MB556 User Manual - Stanley Hydraulic Tools

MB556
MOUNTED
HYDRAULIC BREAKER
USER MANUAL
Safety, Operation and Maintenance
© 2015 Stanley Black & Decker, Inc.
New Britain, CT 06053
U.S.A.
56597 3/2015 Ver. 11
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
ÜBEREINSTIMMUNGS-ERKLARUNG
DECLARATION DE CONFORMITE CEE
DECLARACION DE CONFORMIDAD
DICHIARAZIONE DI CONFORMITA
Hydraulic Tools
______________________________________________________________________
I, the undersigned:
Ich, der Unterzeichnende:
Je soussigné:
El abajo firmante:
lo sottoscritto:
Weisbeck, Andy
Surname and First names/Familiennname und Vornamen/Nom et prénom/Nombre y apellido/Cognome e nome
hereby declare that the equipment specified hereunder:
bestätige hiermit, daß erklaren Produkt genannten Werk oder Gerät:
déclare que l’équipement visé ci-dessous:
Por la presente declaro que el equipo se especifica a continuación:
Dichiaro che le apparecchiature specificate di seguito:
1.
Category:
Kategorie:
Catégorie:
Categoria:
Categoria:
Hydraulic Hammer Breaker
2.
Make/Marke/Marque/Marca/Marca
Stanley
3.
Type/Typ/Type/Tipo/Tipo:
MB556
4.
Serial number of equipment:
Seriennummer des Geräts:
Numéro de série de l’équipement:
Numero de serie del equipo:
Matricola dell´attrezzatura:
5.
Mass/Masse/Masse/Masa/Massa
All
752 lbs / 341 kg
Has been manufactured in conformity with
Wurde hergestellt in Übereinstimmung mit
Est fabriqué conformément
Ha sido fabricado de acuerdo con
E’ stata costruita in conformitá con
Directive/Standards
Richtlinie/Standards
Directives/Normes
Directriz/Los Normas
Direttiva/Norme
No.
Nr
Numéro
No
n.
Approved body
Prüfung durch
Organisme agréé
Aprobado
Collaudato
EN ISO
12100:2010
Self
EN
Noise Directive
Machinery Directive
982:2008
2000/14/EC:2005
2006/42/EC:2006
Self
Self
Self
6.
Special Provisions:
None
Spezielle Bestimmungen:
Dispositions particulières:
Provisiones especiales:
Disposizioni speciali:
7. Measurements: Measured Sound Power Level 124 LwA
Messungen
Guaranteed Sound Power Level 128 LwA
Mesures
Measured in accordance to Directive 2000/14/EC,
Mediciones
Misurazioni
8.
Representative in the Union: Patrick Vervier, Stanley Dubuis 17-19, rue Jules Berthonneau-BP 3406 41034 Blois Cedex, France.
Vertreter in der Union/Représentant dans l’union/Representante en la Union/Rappresentante presso l’Unione
Done at/Ort/Fait à/Dado en/Fatto a Stanley Hydraulic Tools, Milwaukie, Oregon USA
Signature/Unterschrift/Signature/Firma/Firma
Position/Position/Fonction/Cargo/Posizione
2 ► MB556 User Manual
3/22/2011
Director of Product Development
Date/Datum/le/Fecha/Data
3-22-11
TABLE OF CONTENTS
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY...........................................................................................................................2
SAFETY SYMBOLS...................................................................................................................................................4
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS...........................................................................................................................................5
TOOL STICKERS & TAGS.........................................................................................................................................8
OPERATION...............................................................................................................................................................9
TROUBLESHOOTING.............................................................................................................................................15
MAINTENANCE.......................................................................................................................................................16
CHARGING THE ACCUMULATOR..........................................................................................................................17
FLOW CONTROL KIT INSTRUCTIONS..................................................................................................................18
WEAR TOLERANCES.............................................................................................................................................19
PROPER USE & CARE OF TOOL BITS..................................................................................................................20
FLOW TEST PROCEDURES...................................................................................................................................24
DEFINITIONS...........................................................................................................................................................26
SPECIFICATIONS....................................................................................................................................................27
ACCESSORIES.......................................................................................................................................................28
MB556 POWER CELL ILLUSTRATION...................................................................................................................29
HOUSING PARTS ILLUSTRATION..........................................................................................................................30
MB556 PARTS LIST.................................................................................................................................................31
MB55600SS.............................................................................................................................................................32
MB556 MOUNTING BRACKETS.............................................................................................................................33
IMPORTANT
To fill out a Product Warranty Validation form, and for information on your warranty,
visit Stanleyhydraulics.com and select the Company tab, Warranty.
(NOTE: The warranty Validation record must be submitted to validate the warranty).
SERVICING: This manual contains safety, operation, and routine maintenance instructions. Stanley Hydraulic Tools
recommends that servicing of hydraulic tools, other than routine maintenance, must be performed by an authorized
and certified dealer. Please read the following warning.
WARNING
SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH COULD RESULT FROM THE IMPROPER REPAIR OR
SERVICE OF THIS TOOL.
REPAIRS AND / OR SERVICE TO THIS TOOL MUST ONLY BE DONE BY AN
AUTHORIZED AND CERTIFIED DEALER.
For the nearest authorized and certified dealer, call Stanley Hydraulic Tools at the number listed on the back of this
manual and ask for a Customer Service Representative.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 3
SAFETY SYMBOLS
Safety symbols and signal words, as shown below, are used to emphasize all operator, maintenance and repair actions which, if not strictly followed, could result in a life-threatening situation, bodily injury or damage to equipment.
This is the safety alert symbol. It is used to alert you to potential personal injury
hazards. Obey all safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid possible
injury or death.
DANGER
This safety alert and signal word indicate an imminently hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
WARNING
This safety alert and signal word indicate a potentially hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
CAUTION
This safety alert and signal word indicate a potentially hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
CAUTION
This signal word indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in property damage.
NOTICE
This signal word indicates a situation which, if not avoided, will result in damage
to the equipment.
IMPORTANT
This signal word indicates a situation which, if not avoided, may result in damage to the equipment.
Always observe safety symbols. They are included for your safety and for the protection of the tool.
LOCAL SAFETY REGULATIONS
Enter any local safety regulations here. Keep these instructions in an area accessible to the operator and maintenance personnel.
4 ► MB556 User Manual
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
WARNING
WARNI NG
Do not operate the breaker unless the
following safety instructions have been
thoroughly read and understood! Read this
manual before installing, operating or
maintaining this equipment.
• A flying projectile from the breaker, breaker
tool, rock or other material may enter the
operator's compartment and cause serious
or fatal injury to the operator. Personal
protection equipment must be used.
• A flying projectile from the breaker, breaker
tool, rock or other material may cause
serious or fatal injury to bystanders. Never
operate the breaker when bystanders are in
the work area.
