600 User Manual - LMI Corporation

Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
User Guide
Copyright © 2011
ASI DataMyte, Inc.
All rights reserved.
95777-004
600 Handheld Data Collector
User Guide
© 2011 ASI DataMyte, Inc.
2800 Campus Drive, Suite 60
Plymouth, Minnesota 55441
Phone 763-553-1040 • Fax 763-553-1041
www.asidatamyte.com
Restricted Rights Legend—Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as
set forth in Section 52.227-7013(c)(1)(ii)(May, 1987) of the U.S. Department of Defense Supplement to the
Federal Acquisition Regulations or other similar regulations of other governmental agencies.
Export Notice—These commodities are licensed by the U.S. for ultimate destination (ELS Country).
Diversion contrary to U.S. Law prohibited.
Disclaimer—In no event shall ASI DataMyte, Incorporated be liable for direct, indirect, special, incidental,
or consequential damages arising from the use or inability to use this product or documentation, even if
advised of the possibility of such damages. Information in this document is subject to change without notice
and does not represent a commitment on the part of ASI DataMyte, Inc. Because of the variety of uses for the
product described in this document, those responsible for the application and use of this hardware and
software must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps have been taken to assure that any application and
use meets all performance and safety requirements, including any applicable laws, regulations, codes and
standards.
Copyright Notice—Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in whole or in part, without
written permission of ASI DataMyte, Inc. is prohibited. Copyright © 2010 ASI DataMyte, Inc. All rights
reserved. Microsoft® and Windows® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Other product
names mentioned in this document are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies and
are hereby acknowledged.
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................... 4
Getting Started .................................................................................................................... 5
Power Requirements .................................................................................................................. 5
Replacing the Batteries .............................................................................................................. 7
Cleaning Instructions........................................................................................................... 9
Product Warnings.............................................................................................................. 10
Warning Labels ........................................................................................................................ 10
No Telecommunications Connection ....................................................................................... 10
Battery Warnings............................................................................................................... 11
Battery Cautions ................................................................................................................ 11
Battery Charger Warnings ............................................................................................................ 12
Battery Charger Cautions ................................................................................................. 12
Agency Approvals and Compliance .................................................................................. 13
FCC Compliance Statement ..................................................................................................... 13
Industry Canada Compliance Statement .................................................................................. 13
European Union Directives ..................................................................................................... 13
RF Energy, Related Devices, and Safe Usage ......................................................................... 15
Environmental Considerations ................................................................................................ 15
600 Data Collector Overview ...................................................................... 16
DM600 – TranSend II Configurations ............................................................................... 17
Network Configuration ............................................................................................................ 17
Non Network Configuration ..................................................................................................... 18
Data Collector Features .................................................................................................... 19
Hardware Features .................................................................................................................. 19
Software Features .................................................................................................................... 19
Hardware Overview........................................................................................................... 20
Data Collector Front View ...................................................................................................... 20
Back View ................................................................................................................................ 21
Bottom View ............................................................................................................................. 22
Top View .................................................................................................................................. 23
Alphanumeric Keypad ....................................................................................................... 27
Alphanumeric Keypad Key Combinations ............................................................................... 27
Interface Basics................................................................................................................. 31
Powering the Data Collector On ............................................................................................. 31
Powering the 600 Data Collector OFF ................................................................................... 32
The About Screen ..................................................................................................................... 32
Configuring the Data Collector .................................................................. 33
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 34
Setting Preferences .................................................................................................................. 34
Common Views ........................................................................................................................ 36
Enabling Alarms ...................................................................................................................... 42
i
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Contents
Configuring Gages ...................................................................................... 44
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 45
Configuration Checklist ........................................................................................................... 45
Supported Gage Types ..................................................................................................... 46
Analog Gage Manufacturers .................................................................................................... 46
Gage List ........................................................................................................................... 47
Gage Input Port Identification ................................................................................................. 49
Configuring the Torque Port .............................................................................................. 50
Torque Port Configuration Options ......................................................................................... 53
Torque Type Parameters.......................................................................................................... 56
Mastering Gages ............................................................................................................... 61
Analog Gages ........................................................................................................................... 61
Torque Tools ............................................................................................................................ 62
Testing Torque Tools ............................................................................................................... 64
Working with Setups ................................................................................... 66
Overview ........................................................................................................................... 67
Transferring Setups........................................................................................................... 68
Data Collection ............................................................................................ 69
Overview ........................................................................................................................... 70
Selecting a Setup .............................................................................................................. 72
Using the <select> Key ........................................................................................................... 72
Checking the Input Configuration ...................................................................................... 73
Checking Input Sources ........................................................................................................... 73
Collecting Data .................................................................................................................. 75
Entering Characteristic Data................................................................................................... 77
Out-of-Spec Readings .............................................................................................................. 81
Preview Out of Spec PromptUnreasonable Readings .................................................................. 81
Data Collect................................................................................................................................ 82
PreviewAssignable Cause Entries ............................................................................................. 82
Viewing “View Selections” ...................................................................................................... 84
Descriptors View
Characteristic View
Torque Curve View ..... 85
X-Bar & R
X-Bar & S
Histogram ............. 85
Histogram StatisticsRetaking Readings....................................................................................... 85
Using ReAudit .......................................................................................................................... 87
Viewing Characteristic Descriptors ......................................................................................... 89
Viewing Images ........................................................................................................................ 89
Residual Torque Measurement ................................................................. 90
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 91
What is Residual Torque? ........................................................................................................ 91
How do we measure residual torque? ...................................................................................... 91
Selecting a Measurement Strategy ................................................................................... 92
Theory of Operation for Angle-Based Restart and Angle-Based Breakaway ................. 103
Capturing Multiple Values from a Single Torque Event .................................................. 105
Establishing residual torque specification limits .............................................................. 105
Using Torque Wrench Extensions .................................................................................. 106
ii
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Contents
Dynamic Torque Measurement ............................................................... 107
Torque Wrenches............................................................................................................ 108
Torque Verification Recommendations .................................................................................. 108
Dynamic Torque Applications ............................................................................................... 108
Dynamic Torque Applications ............................................................................................... 109
Torque Wrench Adapters ....................................................................................................... 109
Torque Algorithms ................................................................................................................. 110
Pick-a-Point ........................................................................................................................... 114
Exporting Data........................................................................................... 115
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 116
TranSend II Software ............................................................................................................. 116
Transferring Data to TranSend II .................................................................................... 117
Flash Update Procedures ......................................................................... 118
600 Flash Update Introduction ........................................................................................ 119
Obtaining the Image File ................................................................................................. 120
Setting up Communications ............................................................................................ 121
Transferring the Firmware Update File ........................................................................... 122
Appendices ................................................................................................ 123
Appendix A - Characteristic Source ................................................................................ 124
Source Location Symbols ....................................................................................................... 124
Operator Symbols .................................................................................................................. 125
Boolean Operators ................................................................................................................. 125
Function Operators................................................................................................................ 126
Appendix B - Torque Wrench Adapters .......................................................................... 127
Using a Torque Adapter Extension ........................................................................................ 127
Torque Adapter Orientations ................................................................................................. 127
Appendix C – Port Pin Diagrams .................................................................................... 132
Support Information .................................................................................. 135
Technical Support ........................................................................................................... 135
ASI DataMyte Customer Service .................................................................................... 135
Support and Maintenance Agreements .......................................................................... 136
Index ........................................................................................................... 137
iii
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
1
Introduction
4
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Getting Started
Power Requirements
The ASI DataMyte Model 600 Data Collector can be powered with one battery. See Table 1,
Data Power Sources and Rating for specifications of the types of power sources compatible with
the 600, and Table 2, Battery Usage Time Chart, for additional information on battery
performance.
Table 1: Data Power Source and Rating
Power Source Type
Parameter
Rating
Voltage
3.7 Volts
Capacity
4000 mAh
Battery Powered
Lithium-ion
Battery Usage
The ASI DataMyte Model 600 has been designed and optimized to run on one Lithium-ion
battery supplied by ASI DataMyte. The Lithium-ion will provide the optimum cost benefit for
operation under any operating conditions.
The following Battery Usage Time Chart provides an idea of expected battery performance. The
table is based upon fully charged high capacity Lithium-ion battery and the following use
scenario. An operation based upon a five characteristic setup with a subgroup size of one. Each
subgroup collected had three readings out of specification, one reading that generated a caution
limit violation and one reading that was in specification, and that data was used to represent a
typical data collection effort for the purpose of the comparisons. It should be noted that the
accompanying buzzer duration and LED status varied dependent on each sample, and the data
used to generate the information may be atypical in that it represents a somewhat heavier than
normal battery load.
The information provided herein does not imply a commitment on the part of ASI DataMyte
regarding average battery usage: your usage time may vary depending upon the setup and other
use variables.
Use only batteries approved by ASI DataMyte with this data collector. Risk of
battery explosion and / or damage to data collector or charging equipment can
result if an incorrect battery type is used.
5
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 2: Battery Usage Time Chart
Light Use
Medium Use
Heavy Use
LED Duration
off
1 sec.
5 sec.
Backlight Duration / Intensity
5 sec / 4
10 sec. / 6
15 sec. / 8
Data Collection Rate
60 sec.
48 sec.
15 sec.
Buzzer Status / Tone
off
soft/12
loud/12
7 Hours 4
Minutes
6 Hours 41
Minutes
5 Hours 12
Minutes
Usage Definition:
Estimated Collection Time:
Battery: 4000 mAh Tool:
LightStar Series B Torque
Wrench*
* The values represent the highest battery usage for the 600 data collector; other applications should
experience longer battery life.
Guidelines for Optimum Lithium-Ion Battery Performance
600 Lithium-Ion batteries are provided with at least a 35% charge and need to
be fully charged before used.
600 Lithium-Ion batteries learn their maximum capacity by being cycled (fully
discharged or fully charged) numerous times, 3 or more. This conditioning is
highly recommended to obtain maximum battery life and performance.
Conditioning the battery (one cycle) once every 50 charges is recommended to
improve the gas gage accuracy and battery capacity.
Lithium-Ion batteries naturally discharge when not in use and should not be
stored for long periods of time without being cycled.
To maximize service life, spare batteries should be cycled at least every three
months and stored at 50% of full charge in a cool temperature, 15 C (59F) or
less. Do not freeze.
Only charge the 600 Lithium-Ion battery (Model No. 57570) in the ASI
DataMyte single bay charger Model 95747 or quad bay charger model 95746.
For additional guidelines for optimizing battery performance, please refer to the
following online resource http://www.batteryuniverisity.com/.
6
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Charging the Batteries
The battery charging system in the 600 Handheld Data Collector is different from that of all other ASI
DataMyte data collectors. The 600 Handheld Data Collector uses a Lithium-ion battery and batteries
are not charged when installed in the unit – even when the USB cable is plugged in. Discharged
Lithium-ion batteries should only be charged in the charging unit designed for that particular style
battery. Batteries supplied with the unit have little or no residual charge. Before using the data
collector, place the batteries in the charger until they are completely charged (a full charging cycle
takes approx. 3 to 4 hours to complete).
Never place non-rechargeable batteries in the battery charger as this may cause
damage to the batteries, the charger, or nearby property, and may be hazardous
to individuals near the charging unit.
Steps
1. Insert the batteries into the charging unit. Be sure to orient the batteries so that
the polarity is correct.
2. Connect the charging unit cord.
3. Plug the charging unit cord into a grounded wall outlet.
The indicators on the charger give the charging status:

