User Manual
Workbench
Create and Customize User Interfaces for Router Control
snellgroup.com
Workbench
www.snellgroup.com
Information and Notices
Information and Notices
Copyright and Disclaimer
Copyright protection claimed includes all forms and matters of copyrightable material and
information now allowed by statutory or judicial law or hereinafter granted, including without
limitation, material generated from the software programs which are displayed on the screen
such as icons, screen display looks etc.
Information in this manual and software are subject to change without notice and does not
represent a commitment on the part of Snell Limited. The software described in this manual is
furnished under a license agreement and can not be reproduced or copied in any manner
without prior agreement with Snell Limited, or their authorized agents.
Reproduction or disassembly of embedded computer programs or algorithms prohibited.
No part of this publication can be transmitted or reproduced in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and
retrieval system, without permission being granted, in writing, by the publishers or their
authorized agents.
Snell operates a policy of continuous improvement and development. Snell reserves the right
to make changes and improvements to any of the products described in this document
without prior notice.
Contact Details
Customer Support
United Kingdom (HQ)
+44 (0) 118 921 4214 (tel)
+44 (0) 118 921 4268 (fax)
customersupport@snellgroup.com
Regional Support Contacts
Snell USA
+1 818 556 2616 (tel)
+1 818 556 2626 (fax)
support.us@snellgroup.com
Snell Germany
+49 (0) 6122 98 43 0 (tel)
+49 (0) 6122 98 43 44 (fax)
support.germany@snellgroup.com
Snell Spain
+34 91 446 23 07 (tel)
+34 91 446 17 74 (fax)
support.spain@snellgroup.com
Snell France
+33 1 41 95 30 50 (tel)
+33 1 41 95 30 51 (fax)
support.france@snellgroup.com
Snell Asia Pacific
+852 2356 1660 (tel)
+852 2575 1690 (fax)
support.hk@snellgroup.com
Snell India
+91 124 462 6000 (tel)
+91 124 437 5888 (fax)
support.india@snellgroup.com
Snell Russia
+7 499 248 3443 (tel)
+7 499 248 1104 (fax)
support.russia@snellgroup.com
Snell China
+86 10 6515 6158 (tel)
+86 10 6515 5659 (fax)
support.china@snellgroup.com
For further details of our Regional Customer Support Offices please visit the Snell web site
and navigate to Support/Customer Support Contacts.
http://www.snellgroup.com/support/customer-support/customer-support/
Customers with a support contract should call their personalized number, which can be found
in their contract, and be ready to provide their contract number and details.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Page 2
© 2013 Snell Limited
Workbench
www.snellgroup.com
Contents
1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.2 Database Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.3 Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.4 Configurations for Multiple Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
1.5 Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Issue 1 Rev 4
2. Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1 System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1 Minimum Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 Install Workbench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 Finish the Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 Manually Installing Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.1 Configuration Helper Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.2 Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.3 Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.4 Microsoft Data Access Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.5 Visual C++ Redistributable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.6 SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.7 SQL Server Management Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.8 Workbench Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.9 Add a Mirrored Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.10 Create a New Database Using SQLDBTool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.11 Create a Blank Database Using SQLMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.12 Install Sample Databases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 Start Workbench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 Log In to Workbench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7 LiveRunner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7.1 Command Line Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8 Pbak DeployTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8.2 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9 Configuration Helper Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3. General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 Screen Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1 Home Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2 Mode Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Run Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Change User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 Exit Workbench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4. Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1 Add a New User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.2 Delete a User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3 Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.1 Default Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.2 Add a New Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.3 Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 Screen Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5 Controller Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.6 Locking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7 Data Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.1 Screen Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.2 Database Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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© 2013 Snell Limited
Workbench
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4.8 Sequence Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.9 Identity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
5. Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.2 Screen Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.2.1 Sample Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.2.2 Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.2.3 Controller Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
5.3 Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
5.4 Configuring Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
5.4.1 Add a New Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
5.4.2 Edit Controller Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
5.5 Configuring a Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
5.5.1 Router Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
5.5.2 Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
5.5.3 Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
5.5.4 Port Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
5.5.5 Advanced Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
5.5.6 Hardware Config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.5.7 Local Router Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5.6 Configuring Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
5.6.1 Panel Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
5.7 Configuring Additional Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
5.7.1 Add a New Device to the Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
5.7.2 Available Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
5.7.3 Alarm Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
5.7.4 FieldStore Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
5.7.5 GPI Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.7.6 Tielines Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.7.7 UMD Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
5.7.8 UMD Engine Device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.8 Controller Configuration Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.8.1 Generic Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
5.8.2 Online Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5.8.3 Checksum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5.9 Controller Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5.9.1 Edit Controller IP Address or Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5.9.2 Push and Pull Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
5.9.3 Configuration Backup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
5.9.4 Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
5.9.5 Dual Redundancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
5.9.6 Refresh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
5.9.7 Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
5.9.8 Delete RollCall Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
5.9.9 Convert a Nucleus 2450 Controller to a 246x Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
5.9.10 Upgrading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
6. Design Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
6.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
6.2 Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
6.3 Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
6.4 Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
6.4.1 Create a New Blank Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
6.4.2 Screens Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
6.4.3 Screen Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
6.5 Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
6.5.1 Hardware Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
6.5.2 Soft Panels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
6.5.3 Panel Templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
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6.6 Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
6.7 Toolbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
6.7.1 Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
6.7.2 Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
6.7.3 Numeric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
6.7.4 Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
6.7.5 Meters and Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
6.7.6 Mimic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
6.7.7 Device Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
6.8 Property Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
6.9 Device Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
6.9.1 DCCP Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
6.10 Key Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
6.11 Key Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
6.11.1 Run Mode Key Sequences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
6.11.2 Key Sequences Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.12 Auto Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
6.12.1 Automatically Assign a Dial-up Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
6.12.2 Automatic Key Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
6.13 Brushes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
6.13.1 Add a Brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
6.13.2 Clone a Brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
6.13.3 Solid Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
6.13.4 Linear and Radial Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
6.13.5 Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
6.13.6 Rename a Brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
7. Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2 Rules Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3 Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4 Toolbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.1 Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.2 Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.3 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.5 Property Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.6 Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.6.1 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.7 Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.7.1 Operator Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8 Rules Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8.1 Rules Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
128
128
128
129
129
129
131
132
132
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8. System Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3 Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4 Device Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.1 Import/Export Device Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5 Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.1 Add a Device to a Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.2 Device Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6 Pin Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.1 Names and Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.2 Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.3 Mimic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7 Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.1 Cable Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
136
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136
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137
138
139
139
140
140
140
140
141
142
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Appendix A. Worked Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