• On some machines/carriers, the breaker
can enter the operator's compartment if it
breaks loose and swings toward the
operator. Make sure that suitable impact
shields are used when operating the
breaker with this type of equipment.
• Do not operate the breaker unless all safety
decals described in this manual are in
place. The decals must be inspected
periodically to ensure that all wording is
legible. The decals must be replaced if
illegible. Replacement decals can be
obtained from your authorized Stanley
Distributor.
Read the Manual
Wear Breathing
Protection
Wear Hearing
Protection
Wear Eye
Protection
• When operating the breaker you must use
ear protection, eye protection, and
breathing protection.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 5
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Tool operators and maintenance personnel must always
comply with the safety precautions given in this manual
and on the stickers and tags attached to the tool and
hose.
These safety precautions are given for your safety. Review them carefully before operating the tool and before
performing general maintenance or repairs.
Supervising personnel should develop additional precautions relating to the specific work area and local
safety regulations. If so, place the added precautions in
the space provided in this manual.
The MB656 Mounted Hydraulic Breaker will provide
safe and dependable service if operated in accordance with the instructions
given in this manual. Read
and understand this manual and any stickers and
tags attached to the tool
and hoses before operation. Failure to do so could
result in personal injury or
equipment damage.
Check the rules and regulations at your location. The
rules might include an employer’s work safety program.
Regulations may identify hazards such as working
around utility supply lines or hazardous slopes.
BE THOROUGHLY TRAINED BEFORE
OPERATING THE UNIT ALONE
•
Operator training must start in an area without bystanders and use all the controls until he/she can
control the machine fully under the conditions of the
work area.
•
When learning to operate a machine, do so at a slow
pace.
KNOW THE WORK CONDITIONS
•
The operator must know any prohibited uses or
work areas for the machine. For example, excessive slopes and poor or dangerous terrain conditions must be avoided.
6 ► MB556 User Manual
OBEY SAFETY RULES
•
Operate the breaker in accordance with all laws and
regulations which affect you, your equipment, and
the work site.
•
Do not operate the breaker until you have read this
manual and thoroughly understand all safety, operation and maintenance instructions.
•
The operator must be familiar with all prohibited
work areas such as excessive slopes and dangerous terrain conditions.
•
Do not operate the breaker until you have read the
carrier equipment manual and thoroughly understand all safety, operation and maintenance instructions. The word “carrier”, as used in this manual,
means a backhoe or excavator or similar equipment
used to operate the breaker.
•
Ensure that all maintenance procedures recommended in this manual are completed before using
the equipment.
•
The operator must not operate the breaker or carrier
if any people are within the area where they may be
injured by flying debris or movement of the equipment.
•
Know the limits of your equipment.
•
Establish a training program for all operators to ensure safe operation.
•
Warning: Use of this tool on certain materials during
demolition could generate dust potentially containing a variety of hazardous substances such as asbestos, silica or lead. Inhalation of dust containing
these or other hazardous substances could result
in serious injury, cancer or death. Protect yourself
and those around you. Research and understand
the materials you are cutting. Follow correct safety
procedures and comply with all applicable national,
state or provisional health and safety regulations
relating to them, including, if appropriate arranging
for the safe disposal of the materials by a qualified
person.
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
•
Do not operate the tool unless thoroughly trained or
under the supervision of an instructor.
•
Do not operate a damaged, leaking, improperly adjusted, or incompletely assembled breaker.
•
Become familiar with the carrier controls before operating the carrier and the breaker.
•
Do not modify the breaker in any manner.
•
When operating the breaker you must use ear protection, eye protection, and breathing protection.
•
•
While learning to operate the breaker and carrier, do
so at a slow pace. If necessary, set the carrier mode
selector to the slow position.
Use only tool bits supplied by Stanley Hydraulic
Tools. Use of tool bits supplied by another manufacturer may damage the breaker and will void the
warranty.
•
•
Make sure all controls (levers and pedals) are in the
NEUTRAL position before starting the carrier.
To avoid personal injury or equipment damage, all
breaker repair, maintenance and service must only
be performed by authorized and properly trained
personnel.
•
While operating the breaker and carrier, keep hands
and feet on the controls at all times.
•
•
Before leaving the carrier, always lower the boom
and insure the carrier is stable. Never leave the machine with the engine running. ALWAYS ENGAGE
THE PARKING BRAKE.
If you do not understand how to safely operate your
breaker, contact an authorized Stanley Dealer for
assistance.
•
Keep this manual with the breaker.
•
Do not operate this equipment if you are taking medication which may affect your mental judgement or
physical performance.
•
Do not operate this equipment if you are under the
influence of drugs or alcohol.
•
Stop the engine before attempting to make any repairs, adjustments or servicing to either the carrier
or the breaker.
•
Do not operate the tool at oil temperatures above
190 °F/88 °C. Operation at higher temperatures
can damage the internal components of the breaker
and carrier and will result in reduced breaker performance.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 7
TOOL STICKERS & TAGS
Stanley Hydraulic Tools
Division of The Stanley Works
3810 SE Naef Road
Milwaukie, OR 97267 USA
MODEL NO:
SERIAL NO:
OPERATING WEIGHT:
INPUT FLOW:
CIRCUIT RELIEF PRESSURE:
66219
Guaranteed Sound Power Level Decal
56593 (Excavator)
56594 (Skidsteer)
CE Specification Plate
PN:73008
70752
Stanley Logo Sticker
PN:73005
73005
MB556 Decal
47351
Composite Warning Sticker
56595
Main Accumulator Spec Sticker—300 psi
26068
Grease Sticker
47352
Lifting Point Decal
8 ► MB556 User Manual
OPERATION
PRE-INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
PRE-OPERATION PROCEDURES
SKIDSTEER, BACKHOE OR EXCAVATOR
SIZE
NITROGEN CHARGE
Check the Specifications section of this manual to determine correct carrier size, hydraulic flow and pressure
requirements.
WARNING
If hydraulic pressure, hydraulic back-pressure,
hydraulic flow or carrier weight class are exceeded,
the tool warranty is void.
EXISTING EQUIPMENT HYDRAULICS VS.
APPLICATION ATTACHING KITS
Using existing equipment hydraulic auxiliary systems
for operating hydraulic tools could cause problems for
the hydraulic tool and the hydraulic system if not set up
properly. Simply plugging into the hydraulic system without confirming pressure and flow to the hydraulic tool is
not a good practice. Spare spool valves, dipper circuits,
etc., are just a few examples of easily accessible hydraulic circuits which could prove to cause problems for
hydraulic tool usage.
The breaker has been properly charged with nitrogen at
the factory and is ready to use.
TOOL BIT LUBRICATION
Grease the top 10 in. / 250 mm of the breaker tool bit before installing. During operation, the tool can be greased
through the grease fitting. Grease is required.
Make sure the tool bit is against the piston by placing the
tool bit against the ground and then putting down pressure on the breaker. See the illustrations below.
Grease
This Area
of Bit
10 250
inches/250
mm/10 mm
in.
