HERON-FPGA4 User Manual

HUNT ENGINEERING
Chestnut Court, Burton Row,
Brent Knoll, Somerset, TA9 4BP, UK
Tel: (+44) (0)1278 760188,
Fax: (+44) (0)1278 760199,
Email: sales@hunteng.co.uk
http://www.hunteng.co.uk
http://www.hunt-dsp.com
HUNT ENGINEERING
HERON-FPGA4V Version2
(with FF1152 FPGA)
HERON Module with
3M, 6M or 8M gate Virtex II FPGA
USER MANUAL
Hardware Rev B
Document Rev F
T.Hollis 06/05/05
COPYRIGHT
This documentation and the product it is supplied with are Copyright HUNT
ENGINEERING 2005. All rights reserved. HUNT ENGINEERING maintains a policy
of continual product development and hence reserves the right to change product
specification without prior warning.
WARRANTIES LIABILITY and INDEMNITIES
HUNT ENGINEERING warrants the hardware to be free from defects in the material
and workmanship for 12 months from the date of purchase. Product returned under the
terms of the warranty must be returned carriage paid to the main offices of HUNT
ENGINEERING situated at BRENT KNOLL Somerset UK, the product will be repaired
or replaced at the discretion of HUNT ENGINEERING.
If HUNT ENGINEERING decides that there is any evidence of
electrical or mechanical abuse to the hardware, then the customer shall have no
recourse to HUNT ENGINEERING or its agents. In such circumstances HUNT
ENGINEERING may at its discretion offer to repair the hardware and charge for
that repair.
Exclusions -
Limitations of Liability - HUNT
ENGINEERING makes no warranty as to the fitness of
the product for any particular purpose. In no event shall HUNT
ENGINEERING’S liability related to the product exceed the purchase fee actually
paid by you for the product. Neither HUNT ENGINEERING nor its suppliers
shall in any event be liable for any indirect, consequential or financial damages
caused by the delivery, use or performance of this product.
Because some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential
damages or limitation on how long an implied warranty lasts, the above limitations may not
apply to you.
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Technical support for HUNT ENGINEERING products should first be obtained from the
comprehensive Support section http://www.hunteng.co.uk/support/index.htm on the
HUNT ENGINEERING web site. This includes FAQs, latest product, software and
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please refer to http://www.hunteng.co.uk for the list of current re-sellers.
HUNT ENGINEERING technical support can be contacted by emailing
support@hunteng.demon.co.uk, calling the direct support telephone number +44 (0)1278
760775, or by calling the general number +44 (0)1278 760188 and choosing the technical
support option.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................... 5
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN VERSION 2 AND VERSION 1 HERON-FPGA4................................................... 6
LOCATION OF ITEMS ON THE HERON-FPGA4V .............................................. 7
GETTING STARTED ................................................................................................... 8
STANDARD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (IP) ............................................................................................. 8
MODULE FEATURES ................................................................................................. 9
SERIAL CONFIGURATION OF THE USER FPGA ......................................................................................... 9
USER FPGA BOOT ROM ....................................................................................................................... 9
JTAG LINK TO THE FPGA....................................................................................................................... 9
CLOCKING OF THE FPGA ...................................................................................................................... 11
HERON FIFOS .................................................................................................................................... 12
DIGITAL I/O........................................................................................................................................... 13
MODULE AND CARRIER ID .................................................................................................................... 14
GENERAL PURPOSE LEDS ..................................................................................................................... 14
DONE LEDS .......................................................................................................................................... 14
SERIAL PORTS ....................................................................................................................................... 14
GETTING STARTED ON YOUR FPGA DESIGN ................................................. 16
WORKING THROUGH EXAMPLE 1........................................................................................................... 17
Preparing ISE .................................................................................................................................. 17
Copying the examples from the HUNT ENGINEERING CD........................................................... 18
Opening the Example1 Project........................................................................................................ 18
The Project's functional parameters................................................................................................ 18
Setting up the Configuration Package............................................................................................. 19
User Timing Constraints.................................................................................................................. 20
Creating the Bitstream for Example1 .............................................................................................. 21
Simulating the complete design ....................................................................................................... 22
MAKING YOUR OWN FPGA DESIGN................................................................... 23
USER_AP INTERFACE ............................................................................................................................ 23
HARDWARE INTERFACE LAYER ............................................................................................................. 27
IMPORTANT!.......................................................................................................................................... 27
OTHER EXAMPLES ................................................................................................................................. 27
HOW TO MAKE A NEW DESIGN ............................................................................................................. 28
Inserting your own Logic................................................................................................................. 28
Top-level fine tuning (using other special IO pins) ......................................................................... 28
User Timing Constraints.................................................................................................................. 29
HINTS FOR FPGA DESIGNS ................................................................................................................... 29
Use of Clocks ................................................................................................................................... 30
Possible Sources of Clocks .............................................................................................................. 30
Flow Control.................................................................................................................................... 31
Pipeline Length or “latency” .......................................................................................................... 31
I/O FROM THE FPGA............................................................................................................................. 31
DSP WITH YOUR FPGA......................................................................................................................... 31
SOFTWARE................................................................................................................. 33
FPGA DEVELOPMENT TOOL.................................................................................................................. 33
DESIGN FILES FOR THE FPGA ............................................................................................................... 33
GENERATING DESIGN FILES................................................................................................................... 34
Files for HERON Utility (*.RBT)..................................................................................................... 34
Files for direct JTAG programming (*.bit) ..................................................................................... 35
Files for PROMs (*.MCS) ............................................................................................................... 35
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
HERON_FPGA CONFIGURATION TOOL ............................................................................................... 35
HUNT ENGINEERING HOST-API.................................................................................................... 35
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-API................................................................................................. 36
HARDWARE DETAILS ............................................................................................. 37
HERON MODULE TYPE ........................................................................................................................ 37
HARDWARE RESET ................................................................................................................................ 37
SOFTWARE RESET (VIA SERIAL BUS) ..................................................................................................... 37
CONFIG.................................................................................................................................................. 37
DEFAULT ROUTING JUMPERS ................................................................................................................ 38
PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS OF THE MODULE .............................................................................................. 38
POWER REQUIREMENTS OF THE HERON-FPGA4V .............................................................................. 38
FPGA POWER CONSUMPTION/DISSIPATION ........................................................................................... 39
FIFOS ................................................................................................................................................... 41
USER FPGA CLOCKING......................................................................................................................... 43
User oscillators................................................................................................................................ 44
DIGITAL I/O CONNECTORS .................................................................................................................... 45
I/O characteristics ........................................................................................................................... 45
I/O Standard jumpers ...................................................................................................................... 45
Using Digitally Controlled Impedance (DCI) ................................................................................. 45
“DIGITAL I/O n” Connector Pin out.............................................................................................. 46
Differential pairs ............................................................................................................................. 47
Resistor Packs.................................................................................................................................. 47
Voltage Levels.................................................................................................................................. 49
ESD Protection ................................................................................................................................ 49
Use of the MAX3160........................................................................................................................ 50
ESD protection ................................................................................................................................ 51
USING THE JTAG PROGRAMMABLE CONFIGURATION PROM ............................................................... 52
BOOT FROM PROM JUMPER ................................................................................................................. 52
UNCOMMITTED MODULE INTERCONNECTS ........................................................................................... 53
GENERAL PURPOSE LEDS ..................................................................................................................... 53
OTHER HERON MODULE SIGNALS ........................................................................................................ 53
FITTING MODULES TO YOUR CARRIER .......................................................... 54
ACHIEVABLE SYSTEM THROUGHPUT ............................................................. 55
TROUBLESHOOTING .............................................................................................. 56
HARDWARE ........................................................................................................................................... 56
SOFTWARE ............................................................................................................................................ 56
CE MARKING ............................................................................................................. 57
TECHNICAL SUPPORT............................................................................................ 58
APPENDIX 1 – HERON SERIAL BUS COMMANDS ........................................... 59
MODULE ADDRESS ................................................................................................................................ 59
MODULE ENQUIRY ................................................................................................................................ 59
FPGA CONFIGURATION ........................................................................................................................ 59
USER I/O ............................................................................................................................................... 60
SPECIAL OPTIONS AND RESPONSE .......................................................................................................... 60
APPENDIX 2 – FPGA PINOUT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOOLS ........................ 61
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Introduction
The HERON module is a module defined by HUNT ENGINEERING to address the
needs of our customers for real-time DSP systems. The HERON module is defined both
mechanically and electrically by a separate HERON module specification that is available
from the HUNT ENGINEERING CD, via the user manuals section from the CD
browser, or online from http://www.hunteng.co.uk and going to the application notes
section in the user area.
The HERON module specification also defines the features that a HERON module carrier
must provide. HERON stands for Hunt Engineering ResOurce Node, which tries to make
it clear that the module is not for a particular processor, or I/O task, but is intended to be a
module definition that allows “nodes” in a system to be interconnected and controlled
whatever their function. In this respect it is not like the TIM-40 specification which was
specific to the ‘C4x DSP.
As the HERON-FPGA4V was developed, HUNT ENGINEERING have already
developed HERON modules carriers like the HEPC9, HERON processor modules (that
carry various other members of the TMS320C6000 family of DSP processors from TI), and
HERON-IO modules. In addition to these modules, the HERON specification is a superset of the pre-existing HUNT ENGINEERING GDIO module, so the GDIO modules
from our C4x product range can also be used in HERON systems.
The HERON module connects to the carrier board through several standard interfaces.
•
The first is a FIFO input interface, and a FIFO output interface. This is to be used for
the main inter-node communications. (It is usually also used for connection to the
HOST computer if any).
•
The second is an asynchronous interface that allows registers etc to be configured from
a HERON module. This is intended for configuring communication systems, or
perhaps to control some function specific peripherals on the carrier board.
•
The third is a JTAG (IEEE 1149.1) interface for running processor debug tools.
•
The Fourth is the HERON Serial Bus, used for configuration messages.
•
The last is the general control such as reset, power etc.
HUNT ENGINEERING defined the HERON modules in conjunction with HEART –
the Hunt Engineering Architecture using Ring Technology. This is a common architecture
that we have adopted for our HERON carriers that provides good real time features such
as low latency and high bandwidth, along with software reconfigurability of the
communication system, multicast, multiple board support etc., etc.
However, it is not a requirement of a HERON module carrier that it implements such
features. In fact our customers could develop their own module carrier and add our
HERON modules to it. Conversely our customers could develop application specific
HERON modules themselves and add them to our systems.
The HERON-FPGA4V is a HERON module that can be used for hardware signal
processing or for flexible I/O.
The HERON-FPGA4V provides a choice of FPGA sizes. The HERON-FPGA4V
provides a Virtex II 3M, 6M or 8M gate FPGA (Xilinx part number xc2v*000-*ff1152). The
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Virtex II family includes block ram, and dedicated multipliers – refer to the data sheets on
the Xilinx web site at http://www.xilinx.com .
The HERON-FPGA4V connects all of the HERON module signals, except the HERON
CONNECTOR JTAG, to the FPGA, allowing flexible use of the module’s resources.
The HERON-FPGA4V provides some of the FPGA I/Os connected to connectors on the
module. This allows the FPGA to be configured for a variety of I/Os. There are also
configurable components that can provide RS232, RS485. There is a separate JTAG
connector on the FPGA4V which gives access to the FPGA and PROM.
The HERON-FPGA4V uses the HERON module’s serial bus to download configuration
bit streams into the FPGA, allowing the user to configure it with standard functions
provided by HUNT ENGINEERING or functions that they have developed themselves
using the Xilinx development tools. There is also the possibility for the module to configure
the Virtex part from a PROM.
Differences between Version 2 and Version 1 HERON-FPGA4
There are two versions of the HERON-FPGA4V module that are both currently available.
Each version uses a different Hardware Interface Layer (HIL) To ensure that you have the
correct manual for your HERON-FPGA4V and that you are using the correct software,
check the following:
HERON-FPGA4V2 (for which this is the product manual) has an FPGA in the FF1152
package, which has a PROM that can be used to download the FPGA configuration.
HERON-FPGA4V1 has an FPGA in the BF957 package, This FPGA part does not have a
PROM.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Location of Items on the HERON-FPGA4V
power circuit
power circuit
1.5V
LED
3.3V
LED
HERON connector with Default Routing jumpers
Digital I/O connector F
Digital I/O connector E
Digital I/O connector D
Digital I/O connector C
Digital I/O connector B
Digital I/O connector A
HERON connector
Vcco
jumpers
FPGA
JTAG
connector
User
osc0
Virtex II 3M, 6M or 8M gate
FPGA
User
FPGA
boot from
prom
jumper
PROM
HERON connector
HERON connector
General
Purpose
LEDs
7
Control
FPGA
“DONE
LED”
User FPGA
“DONE” LED
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Getting Started
The HERON-FPGA4V is a module that plugs into a HERON module carrier.
The HERON-FPGA4V should be fitted to the carrier card along with any other modules
that your system has and their retaining nuts fitted (see a later section of this manual for
details).
The Default routing jumpers must be set correctly for the system. For most systems the
FPGA based modules will not require any default routing jumpers to be fitted. This will
allow the FPGA to access whatever FIFO is needs to, and will rely on the FIFO being
connected to the right place by the carrier configuration. (See a later section for details on
default routing jumpers).