Power: Solid Green – Power is available

Ready: Solid Green – Battery is ready

Charger or Fault: Solid Yellow – Battery is charging
Flashing Yellow – Battery is rejected
Replacing the Batteries
When the data collector detects a low battery condition, it will beep and display a “Low Battery”
message at the bottom of the display:
The message is repeated and the beeps will continue at one minute intervals until either 10 minutes
has elapsed (at which point the data collector shuts off) or until the battery charge falls below the
shutdown threshold.
7
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Use only batteries approved by ASI DataMyte with this data collector. Failure to
charge and use batteries as described in this document could result in poor
battery performance damage to the charging adapters or batteries or harm to
personnel.
Steps
1. Turn the data collector over to access the battery compartment cover as shown
in Figure 1.
2. Press down on the tab on the compartment cover and gently lift the cover up.
3. Remove the old battery from the battery compartment.
4. Install the recently charged battery in the orientation marked by the polarity
indicators inside the battery compartment.
5. Replace the compartment cover by inserting the lower lip of the cover into the
ledge on the data collector case. Press the cover into place, the cover should
snap snugly into the latch.
Figure 1. Replacing the Battery
8
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Cleaning Instructions
Unplug all power connections before cleaning. Do not use excessive moisture that
may seep into openings in the case.
Clean the case of the main unit and accessories using a mild detergent and soft damp
cloth to remove any dust and dirt accumulation.
Rub the case dry with a soft cloth to remove moisture. Do not operate the equipment
if you suspect that any moisture has entered the unit or accessories.
9
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Product Warnings
Warning Labels
If this equipment is not used in the manner described in this manual, the protection provided as part of
the equipment may be impaired causing personal injury and property damage. This label directs the
user to important information on the use of this equipment:
Refer to this User Guide for technical specifications
and instructions for use.
The technical specifications and instructions for use for safe operation can be found in this user guide:
No Telecommunications Connection
The following symbol is used to indicate that the telephone port on the data collector is not intended
to be used for telecommunications devices:
The Model 600 data collector is not intended to be connected to a public telecommunications
network.
10
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Battery Warnings
Failure to follow any of the following warning statements could result in damage
to the Model 600, the batteries, or injury to the operator.
Mistreatment of a battery may cause the battery to generate heat, explode, or
ignite and cause serious injury.
Do not short battery terminals or cause the (+) and (-) ends to contact metal
objects either when handling, carrying, or storing the battery
Do not expose the battery to fire
Do not expose the battery to heat or solder to the battery
Do not expose the battery to moisture
Do not pierce, crush, or subject the battery to impacts or shocks
Do not disassemble, or modify the battery. The battery contains safety and
protection devices. If these safety and protection devices are damaged, the
battery may generate heat, explode, or ignite.
Do not charge or discharge the battery in any device except those approved by
ASI DataMyte.
If a battery should leak fluid onto skin, eyes, or clothing rinse immediately with
water. If the eyes have been involved, contact a doctor immediately.
Battery Cautions
Failure to follow any of the following cautionary statements could result in
damage to the Model 600, the batteries, or injury to the operator.
Use only ASI DataMyte approved batteries. Risk of battery explosion and / or
damage to the data collector or charging equipment can result if an incorrect
battery type is used.
When the battery is worn out, insulate the terminals with adhesive tape or similar
materials before disposal.
Only discharge the battery when ambient temperature is between -20 0 C and +
45 0 C
Only charge the battery when ambient temperature is between 0 0 C and +45 0 C
If fluid should ever leak from a battery, avoid contact with the fluid. If fluid gets
into the eyes rinse with water and consult a doctor immediately.
Failure to follow the charging instructions provided could result in poor battery
performance, damage to the battery charger, batteries, or even harm to the
user/operator.
Immediately discontinue use of the cell if while using, charging, or storing, the
cell emits an unusual smell, feels hot, changes color, changes shape, or appears
abnormal in any other way.
11
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Battery Charger Warnings
Failure to follow any of the following warning statements could result in damage
to the battery charger, the batteries, or injury to the operator.
Do not store the batteries in the battery charger.
Battery Charger Cautions
Failure to follow any of the following cautionary statements could result in
damage to the battery charger, the batteries, or injury to the operator.
Use only ASI DataMyte approved battery charger. Risk of battery explosion and
/ or damage to the charging equipment can result if an incorrect battery charger is
used.
Only charge the battery when ambient temperature is between 0 0 C and +45 0 C
Failure to follow the charging instructions provided could result in poor battery
performance, damage to the battery charger, batteries, or even harm to the
user/operator.
12
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Agency Approvals and Compliance
FCC Compliance Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a business, commercial, or
industrial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy
and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely
to cause harmful interference in which case you will be required to correct the interference at
your own expense.
Notice: Any modifications made to this device that are not approved by ASI DataMyte, Inc. may
void the authority granted to the user by the FCC to operate this equipment.
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions:
1.
This device may not cause harmful interference, and
2.
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
Industry Canada Compliance Statement
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
European Union Directives
The product described in this documentation complies with the EU directive 2004/108/EC (EMC
Directive) and bears the CE Mark accordingly. The product has been tested and found to meet the
requirements of the harmonized standards, EN 60950 (Information Technology Equipment –
Safety – Part 1: General Requirements), EN 61326-1 (Electrical equipment for measurement,
control and laboratory use – EMC requirements – Part 1: General requirements, Class A
requirements), EN 55011 (Industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) Radio-frequency equipment –
Electromagnetic disturbance characteristics – Limits and methods of measurement, Class A
requirements), EN 61326-2-1 (Electrical equipment for measurement, control, and laboratory use
– EMC requirements – Part 2-1: Particular requirements – Test configurations, operational
conditions and performance criteria for sensitive test and measurement equipment for EMC
unprotected applications), and the following Immunity requirements: EN 61000 – 2, 3, 4, 6, and
8.
13
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
This is a Class A product. In a domestic or light industrial environment this
product may cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to
take adequate measures.
14
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
RF Energy, Related Devices, and Safe Usage
This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and must be installed in
accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Only devices verified to comply with the limits for
FCC Class A or better may be attached to this equipment. It is recommended that ASI DataMyte
cables be used whenever possible. If ASI DataMyte cables are not used, all peripheral devices should
be connected to this device via shielded cables with metalized connector hoods. If the product and
peripheral devices are not properly installed, this equipment may cause interference with radio and
television reception and is likely to violate FCC or European Union rules. If this equipment is not
used in the manner described in this manual, the protection provided by the equipment may be
impaired causing personal injury and property damage. Compliance with the directives may also be
impaired if the equipment is not used as described in the manual, modified, or used with equipment
that does not comply with the applicable directives.
Environmental Considerations
The 600 Handheld Data Collector operates at 0° to 45° Celsius up to 6,600 feet without de-rating.
The data collector may be stored at –20° to 60° C.
15
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
2
600 Data Collector
Overview
16
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
DM600 – TranSend II Configurations
The 600 Handheld Data Collector along with TranSend II can be configured in a network or a non
network configuration. The figures below show both configurations:
Network Configuration
600 – TranSend II
Network Configuration
With the network configuration one central database is used for all 600
data collectors. All data from all 600's will go into the same database.
`
`
PC Running
TranSend II Client
600 Data Collector
U SB
USB
600 Data Collector
USB
600 Data Collector
`
PC Running
TranSend II Client
PC Running
TranSend II Client
Ethernet
`
PC Running
TranSend II Server
Microsoft SQL 2008
Central Database
GageSuite and
TranSend Databases
Figure 2. Network
17
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Non Network Configuration
600 – TranSend II
Non-Network Configuration
With the single configuration each PC has a separate database.
USB
`
PC Running
TranSend II Client and Server
Microsoft SQL 2008
GageSuite and
TranSend Databases
`
PC Running
TranSend II Client and Server
Microsoft SQL 2008
GageSuite and
TranSend Databases
Figure 3. Non Network
18
600 Data Collector
U SB
600 Data Collector
USB
600 Data Collector
`
PC Running
TranSend II Client and Server
Microsoft SQL 2008
GageSuite and
TranSend Databases
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Data Collector Features
The 600 Handheld Data Collector is a lightweight, portable data collection device. It has an easy-toread color LCD panel that can be adjusted for various lighting conditions.
Hardware Features

1000 Mb of memory.

480 x 640 VGA TFT Active Matrix Color LCD with backlight.

Optional Digital module for connecting:
1. Mitutoyo
3. Ono Sokki
5. CDI
7. Serial
2. Federal Maxum 4. LMI Diamondback 6. Sylvac Serial

Optional Torque module for connecting:
1. Industry Standard Torque Wrench
3. Rotary Transducer
2. LED Indicating Torque Wrench with Angle 4. Rotary Transducer with Angle

Optional LMI module for connecting:
1. LMI 200
3. LMI TP-107
2. LMI 241, 241BW 4. LMI SK5038

Visual and Audio Feedback – two LED’s and a built-in speaker supply operator feedback as
data is collected.

Built-in Flash ROM loader for easy software upgrades.

USB communications for data-setup transfer.

Runs on one battery. Uses a “Low Battery” warning and user-defined automatic power-off
for battery management.
Software Features

Menu-driven interface for ease of operation.

Data collection of variables data with or without user defined labels.

Supports digital gages with the addition of a Digital module.

Supports analog gages with the addition of a Torque module.

Supports LMI gages with the addition of a LMI module.

Support of ASI DataMyte programs such as TranSend II™, as well as with third-party
software applications such as Microsoft® Excel™.

Supported languages: Chinese, English, Ford, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish

Graphical representation of data collection in columnar format.

Graphical representation of collected data in Xbar R, Xbar S and Histogram charts.
19
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Hardware Overview
Data Collector Front View
The 600 Handheld Data Collector standard hand grip contains an alpha-numeric keypad.
Color Display
Status Indicators
Alphanumeric Keypad
Figure 4. Front View

Color Display – The user interface for the data collector is displayed using a 480 x 640
VGA TFT Active Matrix Color LCD with backlight.

Alphanumeric Keypad – Contains additional keys for entering alphanumeric text.

Status Indicators – Two LED indicators are used to indicate the status of a given
reading.
Figure 5. Physical Dimensions
20
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Back View
The back of the 600 Handheld Data Collector provides access to the rechargeable battery
compartment.
The 600 Handheld Data Collector accommodates one ASI DataMyte supplied battery. The battery
compartment lifts off away from the case by pressing down on the tab on the compartment cover and
gently lifting up. See Battery Usage on page 5 for more information about charging and replacing the
battery.
The battery charging system in the 600 Handheld Data Collector is different from that of any other
ASI DataMyte data collector you may have. The 600 Data Collector uses one battery, and, any
batteries left in the 600 will not be charged-even if an USB communications cable is plugged in.
Discharged batteries should only be charged in the charging adapters designed for that particular
battery.
Do not open the battery, dispose of in fire or put in backwards.
Figure 6. Back View
21
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Bottom View
The bottom of the 600 Handheld Data Collector provides connections for USB communications.
USB Communications Port
Figure 7. Bottom View
USB Communications Port
The USB communications port is used to connect an ASI DataMyte #95748 cable from the data
collector to a computer running support software.
Figure 8. USB Communications Port
22
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Top View
The top end of the 600 Handheld Data Collector contains gage input ports. The exact ports on your
data collector may vary, depending on the options purchased.
Analog Gage (LMI) Option
The analog version of the 600 Data Collector includes analog gage connectors that support
two analog gage ports.

One USB gage port

One digital port

One dual channel analog gage port can be used for true position gages or an
LMI 241 gage.

Two single channel analog gage ports can be configured for and LMI 200
gage.
Digital Port
USB Port
LMI Ports
Figure 9. Top View – LMI Option
23
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque Option
The torque version of the 600 Handheld Data Collector includes the following ports:

One USB gage port

One analog torque wrench port
Note:
The torque module requires calibration annually. Contact ASI DataMyte
Customer Service for more information.
USB Port
Torque Port
Figure 10. Top View – Torque Option
Digital Gage Port
Most digital gages and barcode wands can be plugged into the digital gage port. The cable for the
gage is vendor-specific.
Figure 11. Digital Gage Port
24
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Dual Channel Analog Gages
If the analog option is installed, the dual channel analog gage port is indicated by a gap and flush
symbol. The dual channel analog gage port is used for true position gages.
Figure 12. True Position Gages
Single Channel Analog Gages
Two additional single channel analog gage ports are provided when the analog option is installed.
A typical use of a single channel analog gage port is to attach an LMI 200 Probe Gage or an LMI 300
Gap and Flush gage as shown in figure 13.
Figure 13. LMI 200 Probe, LMI 300 Gap and Flush Gage
25
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque Wrench
When the torque module is installed (see Figure 14), an analog port provides connection for a torque
wrench.
Figure 14. Torque Wrench
Figure 15. Rotary Transducer
26
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Alphanumeric Keypad
The 600 Handheld Data Collector's alphanumeric Keypad uses a number of specialized keys to
navigate the data collector interface.
Figure 16. Alphanumeric Keypad
Alphanumeric Keypad Key Combinations
Many Keypad keys work in a series by pressing multiple keys. Key combinations are indicated
by a “,” between the keys.
The alphanumeric/symbol keys are primarily used for entering the numbers 0 through 9. In addition,
each number key is associated with up to three letters. Letters and symbols can be entered into fields
by pressing the Left Pointer Key, the Center Pointer Key, or the Right Pointer Key and the
corresponding alphanumeric/symbol key.
Note:
The alphanumeric keys are “sticky” which means that they are pressed one at a time.
27
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Alphanumeric Keypad Key Combinations
Table 3: Alphanumeric Keypad Key Combinations
Key(s)
Function(s)
<menu>
1) Powers collector ON.
2) Displays the Main menu.
<shift>
When entering character string data, changes lower to upper
case.
<shift>, <menu>
Move to previous menu action.
<view>
Displays menu for Descriptors, Characteristic Review, Torque
Curve, X-Bar & R, X-Bar & S, Histogram and Histogram Statistics
selections. As set in Preferences.
<data>
1) Go to the Data Entry screen.
2) While collecting data, pressing the data key displays assigned
image.
<select>
Displays the Select Menu, allowing you to select a setup or
characteristic.
<symbol>, <select>
While collecting data, displays a prompt to jump to a specified
characteristic for data collection.
<enter>
1) Selects item from a list or menu.
2) Opens or closes an input box.
3) Toggles an option.
4) Triggers a gage reading in data entry or test.
5) Selects and inputs characters.
<>
Moves a selection cursor to the previous field in a menu or list.
<>
Moves the selection cursor to the next field in a menu or list.
<>
1) Move the selection cursor to the left while in a menu.
2) Move the cursor one character to the left in an input box.
<>
1) Moves the selection cursor to the right while in a menu.
2) Moves the cursor one character to the right in an input box.
<>
1) While collecting data, move to the next cell in data collection
sequence.
2) When reviewing an item, move to the next operation.
3) When reviewing data move to the next characteristic.
4) When an input box is displayed, close and enter the input
string.
<◄◄>
1) While collecting data, move to the previous cell in data
collection sequence.
2) When reviewing an item, move to the previous operation.
3) When reviewing data move to the previous characteristic.
4) When an input box is displayed, delete the previous character
in the input string.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 3: Alphanumeric Keypad Key Combinations
Key(s)
Function(s)
Creates the left symbol shown over the selected number key.
<symbol>,
, 1-9
<symbol>,
, 1-9
Creates the center symbol shown over the selected number key.
Creates the right symbol shown over the selected number key.
<symbol>,
, 1-9
.
Use the period key to enter a decimal point in a number.
-
Use the minus key to enter a negative number.
< >
< >
space
Creates a space after a letter, number or symbol.
Deletes one character to the left of the prompt.
Deletes a complete line of characters.
<shift>,
Creates the left letter shown on the top of the key.
, 1-9
Creates the center letter shown on the top of the key.
, 1-9
Creates the right letter shown on the top of the key.
, 1-9
Creates the left letter shown on the top of the key in upper case.
<shift>,
, 1-9
<shift>,
, 1-9
<shift>,
, 1-9
Creates the center letter shown on the top of the key in upper
case.
Creates the right letter shown on the top of the key in upper case.
29
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Examples of Using the Alphanumeric Keypad
The following example shows which keys to press to create specific letters or symbols. None of the
keys on the alphanumeric keypad are pressed at the same time, instead press one key at a time in the
order indicated. Key names appear within angle brackets, for example, the Symbol key is written as
<symbol> and the number 2 key as <2>.
Table 4: Examples of Using the Alphanumeric Keypad
To Enter...
Press these keys...
#
<symbol>
<6>
Z
<3>
To enter a source code such as k,g1:
k
<4>
,
<symbol>
<1>
g
<9>
1
<1>
30
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Interface Basics
Before starting up the data collector, make sure that the batteries are installed and fully charged.
Powering the Data Collector On
Step
1. Press the <menu> key.
In a moment, the 600 Main Menu appears.
Title Bar
Menu Options
Active Setup
Status Bar

Title Bar - The Title Bar appears at the top of the display and tells you where
you are in the data collector program. The Title Bar sometimes prompts you
for the next action to perform.

Menu Options - Submenu Options list the procedures you can perform. The
currently selected option is highlighted in red. Use the arrow keys ( or ) to
select an option. Some submenu options may be "grayed out," which means
that the option is not available at this time.

Active Setup - The Active Setup line refers to the setup currently active in the
data collector.

Status Bar - The Status Bar appears at the bottom of the display and tells you
status information for power, time and connectivity.
31
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Powering the 600 Data Collector OFF
Steps
1. If the Main menu is not displayed, press the <menu> key.
2. From the Main menu, press  or  to select Off.
3. Press <enter>.
The About Screen
The About screen shows the following information about your 600 Handheld Data
Collector.