Tool Bit
Stanley Hydraulic Tools has for many years developed
ATTACHING KITS for adapting to existing hydraulic systems of many popular carriers.
If your equipment does not contain an attaching kit, ask
your Stanley dealer for information, installation, and
pricing on a kit which matches your equipment needs.
Figure 1. Greasing the Top of the Tool Bit
TEST THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
1. Have your Stanley dealer test the carrier hydraulic
system to make sure the system is operating at the
manufacturers specified capacity and pressure ratings.
2. Be sure the fluid in the hydraulic system is filtered
to at least 10 micro-meters. (Particles found in fluid
should not exceed 10 micro-meters in size.)
3. Check the hydraulic filter. Replace the filter if dirty or
deteriorated.
4. Have your Stanley dealer test the circuit to which
the breaker will be connected to make sure that the
circuit is supplying the specified flow and pressure
rating for the breaker. See the Specifications section
of this manual.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 9
OPERATION
WARNING
Greasing the tool bit without down pressure on the
breaker results in grease filling the space between
the piston and the tool bit. When the breaker is next
activated, the piston will strike the grease at a speed
which will pressurize the grease resulting in seal and
grease zerk failure.
Piston in Down Position
Against Tool Bit
Tool Stop
Lower Bushing
Tool Bit
Grease Will Fill
This Space
WARNING
Always wear eye protection when installing or
removing the tool retaining pin.
LOW TEMPERATURE WARM-UP
PROCEDURE
1. After starting the carrier, warm-up the hydraulic system at engine idle until hydraulic lines are warm to
the touch.
2. With the carrier at idle and the breaker suspended
in the air or with minimal down pressure, turn on the
breaker to gradually warm up its internal components.
3. When the hydraulic system and breaker are warm,
proceed with operation.
LONG TERM STORAGE
Piston Not Against
Tool Bit Leaving Space
Between the Piston and
Bit
Tool Stop
Lower Bushing
1. Remove the tool bit, clean the tool stop and the lower bushing. Thoroughly coat the surfaces of the tool
stop and the lower bushing with grease.
2. If hoses are attached to the breaker, install plugs
on the hose ends. If hoses are removed from the
breaker, install plugs on the hose ends and install
plugs in the breaker IN and OUT ports.
3. Store the breaker in a vertical position. Do not store
the breaker horizontally for extended periods.
OPERATING A BREAKER
Tool Bit
Figure 2. Positioning the Tool Bit with Lubrication
SECURING THE TOOL BIT
1. The tool retainer is shipped installed in the breaker
(see parts illustration).
2. Drive out the tool retainer using a punch and hammer.
3. Grease the top area of the tool bit as shown in Figure 1.
4. Install the tool bit making sure the notch is aligned
with the lower body retainer pin hole.
5. Install the tool retainer.
10 ► MB556 User Manual
PREPARATION FOR USE
Read the section in this manual titled Pre-Operation Procedures before operating a breaker. Failure to follow the
preparation instructions can result in severe damage to
the breaker and carrier and void the warranties of both.
POSITIONING THE CARRIER
SKIDSTEER LOADERS
With the breaker tool in place on the material to be
worked, position the skidsteer loader arms and the
breaker bracket so the breaker is almost vertical and the
front tires of the skidsteer are off of the ground.
Keep lowering the loader arms as the tool penetrates
the work material so the skidsteer weight stays on the
tool. The breaker is more efficient when adequate down
force is applied.
OPERATION
Apply down force.
Figure 5. Excavator
Figure 3. Skidsteer Loader
BACKHOES
With the breaker tool in place on the material to be
worked, position the backhoe so the boom is halfway up
(45°) and the dipper holds the breaker almost vertical.
Lower the loader bucket until the weight is off the front
tires.
POSITIONING THE BREAKER TOOL ON
THE WORK MATERIAL
Position the tool bit near the edge of the work material,
not in the center or far from the edge. Position the tool
6–18 inches (depending on the material) from the edge.
Breaking off smaller pieces of rock or concrete usually
accomplishes more than trying to break larger pieces.
Apply down pressure.
Figure 4. Backhoe
Apply down force to the boom/dipper until the rear of the
backhoe is raised off the ground. Rear tires and stabilizers should be off the ground so the total rear weight of
the backhoe is on the breaker tool. The breaker is more
efficient when adequate down force is applied.
EXCAVATORS
With the breaker tool in place on the material to be
worked, position the excavator so the dipper is at approximately 45° and the breaker is almost vertical. The
tracks of the excavator should be in line with the boom
and the breaker.
Break near the edge.
Figure 6. Position the Tool Bit
On flat material or rock, the breaker should be vertical
or “curled” back slightly to direct the impact force downward and toward the backhoe. This directs the force
back toward the edge of the work material. If the tool
is positioned in the center of the work, or too far from
the edge, the energy will be absorbed into the material
without cracking it. Do not run the breaker longer than
15–20 seconds. If breakout does not occur within this
time, move the breaker to another position.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 11
OPERATION
On flat material such as concrete runways, starting to
break in the middle of the material may cause vibrations
to be transmitted throughout the breaker and excavator
because the material has no place to break to. Always
try to start at a point which will permit the material to
break out.
MAINTAIN DOWN PRESSURE
Maintaining hard contact with the surface of the material
to be broken in addition to maintaining adequate “down
force” is very important. Always keep “down pressure”
or “down force” on the point of the breaker by lifting the
wheels, tracks, or stabilizers slightly above the ground.
This method takes the “slack” out of the bracket and
boom pivots, and reduces the impact on the pivots in
the boom.
The operator needs to be constantly aware of the amount
of down pressure being applied and be able to adjust it
if necessary. Not enough down pressure results in low
production and accelerates wear and tear on the equipment. Too much down pressure may cause the breaker
housing to violently crash into the broken material when
“break-through” occurs.
In any breaking job, the operator should make every effort to “follow” the breaker with “down pressure” as the
machine breaks farther into the material. The breaker
should be stopped as soon as “break-through” occurs or
if it is apparent that good solid blows are not occurring.
BREAKING
The operator should note the sound of the blow when
the breaker is running. With experience, the operator will
be able to tell the difference between a good solid blow
and a hollow sounding blow. A hollow blow means that
solid blows are not occurring and breaker should be repositioned.
Continuous tool penetration usually does not do much
good. If the material does not break with 3–6 inches of
tool penetration, it usually won’t break with full penetration. The time used for additional penetration could be
better used to strike blows in another place.
Many materials do not respond well to continued hammering in one place. The breaker tool should be repositioned on the work each time the tool penetrates but
does not crack the material.
12 ► MB556 User Manual
Do
not break
break continuously
continuously
Do not
in
one
place
in one place.
Figure 7. Breaking
CAUTION
Continuous penetration in the same area for lengthy
periods will create excessive temperatures at the tip
of the tool bit resulting in loss of temper (hardness)
of the bit, mushrooming of the tip of the bit and may
lead to failure of the bit.