There are two user configurable jumper sets on the HERON-FPGA4V, but most
applications will not need to change them from their default (shipping) condition as shown
in the earlier drawing. This shipping condition is to have jumpers fitted to connect VCCO
to 3.3V, unless we have provided a special configuration for you. If you think that these do
need to be changed, then see the later sections in this manual for details.
The HERON-FPGA4V, following reset, will enter a state where it can be interrogated and
programmed using the HERON module’s serial bus. It is addressed according to the
Carrier number and the slot number of the HERON slot that it is fitted to.
The FPGA configuration data will have been generated using the Xilinx development tools.
HUNT ENGINEERING provide examples for the HERON-FPGA modules in the
correct format for use with the Xilinx Foundation ISE software. HUNT ENGINEERING
also provides software for the Host PC that will allow the output files from the ISE
software to be loaded onto a HERON-FPGA module.
Follow the “Starting your FPGA development” tutorial from the HUNT ENGINEERING
CD, and then the general FPGA examples found in the same place on the CD.
It could be possible to use the HERON-FPGA4V as an I/O module using one of the
example bit streams. In this case it is not necessary to be concerned how to program the
FPGA – simply load the example bit stream and use it.
Standard Intellectual Property (IP)
HUNT ENGINEERING provides examples for the HERON-FPGA4V that perform
different functions. It is possible to use these standard configurations directly if they fit your
needs.
It could be possible to request a new standard example from HUNT ENGINEERING,
which could avoid the need to purchase and learn how to use the FPGA development
tools. Depending on the complexity of your request HUNT ENGINEERING may choose
not to offer it, or to charge for it.
New IP for the HERON-FPGA4V will be posted on the HUNT ENGINEERING web
site in the user area whenever it becomes available. HERON-FPGA4V users can then take
advantage of that IP free of charge.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Module Features
This section describes the features of the HERON-FPGA4V and why they are provided.
90 bits Digital I/O
LEDs
Serial I/Os
Power
Supply Cct
JTAG PROM
Clock
options
FPGA – 3M, 6M or 8M gate Virtex II
Configuration
control FPGA
HERON FIFO CONNECTIONS
HERON CONTROLS
HERON Serial Bus
Serial Configuration of the User FPGA
The HERON-FPGA4V usually has the configuration of the user FPGA downloaded using
the HERON module’s serial configuration bus. This allows the use of “standard”
configurations as supplied on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD, or of user defined
configurations without the need to return the module to the factory.
It is imagined that as the “standard” set of functions grows, that they be made available to
users of HERON-FPGA modules via the HUNT ENGINEERING web site or CD update
requests. Also HUNT ENGINEERING will have the possibility to provide semi-custom
configurations for a charge via email..
USER FPGA boot ROM
The Flash based PROMs when fitted to the HERON-FPGA4V can be programmed (and
re-programmed) using a Xilinx parallel cable 4). See the later section on using this
Configuration PROM.
This feature is really intended for use when system design is completed, and systems will be
deployed. It is a particular advantage when the DSP system will be ROM booted, as it
removes the need for the DSP FLASH ROM to store the configuration for the FPGA too.
However, if a system is being deployed with a host machine such as a PC, it might be
preferable to continue to use the serial configuration method, as this will make in field
upgrades and bug fixes simpler to deploy.
JTAG link to the FPGA
The JTAG chain of the FPGA4V contains the FPGA in addition to the FLASH PROM.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
This makes it possible to access the FPGA directly and so download designs via JTAG.
This has advantages in systems that do not have a serial configuration bus as designs can be
downloaded directly to the FPGA.
Software tools such as Chipscope can also be used via the JTAG chain to debug the
configuration loaded into the FPGA.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Clocking of the FPGA
The Xilinx FPGA used on the HERON-FPGA4V does not have a single clock input, but
rather it can use any one of its pins to provide a clock input. This means you can have many
sources of clocks, each of which can be used inside your FPGA design. You can even
divide these clocks using flip flops, or even multiply using digital clock manager
components.
Clock Options
OSC1 (100Mhz)
OSC0
UMI0,1,2&3
ANY DIGITAL
I/O PIN
buffer
Your FPGA design
Necessary clocks
Output FIFO clock
feedback
Input FIFO clock
feedback
The simplest way to manage your FPGA design is to use just one clock throughout your
design. However the FPGA must drive both of the HERON FIFO clocks, at a frequency
that is suitable for your module carrier (see the documentation for your module carrier for
details of its restrictions). The FPGA may also need to use clocks for the digital I/Os. The
frequency for these might be limited by the equipment that it is connected to, or by the
needs of your signal processing. The needs for these clocks can only be determined by
looking carefully at the needs of your system.
If these clocks cannot be the same, then the next best situation is to have one clock derived
from the other. In that way the relationship between the clock edges will be known.
The most difficult case for your FPGA design is to have many clocks from different
sources that are all used in the same design. Then you must carefully manage signals that
cross from one clock “domain” to another. This can be handled by FIFOS, or by multiple
registering to prevent metastability problems. Refer to texts on digital design to understand
these issues.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Clock Options
OSC1(100Mhz)
OSC0
buffer
Div2?
UMI0,1,2&3
ANY DIGITAL
I/O PIN
Logic
Necessary clocks
Output FIFO clock
feedback
Input FIFO clock
feedback
Example1 design
The HERON-FPGA4V provides a highly flexible set of choices for the clocking of the
FPGA.
The HERON-FPGA4V has a socket for a user oscillator. It has a further location for
Surface mount oscillators to be fitted for designs that require all 2 user oscillators to be
used. These User Oscillators are connected to Global Clock pins on the Virtex II giving
direct access to the Digital Clock Managers (DCM) modules within the FPGA.
Default shipping state is to have a 100Mhz oscillator fitted to the surface mount sites –
driving 100Mhz on UserOsc1. This is a standard commercial oscillator module, that is +100ppm accuracy. If you require higher accuracy clocks then you should use one of the
other clock sources.
There are 90 Digital I/O pins that can also be used as clock inputs or outputs on the Digital
I/O connectors A,B,C,D,E and F. On connectors A,B,D and E the first pair of pins are
connected to the Global Clock pins of the Virtex II giving direct access to the Digital Clock
Manager (DCM) modules within the FPGA. These pins can be used for standard I/O if
required.
Also the UMI pins on the module connector could be used as a clock input, for example if
another module in the system is programmed to drive that clock onto the UMI connection.
HERON FIFOS
The HERON module can access up to 6 input FIFOs and up to another 6 output FIFOs.
Actually it is most likely that a carrier board will not implement all 12 FIFO interfaces. Each
FIFO interface is the same as the others, using common clocks and data busses.
The input and output interfaces are separate though, allowing data to be read and written at
the same time by a module like the HERON-FPGA4V.
While it is possible to read one FIFO and write another FIFO at the same time, the use of
shared pins means no more than one can be written or read at the same time.
For each interface (input or output) there is a FIFO clock that must be a constant
frequency, and running constantly. There may be some minimum and maximum frequency
requirements for a particular Module Carrier card that the designer of the FPGA contents
must be sure to comply with. This is because the FIFO clocks are generated by the FPGA,
probably based on one of the clock inputs to the part.
Each FIFO interface has a separate “enable” signal that is used to indicate which FIFO is
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
accessed using the clock edge.
Input FIFOs
The input FIFOs use a common data bus that is driven onto the HERON module. It is
important to ensure that no more than one of the FIFOs are read at the same time, but
more importantly that no more than one has its output enable selected.
By properly asserting the “read enable” and “output enable” signals relative to the clock the
FPGA can access the FIFO of its choice at a rate up to one 32 bit word per clock cycle.
For the timing of those signals refer to the HERON module specification.
Each input FIFO interface provides Flags that indicate the state of the FIFO. An empty
flag shows that there is no data to be read, an almost empty flag shows that there are at least
4 words left. While the almost flag is not asserted accesses can be made on every clock, but
after it is asserted, it is better to make one access only, then check the empty flag on the
next clock, before deciding if another access is possible.
Output FIFOs
The output FIFOs use a common data bus that is driven by the HERON module. It is
important to ensure that no more than one of the FIFOs is written at the same time –
unless that is required by your system.
By properly asserting the “write enable” signals relative to the clock, the user FPGA can
access the FIFO of its choice at a rate up to one 32-bit word per clock cycle.
For the timing of those signals refer to the HERON module specification.
Each output FIFO interface provides Flags that indicate the state of the FIFO. A full flag
shows that there is no room left to write, an almost full flag shows that there are at least 4
words of space left. While the almost flag is not asserted accesses can be made on every
clock, but after it is asserted, it is better to make one access only, then check the full flag on
the next clock, before deciding if another access is possible.
FIFO clocks
The FIFO clocks are provided by the user FPGA, but are buffered externally using an
LVT245 buffer that is able to provide the drive current required on these signals. To enable
circuitry internal to the FPGA to be designed to use the actual clock that is applied to the
FIFO, the buffered FIFO clock signals are connected to the remaining GCLK inputs. This
allows DLLs to be used to provide a clock internal to the FPGA that has the same phase as
that applied to the FIFOs on the carrier board.
Digital I/O
The HERON-FPGA4V connects 90 of the FPGAs I/O pins to connectors. This allows
them to be configured as digital Inputs and Outputs as chosen by the user’s FPGA
program. The first pair of pins on connectors A, B, D and E are linked to Global Clock
pins on the Virtex II giving access to the Digital Clock Manager (DCM) modules. These
pins can be used for standard I/O.
The HERON-FPGA4V has split the Digital I/O’s in two halves, connectors A, B and C
are connected to BANK 1, and connectors D, E and F are connected to BANK 0 of the
Virtex II . These are the only signals connected to these banks. There are two jumpers that
allow the output driver supply voltage (VCCO) to be selected independently for each of
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
these banks, with options of the Core voltage 1.5V, or 3.3V. If a different VCCO voltage is
required then this could be supplied by an external voltage source onto the jumpers.
The pins on the Digital I/O connectors are linked to I/O pins on the Virtex II so that each
signal pin can be used as an independent single ended input or output. The Virtex II
FPGA’s are designed to cater for differential inputs and outputs using defined pairings of its
I/O pins, this is reflected in the Digital I/O connectors on the FPGA4V as the signal pairs
have been routed to adjacent pins on the connectors. The FPGA4V has 42 differential pairs
linked from the FPGA to the Digital I/O connectors. The choice of using the pins on the
Digial I/O connectors for single ended signals or differential pairs is determined by the
design implemented in the FPGA.
Module and Carrier ID
The HERON specification assigns pins on the HERON module that give a HERON
module access to the carrier ID of the carrier that it is plugged into, and a unique HERON
slot identifier.
These IDs are used by the configuration FPGA so that the module is addressed on Heron
Serial Bus (HSB) using this information. These signals are also connected to the User
FPGA so a user program can use them if required.
General Purpose LEDs
There are some LEDs on the HERON-FPGA4V that are connected to some of the FPGA
I/O pins. There are five such LEDs, which can be used by the FPGA program to indicate
various states of operation.
Done LEDs
There are two Done LEDs, labelled “DONE” and “CTRL DONE”. They are illuminated
if the relevant FPGA is not configured.
LED “DONE is connected to the user FPGA
LED “CTRL DONE” is connected to the Control FPGA.
This means that the “CTRL DONE” should flash at power on, and then go out showing
that the control FPGA is ready to accept a configuration stream for the User FPGA.
After downloading a bitstream to the user User FPGA LED “DONE” should also go out.
Serial Ports
The Digital I/O connector ‘F’ the HERON-FPGA4V has 15 pins connected directly to the
Virtex II and also uses four of the remaining pins to provide the opportunity to use a
variety of serial port configurations. The remaining pins are taken to ground on the PCB.
On the other Digital I/O connectors all the non-signal pins are taken to ground on the
PCB. There is a MAX3160 “protocol converter” chip provided external to the FPGA,
which can provide: -
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
1 channel 4 wire RS232
With RTS and CTS
2 channels of 2 wire RS232
Without RTS and CTS
1 channel of 4 wire RS485
One pair in each direction
2 channels of 2 wire RS485
Two bi-directional pairs
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Getting Started on your FPGA Design
HUNT ENGINEERING provide a comprehensive VHDL support package for the
HERON-FPGA4.
This package consists of a VHDL “top level”, with corresponding user constraints file,
VHDL sources and simulation files for the Hardware Interface Layer, and User VHDL files
as part of the examples.
The Hardware Interface Layer correctly interfaces with the Module hardware, while the top
level (top.vhd) defines all inputs and outputs from the FPGA on your module. Users should
not edit these files unless a special digital I/O format is required – see the later section
“Digital I/O from the FPGA”.
The file user_ap.vhd is where you will make your design for the FPGA, using the simplified
interfaces provided by the Hardware Interface layer.
Entire FPGA design (VHDL top level) top.vhd
User_Ap – user VHDL level
I/O pins
Hardware
Interface
Layer
Organisation of VHDL support for FPGA modules.
After synthesising your design, you will use the Place and Route tools from Xilinx (either as
part of your ISE package, of from the Xilinx Alliance tools). These tools will use the User
Constraints File (.ucf) to correctly define the correct pins and timing parameters. You will
need to minimally edit this file to have the timing constraints that you need, but the file
provided means you do not need to enter the pin out constraints at all.
It is expected that every user will start by following the Getting Started example, Example1,
which is supplied on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD. By working through the Getting
Started example you will be able to see how the User FPGA is configured, how a simple
example can be built, and a new bitstream generated.
