog is displayed.
b. Adjust the effect’s settings and click the OK button. For more information about an individual effect’s settings, click the Help
button
in the plug-in window.
c. Repeat steps 3a and 3b as necessary to create your effects list.
d. Perform the following actions as needed:
If
Then
You need to change an effect’s preset
Select the effect in the list and click the Change Preset button.
You need to change an effect’s position in the chain Select the effect in the list and click the Move up or Move down
button.
4. Select the Metadata tab and type values for any metadata (file information) that you want to save in the output files.
If
Then
The Overwrite check box is not selected and the destination file already
includes information for a metadata item
The Overwrite check box is selected and the destination file already
includes information for a metadata item
The existing information is preserved (keywords; however, will be
appended).
192 | CHAPTER 13
The existing information is overwritten with the information from the
Metadata tab (existing information will be erased if the box is blank).
Note: If a metadata type is not supported by the output format, it will be ignored.
5. Select the Save tab to choose file output settings for rendered files.
a. Click the Add Save Option button to create a new setting or select an existing setting and click the Change Save Options
button. The Output Options dialog is displayed.
If you want to convert to multiple formats at once, click the Add Save Options button to create a setting for each file type that
you want to convert.
b. In the File Format section, select a radio button to indicate the format that you want to use for processed files:
Button
Description
Same as source
Select this radio button if you want to save converted files using the same format as the original file.
Select this radio button and choose a file type from the Type drop-down list if you want to convert your files to
a new format. The parameters that will be used for rendering your file are displayed in the Template box. You
can click Change to choose a new template.
Convert to
For any output format, choose Default Template to preserve the source file's format (sample rate, bit-depth,
and number of channels) in the output file.
c. In the File Names section, select a radio button to indicate the format that you want to use for processed files:
Button
Description
Same as source
Select this radio button if you want to save converted files using the same name as the original file.
Select this radio button and type text in the Append to name box if you want to add a descriptor to the file
names of converted files.
Append to name
The text you enter will be added to the original file name during conversion. For example, if your source file is
C:\Audio\DoorSlam.wav, the file could be saved as C:\Audio\DoorSlam-BatchConverted.wav during
conversion.
d. In the File Folder section, select a radio button to indicate where you want to save processed files:
Button
Description
Same as source
Select this radio button if you want to save converted files in the same folders as the original files.
Select this radio button and type a path in the edit box (or click Browse) in the Append to name box if you
want to save all converted files in a specific folder.
Save files to
You can select the Preserve source subfolders check box if you want to use the same folder structure in your
source and converted files. For example, if your source file is C:\Audio\DoorSlam.wav, you could specify D:\ as
your output folder, and the file will be saved as D:\Audio\DoorSlam.wav during conversion.
e. Click the OK button.
6. Click the Save Job button
to save the updated batch job or click the Save As
button to save the edited batch job with a
different name.
UTILIZING THE SCRIPTING FEATURE | 193
194 | CHAPTER 13
Chapter 14 Working with MIDI/SMPTE
This chapter describes using Sound Forge® software in conjunction with internal and external MIDI devices.
What is MIDI?
The musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) is a set of commands or a language that music software and hardware use
to communicate. The most common way to utilize MIDI is to have a device, such as a MIDI sequencer, generating and
sending MIDI commands to another device, such as a synthesizer.
MIDI triggers
You can use numerous internal and external devices to generate MIDI commands and trigger audio playback in the
software.
Playback versus triggered playback
Procedures in this section use the Sound Forge MIDI Keyboard as the MIDI device for triggering audio playback.
For more information, see Using the MIDI Keyboard on page 209.
Simple playback
When you click the Play button in the transport bar or playbar, the audio file in the active data window plays and you
hear the audio. MIDI is not involved.
Triggered playback
When the MIDI keyboard triggers playback of the same file, the following items occurs:
• The MIDI Keyboard transmits MIDI commands to the MIDI router.
• The MIDI router transmits the MIDI commands to the Sound Forge MIDI input port.
• The audio file plays.
Note: In the case of triggered playback, MIDI commands may come from any software or hardware device that
generates MIDI.
Triggering file playback
Using the MIDI Keyboard or any other MIDI device to trigger audio playback involves three separate procedures:
• Configuring the MIDI device (in this case, the MIDI Keyboard).
• Enabling MIDI input synchronization.
• Configuring the MIDI trigger.
WORKING WITH MIDI/SMPTE | 195
Configuring the MIDI device
1. From the View menu, choose Keyboard. The MIDI Keyboard is displayed.
On/Off
Voice
Note/Chord
Output Channel
MIDI Out
Octave
Output Velocity
2. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
3. Click the MIDI Out button
and choose the appropriate MIDI router from the menu.
4. Set the keyboard’s Output channel value to 1. The MIDI device is configured.
Turning on MIDI input synchronization
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the MIDI/Sync tab.
3. From the Input drop-down list, choose the appropriate MIDI router and click OK.
Configuring the MIDI trigger
1. From the Options menu, choose MIDI Triggers. The MIDI Triggers dialog is displayed.
2. Select Play All from the Event list box.
3. In the Trigger section, select the Note radio button. The Channel and Note boxes activate.
4. Enter 1 in the Channel box.
5. Enter C4 in the Note box and click OK.
The Sound Forge software is now configured to play the Voiceover.pca file when it receives a C4 Note-On command on MIDI
Channel 1.
196 | CHAPTER 14
Starting playback
1. From the Options menu, choose MIDI In/Out, and choose Trigger from MIDI Timecode from the submenu. A check mark appears
adjacent to the command, indicating that it is active and the software is ready to receive MIDI commands.
2. Click the C4 key on the MIDI Keyboard.
Click the C4 key to begin playback
The Voiceover.pca file plays in its entirety.
Resetting MIDI triggers
Once set, MIDI triggers are not permanent. They can be edited or deleted as needed.
1. From the Options menu, choose MIDI Triggers. The MIDI Triggers dialog is displayed.
2. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Reset all triggers to (none) and click OK.
Triggering region playback
Frequently, it is preferable to use a MIDI device to control the triggering of the individual regions within a file. As in the previous
example, the MIDI Keyboard will be used to demonstrate this function.
Note: Before performing this procedure, reset all triggers. For more information, see Resetting MIDI triggers on page 197.
Configuring region playback triggers
1. Display and configure the MIDI Keyboard. For more information, see Configuring the MIDI device on page 196.
2. Set up the MIDI input synchronization. For more information, see Turning on MIDI input synchronization on page 196.
3. Open the Voiceover.pca file and display its Regions List.
4. Select the “Wow” region and press Enter. The Edit Marker/Region dialog is displayed.
5. From the Trigger drop-down list, choose MIDI: Note On - Play.
6. Enter 1 in the Channel box and C-4 in the Note box.
7. Click OK. A small musical note appears adjacent to the “Wow” region in the Regions List to indicate that a trigger has been
configured.
WORKING WITH MIDI/SMPTE | 197
A small musical note
indicates a region trigger
8. Repeat steps 4 through 7, providing each region with a unique MIDI trigger.
Using region playback triggers
1. From the Options menu, choose MIDI In/Out, and choose Trigger from MIDI Timecode from the submenu. A check mark appears
adjacent to the command, indicating it is active and the software is ready to receive MIDI commands.
2. Click C4 on the MIDI Keyboard. The “Wow” region plays.
3. Click other trigger keys on the MIDI Keyboard and observe how this feature can be used to play regions on cue or quickly rearrange
an audio file.
Note: Only one region can be played at any given time. Overlapping causes the active region’s playback to be interrupted and the new
region’s playback to begin.
Triggering playback from additional internal/external MIDI devices
The basic concepts of MIDI routing and triggering from the Sound Forge MIDI Keyboard described in previous sections apply to any
hardware or software device capable of generating MIDI commands. Follow the same basic steps to trigger playback:
1. Install and configure the MIDI controller (refer to the product-specific documentation for installation procedures).
2. Set up MIDI input synchronization. For more information, see Turning on MIDI input synchronization on page 196.
3. Configure the MIDI triggers to respond to the corresponding controls on the controller. For more information, see Configuring the
MIDI trigger on page 196.
Advantages of external MIDI controllers
In addition to simple playback, MIDI commands can be used to control a wide array of the Sound Forge navigation and editing
functions. In fact, a quick look at the Event drop-down list in the MIDI Triggers dialog can provide you with an idea of the power of MIDI
commands used in conjunction with Sound Forge software.
Using external MIDI controller presets
Sound Forge system presets support the sequencer, cursor, dial, and function buttons on the following external MIDI controllers:
• Roland MCR-8 Multi-Controller
• JLCooper Media Control Station 2
The system presets for these controllers allow you to perform the following actions:
•
•
•
•
Move the cursor using the controller’s dial.
Drop markers by clicking the dial.
Zoom in and out of the waveform using the cursor keys (vertically and horizontally).
Start and stop audio playback using the sequencer controls.
Note: Users of the aforementioned external MIDI controllers need not limit themselves to Sony Media Software’s default configurations.
198 | CHAPTER 14
Sound Forge software and MIDI timecode synchronization
MIDI timecode (MTC) is a method of using SMPTE timing signals to synchronize multiple devices. Although MIDI timecode is typically
used to synchronize audio and video, it can also be used to synchronize playback devices. You can synchronize to external MTC or
generate MTC for other devices to follow. For more information, see SMPTE Timecode on page 265.
You can also specify start times of regions in the Regions List to synchronize digital audio with additional timed events. For example, if a
MIDI sequencer generates SMPTE timecode, you can synchronize to it with its own SMPTE timecode and initiate region playback at
specified times.
MTC synchronization versus Note-On MIDI triggering
Synchronizing to MTC is similar to synchronizing to other MIDI events and can be used in many of the same situations. The major
advantage of MTC synchronization is that it allows for you to specify accurate SMPTE start times. However, MTC synchronization
requires more of your system’s processing power.
When triggering a limited number of sounds in the software from a sequencer, it is preferable to use Note-On MIDI Triggering. For more
information, see Triggering file playback on page 195.
Playing regions using MTC from a sequencer
Triggering region playback in Sound Forge software from a sequencer using MTC involves three procedures:
• Configuring the regions.
• Enabling MIDI input synchronization.
• Configuring the sequencer.
Configuring the regions
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file and view the Regions List and Playlist windows.
2. Select the “Wow” region in the Regions List and drag it to the playlist. The “Wow” region is added to the playlist.
The “Wow” region is added to the playlist.
3. Select the “Wow” region in the playlist and press Enter. The Edit Playlist dialog is displayed.
4. From the Trigger drop-down list, choose SMPTE: Play at Time. The SMPTE time box is activated.
5. Enter an appropriate SMPTE start time using the hours:minutes:seconds:frames format and click OK. A small musical note appears
adjacent to region in the playlist to indicate that a start time for this region’s playback is configured.
A small musical note
indicates a start time
Turning on MIDI input synchronization
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the MIDI/Sync tab.
3. Specify the MIDI input that corresponds to the output port of the sequencer and click OK.
4. From the Options menu, choose MIDI Triggers. The MIDI Triggers dialog is displayed.
WORKING WITH MIDI/SMPTE | 199
5. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Reset all triggers to (none). This prevents other MIDI commands from creating additional
triggers.
6. Click OK.
7. From the Options menu, choose MIDI In/Out, and choose Trigger from MIDI Timecode from the submenu. A check mark appears
adjacent to the command to indicate that synchronization to MTC is ready.
Configuring the sequencer
1. Set the sequencer’s MIDI output port to correspond with the Sound Forge MIDI input port.
2. Turn on the sequencer’s MTC output. If the sequencer supports generating MTC, it is now ready to sync.
3. Press the sequencer’s Play button. The Sound Forge MIDI In status box displays the same SMPTE time as the sequencer’s SMPTE
time. At the specified SMPTE time, playback of the region is started without interrupting the sequencer’s output to other devices.
Playing regions using MTC from an external device
When using a hardware device that generates MTC, the configuration procedure is basically the same as outlined above. Simply specify
the device’s MTC output driver as the Sound Forge MIDI input port in the Preferences dialog’s MIDI/Sync tab.
Using Sound Forge software to generate MTC for a MIDI sequencer
You can generate MTC for other devices to follow. However, it is important to understand that the software only generates MTC while
playing a file or from a playlist. Generating MTC involves two procedures:
• Configuring the Sound Forge software.
• Configuring the sequencer.
Configuring Sound Forge software
1. Open an audio file.
2. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
3. Click the MIDI/Sync tab.
4. Specify the Sound Forge MIDI output that corresponds to the input port of the sequencer and click OK.
5. From the Options menu, choose MIDI Triggers. The MIDI Triggers dialog is displayed.
6. From the Preset drop-down list, choose Reset all triggers to (none). This prevents other MIDI commands from creating additional
triggers.
7. Click OK.
8. From the Options menu, choose MIDI In/Out, and choose Generate MIDI Timecode from the submenu. A check mark appears
adjacent to the command, indicating that the software is ready to generate MTC.
200 | CHAPTER 14
Configuring the sequencer
1. Specify the sequencer’s MIDI input port that corresponds to the Sound Forge MIDI output port.
2. Set the sequencer’s SMPTE offset time value as needed.
Note: Sound Forge software uses 00:00:00:00 as its output start point, but certain sequencers recommend a SMPTE offset
time of at least four seconds to ensure synchronization.
3. Turn on the sequencer’s MTC input.
4. If required by the sequencer, press the Play button. The sequencer does not begin playback, but switches to “Waiting for MTC”
mode.
5. Start playback of the file in the software. When the SMPTE offset time is satisfied, the sequencer locks to and follows the MTC
generated by the Sound Forge application.
Using Sound Forge software to generate MTC for an external device
To use the software to send MTC to an external device, follow the previous instructions, but configure the Sound Forge MIDI output port
to send directly to the device’s MIDI driver.
WORKING WITH MIDI/SMPTE | 201
202 | CHAPTER 14
Chapter 15 Optimizing for Sound Forge Software
This chapter contains information on configuring your system to optimize the performance of Sound Forge® software.
Defragmenting your hard drive
The Sound Forge application is a disk-based digital audio editor that allows editing operations to be performed on the
system’s hard drive rather than in memory. Because of this, you are able to edit large files as well as retain extensive
undo/redo information and clipboard data.This also means that the hard drive specified for temporary storage must have
sufficient free space to store large quantities of data.
With time and usage, hard drives become fragmented, leading to discontiguous files and slow access. This is particularly
true for older hard drives. Since the software is hard drive intensive, faster disk access equates better performance.
Therefore, the initial step in improving system performance is hard drive defragmentation. The computer’s operating
system is typically equipped with a defragmenting program that should be run prior to using Sound Forge software.
Increasing total buffer size
The total buffer size value determines the amount of RAM used for recording to/playing from the hard drive. A total
buffer size of 512 KB is recommended, but increased buffering may be necessary if you detect gaps during playback.
Increasing the total buffer size requires additional memory. Combined with a large preload size, this may result in a delay
when starting and stopping playback.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Audio tab.
3. Use the Playback buffering slider to configure an appropriate buffer size value and click OK.
Turning off the playback cursor and record counter
The playback cursor and record counter options determine whether these displays are updated during recording and
playback. If you detect dropouts and skipping at high sample rates (greater than 44,100 Hz), turn these displays off to
minimize processing overhead.
1. From the Options menus, choose Preferences. The Preferences dialog is displayed.
2. Click the General tab.
3. Clear the Show the position of the playback cursor and Show the record counter while recording check boxes and
click OK.
Turning off the channel (output) meters
Sound Forge channel meters use a small amount of processing overhead during playback. However, if you detect
dropouts during playback and previous fixes have failed, try turning off these meters.
From the View menu, choose Channel Meters. The check mark adjacent to the command is cleared, indicating that the
channel meters are turned off.
Turning on passive updating for time and video displays
Passive update options lower the priority of redrawing the time and video displays during playback. When these options
are turned on, the displays update only if there is ample time. Frequently this goes unnoticed, and enabling these options
minimizes playback overhead with little or no inconvenience.
OPTIMIZING FOR SOUND FORGE SOFTWARE | 203
Time displays
From the Options menu, choose Time Display, and choose Passive Update from the submenu. A check mark appears next to the
command to indicate that this option is turned on.
Video displays
From the Options menu, choose Video, and choose Passive Update from the submenu. A check mark appears next to the command to
indicate that this option is turned on.
Synchronizing audio and video
If your video has been opened from a slow device, such as a CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or network drive, Sound Forge software may have
trouble accurately playing back the audio and video in sync. You should always copy your video files to a fast hard drive. Listed below
are a few tips that can help when trying to synchronize the audio and video:
• After assembling or editing the audio you wish to use with your video, place markers during video playback to correspond to any
major synchronization points. You can locate a particular frame by dragging the cursor along the audio if the Video Preview window
is open (from the View menu, choose Video Preview) or the Animate Video Strip option is enabled (from the Options menu, choose
Video>Animate Video Strip. After primary locations have been identified, drag your audio to these markers to mix and paste audio.
• Features such as Insert Silence, Delete/Clear, and Time Stretch are commonly used to correct synchronization. Another useful trick is
to create a region representing the offset between a video frame and audio event. Then you can enable Lock Loop/Region Length
and drag the offset region to a preceding silent section. Use the region as a template for adjusting the audio stream length—either
copying and pasting to insert time or deleting to remove time.
204 | CHAPTER 15
Chapter 16 Sampling
Used in conjunction with the Sampler Tool, the Sound Forge® software’s powerful editing capabilities allow you to create,
edit, and transfer samples between external and internal samplers. This chapter describes the procedures used to transfer
(dump) samples between the computer and sampler with the Sampler Tool.
Samplers
Samplers are devices that produce on-demand playback of audio samples at varying pitches. For the purposes of this
manual, we will concentrate on two basic varieties: external samplers and internal samplers.
External samplers
External samplers are typically capable of recording samples or transferring prerecorded samples into their memory. You
can choose between two methods to transfer samples to external samplers:
• MIDI Sample Dump Standard (SDS)
• SCSI MIDI Device Interface (SMDI)
MIDI Sample Dump Standard (SDS)
The MIDI SDS is used to send and receive digital samples using normal MIDI hardware and cable connections. Due to the
limited bandwidth of the MIDI protocol and the large amount of data required by digital samples, a MIDI SDS transfer can
be time consuming. Furthermore, SDS is limited to mono samples, though certain samplers allow two mono samples to
be joined as a stereo sample.
SCSI MIDI Device Interface (SMDI)
The SCSI MIDI Device Interface (SMDI) allows music hardware and software to communicate using SCSI hardware and
cables. Because SCSI hardware has a greater bandwidth than MIDI, SMDI transfers are considerably faster than SDS
transfers. In addition, SMDI supports mono and stereo sample transfers.
Internal samplers
Internal samplers are cards installed in your system that, unlike typical sound cards, actually allow sounds to be
downloaded into memory and played at varying pitches to simulate a musical instrument.
Using an unsupported internal sampler
If you have an internal sampler not directly supported by the Sampler Tool, you have two options:
• Use the MIDI SDS transfer protocol.
• Use an open loop transfer.
Note: If you have a Windows-compatible internal sampler, contact the manufacturer about supporting SDS in Windows
drivers.
Configuring the Sampler Tool
Configuring the Sampler Tool is fairly straightforward, especially if the desired configuration exists in the list of presets.
SAMPLING | 205
1. From the Tools menu, choose Sampler. The Sampler dialog is displayed.
2. From the Configuration drop-down list, choose the desired configuration. If the desired configuration is not listed, you must create
it in the Sampler Configuration dialog. For more information, see Creating a sampler configuration on page 206.
3. Enter a value in the Logical send/receive sample number box.
This value determines the number that the sampler uses as its location reference when sending or receiving samples. This number
can be biased for specific samplers with the Sample bias option in the Sampler Configuration dialog. For more information, see
Creating a sampler configuration on page 206.
4. Begin the process of sending or receiving samples. For more information, see Sending and receiving samples on page 208.
Creating a sampler configuration
The Sampler Configuration dialog allows you to create new sample configurations that can be saved as presets and accessed from the
Sampler dialog. Creating new custom configurations requires you to specify the sampler and sample transfer mode. However, the
process of creating a custom sampler configuration differs based on which transfer mode is used.
1. From the Tools menu, choose Sampler. The Sampler dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Configure button. The Sampler Configuration dialog is displayed.