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A.1 XY Soft Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.1 Create New Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.2 Clone Panel Without a Take Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.3 Link Panels Together. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2 BPX Soft Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.1 Create New Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.2 Modify Screen Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.3 Modify Panel Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.4 Modify Group Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.5 Add Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.6 Move Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.7 Assign a Source and Destination to Each Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.8 Add Buttons to Link Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3 Alarm Soft Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.1 Create New Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.2 Modify Screen Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.3 Modify Panel Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.4 Modify Group Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.5 Add an Image Tally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.6 Add a Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.7 Add More Image Tallies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.4 Live Renaming of Sources and Destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.5 Numeric Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.6 Radio Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.7 Monitor Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.7.1 Add Monitor Buttons to an XY Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.7.2 Monitoring on an XY Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.7.3 Monitoring on a Dial-up Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.8 Destination Follow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.9 Configure a MultiViewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.10 Audio and Video Routing and Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.10.1 Audio Processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.10.2 Frame Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.10.3 Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.11 Audio Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.12 Logging Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.13 Mimic Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.13.1 Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.13.2 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.13.3 Router Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.13.4 Re-entrant Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.13.5 Setup a Mimic Soft Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.14 RollCall Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.15 GPI Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.15.1 GPI Ports on a Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.15.2 Configuring GPI Overrides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.16 Set Controller Dual Redundancy Over IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.17 Set up Tie-lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.17.1 Set up a Tie-line Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.17.2 Configure a Safe Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.17.3 Configure a Soft Panel for Tie-lines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.18 Router Follow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.19 Configure Dynamic UMDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.19.1 Configure the Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
143
143
146
147
148
148
148
149
149
149
150
150
150
151
151
151
151
152
152
153
153
154
155
155
157
157
157
158
159
160
161
162
167
168
170
171
173
173
174
174
174
175
176
177
177
177
178
179
179
181
181
183
184
184
Appendix B. Controllers Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1 2330 Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.1 PC Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.2 2330 Controller LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.3 Updating 2330 Controller Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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187
187
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B.1.4 2330 Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1.5 RollCall Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2 Nucleus 2450 Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.1 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.2 Nucleus 2450 Firmware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.3 Nucleus 2450 LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.4 Network Initialization File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.5 Configuration Initialization File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3 246x Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.1 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.2 246x Firmware Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.3 246x Controller LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.4 246x Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.5 RollCall Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.4 RollCall Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
189
190
191
191
192
192
194
197
200
200
200
201
203
204
205
Appendix C. Routers Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1 Pyxis Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.1 Install the Sample Pyxis Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.2 Sample Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.3 Sample Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.4 Pyxis Module Locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2 Sirius 800 Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.1 Sirius 850 Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.2 Sirius 840 Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.3 Sirius 830 Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.3 Cygnus Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.3.1 Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.3.2 Example Module IDs… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
206
206
206
207
209
210
212
212
214
216
218
218
219
Appendix D. Hardware Panels Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1 Supported Hardware Panels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.1 1U Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.2 2U Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2 Panel Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.1 Special Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.2 Protect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.3 Line-up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.4 Next and Previous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.5 Alt-dest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.6 Dest-ident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.7 Level Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.8 Alt-lev. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.9 Clear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.10 Controllable Destinations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.11 Destination Keypads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.12 Source Keypads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.13 Panel Swap Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.14 Override Salvo Protects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.15 Mask with Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.16 Display Audio Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.17 Configure Audio Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.18 Override Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.19 Panel Lock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.20 Making selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.21 Panels with Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3 Audio Modify/Video Reference Operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.1 Common Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.2 Rules for 6276 X-Y Panels (not designated master) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.3 Rules for 6277 Multi-output Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
220
220
220
222
222
222
222
223
223
223
223
223
224
224
224
224
224
224
225
225
225
226
226
226
227
227
228
228
229
230
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Appendix E. Control Behaviors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1 Panel Behaviors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2 Design Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.1 Tab Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.2 Titled Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.3 Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.4 CheckBox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.5 Combo Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.6 Edit Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.7 Image. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.8 Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.9 List Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.10 Edit Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.11 Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.12 Composite Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.13 Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.14 Up Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.15 Hyperion Thumbnail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.16 Jog Shuttle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.17 List Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.18 Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.19 Radio Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.20 Source Queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.21 Web Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.22 Bar Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.23 Line Graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.24 Round Gauge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.25 Device Selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.26 Mimic Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.27 Device Chain Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.28 Device Selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
231
231
231
231
231
231
234
235
235
235
236
236
237
238
239
239
239
239
239
239
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
Appendix F. Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.1 SQL Server Management Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.1.1 Restore a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.1.2 Backup a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.2 SQLDBTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.2.1 Restore a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.2.2 Backup a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.3 Aurora/Nebula Importer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.4 Importing a Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.5 Imported Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
241
241
241
244
245
245
245
246
246
247
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Introduction
1. Introduction
1.1 Description
Workbench provides a unified environment for control and monitoring of Snell and third-party
products. It is used to create and customize user interfaces for router control, modular
product monitoring and control, and offers highly flexible alarm and status reporting options.
The system is flexible and scalable, providing a range of interfaces from a single router
control panel running on a PC, through to large and powerful installations using dual
redundant control across many sites. By downloading all relevant data from the database on
power up, clients (PCs) and device drivers can operate independently if connection to the
database is lost.
Workbench operates in a client-server configuration using standard TCP/IP network
protocols, that makes it easy to integrate into existing network infrastructures. Snell and
third-party protocols are also used when interconnecting different equipment types.
If required, device drivers can use an embedded, controller with dual redundant power, and
run a real-time operating system. This combination offers the ultimate in resilient design.
Individual logins provide access to specific screens, defined by the users login or role,
meaning each operator or job function can have dedicated screens for the task in hand.
Workbench is a powerful design tool to design screens for any style of user interface. Every
aspect of the user interface can be customized, so that screens can range from clear and
functional, to more radical designs for the artistically creative.
1.2 Database Configuration
Choose which installation suits your requirements. Fig 1. and Fig 2. show two typical
installation scenarios:
•
A distributed installation where the database and SQL server are installed on the
server PC, with client PCs that have individual components that connect through the
network to the database.
•
A stand-alone installation where everything resides on a single PC.
Server
SQL
Server
Database
Network
PC1
PC2
Management
Studio
Workbench
Fig 1.
Issue 1 Rev 4
PC3
LiveRunner
Client
Installation on a Network
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Introduction
Standalone PC
Fig 2.
Database
SQL
Server
Workbench
Management
Studio
Installation on a Single PC
1.3 Architecture
The physical inputs and outputs of the system can be from numerous individual pieces of
hardware. A controller maps the physical inputs and outputs of the router to the software
inputs (sources) and outputs (destinations).
A router is a collection of inputs (sources) and outputs (destinations) and crosspoints, that
can be on one or more cards, see Fig 3. Each router box has an internal control card for the
router to be controlled by a combination of serial or IP interfaces.
Router
Crosspoint
Inputs
(Sources)
Outputs (Destinations)
Fig 3.
Router Diagram
A level is a logical grouping of inputs and outputs, which may or may not have a direct
correspondence with a particular piece of hardware. Typically, a level depends on the
operational requirements, and represents groups of inputs and outputs such as video, or
audio, or data.
A matrix is a routing system made up of one, or more levels, which is controlled as a single
entity, Fig 4.