In this way, you can use example1 to check your understanding of how the module works,
and you can also use the example as a sanity check that your hardware is functioning
correctly.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Working through Example 1
All HERON modules that have FPGAs have an “Example1” provided for them. It is a
simple example that connects data from the input FIFO interface to the output FIFO
interface, and also exercises the HSB interface.
This example is fully described in the “Starting your FPGA development” tutorial on the
HUNT ENGINEERING CD.
The tutorial works through running the example and then modifying and re-building it. The
tutorial assumes that you are using the latest version of the ISE Foundation tool-set from
Xilinx. If you are using a different version of ISE Foundation, you will simply need to
convert the project as described in the application note provided by HUNT
ENGINEERING titled ‘Using Different Versions of ISE’. There is also an application note
on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD that describes using design flows that are different
from ISE, titled ‘Using VHDL tools other than ISE’.
The example is quite simple but demonstrates the use of the interfaces found in the
Hardware Interface Layer supplied with the module. The example is supplied in two ways.
Firstly, there is a ready-to-load bitstream, supplied in the Hunt Compressed Bitstream file
format, or ‘.hcb’ format. This is the file format used by the HUNT ENGINEERING
configuration tool. Secondly, there is an example1 project supplied for ISE, enabling the
design to be rebuilt and a new bitstream downloaded.
The bitstream file is provided to allow you to load the example1 onto the hardware without
having to re-build it. This is a useful confidence check to see if any problems you are
experiencing are due to changes you have made, or the way you have built the design. If the
bitstream from the CD fails to behave then the problem is more fundamental.
To make things easier, we have created the proper ISE project files for the examples.
Using these projects will allow you to run the complete design flow, from RTL-VHDL
source files to the proper bitstream, ready to download on your Heron FPGA board.
No special skills are required to do this.
However, if you want to write your own code and start designing your own application, you
must make sure that you have acquired the proper level of expertise in:
* VHDL language,
* Digital Design
* Xilinx FPGAs
* ISE environment and design flow
Proper training courses exist which can help you acquire quickly the required skills and
techniques. Search locally for courses in your local language.
Preparing ISE
Before beginning work with Example1 you will need to make sure ISE is properly installed.
In addition, you should ensure that you have downloaded the latest service pack from the
Xilinx website for the version of ISE you are using.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Copying the examples from the HUNT ENGINEERING CD
On the HUNT ENGINEERING CD, under the directory “fpga” you can find directories
for each module type. In the case of the HERON-FPGA4V the correct directory is
“fpga4v2”.
There are two ways that you can copy the files from the CD.
1) The directory tree with the VHDL sources, bit streams etc can be copied directly from
the CD to the directory of your choice. In this case there is no need to copy the .zip file,
but the files will be copied to your hard drive with the same read only attribute that they
have on the CD. In this case all files in the “examplex” directories need to be changed
to have read/write permissions. It is a good idea to leave the permissions of the
common directory set to read only to prevent the accidental modification of these files.
2) To make the process more convenient we have provided the zip file, which is a zipped
image of the same tree you can see on the CD. If you “unzip” this archive to a directory
of your choice, you will have the file permissions already set correctly.
Opening the Example1 Project
Let us start with Example1. In the tree that you have just copied from the CD, open the
Example1 sub-directory. You should see some further sub-directories there:
* ISE holds the ISE project files.
* Src holds the application-specific Source files.
* Sim holds the simulation scripts for ModelSim.
* Leo_Syn holds the synthesis scripts for Leonardo Spectrum and Synplify users.
You may ignore this directory in this chapter.
Open the Xilinx ISE Project Navigator. If a project pops up (from a previous run), then
close it. Use File Æ Open project.
If you own a HERON-FPGA4V module equipped with a VirtexII device, you need to
open ex1_fpga4v.npl.
Select Example1\ISE\XXXXX.ise and click on the "Open" button.
After some internal processing, the "Sources window" of the Project Navigator will display
the internal hierarchy of the Example1 project.
If you are encountering errors at this stage, you should verify that:
The example files have been correctly copied onto your hard disk, and especially the
\Common and Example1\Src directories.
The correct version of ISE has been successfully installed. Be sure to have installed XST
VHDL synthesis and the support for the Virtex2 family.
The Project's functional parameters
Double click on "user_ap1" in the Sources window.
This opens the VHDL colour-coded text editor so that you can see the part of the project
where you can enter your own design.
The first code that you will see at the beginning of this file is a VHDL Package named
"config" which is used to configure the design files according to the application's
requirements. See the next section of this manual for a description of these items
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Below the package section, you will see the User_Ap1's VHDL code.
This is where you will insert your own code when you make your own design.
We provide a system which is built in such a way that the user should not need to edit any
other file than User_Ap (and the entities that this module instantiates).
In particular, the user should NOT modify the HE_* files,
even when creating new designs for the FPGA.
Setting up the Configuration Package
At the top of the file USER_APx.VHD (where x indicates the example number) there are
settings that you can change to affect your design (in this case the example). The idea is that
settings that are often changed are found here.
1. Divide External Clock by 2
The example uses the 100Mhz oscillator that is fitted to Osc1 of the module. It generates
the FIFO clock either directly from this 100Mhz, or divides it by 2 to generate a 50Mhz
FIFO clock. Unfortunately the HEPC8 module carrier cannot support a clock as high as
100Mhz, and the HEPC9 carrier cannot support a clock as low as 50Mhz.
Set this parameter to "True" if you want to divide the external clock by two and use this as
your main Clock.
If you are using an HEPC8 carrier board, set DIV2_FCLK to "True".
If you are using an HEPC9 carrier board, set DIV2_FCLK to "False".
2. FIFO Clocks
You must decide whether you will have a single common clock for driving the input and
output FIFOs. Normally a design is simpler if the same clock is used for input and output
FIFOs, but the module design allows you to use different frequencies or phases if that is
more convenient for the design of your system. Whether you use a common clock or
separate clocks will affect your design, but it also affects the use of clocks in the Hardware
Interface Layer.
Set FCLK_G_DOMAIN to True if you have the same clock driving both FIFOs.
This is the default option for the Examples. If you are unsure, select this choice.
Then, you must know whether your clocks are running slower than 60 MHz or not. This is
the frequency that you connect to the SRC_FCLK_G in your design.
Set HIGH_FCLK_G to True if your global clock is running at 60 MHz or above. In this
case an HF DLL will be used in the FIFO clocks to ensure the proper timing.
Set HIGH_FCLK_G to False otherwise. In this case the HF DLL does not work, and an
LF DLL is necessary.
Set FCLK_G_DOMAIN to False is you have a different clock driving each Fifo.
This option should be reserved to advanced users familiar with the management of multiple
clock domains systems.
Then, you must know whether each of your clocks are running slower than 60 MHz or not.
These are the frequencies that you connect to the SRC_FCLK_RD and SRC_FCLK_WR in
your user_ap.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Set HIGH_FCLK_RD to True if your Input Fifo clock is running at 60 MHz or above, so
that the HF DLL will be used for the input FIFO clock.
Set HIGH_FCLK_RD to False otherwise, so a LF DLL will be used for the input FIFO
clock.
Set HIGH_FCLK_WR to True if your Output Fifo clock is running at 60 MHz or above,
so that the HF DLL will be used for the output FIFO clock.
Set HIGH_FCLK_WR to False otherwise, so that a LF DLL will be used for the output
FIFO clock.
The Table below summarises the available choices:
FCLK_G_DOMAIN
HIGH_FCLK_G
HIGH_FCLK_RD
HIGH_FCLK_WR
True
True / False
n.a.
n.a.
False
n.a.
True / False
True / False
In the case of example1, the correct choices are:
For the HEPC8
DIV2_FCLK
FCLK_G_DOMAIN
HIGH_FCLK_G
HIGH_FCLK_RD
HIGH_FCLK_WR
True
True
False
n.a.
n.a.
DIV2_FCLK
FCLK_G_DOMAIN
HIGH_FCLK_G
HIGH_FCLK_RD
HIGH_FCLK_WR
False
True
True
n.a.
n.a.
For the HEPC9
User Timing Constraints
As with all FPGA designs it is necessary to apply some timing constraints to the design to
ensure that the tools generate a design that will operate at the frequency that you require.
Example1 has these defined in the .ucf file.
Although you can use the configuration package to set the frequency of the FIFO clocks to
be 50Mhz, you can still use the stricter timing constraints needed when those clocks run at
100Mhz. So in the case of example1 you do not need to change any of the timing
constraints. When you make changes to the design however you may find that you
introduce more clock nets that need to be added to the .ucf file. In some cases you may find
that the tools are unable to achieve your desired clock frequency and then (if you are using
an HEPC8) you should change the constraints to reflect you true needs.
For more details on Timing Constraints please refer to the Xilinx tools documentation.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Creating the Bitstream for Example1
Once the project has been opened as described above:
1.
In the "Sources in project" window (Project Navigator), highlight (single-click on)
the entity ‘top’ ("..\..\Common\top.vhd").
This is extremely important! Otherwise, nothing will work!
2.
Double-click on the "Generate Programming File" item located in the "Processes
for Current Source".
This will trigger the following activity :
Complete
synthesis,
using
all
the
project's
source
files.
Since warnings are generated at this stage, you should see a yellow exclamation mark
appear besides the "Synthesize" item in the Processes window.
Complete Implementation :
- "Translation"
- Mapping
- Placing
- Routing
3.
Creation of the bitstream.
Note that this stage does run a DRC check, which can potentially detect anomalies
created by the Place and route phase (especially with Virtex II ES parts).
When the processing ends, the proper bitstream file, with extension ".rbt" can be
found in the project directory. This file MUST be called top.rbt. If it is not then you
have synthesised a small part of your design because you did not properly highlight
top.vhd in step1.
In the "Pad Report" verify a few pins from the busses, like :
LED(0) = AJ19, LED(1) = AJ18, LED(2) = AH19, LED(3) = AH18, etc... To do
this you need to open “implement design” in the processes window, then open
“Place and Route”. Then double click on the pad report to open it
If you see different assignments, STOP HERE, and verify the UCF file selected for
the project.
You can download this file on your FPGA board and see how it works. See a later section
of this manual.
Note that the user_ap level includes a very large counter that divides the main system clock
and drives the LED #4. It is then obvious to see if the part has been properly programmed
and downloaded: the LED should flash. The hardware will probably require a reset after
configuration before the LED starts to flash.
If the LED does not flash, we recommend that you shut down the PC or reprogram the
device using a "safe" bitstream. Otherwise, some electrical conflicts may happen (see
below).
Possible causes for the device failure to operate are :
1.
Wrong (or no) UCF file.
This happens (for example) if you select the XST-version of the UCF with a
Leonardo Spectrum (or Synplify) synthesis. The pin assignment for all the vectors
(busses) will be ignored, and these pins will be distributed in a quasi-random
fashion!
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
2.
Wrong parameters in the CONFIG package.
3.
Design Error.
If nothing seems obvious, rerun the confidence tests, then return to the original example 1.
Simulating the complete design
To generate the bitstream as above, you did not need to do any simulation. However, if you
start modifying the provided examples and add your own code, verification can soon
became an important issue.
If you need to simulate your design, you will need to install a VHDL simulator such as
ModelSim (available in Xilinx Edition, Personal Edition, or Special Edition).
The example projects provided on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD include simulation
files that provide a starting point for simulating your own design. If you wish to work
through the simulation examples provide, please read the document ‘Simulating HERON
FPGA Designs’.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Making your own FPGA Design
The actual contents of the User FPGA on the HERON-FPGA4 are generated by the user.
While making this development requires some knowledge of Digital Design techniques, it is
made quite simple by the development environment that you use.
We recommend the Foundation ISE series software available from Xilinx, because that is
what we use at HUNT ENGINEERING, and any examples and libraries we provide are
tested in that environment. However there are other tools available from third parties that
can also be used. The use of VHDL sources for our Hardware Interface Layer and
examples means that virtually any FPGA design tool could be used. Any development tool
will eventually use the Xilinx Place and Route tool, where the user constraints file that we
supply will ensure that the design is correctly routed for the module. There are application
notes on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD that describe how other tools might be used.
The best way to learn how to use your development tools is to follow any tutorials provided
with them, or to take up a training course run by their vendors.
ALL NEW PROJECTS SHOULD START FROM ONE OF THE PROVIDED
EXAMPLES – that way all of the correct settings are made, and files included. Your design
should take place entirely within the User-Ap level, except in the case of needing to change
the I/O formats of the Digital I/Os in which case it is necessary to minimally edit the
top.vhd file – see a later section in this manual for details.
It is assumed that you are able to use your tools and follow the simplest of Digital Design
techniques. HUNT ENGINEERING cannot support you in these things, but are happy to
field questions specific to the hardware such as “how could I trigger my A/D from a DSP
timer?” or “How can I use the FIFO interface component to do….?”.
User_Ap Interface
This section describes the Interface between the User_Ap central module (or entity in
VHDL Jargon) and the external Interface hardware. This is the part where you connect
your FPGA design to the resources of the module.
In other words:
1.
The Clocks system
2.
How your application can communicate with the external world : Digital I/Os, HSB
interface, and FIFOs.
You need to understand this interface in order to properly connect your processing logic.
The complete FPGA project consists of a Top level in which many sub-modules (entities)
are placed (instantiated) and interconnected. One of these modules is User_AP: your
module.