3. From the Sampler model drop-down list, choose the appropriate sampler. If the desired sampler is not included in the drop-down
list, choose the generic SMDI or SDS capable sampler option. If the sampler supports the specified protocol, the Sampler Tool
should interface with the sampler.
4. Specify input/output settings for the sampler:
If
Then
Your sampler uses MIDI/SDS transfer
Select the MIDI radio button and choose input and output ports in the MIDI In and
MIDI Out boxes
Your sampler uses SCSI/SMDI transfer
Select the SCSI radio button and select your sampler in the Sampler box.
206 | CHAPTER 16
Note: The Sampler box lists all devices connected to the selected SCSI host, including devices that are not samplers.
5. If desired, enter a value in the Sample bias box. Sample bias is a user-specified value that is added to the logical sample number to
determine the actual sample number used for sending or receiving.
Additionally, sample bias can be used to define unique biases for multiple projects. For example, when composing multiple pieces
using different samples, it is possible to create unique sampler configurations for each project. Simply establish a unique sample
bias to segregate the samples within the sampler.
6. Enter a value in the MIDI channel box to specify which MIDI channel (1-16) is used when transferring samples.
7. Select the Open loop check box if you want to send SDS sample data immediately upon clicking the Send Sample button. This is
an unconditional transfer of sample data (no handshake).
8. Select the Send request when retrieving samples check box if you want the Sampler Tool to send a request for the sample to the
sampler when you click Get Sample.
Clearing the Send request check box requires that the sample transfer be initiated from the sampler, even after you click Get
Sample. Typically, pressing the appropriate button on the sampler satisfies this request.
9. Select the Wait for request when sending samples check box if you want the Sampler tool to wait for the sampler to request the
sample transfer before sending the sample, even after you click Send Sample. Typically, pressing the appropriate button on the
sampler satisfies this request.
Clearing the Wait for request check box configures the Sampler Tool to send the sample as soon as you click Send Sample.
Open loop versus closed loop
Open loop describes a unidirectional communication protocol. When the Open loop check box is selected, the source transmits all data
to the destination without listening for instruction from the destination. The destination has no control over how the data is sent and
cannot ask for information to be repeated. This lack of feedback makes open-loop transfers prone to error.
The Open Loop check box in the
Sampler Configuration dialog
If the Open loop check box is cleared, the communication protocol is referred to as closed loop. A closed loop allows information to
flow in both directions. Using closed-loop transfers, the source sends data in small packets and the destination, upon receiving the
packet, either retains the data or discards the packet and requests the data to be resent. Using closed-loop protocol, the source does
not send the next packet of data until the destination requests it. This makes closed-loop transfers more reliable than open-loop
transfers.
In addition to being less reliable, open-loop transfers are slower than closed-loop transfers, especially when sending samples using the
Sampler Tool. This is due to intentional delays placed between data packets to compensate for varying sampler speeds. Closed-loop
transfers typically guarantee the most efficient timing between packets.
If possible, avoid using an open loop to receive samples from a sampler. The Sampler Tool cannot control the flow of data packets and
there is a high probability that data will be missed.
Tip: Open-loop transfers can be useful when you do not have enough cables to connect both the MIDI input and MIDI output ports.
SAMPLING | 207
Saving sampler configurations
Once you complete a sampler configuration, you can save it as a preset and quickly access it in the future.
1. From the Sampler Configuration dialog, click Save As. The Save Preset dialog is displayed.
2. Enter a descriptive name in the New preset name box and click OK. The new configuration is saved and can now be chosen from
the Configuration drop-down list in the Sampler dialog.
Note: To delete a preset, choose it from the Preset drop-down list and click Delete.
Sending and receiving samples
Once you have accurately configured the sampler setup, you can send and receive samples using the Send Sample and Get Sample
buttons in the Sampler dialog.
Sending a sample
1. From the Tools menu, choose Sampler. The Sampler dialog is displayed.
2. From the Configuration drop-down list, choose the sampler configuration.
3. Enter the sample number to be sent in the Logical send/receive sample number box. The Sampler Tool takes into account the
configuration’s sample bias and displays values for the Actual send sample number and Actual receive sample number. For more
information, see Creating a sampler configuration on page 206.
4. Click Send Sample. Sample transfer starts. A meter in the status bar indicates the progress of the transfer. You can cancel a transfer
at any time by clicking Cancel or pressing Esc.
Receiving a sample
1. From the Tools menu, choose Sampler. The Sampler dialog is displayed.
2. From the Configuration drop-down list, choose the sampler configuration.
3. Enter the sample number to be received in the Logical send/receive sample number box. The Sampler Tool takes into account the
configuration’s sample bias and displays values for the Actual send sample number and Actual receive sample number. For more
information, see Creating a sampler configuration on page 206.
4. Click Receive Sample. Sample transfer starts. A meter in the status bar indicates the progress of the transfer. You can cancel a
transfer at any time by clicking Cancel or pressing Esc.
MIDI unity note and Fine tune
Once you specify a configuration in the Sampler dialog, the Sampler area near the bottom of the dialog displays all relevant sampler
configuration information.
The bottom pane of the dialog contains two additional parameters: MIDI unity note and Fine tune.
208 | CHAPTER 16
Parameter
MIDI unity note
Fine tune
Description
The MIDI unity note value indicates the pitch to which the sample is tuned.
The Fine tune value indicates any minor tuning differences (measured in cents) in
the sample.
Editing MIDI unity note and Fine tune
Both values can be edited and used with samplers that support tuning information by choosing Edit Sample from the Special menu.
Note: The software does not use this information.
Using the MIDI Keyboard
With the MIDI Keyboard, you can control internal/external synthesizers and samplers from the Sound Forge application. The MIDI
Keyboard can also be used to listen to the sounds on a synthesizer or in the synthesis section of the sound card.
Displaying the MIDI Keyboard
To display the MIDI Keyboard, choose Keyboard from the View menu. The keyboard can be resized, moved, or docked within the
workspace.
On/Off
Voice
Note/Chord
Output Channel
MIDI Out
Octave
Output Velocity
Turning on the MIDI Keyboard
Clicking any key turns the keyboard on. If you do not hear any sound, verify that the output is connected to the MIDI Output device.
SAMPLING | 209
Configuring the MIDI Keyboard output port and channel
1. Click the MIDI Out button
and choose an output device from the menu.
Specify the output
device from the
shortcut menu
2. Choose Send Program Changes from the menu if the keyboard will be used to choose instrument voices. A check mark appears
adjacent to the command to indicate that this option is turned on.
3. Configure the MIDI input channel of the selected device to correspond to the keyboard’s output channel.
Note: Most MIDI devices are configurable to accept MIDI commands on any channel.
Troubleshooting the MIDI Keyboard
If after configuration, the keyboard fails to produce sound, check the following items:
•
•
•
•
•
Verify that the output velocity of the keyboard is set to a value greater than 100.
Verify that the MIDI input channel in the sound module is set to the same channel as the keyboard.
Verify that the device is configured to receive MIDI input.
Verify the device output volume level.
Verify external MIDI connections, if applicable.
Specifying instruments
1. Choose Send Program Changes from the MIDI Out button
menu. A check mark appears adjacent to the command to indicate
that this option is turned on. If this option is turned off, patches cannot be switched.
2. From the Voice drop-down list, choose the new voice and click any key.
Note: Patch names are arranged as specified in the General MIDI Standard. For synthesizers not using the General MIDI convention, use
the patch number instead of the instrument name.
Generating chords
You can also generate chords instead of single notes by choosing a chord structure from the keyboard’s Note/Chord drop-down list.
Chords are generated using the specified note as the root of the chord or interval.
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Setting up MIDI/SDS hardware
To use MIDI/SDS protocol with an external sampler that supports MIDI/SDS, you must install a MIDI card with MIDI input and output
ports in the system.
1. Using a MIDI cable, connect the MIDI output port of the sampler to the MIDI input port of the MIDI card.
2. Connect the MIDI input port of the sampler to the MIDI output port of the card.
Note: This is the same configuration used to connect a MIDI keyboard to a computer for sequencing.
Internal samplers do not require a MIDI card and MIDI cables; however, an open-loop protocol may be required when sending samples
to an internal sampler. The sampler’s documentation should specify the requirements for performing SDS transfers if the sampler
supports this action.
Troubleshooting MIDI/SDS with open loop
Open-loop transfers, while not recommended for sending or receiving samples, can assist you in troubleshooting SDS hardware setup
problems. If the Sampler Tool does not transfer data to (or from) the sampler, select the open-loop option and attempt single cable
transfers. If open-loop transfers are successful, but closed-loop transfers are not, any of the following items may be the cause:
• The sampler does not support closed-loop transfers (handshaking).
• One or more of the MIDI cables or connections is faulty.
• The MIDI card is not receiving MIDI input (send) or sending MIDI output (receive). Interrupt conflicts are common for MIDI input.
Setting up SCSI/SMDI hardware
To use the SCSI/SMDI protocol with an external sampler that supports the SCSI/SMDI protocol under Windows 98SE, Windows Me,
Windows 2000, or Windows XP, only a compatible SCSI adapter is needed. The computer and sampler must be powered-down prior to
connecting or disconnecting SCSI cables to prevent damage to the computer and/or hardware.
Troubleshooting SCSI/SMDI
A brief description of some common problems encountered with SCSI and samplers follows.
Conflicting SCSI IDs
When connecting devices on a SCSI chain, each device must have a unique device identifier (ID). SCSI allows for up to eight unique ID
values, numbered 0 to 7. Typically, device ID 7 is used for the internal SCSI controller card, leaving ID 0 through 6 for other devices.
Note: The ID of a bootable SCSI hard drive must be set to 0.
The following table describes a typical SCSI configuration:
ID
Device(s)
0
1
2-6
7
Hard Drive
CD-ROM/DVD-ROM Drive
Samplers
SCSI Controller Card
SAMPLING | 211
Periodic transfer failures
Messages such as “The SCSI Device is not responding” or “A problem was encountered while transferring the sample” may indicate a
problem with a SCSI bus.
1. From the Tools menu, choose Sampler. The Sampler dialog is displayed.
2. Click Configure. The Sampler Configuration dialog is displayed.
3. Repeat the selection of the SCSI host. This causes a series of SCSI commands to be executed that may settle the bus.
If the problem persists, power-down and restart all equipment.
Sampler is recognized but does not transfer reliably
The following items are possible causes of unreliable SCSI transfers.
Synchronous transfer mode
Select samplers (the Kurzweil K2000 among them) do not operate properly if there is a SCSI device set to synchronous transfer mode on
the same SCSI chain. SCSI hard drives and CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs often have the option of using a synchronous transfer mode. If there
is a host versus device synchronous transfer option, select the host option. Refer to the SCSI device’s documentation for more
information.
SCSI termination
If the SCSI chain is not properly terminated, unreliable SCSI transfers may be experienced. Refer to the SCSI card and SCSI device
documentation for more information.
Long or faulty SCSI cables
SCSI cables that are very long or not properly shielded may not operate reliably. In addition, do not use cables that are not certified SCSI
cables.
Adaptec 1540/1542CF does not recognize a sampler
If the Adaptec 1540/1542CF does not recognize the sampler, a change may be required in the configuration of the Adaptec controller.
Some samplers do not operate when the Reset SCSI Bus at Power-On option of the Adaptec controller is turned on. This is the default
operation for the 1540/1542CF and must be turned off to allow the system to work with the sampler.
Note: Turning off the Reset SCSI Bus at Power-On option may keep other devices on the SCSI chain from resetting correctly when using
the system’s soft boot feature. Other systems may freeze temporarily. To guarantee that devices are reset when rebooting with this option
turned off, use the system’s reset button or power-down and up to reset the system.
SCSI/SMDI-compatible menu is not displayed under Windows 98SE and Windows Me
Verify proper SCSI termination and check for multiple devices on the SCSI chain using the same SCSI ID. If this fails to solve the problem,
Adaptec SCSI card users may need to update the system’s mini-port drivers. Adaptec has a series of updated mini-port drivers available
for Windows 98SE and Windows Me on the Web.
After you download the file, you must create a temporary directory or folder on the system and run the WIN95MPD.EXE program. Follow
the directions in the readme.txt file to update the drivers for the Adaptec SCSI card.
212 | CHAPTER 16
Chapter 17 Looping
Sound Forge® software is an excellent tool for creating loops and provides the perfect compliment to Sony Media
Software’s revolutionary ACID® line of loop-based music creation tools.
Creating loop regions in files is useful only when you intend to transfer the files to a hardware sampler that supports the
loop regions.
Loops
A loop is a sample or region in an audio file that is repeated during playback. Samples are finite and frequently very short
in length. Therefore, they must be repeated (or looped) to create longer or sustaining sounds.
Note: Loops can also be used to repeat entire sections of music, although the playlist is better suited to this purpose.
Sustaining and release loops
A sound envelope contains four elements: attack, decay, sustain, and release.
Attack
Decay
Sustain
Release
Typically, the sustain portion of the envelope is looped to lengthen the duration of a sound. This is referred to as the
sustaining loop.
While sustaining loops are useful, it is frequently necessary to create a second loop, taken from later in the envelope. This
allows you to reproduce longer, more complex sounds, such as a piano chord struck with the sustain pedal depressed.
This second type of loop is referred to as the release loop.
Creating a sustaining loop
1. Open the Drumhit.pca file and create a selection containing the snare hit at the beginning of the waveform.
Create and preview the selection
2. With the Loop Playback button
selected in the transport bar, click the Play Normal button
on the playbar to
preview the loop.
3. From the Special menu, choose Insert Sample Loop (or press Alt+Shift+L). The Edit Sample dialog is displayed.
4. Choose the Sample type by selecting the Sustaining radio button if it is not already selected. The controls in the
middle pane of the dialog activate.
LOOPING | 213
5. Select the Loop count radio button.
Select the Loop Count radio button
and enter a loop count value
6. Enter a value of 10 in the Loop count box and click OK. The data window displays the appropriate tags in the ruler to specify the
loop’s start and end points. The Play as Sample button
appears on the playbar.
Loop start and
end tags
7. Click the Play as Sample button
on the playbar. The looped snare selection repeats ten times before the cymbal crash.
Creating a sustaining loop with a release loop
To add a release loop to the sustaining loop created in the previous procedure, you must reconfigure the dialog and rearrange the loop
tags in the data window.
Configuring the dialog
1. Right-click either of the loop tags and chose Edit from the shortcut menu. The Edit Sample dialog is displayed.
2. In the Edit Sample dialog, select the Sustaining with Release radio button.
3. Verify that the Release radio button is selected in the Loop to edit area of the dialog.
4. Select the Loop count radio button. The edit box is activated.
5. Enter a value of 5 in the Loop count box and click OK. Both loops (sustaining and release) are configured.
Arranging the loop tags
Once the dialog is properly configured to support a release loop, release loop tags are created in the data window beneath the
sustaining loop tags. The sustaining and release loops temporarily contain identical data.
1. Drag the sustaining loop end tag toward the left side of the data window to reveal the release loop end tag.
Drag the sustaining
loop end tag
Release loop end tag
The release loop end
tag is revealed
2. Drag the sustaining loop start tag toward the right side of the data window. This reveals the release loop start tag.
214 | CHAPTER 17
3. Arrange the loop tags so that the snare hit is contained within the sustaining loop and the cymbal crash is contained within the
release loop.
Arrange the sustaining and
release loops in the data window
4. Click the Play as Sample button
in the playbar. The entire file plays with the snare hit repeated ten times followed by the
cymbal crash five times.
Looping techniques
Depending upon the source material, creating a natural-sounding loop can be a difficult task. Many factors beyond your control may
produce distracting pops and glitches, thereby calling unwanted attention to the loop. Although looping skill is largely the product of
practice and experimentation, there are some guidelines to consider.
Match endpoint amplitudes
One of the easiest ways to minimize the occurrence of glitches when creating loops is to select loop endpoints that have an amplitude
of zero. These points are known as zero-crossings. For more information, see Finding zero-crossings on page 236.
Match endpoint waveform slope
Another technique for reducing loop glitches is to avoid matching loop endpoints where the waveform slope does not match. If the
waveform slope changes drastically, a pop plays when the sample is looped.
Non-matching slope
Matching slope
Match endpoint sound levels
The overall amplitude (or loudness) approaching the loop’s endpoints should be as similar as possible to prevent distracting glitches.
Unfortunately, it is frequently difficult to avoid this problem, particularly with rapidly decaying source material. For more information, see
Viewing loop amplitude on page 236.
Avoid very short loops
If the loop is shorter than ~50 ms (1/20 Hz), the pitch of the loop may not equal the sample pitch. Pitch-tuning a loop is accomplished by
creating short loops with a length equal to 1/frequency. For example, a sample of pitch 440 Hz corresponds to A5 on the keyboard,
meaning the loop can be pitch-tuned 2.27 ms. However, pitched loops do not sound like the original sample.
LOOPING | 215
Editing loops
The loop you initially create in any situation is rarely perfect. Frequently, loops require some degree of editing before they are usable.
Once you create a loop, you can quickly edit its beginning and end (and subsequently its length) by dragging the markers to a new
location.
Crossfading loops
You can use the Crossfade Loop tool to loop audio from difficult source material. It allows you to crossfade the end of a loop with the
beginning of the loop in order to create a smoother, more natural-sounding transition. In addition, you can configure the Crossfade
Loop tool to crossfade the beginning of the audio loop with the beginning of the post-loop audio on the loop’s final pass. This smooths
the occasionally awkward transition from looped to non-looped audio.
Using the Crossfade Loop tool
1. Open the Loop.pca file. A sustaining loop appears in the data window.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Crossfade Loop. The Crossfade Loop dialog is displayed.
3. Drag the Loop slider to configure the percentage of the loop to be crossfaded.
4. If desired, select the Post-Loop check box and drag the slider to configure the percentage of the loop to be crossfaded into the
post-loop audio.
5. From the Preview mode drop-down list, specify how the Preview button operates: Loop the Loop, Play Loop through Post-Loop,
or Play as One Shot.
6. Preview and tune the crossfade until you cannot detect the loop transitions.
7. Click OK.
216 | CHAPTER 17
Creating loops for ACID software
The Sound Forge application is an excellent tool for creating and editing loops to be imported into any of the ACID family of products.
You can create four different types of files for ACID use:
•
•
•
•
One-shot file
Loop file
ACID 2.0 disk-based file
ACID 3.0 or later beatmapped file
Creating an ACID one-shot file
One-shots are files that do not stretch with tempo or change pitch to match the key of the ACID project. This behavior makes one-shots
particularly suited for audio such as cymbal crashes, sound effects, and short vocal lines.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Create a selection containing the “Wow” and drag it to the workspace. A new data window is created containing the “Wow” audio
data.
3. From the Special menu, choose Edit ACID Properties. The Edit ACID Properties dialog is displayed.
4. Select the One-Shot radio button and click OK.
5. From the File menu, choose Save As and save the file with a descriptive name.
Creating an ACID loop file
Loops are musical building blocks and are by far the most common type of file used in the ACID application. Loops stretch with an ACID
project’s tempo and can be configured to change pitch. When creating Sound Forge files for use in ACID software, the Edit ACID
Properties dialog defaults to the loop setting.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file.
2. Create a selection containing the “And easier” and drag it to the workspace. A new data window is created containing the “And
easier” audio data.
3. From the Special menu, choose Edit ACID Properties. The Edit ACID Properties dialog is displayed.
4. Select the Loop radio button. The Root note for transposing and Number of beats boxes activate.
Select the Loop radio button
5. Choose one of the following options:
If
Then
The loop should be transposed when inserted in an
ACID project
The loop should not be transposed in an ACID project
Choose it’s root note from the Root note for
transposing drop-down list.
Choose Don’t transpose from the drop-down list.
6. In the Number of beats box, specify the length of the loop in beats. The default value is four beats.
7. Click OK.
8. From the File menu, choose Save As and save the file with a descriptive name.
LOOPING | 217
Creating an ACID 2.0 disk-based file
ACID 2.0 disk-based files can stretch to comply with an ACID project’s tempo, but require that you specify the file’s original tempo upon
configuration. If the original tempo is not specified in the Edit ACID Properties dialog, no stretching occurs.