The data collector model number

The amount of installed memory in megabytes

The data collector software version number and build number

ASI DataMyte's address and technical support telephone number

Patent information
To display the About screen, perform the following.
Steps
1. Power the 600 Data Collector on.
2. Press  or  to select About and press <enter>.
The About the 600 screen appears:
32
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
3
Configuring the Data
Collector
33
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Introduction
This section contains procedures for configuring preferences and for configuring views for the 600
Handheld Data Collector. Preferences allow you to customize your data collector with settings for
features such as key click sound, LED duration, and data collection preferences.
Setting Preferences
1. Press  or  to select Preferences and press <enter>.
2. Press  or  to select the device preference to change, and press <enter> to
either toggle the parameter value or display a data input prompt. See Table 5 on
the following page for a description of each option.
34
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Setting Preferences
Table 5: Preferences
Preference
Description
Settings
Key Click
Clicking sound when Keypad key is
pressed.
(On) or (Off)
Key Repeat
Auto-repeat when key is pressed.
(On) or (Off)
Key Case
Determines default case of letter.
(Upper) or (Lower)
Enable Buzzer
Turning on or off the buzzer.
(Enable) or (Disable)
Buzzer Volume
Determines the loudness of the speaker.
(High) or (Low)
Buzzer Tone
Determines the pitch of the speaker.
(1)–(16) (lower to higher)
LCD Brightness
Determines the brightness of the
display.
(1)–(8) (dim to bright)
LED Duration
Length of time the LED status indicator
lights remains turned on.
(0)–(99) seconds
Backlight Time
Length of time backlight remains on if
unit is idle.
(0)–(999) seconds
Retake Prompting
Determines whether a prompt asking
the operator to retake an out-of-spec
reading appears during data collection.
(On) or (Off)
Sort Setup List
Determines how the list of setups is
displayed.
(AlphaNum) or (None)
Save Torque Option
Determines when torque curve data is
stored in memory.
(None), (On Spec
Violation), (Exceptions) or
(Automatic)
View 1 Option
Determines which default graphical
representation of data is displayed when
the <view> button is selected.
(None), (Torque Curve),
XBar & R Chart),
Histogram), (Histogram
Stats), (Xbar & S Chart),
(Chars Review) and
(Descriptors)
View 2 Option
Determines which default graphical
representation of data is displayed when
<shift> then <view> buttons are
selected.
(None), (Torque Curve),
XBar & R Chart),
Histogram), (Histogram
Stats), (Xbar & S Chart),
(Chars Review) and
(Descriptors)
Languages
Determines which language the data
collect application is displayed in.
German, English,
Spanish, Ford, French,
Italian, Portuguese, and
Chinese
Number Decimal
Separator
Determines which character is used as
the decimal separator.
Dot (.) or Comma (,)
35
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Common Views
The Characteristic Review, Torque Curve (only available with a Torque Module), X-Bar & R, X-Bar
& Sigma, Histogram and Histogram Statistics views are common to the ASI DataMyte 600 data
collector. These views are displayed by hitting the <view> button on the 600 data collector.
Characteristic Review
The Characteristic Review screen displays the data collected for a given
characteristic in a setup.
Characteristic Name
Characteristic Data
Subgroup and Piece
▲▼
To Scroll
Thru Data
Setup Name
Steps
Use  or  to move between characteristics.
Select a line and press <shift>+<data> to jump to the selected place in the data
collection sequence for a NULL value. This does not function unless there is a
NULL value.
Torque Curve
The Torque Curve screen displays the torque curve for the most recent torque event
(only available with a Torque Module). The curve and its associated values may be
saved for export to appropriate support software, such as TranSend II.
Note:
Saving torque curves is controlled by a
setting in the Preferences:
None: No torque curve will be saved.
Out of Spec: A torque curve will be saved
each time a data value out of spec is taken.
Exceptions: Torque curves with no saved
value will be saved. (Default Setting)
Automatic: All torque reading collected will
be saved.
36
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Step
Press <shift>, <enter> to save the Torque Curve, making it available for
transfer.
Torque View
The displayed torque curve will plot the points that occur from the time the analog signal crosses the
start threshold to the time that the signal successfully crosses the stop threshold. The torque event will
be scaled to fit, regardless of duration:
Torque Curve, View
Torque Curve With Angle, Gage Test
Torque Curve, Pick a Point
Torque Curve Export
A Torque Curve View may be saved for export to Excel for more detailed analysis. When a Torque
Curve View is displayed, pressing <shift><enter> will save the torque curve as a file to be exported at
a later time.
Note: You may import Torque Curve data to Microsoft Excel using the ASI DataMyte TranSend II
application (an example of which is shown above).
37
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
X-Bar & R (Range)
The X-Bar & Range screen displays the data collected for a given characteristic in a
setup.
Chart Type
Characteristic Name
Xbar Upper Control Limit
(If Defined)
Xbar Chart
Xbar Lower Control Limit
(If Defined)
Rbar Upper Control Limit
(If Defined)
Range Chart
Rbar Lower Control Limit
(If Defined)
Setup Name
Subgroup Number
Use  or  to move between characteristics.
Points on the Xbar and Range chart:
Mean – (X-bar or MX-bar) The average of a sample which is the sum of
readings divided by the number of readings. For Individuals chart, the “Mean”
is plotted as a Moving Average.
R or MR – The range (or Moving Range) of samples. The difference between
the highest and lowest readings within a subgroup. For Individuals chart, the
“Range” is plotted as a Moving Range.
A plotted point on the X-bar and Range chart takes any one of the following
forms:
- Point in control
- Point to represent incomplete
characteristic (partially missing data)
- Point between control limit and 10% greater/less than control limit
- Point greater than 10 % above UCL
- Point less than 10% below LCL
In addition, a point may be missing from the chart, indicating that the subgroup
was skipped altogether. There may be no connecting line between to sequential
points, indicating that the latter subgroup is incomplete.
38
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
X-Bar & S (Sigma)
The X-Bar & Sigma screen displays the data collected for a given characteristic in a
setup.
Chart Type
Characteristic Name
Xbar Upper Control Limit
(If Defined)
Xbar Chart
Xbar Lower Control Limit
(If Defined)
Sigma Chart
Sbar Lower Control Limit
(If Defined)
Subgroup Number
Setup Name
Use  or  to move between characteristics.
Points on the Xbar and Sigma chart:
Mean – (X-bar or MX-bar) The average of a sample which is the sum of
readings divided by the number of readings. For Individuals chart, the “Mean”
is plotted as a Moving Average.
S – The sigma of samples. The difference between the highest and lowest
readings within a subgroup. For Individuals chart, the Moving Range chart is
displayed.
A plotted point on the X-bar and Sigma chart takes any one of the following
forms:
- Point in control
- Point to represent incomplete
characteristic (partially missing data)
- Point between control limit and 10% greater/less than control limit
- Point greater than 10 % above UCL
- Point less than 10% below LCL
In addition, a point may be missing from the chart, indicating that the subgroup
was skipped altogether. There may be no connecting line between to sequential
points, indicating that the latter subgroup is incomplete.
39
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Histogram
The Histogram screen displays the data collected for a given characteristic in a setup.
Chart
Type
Chart
Chart
Type
Type
Characteristic Name
+ - Sigma
Spec Limits
(If Defined)
Mean
Normal Distribution Curve
Data
Setup Name
Use  or  to move between characteristics.
The Histogram Chart displays the following information:
Upper and Lower Specification Limits (USL and LSL) – The vertical lines
indicating the highest and lowest values of a product dimension or
measurement that is acceptable.
Mean and ±3 Sigma Lines – The vertical lines indicating ±3 Sigma from the
mean of the distribution.
Frequency –The y axis line represents the number of data points that fall
within a class interval. Relative frequency is the frequency divided by the
total number of readings in a population.
Class Interval (Bin Width) – A range of readings of equal length (also
called a cell or bin). The entire set of intervals makes up the x axis line over
which data points are plotted. Each bar covers an interval and is centered at
the midpoint.
The bin width is constrained to be a multiple of the resolution for the
characteristic. Without this constraint, histograms would erroneously indicate an
uneven distribution of data. If a value falls on the boundary between two bins, it
is placed in the bin above the boundary. Points lying outside the distribution may
not be shown on the chart; a message (<0 or >0) indicates how many values are
not displayed and what side of the chart they are on.
40
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Histogram Statistics
The Histogram Statistics screen displays the data collected for a given characteristic
in a setup.
Chart Type
Characteristic Name
Statistic Values
Scroll Bar to See
Other Statistics
Statistics
Setup Name
Use  or  to move between characteristics.
All statistics are based on the standard sigma calculation.
41
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Enabling Alarms
The 600 Data Collector only monitors events on a characteristic when the Alarm is set for the current
characteristic. In TranSend II, toggle the Alarm parameter (On) or (Off) for each characteristic.
Follow these steps to enable an alarm.
Steps
1. From the TranSend II main menu, select <Setup Editor>.
2. Double click the desired setup.
The Alarms option appears in the Setup Characteristics section.
Alarms Option
3. Mouse click to toggle the Alarms setting to On.
4. Click <Event Prompts> to display a list of characteristic event conditions to
monitor.
Event Prompts
5. Press  or  to scroll through the list of conditions, and mouse click at each
entry to monitor.
6. When all items are selected, press <OK> or set the event conditions.
42
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
7. Select the save conditions for this set of event conditions and press <OK>.
Set all events like selected: apply these conditions to all events in current
characteristic. You can then set unique conditions for other characteristics.
Set all other characteristics like this: apply these conditions to the current
characteristic and all characteristic in this setup.
Cancel: returns to the setup without making any changes.
8. Repeat for each characteristic in the setup (scroll through the characteristics), if
necessary.
43
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
4
Configuring Gages
44
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Introduction
This section includes procedures for configuring, mastering and testing torque tools. Torque
Tools are connecting to the Torque Module port on the data collector. The data collector
software requires different configuration information depending on these various types. For
detailed information about torque tool applications see Section 7.
Configuration Checklist

Have your gage documentation at hand while configuring the gage.

Have the correct gage cabling in place. The cable that runs from the
gage to the data collector is vendor-specific. If you do not know
what cable to use, contact the gage vendor or ASI DataMyte
Technical Support.

Obtain the required communications parameters from the gage
documentation.
45
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Supported Gage Types
The 600 data collector can accept input from the following types of gages:

Digital – C.D.I., Maxum, Mitutoyo, Sylvac Serial, and Ono Sokki digital
gages. You should know the gage parameters (if any) for proper gage
configuration.

Serial – RS232, TTL, or RS422 gages. Communication parameters (i.e., data
bits, stop bits, parity, baud rate, Inquiry/Response strings, etc.) must be
known during configuration.
Note: Barcode Wands are considered serial devices or keyboard wedge.

Continuous Serial – RS232 with continuous output. Communication
parameters (i.e., data bits, stop bits, parity, baud rate, Inquiry/Response
strings, etc.) must be known during configuration.

Single Channel Analog – Single Channel Analog gages use only one port on
the data collector.

Dual Channel Analog – Dual Channel Analog gages require two ports with
one connector on the 600 Handheld Data Collector.

Torque Tools – Torque Wrenches and Rotary Transducers require that the
torque module be installed.
Analog Gage Manufacturers
Gages from the following gage manufacturers can be configured for use with the 600
Data Collector.
Analog Gage Manufacturers
Gage Manufacturer
Address
Linear Measurement Instruments,
Corporation
101 North Alloy Drive
Fenton, Michigan 48430
Phone: 810-714-5811
Fax: 810-714-5711
46
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Gage List
Many different gages can be attached to the 600 Handheld Data Collector to gather information. Each
gage used with the data collector is defined in the Gage Suite that is transferred from the TranSend II
application. The Gage Suite is used to:

Provide a List of Gage Input Ports used by the data collector.