Level 1. Video only
Matrix
Level 2. Audio only
Level 3. Data only
Fig 4.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Matrix Diagram
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Introduction
Associations are a method of grouping together signals so that they can be routed together
on a single press of a button. For example, VTR signal levels can be grouped into a single
association:
•
Level 1 = video
•
Level 2 = audio
•
Level 3 = control signal
Source Associations refer to the group of sources, and Destination Associations refer to a
group of signals at a destination (for example, a monitor). By default, Associations names are
derived from the top level name. The Association, Source and Destination names can be
changed through the Names Editor. See “Names” on page 53.
1.4 Configurations for Multiple Routers
There are several ways of configuring a series of routers depending on your requirements.
For all configurations, Workbench can be connected during operation as a soft panel (GUI)
control interface.
Fig 5. shows three routers that are configured so that there is one matrix. The first router is a
master, and has a Nucleus controller. The second router, which is connected to the first using
SW-P-02 Out protocol, has a Nebula controller and is also a master. The third router has a
slave control card, so receives its routing information from the Nebula master controller. The
routers are connected to the master through serial connections. Control panels can be
connected either serially, or via Ethernet with the Nucleus controller.
Workbench
Matrix 1
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Fig 5.
Master
(Nebula)
Level 2
Slave
(Nebula)
Level 3
Single Matrix, Multiple Levels
Fig 6. shows three routers, and each has its own matrix. Each router is a master, and has a
Nucleus controller. The panels are connected to each master through serial connections.
Each router has one or more levels and operates completely independently.
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Introduction
Workbench
Matrix 1
Matrix 2
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Matrix 3
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Level 2
Level 2
Level 3
Fig 6.
Multiple Matrix, Multiple Levels
Fig 7. shows three routers, and each has its own matrix. Each router is a master, and has a
Nucleus controller. The panels are connected to each master through an external 2330
controller. Each router has one or more levels.
Workbench
2330
Matrix 1
Matrix 2
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Level 2
Level 2
Matrix 3
Master
(Nucleus)
Level 1
Level 3
Fig 7.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Multiple Matrix, Multiple Levels
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Introduction
1.5 Protocols
Workbench control systems employ a large number of native and third-party protocols. The
following Snell protocols are used in Workbench systems:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
DCCP — The Device Configuration and Control Protocol is the primary IP protocol
used to configure and control hardware from Workbench.
•
General Switcher (SW-P-02) — Available on RS232, RS422, or Ethernet in most
routers, and is used by 2330 serial router ports for direct control of a router by
numerical source and destination. Also router status can be interrogated for missing
or faulty modules.
•
General Remote (SW-P-08) — Available on RS232, RS422, or Ethernet for
communication with a control system, or interfacing with automation (third party in
some cases). Allows interrogation of source and destination names, and supports all
on-line editor messages and diagnostics.
•
Multidrop (SW-P0-6) — RS422 for communication with a control system allowing up
to 16 devices from one multi-drop string. A range of BPX, Dial-up and LCD panels can
be connected to the system. UMDs are not directly supported.
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Installation
2. Installation
2.1 System Requirements
The Workbench software can run with any screen resolution. However, a resolution of 1920 x
1080 is recommended for Run mode and screen design, and a minimum of 1280 x 1024 for
Workbench general configuration.
Specification:
27B
Note:
•
A PC running MS Windows 7 64-bit (Windows 7 32-bit and XP SP3 or higher 32-bit or
64-bit are also supported)
•
A multi-core processor (>2.1 GHz)
•
1 GB RAM minimum (>2 GB RAM recommended)
•
Support for DirectX 9 graphics with a WDDM driver, 128 MB of graphics memory
(minimum), Pixel Shader 2.0 and 32 bits per pixel
For Windows 7, Administration rights are required for installing Workbench.
System performance is dependent on the PC’s available resources. The PC should be as
“clean” as possible of other running processes.
2.1.1 Minimum Installation Requirements
For a distributed installation, the minimum installation requirement consists of the mandatory
items and the LiveRunner component, see Table 1.
For a standalone installation, the minimum installation consists of the mandatory items and
the SQL Server Express component.
2.2 Install Workbench
Note:
During the installation, do not close the installation wizard or the Workbench Install Helper.
Wait until the entire setup process is complete before exiting the install wizard and
Workbench Install Helper.
1.
If upgrading, ensure that no Workbench components are running, for example,
LiveRunner.
2.
Insert the Workbench DVD into the CD-ROM drive. The installation application starts
automatically. If it does not, browse to the installation CD-ROM and click
WorkbenchInstaller.exe.
3.
If the Install Checker screen displays, Administration rights may not have been
granted on the PC.
Fig 8.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Install Checker Screen
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Installation
To run the Configuration Helper, open:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Configuration Helper
•
Fig 9.
4.
Right-click on Configuration Helper and select “Run as administrator”.
Run as Administrator
When using Windows 7, the User Account Control screen displays when starting the
installer.
Fig 10. User Account Control
Issue 1 Rev 4
5.
Click Yes to continue.
6.
The Windows Installer screen may display during the installation process.
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Installation
Fig 11. Windows Installer Screen
7.
Click OK. The installation continues.
8.
The end user license agreement (EULA) displays.
Fig 12. License Agreement
9.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Read through the license, and click I Agree.
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Installation
10. The Choose Components screen displays.
Fig 13. Choose Components
11. Select the Workbench components to install and clear those that are not required for
installation. Table 1. lists the available options.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Greyed-out (
) items are mandatory. The installer checks to see whether the item is
already present, and only installs it if it is not found.
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Component
Description
MSI 4.5
Microsoft Windows Installer 4.5
Required
for Client
Required
for Server
9
9
NET Framework 3. 5 SP1 NET Framework 3 5 SP1
9
9
NET Framework 4
NET Framework 4
9
9
Visual C++ 2010
Visual C++ Redistributable
9
9
Windows Powershell
Microsoft's task automation framework
that integrates with the .NET
Framework
9
9
9
SQLDBTool
Used to backup/restore/create
Databases. Can be used in place of
the SQL Management Studio
Core Files
Core Installation files
9
Workbench
Design and configuration files
9
Live Runner
Live control and monitoring
9
Rules Server
Rules server application
Logging Tools
Tools and utilities for viewing and
gathering log messages
Example Resources
Example screen files and database
Controllers
Windows and embedded controller
executable files
Pbak Deploy Tool
Used to upgrade software on
embedded controllers
Documentation
Manual and Getting Started guide in
PDF format
Table 1.
Note:
Installation
Installation Components
For SQL installation on a server, refer to the readme.rtf file on the DVD
(MCM\Resources\Installers\readme.rtf) for the various dependencies.
12. Click Next.
13. The Install Location screen displays.
Fig 14. Install Location
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Installation
14. Either accept the default destination or browse to a new destination.
15. Click Install. The selected components begin to install.
Note:
During the installation, do not close the installation wizard or the Configuration Helper. Wait
until the entire setup process is complete before exiting the install wizard and Configuration
Helper.