While ACID 2.0 disk-based files can change tempo, they cannot change pitch. Disk-based files are typically used in ACID 2.0 software for
extended vocal tracks or other long audio files that do not loop.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file and select the entire waveform.
2. From the Special menu, choose Edit ACID Properties. The Edit ACID Properties dialog is displayed.
3. Select the ACID 2.0 Disk-Based radio button. The Tempo check box activates.
4. If the file should stretch to match the ACID 2.0 project’s tempo, select the Tempo check box. The Tempo box activates.
5. Specify the file’s original tempo (60-240 bpm) in the Tempo box and click OK. For more information, see Setting loop tempo on page
221.
6. From the File menu, choose Save As and save the file with a descriptive name.
Creating an ACID beatmapped file
ACID beatmapped files can change tempo and pitch to match an ACID project. You must specify the file’s original tempo and root note
for transposing upon configuration. If you do not specify these values, no tempo or key changes occur. Beatmapped files are typically
used in ACID software version 3.0 or later for extended vocal tracks or other long audio files that do not loop.
1. Open the Voiceover.pca file and select the entire waveform.
2. From the Special menu, choose Edit ACID Properties. The Edit ACID Properties dialog is displayed.
3. Select the ACID Beatmapped radio button. Complete the information for an ACID beatmapped file:
•
•
•
Select a value from the Root note for transposing drop-down list so that the ACID application can transpose the file to match
the project key. Select Don’t transpose from this list to keep the key from being changed.
Specify the file’s original tempo (40-300 bpm) in the Tempo box so that the ACID application can stretch the file to match the
project tempo. For more information, see Setting loop tempo on page 221.
Enter a value in the Downbeat offset (samples) box to indicate the location of the first downbeat.
4. Click OK.
5. From the File menu, choose Save As and save the file with a descriptive name.
218 | CHAPTER 17
Using the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar
The ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar provides quick access to the commands used to create and edit files for the ACID software.
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars. The Preferences dialog appears with a list of available toolbars.
2. Select the ACID Loop Creation Tools check box and click OK.
Edit ACID Properties: displays the Edit ACID
Properties dialog.
Shift Selection Right: shifts the current
selection to the right so the current end point
becomes the start point.
Edit Tempo: calculates the musical tempo
(beats per minute) based upon the current
selection.
Rotate Audio: moves the current selection to
the opposite end of the file.
Double Selection: doubles the size of the
current selection.
Selection Grid Lines: toggles the selection
grid line display on/off.
Halve Selection: divides the current selection
in half.
Tempo: displays the current loop tempo.
Shift Selection Left: shifts the current
selection to the left so the current start point
becomes the end point.
Editing loops for ACID software
You can use a number of tools to prepare audio for use in ACID software.
Halving or doubling a loop
These commands allow you to quickly change the size of a selection.
Loop
Half loop
Double loop
Halving a loop
From the Special menu, choose ACID Looping Tools, and choose Halve Selection from the submenu.
Tip: You can also click the Halve Selection button
on the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar or press ; (semicolon key).
Doubling a loop
From the Special menu, choose ACID Looping Tools, and choose Double Selection from the submenu.
Tip: You can also click the Double Selection button
on the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar or press ‘ (apostrophe key).
LOOPING | 219
Shifting a selection left or right
The shift selection commands allow you to quickly create a new selection adjacent to the current selection while maintaining the size of
the original.
Creating a new selection to the left of the current selection
From the Special menu, choose ACID Looping Tools, and choose Shift Selection Left from the submenu.
Tip: You can also click the Shift Selection Left button
on the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar or press <.
Creating a new selection to the right of the current selection
From the Special menu, choose ACID Looping Tools, and choose Shift Selection Right from the submenu.
Tip: You can also click the Shift Selection Right button
on the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar or press >.
Rotating audio
You can move the beginning of a loop to the end, or the end of a loop to the beginning by rotating the audio. From the Special menu,
choose ACID Looping Tools, and choose Rotate Audio from the submenu.
Notes:
• You can also click the Rotate Audio button
on the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar or press : (colon).
• If the selected audio does not originate from the start or end of a loop, Rotate Audio has no effect.
• Rotating the audio has different effects, depending on what is selected.
• If no audio is selected, Rotate Audio transfers the first 25% of the loop to the end of the loop.
• If audio is selected from the start of a loop, Rotate Audio transfers the selection to the end of the loop.
• If audio is selected from the end of a loop, Rotate Audio transfers the selection to the start of the loop.
220 | CHAPTER 17
Setting loop tempo
You can calculate, and if necessary edit, the tempo of your loops. Loop tempo is especially important if the loop will be used for building
a project in any ACID product. For more information, see Creating loops for ACID software on page 217.
Calculating loop tempo
1. Select the loop.
2. From the Special menu, choose Edit Tempo. The Edit Tempo dialog is displayed.
3. Specify the number of beats the loop represents in the Selection length in beats box.
4. Click the mouse pointer in the Tempo in beats per minute box. The loop tempo calculates and displays.
Calculating loop tempo using the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar
To calculate loop tempo using the ACID Loop Creation Tools toolbar, select the looped audio in the data window. The tempo pane
indicates the loop tempo based on the current Beat Length value.
Loop tempo displays
in the Tempo pane
Saving loop points
To save loop information with the file, select the Save metadata with file check box in the Save As dialog. For more information, see
Using the Save As/Render As dialog on page 52.
LOOPING | 221
222 | CHAPTER 17
Chapter 18 Working with Video
Sound Forge® software supports opening and saving Microsoft® Audio and Video Interleave (AVI), Windows Media®
Video (WMV), QuickTime® (MOV), and MPEG video files. You can edit a video file’s audio track with single-frame accuracy.
Viewing video
You can view the video portion of a file in the data window’s video strip and in the Video Preview window. You can also
view video on an external monitor.
Using the video strip
Though Sound Forge software does not perform video editing, the video strip display allows you to navigate video files.
Right-click the Edit Tool Selector
to view the video strip
Video
strip
Thumbnail
Small triangle indicates
the location of the frame
on the timeline
By default, the video strip displays when you open a file containing video. If the video strip is not displayed, right-click the
data window’s Edit Tool Selector and choose Video from the shortcut menu. A check mark appears adjacent to the
command and the video strip is displayed. To hide the video strip, choose Video from the shortcut menu again.
Changing video strip height
You can change the video strip height by dragging the thin bar at the bottom of the video strip. To change the default
height for all video files you open, choose Preferences from the Options menu and set a Default video strip height on
the Display tab.
Drag the bar below the video strip
to change the video strip height.
Enabling frame animation
When playing a video file, you can specify whether frames are animated or displayed as still frames. To turn on frame
animation, right-click the video strip and choose Animate from the shortcut menu. A check mark appears adjacent to the
command to indicate this feature is turned on.
Using the cursor to select a frame
When frame animation is turned on, clicking anywhere within the audio portion of the data window displays the
corresponding video frame in the video strip. To move the cursor by single frames, press Alt+ or Alt+ .
WORKING WITH VIDEO | 223
Viewing frame numbers
You can display frame numbers on each frame in your video strip, which can assist you in
positioning your audio. As you zoom in more tightly, each frame in the strip represents one frame in
the video.
1. Open a video file and display the video strip.
Frame
number
2. From the Options menu, choose Video, and then choose Number Frames. A check mark
appears next to this option on the menu when the feature is enabled, and a small box with a
number appears at the bottom of each frame. The small black arrow marks the exact position of the frame.
Tip: You can also right-click the video strip and choose Number Frames from the shortcut menu.
3. Using the data window’s zoom ratio controls, zoom in/out on the waveform several times and observe the numbering of the video
frames.
Tip: Select a frame number format by choosing Preferences from the Options menu and selecting an option from the Frame
numbering on thumbnails drop-down list on the Video tab.
Animating the video strip
During playback of a video file, the video strip can display animated or still frames. This can visually aid in editing and positioning your
audio to match the video. From the Options menu, choose Video, and then choose Animate Video Strip (or right-click the video strip
and choose Animate from the shortcut menu). A check mark appears next to this option on the menu when the feature is enabled.
When the video strip is animated, the video strip always displays the frame that corresponds to the cursor position. Press Alt+ or
to move the cursor one frame.
When frame animation is turned off, the video strip always shows the frame that corresponds to the left edge of each image in the video
strip.
Tip: If you experience slow or stuttering video preview, turn off animated video to reduce the load on your CPU.
Copying the current video frame to the clipboard
You can use the clipboard to copy the video frame at the current cursor position. From the Options menu, choose Video, and then
choose Copy Frame (or right-click the video strip and choose Copy Frame from the shortcut menu). The current frame is copied to the
clipboard.
Previewing files with video
If you are working with a media file that contains video, you can use the Video Preview window for previewing. You must have the Video
Preview window displayed to preview the audio stream. You can hide or display the Video Preview window by choosing Video Preview
from the View menu. To begin previewing the current data window, click the Play All button
Tip: To display the Video Preview window, press Alt+4.
224 | CHAPTER 18
on the transport bar.
Video Preview window
Copies the current frame to the clipboard
Sets up previewing on an external monitor
Frame Rate
Current Display Size
Frame Number
Original Frame Size
Changing the Video Preview settings
The Video Preview window can be configured in a number of ways to make it more useful. The Video Preview window can be used on a
separate monitor (if your video hardware supports this feature), docked at the bottom of the workspace, or floated freely on the screen.
You can quickly access settings for the Video Preview window using the shortcut menu. Right-click the Video Preview window to adjust
the following options:
Option
Description
Copy Frame
Default Background
Black Background
White Background
Integral Stretch
Copies the contents of the frame to Windows Clipboard.
Sets the Video Preview window background color to the system default color.
Sets the Video Preview window background color to black.
Sets the Video Preview window background color to white.
When selected, the Video Preview frame will only be stretched by integral amounts. Turning this setting on usually provides faster
drawing.
Compensates for any spatial distortion due to non-square pixel aspect ratios when viewed on a computer monitor.
Simulate Device
Aspect Ration
External Monitor
Passive Update
Show Toolbar
Show Status Bar
Sends the preview out to an external monitor. This only functions if your hardware supports this feature. If you have not configured your
external monitor settings, clicking this button displays the Video tab of the Preferences dialog, allowing you to choose your external
monitor device. For more information, see Configuring your video settings on page 228.
Important: Pulldown is automatically added when you preview 24p video on an external monitor.
Reduces the overhead needed to update the Video Display window. The Video Display is updated when the processor is idle.
Toggles the display of the toolbar at the top of the window.
Toggles the information display at the bottom of the window.
Resizing the Video Preview
Double-click the title bar of the Video Preview window to automatically resize the window to fit the current video file. Double-click the
title bar again to resize the window to half its previous size. This smaller size window allows for faster video frame previewing.
WORKING WITH VIDEO | 225
Using an external monitor
You have the option of viewing video on an external monitor. To use this feature, you must have an OHCI-compliant IEEE-1394 DV
interface and a device to convert the DV signal to video, such as a DV camcorder, deck, or media converter.
Note: Pulldown is automatically added when you preview 24p video on an external monitor.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences and click the Video tab (or click the External Monitor button
on the Video
Preview window).
2. From the External monitor device drop-down list, select the appropriate device.
3. Click Properties and adjust the following settings as needed:
If
Then
Your source media does not conform to DV standards
Choose a setting from the If project format is invalid for DV output, conform to
the following drop-down list. The video is automatically adjusted to display
properly on your external monitor
You can configure an offset for your hardware. Drag the Sync offset (frames) slider
to synchronize audio and video. This setting affects synchronization for previewing
on an external monitor only; audio and video synchronization in the file is
unaffected.
Your audio is not synchronized with your external
monitor
4. Click Close to close the External Monitor dialog.
5. Click OK to close the Preferences dialog.
Attaching video to an audio file
Once you have edited an audio file to your satisfaction, you can attach it to a video file and save it as a video file.
1. Open the audio file you want to use. For more information, see Getting media files on page 44.
2. From the File menu, choose Properties. The Properties dialog is displayed.
3. Click the Video tab.
4. On the Video page, click the Attach button. The Open dialog is displayed.
5. Locate and select a video file you want to attach, and click the Open button. The Open dialog closes and you return to the Video
page.
6. Click Apply to attach the video file.
7. To change the field order setting for the video file, choose an option from the Field order drop-down list. The options are
explained below:
Option
Use
None (Progressive)
Lower Field First
Upper Field First
For video to be viewed on a computer monitor.
For DV output
For output that is jittery or shaky, or if specified by your hardware manual.
8. To change the video’s pixel aspect ratio, choose an option from the Pixel aspect ratio drop-down list. The pixel aspect ratio should
be based on the destination and use of the final media file.
226 | CHAPTER 18
9. Click OK to close the Properties dialog.
Note: The file must be saved in a video file format to permanently attach the video. For more information, see Saving a video file on page
228.
Detaching video from an audio file
You can detach the video stream from a media file.
1. Open the media file you want to use. For more information, see Getting media files on page 44.
2. From the File menu, choose Properties. The Properties dialog is displayed.
3. Click the Video tab.
4. On the Video page, click the Detach button.
5. Click OK. The video stream is removed, and the video strip is hidden.
Setting video options
Video file properties
The video properties for a file affect how video is displayed and rendered when you save the file. In most situations, you can leave these
settings at their default values. However, you can adjust the video properties of a file as needed.
1. From the File menu, choose Properties.
2. Click the Video tab.
3. Choose a setting from the Field order drop-down list. This setting affects how the video is displayed and rendered when you save
the file.
•
•
•
None (progressive scan) treats video as non-interlaced.
Upper field first treats video as interlaced and reads the interlaced video as upper field first.
Lower field first treats video as interlaced and reads the interlaced video as lower field first.
Note: The Field order setting remains in effect only as long as the file is open; the setting is not retained when you save or close the file.
4. Choose a setting from the Pixel aspect ratio drop-down list to determine the ratio used to display and render the video. In most
cases, this value is auto-detected for you.
5. Click OK.
WORKING WITH VIDEO | 227
Configuring your video settings
You can use the Video tab on the Preferences dialog to choose your video settings. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and
then click the Video tab.
The items on this tab are explained below.
Items
Description
Resample source video when
rendering to a higher frame rate
Deinterlace method
Select this check box if you want to interpolate video frames when you render to a frame rate that is greater than the
source file's frame rate.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to determine how the two fields that make up a video frame are separated when
you render to a progressive format:
Allow pulldown removal when
opening 24p DV
Frame numbering on thumbnails
External monitor device
• Blend Fields: Maintains the data in the two fields by blending them together. This method can produce a smooth,
motion-blurred image.
• Interpolate: Deletes one field and uses the remaining field to interpolate the deleted lines. This produces sharper
images than Blend Fields but can introduce jagged motion or stair-stepping artifacts.
If you want to automatically remove pulldown fields when opening 24 fps progressive-scan DV video files, select this check
box. To open your 24p DV video files as 29.97 fps interlaced video (60i), clear this check box.
This drop-down list determines how the frame information is displayed on the video strip when you have frame number
display enabled. To display frame numbers, choose the Frame number option. To display timecode, choose the Media
timecode option.
Allows you to identify an external video device with which Sound Forge software can communicate. This video device is
used to display previews on an external monitor.
Important: Pulldown is automatically added when you preview 24p video on an external monitor.
Saving a video file
1. From the File menu, choose Save As. The Save As dialog is displayed.
2. From the Save as type drop-down list, choose a video file format.
3. Name the file in the File name box.
4. Select or clear the following check boxes as needed:
•
•
Stretch video to fill output frame (do not letterbox): Selecting this check box stretches the source video frame if the
destination frame size differs. When this check box is cleared, letterboxing or pillarboxing is used to keep the frame aspect
correct.
Fast video resizing: Selecting this check box speeds the process of saving video. When this check box is cleared, the time
required to save the file can increase dramatically. Clear this check box only when you have critical material where nothing but
the highest quality video rendering will do.
5. From the Template drop-down list, select a template for rendering and compressing the file.
You can click Custom to customize the settings in the Custom Settings dialog. For help on the different settings, click the Help
or press Shift+F1. Click OK to close the Custom Settings dialog and return to the Save As dialog.
button
Tip: You can save the custom settings to use again by entering a template name in the Template box and clicking the Save Template
button
.
6. Click Save.
228 | CHAPTER 18
Chapter 19 Using Spectrum Analysis
This chapter introduces you to the concept of frequency and describes the Sound Forge® Spectrum Analysis. Spectrum
Analysis allows you to examine audio frequencies and overtones using either spectrum graphs or sonograms.
Working in the frequency domain
Unlike the waveform display, which represents audio in the time domain (amplitude vs. time), Spectrum Analysis allows
you to examine sound by representing the sound in the frequency domain (amplitude vs. frequency).
Consider the following graphic, which depicts the same audio event as a waveform and as a spectrum graph.
Waveform display
Spectrum graph
Data displayed in the frequency domain (whether in the form of a spectrum graph or sonogram) shows the amplitudes
and frequencies of sine waves that, if mixed together, would sound much like the original sound. Since it’s relatively easy
to remember how a sine wave sounds at different frequencies, it’s possible to visualize how simple waveforms sound by
looking at the spectrum of the sound.
Learning to “read” the frequency components of a sound in conjunction with their corresponding amplitudes makes it
possible to determine the fundamental frequency of a sound, as well as its overtones. Similarly, you can identify
unwanted noise, thereby allowing filtering to be applied where needed.
Fast Fourier Transform
A Fourier transform is computationally intensive, and for this reason it is common to use a technique called a Fast Fourier
Transform (FFT) to perform spectral analysis. The FFT utilizes mathematical shortcuts to reduce the processing time at the
expense of putting limitations on the analysis size.
The analysis size, also referred to as the FFT size, indicates the number of samples from the audio signal used in analysis
and also determines the number of discrete frequency bands. When a large number of frequency bands are used, the
bands have a smaller bandwidth and this provides for more accurate frequency readings.
However, since complex sounds have a rapidly changing spectrum, a large analysis size can blur the time-changing
frequencies of a sound. For example, when performing FFT analysis of an audio file sampled at 44,100 Hz using an
analysis size of 4096, almost 100 milliseconds (44,100/4096) of sound are analyzed. If the sound is not constant for those
100 milliseconds, it is impossible to focus on the instantaneous spectrum at smaller time intervals. This is the trade-off
between time resolution and frequency resolution encountered when analyzing audio signals.
Spectrum Analysis allows you to perform precise FFT analysis and displays the resulting data in a spectrum graph or a
sonogram display. The spectrum graph allows real-time monitoring of playback or input, while the sonogram displays a
playback cursor for real-time preview. Both formats make it easy to navigate data and read audio frequency and position.
USING SPECTRUM ANALYSIS | 229
Using a spectrum graph
In the spectrum graph, the horizontal axis represents frequency in Hertz (Hz), while the vertical axis represents amplitude in decibels
(dB).
Displaying a spectrum graph
1. Open an audio file.
2. Select the portion of the waveform you want to analyze. The sound or note you want to analyze should be in the center of the
highlighted area.
Note: Analyzing long sections of audio can take a long time and decreases the time resolution, so your selection should be relatively
short. Also, if the audio has a low amplitude level, you can boost it by using the Volume or Normalize functions. For more information, see
Volume on page 156 and Normalize on page 151.
3. From the View menu, choose Spectrum Analysis. The Spectrum Analysis window is displayed.
4. Use the toolbar at the top of the window to set your display options.
Tip: You can also click the Settings button (
) in the Spectrum Analysis window to set additional options.
The spectrum graph displays the amplitude (in dB) of each frequency component from 0 Hz (DC) to the Nyquist frequency.
Frequency is displayed along the X (horizontal) axis, and the amplitude is displayed along the Y (vertical) axis.
Tip: You can continue to make selections in the sound file with the Spectrum Analysis window open (just move the cursor or make
selections as you normally would). Click the Refresh button ( ) in the Spectrum Analysis toolbar to update the display. If no selection is
made, analysis is performed on the samples immediately following the cursor position.
230 | CHAPTER 19
Monitoring an input and output source
Click the Real Time Monitoring button
to turn real-time spectrum analysis on or off. Click the down arrow next to the button and
choose a command from the menu to specify whether you want to monitor your sound card’s input or output:
• When you choose Monitor Input, Sound Forge will monitor the recording devices selected on the Record page of the Audio tab in
the Preferences dialog. For more information, see Audio tab on page 248.