Indicate how a particular Gage Input Port is presently configured.
Perform the following steps to access the Gage Suite.
Steps
1. From the Main menu, press  or  to select Gage and press <enter>.
The Gage Suite Selection window opens.
This Gage Suite is selected
Gage Suite Names
Gage Suite Description
2. Press  or  to scroll through the list of gage suites and press <enter> to select.
47
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
The Gage Alias window opens.
Selected Tab
Tab Controls
Selected Gage Alias
Gage and Use for
Selected Alias
Gage Alias Description
3. Press  or  to configure, test, or master a port and/or gage (see page 56).
48
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Gage Input Port Identification
All configurations of a port are available for data collection - even the ports not
currently displayed on the gage list. The physical ports available depend on the
configuration of your data collector.
USB Port
Torque Port
Torque Option
USB Port
Digital Port
LMI Ports
LMI Option
USB Port
Digital Port
Digital Option
Figure 17. Gage Input Ports
49
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Configuring the Torque Port
Torque is a measurement of force applied to tighten or remove a threaded fastener (such as a bolt,
screw, or nut). Refer to section 7 for more information about torque applications.
Steps
1. Connect the wrench with the appropriate cable to the torque wrench input port.
2. On the Main menu, select Gage and press <enter>.
3. Press  or to select a torque gage suite from the Gage Suite Selection screen.
50
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
3. Press  or to select a torque gage alias from the Gage Alias Selection screen.
4. Press  or  to select Configure in the Alias List submenu.
The Configure Gage Parameters screen opens for the selected gage alias.
Gage Suite Name
Alias Name
Gage Parameters
Use Parameters
Parameter Value
Alias Description
51
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
5. Complete the required fields in the Configure Gages screen. See Table 6,
“Torque Configuration Options,” on the next page for details about additional
options for each (general) parameter.
6. When you have set all of the configuration options, either press the <menu> key
or any arrow key.
52
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque Port Configuration Options
Table 6: Torque Configuration Options
Field
Description
Options
Scale
Maximum value the torque wrench or in-line transducer
is rated for. This value is often stamped on the gage.
For a 100 ft/lb wrench, the full scale is 100.
0-10,000
Rotation
Direction that the wrench or fastening device must be
turned in the application.
CW, CCW
Transducer
Sensitivity rating of the transducer. Most handheld
torque wrenches are 2.0 mv/v.
Collector sensitivity is fixed at 2.0 mv/v, with 1.0 and 1.6
values scaled.
1.0 mv/v,1.6 mv/v
or 2.0mv/v Bridge
Pick-a-point
This option provides a means of selecting any point
from a torque waveform and to store that selected point
as the reading.
On, Off
Sample Event
(Peak, Pulse, Breakaway,
Restart only)
Samples the torque signal at either a change in time or
a change in angle.
Time, Angle
Sample Time
The time duration between consecutive signal samples.
0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 3,
5, 10ms
Start Threshold
A percentage of the lower spec limit (or of the full scale
if lower spec limit is not defined) that the signal must
rise above for the amount of time specified by the value
for “Start Dwell” in order to be considered a valid signal.
If the value for Start Threshold is too high, it may mask
the actual peak signal. If the value is too low, it will not
mask the noisy portion of the signal.
2 to 99% of full
scale
Start Dwell
Minimum amount of time that the signal must remain
above the value set for “Start Threshold” in order to be
considered a valid signal. If the value for “Start Dwell” is
set too short, random noise may be accepted as data.
0-100 ms
Stop Threshold
A percentage of the full scale value that the signal must
remain below for the amount of time set in “Stop Dwell”
in order to terminate detection and accept a reading.
1 to (start
threshold -1)% of
full scale
Stop Dwell
Amount of time that the signal must remain below the
“Stop Threshold” in order to terminate detection and
accept a reading.
0-1000 ms
Peak Duration
(Peak Torque only)
The number of consecutive signal samples that must be
within the number of A/D bits as specified by the Peak
Zone. To use only the value of the highest point, set
duration to 1; to use the value of the plateau, set the
value to a number less that number of pixels that make
the plateau in the curve plot window.
1-10
Extension Multiplier
This option will multiply the gage result by a constant.
This is typically used with gage extensions.
.5 to 2.00
53
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 6: Torque Configuration Options
Field
Description
Options
Peak Zone
(Peak Torque only)
The number of A/D bits that a number of consecutive
signals must be within in order to qualify as a peak. Set
this large enough to always take a reading, but small
enough so that the point of interest is always in the flat
part of the plateau.
1-10
Dwell Blanking
This option determines whether a valid signal will be
accepted during the amount of time set in “Start Dwell”.
(On) or (Off)
Dead Time
Minimum amount of time after the signal has fallen
below the Stop Dwell time before the data collector can
accept another reading.
0-1000 ms
Delta Slope (Breakaway
and Restart only)
Required percentage change in the slope of the curve
to indicate breakaway.
1- 99%
Counts per Revolution
Angle-based breakaway and Restart constrain the
Counts per Revolution to be 9828 to match the
LightStar wrench (with angle option).
0 - 65000
The number of pulses per revolution generated by your
rotary transducer with angle. Typically 720, 1440, 2160,
2880, 9828.
Use (Angle Torque only)
Capture an angle value as data. Hand Set an angle of
rotation past a minimum torque.
Capture, Set
Noise Threshold
(Not for angle torque)
A percentage of full scale that the input signal must
cross before a signal can be considered a valid signal.
2-20%
Gage LED
Set to (On) only if using an LED indicating wrench (if set
to (On) with non-LED wrenches, erroneous behavior
may result).
(On) or (Off)
Precision
Decimal precision for gage values.
0 to 8
Angle Precision
Decimal precision for angle values.
0 to 8
Alignment Frequency
Type
The type of alignment frequency.
Hours or Days
Alignment Frequency
The precision of alignment frequency.
2 to 99 Hours or
Days
Over Torque Alert
(Breakaway, Restart and
Torque At Angle only)
A percentage of full scale that if the input signal crosses
will result in an Over Torque message.
0 to 100 % of Full
Scale
Timeout (Breakaway,
Restart and Torque At
Angle only)
Time limit (in seconds) on the duration of an angle
based reading.
1 to 10 Seconds
Minimum Rotation
(Breakaway and Restart
only)
This option determines the minimum rotation before a
valid reading can be taken.
0.0 to 5.0 Degrees
Restart Window
(Breakaway and Restart
Amount of angular rotation past the break point to
discover additional tightening to confirm the break.
0.1 to 9.0 Degrees
54
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 6: Torque Configuration Options
Field
only)
Description
Options
Capture Angle (Torque At
Angle Only)
This option determines the minimum angle rotation.
0.25 to 20
Degrees
55
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque Type Parameters
The following tables provide additional parameter information for the type of torque measurement selected.
Table 7: Set Torque Parameters
Parameter
Values
Default
Scale
0.0 to 10000.0
100
Transducer
1.0, 1.6, 2.0 mv/v
2.0 mv/v
Noise Threshold (%)
2% to 20% of Full Scale
3%
Counts per Revolution
Precision
Angle Precision
Gage Use Parameters
1 to 65000
0 to 8
0 to 8
9828
2 Decimal Places
2 Decimal Places
Rotation
CW/CCW
CW
Start Threshold
2% to 100% of Lower Spec Limit (or 5% Full
Scale if no LSL)
100%
Stop Threshold *
1% to (Start Threshold – 1)% of Full Scale
2%
Start Dwell
0 to 100 (0.050 ms resolution if less than 10ms)
10 ms
Stop Dwell
0 to 1000
50 ms
Dead Time
0 to 1000
300 ms
Gage LED
On/Off
On
Extension Multiplier
Non Zero
1
Gage Parameters
* If the actual stop threshold becomes greater than the start threshold, the torque algorithm code will constrain the stop
threshold to be equal to the start threshold.
56
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 8: Peak Torque Parameters
Parameter
Values
Default
Scale
0.0 to 10000.0
100
Transducer
1.0, 1.6, 2.0 mv/v
2.0 mv/v
Noise Threshold (%)
2% to 20% of Full Scale
3%
Counts per Revolution
Fixed at 9828
9828
Precision
Angle Precision
Gage Use Parameters
Sample Time
Rotation
Pick-a-Point
Start Threshold
Stop Threshold **
Start Dwell
Stop Dwell
Dead Time
Dwell Blanking
Gage LED
Peak Duration
Peak Zone
Extension Multiplier
0 to 8
0 to 8
If Sample Event = Time
0.050 to 250 (0.050 ms resolution if < 10ms)
CW/CCW
On/Off
2% to 99% of LSL (or 5% Full Scale if no LSL)
1% to (Start Threshold – 1)% of Full Scale
0 to 100 (0.050 ms resolution < than 10ms)
0 to 1000
0 to 1000
On/Off
On/Off
1 to 10
1 to 10
2 Decimal Places
2 Decimal Places
Non Zero
1
Gage Parameters
1 ms
CW
Off
50%
2%
30 ms
50 ms
300 ms
Off
On
1 sample
1 bit
If Sample Event = Angle
Rotation
Pick-a-Point
Start Threshold
Stop Threshold **
Start Dwell
Stop Dwell
Dead Time
Dwell Blanking
Gage LED
Peak Duration
Peak Zone
Extension Multiplier
CW/CCW
On/Off
2% to 99% of LSL (or 5% Full Scale if no LSL)
1% to (Start Threshold – 1)% of Full Scale
0 to 100 (0.050 ms resolution < than 10ms)
0 to 1000
0 to 1000
On/Off
On/Off
1 to 10
1 to 10
CW
Off
50%
2%
2 ms
350 ms
300 ms
Off
On
1 sample
1 bit
Non Zero
1
** If the actual stop threshold becomes greater than the start threshold, the torque algorithm code will constrain the
stop threshold to be equal to the start threshold.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 9: Breakaway Torque Parameters
Parameter
Values
Default
Scale
0.0 to 10000.0
100
Transducer
1.0, 1.6, 2.0 mv/v
2.0 mv/v
Noise Threshold
3% to 20% of Full Scale
3%
Counts per Revolution
Fixed at 9828
9828
Precision
Angle Precision
Gage Use Parameters
0 to 8
0 to 8
2 Decimal Places
2 Decimal Places
CW/CCW
CW
On/Off
Off
2% to 99% of LSL (or 5% Full Scale if no LSL)
0 to 100% of Full Scale
1 to 10 Seconds
0-5 degrees
0.1-9.0 degrees
1 to 99
50%
30%
10 Seconds
1
1.5
60
Non Zero
1
Gage Parameters
Rotation
Pick-a-point
Start Threshold *
Over Torque
Timeout
Minimum Rotation
Restart Window
Delta Slope
Extension Multiplier
* If the actual stop threshold becomes greater than the start threshold, the torque algorithm code will constrain the stop
threshold to be equal to the start threshold.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 10: Restart Torque Parameters
Parameter
Values
Default
Scale
0.0 to 10000.0
100
Transducer
1.0, 1.6, 2.0 mv/v
2.0 mv/v
Noise Threshold
3% to 20% of Full Scale
3%
Counts per Revolution
Fixed at 9828
9828
Precision
Angle Precision
Gage Use Parameters
0 to 8
0 to 8
2 Decimal Places
2 Decimal Places
CW/CCW
CW
On/Off
Off
2% to 99% of LSL (or 5% Full Scale if no LSL)
0 to 100% of Full Scale
1 to 10 Seconds
0-5 degrees
0.1-9.0 degrees
1 to 99
50%
30%
10 Seconds
1
1.5
60
Non Zero
1
Gage Parameters
Rotation
Pick-a-point
Start Threshold *
Over Torque
Timeout
Minimum Rotation
Restart Window
Delta Slope
Extension Multiplier
* If the actual stop threshold becomes greater than the start threshold, the torque algorithm code will constrain the stop
threshold to be equal to the start threshold.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Table 11: Pulse Torque Parameters
Parameter
Values
Default
Scale
0.0 to 10000.0
100
Transducer
1.0, 1.6, 2.0 mv/v
2.0 mv/v
Noise Threshold
3% to 20% of Full Scale
3%
Counts per Revolution
Fixed at 9828
1440
Precision
Angle Precision
0 to 8
0 to 8
2 Decimal Places
2 Decimal Places
0.050 to 250 (0.050 ms resolution if < 10ms)
0.100 ms
CW/CCW
CW
On/Off
Off
2% to 99% of LSL (or 5% Full Scale if no LSL)
0.050 to 50.0 (0.050 ms resolution if < 10ms)
0 to 1000
On/Off
50%
0.25 ms
300 ms
Off
Non Zero
1
Gage Parameters
Gage Use Parameters
Sample Time
Rotation
Pick-a-point
Start Threshold
Start Dwell
Stop Dwell
Gage LED
Extension Multiplier
* If the actual stop threshold becomes greater than the start threshold, the torque algorithm code will constrain the stop
threshold to be equal to the start threshold.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Mastering Gages
Mastering a gage calibrates the 600 Handheld Data Collector to known mechanical references
(masters). Master an analog gage whenever it is to be used in a new configuration.
Analog Gages
Analog gages must be mastered before they are used for data collection. Although the 600
Handheld Data Collector retains the mastering in memory even when the power is turned off, it is
recommended that analog gages be re-mastered periodically. This could be once a shift, once a
week, or before each time that the gage is used. Re-master the gage whenever a new gage is used
even if the same type of gage is to be used for measurement.
Mastering for analog gages can be of three types:

One-Point Mastering – Calibrates or masters a gage using one known points
as numeric values.

Two-Point Mastering – Calibrates or masters a gage using two known points
as numeric values.

Three-Point Mastering – Calibrates or masters a gage using two steps that
define the scale and direction, and a third step that establishes offset.
Steps
1. Connect the analog gage with the appropriate cable to the applicable analog
gage input port.
2. Power the gage ON.
3. On the Main menu, select Gage and press <enter>.
4. Select the gage alias to master from the Gage Suite screen.
5. Press  or  to select Master in the Gage Alias submenu.
Different options appear at the bottom of the Master Gages screen depending on
how the gage was configured. If two-point mastering was selected in the
configuration, Master Hi and Master Lo are available. If three-point mastering
was selected in the configuration, Master Lo, Master Hi, and Master Zero are
available.
Note:
When mastering gages at the full extent of their travel, it may be necessary to
set the Start Threshold gage parameter to a negative value in order to use the
Time at Level option.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque Tools
Most torque tools produce an output voltage of zero when at rest. Because some residual offset is
possible, it is necessary to master the output of the tool at a resting value. Moreover, each tool
may have different output voltages when at rest. It is recommended that all torque tools used
during data collection be mastered before use each shift.
Steps
1. Connect the torque tool with the appropriate cable to the Torque input port.
2. On the Main menu, select Gage and press <enter>.
3. Select the gage alias to master from the Gage Suite screen.
4. Press  or  to select Master in the Gage Alias submenu.
The Master Gages screen opens.
Gage Suite Name
Gage Alias Name
Gage Values
Gage Master Instructions
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
5. Allow the torque tool to settle at rest, with no force applied.
6. Press <enter> to master the tool.
After pressing <enter>, the wrench LED will light yellow until “OK” message
appears. If the LED turns red and the message “Fail” appears, retry the
mastering operation.
Master OK
Master Fail
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Testing Gages
After mastering a gage, test the gage to make sure that it is configured properly and is sending
readings to the data collector.
Testing Torque Tools
Steps
1. Connect the torque tool with the appropriate cable to the configured Data
Collector torque input port.
2. On the Main menu, select Gage and press <enter>.
3. Select the gage alias to test from the Gage Suite screen.
4. Press  or  to select Test in the Gage Alias submenu.
5. Verify that the gage reads zero with no load applied to the torque tool.
6. Enter the lower specification limit (Default is 10) or the expected measurement
value.
7. Activate the torque tool by applying force to a test bolt.
Observe the results on the Test Gages screen:
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
For Angle configurations, your test screen will look similar to the following:
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
5
Working with Setups
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Overview
A setup is a group of setup characteristics, labels, and data collector options specifically packaged for
use with the ASI DataMyte 600 Data Collector. You create setups using TranSend II and then transfer
the setup to the data collector. Figure 18 shows a typical process for working with setups.
Figure 18. Working with Setups
1. Create Setup(s) – Create a setup using the following support software package:
TranSend II™
2. Transfer Setup(s) – The process for transferring data depends on the support software package
used. You will need the ASI DataMyte USB cable to connect the data collector to the computer
running the support software.
3. Select Setup – Use the 600 Handheld Data Collector interface to select a setup.
4. Collect Data – Collect data for the setup.
5. Transfer Data – Transfer data back to the support software for analysis and storage.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Transferring Setups
Details about transferring setups to the 600 Handheld Data Collector varies with each software
package and is described in their respective user guides. Follow these steps to prepare the data
collector to receive a setup.
Steps
1. Connect the data collector to the computer running the support software using
the #95754 USB cable.
2. Power the data collector on.
3. Use your support software to transfer the setup to the 600 Data Collector.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
6
Data Collection
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
Overview
Figure19 shows the sequence for collecting data using the 600 Handheld Data Collector. Each step is
described briefly beginning on page 71 and in more detail following the overview.
Select
Setup
Check Input
Configuration
No
Yes
Continue?
Enter Subgroup
Label
Information
Enter Piece
Label
Information
Boundary
Char
Label(s)
M easure
Characteristic(s)
Enter Cause
out of
control
in control
Corrective Action
No
Characteristic
Subgroup(s)
Complete?
Adjust Process
Yes
Figure 19. Data Collection Sequence
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Section 6: Data Collection
Data Collection Sequence
1. Select Setup – When the data collector is properly configured, select the setup.
2. Check Input Configuration – Ensure that any gages or input devices referenced in
the setup, such as a torque wrench, are properly configured and mastered.
Note: Normally, this step is performed only once - at the outset of collecting data for
a new setup.
3. Enter Subgroup Label Information (if any) – Enter the subgroup label
information, such as Operator Name, Shift, etc. Subgroup labels are optional.
4. Enter Piece Label Information (if any) – If any piece labels are used, enter the
piece label information for all pieces of the largest characteristic subgroup either
at one time or before each piece is measured for variables data. The flow
diagram illustrates this by moving either directly from Enter Piece Label
Information to Measure Characteristic(s) or by looping at Enter Piece Label
Information until all pieces of the largest characteristic subgroup are inspected.
Piece labels are optional.
5. Measure Characteristic(s) – When the operator completes entering the label
information, the data collection sequence proceeds to display a prompt for the
first variable characteristic's data. While the operator is collecting data, if an
alarm condition is detected, the Cause label (and perhaps other characteristic
labels) can automatically appear. The operator must respond to the label by
indicating what is responsible for the non-normal condition before data
collection resumes. Characteristic label values can only be entered when
characteristic data is being collected.
Note: While collecting data, characteristic labels can be set to automatically appear
whenever an alarm condition is detected.
6. Characteristic Subgroup(s) Complete? – As long as data collection for each
characteristic subgroup is incomplete, the 600 Handheld Data Collector
continues to prompt you for variable characteristic data. When all the data for
each characteristic subgroup is complete, you can choose to continue collecting
data for this setup or you can choose to select a different setup.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Selecting a Setup
You can select a setup that is stored in the data collector by pressing the <select> key.
Using the <select> Key
Steps
1. Power the data collector on.
2. Press <select> on the keypad.
The data collector displays a list of setups that are currently stored in memory.
Select Characteristics or Setups
Setups in Memory
Selected Setup
Current Active Setup
The bottom line displays the currently selected setup. This active setup also
appears selected in the list.
The Select Setup screen lists setups either in alphabetical or chronological
order depending on how the Part List option is set in the Preferences (see
Setting Preferences on page 34).
Note:
If pressing the <select> key does not display the Setup Selection menu, you
may have no setups loaded into memory.
3. If necessary, press  or  to select characteristics of the highlighted setup.
4. Press  or  to select the setup.
5. Press <enter>. Setup is selected and data collect is entered.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Checking the Input Configuration
Before collecting data with a new setup, check the label and characteristic input sources for the setup
elements to ensure that any gages referenced in the setup are properly configured.
Checking Input Sources