Use a “scoring” method of breaking when cracking the
material becomes difficult. This technique involves striking the rock or concrete at several places along a line
where you want the crack to occur. Most materials break
sooner when struck several places along a line than
when struck repeatedly in one location. On each line,
the breaker tool should be continually repositioned.
Practice determines the best length of time to stay in
one spot (15–20 seconds) and how far to move the
breaker tool.
OPERATION
Always direct the down pressure force in a line toward
the point of tool contact with the work.
Moving rocks with the tool bit is another method of binding the tool bit. This practice should be avoided as it may
cause tool bit failure.
Rebar reinforced concrete introduces the problem of
concrete chunks being held together by the rebar after
the concrete has been broken. The best approach to this
problem is to use a chisel point tool which permits cutting the rebar with the breaker. Another method is to peScoring with the breaker riodically cut the rebar with an oxy-acetylene torch
BLANK FIRING
Figure 8. Scoring with the Breaker
Breaker tool binding can cause erratic breaker operation and premature wear on the tool shank. Breaker tool
binding is caused by failure to direct the down force in
the direction of the tool bit.
Breaker tool bit binding
Figure 9. Breaker Tool Bit Binding
CAUTION
Do not pry with bit and breaker. The tool bit may
break causing injury.
Excessive side force cocks the tool in its bore, prevents
proper movement and causes premature tool shank and
bushing wear. Since the breaker tool bit must be pushed
up into the breaker to operate, a binding tool prevents
the breaker from operating correctly. Binding also causes
the tool bit and tool bushings to seize and often results
in breakage of one or more breaker components.
To understand “Blank Firing”, the operator needs to be
aware that the tool bit is able to drop down in the lower
body cavity, far enough so that the piston cannot strike it,
when the tool bit is not in contact with the work surface.
“Blank Firing” occurs whenever the breaker is operating
and the piston is not able to strike the tool bit solidly or
not strike the tool bit at all. “Blank Firing” accelerates
wear and tear on breaker and carrier components and
may result in failure of one or more components. Excessive “Blank Firing” may be considered equipment abuse
and may result in voiding warranties.
Break-through or difficult surface contact results in
“Blank Firing” when the material being broken fractures
and the tool bit is no longer in “hard contact” with the
material but is still pushed high enough in the lower body
cavity so that the piston can strike it. In this position, the
piston strikes the tool bit and the tool bit, in turn, is driven
against the retaining pins because it is not in sufficient
contact with the material to be broken. The energy is absorbed by the retaining pins, other breaker components,
and the carrier boom components. “Blank Firing” of this
type can be experienced in trench work where obtaining striking contact with the work surface is difficult or
the wrong tool bit is used, or in flat rock work where the
operator fails to stop operation of the breaker when slippage, fracturing or material break-through occurs.
“Blank Firing” as a result of operator error occurs when
the tool bit is not in contact with the work surface to be
broken and is allowed to drop down in the lower body
cavity so that the piston is not able to strike it. Instead,
the downward movement of the piston will be stopped
by an internal oil cushion located at the bottom of the
piston’s stroke and the energy of the piston will be absorbed by breaker components and excavator boom
components. “Blank Firing” of this type can be experienced when the operator fails to stop operation of the
breaker when the material fractures or material breakthrough occurs, or during re-positioning of the breaker.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 13
OPERATION
While “Blank Firing” cannot always be avoided, it can be
kept to a minimum by avoiding the above conditions as
much as possible.
UNDERWATER USAGE
Underwater usage of the breaker will cause damage
to internal components. Even if the breaker is partially
submerged, water is introduced to an area between the
tool bit and piston. On the piston down cycle, the water
becomes compressed and damages adjacent components.
Depth/Feet
Pressure/PSI
Air Flow Rate/
cfm
60
53
69
50
44
60
40
35
52
30
27
44
25
22
39
20
18
35
15
13
31
10
9
27
5
4
23
0
0
18
GREASE THE BIT
Grease should be applied to the upper end of the breaker tool bit each time it is installed. Thereafter, the tool
should be greased at the fitting to reduce wear in the
lower body and bushings of the tool. See Greasing The
Tool Bit in the sections titled Pre-Operation Procedures.
Do not
underwaterwithout
without supplying
supplying airair
to to
breaker
Do not
useuse
underwater
breaker.
Figure 10. Underwater Restrictions
CAUTION
No part of the breaker may be submerged in
water. Underwater usage of the breaker will cause
internal damage to the breaker. Consult Stanley for
modifications and specific warranty coverage if you
have an underwater requirement.
The breaker is equipped with an underwater port on the
side of the breaker. Connect an air line to this port and
supply the required air pressure and flow to the breaker
when using underwater. The following chart shows the
air flow rate and pressure required for various depths of
operation.
14 ► MB556 User Manual
TROUBLESHOOTING
This section describes how to find and resolve problems
users may experience. If a situation occurs that is not
covered, call your Stanley Customer Service representative for assistance.
WARNING
Inspecting the tool or installing parts with the
hydraulic hoses connected can result in severe
personal injury or equipment damage. To prevent
accidental startup, disconnect the hydraulic power
before beginning any inspection or installation task.
PROBLEM
Breaker will not fire.
If symptoms of poor performance develop, the following
chart can be used as a guide to correct the problem.
When diagnosing faults in operation of the tool, always
check that the hydraulic power source is supplying the
correct hydraulic flow and pressure to the tool as listed
in the table below. Use a flowmeter known to be accurate. Check the flow with the hydraulic oil temperature at
least 80 °F/27 °C.
CAUSE
Low hydraulic oil level.
Fill reservoir.
No flow to breaker.
Have hydraulic circuit tested by
authorized dealer/distributor per
approved procedure.
Main relief set low.
Breaker runs slowly.
Internal damage.
Have unit serviced by an authorized
dealer/distributor.
Damaged quick couplers.
Replace.
Low hydraulic flow
Have hydraulic circuit tested by an
authorized dealer/distributor per
approved procedure.
Excessive heat build up.
Excessive nitrogen pressure.
Internal leakage.
Breaker runs erratically.
SOLUTION
Low or excessive back-pressure.
Damaged switch or connection.
Have unit serviced by an authorized
dealer/distributor.
Have carrier serviced by an authorized
dealer/distributor.
Relief set too low.
Internal damage.
Breaker runs but at reduced
power.
Tool binding.
Add grease to tool shank. Do not pry
while operating.
Low accumulator charge.
Have unit serviced by an authorized
dealer/distributor.
Excessive back-pressure.
Relief set too low.
Breaker leaks oil around tool bit
and tool bushing.
Lower seals failed.
Have unit serviced by an authorized
dealer/distributor.
Hydraulic system overheats.
Main relief set low.
Have unit serviced by an authorized
dealer/distributor.
Insufficient cooling capability in
hydraulic circuit.
Line/hose size too small.