• When you choose Monitor Output, Sound Forge will monitor the playback devices selected on the Playback page of Audio tab in the
Preferences dialog. For more information, see Audio tab on page 248.
Notes:
• When Monitor: Output is selected, the post-processing signal is monitored when you start playback from the Plug-In Chainer.
• Real-time spectrum analysis can require significant processing power. If the spectrum graph’s refresh rate seems sluggish, set the display
mode to Line Graph, decrease the FFT size, or turn off snapshots.
Viewing frequency and amplitude values, notes and statistics
As you move the cursor through the spectrum graph, the amplitude and frequency values at the current position are displayed in a
ToolTip next to the cursor and in the Statistics area at the bottom of the window:
Use the cursor to
display amplitude and
frequency values
Statistics area
Right-click the graph and choose Show Position from the shortcut menu to toggle the display of ToolTips. The setting for each graph in
a multichannel file is independent.
If you want to display the nearest musical note equivalent of the cursor position in a ToolTip, right-click the graph and choose Show
Notes from the shortcut menu:
Use the cursor to display
musical note equivalent
Right-click the Spectrum Analysis window and choose Show Statistics from the shortcut menu to toggle the display of the Statistics
area at the bottom of the Spectrum Analysis window.
USING SPECTRUM ANALYSIS | 231
Navigating a spectrum graph
After a spectrum graph displays, Grab/Pan mode allows you to scroll vertically and horizontally. To enable Grab/Pan mode, right-click
the Spectrum Analysis dialog and choose Grab/Pan from the shortcut menu. A check mark appears next to this option when Grab/Pan
mode is enabled. The cursor displays as a hand
, and you can drag horizontally or vertically to scroll through the graph.
When you are zoomed into a selection of the spectrum graph, you can drag the horizontal and vertical sliders to scroll through the
graph. The thumbnail image in the lower-left corner of the Spectrum Analysis window will show you which part of the graph is being
displayed.
To turn off Grab/Pan mode, choose Grab/Pan from the shortcut menu again.
Changing the graph type
Click the down arrow next to the Normal Display button
and choose Line Graph, Filled Graph, or Bar Graph from the menu to
change the type of graph displayed in the Spectrum Analysis window. A check mark is displayed next to the selected graph type.
Note: Some video drivers have problems displaying Filled Graph and Bar Graph modes. If you encounter problems such as incorrect
shading or very slow drawing, use the Line Graph option or change video drivers.
If you’re analyzing a multichannel file, you can click the down arrow next to the Normal Display button and choose Single Graph to see
all channels in a single graph.
Right-click the graph and choose Logarithmic from the shortcut menu to toggle the x-axis between logarithmic and linear mode. In
logarithmic mode, more of the graph is devoted to lower frequencies.
Changing the zoom level of the graph
Zooming can be accomplished in several ways:
1. Drag on the graph to draw a box around the area you want to magnify. You can toggle through mouse selection mode by rightclicking while holding the left mouse button:
•
•
•
The first type is a vertical zoom window. This will allow you to zoom to a frequency range.
The second type is horizontal zoom window. This will allow you to zoom to an amplitude range.
The third type is a combination of vertical and horizontal zoom. This will allow you to zoom to a frequency and amplitude
range.
2. Right-click the graph and choose Zoom Out Full to view the entire amplitude and frequency range.
3. Right-click the graph and choose Normalize dB to set the Spectrum Graph amplitude range equal to the maximum and minimum
values in the graph.
Synchronizing graphs in a multichannel file
When viewing a spectrum graph for a multichannel file, an individual graph displays for each channel. Click the Sync button
synchronize the displays so you can view the same region of the FFT in all channels.
to
Updating a spectrum graph
Select the Auto Refresh button
selection in the data window.
if you want the Spectrum Analysis display to refresh automatically updated when you change your
When the button is not selected, the display is not updated until you click the Refresh button
.
If you want the graph to refresh automatically during playback or input monitoring, select the Real Time Monitoring button
232 | CHAPTER 19
.
Viewing multiple spectrum graphs
Once you create a selection in the data window, you can display up to 64 individual spectrum graphs (each representing a specific point
in time).
1. Open an audio file.
2. From the View menu, choose Spectrum Analysis. The Spectrum Analysis window is displayed.
3. Click the Settings button
. The Spectrum Settings dialog is displayed. For more information, see Adjusting Spectrum Analysis
settings on page 237.
4. Type a number in the Slices displayed box. The Forward and Backward radio buttons activate.
5. Select either the Forward or Backward radio button.
•
•
Selecting the Forward radio button displays the first slice of the selection in the foreground of the spectrum graph.
Selecting the Backward radio button displays the last slice of the selection in the foreground of the spectrum graph.
6. Click OK.
7. Use the Slice slider to add/remove slice graphs in the Spectrum Analysis dialog.
Use the Slice slider
to add or remove
slice graphs
Creating and comparing snapshots of the Spectrum Analysis window
You can store up to four snapshots to compare multiple spectrum graphs. You can take snapshots from a single data window or from
different data windows.
Note: Snapshots are not available in sonogram display or when the Slices displayed setting in the Spectrum Settings dialog is greater
than 1.
Taking a snapshot
1. Navigate to the portion of the graph you want to capture.
2. Click the Set button, and then click a snapshot button
in the Spectrum Analysis toolbar.
Available snapshots buttons are displayed in black, and buttons that are in use are displayed in blue and underlined.
Showing and hiding snapshots
1. Select a numbered button in the Spectrum Analysis toolbar to display a stored snapshot. All selected snapshots will be displayed in
the Spectrum Analysis window at the same time.
2. Click a selected snapshot button to exclude it from the display.
3. Select the Hide active plot button
to hide the current spectrum so you can concentrate on your snapshots.
USING SPECTRUM ANALYSIS | 233
Erasing snapshots
You don't need to erase individual snapshots to update or replace them. Simply click the Set button
button
, and then click a snapshot
in the Spectrum Analysis toolbar to update its image.
If you want to erase all snapshots, click the Clear all snapshots button
.
Viewing snapshot statistics
Information about each snapshot is displayed at the bottom of the Spectrum Analysis window:
Printing the graph
Click the Print button
to print the contents of the Spectrum Analysis window, including the graph and statistics data.
Using a sonogram
The sonogram is another way of displaying spectral data variations over time. In a sonogram, the X (horizontal) axis represents time, and
the Y (vertical) axis represents frequency.
Sonogram
The amplitude of each frequency component in the sonogram is represented by the color intensity of each point in the graph. This
method of displaying spectral information is useful for identifying distinctive spectral patterns created from sounds such as speech,
musical instruments, and ambient noise.
Displaying a sonogram
1. Open an audio file and select the portion of the waveform you want to analyze. The sound or note you want to analyze should be
in the center of the highlighted area.
Note: Analyzing long sections of audio can take a long time and decreases the time resolution, so your selection should be relatively
short. Also, if the audio has a low amplitude level, you can boost it by using the Volume or Normalize functions. For more information, see
Volume on page 156 and Normalize on page 151.
2. From the View menu, choose Spectrum Analysis. The Spectrum Analysis dialog is displayed.
3. Click the Sonogram button
234 | CHAPTER 19
to display your data as a sonogram.
4. Use the toolbar at the top of the window to set your other display options.
Tip: You can also click the Settings button
in the Spectrum Analysis window to set additional options.
If there is no selection in the waveform display window, the sonogram analyzes the sound data from the current cursor position to the
end of the file.
Displaying frequency and amplitude values, notes and statistics
As you move the cursor through the sonogram, the amplitude and frequency values at the current position are displayed in a ToolTip
next to the cursor and in the Statistics area at the bottom of the window:
Use the cursor to display
amplitude and frequency
values
Statistics area
Right-click the sonogram and choose Show Position from the shortcut menu to toggle the display of ToolTips. The setting for each
sonogram in a multichannel file is independent.
If you want to display the nearest musical note equivalent of the cursor position in a ToolTip, right-click the sonogram and choose Show
Notes from the shortcut menu:
Use the cursor to display
musical note equivalent
Right-click the Spectrum Analysis window and choose Show Statistics from the shortcut menu to toggle the display of the Statistics
area at the bottom of the Spectrum Analysis window.
Updating a sonogram
A sonogram updates in the same method as a spectrum graph. For more information, see Updating a spectrum graph on page 232.
USING SPECTRUM ANALYSIS | 235
Monitoring an input and output source
Click the Real Time Monitoring button
to turn real-time spectrum analysis on or off. Click the down arrow next to the button and
choose a command from the menu to specify whether you want to monitor your sound card’s input:
• When you choose Monitor Input, Sound Forge will monitor the recording devices selected on the Record page of the Audio tab in
the Preferences dialog.
• When you choose Monitor Output, a cursor is displayed in the sonogram to indicate the play position (real-time output monitoring is
not available in sonogram display mode).
Tuning a sonogram
It is frequently necessary to experiment with the control parameters in the Spectrum Settings dialog to produce the best possible
sonogram. For more information, see Adjusting Spectrum Analysis settings on page 237.
Improving the graph’s contrast
To improve the contrast of the sonogram, decrease the frequency and amplitude ranges as much as possible.
Smoothing the graph’s display
If the graph appears too pixelated, raise the Set sonogram resolution value to 200.
Improving the frequency resolution
For greater frequency resolution, choose a higher value from the FFT size drop-down list.
Reducing the processing time
To reduce processing time, decrease the Set sonogram resolution value and/or choose a lower value from the FFT size drop-down list.
Adjusting color intensity
Adjust the sonogram’s color intensity using the Color slider located directly beneath the
sonogram. Notice that the bottom pane of the dialog depicts the color scale in dB.
Adjust the color
intensity
Tip: This function may be fairly slow if you do not have a palletized driver or if Video for
Windows is not installed.
Synchronizing sonograms in a multichannel file
When viewing a sonogram for a multichannel file, an individual graph displays for each channel. Click the Sync button
synchronize the displays so you can view the same region of the FFT in all channels.
to
Returning to a spectrum graph
To return to the spectrum graph, click the Normal Display button
in the toolbar.
Printing the sonogram
Click the Print button
236 | CHAPTER 19
to print the contents of the Spectrum Analysis window, including the sonogram and statistics data.
Adjusting Spectrum Analysis settings
From the Spectrum Analysis toolbar, click the Settings button
the role of each control in audio spectrum analysis.
to display the Spectrum Settings dialog. The following table explains
Item
Description
FFT size
Choose a value from the FFT size drop-down list to set the size in samples of the analysis window and number of
discrete frequencies analyzed. Higher numbers produce increased frequency resolution at the expense of lower time
resolution and longer computational time.
The value in the FFT overlap box specifies the percentage of overlap between FFT analysis windows. Overlapping
allows for more accurate analysis. Lower settings decrease the number of distinct analysis functions performed,
which decreases processing time. High settings allow for more analysis, but can result in slow processing.
Choose a setting from the Smoothing window drop-down list to determine the window function applied to the
input data before analysis. The window function affects the sharpness of peaks in an FFT graph and the leakage into
neighboring frequencies.
FFT overlap
Smoothing window
• Choose Rectangle to apply no window. This results in a very sharp peak, but high leakage.
• Choose Triangular (also called a Bartlett or Parzen window) to apply a window that results in less leakage than the
rectangle window.
• Hamming, Hanning, and Blackman windows are commonly used in audio applications.
Slices displayed
Set sonogram
resolution
• Choose Blackman-Harris to obtain the least sideband leakage of the six options. The major drawback of
Blackman-Harris is rounded graph peaks.
The Slices displayed value determines the number of FFT slices displayed. When displaying multiple slices in the
spectrum graph, slices are displayed chronologically forward or backward based on whether you have the Forward
or Backward radio button selected.
The Set sonogram resolution value determines the number of FFT samplings used in a sonogram. This keeps the
processing time and graph resolution constant. Increasing this value increases the horizontal graph resolution, but
requires more processing time.
When this check box is cleared, the number of samplings is determined by the length of the selection and the FFT
overlap setting.
Note: Increasing the samplings increases the horizontal graph resolution but requires more processing time.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to specify which graph you want to edit.
If you are analyzing a multichannel file, select the Sync graphs check box to synchronize the displays so you can view
the same region of the FFT in all channels.
Logarithmic graphing Select the Logarithmic graphing check box to display the X-axis in logarithmic mode rather than linear mode. In
logarithmic mode, more of the graph is devoted to lower frequencies.
Channel
Sync graphs
Freq. Min. (Frequency
minimum)
Max. (Frequency
maximum)
Ceiling
Floor
Hold peaks during
monitoring
Maintain last
monitored view
Note: Logarithmic graphing affects the display only when Normal Display is selected.
Determines the lowest frequency displayed in the graphs.
Determines the highest frequency displayed in the graphs.
Determines the highest amplitude displayed in the graphs.
Determines the lowest amplitude displayed in the graphs.
Select this check box to indicate the highest value of each frequency on the spectrum graph with a small horizontal
line. The length of time (in seconds) that the peak is held is determined by the value entered in the edit box.
Select this check box if you want to maintain the state of the Spectrum Graph when you stop playback. Clearing this
check box results in the graph resetting to the cursor position when playback stops.
USING SPECTRUM ANALYSIS | 237
Saving spectrum graph settings
After you configure the controls in the Spectrum Settings dialog, you can save the settings as a custom preset by clicking Save As and
entering a name for the new preset. Click OK to save the new preset.
238 | CHAPTER 19
Chapter 20 Customizing Sound Forge
You can customize Sound Forge® software to suit your project needs and working references. Many of the settings
depend on your equipment or studio set-up. Sound Forge software can be set to work with the components that you use
in your studio.
Setting preferences
Preferences affect how Sound Forge software functions. Any changes that you make to the preferences remain set until
you change them again or reset Sound Forge software to use the default presets.
You can access the Preferences dialog by choosing Preferences from the Options menu. This dialog contains tabbed
pages. The following sections explain the settings on each tab.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 239
General tab
The General tab allows you to set miscellaneous Sound Forge options.
Option
Description
Show logo splash-screen on startup
Open default Workspace on startup
Default to slow scroll when drag
selecting
When this check box is selected, the Sound Forge splash screen will be displayed briefly upon startup.
If this check box is selected, files that were open when you last exited the program will be opened automatically.
In some very fast computers, automatic scrolling while selecting is too fast to use accurately. When this option is
turned on, drag-selecting will cause a slow scroll.
Warn when Paste or Mix formats do not
match
Confirm on close
Compatible draw mode (for broken
video drivers)
Compatible scroll mode (for other
broken video drivers)
Show a textured background on the
Workspace
Ignore fact chunk when opening
compressed WAV files
Tip: Click the right mouse button while selecting to toggle slow scrolling.
Select this check box if you want to be warned before mixing data that has different sample rates.
Mixing data of different sample rates may produce unintended results.
Select this check box if you want the application to present a confirmation message box before exiting.
Because the application's drawing routines are highly optimized, they increase the chance of causing little-known
video card problems to arise. Some video cards have bugs in their drivers that can make your system lock up when the
application tries to draw a waveform.
Compatible draw mode uses a different method of drawing the waveform that, although not as smooth, puts less
stress on the video card. With some video cards, this mode actually increases the draw speed. However, more flashing
can occur.
When this check box is selected, a less optimized method of scrolling the data window will be used. In some instances,
this can reduce interference problems between your audio and video card when Smooth Scrolling playback is
selected.
When this check box is selected, a stucco texture will be used for the application background.
When this check box is selected, the software will ignore fact chunks in compressed WAV files.
Compressed WAV files use fact chunks to specify how many actual samples are represented in the file. If a compressed
file is improperly authored, this may cause some of the compressed data to not be loaded. If you suspect that not all
sound data is being loaded from a compressed file, try checking this option and reopening the file.
Show free storage space on Status Bar
Show shuttle controls on Data Window
transport
Auto-power MIDI keyboard window
Use Net Notify to stay informed about
Sony products
Allow floating windows to dock
Spacebar and F12 Play/Pause instead of
Play/Stop
Warn when metadata cannot be saved in
the file
Tip: If you change the setting of this check box, please delete any proxy (.sfap0) files associated with compressed WAV
files.
When this check box is selected, the total amount of free disk space available on your specified temporary drive is
displayed on the status bar.
Use the Temporary files and record folder box at the bottom of the General tab to set the folder that will be used
for temporary files and recorded data.
When this check box is selected, Rewind and Forward buttons will appear on each data window's transport
controls.
Select this check box if you want to open the MIDI device assigned to the MIDI keyboard (if it is not already open) when
you click a key on the MIDI keyboard. You may want to turn off this option if you are using the same MIDI output device
for MIDI synchronization or for your sequencer.
If this option is turned off, you need to click the On button on the keyboard prior to using it to send notes.
When this check box is selected, information from Sony will be displayed periodically at startup. Clear the check box to
bypass the Net Notify dialog.
When this check box is selected, windows will automatically be docked when you drag them to the edges of the Sound
Forge workspace. You can hold the Ctrl key while dragging a window to prevent it from docking.
When this check box is cleared, windows will not dock unless you hold the Ctrl key.
Select this check box if you want the F12 and spacebar keyboard shortcuts to toggle between Play and Pause mode. In
this mode, the cursor will maintain its position.
Select this check box if you want to be prompted to save metadata to a separate file if it cannot be saved within the
media file.
When the check box is cleared, metadata will automatically be saved to a separate file if necessary.
Show the position of the playback cursor When this check box is selected, the Position field in the status bar will show the cursor position during playback.
Turn off this option if you have a very slow computer or video card.
Show the record counter while recording Select this check box if you want the record time displayed in the Record dialog. Clear the check box if you have a very
slow computer or video card.
Automatically reopen file after Save As Select this check box if you want to automatically reopen files when you save to a different format. Changes in bit
depth, channels, or compression format will result in reopening and will allow you to listen to any changes in sound
quality.
Clear the check box and select the Prompt to open new file after Save As check box if you want to be prompted
to open the saved file in a new data window.
Prompt to open new file after Save As
When both check boxes are cleared, Sound Forge software does nothing after saving to a different format. If you’re
saving a file to several compressed formats, clearing these check boxes prevents you from having to reopen the file
after saving each format.
When the Automatically reopen files after Save As check box is cleared, select this check box if you want the
application to prompt you to open the destination file to a new data window after saving a sound file to a different
format.
Opening the file in a new data window will allow you to hear any changes in quality between the original file and the
result of the Save As operation.
240 | CHAPTER 20
Option
Description
Keep media files locked
Select this check box if you want to lock media files after you've opened them.
Delete temporary files on close
Hide new temporary files
Always proxy compressed formats
Clear the check box if you want to unlock media files when you switch to another application.
Select this check box if you want to delete the peak (.sfk) and proxy (.sfap0) files associated with a media file when you
close a data window.
Select this check box if you want to turn on the Hidden file attribute when creating new peak (.sfk) and proxy (.sfap0)
files.
In the Windows Control Panel, double-click Folder Options and select the View tab. Select the Show hidden files
and folders radio button if you want to be able to see hidden files.
Select this check box if you want to create an uncompressed proxy (.sfap0) file when you open a compressed file
format.
Selecting this check box can improve performance on slower computers or for formats that cannot be decompressed
quickly for real-time playback.
Remember last-used sample rate for .vox Select this check box if you want the software to remember the last-used sample rate when you open a .vox file. When
and .ivc files
the check box is cleared, you will be prompted to choose a sample rate each time you open a .vox file.
Remember last-used settings for .raw
Select this check box if you want the software to remember the last-used settings when you open .raw files. When the
files
check box is cleared, you will be prompted to choose a settings each time you open a .raw file.
Allow Undo past Save
When this check box is selected, your undo history is maintained until you close the data window (or exit the
application) so you can undo edit operations even if you’ve saved your file.
When this check box is selected, quick file saving may not be available.
Use floating point temporary files
Use SPTI for CD burning
Enable Windows XP Theme support
Tip: If you want to be able to undo edit operations even after closing and reopening your file, save a Sound Forge
project.
Select this check box if you want to use higher precision IEEE floating-point temporary files for audio files. This setting
results in more accurate processing but requires more disk space and yields slower processing.
When the check box is cleared, the bit depth of the temporary file will match the source file.
Select this check box if you want to use SPTI (SCSI Pass-Through Interface) to communicate with your CD burning
drive.