Label Source refers to the location from which a label value is entered.

Characteristic Source refers to the location where a characteristic value is entered.
For example, a source can be the Keypad (K), a gage alias (peak), or a list (L). The
input source is determined by the setup.
If you enter label values using a gage, the gage port must be configured for this type
of use. See Section 4, Configuring Gages for more information about configuring
gage ports. Also see Appendix A - Characteristic Source for information about source
identifiers.
Source information cannot be reviewed in the 600. It can only be reviewed in the
support software (TranSend II). To review the input configuration, perform the
following steps:
Steps
1. Start the TranSend II software.
2. From the Main menu, press <Setup Editor>.
3. Select the setup by double clicking on the setup name.
The Setup screen appears:
Gage Suite Used
Subgroup Label Source
Characteristic Source
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
To verify that a Gage Suite is configured for a specific setup, perform the following
Steps
1. From the Main menu, press  or  to select Gage and press <enter>.
The Gage Suite Selection opens:
List of Gage Suite Names
2. If a Gage Suite is not displayed that matches the Gage Suite selected in the
Setup, configure the Suite as described in Section 4, Configuring Gages.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
Collecting Data
To collect data for the currently selected setup, press the <data> key on the keypad. The data collector
opens the data collection screen where you last stopped collecting data or at the beginning of the
collection sequence if you had not collected any data for the setup.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Entering Label Information
Generally, a setup begins with one or more prompts for subgroup label values:
Element Number
Label Prompt
List Choices
Label Source
Last Entry
Setup Name
Screen Elements






Element Number – The number of the element for which you are being
prompted to enter data. SG LBL# indicates a subgroup label element,
P L BL# a piece label, and C# a characteristic. SG# indicates the subgroup
number.
Label Prompt – Name of label to enter.
Label Source – The source from which the collector expects to get the data.
List Choices – List of predetermined choices.
Last Entry – The last entry you made, if any. In Autoscan mode, the last two
entries are displayed. If you took an out-of-spec reading, the last entry
display indicates whether the entry was over or under the limit.
Setup Name – The setup name for which you are currently entering subgroup
data.
Steps
1. Enter the requested information for the first label using the alias indicated. For
example, you may scan a barcode using a barcode wand configured for port
USB or enter data using the keypad.
To enter the dittoed value (the same value as entered previously), press
<enter>.
The data collector accepts the reading and proceeds to
the next setup element:
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
2. Enter label information using the alias indicated, for example:
For a list source as shown above, press  or  to select the correct choice
and press <enter>.
To enter the dittoed value, press <enter>.
Entering Characteristic Data
After all label information is entered, such as subgroup and piece label values, the data collection
sequence proceeds to prompt for variable characteristic data. You can enter data in either the Data
Entry screen or the Preview screen or view and enter characteristic label data in the Char Label
screen.
If engineering limits/caution limits are defined for the characteristic, the data collector LED’s indicate
the status of a reading:

Red (left) LED – The reading is out of engineering limits.

Green (right) LED – The reading is between the engineering limits.

Orange (left and right) LED – The reading is within the caution limits.
Note: The duration of the LED Indicators is set in the data collector Preferences, see page 34.
The Data Entry Screen
Engineering Limits
Element Number
Characteristic Name
Alias Name
Last Entry
Setup Name
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Section 6: Data Collection
Steps
1. If the Data Entry screen is not displayed, press Data.
2. Use one of the sources indicated to enter data.
In the Data Entry screen above, the source for the characteristic is peak which
means that data can come from the gage connected to the alias peak.
To enter data using the alphanumeric keypad, enter the information into the
Data Entry Box using the keys on the keypad.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Preview Screen
Preview Mode provides a graphical representation of data values in a column display
during data collection.
The Preview screen in torque applications shows a zero-based column graph. As you
exert force on the torque wrench, the column “fills” upward, then drops back to zero
when the force is removed (for torque applications, Preview Mode is enabled only for
Peak and Set torque types as well as LMI gages).
Note: Data entry mode will now first default to the ‘Preview’ screen for
characteristics that have a gage source specified—if the torque module or LMI
module is not installed (if the torque module is installed, data entry will not default
to Preview Mode).
Steps
1. If the Preview screen is not displayed, press  to select Preview.
Notice the column display representing the gage's digital reading.
2. For non-torque gages, to take a gage reading:
Press <enter> on the keypad.
The column display updates immediately to incorporate the new reading into the
results, and the LED indicators flash to indicate status as described on page 33.
Preview Mode does not show source formulas. To see a source formula, press  to
select Enter Data. Enter readings as described previously and press  to select
Preview and view the result.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Label Entry
The data collector prompts you for characteristic labels when applicable, however
you may enter characteristic label data using the Label option tab at any time during
the data collection.
1. Press  or  to move to Char Label.
Double arrows indicate that
additional characteristic
labels may exist. Press ◄◄
or ►► to view the next or
previous label.
Label Choice List
Active Setup Name
2. Select any label choice.
Characteristic Boundary
After the first characteristic reading is taken, the data collector proceeds to the next
characteristic. If characteristic boundary is (On) for the first characteristic, the
operator collects the first characteristic's data for each sample in the subgroup before
proceeding to the second characteristic. The boundary option is set in the support
software, TranSend II.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Out-of-Spec Readings
You can set the data collector to prompt the operator if a reading is out of spec. See “Setting Device
Preferences” on page 32. If a reading is out of specification and Retake Prompting is set to (On), a
prompt similar to the following appears.
Prompted Out of Spec Prompt
Proceed in one of two ways:
Steps
1. Press <enter> to Accept the reading as valid.
2. Press  to select Retake the reading without saving the initial reading.
If you are collecting data while in the Preview Mode, the column display indicates an out-ofspecification reading immediately using message:
Preview Out of Spec Prompt
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Section 6: Data Collection
Unreasonable Readings
The data collector will force the operator to take another reading.
An unreasonable reading appears as follows:
Data Collect
Preview
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
Assignable Cause Entries
If an assignable cause condition (limit violation, first or last piece) is detected, the Cause prompt
automatically appears. Alarms must be active for the characteristic, refer to Enabling Alarms
on page 42.
Steps
1. Press  or  to select an assignable cause from the label list.
2. Press <enter>.
Moves to Next/Previous Label
label
Label Name
Label Value List
Setup Name
After a value is entered in response to the Cause prompt, other characteristic label(s) may
also appear depending on the setup's configuration.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Viewing “View Selections”
Press the <view> key at any time or <shift> then <view> to see the View Selections for the current
setup.
1.
Descriptors – Displays the Descriptors for the current setup.
2.
Characteristic Review – Displays collected data for the current setup/characteristic.
3.
Torque Curve – Displays the last taken torque curve.
4.
X-Bar & R – Displays an X-Bar and Range chart for the current setup/characteristic.
5.
X-Bar & Sigma – Displays an X-Bar and Sigma chart for the current setup/characteristic.
6.
Histogram – Displays a Histogram chart for the current setup/characteristic.
7.
Histogram Statistics – Displays Histogram Statistics for the current setup/characteristic.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Descriptors View
X-Bar & R
Section 6: Data Collection
Characteristic View
X-Bar & S
Histogram Statistics
85
Torque Curve View
Histogram
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
Retaking Readings
At any time during data collection for a setup, retake a reading by pressing the  key until the
reading you wish to change is displayed. The former reading appears. At this point, the reading can be
retaken and the new value replaces the older value. The data collector proceeds to the next setup
element in the sequence.
Retaking a reading in the DM600 after a subgroup is transferred to TranSend II is not allowed.
Characteristic, Piece and
Subgroup location
Former Reading
Data Collect View
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 6: Data Collection
Using ReAudit
Use the ReAudit option to create a setup that consists of only a subset of selected characteristics from
the current setup. ReAudit option is useful for monitoring data for a frequently failing characteristics.
Steps
1. Select ReAudit from the Main menu.
ReAudit Selection
2. In the Choose Setup to ReAudit screen, select the setup that contains the
characteristics to monitor.
The data collector creates a new setup from the selected setup and names it the
same as the original with the suffix,R1. Subsequent re-audits of the same part
setup would be named,R2, ,R3, etc.
Note:
The new name can only be 32 characters long, including the, Rx designator.
If the setup name is longer than 29 characters, it will be truncated to allow
space for the ,Rx designator.
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Section 6: Data Collection
3. The next screen lists the characteristics in the setup.
4. Press  or  to navigate to the first characteristic to include in the ReAudit
setup and press <Enter>. A checkmark is placed before the selected
characteristic.
Note:
Pressing “Shift + ” will select all characteristics and pressing
“Shift + ” will unselect all characteristics.
5. Repeat to select additional characteristics if necessary.
6. Press  or  to select Create.
The newly created setup opens in data collect.
7. Collect data for the setup as prompted by the data collector.
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Section 6: Data Collection
Viewing Characteristic Descriptors
Characteristic Descriptors are short descriptive fields used to communicate additional information to
the data collector user. Characteristic descriptors can be defined when a setup is created in TranSend
II. Characteristic descriptors can be viewed while in Preview Mode or Prompted Data Collect Mode.
Steps
1. If necessary, press  or  to select Data.
2. Press the <data> key.
Additional information about the characteristic appears in an overlay such as the
following:
Viewing Images
Characteristic images are descriptive photographs used to communicate additional information to the
data collector user. Characteristic images must be defined when a setup is created in TranSend II.
Characteristic images can be viewed while in Prompted Data Collect and Preview Modes.
Steps
1. From the data collect view, press <data>.
2. Press <data> again to display the characteristic descriptors for the characteristic.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
7
Residual Torque
Measurement
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Introduction
What is Residual Torque?
Torque is defined as force that causes twisting or turning. Residual torque may be
defined as the torque that remains on a threaded fastener after it has been tightened.
The purpose of residual torque measurement is either to assess the performance of a
power tool that fastened a given joint, or to simply determine whether the torque on
given joint is sufficient for its intended purpose.
For example, for safety purposes the torque on the lug nuts of a vehicle should not
be below 110 Nm. Measuring the residual torque will determine if the lug nut is
safe for use.
Another example: The power tool that installs that lug nut is supposed to install it
between 120-160 Nm. Measuring the residual torque on the fastener will determine
if the power tool is performing as it should.
How do we measure residual torque?
We measure residual torque by means of applying torque to the tightened fastener
and observing the behavior of the fastener. This is usually performed with a hand
torque wrench.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Selecting a Measurement Strategy
Different applications require different measurement strategies.
Angle Based Restart
Restart Torque is used in residual torque measurement applications where you need to remove the
effects of stiction. The restart point is essentially the point at which the installing tool ended the
application of torque. Paint, temperature differences, lock washers, metallic adhesion, and adhesive
compounds can all increase the amount of force required to break the fastener loose. To more
accurately record the torque applied by the original fastening process, it may be preferable to record
the point after the breakaway when the fastener “restarts.” This is the preferred measurement strategy
for almost all joints.
The following represents force applied over time on a high stiction joint in a Restart torque
application:
Restart on a high stiction joint
The following curve represents force applied over time on a low stiction (i.e.,
well-lubricated) joint in a restart torque application:
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench

Slow steady pull until fastener moves 1.5 degrees until LED lights or buzzer sounds.
Best Application

Determining the point to which a power tool has fastened the joint. This is the recommended
algorithm for checking power tool performance and estimating clamp load.
Most Problematic Application

Not suitable for applications where the work piece is rotationally unstable or when additional
rotation will not apply additional torque (i.e., a fastener beyond yield). Another example is a
very long shank bolt where the head may start to turn before the threads turn producing a false
double break.
Joint Characteristics

Good for all joint types.
Error Conditions


Work piece rotation may result in a false reading
Jerking the wrench may result in no reading
Source-Based Gage Override