The top-level and the other modules make the system work, but you do not have to
understand or modify them in any way.
Let us see all of the Inputs/Outputs (Ports) of your User_Ap module:
Note that the names used for these ports are effectively “reserved” even if the user does not
connect to that signal. This means the user must be careful not to re-use the same name for
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
a signal that should not connect to these ports.
Port
Direction Description
in user_ap
GENERAL
RESET
In
Asynchronous module reset (active high)
CONFIG
In
System config signal (active low)
ADDR_FLAGSEL
In
Module input to select the mode of some
module pins – see HERON specification
BOOTEN
Out
Module output not normally used
UMI_EN[0:3]
Out
Uncommitted Module Interconnect enables,
FPGA output driven when low
UMI_IN[0:3]
In
Uncommitted Module Interconnects in
UMI_OUT[0:3]
Out
Uncommitted Module Interconnects out
MID[0:3]
In
Module ID of this module slot
CID[0:3]
In
Carrier ID of this carrier
UDPRES
Out
Optional reset to system. Drive to ‘1’ if not
used.
LED[0:4]
Out
5 x LEDs, can be used for any purpose
OSC0
In
External Clock from OSC0 oscillator
OSC1
In
External Clock from OSC1 (100MHz)
T1IN_A
Out
Data driven to RS232/485 chip
T2IN_A
Out
Data driven to RS232/485 chip
R1OUT_A
In
Data input from RS232/485 chip
R2OUT_A
In
Data input from RS232/485 chip
RS485_232_A
Out
Control signal driven to RS232/485 chip
HDPLX_A
Out
Control signal driven to RS232/485 chip
FAST_A
Out
Control signal driven to RS232/485 chip
FCLK_RD
In
Read FIFO Clock to be used in this module
(only when FCLK_G_DOMAIN = FALSE)
SRC_FCLK_RD
Out
Input FIFO Clock source for the top level
(only when FCLK_G_DOMAIN = FALSE)
CLOCK SOURCES
SERIAL I/OS
FIFO CLOCK
INTERFACE
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
FCLK_WR
In
Output FIFO Clock to be used in this
module (only when FCLK_G_DOMAIN =
FALSE)
SRC_FCLK_WR
Out
Output FIFO clock source for the top level
(only when FCLK_G_DOMAIN = FALSE)
FCLK_G
In
Common FIFO clock to be used in this
module (only when FCLK_G_DOMAIN =
TRUE)
SRC_FCLK_G
Out
Common FIFO clock source for the top
level (only when FCLK_G_DOMAIN =
TRUE)
INFIFO_READ_REQ[5:0]
Out
Input FIFO Read Request
INFIFO_DVALID[5:0]
In
Input FIFO Data Valid
INFIFO_SINGLE[5:0]
In
Input FIFO Single Word Available
INFIFO_BURST[5:0]
In
Input FIFO Burst Possible
INFIFO0_D [31:0]
In
Input FIFO 0 Data
INFIFO1_D [31:0]
In
Input FIFO 1 Data
INFIFO2_D [31:0]
In
Input FIFO 2 Data
INFIFO3_D [31:0]
In
Input FIFO 3 Data
INFIFO4_D [31:0]
In
Input FIFO 4 Data
INFIFO5_D [31:0]
In
Input FIFO 5 Data
OUTFIFO_READY[5:0]
In
Output FIFO Ready for Data
OUTFIFO_WRITE[5:0]
Out
Output FIFO Write Control
OUTFIFO_D [31:0]
Out
Data written into Output FIFO
MSG_CLK
Out
Clock to HE-USER interface logic.
MSG _DIN [7:0]
In
Data received from HSB
MSG _ADDR [7:0]
In
"address" received from the HSB
MSG _WEN
In
Write access from the HSB
MSG _REN
In
Read access from the HSB
MSG _DONE
In
Message was successfully transmitted (used
when initiating HSB messages)
MSG _COUNT
In
Counter enable
messages
MSG _CLEAR
In
Asynchronous clear for address counter
hen initi ting HSB mess ges
INPUT FIFOs
OUTPUT FIFOs
HE_USER I/F
25
when
initiating
HSB
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
when initiating HSB messages
MSG _READY
Out
to acknowledge an access from the HSB
MSG _SEND
Out
Message send command
initiating HSB messages)
MSG _CE
Out
to control speed operation
MSG _DOUT [7:0]
Out
Data to be sent to HSB
MSG _SEND_ID
Out
Indicates when a byte should be replaced by
Own ID (used when initiating HSB
messages)
MSG _LAST_BYTE
Out
To indicate when the last byte to be sent is
presented when initiating HSB messages
CONN_A_EN[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O enables for connector A, FPGA
output pin driven when low
CONN_A_IN[0:14]
In
Digital I/O in for connector A
CONN_A_OUT[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O out for connector A
CONN_B_EN[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O enables for connector B, FPGA
output pin driven when low
CONN_B_IN[0:14]
In
Digital I/O in for connector B
CONN_B_OUT[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O out for connector B
CONN_C_EN[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O enables for connector C, FPGA
output pin driven when low
CONN_C_IN[0:14]
In
Digital I/O in for connector C
CONN_C_OUT[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O out for connector C
CONN_D_EN[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O enables for connector D, FPGA
output pin driven when low
CONN_D_IN[0:14]
In
Digital I/O in for connector D
CONN_D_OUT[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O out for connector D
CONN_E_EN[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O enables for connector E , FPGA
output pin driven when low
CONN_E_IN[0:14]
In
Digital I/O in for connector E
CONN_E_OUT[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O out for connector E
CONN_F_EN[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O enables for connector F, FPGA
output pin driven when low
CONN_F_IN[0:14]
In
Digital I/O in for connector F
CONN_F_OUT[0:14]
Out
Digital I/O out for connector F
(used
when
DIGITAL I/O
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Hardware Interface Layer
All of the signals listed above are connected between the ‘User_Ap’ interface and the pins
of the FPGA via the ‘Hardware Interface Layer’. The Hardware Interface Layer includes
logic that correctly interfaces many different functional parts of the FPGA, from HERONFIFO interfaces, to clock inputs and outputs, to digital I/O and serial I/O.
For a complete description of the Hardware Interface Layer (HIL), please read the
document ‘Using the Hardware Interface Layer in your FPGA Design’.
Important!
There are many signals that are connected between the FPGA on the HERON-FPGA4V
and the HERON module connectors. Most of these signals will only be used by advanced
users of the HERON-FPGA4V. The FPGA pinning of these signals is defined in the UCF
file, and the top.vhd has these signals commented out. Users that want to use these signals
will need to uncomment them in the top.vhd and add the correct ports to the user_ap.vhd.
The FPGA sets any I/O pins of the device that are not listed in the design to have a 50150K pull down. Most of the HERON module signals are pulled to their inactive state by
10K resistors so this 50K will have no effect. However the UDPRES signal does not, and
setting this signal low will cause your whole board to be reset. Thus it is important that the
UDPRES pin is driven high by the FPGA if it is not being used.
It is also advised to do the same with the LED pins to prevent them becoming illuminated
erroneously.
Other Examples
There are some other examples (source and .rbt files) provided for the HERON-FPGA4V
on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD. Follow “Getting Started” and then “Starting with
FPGA”. Choose “General FPGA Examples” and click on the directory for the fpga4V2.
The examples are in the directories example2, example3 etc.
These examples have pdf documents that describe their function.
These examples could be useful to users who do not want to use the FPGA on the
HERON-FPGA4V and simply want to use it as a fast digital interface for a DSP system.
Refer to the pdf files to see the functionality provided by each “standard” bitstream.
Please note that as with the examples any “user” work should be done in the user_ap
section i.e. do not put your own logic into the hardware interface layer, but simply include
them into your own design. This enables your design to be protected from hardware
specific details like pinout, and also allows you to benefit from any new versions that
HUNT Engineering might make available without having to re-work your part of the
design.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
How to Make a New Design
For any new design that you make, it is important that you start from the examples
provided on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD.
When making a new design for the HERON-FPGA4 by starting from one of the examples
you will already have a project that is correctly set up to use the supplied Hardware
Interface Layer. The project will already include the correct settings and user constraints.
In fact, in all situations you should start development from one of the examples on the
HUNT ENGINEERING CD, even if you intend to develop the FPGA in a way that is
completely different to any of the examples.
In the case where you are to make a new design that does not match a standard example,
you should start development from Example1 and add your own logic in place of the
existing Example1 VHDL. By doing this, you will automatically inherit the proper ISE
settings, user constraints and project structure.
When your are creating a new design from one of the standard CD examples you will need
to be sure that the version of ISE design tools you are using matches the version of ISE for
which the example projects were created. If you are using a different version of ISE then
you must work through the HUNT ENGINEERING application note ‘Using Different
Versions of ISE’.
In developing new VHDL, there are proper training courses that exist to help you quickly
acquire the required skills and techniques. Search locally for suitable training on these
subjects. You may also consider sub-contracting part or whole of the new FPGA design.
Inserting your own Logic
When making a new design, you will create and insert your own logic inside the USER_AP
module.
From here you can interface to the HERON FIFOs, the HSB and the general purpose
digital I/O.
When these interfaces are simple, you may code the proper logic directly in the USER_AP
module.
For more complex interfaces, you may code separate entities in separate source files, and
instantiate these entities within USER_AP, as was done in the Examples.
Important: the first thing to edit in the user_ap.vhd file is the package section where generic
parameters are set to match your configuration and your design.
Important : The HE_USER interface cannot be left entirely unconnected. If you have a
design that does not use the features of this interface, you must be certain to connect the
following. The Clock of the HE_USER must be running. The inputs MSG_SEND,
MSG_SEND_ID, MSG_LAST_BYTE and MSG_CS must be connected to 0. The
MSG_READY must be connected to ‘1’.
Top-level fine tuning (using other special IO pins)
The top level defines all of the I/O pins from the FPGA. Some of them are not used in the
examples, but have buffers instantiated in the top.vhd. Some of those pins can have
alternative signal formats that require a different Xilinx primitive to be instantiated for the
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
buffers.
Refer to the hardware details section of this manual to learn which pins are suitable for
which use.
If the buffers that are already instantiated in top.vhd (usually LVTTL) are suitable for your
needs then there is no need to modify top.vhd, you can simply use the signals that are
connected as ports to the user_ap file.
If you need different buffer types then it is necessary to edit top.vhd.
The method to do that is :
Make a copy of the original TOP.vhd file (from /Common) and work on this copy.
Each I/O pin has a buffer type instantiated in top.vhd.
Edit the instantiation to use the proper Xilinx Buffer primitive.
You may sometimes have to insert attributes in the UCF file to qualify the IO.
Modify the User_Ap entity to make these signals visible.
Add the signals in the User_Ap instantiation port map .
User Timing Constraints
As with all FPGA designs it is necessary to apply some timing constraints to the design to
ensure that the tools generate a design that will operate at the frequency that you require.
These will be defined in the .ucf file.
The .ucf file provided as a template has some timing constraints already, but when you
make changes to the design you may find that you introduce more clock nets that need to
be added to the ucf file.
For more details on Timing Constraints please refer to the Xilinx tools documentation.
Hints for FPGA Designs
Having said that we cannot support you in making your FPGA design, we always try to
make your development easy to get started, so this section outlines some things that you
need to think about.
The FPGAs are basically synchronous devices, that is they register data as it passes through
the device – making a processing pipeline. It is possible to apply asynchronous logic to
signals but the FPGA concept assumes that logic is between registers in the pipeline.
This pipeline gives rise to two things that you need to consider. One is the maximum clock
frequency that that pipeline can operate at, and the other is the number of pipeline stages in
the design.
As with any component in your FPGA design, components from the HERON-FPGA4V
component library operate synchronously. That is, any control or data signal that you
connect to the library component must be generated from logic that uses the same clock
signal that is connected to the library component. Similarly, logic that is connected to
outputs of the library component will need to be clocked by the same clock signal.
For a conventional circuit design, you would normally need to consider the signal delays
from the output of one synchronous element to the input of the next element. By adding up
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
a ‘clock to output’ delay from the output of the first element, adding routing delays and the
‘setup to clock’ delay for the input of the second element you would have a timing figure to
match against the clock period. If the calculated figure is found to be too large, the circuit
must be slowed down, or logic must be simplified to reduce the calculated value to one that
fits the requirements.
When creating a design using the Xilinx development tools however, you only need to add
a timing specification to the clock net that is used to clock both elements. This
specification, which may be supplied in units of time or units of frequency will be
automatically used by the tool to check that the circuit will run at the specified speed.
This leaves you free to focus on the functionality of the signals, while the Xilinx
implementation tools work on achieving your specified time constraints. If at the end of
your implementation the tools tell you that your timing constraints have been achieved,
then the combination of all setup, hold and routing delays are such that your design will
operate at the frequency you defined.
What this means for your design is that when you place a library component you need to
consider whether signals are set high or low correctly on each clock edge (note, all library
components are positive/rising edge clocked). What you do not need to worry about is the
timing issues of each signal beyond having applied a time constraint on to the clock net that
is applied to those components and the connected logic.
Use of Clocks
Because of the assumption that the design is a pipeline, the development tools will allow
you to enter a specification for the clocks used in the design. This allows you to specify the
frequency that you need the resulting design to operate at.