Excessive back-pressure.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 15
MAINTENANCE
DAILY MAINTENANCE CHECKS
•
Check for loose or missing fasteners. Tighten or replace as needed.
•
Inspect tool retaining pins and pockets for wear.
•
Check for hydraulic leaks at all fittings and hoses.
Replace any defective hoses.
•
Apply grease to the grease fitting in the lower body
each morning. Grease as needed throughout the
work day.
TOOL STOP AND LOWER BUSHING
15 inches
Inspect the tool stop and lower bushing for excessive
galling and metal pickup on the tool bit. Also check for
cracks. If cracks are present, the part must be replaced.
The extent of wear of the tool stop and lower bushings
and the tool bit can be checked by moving a NEW tool
bit back and forth and measuring the gap between the
tool bit and the lower bushing. If the gap is more than
.250 in./6 mm, the upper bushing, lower bushing and
tool bit should be replaced. A gap in excess of .250 in./6
mm will cause damage to the piston. Do not just replace
the tool bit or the lower bushing individually as this will
result in premature wear of the replaced component. It is
recommended to replace ALL worn components.
16 ► MB556 User Manual
Figure 11. Measuring Tool Bit Gap
CHARGING THE ACCUMULATOR
The tools required to charge the breaker accumulator
are the Charge Hose assembly (505232) and the Accumulator Tester (28257), which are used with other
Stanley model breakers. When charging the accumulator, make sure the tools and charge valve is clean. Dirt
can contaminate the charge valve and cause leakage.
1. Remove the protective plug from the accumulator
charge valve. NOTE: There are two accumulators
on this breaker, the main accumulator and return
line accumulator.
2. Hold the chuck end of the tester and turn the gauge
fully counter clockwise to ensure the plunger inside
the chuck is completely retracted.
3. Screw the tester into the breaker charge valve by
turning the chuck. Do not use the gauge for turning as this will advance the plunger in the chuck.
Tighten the chuck lightly against the breaker charge
valve.
4. Turn the gauge clockwise to advance the plunger
until a pressure is indicated on the gauge. Do not
overtighten.
5. If the pressure is correct, unscrew the gauge to retract the plunger. Then, loosen and remove the tester from the charge valve. If the pressure is not correct, proceed to Step 6.
NOTE:
When disengaging the tester a “POP” of nitrogen is
normal.
6. Connect the charge hose assembly to the charging valve on the tester. Make sure the valve on the
charge hose assembly is closed. Open the valve on
the nitrogen bottle.
7. Very slowly open the valve on the charge hose assembly and slowly meter the nitrogen into the breaker charge valve until the tester reads the correct
charge pressure.
8. When the correct pressure is obtained, close the
valve on the charge hose assembly and on the nitrogen bottle. Unscrew the gauge to retract the plunger. Loosen and remove the tester from the charge
valve. Before replacing the protective plug, inspect
the plug O-ring. If damaged or deformed, replace
the plug. Apply Loctite™ 242 to plug and cap.
CHARGE PRESSURE SPECIFICATION
Main Accumulator
Charge Port
Location
P/N 28257 Tester
Main Accumulator: 300 PSI +/- 10 PSI
21 BAR +/- .7 BAR
Main Accumulator
P/N 505232 Charge Hose Assy
P/N 28257 Tester
MB556 User Manual ◄ 17
FLOW CONTROL KIT INSTRUCTIONS
The Flow Control Kit is an option for Skid Steer Models.
The Flow Control Kit regulates the flow from the skid
steer hydraulics to the breaker to prevent over-speeding
of the breaker. Follow the instructions below to install
the kit.
HOSE ROUTINGS
•
Install the flow control block between the breaker and
the loader’s hydraulics using the 7/16 in. capscrews,
washers, and nuts provided. (Torque to 41 ft-lbs)
T = Tank. Route to the tractor’s hydraulic reservoir.
•
Connect the hoses.
R = Return. Route to the breaker OUT port.
S = Supply. Route to the breaker IN port.
P = Pressure. Route to the tractor’s hydraulic pressure.
The parts list for the Flow Control Kit is shown below.
S
4
3
5
R
2
P
T
1
6
8
7
Figure 13. Flow Control Kit
ITEM
NO.
PART
NO.
QTY
DESCRIPTION
1
34621
1
FLOW CONTROL BLOCK
2
34839
6
WASHER
3
371516
3
NYLOCK NUT
4
02773
4
ADAPTER
5
58653
1
ORIFICE LOCATED UNDER
FITTING DESIGNATED AS "S"
6
58652
3
CAPSCREW
7
58654
2
HOSE
8
58655
2
HOSE
18 ► MB556 User Manual
WEAR TOLERANCES
NEW
REJECT LIMIT
LOWER BUSHING (ITEM 19)
2.775 in. / 70.5 mm
2.890 in. / 73.5 mm
FIGURE 14. LOWER BUSHING
TOOL STOP (ITEM 18)
A) 2.775 in. / 70.5 mm
Inside Diameter
A) 2.890 in. / 73.5 mm
Inside Diameter
B) .60 in. / 15.2 mm
Depth
B) .48 in. / 12 mm Depth
Wear Areas
B
A
C
C=Measure at 1.2 in./30 mm
FIGURE 15. TOOL STOP
RETAINER PIN (ITEM 17)
1.745 in. / 44 mm
Outside Diameter
1.660 in. / 42 mm
Outside Diameter
FIGURE 16. RETAINER PIN
RETAINER PIN (ITEM 16)
.25 in. / 6 mm
Outside Diameter
.18 in. / 4.6 mm
Outside Diameter
PISTON
Wear Limit
1.800 in. / 46 mm Depth
1.760 in. / 45 mm
New Part
FIGURE 17. PISTON
MB556 User Manual ◄ 19
PROPER USE & CARE OF TOOL BITS
Tool bits are made and heat treated to specification.
Tool bits, however well made, are wear parts, and are
used in the most destructive applications. Even when
the hydraulic breaker is used properly, and the operator
is an experienced one, a tool bit may become damaged.
When a tool bit has been damaged, it is useful to determine the cause immediately in order to prevent the
damage from occurring again.
All Stanley tool bits are machined and hardened for
maximum performance. Care must be taken to maintain
the tools original condition for optimum productivity and
life expectancy. It is not uncommon for an operator who
is unfamiliar with using a hammer to break a point. This
is part of the learning experience.
Worn-out retainer pin(s) will cause uneven loading on
the pin(s) themselves, causing failure of the tool or retainer pin(s). This will also cause excessive wear to the
front bushing(s).
METAL-TO-METAL CONTACT
Extreme caution should be used to avoid scratches or
gouges on the surface of the tool. These areas create a
stress concentration Metal-to-Metal Contact point, thus
weakening the tool.
Another form of metal-to-metal contact is galling, which
usually occurs from the lack of lubrication. Special care
should be taken to keep the tool shank lubricated every
two (2) to three (3) hours.