The default value for change of slope is 60%. If a given joint requires greater sensitivity to
capture the break point, decrease this percentage. This can be accomplished by modifying the
characteristic source. For example, Angle {40} will override the gage configuration to use a
slope of 40%. It is unlikely you will ever need this feature.
Angle Based Restart Summary
Strengths:




Operator independent
Instant LED and buzzer notification of fastener motion and measurement status
Little or no training required
Most repeatable method for measuring torque required to keep a fastener in motion after
breakaway
 Eliminates overshoot errors
 Eliminates false readings due to early release
Weaknesses:


Requires rotationally stable work piece
Not suitable for fasteners torqued to yield
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Angle based Breakaway
Angle Based Breakaway is the torque required to start a fastener in motion qualified by angle to
eliminate false readings.
The following curve represents the force applied over angle on a high stiction joint in a breakaway
torque application:
Angle Based Breakaway on a high stiction joint
The following curve represents the force applied over angle on a low stiction (i.e., well-lubricated)
joint in a breakaway torque application:
Angle Based Breakaway on a well-lubricated joint
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench

Slow steady pull until fastener moves 1.5 degrees until LED lights or buzzer sounds.
Best Application

Measuring the torque required to start a fastener in motion. For example, lug nuts on a vehicle
where the purpose of the measurement is to determine if they are too tight for a customer to
break them free.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Most Problematic Application

Not suitable for applications where the work piece is rotationally unstable or when additional
rotation will not apply additional torque (i.e., a fastener beyond yield). Another example is a
very long shank bolt where the head may start to turn before the threads turn producing a false
double break.
Joint Characteristics

Good for all joint types.
Error Conditions


Work piece rotation may result in a false reading
Jerking the wrench may result in no reading
Source-Based Gage Override
The default value for change of slope is 60%. If a given joint requires greater sensitivity to capture
the break point, decrease this percentage. This can be accomplished by modifying the characteristic
source. For example, Angle {40} will override the gage configuration to use a slope of 40%. It is
unlikely you will ever need this feature.
Angle Based Breakaway Summary
Strengths:






Operator independent
Instant LED and buzzer notification of fastener motion and measurement status
Little or no training required
Most repeatable method for measuring torque to turn
Eliminates overshoot errors
Eliminates false readings due to early release
Weaknesses:


Requires rotationally stable work piece
Not suitable for fasteners torqued to yield
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque at Angle
Torque at Angle is the measured torque at a preset number of degrees of sensed rotation past a
starting torque threshold. Note: Sensed rotation includes windup in the wrench, the work piece, the
socket, the extension, as well as the fastener rotation itself.
Torque at Angle Chart
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench

Slow steady pull until LED lights or buzzer sounds.
Best Application

Fasteners that exhibit a double break such as extremely long shank bolts where the head turns
before the threads and fasteners torqued to yield where angle based restart and breakaway are
not appropriate.
Most Problematic Application

Applications where there is a significant degree of variation on flexibility or rotational
instability from one work piece to the next.
Joint Characteristics

Best for those rare joints that experience a double break.
Error Conditions

Excessive work piece rotation may result in a false reading
Source-Based Gage Override
Overriding the gage configuration capture angle can be accomplished by modifying the characteristic
source. For example, Angle {2.7} will override the gage configuration capture angle to use 2.7
degrees of rotation past the start threshold. Since different joints using different sockets, extensions,
etc. will have a different amount of windup, this value may need to be customized on a per
measurement basis. The capture angle should always be past windup and within the fastener rotation
portion of the torque/angle curve. See above.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
In addition, the start threshold from which angle is measured can be established on a permeasurement basis using the form Angle{2.7}{35}, where 2.7 is the overriding capture angle and 35
is the start threshold in torque units.
Torque at Angle Summary
Strengths:





Operator independent
Instant LED and buzzer notification of fastener motion and measurement status
Little or no training required
Eliminates overshoot errors
Eliminates false readings due to early release
Weaknesses:



Requires rotationally stable work piece
Has greater variability than angle based restart or angle based breakaway
Capture angle needs to be set individually for each joint type to be audited
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Peak
Peak torque is the highest measured value during a torque event represented by the maximum torque
required to turn a fastener. The following curve represents the force applied over time in a peak
torque application:
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench

Creep up slowly and release the wrench the instant the fastener turns.
Best Application

Fasteners where the operator can easily determine (i.e., by sight) that the fastener has moved.
Most Problematic Application

Fasteners where the operator cannot easily determine (i.e., by sight) that the fastener has
moved. Applications where the work piece is in motion or vibration may be mistaken for
fastener motion.
 Joints where stiction can vary from little or none to very large on one fastener to the next.
Joint Characteristics

All types.
Error Conditions


Excessive overshoot will yield a false high measurement
Wrench release before fastener motion will generate a false low measurement
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Peak Summary
Strengths:

Simplicity
Weaknesses:






Operator dependence
Significant training required
Best technique is very slowly increasing pressure until fastener turns
Variations in human reaction time result in overshoot
Early release causes false low
Excessive overshoot causes false high
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque vs. Time Breakaway
Torque vs. Time Breakaway is the point at which there is a sharp change in slope in the torque/time
curve, normally caused by the start of fastener motion.
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench
 A fast high-speed pull.
Best Application
 Well-lubricated hard joints. For example, new fasteners immediately after installation.
Most Problematic Application
 Low stiction soft joints.
 Use by other than highly trained and highly skilled operators.
Joint Characteristics
 Best for high stiction joints.
Error Conditions
 A slow pull will frequently produce a false low reading.
Torque vs. Time Breakaway Summary
Strengths:
 Most Accurate measure of torque to turn
Weaknesses:
 High operator dependence
 Substantial training required
 Operator technique easily causes errors
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Torque vs. Time Restart
Torque vs. Time Restart is the torque required to keep a fastener in motion immediately after
breakaway.
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench
 A fast high-speed pull.
Best Application
 High stiction joints that produce a sharp break in the torque time curve. For example, a painted
or corroded joint.
Most Problematic Application
 Low stiction soft joints.
 Use by other than highly skilled operators.
Joint Characteristics
 Best for high stiction joints.
Error Conditions
 A slow pull will frequently produce a false low reading.
Torque vs. Time Restart Summary
Strengths:
 Most accurate for measuring torque required to keep a fastener in motion after breakaway
Weaknesses:
 High operator dependence
 Substantial training required
 Operator technique errors easily cause large measurement errors
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Set Torque
Set Torque is a technique whereby a tone will sound when the wrench applies a preset amount of
torque to a fastener. This is used where it is necessary to check for minimum torque on a fastener
without causing fastener motion. For example, a joint locked with a chemical adhesive may be
checked to ensure the fastener does not rotate when the predefined amount of torque is applied.
Proper Technique - How to pull the wrench

Slowly apply until tone is heard and then release. If the fastener fails to move, the joint passes
inspection; if it moves, the joint fails inspection.
Best Application

Adhesively locked fasteners.
Most Problematic Application

Fasteners where the operator cannot easily determine (i.e., by sight) that the fastener has
moved.
Joint Characteristics

All types.
Error Conditions

Overshoot causing fastener motion.
Set Torque Summary
Strengths:

Ideal for adhesive lock fasteners where a check for minimum without check for motion is
required
Weaknesses:

Limited application
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Theory of Operation for Angle-Based Restart and AngleBased Breakaway
When measuring residual torque the wrench senses two kinds of angular motion. The first is windup,
which is caused by flex in the work piece, metallic wrench drive, extension, socket, and bolt head.
Typically windup is only a few degrees (or a fraction of a degree). For the same joint, windup will be
greater with a long socket, long extension, crow's foot, or rubber mounted work piece. See below.
The second type of motion detected by the wrench is fastener rotation:
Both angle-based breakaway and restart are based on the change of slope between windup and
fastener rotation. This allows rejection of "slip offs" that do not result in fastener motion. In addition,
excessive follow through will not cause erroneously high readings as the data point captured is
independent of final wrench release.
Both angle-based breakaway must detect additional tightening to confirm the break point.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
When reviewing a torque/angle curve, release is a form of "unwinding":
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Capturing Multiple Values from a Single Torque Event
The 600 has the ability to Autoscan two characteristics that measure a single torque event as long as
the second characteristic is Torque at Angle, Angle Based Restart, or Angle Based Breakaway. This
feature will be useful to compare the variability of different measurement strategies, or for example to
quantify the effects of stiction by capturing both Angle Based Restart and Breakaway and calculating
the difference in a third characteristic.
Note that Pick-a-Point must be off for the AutoScan function to work. Turning Pick-a-Point On will
disable the AutoScan function while collecting data.
Quantify Effects of Stiction
Characteristic
Source
AutoScan
C1 (Restart)
Angle Based Restart gage
configuration
Angle Based Breakaway gage
configuration
C1-C2
Off
C2 (Breakaway)
C2 (Stiction Calculation)
On
On
Establishing residual torque specification limits
You may have residual torque specification limits established in your organization. If not, we
recommend the following procedure for establishing them.
Since static friction is greater than dynamic friction, joints can relax after tightening, and there is
variability in the residual measurements, specification limits may be established as follows:
Step
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Action
Note installation (dynamic) specification limits.
Take a large sample (30 to 100 pieces) of dynamic measurements. The larger
the sample the better, and the more operators doing the residual
measurements the better.
Measure the residual torque on each of the joints measured dynamically.
Find the mean of the dynamic measurements.
Calculate the standard deviation of the dynamic measurements.
Find the mean of the residual measurements.
Calculate the standard deviation of the residual measurements.
Determine the mid point of the dynamic specification limits. Lower spec limit
plus upper spec limit all divided by two.
Determine the midpoint of the residual specification limits.
Mean of residuals times mid point of dynamic spec divided by mean of dynamic
measurements
Establish the tolerance spread of the residual limits. Tolerance of dynamic limits
times residual standard deviation divided by dynamic measurements standard
deviation.
Establish the upper residual specification limit. Calculated mid point for residual
measurements plus half the calculated tolerance.
Establish the lower residual specification limit. Calculated mid point for residual
measurements minus half the calculated tolerance.
105
Example
70Nm to 90Nm
78Nm
1.0Nm
86Nm
1.5Nm
(70+90)/2 = 80
80*86/78 = 88.2
(90-70)*1.5/1.0 = 30
88.2+30/2 = 103.2
88.2-30/2 = 73.2
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Using Torque Wrench Extensions
Adapter extensions are sometimes required when the fastener location, on which a torque reading is
to taken, does not allow direct access with a conventional socket. When an adapter is used it has the
effect of extending, or in some cases shortening, the pivot point of the torque wrench and thus
creating a lever arm affect that must be accounted for when taking measurements.
See Appendix B - Torque Wrench Adapters for details about how to calculate scaling factors for use
with torque wrench adapters.
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SECTION
8
Dynamic Torque
Measurement
107
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
Torque Wrenches
The most commonly used measurement device for torque is a transducer which uses an increasing
voltage output to indicate an increase in torque. The 600 Handheld Data Collector converts this
voltage signal to a digital value that represents the force used.
When calibrated using a 350 bridge, the Torque Module provides the following measurement
accuracy (using clockwise motion):
2.0 mv/v signal: ± 0.1% static applications, ± 0.2% dynamic applications.
The torque module should be calibrated annually to maintain this accuracy.
Torque Verification Recommendations
ASI DataMyte recommends that companies implement a verification system in order to minimize
equipment malfunction on the production line. As with any other measurement tool, verification of
torque accuracy should be done on a periodic basis between calibrations (e.g., daily or at each shift
change) in order to ensure that the data collection system is functioning properly. Torque verification
is recommended after the unit is dropped or after any abnormal event (e.g., extreme temperatures,
electro-static discharge hit, etc.). Torque measurement equipment can be verified by using a "dead
weight" test or by replacing the torque wrench with a torque simulator.
Dynamic Torque Applications
In dynamic torque applications, in-line transducers are typically installed between the fastening tool
and the fastener. For example, with an air stall tool, the in-line transducer is placed between the tool
and the socket on the fastener. The torque is measured as it is applied by the process; the desired
measurement to record is the maximum (or peak) force applied by the process. The voltage the
transducer produces when the peak force is attained is converted by the 600 Handheld Data Collector
into a digital value that represents the force applied.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
Dynamic Torque Applications
In static applications, the transducer is fitted into the head of a hand held torque wrench. An operator
then uses a torque wrench to audit the torque applied by a fastening system after the fastening process
is complete.
The operator applies torque to the fastener by pulling on the torque wrench. When the force applied
by the operator exceeds the static frictional force of the joint, the fastener begins to move. At the
precise moment that the fastener begins to move, the torque applied by the operator is approximately
equal to the torque applied by the fastening process. The transducer sends a voltage to the data
collector, which is converted into a digital value that represents the torque applied.
Torque Wrench Adapters
Adapter extensions are sometimes required when the fastener location, on which a torque reading is
to taken, does not allow direct access with a conventional socket. When an adapter is used it has the
effect of extending, or in some cases shortening, the pivot point of the torque wrench and thus
creating a lever arm affect that must be accounted for when taking measurements.
See Appendix B - Torque Wrench Adapters for details about how to calculate scaling factors for use
with torque wrench adapters.
Figure 20. Torque Wrench Adapters
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
Torque Algorithms
The 600 Handheld Data Collector uses one of three different algorithms (or sets of rules) to convert
the transducer’s analog signal to a digital value that represents the force applied. The algorithms are:
Peak, Pulse and Set Torque.
Peak Torque
Peak Torque is used to measure the torque on a fastener at installation. This is done by monitoring the
voltage signal generated by an in-line transducer and recording the maximum or peak reading. Since
fastening systems, such as air stall tools, can produce a series of peaks during the installation of a
single fastener, the parameters for the peak algorithm can be configured to read only the desired peak
signal.
The following curve represents the force applied over time in a peak torque application.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
Pulse Torque
Pulse Torque measures the highest peak from a series of peaks. This requires higher sampling
frequency than for typical air stall tools or DC electric tools.
Note: The pulsed torque gage type will be capable of sample rates as fast as 50 micro-seconds
(20Khz).
Pulse Count
When a gage type is set to Pulsed Torque, the number of pulses that occur between snug and the
occurrence of the peak reading can be recorded. Snug is typically defined as 50% of the lower
specification limit.
To capture the Pulse Count an auto-scanned pair of characteristics must be set up where the first
characteristic source is ‘Gx’ (where ‘Gx’ is a pulsed torque gage type configuration) and the second
characteristic source is of the form ‘Cnt(Gx)’. Note that the Cnt() function is used to count pulses.
In the gage test mode, pulse counts will be displayed with the peak value for pulsed torque gage type
configurations.
Angle
An Angle gage type will support three different applications: Torque and Angle, Angular
Displacement, and Angle Set. In addition, a change in angle may be used as a sample event for torque
measurements alternatively to a change in time.
Torque and Angle—To capture the installation torque and angle between snug and peak, an autoscanned pair of characteristics must be set up where the first characteristic source is set up for Peak
(or Pulse) and a second characteristic is setup for Angle (capture). When the torque event is captured,
the angle will be measured between snug (were snug is the start threshold for the first characteristic)
and peak.
Example:
Source of C1 = Angle {13.7} (where Angle is configured Type=Peak (or Pulse) and 13.7 = start threshold or snug)
Source of C2 = Angle (where Angle is configured Type = Angle, Use = Capture)
Note: In the gage test mode, when an analog reading occurs for a torque gage setup, the angle value
will also be displayed if angle encoder pulses are present and the next gage setup in the gage list is an
angle gage type. In the gage master mode, the angle value will be displayed in real-time if the gage
setup is an angle gage type.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
Angular Displacement—To capture angular displacement, one characteristic, C1, is set up as the
source of Dsp(angle), where angle is configured for angle (capture) and Dsp() is a function used to
record angular displacement. Angular displacement is then obtained by rotating an angle transducer
between start and stop key presses (<Enter>) while in data entry mode:
Typical Application: Tool Checking
C1 is configured as above, C2 is configured for keyboard input, C3 is the difference between C1 and
C2 and is auto scanned with C2. The Angle Transducer is installed on an angle-capable run-down tool
that has its own angle display. Zero the display on the run-down tool and press <Enter> on the data
collector to start the measurement. Rotate the tool approximately 360 degrees and press <enter>
again. Key in the angle as displayed on the run-down tool for C2. C3 will detect any deviation
between the two angular measurements.
Angle Set— Angle Set is for hand assembly where joints or clamp load is critical, and a given
angular rotation of the transducer past “snug” is required (for example, when a fastener needs to
rotate 6 degrees past 30 Nm of torque).
To apply the ‘set angle’ algorithm, an auto-scanned pair of characteristics (C1 and C2) must be set up
where the C1 source is ‘Gx’ and ‘Gx’ is Type=Peak, and C2 is set up where source is ‘Gxn’ and
‘Gxn’ is an angle gage type configuration with the ‘Use’ parameter set to ‘Set’.
Per Above Example:
Source of C1 = Peak{30} (where Peak is configured Type=Peak and 30 = start threshold, i.e., snug)
Source of C2 = Angle (where Angle is configured Type = Angle, Use = Set) and the lower spec limit is set to 6.0.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
As force is applied to the transducer, the angle of rotation is recorded when the applied torque
achieves “snug.” As rotation continues, the operator will be alerted (by a “let go tone”) when the
amount of rotation exceeds the lower spec limit for C2.
Note: If the second characteristic source has the format ‘Gxn{y}’ where y is an angle value in
degrees, y will be substituted as the ‘nice’ alarm threshold instead of the characteristic’s low limit.
Sample Event: Angle
Torque algorithms may be configured to be sampled by a change in angle or by a change in
time (in previous releases, sampling was only time-based).
A ‘Sample Event’ parameter has been added to torque gage configurations. If set to ‘Angle’
(instead of ‘Time’), the analog signal will be sampled for algorithm satisfaction whenever the
angular displacement changes.
Set Torque
Set torque is used in applications where fastening is done manually with a hand held wrench. This is
typically found in low volume production applications, such as aircraft assembly, or as a rework tool
in more automated settings. For example, head bolts on a 6-cylinder engine may be fastened with a
closed loop multi-spindle in-line system. Those engines that are tagged for rework may be quickly
checked with the data collector using Set Torque, even where multiple fasteners with different torques
are involved. Set Torque allows you to record the maximum or peak torque applied and also provides
audible signals to the operator when the lower and upper specifications limits have been surpassed.
The lower spec limit is indicated with a release tone and the upper spec limit is indicated with a
distinctive alarm.
The following curve represents the force applied over time in a set torque application, and also shows
lines where the specification limits are reached:
Peak
Y=Force
Upper Spec Limit
(Distinctive alarm)
Lower Spec Limit
(Single tone)
X=Time
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 8: Dynamic Torque Measurement
Pick-a-Point
Normally, the value of the characteristic for the piece is determined by the algorithm in the data
collector based on the torque type selected in the gage configuration. Use Pick-a-Point to select any
point from the torque curve to enter as the data value.
The pick-a-point feature can be used for any port where the Gage configuration uses Peak,
Breakaway, or Restart, and where Pick-a-Point has been turned on for the gage setup.
Steps
1. Make sure that Pick-a-Point is set to ON in the gage (Use Parameter) configuration.
2. Use the gage to take a reading as part of the normal data collection process.
The data collector displays the torque curve in the data collection window instead of
storing the reading. The data value is indicated by the red cursor:
Data Value
Data Value
You can accept the value indicated, continue to take readings, or use the arrow keys to move
the cursor to the point on the curve that you want to record.
3. Press <enter> to accept the value shown by the Cursor Value.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
9
Exporting Data
115
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 9: Exporting Data
Introduction
Data collected using the 600 Handheld Data Collector can be analyzed using ASI DataMyte
support software such as TranSend II™ software. The data can also be analyzed using various
third-party software applications such as Microsoft® Excel™.
TranSend II Software
If you are using ASI DataMyte TranSend II software, you can transfer data from the data
collector and then use either an ASI DataMyte analysis program or a third-party program to
analyze the data.
600 Data Collector
TranSend II Software
Import
data
Collected data
Analyze
data
Figure 21. Exporting to TranSend II Software
116
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 9: Exporting Data
Transferring Data to TranSend II
Use the following procedures for transferring data to TranSend II software. See the TranSend II
User Guide for detailed procedures.
1) Collect Data
Use the 600 Handheld Data Collector to collect data for the required setups.
2) Configure TranSend II Communications
Ensure that TranSend II is properly configured for communication with the 600 Handheld Data
Collector.
Steps
1. Attach the #95748 cable to a free USB port on the computer running TranSend II.
2. On the TranSend II main screen, click the Options button.
3. On the Receive Data screen, set the Receive Data options.
3) Import the Collected Data
See the TranSend II User Guide for detailed procedures.
Steps
1. On the TranSend II main screen, click the Open Collector button.
2. All setups with data are automatically imported as specified in the Receive Data Options
screen.
4) Analyze the Data
Use third-party software, such as Microsoft Excel, to analyze the data.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
10
Flash Update
Procedures
118
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 10: Flash Update
600 Flash Update Introduction
Firmware refers to the operating system and program code stored in microprocessor chips
in the 600 Handheld Data Collector. “Flash” firmware refers to the ability of the chips to
be updated without physically replacing any components such as ROM chips in the data
collector. The flash firmware update is completed by using the TranSend II software
application. You will need the firmware file to proceed. The firmware image file will
need to be in a specific location in order to update