Simple designs will use only one clock, and all parts of the design will use that clock. It is
usual for every “part” of the design to use the rising edge of this clock. This makes it very
simple for the development tools to determine the maximum possible frequency that design
could be used at. Adding too much combinatorial logic between pipeline stages will reduce
the maximum possible clock rate. This gives rise to a hint – If your design will not run fast
enough, add some more pipelining to areas where lots of combinatorial logic is used.
Typically development tools will give a report stating the maximum clock rate that can be
used in a particular design, and will probably raise errors if that is slower than the
specification that you have provided for the clock used in the design.
More complicated designs would use several clock nets, which may be related in frequency
or phase, or may be completely independent. In such a design you must be careful when
outputs from logic using one clock are passed to logic using a different clock. It is often
useful to add a FIFO, which allows input and output clocks to be completely independent.
Possible Sources of Clocks
As you can see from the section above, an FPGA design may require one or more clock
frequencies to achieve the job it needs to do. How you implement your design governs the
number and frequencies of the clocks you need. The design of the module has been made
to give you as much flexibility as possible, but ultimately it is up to you which will be used.
On the HERON-FPGA4V there are two possible Crystal oscillator modules. Either of
these can be used as clocks in the FPGA design, as can clocks provided on any of the other
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Digital I/Os. One technique for example could be to use one of the UMI pins as a clock
input, which can be driven by the timer of a DSP module, or possibly another FPGA
module driving a clock onto that UMI. This type of use though is system specific, and we
cannot supply a generic example for that. The examples that we provide for the module
assume a clock is fitted to the UserOSC1 socket, and use that as the only clock in the
design.
Flow Control
Because the processing speed of the FPGA will almost never be the same as every other
component in your system it will be necessary to use some flow control in your design. The
most general way to implement this is to use Clock enables to enable the processing only
when it is possible for data to flow through the “system”. Otherwise some type of data
storage (like FIFOs) must be implemented to ensure that data is never lost or generated
erroneously.
When data is read from the HERON Input FIFOs there are FIFO flags to indicate when
there is data to be read. Reading from the FIFO when the flags indicate that there is no data
to read will result in false data being fed through your system. Thus your design must either
a) only assert the read signal when the Empty Flag (EF) is not asserted, or b) use the EF as
a clock enable for the logic in the design, thus preventing the invalid data caused by reading
an empty FIFO, from being propagated through the design. The actual method used will
depend on the needs of the design.
When data is written to the HERON Output FIFOs there are flags to indicate when it is
possible to write new data. Writing to the FIFO when the flags indicate there is no room
will result in data being lost from your system. Thus your design must not assert the Write
enable signal when the Full Flag (FF) is asserted.
Pipeline Length or “latency”
The latency of your design will be determined by the length of the pipeline used in your
FPGA design. The simplest way to determine this is to “count” the Flip-Flops in your data
path, but whichever tools you are using might provide a more elegant way. For example the
“Core Generator” will state the pipeline steps used with each core, and will even let you
specify a maximum in some cases.
I/O from the FPGA
In addition to the FIFO and HSB interfaces of the HERON-FPGA4V, there are some
General purpose Digital I/O connectors and some options for serial interfaces. The use of
these interfaces will be specific to a particular design, so they have not been included in the
examples supplied. The pins to use are defined in the top.vhd, and the locations are already
defined in the .ucf files. The choice of buffer type and the time specs of those interfaces
must be taken care of by the designer.
DSP with your FPGA
The FPGA can be used to perform powerful Digital Signal Processing. It is beyond the
scope of this manual and indeed not part of the normal business of HUNT
ENGINEERING to teach you how to do this. There is however a simple way to build
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Signal Processing systems for the Xilinx FPGAs.
Xilinx supply as part of their tool-set something called a “Core Generator”. This provides a
simple way of generating filters, FFTs and other “standard” signal processing elements,
using a simple graphical interface. It results in a “block” that can be included in your design
and connected like any other component. Typically it will have a clock input that will be
subject to the pipeline speed constraints, and clock enables to allow flow control.
Using the Core Generator you can quickly build up signal processing systems, but for more
complex systems you should take a course on Signal Processing theory, and perhaps attend
a Xilinx course on DSP using FPGAs.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Software
The software for use with your FPGA will consist of several partsFPGA Development tool
The application contents of the FPGA will be generated using FPGA development tools.
Xilinx ISE is the recommended tool, along with ModelSim if you require simulation.
It is possible to use alternative FPGA synthesis tools such as Leonardo Spectrum, or
Synplicity, but ultimately the Place and Route stage will be performed by the same tool.
Users of ISE have the Place and Route tool included, but users of the other tools require
the Xilinx Alliance tool.
The FPGA design can be entered using VHDL.
Design Files for the FPGA
The FPGA design can be downloaded onto the FPGA4V in three ways. Via the
Configuration serial bus which requires a *.rbt file, via the Flash PROM on the JTAG chain
which requires a *.mcs file, and thirdly directly programming the FPGA via the JTAG chain
which requires a *.bit file.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Generating Design Files
Files for HERON Utility (*.RBT)
The sections in this document titled “Creating a Project” and “Inserting your own logic”
lead up to the generation of a *.rbt file which can be downloaded via the Configuration
serial bus using the HERON Utility. Before generating the *.rbt file right click on “generate
Program File” in the “processes for Current Source” window in ISE , select “Properties” on
the menu and then select “General Options”. Check that “create ASCII Configuration File
“ has been selected.
Also from “Process Properties” select the “Start-up Options” and check that CCLK has
been selected for the “Start-Up Clock”. This is the default used in the example projects
provided.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Files for direct JTAG programming (*.bit)
The FPGA can be programmed directly through the JTAG connector on the FPGA4V
using Xilinx “iMPACT” software together with a *.bit file. The only difference between the
option settings for the *.rbt file is in the “Start-Up clock” which should now be set to
JTAG Clock.
Files for PROMs (*.MCS)
The Flash PROMs on the FPGA3 can be programmed, and reprogrammed via the JTAG
chain using ‘*.mcs’ files. These files are generated by the Xilinx “PROM File Formatter”
after the ‘*.rbt’ file has been generated.
Please read the document “Using iMPACT with FPGA modules” for a detailed description
of how to create the correct ‘.mcs’ file for your design.
HERON_FPGA Configuration Tool
HUNT ENGINEERING provides a tool to allow you to load the FPGAs in your system
with .rbt files that you create, or copy from the CD.
For details about using this tool refer to the “Started your FPGA development” tutorial on
the HUNT ENGINEERING CD.
The windows tool actually calls a program with command line parameters set according to
your choices.
The program is HRN_FPGA.exe which will have been installed on your DSP machine in
the directory %HEAPI_DIR%\utils.
For help using that program directly type hrm_fpga –h in a DOS box.
HUNT ENGINEERING HOST-API
The HOST-API provides a consistent software interface to all HERON Module carriers,
from a number of operating systems.
While the FPGA development tools can only be run under Windows on a PC (some can be
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
obtained in Unix versions for a workstation). It is possible to deploy your system from a
number of different Host operating systems. In these cases the HOST-API and the FPGA
loader tool can allow you to use your system, even if you cannot make your FPGA
development there.
Refer to the tutorials, documentation and examples for the HOST-API on the HUNT
ENGINEERING CD.
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-API
If you have C6000 DSPs in your system, you can use HERON-API to communicate with
the FPGA modules via the HERON-FIFOs. Refer to the tutorials, documentation and
examples for the HERON-API on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Hardware Details
HERON Module Type
The HERON-FPGA4V module implements all four of the HERON connectors, which
means it is a 32 bit module that can access all twelve of the possible HERON FIFOs.
For a complete description of the HERON interfaces, signal definitions and connector
types and pin outs, refer to the separate HERON specification document. This can be
found on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD, accessed through the documentation viewer,
or from the HUNT ENGINEERING web site at http://www.hunteng.co.uk.
The HERON-FPGA4V does not have a processor so does not assert the “Module has
processor” pin as defined in the HERON specification.
The HERON-FPGA4V does not support JTAG so does not assert the “Module has
JTAG” pin as defined in the HERON specification.
The HERON-FPGA4V has a serial bus so asserts the “Module has serial bus” pin as
defined in the HERON specification.
The HERON-FPGA4V has a 32 bit interface so asserts the “32/16” pin low.
Hardware Reset
Before the HERON-FPGA4V can be used, it must be reset. This reset initialises the Heron
Serial Bus circuitry into a state where it can be used. Depending on the way that the user
FPGA was last configured, it may also reset some functions in the user FPGA.
This reset DOES NOT cause the user FPGA to require re-configuration.
This signal is driven by the HERON module Carrier and must NOT be left unconnected,
as this will cause the HERON-FPGA4V to behave erratically. It must also NEVER be
driven by the user FPGA on the HERON-FPGA4V.
Software Reset (via Serial bus)
The Serial configuration bus has a reset command that is executed at the beginning of a bit
stream download. This must never be confused with the system hardware reset provided on
the HERON pin – it is not the same thing. The Serial bus reset simply resets the internal
configuration of the FPGA but will NOT perform a hardware reset.
It cannot affect the HERON carrier board FIFOs, or any other module in the system.
Config
There is a system wide Config signal that is open collector and hence requires a pull up to
be provided by the motherboard. The HERON-FPGA4V can drive this signal active (low)
or inactive if required, or can use it as an input to disable data transfer during a DSP
booting phase.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
If the FPGA program does nothing with this signal the signal will be pulled high by the
carrier board.
Default Routing Jumpers
The default routing jumpers are provided by HERON modules. These are the longer pins
on the topmost HERON connector of the module. These pins protrude above the
HERON module when it is fitted to the module carrier, to which jumper links can be fitted.
|Å output
5
4 3 2 1
Æ|Å input
Æ|
0 5 4 3 2 1 0
These jumpers can be used to select the default routing of FIFO 0 on the Carrier card.
The exact use of these jumpers is defined by the HERON module carrier, so you should
reference the user manual for the Carrier card you are using, but the numbering of these
“default routing” jumpers is defined in the HERON spec, and shown above.
e.g. the jumpers as fitted in the diagram show that the default routing for both the input
FIFO #0 and the output FIFO #0 is selected as 1.
HERON processor modules accept their boot stream from FIFO 0, which is why these
jumpers are provided for FIFO #0 only.
The HERON-FPGA4V does not need to boot from FIFO 0, so the Default Input FIFO 0
can be set or not set as required by the user.
Physical Dimensions of the Module
A size 1 HERON module is 4.0 inches by 2.5 inches overall.
The 5mm limit on component height under the module is not violated by the HERONFPGA4V.
The maximum height of the HERON-FPGA4V above the module including mating
connectors and cables is 6.5mm.
This means that the assembly of a HERON module carrier and the HERON-FPGA4V is
less than the 20mm single slot spacing of PCI, cPCI and VME.
Power Requirements of the HERON-FPGA4V
The HERON-FPGA4V only uses power from the 5V HERON supply. The 3.3V and 1.5V
required by the FPGA are generated on board from this +5V.
The maximum rating of the HERON-FPGA4V is determined by the number of gates and
the actual FPGA program loaded.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
The other logic on the HERON-FPGA4V has a maximum of 200mA at 5V.
The Switch mode circuits on the HERON-FPGA4V can supply 5.0A at 1.5V and 3.3A at
3.3V. These circuits are at least 80% efficient.
FPGA Power consumption/Dissipation
The power consumption of an FPGA is governed by the number of edge transitions per
second. This means it depends on not only on the configuration loaded into it and the clock
frequency but also on the data being processed.
The flexibility of a Xilinx FPGA means that determining the possible power consumption is
not a trivial task, an estimate can be obtained by using the Xilinx ‘XPower’ software
package. It is still difficult to get an accurate measure because you need to describe the real
data values and timings to be able to estimate correctly.
The FPGA package on the HERON-FPGA4V is an FF1152 which can only guarantee to
dissipate up to 4.5 watts with an ambient temperature of 50 deg C.
The HERON-FPGA4V power supplies for the FPGA are capable of delivering:1.5Volt
@
5Amps
7.5Watts
3.3Volts
@
3.3Amps
10.89Watts
Total
18.39Watts
This is well above the bare package maximum power dissipation. This means that the first
limit on power consumption of the HERON-FPGA4V is determined by the FPGA
package.
It is always a good idea to have some airflow past the package, and normally a Fan fitted to
the Case of the PC is sufficient to provide this.
From the Xilinx data for the FF1152 package the thermal resistance, junction to ambient, is
in the range 8 -- 13 degC/W. The thermal resistance for junction to case is 0.8degC/Watt.
The maximum the bare package can guarantee to dissipation is 4.5 Watts with an ambient
temperature of 50degC.
The FF1152 already has a metal heatsink incorporated into the package, for an additional
heatsink to have an effect on the thermal dissipation there must be air flow over the
heatsink. If a heatsink with a thermal resistance of 5degC/Watt, with air flow, is fitted the
dissipation will increase to (50degC/(5.0 + 0.8))=8.6 Watts with an ambient temperature of
50 deg C.