BLANK FIRING OR FREE RUNNING
Steel failures that were caused by surface damage take
two main forms. The simplest form is caused by deep
scratches on working steel surface. The broken surface
has a shell pattern around the starting point of failure,
similar to the one in the fatigue failure. The other parts of
the broken surface are brittle. These failures work slowly
through the steel until it suddenly parts completely.
This occurs when the tool is not in proper contact with
the work, thus causing the energy produced by the hammer to be concentrated on the tool retainer(s) and the
retainer slot(s) on the tool itself. Caution should be used
to prevent the hammer from sliding off slanted surfaces
or when breaking through thin material.
The second form of failure caused by surface damage
occurs when there are deep scratches on working steel
surface and there was also excessive bending stress.
The broken surface also shows the shell pattern, but the
other parts of the broken surface are brittle and usually
have a “lip” like that in a stress failure.
Listed below are several methods to determine tool failure and will quickly aid in warranty determination.
TOOL FAILURE NOT COVERED
UNDER WARRANTY
The illustration below is typical of the kind of breakage
that occurs from excessive blank firing.
Figure 18. Excessive Blank Firing Breakage
WORN-OUT FRONT BUSHING(S) OR
RETAINER PIN(S)
Worn-out front bushing(s) will cause the tool to become
misaligned inside the hammer. This misalignment will
cause uneven contact between the piston and tool, thus
causing stress to concentrate on one particular area of
the tool. This can also cause the tool to bind inside the
hammer. Call your dealer for acceptable wear allowances.
20 ► MB556 User Manual
Figure 19. Metal-to-Metal Contact Examples
PROPER USE & CARE OF TOOL BITS
In its most extreme forms, the combination of surface
damage and severe bending can quickly break even the
best working steels.
The illustrations below show examples of severe stress
breaks.
Figure 20. Severe Stress Breaks
PRYING
This is the most common cause of tool failure. Even
when there is no surface damage, the stress from prying can easily break a working steel. This kind of failure
generally results from any type of side pressure such as
an incorrect breaking angle or from using the tool to reposition material. The tool should not be used as a pivot
point when repositioning the carrier. The power generated by the carrier will far exceed the strength of the tool.
As the next illustration shows, fatigue failures take many
forms, but they all exhibit similar features. Generally, the
broken surface is brittle and has a “lip” like that in the
bending failure, even though, in some cases, the lip has
been broken.
Figure 23. Fatigue Failures
CORROSION
Tools should be greased and stored out of the weather.
Corrosion tends to accelerate the fatigue fractures of the
tool.
MUSHROOMING
Driving the tool into a hard material for a long period of
time generates an intense heat, indicated by a blue tone
just above the point. This will soften the steel and cause
the point to fold over or mushroom the end of the tool.
Avoid hammering in one location for too long. If material
does not break after a short period (approximately 15 to
20 seconds), reposition the tool.
Figure 21. Prying Damage Example
Similar failures can also occur when the steel is used
with extreme down pressure, and the steel repeatedly slips off the work at an angle, or the material, itself
moves from under the working steel.
Figure 24. Mushrooming
If the overheated steel is suddenly cooled by being
dipped in standing water, for example, the metal will
harden and become brittle. These are some examples
of failure caused by temper changes occurring on the
job.
Figure 22. Extreme Down Pressure Breakage
MB556 User Manual ◄ 21
PROPER USE & CARE OF TOOL BITS
TOOL FAILURE COVERED UNDER
WARRANTY
INTERNAL MATERIAL FLAW
This failure occurs when a foreign material is rolled into
the steel during the manufacturing process, causing an
imperfection in the internal material flaw grain. The result is an inherent weakness in the tool shank and eventual breakage.
The fatigue failure is started by the defects within the tool
bit. The broken surface exhibits a shell pattern around
the starting point of failure, like that in the fatigue failure.
The other parts of the broken surface are brittle.
This is the only kind of tool bit failure that is always
covered under warranty.
Look for surface cracks, galling, or gouge marks. Breaks
that start as surface damage have a “sea shell” pattern,
with the damaged spot at the center. A large “sea shell”
indicates a slow growing break; a small one indicates
one compounded by side stress.
Stress failures start small, and spread into the center
of the steel. In a stress failure, the coarser the grain,
the greater the stress was, and the more rapid was the
failure.
• Failures in this area are usually the result
of blank firing, worn bushing(s), worn retainer pin(s) or the lack of lubrication.
• Failures in this area are usually the result
of worn retainer pin(s) or blank firing.
• Failures in this area are usually the result
of prying, metal-to-metal contact or corrosion. Prying failures often exhibit a shelllike formation near the edge of the steel
diameter where the break began, and a
“tail” opposite that where the remaining
steel bent and tore.
Figure 25. Internal Material Flaw
As a rule, working steel failures can be diagnosed by
looking at the break itself, and at the place on the steel
where the break occurred. Discoloration, like “rainbow”
effects or blue bands, is the result of extreme heat.
22 ► MB556 User Manual
• Failures in this area are usually the result
of heat build-up, mushrooming, or improper contact with the work.
Figure 26. Diagram of Tool Bit Failures
PROPER USE & CARE OF TOOL BITS
Stanley Breakers are available with several different types of tool bits. The most common are the moil, chisel and
the blunt. Each of these working steels has its own purpose as described below:
To obtain the maximum production from the breaker, it is important to select the proper working steel. Consult your
Stanley representative for assistance in selecting the proper working steel for your application.
MOIL
This is by far the most popular
working steel. It is a general
purpose point used to break
anything from concrete to hard
rock. Its pencil-type point is
used to fracture the material.
The tool is best where penetration speed is important.
CHISEL
This style of point is used generally used for trench work,
where a controlled break is required, and for rock breaking
on materials with a definite line
of cleavage. A chisel bit also
works well in softer concretes
where a moil might penetrate
quickly, but not cause a fracture line.
BLUNT
This flat type of point is used to
break softer material such as
coal or shale. A moil or chisel
will tend to punch holes in this
type of material, where a flat
blunt will shatter the material.
It is also useful when breaking irregularly shaped material
where its broad tip makes it
easier to position.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 23
FLOW TEST PROCEDURES
The correct performance of this procedure will verify if
the auxiliary circuit of the carrier is adequate to properly
operate a Stanley attachment.
This procedure is generic in form. It is the end users
responsibility to ensure that this procedure will work with
his specific type of equipment.
If an adequate flow meter is not available contact your
Stanley Hydraulic Distributor for assistance.
5. Close the restrictor valve on the flow meter until the
attachment relief starts to crack or open. The relief
valve opens when the flow rate (GPM), indicated on
the flow meter begins to decline rapidly. Locate the
tools operating system relief pressure in the specification section in the manual. Adjust attachment relief to specification.
NOTE:
1. With the auxiliary circuit (or kit) completely installed
connect the flow meter between the tool inlet and
outlet hoses.