When this check box is selected, the Sound Forge window will inherit the appearance of the current theme when using
Windows XP. When the check box is cleared, user interface elements will maintain the classic Windows operating
system appearance.
Automatically detect plug-and-play CD/ Select this check box if you want the software to check the capacity of the media when you insert a CD.
DVD drives
Selecting the check box can prevent a hang that can occur with some external drives.
When the check box is cleared, the software will not scan the media each time you insert a disc.
Allow Ctrl+drag style cursor scrub in data When this check box is selected, you can hold Ctrl while dragging the cursor to scrub in data windows.
windows
Automatically name regions and markers When regions and markers are added, this option automatically prompts you for a name. This does not
if not playing
happen when adding markers on-the-fly during playback.
Always open dropped files in new
When this check box is selected, files that are dropped onto the Sound Forge workspace are
window
automatically opened in a new data window.
Recently used file list
Temporary files and record folder
Select the check box if you want to display a list of recently used files on the File menu. Use the edit box to specify the
number of files you want to display.
Specify a folder for storing temporary files and recorded audio, or click the Browse button to specify a new folder.
Using temporary file space allows you to edit very large files and keeps Sound Forge from using large portions of RAM
on your computer. Your temporary directory must have enough space to accommodate the total size of all files you
plan to edit along with space for any clipboard data and undo buffers.
If you change the temporary storage folder, you will have to restart Sound Forge for the change to take effect.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 241
Display tab
The Display tab allows you to specify options for adjusting the appearance of the Sound Forge window.
Description
Option
Default sound file window height
Drag the slider to specify the default data window height for a sound file. This magnification level is used when you
load a sound file or create a new window.
Drag the slider to specify the default height of the video strip when you open a video file.
Choose a ratio from the drop-down list to specify the zoom ratio above which the application will use a peak file
instead of the original file to draw the waveform.
Default video strip height
Peak ratio default for new sound files
If you notice problems with waveform scrolling, try decreasing this setting so it is less than your current zoom ratio.
Normal zoom ratio
To calculate the size of the resulting peak files, divide the size of the file by the peak ratio. For example, a 100 MB sound
file will need a 0.39 MB (100/256) peak file when using 1:256.
Choose a zoom ratio from the drop-down list to specify the default horizontal magnification. This magnification level is
used when you load a sound file, create a new window, or use the Zoom Normal command.
Custom zoom ratio 1
High values show more data, and small values show more detail.
Choose a zoom ratio from the drop-down list to specify a custom level of horizontal magnification.
Custom zoom ratio 2
This zoom ratio will be used when you perform any of the following actions:
•
•
•
Color preference for
Click the Custom Zoom 1 or Custom Zoom 2 button on the Navigation toolbar.
From the View menu, choose Zoom Time, and then choose a Custom Zoom command from the submenu.
Right-click in a data window, choose Zoom from the shortcut menu, and then choose a Custom Zoom
command from the submenu.
The color preferences section allows you set a custom color for a variety of graphics within the Sound Forge interface.
1. Choose a screen element from the Color preference for drop-down list.
2. Set the color of the selected item:
• Drag the Hue slider to change the color of the selected item.
• Drag the Saturation and Brightness sliders to adjust the intensity of the selected color.
Note: When adjusting the display color for channel waveforms, the Saturation and Brightness sliders are not
available. To adjust saturation and brightness for all channels, choose Wave: All Channels from the Color
preference for drop-down list and then adjust the controls.
•Click the Default button to restore a custom color the default setting.
Icon color saturation
Icon color tint
3. Click the OK button.
Drag the slider to adjust the color intensity of icons in the Sound Forge window. Drag to the left to decrease the color
saturation, or drag to the right to increase it.
Drag the slider to adjust the amount of tinting that is applied to the icons in the Sound Forge window. Drag the slider
to the right to add an average of the title bar colors to the icons. Drag to the left to decrease the amount of tinting
applied.
Tip: You can use the Display Properties control panel to change your active window title bar colors.
• In Windows 2000, open the Display Properties control panel and select the Appearance tab. Then choose Active
Title Bar from the Item drop-down list.
• In Windows XP, open the Display Properties control panel and select the Appearance tab. Then click the
Advanced button and choose Active Title Bar from the Item drop-down list.
242 | CHAPTER 20
Editing tab
The Editing tab allows you to specify preferences for editing and undo operations.
Option
Description
Disable triple-clicking to select all sound Select this check box if you don’t want to select all data when you triple-click in a data window. You might want to
file data
select this option if triple-clicks are falsely detected when you make a selection and then try to perform a drag
operation. Otherwise, decrease Windows’ double-click threshold time.
Disable auto-snapping below 1:4 zoom
ratios
Force loop bar to match selection
Drag & drop auto rise delay
Snap to zero-crossing slope
When this check box is cleared, you can triple-click anywhere in a data window to select all data.
Select this check box if you do not want selections to snap to time or zero-crossings when the data window zoom ratio
is less than 1:4.
This is useful if you commonly zoom in fully to adjust selection points manually yet still want to use automatic
snapping when zoomed out.
Select this check box if you want the loop region to always match the current time selection. Clicking to position the
cursor in a data window will clear the loop region. When no loop region exists and looped playback is enabled, the
entire data window will play looped. When the check box is selected, the behavior is similar to Sound Forge 8.0.
Clear the check box if you want to be able to position the cursor without clearing the loop region.
Drag this slider to specify the time before a window underneath the cursor becomes active during drag-and-drop
operations.
Use this drop-down list to specify how zero-crossings are detected when you choose Snap to Zero:
• Negative Slope - Zero-crossings are detected only on a negative slope.
• Any Crossing - Zero-crossings are detected on both positive and negative slopes.
• Positive Slope - Zero-crossings are detected only on a positive slope.
Zero-cross scan time
Zero-cross level threshold
Pencil tool maximum zoom ratio
JKL / shuttle speed
Tip: It is usually best to use either Positive Slope or Negative Slope so that noticeable pops and clicks are not
generated by cutting data.
Specify the maximum time (in samples) that will be used to search for the next zero-crossing.
Specify the sample value below which data will be considered a zero-crossing.
Note: Setting this value above zero can compensate for DC offset. However, if possible, you should remove DC offset
first.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to specify the maximum zoom ratio at which the Pencil tool will be available.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to set the speed that will be used for scrubbing the timeline with the JKL keys
or with a multimedia controller.
Labels tab
The Labels tab allows you modify the default names that are assigned to data windows, regions, and markers.
Edit default data window names
The Window labels section of the Labels tab allows you to modify the names that are assigned to new data windows when you create a
new data window or choose Create a new window for each take from the Mode drop-down list in the Record dialog.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the Labels tab.
2. Select the New window prefix check box and type a prefix in the box if you want to display a name in the new window's title bar.
Clear the check box if you do not want to include a prefix (if you want to number windows only, for example).
3. Select the Use counter and start at check box and type a number in the box if you want to number new data windows.
4. Select the Insert leading zeros in field width of check box and specify a field width if you want to use leading zeros in window
names. For example, if you specify a field width of 3, windows numbered 1 to 99 would be numbered 001 to 099.
5. Click the OK button.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 243
Editing default region names
The Region Labels section of the Labels tab allows you to modify the names that are assigned to regions when you insert regions or
choose Multiple takes creating regions from the Mode drop-down list in the Record dialog.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the Labels tab.
2. Select the Label Regions check box to display text labels for regions in the data window when you insert regions or choose
Multiple takes creating regions from the Mode drop-down list in the Record dialog.
3. Adjust additional settings as necessary:
Item
Description
Prefix
Type a prefix in the box if you want to assign a name to new regions. Clear the check box if you do not want to include
a prefix (if you want to number regions only, for example).
Use counter and start at
Select this check box and type a number in the box if you want to number new regions.
Insert leading zeros in field width of Select this check box and specify a field width if you want to use leading zeros in region names. For example, if you
specify a field width of 3, regions numbered 1 to 99 would be numbered 001 to 099.
4. Click the OK button.
Editing default marker names
The Marker labels section of the Labels tab allows you to modify the names that are assigned to markers when you insert markers
during playback or recording.
1. From the Options menu, choose Preferences, and click the Labels tab.
2. Select the Label Markers check box to to display text labels for markers in the data window when you insert markers.
3. Adjust additional settings as necessary:
Item
Description
New marker prefix
Type a prefix in the box if you want to assign a name to new markers. Clear the check box if you do not want to
include a prefix (if you want to number markers only, for example).
Use counter and start at
Select this check box and type a number in the box if you want to number new markers.
Insert leading zeros in field width of Select this check box and specify a field width if you want to use leading zeros in marker names. For example, if you
specify a field width of 3, markers numbered 1 to 99 would be numbered 001 to 099.
4. Click the OK button.
File Types tab
The File Types tab allows you to indicate which types of files you want to associate with Sound Forge software. When file is associated
with Sound Forge software, you can double-click a sound file in the Windows Explorer and it will open for editing.
1. Select a file type from the list. The File association details box near the bottom of the tab displays information about the selected
file type, as well as the current association.
2. Select the check box for each sound file format you want to associate with Sound Forge software, or clear the check box to remove
a file association.
3. Click the OK button.
244 | CHAPTER 20
MIDI/Sync tab
The MIDI/Sync tab allows you to specify preferences for MIDI and synchronization.
Item
Description
Output
Choose a MIDI device from the drop-down list to specify the MIDI output device for synchronization when Generate
MIDI Timecode is enabled.
Input
Choose a MIDI device from the drop-down list to specify the MIDI input device for synchronization and triggering
when Trigger from MIDI Timecode is enabled.
This is the device through which Sound Forge will receive all MIDI triggering and synchronization input, including
SMPTE/MTC, MIDI triggers, and Regions/Playlist triggers.
Bound record time on SMPTE record sync When this check box is selected, Sound Forge software will not allow recording beyond the specified end time. This
ensures that your record length is exact regardless of any inaccurate timecode.
Use internal timer for SMPTE generation Select this check box if you want to use the internal timer for SMPTE generation rather than position values reported by
the sound card driver. Since many sound cards do not report their position accurately, it is usually better to use the
internal timer for SMPTE generation.
Choose a value from the Internal timer resolution drop-down list to specify the internal timer accuracy used for
generating SMPTE. Low values produce more accurate SMPTE generation, but may also decrease system performance.
Use free-wheel for SMPTE loss
Select this check box to stop playback if the incoming MIDI timecode signal stops. When this check box is not selected,
Sound Forge playback will continue until the user stops playback manually.
In the Free-wheel time box, specify the amount of time that Sound Forge playback will continue after the incoming
MIDI timecode signal stops. If timecode starts again during this time, playback will continue.
In the Free-wheel slack box, specify how fast the software should expect timecode updates before going into Freewheel mode. If you have a fast computer, this value can be set to a lower value if you want to stop playback
immediately when timecode is interrupted.
Enable SMPTE playback offset
Select this check box to specify an offset that will be added to the time displayed in the Sound Forge play counter. For
example, if you want to generate MIDI timecode starting at 01:00:00:00, instead of inserting 1 hour of silence at the
beginning of your sound file, you can specify that amount in this box.
When using Record Sync, you’ll often want to set this value to the Enable MTC/SMPTE Input Synchronization Start time.
The Sound Forge ruler and play counter will not display this offset.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 245
Previews tab
The Previews tab allows you to specify options for previewing files.
Item
Description
Limit non-realtime previews to
Select this check box and specify the length of audio that will be used when generating a preview. Low values
decrease the amount of time needed to generate a preview when tuning effects or processing values.
Select this check box and specify how many seconds of unprocessed audio will be played before the processed
selection. Use this to listen to the transition from unprocessed to processed data.
Pre-roll
Post-roll
Tip: Pre-roll can be toggled on and off by right-clicking the dialog and choosing Pre-roll from the shortcut menu.
Select this check box and specify how many seconds of unprocessed audio will be played after the processed selection.
Use this to listen to the transition from processed to unprocessed data.
Tip: Post-roll can be toggled on and off by right-clicking the dialog and choosing Post-roll from the shortcut menu.
Reactive previewing
Select this check box to automatically recalculate and play back the preview buffer if the parameters of an effect
change. This allows for immediate feedback of the effects of a change.
This option is most useful when using a fast computer, limiting preview times, and not using processor-intensive
effects.
Note: You can temporarily suspend Reactive Previewing by holding down the Shift key while making parameter
changes.
Audio event locator:
Use the Pre-roll and Loop time settings to control how the audio event locator plays audio:
Pre-roll/Loop time
• In the Pre-roll box, specify the amount of data played prior to the cursor position.
• In the Loop time box, specify the amount of time that will loop when you stop the cursor while clicking and
dragging in the overview bar.
To use the audio event locator, click the overview bar and drag the mouse. Similar to a scrub control, playback follows
mouse movement and loops around the cursor position when the mouse is still. Playback stops when the mouse
button is released.
Cut preview configuration:
Use the Pre-roll and Post-roll settings to control the amount of data that is played back when you choose Preview
Pre-roll/Post-roll
Cut/Cursor from the Edit menu:
• In the Pre-roll box, specify the amount of data played prior to the selection or cursor position.
• In the Post-roll box, specify the amount of data played after the selection or cursor position.
Play Looped adjust pre-roll
Playlist pre-roll
246 | CHAPTER 20
When Loop Playback
mode is turned on and you make a selection during playback, playback is pre-rolled from
the end of the selection to help you tune long loops.
Specify the number of seconds before the end of the selection that you would like to pre-roll.
Enter a value in the edit box or use the up and down arrows to specify the amount of pre-roll that will be used when
playing entries in the Playlist/Cutlist window. This allows you to easily hear the transition from one region to another
without having to play all the way through the first region.
Status tab
The Status tab allows you to specify preferences for displaying information in the status bar.
Item
Description
Default frames per second
The default frame rate used to calculate frame values.
Default beats per measure
Frame values are useful when trying to synchronize sound with animation. Most animation players specify a playback
frame rate at which video frames are shown to the user. If you are using an animation that has a frame rate of 15.0
frames per second, you would set the frame rate to 15.0. When status values are displayed, they will be shown in values
of frames. This allows you to find the frame to which a given point in the sound file corresponds.
The number of beats in each measure for displaying in measures and beats. For example, 2/4 time would have two
beats per measure.
Default beats per minute
This setting will be also be used in the Edit Tempo dialog.
The number of beats per minute, i.e. the tempo of a song for displaying lengths.
RMS level scan time
Peak level scan time
This setting will be also be used in the Edit Tempo dialog.
The amount of sound data surrounding the cursor used to calculate the RMS level in the Levels toolbar.
The amount of sound data surrounding the cursor used when searching for a peak level to display in the Levels
toolbar.
0 VU (+4 dBu) level
Choose a setting from the drop-down list or type a value in the box to calibrate the VU/PPM meters to their associated
levels on the peak meters.
VU meters display sound in dB VU, where 0 VU is a reference level, and there is headroom above 0 VU. The Sound Forge
peak meters display peaks in dB FS (decibels relative to full scale).
VU meter integration time
In digital audio, there is no headroom above 0 dB FS. Choosing a setting from this drop-down list subtracts a nominal
dB value from the VU meters so that a signal displayed on the VU meters remains slightly below 0 dB on the peak
meters.
Type a value in the box to set the amount of data surrounding the cursor that will be used to calculate levels in the VU
meters.
This setting has no effect on the PPM scales, which use fixed integration times:
• UK PPM: 10 ms
• EBU PPM: 10 ms
• DIN PPM: 5 ms
• Nordic PPM: 5 ms
Toolbars tab
The Toolbars tab allows you to specify which toolbars you want to display.
Display or hide toolbars
Select the check box to display a toolbar; clear a check box to hide a toolbar.
Display or hide Tool Tips
Select the Show Tool Tips check box if you want to display pop-up descriptions when the mouse is held over certain items.
Customizing a toolbar
1. From the View menu, choose Toolbars. The Preferences dialog appears with a list of available toolbars.
2. Select the check box for a toolbar and click Customize. The Customize Toolbar dialog is displayed.
3. Use the controls in the Customize Toolbar dialog to add, remove, or rearrange the buttons on the selected toolbar. Click Reset to
restore the toolbar to its default setting.
4. Click the OK button.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 247
Audio tab
The Audio tab allows you to specify playback and recording options.
Basic audio preferences
Item
Description
Audio device type
Choose a driver type from the drop-down list.
• Microsoft Sound Mapper - The default setting. Allows the Sound Mapper to choose appropriate playback and
recording devices.
• Windows Classic Wave - Allows you to choose a specific audio device using a classic Wave driver.
Playback
-
Playback device routing
- Playback buffering (seconds)
Record
- Recording device routing
• ASIO - Allows you to choose a specific audio device using a low-latency ASIO driver.
Click the Playback tab to adjust playback routing and buffering settings.
Use this control to assign channels from multichannel audio files to outputs on your sound card: the numbered
columns represent audio channels, and the rows represent the selected playback device's outputs. Select the Enable
check box to enable an output, and select a radio button to assign the channel to an output.
In the following example, channel 1 is routed to the sound card's first output, channel 2 is routed to the second output,
and so on.
Specifies the total amount of buffering that is used during playback.
The larger the number, the more buffering is performed during playback. This value must be as low as possible without
gapping. To set it, start at .25 and play back a typical song. Move some of the track faders. If the playback gaps, try
increasing this slider in small increments until the gapping goes away.
If you simply cannot get playback to be free of gapping, you need to install more RAM in your computer so you can
increase buffering, buy a faster access hard drive, or minimize the number of audio plug-ins you are trying to use
simultaneously.
Click the Record tab to adjust record input routing and buffering settings.
Use this control to assign channels from multichannel audio files to outputs on your sound card: the numbered
columns represent audio channels, and the rows represent the selected record device’s inputs. Select the Enable check
box to enable an input, and select a radio button to assign the input to a channel.
In the following example, the signal from Analog in 1 is recorded to channel 1, Analog in 2 is recorded to channel 2,
and so on.
- Record buffering (seconds)
Advanced
Default All
248 | CHAPTER 20
Specifies the total amount of buffering that is used during recording.
If you use your computer for other tasks while recording, increasing this setting can reduce the likelihood of those
tasks interrupting recording.
Click this button to open the Advanced Audio Configuration dialog. For more information on these options, see below.
Click to restore the Audio tab to the default settings.
Advanced audio preferences
You can click the Advanced button on the Audio tab to access the advanced audio preferences.
Setting
Description
Audio devices
This list contains all of the audio devices that are installed in your computer. Select a device from the list to set the
options below for that device.
When this check box is selected, the software will attempt to compensate for inaccurate devices by interpolating the
playback or recording position. If you notice that your playback cursor is offset from what you are hearing, enable this
option for the playback device.
If the position of playback or recording does not match what you hear after you enable Interpolate position, you
can attempt to compensate using the Position bias slider.
Interpolate position
Position bias
Do not pre-roll buffers before starting
playback
Audio buffers
Buffer size
Moving this slider will offset the position forward or backward to compensate for the inaccuracies of the device.
When this check box is selected, the software will not create buffers prior to starting playback. Some devices do not
behave properly if this check box is cleared.
If your audio stutters when you start playback try selecting this check box.
Drag the slider to set the number of audio buffers that will be used. Adjusting this setting can decrease gapping or
help you synchronize the input and output.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to indicate the buffer size you want to use. Choose MME to use the
Playback buffering setting on the Audio tab in the Preferences dialog.
For example, if you choose MME from the Buffer size drop-down, set the Audio buffers slider to 5, and set
Playback buffering to 0.35 seconds, five 0.07-second buffers are created.
Priority
If you choose 1024 from the Buffer size drop-down and set the Audio buffers slider to 5, five 1024-byte buffers are
created.
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to set the priority that is assigned to your audio buffers.
Increasing the buffers' priority can help you attain smoother playback, but it can also adversely affect other processes.
Video tab
Use the Video tab to specify preferences for displaying video.
Item
Description
Frame numbering on thumbnails
Determines how individual frame information, located in a box at the lower left-hand corner of each frame, will be
displayed in the video strip when frame numbering is turned on.
Allow pulldown removal when opening
24p DV
Deinterlace method
The frame information box can include Frame Numbers or Media Timecode.
Select this check box if you want to remove pulldown when you open 24 fps progressive-scan DV video files.
When the check box is cleared, Sound Forge software will read 24p video as 29.97 fps interlaced video (60i).