16. Once the installation is almost complete, the Configuration Helper displays in a new
window.
Fig 15.
Configuration Helper
The Configuration Helper indicates the status of each of the Workbench components.
The components can be in one of three states:
•
Green: The component installed correctly.
•
Orange: Optional item that has not been installed. (If the Computer component is
Orange it indicates that the screen resolution is not high enough).
•
Red (yellow during update): Required by Workbench but not yet installed.
17. If the Configuration Helper indicates that all components are installed correctly
(green), click OK. The Configuration Helper screen closes, and the Completing
installation screen displays.
If the Configuration Helper displays components that have not installed (red) these
need to be manually installed before continuing. See Manually Installing Components
on page 20.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
If Workbench is run while there are components marked as red, an error message
displays.
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Installation
2.3 Finish the Installation
Fig 16. Completing Installation
To stop Workbench starting immediately after installation, uncheck the Launch Workbench
checkbox.
•
Click Finish.
See Start Workbench on page 28.
2.4 Manually Installing Components
2.4.1 Configuration Helper Display
The Configuration Helper graphically shows the installation status of the Workbench
Components.
The Configuration Helper is also available from the Windows Start Menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Configuration Helper
Each component has information about its status.
•
Click on
to expand each component’s details.
•
Click on
to close the component details.
The different components are listed in Table 2.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Installation
Computer
Displays information about the PC on which the Workbench is
installed.
Microsoft Data Access
Components (MDAC)
Displays information about the MDAC such as installed yes/no,
Version number and whether or not the MDAC installation
meets the requirements of Workbench.
Visual C++ Redistributable Displays information about the Visual C++ installation.
SQL server [1]
Displays information about the SQL server such as installed
yes/no, version number and type of installation.
SQL Server[1] Management Displays information about the SQL Server Management
Studio
Studio.
Workbench Database
Table 2.
[1]
Note:
Displays information about the Workbench Database and
allows connection changes.
Workbench Components
Not required for distributed systems.
Until connecting to a Workbench Database, this particular component displays red as,
required but not installed. See Fig 17.
2.4.2 Support
If problems occur with the installation at any time contact customer support
(customersupport@snellgroup.com).
•
Click Copy to Clipboard, and paste the current screen information into the email.
2.4.3 Computer
Displays information about the PC on which the Workbench is installed.
Fig 17. Installed Computer Component
If this component installs but displays orange, check that the PC conforms to the system
requirements at the beginning of this guide. See System Requirements on page 14.
.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Installation
2.4.4 Microsoft Data Access Components
Displays information about the Microsoft Data Access components, for example, version
number and installation status.
Fig 18. Installed Microsoft Data Access Components
This component is required to run the Workbench. If the component displays as red the
installation was incomplete. Restart the installation.
2.4.5 Visual C++ Redistributable
Displays information about the Visual C++ Redistributable component, for example, version
number and installation status.
Fig 19. Installed Visual C++ Redistributable Component
This component is required to run the Workbench. If the component displays as red the
installation was incomplete. Restart the installation.
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2.4.6 SQL Server
Important:
The version of SQL Server on the installation DVD is 2008 R2. If an existing SQL Server
2005 is available, it is not essential to upgrade. However, the sample database on the
installation DVD is version 2008 R2 and cannot be imported to the 2005 or 2008 version.
If any version of SQL server is installed, the Configuration Helper displays this component as
installed (green).
The SQL Server is optional. For a server installation where the database server is elsewhere
on the network, do not install this component.
Fig 20. SQL Server Component
•
To install the SQL Server or to upgrade from the 2005 version on a standalone
installation, click Click here to install the SQL Server Express Edition.
An install wizard starts and runs through several screens installing both the SQL
Server and SQL Server Management Studio. Do not interrupt the install wizard.
Once the wizard is complete, both the SQL Server and SQL Server Management
Studio components display green.
2.4.7 SQL Server Management Studio
•
To install the SQL Server Management Studio on a server installation, click Click
here to install the SQL Server Management Studio Express Edition.
For a standalone PC this SQL Server Management Studio component is also installed
automatically when the SQL Server wizard is run. See SQL Server on page 23.
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2.4.8 Workbench Database
Important:
The Workbench database must be installed on the server. Therefore, unless already
installed, install SQL Server Express and SQL Server Management Studio (or optional
SQLDBTool) on the server.
Workbench requires a working connection to the Workbench database. Until connected to the
database, the Install Helper displays the connection as red (required by Workbench, but not
yet installed).
Fig 21. Workbench Database
There are two options for connecting to a Workbench database:
2.4.8.1
•
Create a new blank database.
•
Connect to an existing database either locally or on the network.
Create a New Workbench Database
To create a new Workbench Database:
1.
Expand the Workbench Database section.
2.
Click Click here to create databases and permissions. A command window
displays briefly and connects to the database.
3.
From the Install Helper, click the Refresh button.
The Workbench Database displays green (installed correctly).
2.4.8.2
Connect to an Existing Workbench Database
If an existing Workbench database is available, provide the file path, and login credentials:
1.
Expand the Workbench Database section. Click Click here to alter database
connection settings.
The Connection String Editor dialog box displays.
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Fig 22. Workbench Database Connection Settings
2.
Note:
Either, type the server details, or edit the Database Connection String.
The Server Name can be an IP address or a name. When using SQL Express (the default
for a standalone PC) the Server Name must also contain an SQL instance name at the
end. For example, the default server name is typically “localhost\SQLEXPRESS”
3.
If using a mirrored server, enter Failover Partner backup server details. These details
may be added later. See “Add a Mirrored Server” on page 25.
4.
Click OK.
5.
From the Install Helper, click the Refresh button.
The Workbench Database displays green (installed correctly).
2.4.9 Add a Mirrored Server
When using a mirrored server, all changes to the main Workbench configuration database are
copied to the backup database on the mirrored server. In the event of the main database
being unavailable (through network failure, for example) the backup database on the mirrored
server automatically becomes available.
To add a mirrored server to an existing setup:
1.
Start the Configuration Helper. The Configuration Helper is also available from the
Windows Start Menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Configuration Helper
2.
Expand the Workbench Database section.
3.
Click Click here to alter database connection settings.
The Connection String Editor dialog box displays.
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4.
Enter the mirrored server details in the Failover Partner field.
5.
Click OK.
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2.4.10 Create a New Database Using SQLDBTool
The SQLDBTool simplifies the management of databases. It allows for the creation of new
blank databases and the backup and restoring of existing databases.
The SQLDBTool is available from the Windows Start Menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | SQLDBTOOL | SQLDBTool
Fig 23. SQLDBTool Screen
1.
Select the server name from the drop-down list at the top of the screen.
2.
Click Connect and Get Databases.
3.
Type a name for the new database in the Target Database field.
4.