Firmware File – Download the Flash Firmware file from either the ASI DataMyte
Web Page or the TranSend II - DM600 DVD. Since ASI DataMyte offers many
different flash update files, contact Technical Support for the name of the update
file.

File Location – Copy the firmware image file to the following location.
C:\Program Files\ASI DataMyte\TranSend II\ASIDM600
IMPORTANT: If you are an ASI DataMyte TranSend II User, refer to the
TranSend II User Guide to perform these flash update procedures.
Note:
The flash update procedure also updates the torque module firmware if a torque module
is installed.
The flash update procedure also updates the language translations.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 10: Flash Update
Obtaining the Image File
Software updates are available from the ASI DataMyte web site (www.asidatamyte.com)
through the Technical Support link or the TranSend II - DM600 DVD. For assistance in
updating your 600 Handheld Data Collector, contact ASI DataMyte Technical Support.
Image File from Web Site
Steps:
1. Navigate to the Download Files section of the ASI DataMyte web site.
2. Select Model 6xx Files from the Hardware list and click on Go.
3. Download the Update instructions.
4. Download the applicable image file.
The image file is contained within a WinZip archive.
5. Unzip the *.exe file to a folder on your computer.
Image File from DM600 DVD
Steps:
1. Install TranSend II.
2. Select Start – All Programs – ASI DataMyte – TranSend II – ASIDM600
3. In Windows Explorer, the current image file is displayed.
4. The image file ends with an extension of “.bin”.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 10: Flash Update
Setting up Communications
To install the new firmware on your data collector, first establish communications
between the computer that contains the update file and the data collector and transfer the
flash update file.
Steps:
1. Connect the #95748 cable from your computers USB port to the USB port on
the 600 Handheld Data Collector.
Caution:
Before performing the Flash Update procedure, it is
recommended that you back up all setups and data and
reinitialize the 600.
2. Power the data collector ON.
3. Start the TranSend II application.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Section 10: Flash Update
Transferring the Firmware Update File
The data collector uses TranSend II communications while using the flash loader
program.
Steps:
1. From the TranSend II application, select the menu selection Device
Management.
2. From the Device Management view, select Update Firmware.
3. The firmware update file begins transferring to the data collector. A progress bar
is displayed.
4. After the progress bar is no longer displayed, a message is displayed on the
DM600.
5. During the file transfer, the data collector's right LED flashes green.
This indicates normal operation.
6. When the transfer is complete, the data collector automatically reboots.
7. Total estimated firmware update time is approximately 2 minutes.
If an error condition exists, first reattempt the transfer. If problems persist, write
down any error codes or messages. Call Technical Support for assistance.
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
SECTION
11
Appendices
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Appendix A - Characteristic Source
This appendix provides information about specifying valid source formulas for characteristics and
labels for your setups.
Source Location Symbols
The 600 Handheld Data Collector uses symbols to refer to source locations. For variables data,
multiple sources are comma delimited; for label data, multiple sources are comma delimited. For
instance, the source line K, Peak refers to either the Keypad or a gage alias.
The following table lists valid Source Location Symbols.
Table 12. Source Location Symbols
Source
Meaning
Examples
K
Keyboard
K
XXXXX
Alias name, Up to five characters
Peaks, GI
Cx
Characteristic x
C1, C4, C12
Sx
Subgroup x
S2, S4, S6
N
Nominal
C1-N, N-.00012
Constant
A Number
1.6, G1+1.6, max(7.3,G1)
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Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Operator Symbols
The following table lists Operators for creating Source Formulae.
Table 13. Operator Symbols
Source
Meaning
Examples
-
Minus
(C1-C2), Peak-C1
+
Add
(C3+C2), (Peak+Peak+Peak)*0+Peak
*
Multiply
(C3*N)-.2, Peak*.0005, C3*C4
/
Divide
(C1/C2), C4/.018
|
Through
(C1|5), (Peak|4)
~ or ^
Exponent
(C1~2), (Peak~2)/3.1416, (Peak^2)
(,)
And
AVG(C1,C2,C3)
[,]
Or
[Peak,K]1
{n}
Start Threshold
(Torque) -- where n
overrides the start
threshold defined for
the torque tool
Peak{14.7}
Note that n represents an actual torque value (e.g..
14.7 lbft, or 19.3 Nm).
You can also allow math calculations on the gage ports of a source that accepts keyboard and/or
gage input, such as:
k,-1*peak
Boolean Operators
A Boolean expression evaluates to either 1 (true) or 0 (false). You can use Boolean Operators in
source formulae to create “if-else” logical constructions.
The following table lists Boolean operators for creating source formulae.
Table 14. Boolean Operators
Source
Meaning
Examples
>
if x is greater than y,
return 1, else return 0
((C1>10)+(C1<5))*((C1-N)*(C2*-1)
<
if x is less than y,
return 1, else return 0
((C1<C2)*C1)*C2
=
if x equals y return 1
else return 0
(Peak=N)*(Peak-0.002)
125
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Function Operators
The following table lists function operators for creating Source Formulae.
Table 15: Function Operators
Function
Meaning
Examples
Abs
Acos
Asin
Atan
Avg
Cnt
Cos
Dsp
Max
Med
Min
Rng
Sdv
Sin
Sqt
Sum
Tan
Tps
Absolute Value
Arc Cosine
Arc Sine
Arc Tangent
Average
Pulse Count
Trigonometric Cosine
Angular Displacement
Maximum Value
Median Value
Minimum Value
Range
Standard Deviation
Trigonometric Sin
Square Root
Summation
Trigonometric Tangent
True Position
ABS(C2), ABS(AVG(C1|7))
ACOS(C1)
ASIN(C1)
ATAN(C1)
AVG(C1|5), AVG(S1,S2)
CNT(PEAK)
COS(C2)
DSP(PEAK)
MAX(S2), MAX(PEAK|4)
MED(S2), MED(C1|5)
MIN(S9), MIN(C1|7)
RNG(C1|5), RNG(PEAK|8)
SDV(S2), SDV(S2,S3)
SIN(C1)
SQT(C1)
SUM(C2|4)
TAN(C1)
TPS(ALIAS,C1),
TPS(ALIAS,ALIAS,ALIAS)
Notes:
1. Atan(x)—Returns the arc tangent of x, in degrees (–90 to +90 ).
2. Asin(x)—Returns the arc sine of x, in degrees (–90 to +90 ). The range of x is: -1
<= x <= 1.
3. Acos(x)—Returns the arc cosine of x, in degrees (0 to +180 ). The range of x is:
-1 <= x <= 1.
4. Cnt—Used in combination with Pulse measurement. Example: Peak is configured
for Pulse; Characteristic 1 (C1) has a Source of Peak; Characteristic 2 (C2) is autoscanned with C1 and has a Source of CNT(Peak). When a fastener is rundown with
a pulse tool, C1 captures installation torque and C2 captures the number of pulses
from snug to peak.
5. Dsp—Used in Angle measurements. The Displaced Angle value will be captured
between a start (<Enter>) and stop <Enter> command.
Order of Operations
Source expressions are evaluated in standard mathematical order. Anything with parenthesis is
completed first. Multiplication and division are performed before addition and subtraction.
126
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Appendix B - Torque Wrench Adapters
Using a Torque Adapter Extension
Adapter extensions are sometimes required when the fastener location, on which a torque reading
is to taken, does not allow direct access with a conventional socket. When an adapter is used it
has the effect of extending, or in some cases shortening, the pivot point of the torque wrench and
thus creating a lever arm affect that must be accounted for when taking measurements.
When the adapter is positioned at 0°, 90°, or 180° with respect to the torque wrench, calculations
are performed based only on the length of the extension and the length of the torque wrench.
When the adapter is oriented at angles between 0° and 90° or 90° and 180° the calculations are
based on the effective length of the adapter.
Torque Adapter Orientations
Adapter In Line With the Torque Wrench
1. Measure the wrench’s handle length (distance from transducer center point and point
where the force is applied, usually the center of the wrench grip area).
2. Measure the length of the adapter.
3. Add the two together and divide by the original length. That's your scaling factor.
For example:
Figure 22: Adapter in Line with Torque Wrench
Example:
Scaling factor = (200+60) / 200 = 260/200 = 1.3
Source Example: Peak*1.3
127
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Adapter Used at an Angle Between 0° and 90° to the Torque Wrench
1. Measure the wrench’s handle length (distance from transducer center point and point
where the force is applied, usually the center of the wrench grip area).
2. Measure the distance from the center of the adapter fastener connection to the center
point of the transducer along the line of the torque wrench handle as shown below.
Note this result will be less than the length of the adapter itself.
3. Add the two together and divide by the original length. That's your scaling factor.
For example:
Figure 23: Adapter at Angle Between 0° and 90°
Example:
Scaling factor = (200+40) / 200 = 240/200 = 1.2
Source Example: Peak*1.2
128
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Adapter Used at an Angle of 90° to the Torque Wrench
1. Measure the wrench’s handle length (distance from transducer center point and point
where the force is applied, usually the center of the wrench grip area).
2. If the adapter is at 90°, the scaling factor will be 1.0 because there is no change in the
effective length of the wrench. Therefore there is no need to adjust the gage address by
multiplying it by 1.
Figure 24: Adapter at 90° Angle
Example:
Scaling factor = (200+0) / 200 = 200/200 = 1.0
Source Example: Peak
129
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Adapter Used at an Angle Between 90° and 180° to the Torque Wrench
1. Measure the wrench’s handle length (distance from transducer center point and point
where the force is applied, usually the center of the wrench grip area).
2. Measure the distance from the center of the adapter fastener connection to the center
point of the transducer along the line of the torque wrench handle as shown below.
Alternately, if the angle of the extension to the torque wrench is known this may be used
in the calculations.
3. Subtract the two and divide by the original length. That's your scaling factor.
For example:
Figure 25: Adapter at Angle Between 90° and 180°
Example:
Scaling factor = (200-40) / 200 = 160/200 = 0.8
Source Example: Peak*0.8
130
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Adapter in Line at 180° with the Torque Wrench
1. Measure the wrench’s handle length (distance from transducer center point and point
where the force is applied, usually the center of the wrench grip area).
2. Measure the length of the adapter.
3. Subtract the two and divide by the original length. That's your scaling factor.
For example:
Figure 26: Adapter in Line at 180°
Example:
Scaling factor = (200-60) / 140 = 140/200 = 0.7
Source Example: Peak*0.7
131
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Appendix C – Port Pin Diagrams
Analog Port Pinout
The following diagram of the ASI DataMyte 600 Analog Port indicates the pins
with their corresponding functions:
Analog Port