Choose a setting from the drop-down list to determine how Sound Forge software separates the two fields that make
up a video frame when you render to a progressive format:
• Blend Fields: Maintains the data in the two fields by blending them together. This method can produce a smooth,
motion-blurred image.
• Interpolate: Deletes one field and uses the remaining field to interpolate the deleted lines. This produces sharper
Resample source video when rendering
to a higher frame rate
External monitor device
images than Blend Fields but can introduce jagged motion or stair-stepping artifacts.
Select this check box if you want to interpolate video frames when you render to a frame rate that is greater than the
source file's frame rate.
Choose a device from the drop-down list to configure an IEEE-1394 device for use with an external monitor. Sound
Forge will send your video output to this device when you click the Preview on External Monitor button
Video Preview window.
in the
More information on this device are displayed in the Details pane.
You can make additional preview playback adjustments near the bottom of the Video tab once you’ve selected an
external monitor device:
• If necessary, you can adjust the video to display properly on your external monitor. Choose the desired format from
the drop-down list.
• If audio and video do not play back in synchronization, drag the Sync offset slider to specify a frame offset to
restore synchronization.
Displays information about the device selected in the External monitor drop-down list.
Details
If project format is invalid for DV output, If your source media does not conform to DV standards, choose a setting from the drop-down list. The video is
adjusted to display properly on your external monitor.
conform to the following
If your audio is not synchronized with your external monitor, you can configure an offset for your hardware. Drag the
Sync offset (frames)
slider to synchronize audio and video.
This setting affects synchronization for previewing on an external monitor. Audio and video synchronization in the
Sound Forge workspace is not affected.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 249
VST Effects tab
The VST Effects tab allows you to specify where your VST plug-ins are installed.
Item
Description
Default VST search folder
Alternate VST search folder 1
This is the folder in which the application looks for VST effects during startup.
Enter a path in the edit box or click Browse to indicate where the application can find VST effects.
Alternate VST search folder 2
Enter a path in the edit box or click Browse to indicate where the application can find VST effects.
Lists the VST effects that are currently available. Select a VST effect’s check box to make it available for use as a plug-in.
Note: When you use a VST plug-in, the software will lock it for the remainder of your session. A lock is displayed next to
the check box to indicate that the plug-in cannot be removed until you close and restart the application.
Select VST effects to be available as
audio plug-ins
Customizing keyboard shortcuts
From the Options menu, choose Customize Keyboard to customize the keyboard shortcuts available in the Sound Forge interface.
The Shortcut keys box displays the currently assigned shortcut keys for the selected command. Click a tab in the middle of the dialog to
choose which shortcuts you want to see.
Editing or creating new shortcuts
1. From the Options menu, choose Customize Keyboard. The Customize Keyboard dialog is displayed.
2. Click a tab in the middle of the dialog to indicate the type of command you want to assign to a keyboard shortcut.
3. Select a command in the list.
Tip: You can type a word in the Show commands containing box to filter the list of commands to display only commands that contain
the word you typed.
4. Click the Shortcut keys box and press the key combination you want to assign to the selected command.
Tip: If you type a key combination that has already been assigned to another command, the Shortcut currently assigned to box
displays the existing assignment. To find the existing command, click the Locate button.
5. Click the Add button to assign the key combination in the Shortcut keys box to the selected command.
Saving a keyboard mapping
1. From the Options menu, choose Customize Keyboard. The Customize Keyboard dialog is displayed.
2. Click the Save as button and type a name to save your current keyboard shortcuts to an .ini file in the C:\Documents and
Settings\[user name]\Application Data\Sony\Sound Forge\9.0 folder.
Note: The Application Data folder is not visible unless the Show hidden files and folders radio button is selected on the View tab of the
Windows Folder Options control panel.
You can use this file as a backup or to share your keyboard shortcuts with other Sound Forge users.
Deleting a keyboard mapping
1. From the Options menu, choose Customize Keyboard. The Customize Keyboard dialog is displayed.
2. Choose a mapping from the Keyboard map drop-down list and click the Delete button to remove the selected keyboard mapping.
Note: You cannot delete the default Sound Forge keyboard mapping.
250 | CHAPTER 20
Importing or renaming a keyboard mapping
Copy a Sound Forge keyboard mapping .ini file to the C:\Documents and Settings\[user name]\Application Data\Sony\Sound
Forge\9.0 folder.
Note: The Application Data folder is not visible unless the Show hidden files and folders radio button is selected on the View tab of the
Windows Folder Options control panel.
The next time you start Sound Forge, the new keyboard mapping will be available from the Keyboard map drop-down list in the
Customize Keyboard dialog.
Tip: If you want to edit a the name used to identify a keyboard mapping in the Customize Keyboard dialog, open the .ini file in a text
editor and change the <Display Name> portion of the Name=<Display Name> entry. Save the .ini file and restart Sound Forge to use
the new name.
Resetting the default keyboard mapping
1. From the Options menu, choose Customize Keyboard. The Customize Keyboard dialog is displayed.
2. Choose [Default] from the Keyboard map drop-down list and click OK to restore the default configuration.
CUSTOMIZING SOUND FORGE | 251
252 | CHAPTER 20
Appendix A Shortcuts
Keyboard shortcuts
The following shortcuts represent the default configuration. Your system may differ if you've used the Keyboard tab in the
Preferences dialog to customize your keyboard shortcuts in Sound Forge software. Click the Default All button on the
Keyboard tab to restore the default configuration, or you can click the Export button on the Keyboard tab to save the
current shortcuts in a map file.
The available shortcut keys are arranged in tables according to function.
Project file commands
Press
Result
Ctrl+N
Create a new data window.
Ctrl+Shift+N
Create a new data window without displaying the New Window dialog
Ctrl+O
Open a sound file or project.
Ctrl+S
Save modified sound data back to the file.
Alt+Enter
Display the Properties dialog for the active data window.
Ctrl+W
Close the active data window.
Alt+F4
Exit the application.
APPENDIX A | 253
Magnification and view commands
Press
Result
Alt+0
Set input focus to the waveform display in the active data
window.
Alt+1
Show/set input focus to the Explorer window.
Alt+2
Show/set input focus to the Regions List.
Alt+3
Show/set input focus to the Playlist/Cutlist window.
Alt+4
Show/set input focus to the Video Preview window.
Alt+5
Show/set input focus to the Time Display window.
Alt+6
Show/set input focus to the Channel Meters window.
Alt+7
Show/set input focus to the Undo/Redo History window.
Alt+8
Show/set input focus to the Spectrum Analysis window.
Alt+9
Show/set input focus to the Plug-In Chainer window.
Ctrl+Alt+0
Show/set input focus to the Plug-In Manager window.
Ctrl+Alt+1
Show/set input focus to the MIDI Keyboard window.
Ctrl+Alt+2
Show/set input focus to the Script Editor window.
Ctrl+Alt+3
Show/set input focus to the Hardware Meters window.
Shift+F4
Tile the data windows vertically.
Alt+F5
Restore the Sound Forge application window.
Shift+F5
Cascade the data windows.
Ctrl+F5
Restore the active data window.
F6
Toggle playback scrolling on and off.
Shift+F6
Toggle smooth playback scrolling on and off.
Ctrl+F6
Go to the next data window.
Ctrl+Shift+F6
Go to the previous data window.
Ctrl+F10
Maximize the active data window.
Alt+F10
Maximize the Sound Forge application window.
F11
Show/hide windows docked at the bottom of the workspace.
Shift+F11
Show/hide windows docked at the sides of the workspace.
Ctrl+F11
Show/hide all docked windows.
Ctrl+Enter
Maximize the width of the active data window.
V
Insert/show/hide volume envelope.
Shift+V
Insert/remove volume envelope.
P
Insert/show/hide pan envelope.
Shift+P
Insert/remove pan envelope.
254 | APPENDIX A
Data window edit commands
Press
Result
D/Shift+D
Select the previous/next editing tool (Edit tool, Magnify tool, Pencil tool).
Ctrl+D
Select the Edit tool.
Ctrl+A
Select all data in the active window.
Ctrl+C
Copy the selected data onto the clipboard.
Ctrl+E
Paste the clipboard contents into a new data window.
Ctrl+M
Mix data from the clipboard with the active window.
Ctrl+T
Trim (crop) to the current selection.
Ctrl+V
Paste data from the clipboard into the active window.
Ctrl+X
Move (cut) the selected data onto the clipboard.
Ctrl+Y
Repeat last process, effect, or tool.
Ctrl+Z
Undo the last action.
Ctrl+Shift+Z
Redo the last undone action.
Delete
Clear (delete) the selected data; nothing is placed on the clipboard.
Note: If the Treat as Cutlist command (available in the Special menu, Playlist/
Cutlist submenu) is selected, deleting a selection creates a region in the Cutlist
window, but does not remove the selection.
C
Insert a command marker at the current cursor position.
M
Insert a marker at the current cursor position.
Ctrl+B
Toggle Auto Snap to Zero on and off.
V
Insert/show/hide volume envelope.
Shift+V
Insert/remove volume envelope.
P
Insert/show/hide pan envelope.
Shift+P
Insert/remove pan envelope.
Alt+Shift+L
Create a loop from the current selection.
Alt+L
Create a loop from the current selection without displaying the Edit Sample
dialog.
Esc
Stop or cancel the current action (including playback).
F8
Toggle drag-and-drop snapping on and off.
APPENDIX A | 255
Cursor movement
Press
Cursor moves to
(right arrow)/
Ctrl+Alt+
(left arrow)
(right arrow)/Ctrl+Alt+
Move one pixel right/left.
Move one audio sample right/left.
(left arrow)
Alt+
arrow)
(left arrow)/Alt+
(right
Previous/next video frame (video files).
Note: This is only available if the data window contains a video file.
Ctrl+G
Display the Go To dialog.
Home
Go to the first sample visible in the waveform display.
End
Go to the last sample visible in the waveform display.
Ctrl+Home
Go to the first sample in the data window.
Ctrl+End
Go to the last sample in the data window.
Page Up
Move 10% of the current view prior to the cursor position.
Page Down
Move 10% of the current view past the cursor position.
Ctrl+Page Up
Move 100% of the current view prior to the cursor position.
Ctrl+Page Down
Move 100% of the current view past the cursor position.
Ctrl+
(right arrow)
Go to end of file. If regions, loops, or markers exist in the file, this keystroke moves
to the next region, loop, or marker boundary.
Ctrl+
(left arrow)
Go to beginning of file. If regions, loops, or markers exist in the file, this keystroke
moves to the previous region, loop, or marker boundary.
. (period) or \
Center the cursor in the waveform display.
+ (numeric keypad)
Go to the next sample.
- (numeric keypad)
Go to the previous sample.
Ctrl+numeric keypad +
Move 10 samples past the current cursor.
Ctrl+numeric keypad -
Move 10 samples prior to the current cursor.
256 | APPENDIX A
Selecting data
Press
To select from cursor to
Ctrl+Shift+D
Show the Set Selection dialog.
Shift+
arrow
(right arrow)/Shift+
Shift+Ctrl+Alt+
/
(left
Select from the cursor to the next/previous screen pixel.
Select from the cursor to the next/previous sample.
Shift+Ctrl+Alt+
Shift+Alt+
/ Shift+Alt+
Select from the cursor to the next/previous video frame.
Note: This is only available if the data window contains a video file.
Shift+Home
Select from the cursor to the first sample visible in the waveform display.
Shift+End
Select from the cursor to the last sample visible in the waveform display.
Ctrl+Shift+Home
Select from the cursor to the first sample in the data window.
Ctrl+Shift+End
Select from the cursor to the last sample in the data window.
Shift+Page Up
Select from the cursor to 10% of the current view prior to the cursor position.
Shift+Page Down
Select from the cursor to 10% of the current view past the cursor position.
Ctrl+Shift+Page Up
Select 100% of the current view prior to the cursor position.
Ctrl+Shift+Page Down
Select 100% of the current view past the cursor position.
Ctrl+Shift+
Select 10 pixels past the cursor position. If regions, loops, or markers exist in the file, this
keystroke selects to the next region, loop, or marker boundary.
Ctrl+Shift+
Select 10 pixels prior to the cursor position. If regions, loops, or markers exist in the file, this
keystroke selects to the previous region, loop, or marker boundary.
Shift+numeric keypad +
Select from the cursor to the next sample.
Shift+numeric keypad -
Select from the cursor to the previous sample.
Ctrl+Shift+numeric keypad +
Select 10 samples past the current cursor.
Ctrl+Shift+numeric keypad -
Select 10 samples prior to the current cursor.
T
Snap to time.
Shift+T
Snap edge to time.
Z
Snap to next zero crossing.
Shift+Z
Snap edge to next zero crossing.
Tab/Shift+Tab
Switch the selection through the channels in a multichannel file.
<
Shift current selection to the left by the length of the selection.
>
Shift current selection to the right by the length of the selection.
;
Cut the current selection length in half.
‘
Double the current selection length.
:
Rotate audio.
S or Backspace
Toggle current selection on and off.
Alt+Shift+L
Create a loop from the current selection.
Alt+L
Create a loop from the current selection without displaying the Edit Sample dialog.
APPENDIX A | 257
Navigation and playback
Press
Result
Ctrl+<Number>
Save a view in cell <Number> where <Number> ranges from 1 to 8.
<Number>
Restore a view using cell <Number> where <Number> ranges from 1 to 8.
(up arrow) or mouse wheel up
Increase time magnification (zoom in).
(down arrow) or mouse wheel down Decrease time magnification (zoom out).
Shift+
Increase level magnification.
Shift+
Decrease level magnification.
Ctrl+
Zoom to selection if a selection exists; otherwise Zoom In Full.
Ctrl+
Zoom normal (zooms to default zoom ratio set in Preferences).
1 (on numeric keypad)
Display custom zoom ratio 1.
2 (on numeric keypad)
Display custom zoom ratio 2.
Ctrl+Shift+
Pan data window up if zoomed in vertically.
Ctrl+Shift+
Pan data window down if zoomed in vertically.
5 (on numeric keypad)
Switch cursor to opposite end of selection.
I
Set Mark In at the current cursor position.
O
Set Mark Out at the current cursor position.
Spacebar or F12
Play or stop the contents of the data window in default mode.
Shift+Spacebar or Shift+F12
Play all.
Enter or Ctrl+F12
Play/Pause.
X
Switch play mode between Normal, Plug-In Chainer, Play as Sample, and Play as
Cutlist playback modes.
Enter
Pause playback and leave the cursor at the current position.
Esc
Stop or cancel the current action (including playback).
Q
Toggle looped playback.
Ctrl+K
Preview cut (skip selection on playback with pre-roll).
Ctrl+Shift+K
Play to cursor with pre-roll.
J, K, or L
Scrub playback
F6
Toggle playback scrolling on and off.
Shift+F6
Toggle smooth playback scrolling on and off.
F7
Generate MIDI timecode.
Ctrl+F7
Trigger from MIDI timecode.
Record dialog keyboard shortcuts
Press
Result
Ctrl+R
Open Record dialog.
Alt+R
Start/stop recording.
Alt+P
Play.
Alt+T
Reset clip indicators.
Esc
Stop recording or playback.
Alt+Z
Go to the start of the file.
M
Insert a marker while recording.
258 | APPENDIX A
Plug-In Chainer
Press
Result
Ctrl+P
Preview audio through plug-in chain.
Ctrl+Shift+P
Process selection using the plug-in chain.
Ctrl+B
Bypass the plug-in chain while previewing audio.
Ctrl+S
Save chain preset.
Ctrl+T
Toggle through audio tail processing modes (Ignore Tail Data,
Mix Tail Data, Insert Tail Data).
Ctrl+E
Open the Plug-In Chooser dialog to add plug-ins to chain.
Ctrl+Delete
Remove selected plug-in from chain.
Ctrl+Tab
Select the next plug-in in the chain.
Ctrl+Shift+Tab
Select the previous plug-in in the chain.
Ctrl+H
Shows/hides the effect automation parameter chooser.
Regions List
Press
Result
Spacebar
Play or stop playback of the active marker or region.
Enter or Shift+E
Edit the active marker or region.
Delete
Delete the active marker or region.
R
Create region from the current selection.
Shift+R
Create region without displaying dialog.
Playlist/Cutlist
Press
Result
Spacebar
Play or stop playback of the active playlist entry.
Enter
Edit the active playlist entry.
Delete
Delete the active playlist entry.
+ (plus sign)
Add one to the active playlist entry play count.
- (minus sign) (not numeric keypad)
Subtract one from the active playlist entry play count.
* (asterisk) (not numeric keypad)
Add or remove a stop point on the active playlist entry.
/ (forward slash) (not numeric keypad)
Toggle pre-roll on and off for the playlist.
Script Editor
Press
Result
F3
Find next instance of last-searched text
Shift+F3
Find previous instance of last-searched text
Ctrl+F3
Find next instance of the selected text
Ctrl+Shift+F3
Find previous instance of the selected text
Ctrl+N
Create a new script
Ctrl+O
Open a script
Ctrl+R
Run the current script.
Ctrl+Shift+R
Compile the current script.
Ctrl+S
Save the current script.
APPENDIX A | 259
Mouse wheel shortcuts
Mouse wheel action
Result
Wheel Up
Zoom in horizontally.
Wheel Down
Zoom out horizontally.
Ctrl+Wheel Up
Zoom in vertically.
Ctrl+Wheel Down
Zoom out vertically.
Shift+Wheel Up
Scroll left (in 10ths of screen width).
Shift+Wheel Down
Scroll right (in 10ths of screen width).
Ctrl+Shift+Wheel Up
Cursor left or current selection point left (if there is a
selection).
Ctrl+Shift+Wheel Down
Cursor right or current selection point right (if there is a
selection).
Additional mouse shortcuts
Select all
Double-click the waveform display to select the entire sound file. Triple-click when regions, loops, or markers are present.
Tip: You can turn off the triple-click feature on the Editing tab of the Preferences dialog.
Zoom time and level
Double-click the level ruler to zoom the current selection vertically and horizontally. If no selection exists, all waveform data is zoomed.
Return control value to default
Double-click a slider, fader, or spinner to return the control to its default value.
Fine-tune control value
To fine-tune a slider, fader, or spinner, hold the right and left mouse buttons (or hold Ctrl) while dragging.
Preview
Hold Shift and click the Preview button to hear the original audio. This is equivalent to selecting the Bypass check box.
Hold Ctrl and click the Preview button to display the Preview Configuration dialog.
Status bar
The status bar is displayed across the bottom of the Sound Forge window. Right-click the Sample Rate, Bit Depth, or Channels box and
choose a setting from the shortcut menu, or double-click a box to edit the setting directly. Right-click the Total Length box and choose
a format from the shortcut menu.
260 | APPENDIX A
Selection status bar
The selection status bar is displayed at the bottom of Sound Forge data windows. There are several shortcuts for the selection status bar:
• Double-click the Selection Start, Selection End, or the Selection Length boxes to type values in the boxes to specify or edit a
selection.
• Right-click any of the boxes and choose Go To from the shortcut menu to display the Go To dialog and specify a start position for your
selection.
• Right-click any of the boxes and choose Set Selection from the shortcut menu to display the Set Selection dialog and specify your
selection position and length.
• Right-click any of the boxes and to choose a time format.
Go to marker
Double-click a marker tag in the ruler to move the cursor to the position of the marker.
Set selection to region/loop
Double-click a region or loop tag in the ruler to change the current selection to the region or loop end points.
Edit region or marker
Double-click a region or marker in the Regions List to display the Edit Region/Marker dialog.
Edit playlist
Double-click a playlist entry to display the Edit Playlist dialog. For more information, see Editing a playlist/cutlist region on page 109.
Play Normal button
Hold Ctrl and click to preview a Cut operation. Hold Ctrl+Shift and click to play to the cursor with pre-roll.
Slow and fast selection scroll toggle
To create a selection extending past the start or end of the waveform display, hold the left mouse button while clicking the right mouse
button to toggle between fast and slow scrolling.
APPENDIX A | 261
262 | APPENDIX A
Appendix B Microsoft Audio Compression Manager
The Microsoft Audio Compression Manager (ACM) is a standard interface for audio compression in Windows. This
interface allows applications such as Sound Forge® to use compression algorithms provided by other companies.
Sound Forge software fully supports audio compression through the ACM. This allows you to use any ACM-compatible
compression. Compressed WAV files are transparently opened and all available compression formats for WAV files are
provided in the Save As dialog.