The relief valve pressure must be greater than the
operating pressure of the attachment and three
times the back-pressure. Never use the relief valve
to control the flow rate in the circuit. Cracking pressure means the loss of 4 or more GPM.
NOTE:
Record the relief cracking pressure Always use the hoses that are supplied for the attachment and make sure the machine hydraulic
oil is between 90 to 120 °F. This will assure correct
readings and adjustments.
Example:
TEST PROCEDURE
2. With the machine setting at the mode that’s going to
be used to operate the attachment record the GPM
_____.
Locate the correct flow for the attachment in the
manual under the specification section. Adjust the
machine to the correct GPM.
NOTE:
If possible, always set the machine to the highest
GPM output mode. This will prevent the operator
from over flowing the attachments.
3. Once the correct GPM flow is achieved fully open
the restrictor on the flow meter.
4. With the machine in the attachment mode set in
step 2 record the back-pressure. At this point the
pressure reading on the pressure gauge is the backpressure in the circuit. This pressure must not exceed 200 psi/13.5 bar.
Excessive back-pressure will slow the attachments
operation and lead to premature seal failures and
over heating.
Record the back-pressure 24 ► MB556 User Manual
psi.
psi.
Operation pressure of a breaker is 2700 psi. Back-pressure is 150 psi. A good rule to follow when setting the
relief, multiply the back pressure by 3 then add this number to the operation pressure of the attachment.
Operating Pressure
Back-pressure
Operating pressure of the tool
2700 psi
450 psi
3150 psi
The relief valve setting must be greater than the estimated operating pressure of the tool. If the setting is lower,
damage to the circuit may occur. Excess heat will be
generated in the circuit which will damage the attachment and carrier.
FLOW TEST PROCEDURES
HEAT LOAD TEST
TROUBLESHOOTING
With the installation kit properly installed and adjusted
per the above procedure, conduct the heat load test as
follows.
If adequate pump flow is available from the carrier
pump(s) but is not getting to the attachment, consult
your service representative and review the following:
1. Connect the flow meter between the tool inlet and
outlet hoses.
3. Attachment valve(s) are not actuating. Review all
electrical connections that are part of the attachment kit.
2. With the carrier set in the attachment mode, restrict the flow meter until a pressure of 1000 psi
is achieved. This pressure must be maintained
throughout the heat test.
NOTE:
Closing of the restrictor may be required as the temperature increases.
Monitor the oil temperature from the flow meter until
no change is noted. Record the time required for oil to
stabilize. Record the surrounding temperature (ambient temperature). Record the time required to stabilize
minutes.
Record the stabilized oil temperature Record the ambient temperature 4. Ensure proper voltage to the valve(s).
5. Ensure the REG port of the valve is not blocked.
6. Check to make sure the carriers main relief is set
to the manufacturers recommendation and that this
value is equal or greater than the attachment circuit
relief.
7. If the valve will not turn off, check the drain (tank)
line of the valve to ensure that the pressure is 50
psi or less.
°F.
°F.
The “heat rise” is calculated as the stabilized temperature minus the ambient temperature.
Example:
Stabilized Temperature
160°
Ambient Temperature
-80°
Heat Rise
80°
The normal operating temperature range of this circuit
will be the typical ambient temperature range for the
geographical area plus the heat rise calculated above.
Ensure that the operating temperature range is lower
than 180° for optimum operation of the attachment.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 25
DEFINITIONS
Tool:
The hydraulic attachment that the auxiliary circuit is intended to power. These
may include hydraulic breakers, compactors, shears, etc.
Operating Pressure:
That pressure at which the tool will naturally operate without influence of outside pressure relief mechanisms. This pressure is an operating characteristic
of the tool and cannot be altered by the end user without changing the tool
design.
Relief Pressure:
The relief pressure is that pressure at which the circuit will dump fluid in order
to protect itself from damage.
Back Pressure:
The pressure at the tool’s connection to the return circuit of the carrier.
Flow Meter:
Instrument for testing the operating characteristics of a hydraulic circuit. The
data usually available from this device are pressure (psi/bar), flow (gpm/lpm)
and temperature (°F/°C).
Restrictor Valve:
A valve on the flow meter which allows the user to simulate an operating tool
by adding a pressure load (through restriction) to the circuit. This feature is
used to evaluate relief settings and flow ratings at pressure.
V60/V65/V100 Valves:
A priority flow control valve manufactured by Stanley Hydraulic Tools. Allows
for optimum operation of any attachment by providing the proper amount of
flow for operation of the tool the “priority” aspect allows the attachment to function properly if another control function is activated.
Inlet Flow:
The hydraulic oil supplied to the IN port of the tool or valve.
Regulated Flow:
The flow of oil supplied to the tool by the V60/V100 valve.
By-Pass Flow:
The oil flow that is supplied by the carriers pump, but not used in the operation of the attachment. By-pass flow equals inlet flow (to the valve) minus the
regulated flow.
Pressure Line:
The hydraulic line(s) that supply pressurized oil from the pump to the valve or
tool.
Return Line:
The hydraulic line that connects the OUT port of the tool to the tank circuit of
the carrier.
Cracking Pressure:
The pressure at which the relief valve starts to open. Can be seen by a drop in
the flow rate as shown by the flow meter.
Full Open Pressure:
The pressure at which the relief valve is completely open dumping all system
flow to the tank.
Ambient Air Temperature:
The temperature of the outside air.
Stabilized Temperature:
The temperature at which the carrier hydraulic system temperature will stop
rising during testing or operation.
26 ► MB556 User Manual
SPECIFICATIONS
DIMENSIONS AND WEIGHTS
Weight w/Tool Bit, & Mounting Bracket................................................................................................752 lbs / 396 kg
Length w/Tool Bit & Mounting Bracket............................................................................................... 63 in. / 1600 mm
Tool Working Length............................................................................................................................ 15 in. / 381 mm
Tool Diameter........................................................................................................................................ 2.7 in. / 69 mm
Hydraulic Pressure (working).......................................................................................... 1600-2000 psi / 110-138 bar
Flow Range
Minimum............................................................................................................................................. 12 gpm / 45 lpm
Maximum............................................................................................................................................ 22 gpm / 83 lpm
System Relief (min. cracking).......................................................................................................... 2700 psi / 186 bar
Return Line Pressure (max.)................................................................................................................ 350 psi / 24 bar
Operating Oil Temperature (max.)........................................................................................................... 190°F / 88°C
Adapter Fitting Size............................................................................................................................ -12 SAE O-Ring
Recommended Min. Hose ID............................................................................................................................. 3/4 in.
Blows Per Minute.........................................................................................................................590 min. / 1100 max.
Impact Energy Class.......................................................................................................................... 750 ft lb / 1000 J
Sound Power Level........................................................................................................................................ 124 dBA
Carrier Size (Skidsteer)................................................................................................4500-10000 lb / 2043-4536 kg
Carrier Size (Mini Excavator).......................................................................................7000-16000 lb / 3175-7200 kg
Carrier Size (Backhoe).................................................................................................7000-16000 lb / 3175-7200 kg
TORQUE TABLE
Item No.