In the Operation section of the screen ensure that the Backup Mode radio button is
selected.
5.
Browse to the path of where the backup files for the database are to be saved.
6.
Click Create Database.
No further configuration of this database is required. The Workbench application configures
the remainder of the database settings and builds all of the tables.
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2.4.11 Create a Blank Database Using SQLMS
To create a new database SQL Server Express and SQL Server Management Studio must be
installed on the server.
To create a new database:
1.
Start SQL Server Management Studio. Confirm the server name and login
credentials.
2.
Right-click the databases node in the object explorer and select New Database.
3.
Type the name of the database in the Database name field (the default is
Workbench).
4.
Click OK.
No further configuration of this database is required. The Workbench application configures
the remainder of the database settings and builds all of the tables.
2.4.12 Install Sample Databases
Important:
The sample databases on the installation DVD are SQL version 2008 R2 and cannot be
imported to 2005. To install the Workbench databases, upgrade to SQL Server 2008 R2.
When a Workbench database is converted to SQL Server 2008 R2, it is not possible to
revert back to SQL Server 2005. Therefore, if using an existing version of the Workbench
database, make a full backup before upgrading.
The sample databases each have several example controllers and hardware panels, and are
on the installation DVD. To install the sample database:
1.
Browse to the installation CD-ROM and open the Nucleus Default Configurations
folder. The example databases are in .zip folders.
2.
Right-click the required .zip file and select Extract All… the Extraction Wizard
displays. Click Next.
3.
Browse to an appropriate location for the files, and click Next. A .bak file is extracted
to the selected location. Click Finish.
4.
Make sure that Workbench is NOT open.
5.
Open SQL server management express and connect to the server.
6.
Expand the Databases folder. Right-click on the Workbench database and select
Tasks | Restore | Database.
7.
In the Source for restore section, select From device and click the
button. The Specify Backup dialog box displays, click Add.
8.
Locate the .bak file, select it and then click OK.
9.
In the Specify Backup dialog box, click OK.
(browse)
10. Select the file from the Select the backup sets to restore section of the Restore
Database dialog box.
11. In the Select a page section, click Options. Select Overwrite the existing database
and Leave the database ready to use…(RESTORE WITH RECOVERY).
12. Edit the paths and filenames from the default, accordingly, if required.
13. Click OK, and close SQL server management express. The first time that Workbench
is started, update the database.
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2.5 Start Workbench
When the Install Helper shows that all the required components have installed correctly, start
Workbench.
To start the Workbench, do one of the following:
•
Double-click the Workbench icon on the desktop.
•
Start the program from the Windows Start menu.
The path to Workbench in the Start menu is:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Workbench
The first time that Workbench is started, the database needs to be updated. Fig 24. shows the
initial screen. This screen displays when a new version of Workbench is installed, or the
database structure has changed. For example, if one of the sample databases is installed.
Important:
If this dialog box displays, but no changes have been made, contact the system
administrator.
Fig 24. Update Database
To view the differences between the databases, click the
button. The Database Analyzer
displays, indicating the parts of the database that will change when the database updates,
see Fig 25.
Note:
Workbench cannot start without updating the database.
Fig 25. Database Analyzer Example
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Click Update Database.
2.
Click OK. The login screen displays, see Fig 26.
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Fig 26. Login Screen
2.6 Log In to Workbench
When Workbench is first installed, there is only are two users, see Table 3.
User
Password
admin
admin
user
Table 3.
Note:
(none required)
Default Users
If no keyboard is attached, click on the keyboard button to display an on-screen keyboard.
1.
Type a user name.
2.
Type a password, if required.
3.
Click Login or press the Return key. The home screen displays, see Fig 27.
Fig 27. Initial Workbench Administration Screen
See “General Operation” on page 32.
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2.7 LiveRunner
LiveRunner is an optional component of the Workbench installation. LiveRunner is the live
control and monitoring (run mode) client allowing a screen to be run without running
Workbench.
LiveRunner is available from the Windows Start Menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | LiveRunner
The user Login Window displays, see Fig 28.
Fig 28. LiveRunner Login
Note:
1.
Type a user name.
2.
Type a password, if required.
3.
Click Login or press the Return key.
An Initial Screen must be assigned to each user otherwise an error message displays
when logging into LiveRunner. This error also displays if trying to enter Run mode.
2.7.1 Command Line Parameters
Command line parameters can be added to the shortcut from LiveRunner. The options are:
-username (or -user or -u) followed by a Workbench user name.
-password (or -pass or -p) followed by the matching Workbench password.
-fullscreen (or -f) = Run in full screen mode
To create a shortcut:
1.
From Windows, browse to the Workbench installation folder...
\Workbench\LiveRunner.exe.
2.
Create a shortcut to LiveRunner.exe.
3.
Right-click on the shortcut and select Properties.
4.
At the end of the Target (after the ...LiveRunner. exe”), type the required
command-line parameters.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Double-click the shortcut to open the screen.
Example Shortcut:
"C:\Program Files (x86)\Snell\Workbench\LiveRunner.exe -database
"server=localhost\SQLExpress; uid=WorkbenchUser; pwd=probel; database=Centra demo"
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Installation
2.8 Pbak DeployTool
2.8.1 Description
The Pbak Deploy tool is used to transfer configuration files to the removable drive on the
2330 and 2450 controller cards. Because other Snell products use the Pbak Deploy tool, the
Dat and On Time tools are not relevant to Workbench.
Important:
Whenever Workbench is upgraded, transfer the new configuration file to the controller.
To open Pbak Deploy Tool, from the Windows Start menu browse to:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Pbak Deploy Tool
Fig 29. Pbak Deploy Tool
2.8.2 Configuration
Set the Target Drive.
1.
Select File | Configuration
2.
Select the Target Drive from the drop-down list.
3.
Set the RTB directory on the computer. If the default folders are installed, browse to
the folders located in the Workbench installation folder... \MCM\Controllers.
The DAT directory and On time tools directory are not relevant for Workbench
configuration.
Note:
Long network paths should be avoided, otherwise Pbak Deploy may not work correctly.
4.
Click OK.
2.9 Configuration Helper Utility
The Configuration Helper can be accessed from the Windows Start menu, in case further
configuration is necessary after the initial installation:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Configuration Helper
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General Operation
3. General Operation
3.1 Screen Layout
3.1.1 Home Screen
The home screen displays large icons for easy access to the main modes of the Workbench.
Fig 30. Home Screen
A toolbar at the top of the screen is available in all modes (except Run mode which displays in
a new window), and provides quick access from one mode to another without the need to go
to the Home Screen each time. In addition, each mode can be selected from the drop-down
menu displayed when clicking on the main menu button
.