There are two major components to the ACM:
• Audio data compression and decompression
• Transparent playback and recording of non-hardware supported audio files
Audio data compression and decompression
The first component of the ACM allows audio data to be compressed and decompressed. Audio compression is used to
decrease the amount of data required to represent a sound and results in smaller sound files. However, there are
drawbacks to using audio compression on sound files:
• Most audio compression algorithms degrade sound quality. This is referred to as lossy compression because
information contained in the sound is lost when it is compressed. The amount of sound degradation is dependent
upon the algorithm.
• Compressed audio requires more processing time than uncompressed data. The amount of processing time is
dependent on the algorithm as well as the system’s hardware. Typically, opening and saving compressed files takes
longer than uncompressed files.
• Compressed files are not as portable as uncompressed files. To distribute WAV files in a compressed format, you must
verify that the audience can use them. Also, not all audio software can use compressed WAV files, which may make
using other applications with the Sound Forge software difficult.
In Sound Forge software, any compressed WAV file can be opened if a compatible ACM driver is installed. If no
compatible ACM driver is available for a compressed WAV file, you are alerted to the problem.
Saving compressed WAV files is as simple as specifying the compression algorithm in the Format drop-down list of the
Custom Settings dialog. Once a compressed file is saved, updates to the file are automatically saved using the selected
compression algorithm. The compression format can be changed later—or reverted to an uncompressed format—using
the Save As dialog.
APPENDIX B | 263
Transparent playback and recording of non-hardware supported audio files
The second component of the ACM is called the Sound Mapper. It allows playback and recording of audio data formats that are not
directly supported by the sound card. You can select the Sound Mapper as the Playback and Record devices on the Audio tab of the
Preferences dialog. You can perform any additional configuration of the Sound Mapper from the Windows Control Panel.
The Sound Mapper functions as follows. When faced with a sound file recorded at an unusual sample rate such as 22,257 Hz and a sound
card that supports 22,050 Hz, the sound file normally cannot be played. The sample rate of the file must be changed to 22,050 Hz before
it can be played back, but changing the sample rate without resampling causes a pitch shift. However, the Sound Mapper plays this file
without resampling by mapping the sound to the best format possible and performing the resampling in real time.
In addition, the Sound Mapper plays compressed sound files, even on sound cards that do not support compression directly. A file
compressed with Microsoft ADPCM or The DSP Group’s TrueSpeech plays on any sound card without first decompressing the file.
The Sound Mapper can, under the right circumstances, record compressed sound files. Compressing sound data can be
computationally expensive, and the amount of time required is dependent upon the specific compression algorithm and how it is
implemented. Decompressing sound data is typically faster than compressing the same sound data.
It should be noted, however, that the Sound Forge application does not play and record compressed sound files directly. Rather, all
compression and decompression is performed while opening and saving the files. This limitation is fairly insignificant, and the
compressed sound files are saved using the best possible quality—something that cannot always be done in real time. Compressed
sound files saved with the software typically sound better than those recorded with audio compression.
After you save uncompressed audio data to a compressed format, you should audition the file. Compression and decompression are
performed during opening and saving; therefore, the compressed file is not accurately represented until it has been reopened.
264 | APPENDIX B
Appendix C SMPTE Timecode
The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) timecode may be one of the most misunderstood
concepts among individuals within the music industry. The problem with SMPTE timecode formats is that they may mean
different things to people in the audio and video fields. What follows is a brief description of each SMPTE timecode
format.
Important: When synchronizing audio to video, it is crucial that the SMPTE timecode format used in the sequencer or
digital audio workstation is the same as the SMPTE timecode striped onto the video. This guarantees that the SMPTE times
on the video screen and computer monitor synchronize during playback.
SMPTE 25 EBU (25 fps, Video)
SMPTE 25 EBU timecode runs at 25 fps (frames per second), and matches the frame rate used by European Broadcasting
Union (EBU) television systems.
SMPTE 25 EBU format is used for PAL DV/D1 video projects.
SMPTE Drop Frame (29.97 fps, Video)
SMPTE Drop Frame timecode runs at 29.97 fps, and matches the frame rate used by NTSC television systems (North
America, Japan).
SMPTE Drop Frame format is used for NTSC DV/D1 video projects.
Both SMPTE Drop and SMPTE Non-Drop run at 29.97 fps. In both formats, the actual frames are not discarded, but they
are numbered differently. SMPTE Drop removes certain frame numbers from the counting system to keep the SMPTE
clock from drifting from real (“wall clock”) time. The time is adjusted forward by two frames on every minute boundary
except 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50. For example, when SMPTE Drop time increments from 00:00:59.29, the next value is
00:01:00.02.
SMPTE Non-Drop Frame (29.97 fps, Video)
SMPTE Non-Drop Frame timecode runs at a rate of 29.97 fps. This leads to a discrepancy between real (“wall clock”) time
and the SMPTE time, because there is no compensation in the counting system as there is in SMPTE Drop Frame.
SMPTE Non-Drop format is used for NTSC D1 video projects that are recorded on master tapes striped with Non-Drop
timecode.
SMPTE 30 (30 fps, Audio)
SMPTE 30 is an audio-only format and runs at exactly 30 fps. SMPTE 30 is commonly used when synchronizing audio
applications such as multitrack recorders or MIDI sequencers. This format is not used when working with video.
SMPTE Film Sync (24 fps)
The SMPTE Film Sync time format runs at 24 fps (frames per second). This frame rate matches the standard crystal-sync
16/33 mm film rate of 24 fps.
APPENDIX C | 265
266 | APPENDIX C
Appendix D Using CSOUND, MTU, IRCAM, BICSF, and EBICSF Files
Although Sound Forge® software supports a large number of sound file formats directly, it does not support the
CSOUND, MTU, IRCAM, BICSF or EBICSF file types. However, you can use the Sound Forge Raw File Type capabilities to
extract sound data from these file types.
About IRCAM files
The IRCAM or IRCAM-Gross format consists of a 1024-byte header prior to the audio data. This header contains standard
information like the number of channels, sampling rate, and data format, but can also contain the name of the sample
and comments. This format is used by the MTU system and these files are frequently referred to as MTU files. IRCAM files
support two types of data formats: 16-bit linear PCM and floating point data.
About BICSF and EBICSF files
BICSF and EBICSF files (Berkeley/IRCAM/CARL Sound File or Extended BICSF) are extensions of the IRCAM format. Instead
of using the standard IRCAM header, these files replace the first 28 bytes of the header with a standard NeXT/Sun header.
This allows the IRCAM format to store additional information in its 1024-byte header, while also allowing the files to be
read by software that supports the NeXT/Sun file format, such as the Sound Forge application.
Opening files
BICSF and EBICSF files
When reading BICSF and EBICSF files, the software identifies them as NeXT/Sun files. This is because the header of the
BICSF file has been modified to allow it to be read as a NeXT/Sun file. These files are read as long as they are in one of the
supported NeXT/Sun data formats.
IRCAM, CSOUND and MTU files
To read these formats, users must import them as Raw data files. This is best accomplished by configuring the parameters
in the Raw File Type dialog and saving them as presets. The Raw File import function allows these files to be opened
providing they are stored in 16-bit linear format. Sound Forge software does not open floating point format IRCAM files.
APPENDIX D | 267
Opening an IRCAM file
1. From the File menu, choose Open. The Open dialog appears.
2. Specify Raw Audio from the Files of type drop-down list.
3. Select an IRCAM file to open and click Open. The Raw File Type dialog appears.
4. Configure the following parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Specify a sample rate from the Sample rate drop-down list.
In the Sample type area, select the 16-bit PCM radio button.
In the Format area, select the Signed radio button.
Select the appropriate Byte order radio button.
Choose a setting from the Channels drop-down list to select the number of channels stored in the file.
Set the Header value to 1024 bytes.
Set the Trailer value to 0 bytes.
To automatically use these settings to open all Raw files, select the Remember my preference and apply it in the future check
box.
Tip: If you select the Remember my preference and apply it in the future check box, Sound Forge will bypass the Raw File Type
dialog. However, you can access and change these settings from the Open dialog by selecting a Raw file and then clicking the
Custom button.
5. Click OK.
Notes:
• The settings you choose for opening the file — with the exception of the sample rate — will be used when you click Save or save the file
using the Default Template setting in the Save As dialog as long as the number of channels in the source file matches the number of
channels in the file you’re saving. The sample rate will be determined from the source file.
• If you do not always use the same settings for reading raw files, make sure the Keep media files locked check box is selected on the
General tab of the Preferences dialog. Otherwise, the individual settings will be lost if you have multiple raw files open and switch away
from the Sound Forge window.
6. Click Save As. The Save Preset dialog is displayed.
7. Enter a name for the preset in the New preset name box and click OK. The preset is saved and the Raw File Type dialog is displayed.
8. Click OK. The file opens.
Remember that the byte order of files generated by CSOUND is not constant. CSOUND executables for PC generate files that use Little
Endian byte ordering, while CSOUND for other platforms tends to generate files with Big Endian ordering. In addition, MTU files use Big
Endian byte ordering. Sony Media Software recommends initially trying a file in Big Endian.
Note: You may want to save presets for byte ordering, as well as mono or multichannel, when receiving CSOUND files from a number of
source computers.
Saving files
You cannot save these files in their original format. You must select a Sound Forge-supported file format.
To save files for use with software that supports the BICSF/EBICSF format, use the NeXT/Sun format. This format does not save the
additional information found in BICSF/EBICSF files, but allows the data to be read as a NeXT/Sun file.
268 | APPENDIX D
Index
A
ACID
Creating loops for, 217–221
Loop Creation Tools toolbar, 31, 219
Acoustic Mirror, 171–181
Adjusting impulse length, 173
Apply envelope and limit decay to check box, 172
Auto-detect timing spikes mode, 174
Convert mono to stereo check box, 172
Do not use timing spikes mode, 174
Envelope tab, 173
Error messages, 181
General tab, 172
Head-related transfer functions, 179
Impulse control, 172
Impulse output control, 174
Impulse recovery modes, 174
Limiting length of impulse, 172
Low-shelf start frequency/High-shelf start frequency
control, 172
Package Impulse into Preset button, 173
Pan control, 172
Recorded file control, 174
Recover Impulse button, 174
Recover tab, 174
Remove very low frequencies check box, 174
Reset button, 173
Response delay control, 172
Response width control, 172
Saving the impulse with a preset, 173
Summary tab, 174
Test file used control, 174
Troubleshooting, 180
Use the start and end of the recorded file as timing spikes
mode, 174
Using, 171
Acoustic signature, 171
Adjusting, 171
Active data windows, 51
Adding regions to the playlist, 108
Adding tracks to a CD, 123
Additional embedded information, 89
Adjusting envelopes, 169
Adjusting VU meter sensitivity, 36
Animating the video strip, 224
Applying effects automation, 168
Arranging the playlist, 109
ASIO driver support, 113
Attaching video to an audio file, 226
Attributes
file, 83
Audio
digital, monitoring, 32
editing file attributes in Properties, 83
editing file attributes in status bar, 83
increasing volume, 156
mixing from the clipboard, 61
normalizing, 151
reversing, 155
setting volume, 156
Audio device
adjusting hardware outputs, 92
Audio editing, 57–62, 127–128, 129–131
Copying, 57
cutting selections, 59
deleting selections, 60
Mixing, 130
mixing, 60
Overwriting, 127
Pasting, 57, 129
Replicating, 128
Trimming/Cropping, 60
Audio event locator
configuring, 72
scrubbing with, 72
Audio file
detaching video, 227
Audio files
Saving all open, 54
Audio glitches
Finding and repairing, 132
Audio Restoration, 134
Audio spectrum analysis, 229
Audio synthesis, 135–137
DTMF/MF Tones, 135
FM, 135
Simple, 137
Auto Region tool
musical time intervals, 103
Rapid sound attacks, 102
Auto Trim/Crop, 142
Attack threshold fader, 143
Fade in, 143
Fade out, 143
Function drop-down list, 143
Release threshold fader, 143
Automatic labeling for files, regions, and markers, 121
Automatic labeling for Markers, 97
Automatic labeling for regions, 104
Automatic recording, 116
Automatic retake, 119
Adjusting pre/post-roll, 120
Automating effect parameters, 167
INDEX | i
Automation
effects, 168
Auto-snapping
disabling at high magifications, 81
B
Batch Converter, 191
creating or editing batch job, 191
existing batch job, 191
metadata, 192
BICSF, 267
Bit depth, 144
Changing, 84
Converter, 143
editing in Properties, 83
editing in status bar, 83
For CD burning, 123
Bit-Depth Converter
bit depth, 144
controls, 144
dither, 144
noise shaping, 144
Blinking status while recording, 122
Burning CDs, 123
proper use of software, 125
C
Calculating loop tempo, 221
Calibrating DC adjustment for recording, 119
CD
Adding tracks, 123
Bit depth for burning, 123
Burning, 123
Closing the disc, 125
Extracting audio from, 122
Sample rate for burning, 123
CD Architect
exporting to, 66
CD information, 46
editing, 45
obtaining, 45
submitting to Gracenote, 46
Changing the region order, 107, 109
ii | INDEX
Channel Converter, 88, 145
Channels, 146
dialog controls, 146
End, 146
intermixing channels, 146
Invert Mix, 146
Length, 146
mono to multichannel, 145
mono to stereo, 145
Output channels, 146
Source, 146
Start, 146
stereo to mono, 146
swapping stereo channels, 146
Channel Meters, 22
Channel meters, 33, 203
showing/hiding, 33
Channel repair, 132
Channels, 87
intermixing, 146
routing to hardware outputs, 91
swapping in stereo file, 146
Clipboard
copying cutlist to, 112
copying playlist to, 112
copying Regions List to, 112
mixing audio from, 61
Clipped audio
marking, 98
Clipping indicators, 34
Clips
detecting, 98
Closing a CD, 125
Command descriptions, 32
Command markers
deleting, 100
Editing, 100
Inserting, 100
Scott Studios, 100
Commands
customizing shortcut assignment, 250
Commands for streaming media, 99
Compression, 86
Configuring
Measures and beats format, 65
MIDI devices, 196
MIDI Keyboard, 210
MIDI triggers, 196
Plug-ins on a chain, 162
Controls
Envelope graphs, 38
Faders and slider, 37
Using the mouse, 19, 79, 260
Convert to New, 111
Converting file formats, 88
Converting mono files to stereo or multichannel, 145
Converting stereo files to mono, 146
Copying, 57
Copying current video frame, 224
Count, 108
Crash recovery, 67
Creating
Automatic regions, 102
CDs, 123
Graphic fades, 147
Impulse files for Acoustic Mirror, 175
Markers, 96
Markers during playback, 96
Markers during recording, 96, 121
Markers for each index change in extracted CD track, 122
New data windows, 51
New files from the playlist, 111
New windows for each recorded take, 119
Pans, 153
Presets, 140
regions, 101
Regions for each extracted CD track, 122
Regions from markers, 98
regions from markers, 105
Release loops, 214
Sampler configurations, 206
Selections, 78
Selections on the fly, 79
Stop points, 110
Sustaining loops, 213
Views, 82
Creating custom pans, 153
Cropping audio, 60
Using Auto/Trim Crop, 142
Crossfade Loop tool, 216
CSOUND, 267
Cursor position, 69
Custom graphic fade, 148
Customizing keyboard shortcuts, 250
Customizing Sound Forge
Preferences, 239
Cutlist, 111–112
Adding regions to, 111
copying to the clipboard, 112
Creating a new file from, 111
Deleting all cutlist regions, 111
Opening cutlist files, 112
Reverting to playlist, 111
Saving cutlist files, 112
Cutting
previewing cuts, 59
selections, 59
selections in multichannel files, 59
D
Data window, 23
arranging, 24
Components, 23
Displaying/hiding elements, 24
Overview bar, 70
DC Offset
Adjust DC offset by, 147
Compute DC offset from first 5 seconds only, 147
DC offset, 119
Automatically detect and remove, 147
calibrating adjustment for recording, 119
calibrating the DC adjustment, 119
compensating for, 147
dialog controls, 147
estimating, 147
recalibrating the DC adjustment, 119
recalibrating the DC adustment, 119
Defragmenting the hard disk, 203
Deleting
all regions, 104
all regions within selected area, 105
Command markers, 100
Presets, 140
Recovered files, 67
regions, 104
Regions from the playlist, 109
selections, 60
selections in multichannel files, 60
Stop points in the playlist, 110
Deleting a keyboard map, 250
Deleting all markers and regions, 97
Deleting markers, 97
Digital audio
monitoring, 32
DirectX Plug-ins, See Effects
Display resolution
VU/PPM meter, 36
Displaying
Data window elements, 24
Playlist, 108
Regions List, 106
Sonogram, 234
Video strip, 223
Wave Hammer, 181
Dither, 85, 144
INDEX | iii
Docking windows, 21
Explorer, 22
Keyboard, 23
Playlist, 22
Plug-In Chainer, 23
Plug-In Manager, 23
Regions List, 22
Script Editor, 23
Spectrum Analysis, 22
Time Display, 22
Undo/Redo History, 22
Video Preview, 22
Drag-and-drop
Creating new windows, 131
Editing, 129
Mixing, 130
Mono selections to multichannel destinations, 129
Pasting, 129
Snapping to events, 129
Dropping Markers, 96
Dropping markers
During recording, 121
DTMF/MF Tones, 135
DX Favorites menu, 166
E
EBICSF, 267
Editing
command markers, 100
Drag-and-drop, 129
Loops, 216
media file’s source project, 56
multichannel audio, 91, 92
regions in the data window, 104
Sample rate, 84
Sample size, 84
Summary information, 88
iv | INDEX
Effects, 159
adding, 159
Adding a chain of effects, 160
applying, 159
applying automation, 168
applying in multichannel files, 159
Audio tail data processing mode, 163
Automatically organizing, 167
automating, 167
automating with envelopes, 167
Bypassing effects on a chain, 163
Configuring plug-ins on a chain, 162
DX Favorites menu, 166
Hiding effects, 166
Loading saved chains, 164
Loading saved presets, 164
Plug-In Manager, 165
Preset Manager, 167
previewing automation, 168
removing automation envelopes, 168
Removing plug-ins from a chain, 162
Renaming effects, 166
Saving chains, 163
Saving settings as a preset, 159, 164
Effects toolbar, 30
Embedded information, 89
Envelope graphs, 38
Envelopes
adding points, 169
adjusting, 169
adjusting effect parameters, 168
bypassing effect automation, 168
copying to another data window, 170
cutting, copying, and pasting points, 169
effect automation, 167