If fitting a heatsink alone does not increase the power dissipation enough then the next
option is to use a heatsink together with a miniature DC fan to force air through the fins of
the heatsink. A heatsink made by HS Marston (CP464-030-030-04-S-2), which can be
attached to the top of the FPGA either with a thermal adhesive or tape. A 5Volt 25mm
square miniature fan made by Multicomp (KDE502PEB1-8) can be attached to the
heatsink using a self adhesive fan gasket and will allow more power to be dissipated. The
heatsink and gasket (936-881) and fan(306-2545) are available from Farnell. This makes the
height of the FPGA and fan assembly (2.25 + 15.5 + 6.0) = 23.75mm above the surface of
the HERON-IO5V pcb, or 31.35mm above the surface of the motherboard pcb. The
thermal resistance of the heatsink and fan is 2degC/Watt, so the dissipation increases to
(50degC/(2 + 0.8))=17.8Watts with an ambient temperature of 50 deg C.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
To supply power for such a fan there is a pair of plated through holes between the FPGA
and the bottom HERON connector on the HERON-FPGA4V.
FPGA
Heron Connector
Heron Connector
0V
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5V
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Configuration
Max dissipation
Bare Package
4.5Watts
With Heatsink
and airflow
With Heatsink and Fan
8.6Watts
17.8Watts
Depending on the performance of your heatsink your FPGA design could then reach the
limit of one of the power supply circuits on the module. In the unlikely event that the
power supply circuit limit is reached before the package dissipation limit then it will be
necessary to modify the module to use external power supplies for your system.
FIFOs
The HERON FIFO connections are shown in the table of FPGA pinout. The timing of the
signals can be found in the HERON module specification which is on the HUNT
ENGINEERING website and CD.
The design implemented in the user FPGA MUST drive a constant clock onto the FIFO
clock pins. The clock driven by the FPGA on “O/P FIFO clock” and “I/P FIFO clock” is
buffered with an LVT245 buffer that has enough current drive for the carrier board clock
signal. The actual phase of the clock on the FIFO will be the same as the inputs on the
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
GCLK pins, so DLLs can be used to use that same clock to drive logic in the FPGA.
There may be a minimum and maximum frequency imposed by the module carrier that the
module is fitted to.
However it is not necessary to look up any of this information as we supply the Hardware
Interface Layer VHDL that takes care of the FIFO accessing for you.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
User FPGA Clocking
As has been said elsewhere in this manual, the clocking of the FPGA can be a complex
issue. The FPGA does not have such a thing as a clock pin, but rather can use an I/O pin
as a clock, for almost any part of the FPGA design.
Your design will be simpler if a single clock is used, or even if there are several clocks used,
but they are derived from each other. However the FPGA must drive the input and output
FIFO clocks. In each case the logic that interfaces to each must be clocked from the same
clock as the interface.
Different carrier boards have different requirements for the FIFO clocks, and different
applications will have different needs for the sampling rates of the ADC and DAC
interfaces. If they can all be the same then this is the simplest case, and a single clock input
to the FPGA is needed. When the HERON-FPGA4V is shipped there is a 100MHz
oscillator fitted to User OSC1.
If the rates of those clocks need to be different but can be derived from each other then the
design can still be kept quite simple, but sometimes it will be necessary to have several
completely independent clock presented to the FPGA.
To allow a large amount of flexibility, the HERON-FPGA4V offers another Oscillator
module socket. There are also other possibilities such as the Digital I/O connectors or the
UMI pins of the HERON module.
Clocks inputs can be used directly in your FPGA design, but Xilinx provide Delay Locked
Loops (DLL) in the FPGA design. These can be used for a number of purposes such as
clock multipliers, or to align the phase of an internal clock with that of a clock signal on an
I/O pin of the device. This second way is used by the Hardware Interface layer to
guarantee data access times on some of the interfaces.
GCLK0P is driven from the buffered Output FIFO clock, allowing a DLL to be used to
synchronise the internal logic to that clock. This is used by the Hardware Interface Layer to
manage the FIFO clocking.
GCLK6P is driven from the buffered Input FIFO clock, allowing a DLL to be used to
synchronise the internal logic to that clock. This is used by the Hardware Interface Layer to
manage the FIFO clocking.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
User oscillators
The OSC0 socket on the HERON-FPGA4V accept a plastic bodied TTL oscillator such as
the SG531 type from Seiko Epson. The package is a 0.3" 8 pin DIL type body but with only
4 pins
The socket has four pins as shown
VCC
N/C
O/P
GND
These devices are available in TTL and 3.3V versions. Either can be used as the output is
buffered by a 5V tolerant buffer before it is connected to the FPGA pin. The socket
provides +5V supply.
OSC1 is a surface mount location that can be populated at build time. It is powered from
3.3V and the output is NOT buffered before connection to the FPGA. OSC1 is fitted as
standard with a commercial grade (_+100ppm) 100MHz oscillator at the factory.
The above part number is just an example of the oscillator type that can be fitted, and the
exact specification of the oscillator should be chosen carefully for the application it will be
used for. For example the tolerance, jitter and temperature dependence might be important
considerations for some applications.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Digital I/O Connectors
The Digital I/O connectors provide the possibility to have digital I/Os connected directly
to the User FPGA device. On the FPGA4V the connectors have been split such that
connector A, B and C are on BANK 1 and connectors D, E and F are on BANK 0. There
are no other signals other than the Digital I/O signals connected to these banks.
I/O characteristics
The characteristics of the I/O are governed by what is programmed into the FPGA.
However only certain formats are possible with each voltage level on the VCCO pins of an
I/O bank.
On the HERON-FPGA4V The Vcco signals for banks 0 and 1 of the FPGA can be
selected using jumpers on the module. The Module can provide either 1.5V or 3.3V for the
VCCO. Other voltages could be provided externally by connecting to this jumper.
Other banks have the VCCO connected to 3.3V as required for other signals connected to
those banks.
NOTE VIRTEX II I/Os are not 5v tolerant!
I/O Standard jumpers
There are two three pin jumpers on the HERON-FPGA4V that are used to set the VCCO
levels for I/O banks 0 and1 of the FPGA. They are used to enable the different I/O
formats supported by the FPGA.
They are labelled ‘B0’ and ‘B1’, and have the voltages labelled next to each pin. The centre
pin connects to the pins of the FPGA. For details of the effects that this has on the I/O
standards that can be used refer to the data sheet for the FPGA available from
http://www.xilinx.com
Using Digitally Controlled Impedance (DCI)
The Virtex II architecture allows the use of DCI to control the impedance of certain I/O
pins. Each bank of the FPGA used for digital I/O has a pair of resistors connected to the
VRN and VRP pins. The FPGA uses these resistors to set the input/output impedance of
multiple drivers and receivers, but this depends on the your design loaded into the FPGA.
To use DCI the appropriate buffer must be placed in the FPGA design.
On the HERON-FPGA4V there are 50R 1% resistors connected to the VRN and VRP
pins of banks 0 and 1. This means that all the Digital I/O’s can use DCI without changes to
the board.
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
“DIGITAL I/O n” Connector type
The Digital I/O connectors are surface mount 1.25mm pitch connectors. They are arranged
as 15 pins in each of 2 rows. It is supplied by Hirose and its part number is DF13-30DP1.25V(50) . This connector has polarisation against incorrect insertion and mechanical
retention of the mating half.
The mating connector is also supplied by Hirose and has part number DF13-30DS-1.25C
which requires crimp contacts part number DF13-2630SCFA. These crimps are only
available from Hirose in large quantities and require special tooling. Usually if you have
explained at the time of ordering how you will be using your HERON-FPGA4V module
there will be cabling supplied that suits your needs.
If your requirements change then HUNT ENGINEERING will be able to supply
assemblies or component parts to meet your needs but a charge will apply.
“DIGITAL I/O n” Connector Pin out
The connector sits against the top surface of the PCB, facing upwards away from the board.
All pins on this side are GND
(all odd numbers 1-29)
*
n0
n1
n2
n3
n4
n5
n6
n7
n8
n9
n10
n11
n12
n13
n14
ooooooooooooooo
ooooooooooooooo
Where n is the Connector letter A, B, C, D, or E.
*
Z(B)/T1OUT
GND
B/R1IN
GND
Y(A)/T2OUT
GND
A/R2IN
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
Digital I/O connector F is different as it contains the serial I/O in addition to the Digital
I./Os:-
n0
n1
n2
n3
n4
n5
n6
n7
n8
n9
n10
n11
n12
n13
n14
ooooooooooooooo
ooooooooooooooo
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Differential pairs
The HERON-FPGA4V uses a Virtex II device that supports differential signalling formats.
The allocation of pins on the I/O connectors have been carefully chosen so that in most
cases adjacent pins on an I/O connector form the positive and negative halves of a
differential pair. This makes it possible to use up to 42 differential pairs.
Resistor Packs
There are resistor packs fitted for all the Digital I/O connectors on the HERON-FPGA4,
these allow serial termination of each of the signal pins, and/or parallel termination of each
of the differential pairs.
The standard build for SERIAL termination of the Digital I/O on the HERON-FPGA4 is
to fit 0R resistor packs, making the Digital I/O NOT 5V tolerant. 100R (or other available
value) can be requested if necessary for a particular application.
The standard build for DIFFERENTIAL termination of the Digital I/O on the HERONFPGA4 is NOT to fit resistor packs for the parallel termination between differential pairs.
The Digital I/O connectors have the option of 100R resistor packs fitted to terminate the
differential signals, these can be requested to be fitted for a particular application.
The resistor packs are labelled in the photograph, and the table gives the relationship to the
Digital I/O connector and signals.
47
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
SERIES RESISTORS
Resistor
Pack
Digital I/O
Conn
Signals
A0
A
A0,A1,A2,A3
A1
A
A2
Resistor
Pack
Digital I/O
Conn
Signals
B0
B
B0,B1,B2,B3
A4,A5,A6,A7
B1
B
B4,B5,B6,B7
A
A8,A9,A10,A11
B2
B
B8,B9,B10,B11
A3
A
A12,A13,A14,--
B3
B
B12,B13,B14,--
C0
C
C0,C1,C2,C3
D0
D
D0,D1,D2,D3
C1
C
C4,C5,C6,C7
D1
D
D4,D5,D6,D7
C2
C
C8,C9,C10,C11
D2
D
D8,D9,D10,D11
C3
C
C12,C13,C14,--
D3
D
D12,D13,D14,--
D0
D
D0,D1,D2,D3
F0
F
F0,F1,F2,F3
D1
D
D4,D5,D6,D7
F1
F
F4,F5,F6,F7
D2
D
D8,D9,D10,D11
F2
F
F8,F9,F10,F11
D3
D
D12,D13,D14,--
F3
F
F12,F13,F14,--
DIFFERENTIAL RESISTORS
Resistor
Pack
A5
Digital I/O
Conn
Signals
A
A0Æ1,A2Æ3,
Resistor
Pack
B5
Digital I/O
Conn
Signals
B
B0Æ1,B2Æ3,
A4Æ5,A6Æ7
A4
A
A8Æ9,A10Æ11,
B4Æ5,B6Æ7
B4
B
A12Æ13, -C5
C
C0Æ1,C2Æ3,
B12Æ13, -D5
D
C4Æ5,C6Æ7
C4
C
C8Æ9,C10Æ11,
E
E0Æ1,E2Æ3,
D4
D
E
E8Æ9,E10Æ11,
E12Æ13, --
48
D8Æ9,D10Æ11,
D12Æ13, --
F5
F
E4Æ5,E6Æ7
E4
D0Æ1,D2Æ3,
D4Æ5,D6Æ7
C12Æ13, -E5
B8Æ9,B10Æ11,
F0Æ1,F2Æ3,
F4Æ5,F6Æ7
F4
F
F8Æ9,F10Æ11,
F12Æ13, --
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Voltage Levels
The HERON-FPGA4V however has the option of having series Resistors fitted in Digital
I/O lines. The FPGA side of these resistors is connected to the overvoltage protection
which for the FPGA4V is set at 3.3V. Fitting 100R series resistors allows the module to
accept 5V or 3.3V signals without damaging the FPGA.
The standard build of the HERON-FPGA4V is to fit 0R for these resistor packs, making
the Digital I/O NOT 5V tolerant. This allows the Digital I/O connectors to support any of
the voltage formats provided by the Virtex II.
100R (or other available value) can be requested if necessary for a particular application, but
this precludes the use of some of the other I/O standards supported by the Virtex II.
Certain I/O levels require different voltages to be applied to the VCCO pins for that I/O
bank. Refer to the data sheet for the FPGA, and the section of this manual about the
VCCO jumpers.
Connector F has the serial signals connected to it which can have different uses depending
on how the MAX3160 part is configured by your FPGA program.
To use these serial I/Os you must place the correct UART logic in your FPGA design – the
MAX3160 is just a level converter component.
ESD Protection
All of the Digital I/Os are protected against Electro Static Discharge and over voltage The
devices used are Harris SP723 parts.
This protects the inputs to IEC1004-2 level 4, and provides over voltage limiting to the
range 0 to +3.3V.
49
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Use of the MAX3160
Of course the best way to determine how to configure the MAX3160 is to look at the data
sheet provided by the manufacturer Maxim Integrated Products, found at www.maximic.com .
There is one MAX3160 component fitted to the HERON-FPGA4V, powered from 3.3V,
with the RS232/485 signals connected to the Serial I/O Connector described above. The
logic side of the parts is connected directly to pins of the FPGA.
The MAX3160 has 2 digital inputs T1IN and T2IN, and 2 digital outputs R1OUT and
R2OUT.
There are also three control signals also connected to the FPGA, FAST, RS485/RS232 and
HDPLX.