The following modes are available from the Workbench home screen:
Run
displays a new window and displays the interactive screen that has
been designed and configured in Workbench
Design
provides the features for constructing interactive panels and screens
Configuration
setup the various controllers necessary for screen interaction, and
control of the associated hardware
Administration
define the user privileges and role settings
Rules
define rules that must be fulfilled before actions can be taken
Architecture
capture information on system setup: devices, their inputs and outputs,
the cables linking them together and information on the controllers
controlling them
Table 4.
•
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Home Screen Modes
Click on the Snell logo
at the top-right corner of the home screen to open a
window displaying the software version, and links to other useful information.
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General Operation
3.1.2 Mode Windows
The layout of the mode windows is such that a main working area is displayed on the left of
the screen, and menus, or dockable editor windows and tabs, relating to that particular mode
are located to the right of the main working area.
3.1.2.1
Docking Windows
Arrange the dockable editors and tabs in Workbench to suit your working practices. Editors
can either be floating windows, or docked in different positions around the working area.
If an editor is dragged to a new position without docking, it stays as a floating window.
To move an editor window or tab into a new position:
Note:
1.
Click and drag the editor. The selected window shows as a colored rectangle, and
several position markers show the possible docking positions.
2.
Drag the window over the position markers. A colored rectangle indicates the
destination position of each marker. Release the editor to dock it in the required
position.
Each window as well as the main screen area displays a set of position markers if the
selected window is dragged over it. So, a window may be docked within the main screen
area, within the area of, or directly over, an existing editor window.
Docking an editor window directly over an existing window, causes the two windows to be
tabbed allowing selection of either of them.
Fig 31. shows how to move an editor to a new docked position.
Fig 31. Docking Windows
Editors can be pinned to the edge of the screen so that they become tabbed windows.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
To pin an editor or tab to the right-hand edge of the window, click the
•
To restore the editor, click the
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General Operation
Fig 32. Pin Windows
3.1.2.2
Note:
Closing an Editor
•
To close an editor, click the
button.
•
To restore an editor, click the
button and select the editor to restore. The editor
displays back in the position from where it was deleted.
If other editors have been moved since deleting an editor, the restored editor displays as
close to the previous position as possible.
3.2 Run Screen
When all the configuration, design of panels, and actions are defined, the Run screen is used
to control the associated hardware via the interactive screen that has been created.
•
Click
to open the Run screen.
The Run Screen has no menus. It can only be used as defined, and then closed when
not in use.
•
To close the Run screen, click the
button, or press F4.
This does not close Workbench.
3.3 Change User
•
To log in as a different user, click the Logout button
The login screen displays, see Fig 33.
Fig 33. Login Screen
1.
Type a user name.
2.
Type a password, if required.
3.
Click Login or press the Return key.
The home screen displays.
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General Operation
3.4 Log
•
To show the log file, click the Log button
The log file, showing all online events since the start of the current session, displays in
a Windows Notepad window.
Fig 34. Exit Screen
3.5 Exit Workbench
•
Click the
button.
A dialog box prompting for confirmation displays.
Fig 35. Exit Confirmation Screen
•
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Click Yes to exit, or No to return to Workbench.
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Administration
4. Administration
4.1 Description
Administration of Workbench: how to add new users, roles, and permissions. Users belong to
groups based upon roles, which are assigned permissions that support their operational
needs. For example, access for all control operators, or engineers may be grouped together.
•
A Role defines the functions of a group of users.
•
A User defines a system user belonging to one or more roles.
When Workbench is first installed, there are two users, see Table 5.
User
Password
Roles
admin
admin
Everyone
Administrators
user
(none required)
Everyone
Users
Administrators
Table 5.
Default Users
4.2 Users
The Users tab is for adding and deleting users from the Workbench system. It also lists the
roles of each user.
Fig 36. Users
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4.2.1 Add a New User
To add a new user:
1.
From the Home screen or menu, click Administration.
2.
If it is not already displayed, click the Users tab.
3.
Click Add new user. A new user icon is added to the list of users.
4.
In the User Name field, type a user name (the user name is not case-sensitive).
Set a new password:
1.
Click the Change button. A Change Password dialog box displays. In the Password
field, type a password, and then type it again in the Confirm field. The passwords
typed in the two fields must be identical. Passwords are case-sensitive. Blank
passwords are allowed, but are not recommended. Click OK.
2.
If required, select an Avatar. This is an image that represents the user. Click the
Choose image button, and browse to the image.
3.
Select an Initial screen. When the user logs on to Workbench, and selects Run, this
is the screen that displays. See “Screens Editor” on page 110.
A second screen may be setup such that it runs on a right-click of the mouse in run
mode. If required, check the Enable right-click screen checkbox, and select a
screen from the drop-down list.
Note:
If this is the initial set up of users and there are no screens available, ignore this step and
assign an initial screen later.
4.
Note:
If the Auto Login option is selected, to change user, click the Home button and click Log
Out. Enter a new username.
5.
Note:
If the Workbench user name is identical to the windows login, select Auto login to log
the user in to Workbench without the need to enter a user name.
To start Workbench in run mode when logging in, select Navigates directly to run
mode.
An Initial Screen must be assigned otherwise an error message displays when Run mode
is started.
6.
To open screens in edit mode in the Design area, select Automatically load screens
ready for editing.
4.2.2 Delete a User
To delete a user:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Select the user from the list of users on the left.
2.
Click Delete User.
3.
In the confirmation Window, click Yes.
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Administration
4.3 Roles
The Roles tab is for the administrator to assign permissions for each user depending on
operational needs. For example, roles can be created for central control room operators or
system administrators.
Fig 37. Roles
4.3.1 Default Roles
For a new installation, there are three Roles, see Table 6.
Role
Permissions
Memberships
Everyone
No permissions are assigned
admin
user
Users
Run Mode only
user
Administrators
Soft panel design
Run Mode
Configuration
Administration
admin
user
Table 6.
Default Roles
4.3.2 Add a New Role
To add a new role:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Click Add new role a new role named ‘New Role 0’ is added to the list of roles on the
left side of the window.
2.
In the Role Name field type a name for the new role. For example, Operators.
3.
If required, type a brief description of the role in the Description field.
4.
Assign Permissions to the role.
5.
Permissions to Workbench system functions are granted to roles, as opposed to
specific users. The Permissions section on the Roles tab has two lists, Allowed and
Available. Table 7. lists the actions for each permission:
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Administration
Permission
Action
Administration
Provides access to the administration functions.
Advanced Design
Advanced Design provides access to additional properties in the
design section. For example, visibility of button code information
when working with hardware panels.
Note: The Advanced buttons on the design toolbar are not related
to this permission. That is, if a role has the Soft Panel Design
permission, but does not have the Advanced Design permission,
the Advanced buttons are still available.
Configuration
Permits viewing and editing of the controller Configuration section.
Master
The Master permission is intended to allow the user to perform
operations that override other user's actions. It is currently only
used for routing panels, specifically destination protect
functionality. A user with Master permission can take over
protection of a destination protected by another user.