enabling effect automation, 168
flipping, 169
removing effect automation, 168
setting fade properties, 169
showing/hiding effect automation, 168
volume or panning, 167
EQ, 147
Error messages for Acoustic Mirror impulse files, 181
Estimating DC offset, 147
Explorer, 22
Explorer window, 45
Extracting audio from CD, 46
Opening media, 45
Previewing media, 45
views, 47
Exporting, 66
all audio files, 67
single audio file, 66
to CD Architect, 66
to Net MD devices, 67
Exporting to CD Architect
All audio files, 66
Single audio file, 66
Extend edge to next zero
selection, 81
Extend to next zero
selection, 81
Extended summary information, 88
External
MIDI devices, 198
Monitors, 226
Samplers, 205
Extract Regions, 106
Extracting audio
proper use of software, 125
Extracting audio from CD, 122
Creating markers for each index change, 122
Creating regions for each track, 122
Getting Media, 44
Glitches
Finding, 132
Repairing by copying the other channel, 132
Repairing by interpolating audio, 133
Repairing by replacing with preceding audio, 133
Repairing with the Pencil tool, 134
Go To, 69
Gracenote, 45, 46
Graphic fade, 147
Creating a custom fade, 148
Maximum Gain control, 149
Reset Envelope button, 149
resetting the envelope, 149
Show wave control, 149
showing the waveform, 149
H
Halving/doubling loops, 219
Hard disk defragmentation, 203
Hardware meters, 92
adjusting output levels, 93
adjusting preview levels, 93
showing/hiding, 93
Hardware setup
External monitor, 226
MIDI/SDS, 211
SCSI/SMDI, 211
Help
On the Web, 17
Hiding
Data window elements, 24
Docked windows, 22
Effects (plug-ins), 166
Video strip, 223
Holding peaks/valleys, 36
F
Fade, 147
Graphic, 147
In, 149
Out, 149
Fade properties
envelopes, 169
Faders and sliders, 37
Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), 229
File properties
editing, 83
Files
attributes, 83
Automatically naming, 121
Channels, 87
Converting, 88
Creating from the playlist, 111
Explorer window, 45
Opening, 44
opening, 44
Playing, 48
rendering, 66
Sample rate, 84
Saving, 52
Finding and repairing audio glitches, 132
Fine-tuning selections
Keyboard methods, 79
Mouse methods, 79
Flipping envelopes, 169
Floating windows, 21
FM synthesis, 135
Format conversion, 88
Frame animation, 223
Frame numbering, 224
G
Generating MTC with Sound Forge software, 200
I
Importing
Keyboard shortcut map, 251
Impulse files
Adding summary information, 178
Creating, 175
Equipment needed, 175
Equipment placement, 175
Head-related transfer functions, 179
Recording the test tone, 176
Recovering from an acoustic space, 175
Recovering from an electronic device, 175
Recovering the impulse, 176
Setting levels, 176
Transferring the test tone, 175
Trimming impulse files, 177
Trimming the test tone, 176
Using in creative ways, 178
Increasing the volume of a selection, 156
INDEX | v
Initiating MIDI playback, 197
Inserting
Command markers, 100
Silence, 149
Installing
Sound Forge software, 16
Intermixing channels in a file, 146
Internal
MIDI devices, 198
Samplers, 205
Interpolating audio to repair glitches, 133
Introducing Sound Forge software, 15
Invert/Flip, 150
IRCAM, 267
K
Keyboard
MIDI, 209
Keyboard mapping
saving, 250
Keyboard shortcuts, 253
creating new, 250
customizing, 32, 250
deleting a keyboard map, 250
editing, 250
importing a keyboard map, 251
renaming a keyboard map, 251
resetting the default keyboard map, 251
saving a keyboard map, 250
Keyboard window, 23
L
Labels
Automatically generating for files, regions, and
markers, 121
automatically generating for markers, 97
automatically generating for regions, 104
Level ruler, 74
Levels toolbar, 31
Locking loop and region lengths, 106
Looped playback, 49
Loops, 213–221
Creating for ACID, 217–221
Editing, 216
Halving/doubling, 219
Release, 213
Rotating audio, 220
Saving, 221
Setting tempo, 221
Shifting selections left/right, 220
Sustaining, 213
M
Magnify tool, 76
Mapping
keyboard, 250, 251
vi | INDEX
Markers, 96–100
Automatically naming, 121
automatically naming, 97
changing position, 97
clipped audio, 98
Creating, 96
Creating during playback, 96
Creating during recording, 96, 121
Creating regions from, 98, 103, 105
deleting, 97
deleting all within a selection, 97
editing default names, 244
moving, 97
naming, 96
previewing, 98
renaming, 96
snapping to, 80
triggering using MIDI commands, 98
Measures and Beats
Configuring, 65
Media
getting, 44
Media files
Auto preview setting, 45
publishing to the Web, 66
Meters
audio input, 121
channel, 33
disabling, 203
hardware, 92
mono-compatibility, 37
phase scopes, 36
showing/hiding, 33, 34, 93
VU, 35
MIDI, 195–201
Conflicting SCSI IDs, 211
Device configuring, 196
Devices, 198
Fine-tune value, 208
Initiating playback, 197
Input synchronization, 196
Keyboard, 209
Open loop versus closed loop, 207
Periodic transfer failures, 212
Playback and triggered playback, 195
Resetting triggers, 197
Sample Dump Standard (SDS), 205, 211
SCSI MIDI Device Interface (SMDI), 205
SMPTE, 195
Synchronizing when recording, 120
Timecode synchronization, 199–201
Trigger configuring, 196
Triggered playback, 195
Triggers, 195
Unity note, 208
using commands to trigger markers, 98
using commands to trigger regions, 105
MIDI Keyboard, 209
Configuring, 210
Displaying, 209
Generating chords, 210
Specifying instruments, 210
Troubleshooting, 210
Turning on, 209
Minimizing quantization error, 85
Mixing, 60, 130
audio from the clipboard, 61
by dragging and dropping, 60
Monitor for video previewing, 226
Monitoring audio input levels, 121
Monitoring levels in digital audio, 32
Mono files
converting from stereo, 146
converting to stereo or multichannel, 145
Mono to stereo conversion, 87
Mono-compatibility meters, 37
Mouse shortcuts, 19, 79, 260
Moving markers, 97
MTC sync, 199–201
MTU, 267
multichannel, 60
Multichannel audio
applying effects, 159
deleting selections in, 59, 60
editing, 91
opening and editing, 92
recording, 120
routing channels to hardware outputs, 91
synchronizing sonograms, 236
synchronizing spectrum graphs, 232
Multichannel files
creating from mono, 145
Selecting data, 40
Single-channel editing, 42
Working with, 40
Multiple takes (no Regions), 119
Multiple takes creating regions, 119
Musical time intervals, 103
Mute, 150
N
Naming
Automatically naming files, regions, and markers, 121
automatically naming markers, 97
automatically naming regions, 104
markers, 96
Naming a region, 104
Navigating
In the overview bar, 71
Spectrum graphs, 232
Navigation toolbar, 28
Net MD devices
exporting to, 67
New window
Creating, 51
Creating for each recorded take, 119
Creating through drag-and-drop, 131
Noise gate, 86
Noise shaping, 85, 144
Normalize, 86, 151
Applying dynamic compression, 86
dialog controls, 152
INDEX | vii
Normalize dialog
Attack time, 152
Average RMS level, 152
controls, 152
If clipping occurs, 152
If clipping occurs, Apply dynamic compression option, 152
If clipping occurs, Ignore (saturate) option, 152
If clipping occurs, Normalize peak value to 0 dB option, 152
If clipping occurs, Stop processing option, 152
Ignore below, 152
Normalize to, 152
Normalize using average RMS level, 152
Normalize using peak level, 152
Peak level, 152
Release time, 152
Scan Levels, 152
Use current scan level, 152
Use equal loudness contour, 152
Normalizing audio, 151
O
obtaining from Gracenote, 46
Online help
Via the web, 17
Open dialog, 44
Opening
Cutlist files, 112
Files, 44
multichannel audio, 92
Playlist files, 112
Regions List files, 107
Workspaces, 54
Opening files
Explorer window, 45
Optimization
Hard disk defragmentation, 203
meters, 203
Passive update, 203
Playback cursor and record counter, 203
Total buffer size, 203
Overview bar
Navigating, 71
Playback, 71
Using, 70
Overwriting, 127
P
Pan/Expand, 153
creating custom pan, 153
creating pans, 153
dialog controls, 154
Pan/Expand dialog, 154
controls, 154
Process mode, 154
Process mode, Pan (preserve stereo separation) option, 154
viii | INDEX
Panning, 153
creating a custom pan, 153
Passive updating of displays, 203
Paste Special, 127
Overwriting, 127
Replicating, 128
Pasting, 57, 129
by dragging and dropping a selection, 58
Drag-and-drop, 129
In existing data windows, 58
In new data windows, 58
Peak files, 47
Pencil tool, 134
Phase scopes, 36
Playbar
Current playback mode, 25
Optional shuttle control buttons, 25
Using, 25
Playing
Files, 48
From a specific point, 48
From the cutlist, 111
From the playlist, 110
Loop Playback mode, 49
Selections, 49
Playlist, 22, 108–112
Adding regions, 108
Arranging, 109
copying to the clipboard, 112
Count, 108
Creating new files from, 111
Deleting regions from, 109
Displaying, 108
Opening playlist files, 112
Playing from, 110
Replicating regions, 109
Saving playlist files, 112
Stop points, 110
Treating as cutlist, 111
Plug-In Chainer, 23
Adding plug-ins, 161, 165
Audio tail data processing mode, 163
Bypassing plug-ins, 163
Configuring plug-ins, 162
Loading saved chains, 164
Loading saved presets, 164
Plug-In Manager, 165
Preset Manager, 167
Removing plug-ins, 162
Saving chains, 163
Saving settings as a preset, 164
VST Effects, 160
Plug-In Manager, 23, 165
Plug-ins, See Effects
Preferences
Audio, 248
Display, 242
Editing, 243
File Types, 244
General, 240
Labels, 243
MIDI/Sync, 245
Previews tab, 246
Status, 247
Toolbars, 247
Video, 249
VST Effects, 250
Pre-roll to cursor, 69
Preset Manager, 167
Presets, 139
Creating, 140
Deleting, 140
Managing, 167
saving in Spectrum Analysis graph, 238
Using, 139
Previewing
cuts, 59
markers, 98
Operations, 141
regions, 105
video, 224
Previewing effect automation, 168
Previews, 141
Bypass, 141
Parameters, 141
Printing
sonogram, 236
spectrum graph, 234
Process mode, Mix mid-side (MS) recording to left and right
channels option, 154
Process mode, Pan (mix channels before panning) option, 154
Process mode, Stereo expand option, 154
Process toolbar, 30
Processes, 139–157
Auto Trim/Crop, 142
Bit-Depth Converter, 143
Channel Converter, 145
DC Offset, 147
EQ, 147
Fade, 147
Fade In, 149
Fade Out, 149
Insert Silence, 149
Invert/Flip, 150
Mute, 150
Normalize, 151
Pan/Expand, 153
resample, 154
reverse, 155
smooth/enhance, 155
time stretch, 155
volume, 156
Processing dialogs
Adjusting the data window selection, 141
Channel box, 141
End box, 141
Length box, 141
More button, 141
Start box, 141
Projects
creating, 43
Proper use of software, 125
Properties
editing file attributes, 83
Publishing to the Web, 66
Punch-In
Adjusting pre/post-roll, 120
Recording mode, 119
Q
Quantization error, 85
R
Rapid sound attacks, 102
RealMedia (.rm) commands, 99
Receiving samples, 208
Record meters, 121
INDEX | ix
Recording, 113–122
Acoustic Mirror test tone, 176
adjusting pre/post-roll, 120
audio configuration
Audio configuration, 113
automatically, 116
Automatically labeling files and regions, 121
Changing blinking status, 122
DC offset, 119
Inserting markers, 121
Modes, 119
multichannel, 120
normal mode, 114
Playing back recorded audio, 120
Punch-In, 119
Synchronizing with other devices, 120
triggering by set threshold, 117
triggering by time, 116
viewing audio input levels, 121
with a timer, 116
Recovering files after a crash, 67
Recovering the impulse for Acoustic Mirror, 176
Region
deleting, 104
naming, 104
renaming, 104
Regions, 101–106
Automatically naming, 121
automatically naming, 104
creating, 101
Creating automatically, 102
Creating from markers, 98
creating from markers, 105
deleting all, 104
deleting all in a selected area, 105
deleting all within a selection, 97
editing default names, 244
editing in data window, 104
Extracting, 106
inserting using drag-and-drop, 102
inserting using the keyboard, 102
inserting using time ruler shortcut, 102
Playback using MTC, 199
previewing, 105
triggering using MIDI commands, 105
Regions List, 22, 106
Changing the region order, 107, 109
copying to the clipboard, 107
Displaying, 106
opening Regions List files, 107
Saving Regions List files, 107
Regions/Playlist toolbar, 29
Release loops, 213
Creating, 214
x | INDEX
Renaming
markers, 96
Renaming a region, 104
Renaming effects (plug-ins), 166
Rendering files, 66
saving the project path, 56
Repairing audio
Audio Restoration plug-in, 134
Copying the other channel, 132
Interpolating audio, 133
Replacing with preceding audio, 133
Using Pencil tool, 134
Repeating an operation, 129
Replacing glitches, 133
Replicating
Audio, 128
Regions in the playlist, 109
Resample
dialog controls, 155
Resample dialog
controls, 155
Interpolation accuracy control, 155
New sample rate control, 155
Resampling, 154
downsampling, 154
upsampling, 154
Resetting default keyboard map, 251
Restoring a selection, 79
Reverse, 155
Reversing audio, 155
Rotating audio, 220
S
Sample rate, 84
Editing, 84
editing in Properties, 83
editing in status bar, 83
For CD burning, 123
Sample size
Editing, 84
Sampling, 205
Configuring the sampler, 205
External samplers, 205
Internal samplers, 205
MIDI Keyboard, 209
Open loop versus closed loop, 207
Sample Dump Standard (SDS), 211
Sampler Tool, 205
Saving sampler configurations, 208
SCSI/SMDI hardware and setup, 211
Sending and receiving samples, 208
Save All, 54
Save As, 52, 88
Saving
All open files, 54
Cutlist files, 112
Files, 52
Loop points, 221
Playlist files, 112
project path in rendered file, 56
Regions List files, 107
Sampler configurations, 208
Summary information, 89
Video files, 228
Workspaces, 54
Scott Studio
commands, 100
Script commands, 99
Script Editor, 23
Scripting, 185
Additional online information, 185
API and sample scripts, 185
Batch Converter, 191
Creating a script, 188
Editing an existing script, 188
Opening and running a script, 187
Script Editor window, 186
Scripting toolbar, 189
Scripting toolbar, 189
Adding or removing toolbar buttons, 189
Creating custom button images, 190
Running a script from, 190
Scrubbing, 72
on the timeline, 72
with the audio event locator, 72
with the keyboard, 72
with the scrub control slider, 72
SCSI MIDI Device Interface (SMDI), 205
SCSI/SMDI
Hardware setup, 211
Troubleshooting, 211
Selection, 81
extend edge to next zero, 81
extend to next zero, 81
snap edge to grid, 81
snap edge to zero, 81
snap to grid, 81
Selections
Auto snap to, 80
Creating on the fly, 79
deleting all markers and regions within, 97
Fine-tuning, 79
Restoring, 79
Selection status boxes, 49
Set Selection dialog, 78
Statistics, 50
Sending samples, 208
Sensitivity
VU meters, 36
Set Selection dialog, 78
Setting digital audio levels, 33
Setting volume, 156
SFK files, 47
Shifting a selection left/right, 220
Shortcuts
creating new, 250
customizing, 250
deleting a keyboard map, 250
editing, 250
importing a keyboard map, 251
Keyboard, 253
renaming a keyboard map, 251
resetting the default keyboard map, 251
saving a keyboard map, 250
Simple synthesis, 137
Smooth/Enhance, 155
SMPTE, 195, 265
Snap edge to grid
selection, 81
Snap edge to zero
selection, 81
Snap to grid
selection, 81
Snap to zero
selection, 81
snap to zero, 81
Snapping, 80
current selection, 80
disabling at high magnifications, 81
to grid, 80
to markers, 80
to whole time divisions, 80
to zero-crossings, 80
Snapshot
viewing statistics in spectrum graph, 234
Snapshots
creating and comparing, 233
erasing in spectrum graph, 234
showing and hiding in spectrum graph, 233
taking in a spectrum graph, 233
INDEX | xi
Sonogram, 234
adjusting color intensity, 236
Displaying, 234
Displaying frequency and amplitude values, 235
Displaying notes, 235
Displaying statistics, 235
improving contrast, 236
improving frequency resolution, 236
printing, 236
reducing processing time, 236
smoothing display, 236
synchronizing for multichannel file, 236
Tuning, 236
Updating, 235
Sound Forge software
Command descriptions, 32
Controls, 37–39
Crash recovery, 67
Data window, 23
Installation, 16
Introduction, 15
Playbar, 25
Status formats, 65
Toolbars, 26
ToolTips, 32
Spectrum Analysis, 22
changing spectrum graph zoom level, 232
changing the graph type, 232
printing graph, 234
printing sonogram, 236
Refreshing graphs, 232
saving custom settings, 238
settings, 237
snapshots, 233
Spectrum analysis, 229
FFT, 229
Sonogram, 234
Spectrum graph, 230
xii | INDEX
Spectrum graph, 230
Ceiling setting, 237
changing zoom level, 232
Channels setting, 237
Displaying, 230
Displaying frequency and amplitude values, 231
Displaying notes, 231
Displaying statistics, 231
erasing snapshots, 234
FFT overlap setting, 237
FFT size setting, 237
Floor setting, 237
Freq. Min. (Frequency minimum) setting, 237
Hold peaks during monitoring setting, 237
Logarithmic graphing setting, 237
Maintain last monitored view setting, 237
Max. (Frequency maximum) setting, 237
Monitoring input/output source, 231, 236
Navigating, 232
printing, 234
saving custom settings, 238
Set sonogram resolution setting, 237
showing and hiding snapshots, 233
Slices displayed setting, 237
Smoothing window setting, 237
snapshots, 233
Sync graphs setting, 237
synchronizing for multichannel file, 232
taking snapshots, 233
thumbnail image, 232
updating, 232
Viewing multiple, 233
viewing snapshot statistics, 234
Spectrum graph type
changing, 232
Spectrum graphs
automatically updating, 232
refreshing, 232
Standard toolbar, 27
Statistics, 50
Status bar
editing file attributes, 83
Status boxes, 49
Status formats, 65
Status/Selection toolbar, 29
Step-down conversion, 84
Step-up conversion, 84
Stereo
compressing selections, 153
expanding selections, 153
swapping channels, 146
Stereo files
Converting to mono, 87
converting to mono, 146
creating from mono, 145
Previewing data, 41
Stop points
Creating, 110
Deleting, 110
Streaming media commands, 99
for RealPlayer, 99
for Windows Media, 99
Summary information, 88
Editing, 88
Saving, 89
Viewing, 88
Sustaining loops, 213
Swapping stereo channels, 146
Synchronizing MIDI timecode, 199–201
Synthesizing audio, 135–137
System requirements, 15, 187
ToolTips, 32
Total buffer size, 203
Transport bar, 27
Triggered playback, 195
Triggered region playback, 197
Triggering markers with MIDI commands, 98
Triggering regions with MIDI commands, 105
Triggers, 195
Resetting, 197
Trimming audio, 60
Using Auto/Trim Crop, 142
Trimming impulse files for Acoustic Mirror, 177
Troubleshooting
Acoustic Mirror, 180
MIDI Keyboard, 210
SCSI/SMDI, 211
System performance, 203–204
Tuning a sonogram, 236
U
Undo/Redo, 62
Undo/Redo History, 22
Unity note, 208
Updating
Displays, 203
Sonograms, 235
spectrum graphs
Refreshing spectrum graphs, 232
T
Tempo
Calculating for loops, 221
Changing a file’s beat values, 66
Creating regions using current tempo, 103
Specifying for ACID loops, 218
Test tone for Acoustic Mirror, 175
Threshold recording, 117
setting prerecord buffer, 117
Time Display, 22
Time ruler, 73
Time Stretch, 155
Timecode
SMPTE, 265
Toolbars, 26
ACID Loop Creation Tools, 31, 219
Customizing, 26, 247
Displaying, 26
Effects, 30
Levels, 31
Navigation, 28
Process, 30
Regions/Playlist, 29
Standard, 27
Status/Selection, 29
Tools, 31
Transport, 27
Views, 28
Tools
Crossfade Loop, 216
Find, 132
Magnify, 76
Pencil, 134
Sampler, 205
Tools toolbar, 31
V
Video, 223–228
Attaching video to audio, 226
detaching from audio file, 227
External monitor, 226
Frame animation, 223
Frame numbering, 224
previewing, 224
Saving, 228
Video preview window, 224
Video strip, 223
Video files
working with, 47
Video frame
copying current, 224
Video Preview, 22
Video Preview window
settings, 225
Video strip
animating, 224
copying current video frame, 224
hiding, 223
showing, 223
Viewing audio input levels, 121
Viewing extended summary information, 88
Views, 82
Creating, 82
INDEX | xiii
Views toolbar, 28
Volume, 156
dialog controls, 157
increasing, 156
Volume dialog
controls, 157
VU meters, 35
adjusting sensitivity, 36
changing display resolution, 36
W
Wave Hammer
Compress tab, 182
Displaying, 181
Limit tab, 183
Web
publishing, 66
Windows Media files
Markers and script commands, 99
Workspaces, 54
Writing to CD, 123
Z
Zero-crossings
Preferences, 79
snapping current selection to, 80
snapping to, 80
Zooming, 73
Level ruler, 74
Time ruler, 73
Zoom ratio, 73
Zoom tricks, 76
xiv | INDEX