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
2.5V EXC
9
+5v Digital
2
EXC Common
10
Digital Common
3
+IN (Low-Level)
11
SW IN
4
-IN (Low-Level)
12
Reserved
5
Guard
13
A Phase
6
Green LED
14
B Phase
7
Reserved
15
Red LED
8
Reserved
USB Gage Port Pinout
The following diagram of the ASI DataMyte 600 USB Gage Port indicates the
pins with their corresponding functions:
USB Gage Port
Pin
Function
1
VBUS +5V
2
D-
3
D+
4
NC
5
GND
132
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
USB Communications Port Pinout
The following diagram of the ASI DataMyte 600 USB Communications Port
indicates the pins with their corresponding functions.
4
3
1
2
Pin
Function
1
VBUS +5V
2
D-
3
D+
4
GND
Digital Gage Port Pinout
The following diagram of the ASI DataMyte 600 Digital Gage Port indicates the
pins with their corresponding functions:
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
Ready, 1's
5
RXD, 4's
2
REQ, FED Sign 2's
6
Serial Clock
3
TXD
7
+ 5v
4
GND
8
Serial Data, 8's
133
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
LMI Port Pinouts
The following diagrams of the ASI DataMyte LMI ports indicate the pins with
their corresponding functions:
Connector
Connector
Pin
Function
1
– Excitation
2
+ Excitation
3
– Excitation
4
+ Excitation
5
A Signal Input
6
B Signal Input
Pin
Function
1
Read Switch Input
2
– Excitation
3
+ Excitation
4
Signal Input
134
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
Support Information
This section contains information on ASI DataMyte maintenance
agreements and technical support.
Technical Support
ASI DataMyte Technical Support experts are only a phone call
away. Contact Technical Support for the following reasons:
To assist in installing and configuring ASI DataMyte
equipment
To help implement data collection applications
To help setup and configure gauges, multiplexers and
accessories
To troubleshoot ASI DataMyte equipment or support software
Technical Support is available free of charge during the initial
warranty period and to current SMA customers.
Phone: 800-207-5631 or 763-553-0455
Call Monday through Friday between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM
Central Standard Time.
Fax: 763-553-1041
Fax your questions to ASI DataMyte Technical Support at any
time. Please include in the email your name, phone number, the
hours you can be reached, and a detailed description of the
problem.
Email: techsupport@asidatamyte.com
Email your questions to ASI DataMyte Technical Support at
any time.
ASI DataMyte Customer Service
ASI DataMyte Customer Service can be reached at 763-553-1040
Monday through Friday between 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Central
Standard Time. Call ASI DataMyte Customer Service to perform
any of the following tasks.
Place orders
Return ASI DataMyte equipment for service
Upgrade ASI DataMyte equipment
Inquire about the status of an order or repair
135
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Appendices
To expedite your service, be sure to have your ASI DataMyte
customer number and, if applicable, your SMA contract number
ready.
Support and Maintenance Agreements
Support and Maintenance Agreements (SMA) are available for the
full line of ASI DataMyte hardware and software products.
Benefits of an SMA contract include:
Toll free number for Technical Support and Customer Service,
which automatically prioritizes your call
Free software/firmware updates/accessories coverage as
specified by seller
Free repair of your ASI DataMyte hardware products
Free calibration service with certificate, starting the day after
we receive the ASI DataMyte Data Collectors (exception:
consult ASI DataMyte for Torque Wrenches, a NON-ASI
DataMyte product)
Free return shipping on repairs and calibration
Repair turnaround is three-days, starting the day after we
receive the product (exceptions: multiple Data Collectors of
five or more and Torque Wrenches - consult ASI DataMyte for
turnaround time)
Accessories coverage as specified by seller
Upgrades at reduced rates and service fee waived
Increased trade-in values
Special discounts on training and field service
Free loaner data collectors if needed during repairs (5xx, 9xx,
3xxx only), subject to availability
If you have already purchased an SMA contract for this product,
this warranty is extended for the duration expressed in the contract.
Please call 763-553-1040 for more information about ASI
DataMyte SMA contracts.
136
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
137
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
138
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
I n d e x
About Screen, 32
Abs, 126
Accuracy
torque, 108
Acos, 126
Adapters
torque wrench, 127, 132, 133, 134
Alarms, 42
enabling, 42
Alphanumeric KeyPad, 20, 27
character input, 30
key combinations, 27, 28
Analog Gage Manufacturers, 46
Analog Gage Option, 23
Analog Gages
mastering, 61
supported, 46
Analog Ports
configuring, 50, 56
Angle, 111
Angle Based Breakaway, 94
Angle Based Restart, 92
Angle Set, 112
Angular Displacement, 112
Arithmetic Operator Symbols, 125
Asin, 126
Assignable Cause Entries, 83
Atan, 126
Auto Graph, 83
Avg, 126
Back View, 21
Backlight
time, 35
Batteries
charging, 7
discharging, 7
replacing, 7
Battery Charger, 7
LED indications, 7
Battery Usage, 5, 6
Battery Warnings, 11, 12
Boolean Operators, 125
Bottom View, 22
Buzzer
tone, 35
volume, 35
Calculating Control Limits, 86
Calibration
139
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
torque, 24
Cause Prompt, 83
Character Input
alphanumeric keypad, 30
Characteristic Boundary, 80
Characteristic Descriptors, 89
Characteristic Review, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41
Characteristics
entering information, 77
Charging the Batteries, 7
Checking Input Source, 73
Cleaning the Data Collector, 9
Cnt, 126
Collecting Data, 75
data collect mode, 75
preview mode, 75
Common Views, 36
Compliance, 13
Configuration
gage checklist, 45
Configuring
analog input ports, 50, 56
data collector preferences, 34
torque wrench ports, 50, 56
Control Charts
viewing, 84
Control Limits
calculating, 86
Copyright, 2
Cos, 126
Counts per Revolution, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60
Data
exporting, 116
transferring, 116
Data Collection
assignable cause entries, 83
auto graph, 83
entering characteristic data, 77
entering label information, 76
exporting data, 116
out-of-spec-readings, 81
selecting a part setup, 72
unreasonable readings, 82
Data Collection Sequence, 70
Data Collector
preferences, 34
Data Entry Screen, 77
Dead Time, 54
Delta Slope, 54, 58, 59
Digital Gages
140
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
mastering, 61
port, 24
supported, 46
testing, 64
Dimensions, 20
Dsp, 126
Dual Channel Analog Gages, 25
Dwell Blanking, 54
Dynamic Torque Applications, 108
End View, 22
Entering Characteristic Data, 77
Entering Label Information, 76
Environmental Considerations, 15
European Union Directives, 13
Export Torque Curve, 37
Exporting Data, 116
Extensions
torque wrench, 127, 132, 133, 134
FCC Compliance, 13
Features, 17, 19
hardware, 19
software, 19
Filter, 53
Firmware File, 119
Flash ROM loader, 19
Flash Update
introduction, 119
transferring file to the data collector, 121
Front View, 20
Full Scale, 53
Function Operators, 126
Gage Configuration
introduction, 45
Gage Input Port
listing configuration of, 47
Gage Input Ports, 49
Gage LED, 54, 56, 57, 60
Gage List, 47
Gages
analog, 46
configuring torque wrenches, 50, 56
digital, 46
mastering analog, 61
mastering digital, 61
mastering torque wrenches, 62
ports, 23
serial, 46
testing digital, 64
testing torque wrenches, 64
torque wrenches, 46, 108
141
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
types supported, 46
Gap and Flush Gages, 25
Getting Started, 5
Hardware Features, 19
Input Configuration, 73
Input Source
for part setup, 73
Input Sources, 73
Interface Basics, 31
Key Combinations
alphanumeric keypad, 27, 28
Key Repeat, 35
Keycase, 35
Keyclick, 35
KeyPad
Alphanumeric, 27, 28
KeyPad Functions
alphanumeric keypad, 27, 28
Label Entry, 80
Labels
entering information, 76
LCD Display, 20
LEDs, 20
Duration, 35
Low Battery Warning, 7
Main Menu, 31
Mastering
analog gages, 61
digital gages, 61
torque wrenches, 62
Max, 126
Measuring Angle, 103
Med, 126
Min, 126
Minimum Rotation, 58, 59
More Menu, 31
Nickel Metal hydride, 5
No Telecommunications Connection, 10
Noise Threshold, 54
Operator Symbols, 125
Order of Operations, 126
Out-of-Spec Readings, 81
Overview, 20
Part Setups, 72
checking input sources, 73
overview, 67
selecting, 72
transferring to the data collector, 68
Peak Duration, 53
Peak torque, 98
Peak Torque, 110
142
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
Peak Zone, 54
Pick-a-Point, 53, 114
Port Pin Diagram, 22
Ports
AC adapter, 22
analog gage, 23
buzzer, 22
digital gage, 23
footswitch, 23
label buzzer, 22
power, 22
RS-232, 22
serial, 22
serial communications, 22
thumbswitch, 23
torque, 24
Power Ratings, 5
Power Requirements, 5
Power Sources, 5
Powering Off, 32
Powering On, 31
Preferences
data collector, 34
user, 34
Preview Screen, 79
Product Warnings, 10
Pulse Count, 111
Pulse Torque, 111
ReAudit, 87
Re-auditing Readings, 87
Replacing Batteries, 7
Residual Torque, 91
Restart Window, 58, 59
Retake Prompting, 35, 81
Retaking Readings, 86
RF Energy, 15
Rng, 126
Rotary Transducer, 26
Rotation, 53
Sample Event, 53
Sample Event Angle, 113
Sample Time, 53
Sdv, 126
Select Key, 72
Selecting a Part Setup, 72
Serial Communications
port, 22
Serial Gage Port, 24
Serial Gages
port, 24
supported, 46
143
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
Set Torque, 102, 113
Shift Key, 35
Sin, 126
Single Channel Analog Gages, 25
Software Features, 19
Software Version, 32
Source Formulae, 125
Source Input Codes, 73, 124
Source Location Symbols, 73, 124
Source-Based Gage Override, 96
Sqt, 126
Start Dwell, 53
Start Threshold, 53, 125
Static Torque Applications, 109
Status Indicators, 20
Stop Dwell, 53
Stop Threshold, 53, 56, 57
Sum, 126
Supported Gages, 46
Tan, 126
Testing
digital gages, 64
torque wrenches, 64
Testing Gages, 64
Top View, 23
Torque, 91
accuracy, 108
calibration, 24
configuration options, 53, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60
dynamic, 108
peak, 110
port, 24
set, 113
static, 109
wrench adapters, 106, 109
wrench extensions, 106, 109
Torque Algorithms, 110
Torque and Angle, 111
Torque at Angle, 96
Torque Curve, 36
Torque Curve Export, 37
Torque Option, 24
Torque Port, 50, 56
Torque specification limits, 105
Torque Tools, 62
Torque View Auto-Size, 37
Torque vs. Time Breakaway, 100
Torque vs. Time Restart, 101
Torque Wrenches, 26, 108
adapters, 106, 109, 127, 132, 133, 134
application, 108
144
Model 600 Handheld Data Collector
Index
calibrating torque module, 24
configuring, 50, 56
extensions, 106, 109
mastering, 62
supported, 46
testing, 64
TranSend, 117
TranSend Software, 116
Transferring Data, 116
Transferring Part Setups
to data collector, 68
True Position Gages, 25
Turning off the data collector, 32
Turning on the data collector, 31
Unreasonable Readings, 82
Updates
firmware, 119
Use, 54
User Preferences, 34
Version, 32
Viewing Characteristic Descriptors, 89
Viewing Charts, 84
Views, 36
Warning Labels, 10
Warnings, 10
battery, 11, 12
Battery, 7
Wrench Adapters, 127, 132, 133, 134
Wrench Extensions, 127, 132, 133, 134
145