Push Configuration
Allows configuration settings to be pushed to a controller.
Pushing a configuration to a controller can have serious
consequences if not done correctly, so this permission should be
limited to a small number of users.
Rules
Permits access to the Rules section.
Run mode
Permits access to the Run mode.
Soft panel design
Permits access to the Soft Panel design (sufficient for most
designers).
System Architecture
Permits access to the System Architecture section.
Table 7.
Permissions
4.3.3 Membership
Once roles and their associated permissions are defined, assign individual users to the roles.
The Users not in Role list shows those users that are not members of the selected role, but
that may be assigned to it.
To add members to a role:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
In the list of roles on the left side of the window, click on the role to assign members
to.
2.
Use the arrow buttons (< and >) to move members to and from the role as required.
A user can belong to any number of Roles (the permissions are combined).
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Administration
4.4 Screen Permissions
The Screen Permissions tab is for assigning access to the different screens on the system.
Permission can be allocated to a Role or to individual users.
Fig 38. Screen Permissions
Permission has three levels:
•
Read: The basic level of access, allowing read only permission. It is required for
visibility in Run mode.
•
Edit: Enables screen modification in Design mode.
•
Delete: Allows the user to remove the screen.
To allocate a permission, check the appropriate box.
Selecting Edit automatically selects Read permissions, and selecting Delete automatically
selects Read and Edit permissions.
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Administration
4.5 Controller Permissions
The Controller Permissions tab is for assigning access to the different controllers on the
system. Permission can be allocated to a Role or to individual users.
Fig 39. Controller Permissions
Permission has three levels:
•
Read: The basic level of access, allowing read only permission. It is required for
visibility in Run mode.
•
Push: Allows the user to push a configuration to the controller.
•
Pull: Allows the user to pull the configuration from the controller.
To allocate a permission, check the appropriate box.
4.6 Locking
Any screen or controller that is being edited is locked automatically. The Locking tab shows a
list of users that currently have screens or controllers locked for editing (including users that
have logged out of Workbench without saving a screen that was being edited). If a screen or
controller has been inadvertently locked, select the item and click the Unlock Selected
button.
Click Refresh list to update the list of users that have locked screens or controllers. Since
this list is not automatically updated, it should be done before doing anything else.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Unlocking a screen or controller does not give a warning to the user that has the lock.
Ensure that the screen or controller is not currently being edited or any changes may be
overridden.
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4.7 Data Management
The Data Management tab is used for backing up and restoring Workbench screens, and for
repairing the database.
The tab also shows the path to the current database, and licensing details.
4.7.1 Screen Management
To backup screens:
1.
Click Backup Screens.
2.
Browse to the folder into which the backup files are to be saved and then click OK.
To restore screens:
Note:
1.
Click Restore Screens.
2.
A warning screen displays stating that all existing objects will be deleted. All changes
that have been made since the backup file was created will be lost.
3.
If this is acceptable, click OK. If not, click No.
It is possible to export individual screens from the Design screen, Individual Controllers
from Configuration or the entire database using SQL Management Studio. For information
about performing database backup and restoration from SQL Management Studio, refer to
the SQL Management Studio online help.
4.7.2 Database Repair
These functions are used to ‘clean’ the database and purge unused items.
Important:
The following functions change the database, and cannot be undone. Ensure the database
has been backed up before using these functions.
To remove unassigned widgets and behaviors with no association:
1.
Click on the Remove Orphaned Objects button.
2.
A warning screen displays.
3.
If this is acceptable, click OK. If not, click No.
4.
When complete, a summary screen displays indicating the number of changes made.
To fix widgets that have an invalid behavior, for example, add a passive behavior to widgets
with a null behavior:
1.
Click on the Fix Widget Behaviors button.
A window displays showing the screens that contain null behavior widgets.
Issue 1 Rev 4
2.
Select the screens to be fixed, and click OK.
3.
When complete, a summary screen displays indicating the number of changes made.
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Administration
4.8 Sequence Sets
Sequence Sets are required for soft panel configuration. Sequence Sets group the key entry
sequences that are required to enter sources and destinations via keypads.
To add a sequence set:
•
Click on the Add button.
Key sequences are defined either on the fly using a dial-up keypad on a soft panel, or in the
Key Sequences Editor in Design mode. See “Key Sequences” on page 121.
To remove a sequence set:
•
Select a sequence set from the list, and click the Remove button.
4.9 Identity
The Identity tab lists the Machines, External Clients and Internal Clients that are present on
the network, and are linked to Workbench. It identifies which soft panel client has protected a
route.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Machines
PCs running Workbench router configuration software
External Clients
PCs running Workbench soft panels
Internal Clients
Hardware control panels connected directly to the router controller
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Configuration
5. Configuration
5.1 Description
Configure controllers, devices and panels for use with Workbench. Configurations are stored
as databases. Sample databases are available to quickly get started with Workbench.
To open configuration mode, log in as a user with Configuration permissions, see section 4.3.
5.2 Screen Layout
Configured controllers display in the main part of the window. To the right is a menu for
configuring, saving, resetting, etc. the controllers. These features are covered later in this
section. A pop-up menu is also available with a right-click when a controller is selected.
5.2.1 Sample Controllers
If a sample database is installed (see Appendix F.), the configuration screen lists several
controllers, see Fig 40.
Fig 40. Default Nucleus Controllers
5.2.2 Networks
The database supplied on the Workbench install CD lists numerous router controllers. Each
controller has a default IP address.
Each router has the router controller software running on the controller card. The controller
has a default fixed IP address. If the router is connected directly, or through a local network,
Workbench automatically identifies the controller, and shows it as connected correctly.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
If the fixed IP addresses of the physical controller causes a conflict on the network, change
both the IP address of the physical router controller and the IP address of the controller
listed in Workbench.
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5.2.3 Controller Status
The configuration screen shows the status of each controller. Icons show whether the
controller is connected, and whether the databases in the physical controller and SQL server
match. When using dual controllers, it shows which is the Primary controller and which one of
the two controllers is currently active.
5.2.3.1
Connection Status
Icon
Description
Controller: Disconnected. Workbench is trying to establish a connection.
Controller: Connection Closed. No controller is found at the given IP address, and
no connection is made. Change the IP address, see section 5.9.1.
Controller: Connected but not ready.
Controller: Connected. A controller is present and is connected correctly.
Controller: Negotiating. Workbench is performing preliminary communication with
the controller.
Controller: Initializing. Workbench is waiting for the controller to initialize.
Controller: Negotiation Failed. A controller is present at the given IP address, but
the controller is not valid. Change the configuration settings, see section 5.9.1.
Table 8.
Note:
5.2.3.2
Controller Connection Status
If there is an IP address conflict, change the IP address of the physical Nucleus controller
and change the Workbench controller settings, see section 5.9.1.