RS232
Set FAST = high, RS485/RS232 = low and HDPLX = low.
Now the signal T1IN is driven by the FPGA, and the RS232 version of this signal appears
on the T1OUT pin of the connector.
The signal T2IN is driven by the FPGA, and the RS232 version of this signal appears on
the T2OUT pin of the connector.
The signal R1OUT is driven by the MAX3160, according to the RS232 version on the
R1IN pin of the connector.
The signal R2OUT is driven by the MAX3160, according to the RS232 version on the
R2IN pin of the connector.
Then a UART circuit configured into the FPGA can use this as either a TX/RX +
CTS/RTS RS232 channel using flow control, or alternatively 2 independent TX/RX RS232
channels without flow control.
The MAX3160 can support baud rates up to 1Mbit/second in RS232 mode. If the FAST
pin is set to logic low it limits the slew rate of the signals giving better immunity to errors
but then the baud rate is limited to 250Kbps.
Full Duplex R485/RS422
Set FAST = high, RS485/RS232 = high and HDPLX = low.
Now the signal T1IN is driven by the FPGA, and the inverted RS422/RS485 version of
this signal appears on the T1OUT pin of the connector, the non-inverted version of this
signal appears on the T2OUT pin of the connector.
The signal T2IN is driven by the FPGA, and is used as a driver enable signals that is driven
high to enable the outputs T1OUT and T2OUT.
The signal R1OUT is not used.
The signal R2OUT is driven by the MAX3160, according to the signal formed by the
RS485/RS422 pair on the pins R1IN (inverting) and R2IN (non-inverting) pins of the
connector.
Then a UART circuit configured into the FPGA can use this as a TX/RX signal pair that
are driven differentially according to RS422/RS485.
50
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
The MAX3160 can support baud rates up to 10Mbit/second in R485 mode. If the FAST
pin is set to logic low it limits the slew rate of the signals giving better immunity to errors
but then the baud rate is limited to 250Kbps.
Half Duplex R485/RS422
Set FAST = high, RS485/RS232 = high and HDPLX = high.
Now the signal T1IN is driven by the FPGA, and the inverted RS422/RS485 version of
this signal appears on the T1OUT pin of the connector, the non-inverted version of this
signal appears on the T2OUT pin of the connector.
The signal T2IN is driven by the FPGA, and is used as a driver enable signals that is driven
high to enable the outputs T1OUT and T2OUT.
The signal R1OUT is not used.
The signal R2OUT is driven by the MAX3160, according to the signal formed by the
RS485/RS422 pair on the pins T1OUT (inverting) and T2OUT (non-inverting) pins of the
connector.
Then a UART circuit configured into the FPGA can use this as a TX/RX signal pair that
are driven differentially according to RS422/RS485 on a single pair formed by T1OUT and
T2OUT. The direction of Transmit/Receive is now controlled using the Driver enable
connected to T2IN. This type of RS485 connection is often used for multi-drop
applications where all devices except one default to input, and only “respond” when polled
by the “master”.
The MAX3160 can support baud rates up to 10Mbit/second in R485 mode. If the FAST
pin is set to logic low it limits the slew rate of the signals giving better immunity to errors
but then the baud rate is limited to 250Kbps.
ESD protection
The MAX3160 provided protection against wiring faults etc, and the use of slew rate
limiting is provided to minimise radiated noise. Users should ensure that cabling used in a
system enables compliance with EMC directives.
51
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Using the JTAG programmable Configuration PROM
With the JTAG programmable FLASH based PROM fitted for the user FPGA, then your
FPGA design can be programmed into this PROM. The user FPGA will then be configured
with your FPGA design on power up, re-configuration can be forced using the send
bitstream command over HSB with a zero length bitstream.
The module has a JTAG connector fitted that is a Hirose 2mm 3x2 connector of part
number DF11-6DP-DSA(01). The mating half that is required for cabling is also a Hirose
part, the housing is DF11-6DS-2C and crimp part number DF11-2428CSA.
The pinout is:(5) 3.3V
GND (6)
(3) TCK
TDO (4)
(1) TDI
TMS (2)
Top view of connector.
The cable supplied with modules that have the PROM option fitted, is as follows:9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
5 6
3 4
1 2
Polarise
Which can be fitted to a Xilinx JTAG cable (such as Xilinx parallel cable 3 or 4) and used to
connect to the PROM on the module.
The JTAG chain from the JTAG connector is linked to the PROMs, and also to the Virtex
II. If the PROMs are not fitted then 0R links are fitted to complete the TDI/TDO chain in
place of the PROMs, leaving just the FPGA. With the JTAG chain linked to the Virtex II
this makes it possible to download the FPGA design directly via JTAG, it also allows
software packages such as Chipscope to be used to help debug the design in the FPGA.
Boot from PROM Jumper
The ‘Boot from PROM’ jumper selects if the FPGA boots from the ROM or via HSB.
For normal operation (HSB) the jumper should NOT be fitted.
52
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Uncommitted Module Interconnects
There are some “Uncommitted Interconnect” signals defined by the HERON specification,
which are simply connected to all modules.
These are intended to connect control signals between modules, for example a processor
module can (via software) drive one of these signals with one of is timer outputs. Then if an
I/O module can accept its clock input from one of these signals, it is possible to implement
a system with a programmable clock. There will be other uses for these signals that are
module design dependent.
The HERON-FPGA4V connects these signals to FPGA I/O pins allowing the user
configuration to use these if required.
General Purpose LEDs
There are some general purpose LEDS on the HERON-FPGA4V, which are driven by
buffers that are external to the FPGA.
The LEDs labelled 0 to 4 are driven by the FPGA pins LED0 to LED4 respectively. The
LED will illuminate when the FPGA drives the pin low.
Other HERON module signals
There are many signals that are connected between the FPGA on the HERON-FPGA4V
and the HERON module connectors. Most of these signals will only be used by advanced
users of the HERON-FPGA4V. The FPGA pinning of these signals is shown in the
appendix of this manual, and their uses in a system is described in the HERON module
specification found on the HUNT ENGINEERING CD and Web Site.
The FPGA sets any I/O pins of the device that are not listed in the design to have a 50150K pull down. Most of the HERON module signals are pulled to their inactive state by
10K resistors so this 50K will have no effect. However the UDPRES signal does not, and
setting this signal low will cause your whole board to be reset. Thus it is important that the
UDPRES pin is driven high by the FPGA if it is not being used.
It is also advised to do the same with the LED pins to prevent them becoming illuminated
erroneously.
53
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Fitting Modules to your Carrier
Fitting HERON modules to your carrier is very simple. Ensure that the module carrier does
NOT have power applied when fitting modules, and normal anti-static precautions should
be followed at all times.
Each HERON slot has four positions for fixing pillars
Primary pillars
Secondary pillars
HERON module
The Carrier card will probably only have spacing pillars fitted to the primary location for
each HERON slot. The pillars for the secondary locations will be supplied as an accessory.
The reason for this is that the legacy GDIO modules cannot be fitted if the secondary
pillars are in place.
The HERON modules are asymmetric about their connectors, so if a module is fitted
entirely the wrong way round, the module does not line up with the markings on the carrier
card. In particular, notice the triangles on the silk screen of the HERON modules and the
HERON slots of the carrier card. These should be overlaid when the module is fitted.
The HERON connectors are polarised, preventing incorrect insertion. So if more than a
gentle force is needed to push the module home, check to make sure that it is correctly
aligned. Take care not to apply excessive pressure to the centre of the module as this could
stress the module’s PCB unnecessarily.
Normally the primary fixings will be enough to retain the modules, simply fit the nylon
bolts supplied in the accessory kit to the top thread of each mounting pillar.
HERON module
Nylon
nut
Module carrier
If the environment demands, the secondary fixing pillars can be fitted to modules that allow
their use.
54
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Achievable System Throughput
In a HERON system there are many factors that can affect the achievable system
throughput. It must be remembered at all times that the part of the system that has the
lowest limit on bandwidth will govern the throughput of the system.
The HERON-FPGA4V can access the HERON carriers FIFOs in 32 bits mode. It can
(with the right contents) transfer one 32bit word in and another out in the same clock cycle.
For example running at a FIFO clock speed of 50MHz, the HERON-FPGA4V can
transfer 200Mbytes/sec in at the same time as transferring 200Mbytes/sec out.
The use of faster clock speeds for the FIFOs will of course result in higher data rates.
55
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Troubleshooting
The following sections attempt to cover all likely problems. Please check through this
section before contacting technical support.
Hardware
If the Hardware has been installed according to the Instructions there is very little that can
be wrong.
• Has the “DONE” LED gone out – if not then the FPGA is not configured
• Perhaps you do not have a FIFO clock being driven from your FPGA Design
• Not driving the UDPRES signal high in your FPGA Design will result in unpredictable
behaviour.
Software
As long as the software has been installed using the installation program supplied on the
HUNT ENGINEERING CD, there should be little problem with the software installation.
If you have problems then return to one of the example programs supplied with the system.
56
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
CE Marking
HUNT ENGINEERING have performed testing on its products to ensure that it is
possible to comply with the European CE marking directives. The HERON-FPGA4V
cannot be CE marked as it is a component in a system, but as long as the following
recommendations are followed, a system containing the HERON-FPGA4V could be CE
marked.
The immense flexibility of the HUNT ENGINEERING product range means that
individual systems should be marked in accordance with the directives after assembly.
1.The host computer or housing in which the HERON-FPGA4V is installed is properly
assembled with EMC and LVD in mind and ideally should itself carry the CE mark.
2. Any cabling between boards or peripherals is either entirely inside the case of the host
computer, or has been assembled and tested in accordance with the directives.
The HERON-FPGA4V digital I/Os ARE protected against Static discharge, so if the
cabling does exit the case, there is suitable protection already fitted.
HUNT ENGINEERING are able to perform system integration in accordance with these
directives if you are unsure of how to achieve compliance yourself.
57
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Technical Support
Technical support for HUNT ENGINEERING products should first be obtained from the
comprehensive Support section http://www.hunteng.co.uk/support/index.htm on the
HUNT ENGINEERING web site. This includes FAQs, latest product, software and
documentation updates etc. Or contact your local supplier - if you are unsure of details
please refer to http://www.hunteng.co.uk for the list of current re-sellers.
HUNT ENGINEERING technical support can be contacted by emailing
support@hunteng.co.uk, calling the direct support telephone number +44 (0)1278 760775,
or by calling the general number +44 (0)1278 760188 and choosing the technical support
option.
58
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Appendix 1 – HERON Serial Bus Commands
Module address
The HERON-FPGA4V is configured to respond to Heron Serial Bus (HSB) commands
addressed to it using the combination of the Board number and slot number that the
module is fitted to. In this way multiple HERON-FPGA modules can be uniquely
addressed in the same system. The HSB address is a 7 bit address that is formed by the
bottom three bits of the slot number (slots 1 to 4 are valid – 001,010,011, 100) with the 4
bits from the board number switch forming the top 4 bits of the seven.
e.g. on board number 1 slot 2 the address would be (board number<<3) || slot[2.0] which
is 0x06.
The HERON-FPGA4V can respond to three different types of serial bus commands:Module Enquiry
The HERON-FPGA4V can receive a message requesting its module type:Master to FPGA module
module type query (01)-->address of requestor
It will then send a reply as follows:FPGA module to "original master"
module query response(02)-->module address (from)-->module type (02)
-->family number(03)-->option-->String byte 0 -->String byte1….String byte26
The string is the string that Xilinx put into their bitstream files. It is always 27 bytes long,
but can actually be null terminated before that. e.g. a Virtex II 3Mgate part would return
2V3000FF1152-6.
FPGA Configuration
The Configuration transaction will be:Master to FPGA module
Configure (03)-->address of requestor--> first config byte-->
2nd config byte......last config byte
After which the FPGA module will reply:FPGA module to original master
configuration success (05)/configuration fail(06)-->module address
59
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
User I/O
Any further use of the HSB will be defined by the bitstream supplied to the module.
The actual use of these messages cannot be defined here, but the format of them must be:Master to FPGA module
user write (08) -->address of requestor -->register address byte -->value byte
-->optional value byte-->optional value byte......
In this way single or multiple bytes can be written, starting from the address given.
Nothing is returned from a write request.
This will result in the 8 bit address being written into the application FPGA using an
address strobe, then one or more data bytes being written to the application FPGA using a
data strobe, and qualified by a write signal. It is therefore the responsibility of the
application FPGA to support auto incrementing addresses if required by its function.
For a read request
Master to FPGA module
user read (09) -->address of requestor -->register address byte -->length byte
In this way single or multiple bytes can be requested, starting from the address given.
The reply will be
FPGA module to original master
user read response(10)-->module address-->data byte-->optional data byte
This will result in the 8 bit address being written into the application FPGA using an
address strobe, then one or more data bytes being read from the application FPGA using a
data strobe, and qualified by the absence of write signal.
Special Options and response
In order to support special features, this message allows the module to reply with 30 bytes
of information. It has been made general purpose so that the same message type can be
extended to support other features in the future.
The information returned is:“Special Options Response” which is a series of 30 bytes. These bytes are defined as :First byte : Compressed bitstream support . 0=no, 1 = yes
Other bytes not used at this time.