Illustration
Description
Apply
Ft/Lb
Nm
10
Power Cell (4)
Hollow Hex Plug -12 SAE
Loctite™ 242
150
203
20
Power Cell (1,3)
Tie Rod
Kopr Kote™
400
542
24
Power Cell (4)
Charge Valve
Loctite™ 242
75
101
37
Power Cell (1,4)
Capscrew
Loctite™ 242
85
115
55
Housing (2)
Capscrew
Kopr Kote™
455
617
45
Housing
Nut
Kopr Kote ™
455
617
1 Tighten in a cross pattern
2 Thread into nut by hand
3 Thread tie rod into nut by hand
4 Use Loctite™
NOTE: Weights, dimensions and operating specifications listed on this sheet are subject to change without notice. Where specifications are critical to your application, please consult the dealer.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 27
ACCESSORIES
Description............................................................................................................................................................... Part No.
Tool Bits
Conical..........................................................................................................................................................................56547
Blunt..............................................................................................................................................................................56548
Chisel, Line-cut..............................................................................................................................................................56549
Chisel, Cross-cut...........................................................................................................................................................56550
Tamping Pad Assy 12 in. x 12 in...................................................................................................................................56551
Miscellaneous
Attaching Kits.................................................................................................................................................. Consult Dealer
Adapter Assembly.........................................................................................................................................................33300
Charge Hose Assembly (Includes Valve and Hose for Nitrogen Tank & Charge Valve Connections)......................... 505232
Charge Kit Assembly (Includes p/n 505232, 28257 and 372047 Charge Kit Box)........................................................ 34892
Accumulator Tester........................................................................................................................................................28257
Service Kit (For Rebuild MB556, 656, 856, 956, 10).....................................................................................................40373
Hose Guard Kit, 20 degree, Bolt on Skidsteer..............................................................................................................59096
Conversion Kit to Adapt Breaker to Skidsteer...............................................................................................................56599
28 ► MB556 User Manual
MB556 POWER CELL ILLUSTRATION
MB556 User Manual ◄ 29
HOUSING PARTS ILLUSTRATION
30 ► MB556 User Manual
MB556 PARTS LIST
Item
Part No.
Qty
1
56539
1
Description
Description
Item
Part No.
Qty
Piston
40
56546
1
Lower Bumper
56595
1
Pressure Spec Sticker 300 psi
2
56540
1
Piston Sleeve
41
3
24508
4
O-Ring*
43
17559
16
Washer
4
24509
1
Symmetical Seal*
44
70752
2
Stanley Sticker
5
24510
1
Rod Wiper*
45
22181
8
Nylock Nut
6
00354
1
O-Ring*
7
24518
1
O-Ring*
46
56593
56594
1
CE Specification Plate (Excavator)
CE Specification Plate (Skidsteer)
8
16549
1
Dowel Pin
49
73005
2
MB556 Sticker
9
22398
1
O-Ring*
50
52745
1
Housing Weldment
10
350223
2
Hollow Hex Plug -12 SAE
55
30949
8
Hex Head Capscrew
11
22980
2
Retainer Spring
56
66219
1
Guaranteed Sound Power Level
12
09764
2
Retainer Pin
57
02773
1
Std Thd Connector
13
09728
2
Pin Retainer Spring
58
02112
1
Adapter 3/4 SAE
14
65039
4
Roll Pin
59
47351
1
Compsite Warning Decal
15
56534
1
Lower Body Assy
(Includes 10-14, 16, 18, 19, 38)
60
72074
1
Grease Decal
61
66764
1
Made in USA Decal
16
58885
2
Dowel Pin
17
56542
1
Tool Retainer
55606
1
SEAL KIT
18
56543
1
Tool Stop
19
56544
1
Lower Bushing
20
56536
4
Tie Rod
21
56538
4
Tie Rod Washer
22
56553
1
Plug
23
24112
1
O-Ring*
24
32165
1
Charge Valve Assy
25
16800
2
Plastic Plug
26
27942
1
Main Body Assy
(Includes 22-25, 27, 33, 56)
27
08104
1
Hollow Hex Plug -6 SAE
28
24512
1
O-Ring*
29
52781
1
Quad Ring*
30
52780
1
Rod Seal*
31
56541
1
Seal Carrier
32
19096
1
O-Ring*
33
01219
5
Pipe Plug
34
24495
1
Spool
35
350818
1
O-Ring*
36
24501
1
Valve Cap
37
00701
6
Capscrew
38
372003
1
Grease Fitting
39
24491
1
Upper Bumper
* Items included in seal kit.
(Note: seal kit also includes Qty-2 (P/N-1605) orings for charge valves, this item not shown in parts
list.
MB556 User Manual ◄ 31
23
2
32 ► MB556 User Manual
10
1
5
1
4
8
3
16
12
1
6
8
14
1
24
1
25
11
1
15
1
8
1
22
1
73005
25
16
72074
56597
15
24
56595
14
70752
56594
13
23
56550
12
70476
56546
11
66764
56535
10
22
56533
9
21
52745
8
66219
47351
7
20
40092
6
65811
30949
5
19
24491
4
56611
22181
3
56611_
17559
2
18
05967
1
17
PART
NO
02773
ITEM
17
1
9
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
8
16
2
2
QTY.
18
1
19
1
7
1
21
1
DECAL, MB556
DECAL, GREASE
DECAL, "STANLEY" 11 INCH
DECAL, "STANLEY" 8.5 INCH
DECAL, USA ORIGIN 3"
GUARANTEED SOUND POWER LEVEL
COUPLER F.F. FEMALE
HOSE
HOSE
MANUAL, MB556 OPERATION
PRESSURE SPEC STICKER - 300 PSI
"CE" SPECIFICATION PLATE
CROSS CUT CHISEL TOOL--NOT SHOWN
LOWER BUMPER
SKID STEER MNTG BRKT
POWERCELL ASSEMBLY
HOUSING WELDMENT
DECAL, COMPOSITE WARNING
COUPLER F.F. MALE
HHCS 7/8-9UNC X 3.000
UPPER BUMPER
NYLOCK NUT 7/8-9UNC
WASHER 7/8" I.D.
STRAIGHT THREAD ELBOW
ADAPTER
DESCRIPTION
1
2
20
1
MB55600SS
MB55600SS
MB556 MOUNTING BRACKETS
MOUNTING BRACKETS
14” PIN CENTER BRKT
WAINROY BRKT 1/4 yd
ADAPTER, EXCHANGE
P/N-30913
P/N-39056
P/N-49309
MB556 User Manual ◄ 33
Stanley Hydraulic Tools
3810 SE Naef Road
Milwaukie, Oregon 97267
503-659-5660 / Fax 503-652-1780
www.stanleyhydraulics.com