The exchange would then be :Master to FPGA module
start Æmodule address ÆSpecial Options request(11) Æaddress of requestorÆstop
FPGA module to "original master"
startÆaddress of requestorÆSpecial Options response(12) Æmodule address
(from)Æoptions byte 0ÆOptions byte1….Options byte29Æstop
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HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Appendix 2 – FPGA Pinout for development tools
The following is the pin-out of the FPGA, so that the signals can be connected in the Xilinx
development tools.
Data Out FIFO:
Signal name
DO0
DO1
DO2
DO3
DO4
DO5
DO6
DO7
DO8
DO9
DO10
DO11
DO12
DO13
DO14
DO15
DO16
DO17
DO18
DO19
DO20
DO21
DO22
DO23
DO24
DO25
DO26
DO27
DO28
DO29
DO30
DO31
FPGA
pin
AL11
AG14
AN8
AJ12
AH12
AP6
AK11
AF13
AL9
AN6
AG12
AP4
AL8
AE13
AN4
AH10
AM11
AG13
AP9
AJ11
AH13
AP7
AK10
AF12
AL10
AN7
AG11
AP5
AM9
AE12
AN5
AH9
FCLK0
AM17
DOCLK/GCLKx
AK17
DOF0CONT0
DOF0CONT1
DOF0CONT2
AJ14
AM12
AN13
O/P FIFO #0 Write enable (active high) output
O/P FIFO #0 Full Flag (active low) input
O/P FIFO #0 Almost full flag (active low) input
DOF1CONT0
DOF1CONT1
DOF1CONT2
AJ13
AM13
AN14
O/P FIFO #1 Write enable (active high) output
O/P FIFO #1 Full Flag (active low) input
O/P FIFO #1 Almost full flag (active low) input
DOF2CONT0
DOF2CONT1
AE15
AF15
O/P FIFO #2 Write enable (active high) output
O/P FIFO #2 Full Flag (active low) input
61
Description
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
output
O/P FIFO Clock output to input of buffer. Use to
drive correct frequency.
O/P FIFO Clock output of buffer – use with DLL
for internal logic
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Signal name
DOF2CONT2
FPGA
pin
AG16
Description
O/P FIFO #2 Almost full flag (active low) input
DOF3CONT0
DOF3CONT1
DOF3CONT2
AE14
AF14
AG15
O/P FIFO #3 Write enable (active high) output
O/P FIFO #3 Full Flag (active low) input
O/P FIFO #3 Almost full flag (active low) input
DOF4CONT0
DOF4CONT1
DOF4CONT2
AN11
AL12
AP11
O/P FIFO #4 Write enable (active high) output
O/P FIFO #4 Full Flag (active low) input
O/P FIFO #4 Almost full flag (active low) input
DOF5CONT0
AN12
O/P FIFO #5 Write enable (active high) output
DOF5CONT1
AL13
O/P FIFO #5 Full Flag (active low) input
DOF5CONT2
AP12
O/P FIFO #5 Almost full flag (active low) input
These FIFO signals should be used via the Hardware Interface Layer
supplied by HUNT ENGINEERING and are only mentioned here for
completeness.
Data In FIFO:
Signal name
DI0
DI1
DI2
DI3
DI4
DI5
DI6
DI7
DI8
DI9
DI10
DI11
DI12
DI13
DI14
DI15
DI16
DI17
DI18
DI19
DI20
DI21
DI22
DI23
DI24
DI25
DI26
DI27
DI28
DI29
DI30
DI31
FPGA
pin
AK27
AN30
AJ25
AL26
AM26
AF23
AH25
AP30
AH22
AK25
AN28
AG22
AP28
AP26
AE21
AL24
AK26
AN31
AH26
AL27
AM27
AF22
AH24
AP31
AH23
AK24
AN29
AG21
AP29
AN27
AE20
AL25
F1CLK
AL18
DICLK/GCLKx
AK19
DIF0CONT0
AL23
62
Description
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
HERON
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
I/P FIFO Clock output to input of buffer. Use to
drive correct frequency.
I/P FIFO Clock output of buffer – use with DLL
for internal logic
I/P FIFO #0 Read enable (active high) output
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
DIF0CONT1
DIF0CONT2
DIF0CONT3
AJ21
AJ20
AK22
I/P FIFO #0 output enable (active low) output
I/P FIFO #0 Empty Flag (active low) input
I/P FIFO #0 Almost Empty flag (active low) input
DIF1CONT0
DIF1CONT1
DIF1CONT2
DIF1CONT3
AL22
AJ22
AH20
AK21
I/P
I/P
I/P
I/P
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
#1
#1
#1
#1
Read enable (active high) output
output enable (active low) output
Empty Flag (active low) input
Almost Empty flag (active low) input
DIF2CONT0
DIF2CONT1
DIF2CONT2
DIF2CONT3
AF20
AJ24
AG19
AD18
I/P
I/P
I/P
I/P
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
#2
#2
#2
#2
Read enable (active high) output
output enable (active low) output
Empty Flag (active low) input
Almost Empty flag (active low) input
DIF3CONT0
DIF3CONT1
DIF3CONT2
DIF3CONT3
AF21
AJ23
AG20
AD19
I/P
I/P
I/P
I/P
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
#3
#3
#3
#3
Read enable (active high) output
output enable (active low) output
Empty Flag (active low) input
Almost Empty flag (active low) input
DIF4CONT0
DIF4CONT1
DIF4CONT2
DIF4CONT3
AM24
AN24
AP24
AN22
I/P
I/P
I/P
I/P
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
FIFO
#4
#4
#4
#4
Read enable (active high) output
output enable (active low) output
Empty Flag (active low) input
Almost Empty flag (active low) input
DIF5CONT0
AM23
I/P FIFO #5 Read enable (active high) output
DIF5CONT1
AN23
I/P FIFO #5 output enable (active low) output
DIF5CONT2
AP23
I/P FIFO #5 Empty Flag (active low) input
DIF5CONT3
AN21
I/P FIFO #5 Almost Empty flag (active low) input
These FIFO signals should be used via the Hardware Interface Layer
supplied by HUNT ENGINEERING and are only mentioned here for
completeness.
IO on Connectors
Signal name
FPGA
pin
A0 (L95N_1)
H17
GCLK1P
A1 (L95P_1)
H16
GCLK0S
A2 (L04N_1)
D8
A3 (L04P_1)
E7
A4 (L05N_1)
H11
A5 (L05P_1)
J10
A6 (L06N_1)
D6
A7 (L06P_1)
C6
A8 (L19N_1)
B4
A9 (L19P_1)
B5
A10(L20N_1)
J12
A11(L20P_1)
J11
A12(L21N_1)
F10
A13(L21P_1)
G9
A14
A5
B0 (L96N_1)
E17
GCLK3P
B1 (L96P_1)
E16
GCLK2S
B2 (L28N_1)
C7
B3 (L28P_1)
C8
B4 (L29N_1)
H13
B5 (L29P_1)
H12
B6 (L30N_1)
D9
63
Description
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
General
General
General
General
General
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
with
with
with
with
with
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
format
format
format
format
format
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
B7 (L30P_1)
B8 (L49N_1)
B9 (L49P_1)
B10(L50N_1)
B11(L50P_1)
B12(L51N_1)
B13(L51P_1)
B14
C0 (L69N_1)
C1 (L69P_1)
C2 (L70N_1)
C3 (L70P_1)
C4 (L71N_1)
C5 (L71P_1)
C6 (L72N_1)
C7 (L72P_1)
C8 (L73N_1)
C9 (L73P_1)
C10(L74N_1)
C11(L74P_1)
C12(L75N_1)
C13(L75P_1)
C14
D0 (L95N_0)
GCLK7P
D1 (L95P_0)
GCLK6S
D2 (L27N_0)
D3 (L27P_0)
D4 (L54N_0)
D5 (L54P_0)
D6 (L73N_0)
D7 (L73P_0)
D8 (L78N_0)
D9 (L78P_0)
D10(L93N_0)
D11(L93P_0)
D12(L91N_0)
D13(L91P_0)
D14(L94N_0)
C9
A6
A7
K14
K13
B8
A9
B10
F14
F13
D12
D13
J15
J14
E13
E14
A11
A12
H15
H14
F15
G15
B14
K18
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
J18
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E25
E24
D22
D23
E21
E22
D20
D21
F18
F19
D19
D18
C19
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
E0 (L96N_0)
GCLK5P
E1 (L96P_0)
GCLK4S
E2 (L24N_0)
E19
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E18
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
C26
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E3 (L24P_0)
D27
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E4 (L28N_0)
D25
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E5 (L28P_0)
D26
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E6 (L53N_0)
C24
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E7 (L53P_0)
D24
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E8 (L67N_0)
B23
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E9 (L67P_0)
B24
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E10(L70N_0)
A23
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E11(L70P_0)
A24
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E12(L72N_0)
C22
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
64
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
E13(L72P_0)
C23
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
E14(L76N_0)
B21
General purpose I/O with selectable I/O format
F0 (L19N_0)
F1 (L19P_0)
F2 (L25N_0)
F3 (L25P_0)
F4 (L22N_0)
F5 (L22P_0)
F6 (L1N_0)
F7 (L1P_0)
F8 (L21N_0)
F9 (L21P_0)
F10(L49N_0)
F11(L49P_0)
F12(L51N_0)
F13(L51P_0)
F14(L52N_0)
B32
C33
A30
A31
B30
B31
D29
C29
C27
C28
B28
B29
A28
A29
A26
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
Description
OSC0(GCLK1S)
OSC1(GCLK2P)
FPGA
pin
AK16
AG17
FCLK0
AM17
DOCLK/GCLKx
AK17
F1CLK
AL18
DICLK/GCLKx
AK19
Clocks
Signal name
65
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
purpose
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
with
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
selectable
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
format
User Oscillator input from socketed Xtal Osc
User Oscillator input from surface mount Xtal Osc
Repeated from above
O/P FIFO Clock output to
drive correct frequency.
O/P FIFO Clock output of
for internal logic
I/P FIFO Clock output to
drive correct frequency.
I/P FIFO Clock output of
for internal logic
input of buffer. Use to
buffer – use with DLL
input of buffer. Use to
buffer – use with DLL
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
LEDs
Signal name
LED0
LED1
LED2
LED3
LED4
FPGA
pin
AJ19
AJ18
AH19
AH18
AM19
Description
General
General
General
General
General
Purpose
Purpose
Purpose
Purpose
Purpose
LED
LED
LED
LED
LED
Control connections to HERON connectors
Signal name
FPGA
Description
pin
ADDR/FLAGSEL AN3
Selector driven by Carrier board to determine the
function of the almost flags
BOOTEN
AM7
This module can drive this low if it wishes the
carrier to operate regardless of the Config
signal
UDPRES
AM8
This module can drive this to reset the carrier
YOU MUST DRIVE THIS SIGNAL HIGH IF NOT USING IT!
RESET
AM16
Reset input from Carrier card
CONFIG
AM14
Open collector signal
Carrier and Module ID
Signal name
FPGA
pin
CID0
AE11
CID1
AJ5
CID2
AH6
CID3
AL2
Carrier
Carrier
Carrier
Carrier
MID0
MID1
MID2
MID3
Module
Module
Module
Module
AD10
AE10
AK4
AJ4
Description
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
driven
driven
driven
driven
driven
driven
driven
driven
by
by
by
by
by
by
by
by
the
the
the
the
the
the
the
the
carrier
carrier
carrier
carrier
carrier
carrier
carrier
carrier
board
board
board
board
board
board
board
board
Uncommitted Module Interconnects
Signal name
UMI0
UMI1
UMI2
UMI3
FPGA
pin
AM15
AJ16
AJ17
AL17
66
Description
Uncommitted
Uncommitted
Uncommitted
Uncommitted
Module
Module
Module
Module
interconnect
interconnect
interconnect
interconnect
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL
Serial options
Signal name
T1IN_A
FPGA
pin
E3
T2IN_A
G5
R1OUT_A
F5
R2OUT_A
K10
RS485/232_A
HDPLX_A
FAST_A
E2
D2
K11
Description
Serial Data Bit output from FPGA (connected to
MAX3160)
Serial Data Bit output from FPGA (connected to
MAX3160)
Serial Data Bit input to FPGA (connected to
MAX3160)
Serial Data Bit input to FPGA (connected to
MAX3160)
Control input to MAX3160
Control input to MAX3160
Control input to MAX3160
User interface between HSB device and FPGA (N.B. Some signals also used during
configuration of FPGA.
Signal name
Data0
Data1
Data2
Data3
Data4
Data5
Data6
Data7
FPGA
pin
AG10
AH11
AK7
AK8
AK28
AL29
AG24
AG25
Address
Strobe
Data Strobe
R/notW
AL5
AM31
AL30
Ready
AM4
Description
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Data
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
for
for
for
for
for
for
for
for
read/write
read/write
read/write
read/write
read/write
read/write
read/write
read/write
via
via
via
via
via
via
via
via
HSB
HSB
HSB
HSB
HSB
HSB
HSB
HSB
Rising edge strobes the 8 bit address
from the Data pins
Low to show an access in progress
State of this pin when Data Strobe is
active defines whether the operation is
read(High) or write (low)
The FPGA asserts this signal low when
either :a) during a Write to the FPGA the data
has been latched
b) during a read from the FPGA the data
has been driven
These signals should be used via the Hardware Interface Layer component HE_USER
supplied by HUNT ENGINEERING and are only mentioned here for completeness.
67
HUNT ENGINEERING HERON-FPGA4V USER MANUAL