Checksum Status
The checksum icons show whether the database in the physical controller matches the
database on the SQL server. Table 9. lists the Checksum status icons.
Icon
Description
Configuration: Match. Both databases are identical.
Configuration: Unknown. Unable to calculate configuration checksum on the
controller.
Note: RollCall does not calculate a checksum.
Configuration: Mismatch. Configuration on the controller is different to the
configuration in the database.
Table 9.
5.2.3.3
Checksum Status
Primary Status
When using dual controllers the Primary column indicates which of the two controllers is the
Primary Controller. The Secondary controller of a pair is left blank in this column.
Important:
Swapping controllers loses the behavior for any hardware or software panels that
references the Primary controller. Reconfigure the panels to reference the new Primary
controller.
Single controllers do not require a Primary status and are left blank.
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5.2.3.4
Configuration
Active Status
The Active column shows whether the status of the controller is Active, Unknown, or in
Standby.
When updating the configuration of controller pairs, push the new configuration to the
controller with Standby status (initially this is the Secondary controller), test the changes and,
either revert to a previous state, or update to the Active controller (initially this is the Primary
controller).
Note:
5.2.3.5
Information does not pass between controllers. To make both controllers match, click the
Copy config to partner button and then push the configuration to the controllers.
Partner Config Matches
For dual controllers, the Partner Config Matches icons indicate whether the databases match
for the Primary and Secondary controllers, see section 5.9.5.
Icon
Description
Both databases match.
There are differences between the databases.
Table 10.
5.2.3.6
Partner Status
Controller Version
This column shows the controller version and the date that it was last changed. This is useful
for determining which database to update if there is a mismatch between dual controllers, see
section 5.2.3.5.
Note:
Workbench and the controller version must be compatible.
5.3 Menu
The following menu items are available at the right side of the screen:
Add Controller...
Add a new controller. See “Add a New Controller” on
page 48.
Edit Controller Config...
Edit the configuration of the selected controller. See “Edit
Controller Configuration” on page 51.
Edit IP Address or Name...
Edit the IP address and name of the selected controller. See
“Edit Controller IP Address or Name” on page 96.
Generic Editor...
Open the Generic Editor. See “Generic Editor” on page 94.
Online Editor...
Open the Online Editor. See “Online Editor” on page 95.
Delete Selected Controllers Delete the selected controller, or several controllers if a group
selection has been made.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Push Config to
Controller(s)
Push the current configuration to all selected controllers. See
“Push and Pull Configuration” on page 97.
Pull Config from
Controller(s)
Pull the configuration from a controller. See “Push and Pull
Configuration” on page 97.
Export Configuration...
Export the configuration of the current controller to a .zip file.
Import Configuration...
Import a configuration file (.zip) to the selected controller.
Export All...
Export the configuration of all controllers to a .zip file.
Note: The exported file contains controller configuration, and
is not a complete database backup.
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Configuration
Import All...
Import a configuration file (.zip) to all controllers.
Reset
Resets the selected controller. See “Reset” on page 98.
Pair Controllers
Pair two similar controllers to give a dual redundancy. See
“Dual Redundancy” on page 98.
Unpair Controllers
Unpair two paired controllers.
Swap Pair
Set the Primary controller to be the Secondary controller, and
the Secondary controller to be the Primary controller. See
“Swap Controllers” on page 99.
Copy config to partner
Copy the configuration of one controller to the other in the
pair, ensuring the configuration matches. See “Copy Config to
Partner” on page 99.
Refresh
Refreshes the list of controllers, and enables/disables menu
functions, as applicable.
Connections
List the active controller connections. See “Connections” on
page 100.
Oid Rewriter...
Change OID references. See “OID Rewrite Helper” on
page 100.
Snapshot Editor...
Save the current crosspoint configuration to a snapshot file,
or import a saved snapshot configuration file. See “Snapshot
Editor” on page 101.
Delete RollCall Cache
Clears the cache of RollCall menu set data. See “Delete
RollCall Cache” on page 104.
With a controller selected, a right-click displays some of the above menu items in a pop-up
menu, plus the following additional menu items:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Find Usages...
Opens a new window listing the screen and rules that
reference the selected controller.
Convert to 246x
When replacing an existing Nucleus 2450 controller with a
new Nucleus 246x controller, convert the 2450 configuration
to that of a 246x without having to reconfigure the new
controller. See “Convert a Nucleus 2450 Controller to a 246x
Controller” on page 104.
Create Default Screen
Opens the New Screen Wizard for panels. See “Screens” on
page 108.
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Configuration
5.4 Configuring Controllers
A controller is a hardware platform that hosts one or more driver interfaces. A driver is a
software implementation of an interface over serial, IP, or GPI that communicates with a PC,
router, or modular frame.
Note:
Set up a controller to match the system requirements. That is, the configuration of the
routers, panels, third-party interfaces, and so on, in the system.
5.4.1 Add a New Controller
1.
Click Add Controller and the Controller Wizard displays.
Fig 41. Select Controller Type
2.
3.
Issue 1 Rev 4
From the drop-down list, click on the relevant controller type:
•
Nucleus Controller (2450): Configured as a Router controller, and Panels device.
A Nucleus 2450 Controller is installed inside a physical router (usually as a pair).
•
RollCall Gateway.
•
Centra Controller (2330/246x/PC): Generic controller that can be configured for a
Router, or any combination of the devices available.
Click on the appropriate radio button according to the configuration required.
•
I have a controller available on the network and I need to copy the
configuration to my local settings - to add a controller and use the existing
configuration from a router.
•
I want to create a new configuration to push to a controller that is on the
network - to add a controller for a new router.
•
I am working offline and want to create a new controller to use at a later
time - to configure a controller for future use.
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5.4.1.1
Configuration
To Configure a New Router on the Network:
1.
If not already selected, select the second radio button I want to create a new
configuration to push to a controller that is on the network.
2.
Click Next.
Fig 42. Set Controller Name
Note:
3.
Type a name for the controller.
4.
Edit the IP Address to match that set in the controller.
If the controller is running on the local PC, use the localhost loop-back IP address of
127.0.0.1. The system does not accept ‘localhost’ as an IP address. If the IP address is set
to 127.0.0.1, other computers cannot access the controller. To enable other computers to
access the controller, use the PC’s actual IP address.
5.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Edit the Port number (Centra Controller only). Nucleus Controllers and RollMap
Gateways have the ports automatically set to 3000 and 2050 respectively.
If the IP address and Port number are unknown:
•
For the Nucleus Controller, extract the CompactFlash from the controller and place
it into a card reader to view the IP address from the Network.ini file. Refit the
CompactFlash back into the controller.
•
For the Centra Controller view the config.xml file that is on the USB memory stick
for the controller.
6.
If configuring a pair of controllers, check the Create Pair checkbox, and enter the
details for the second controller.
7.
Click Next.
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Configuration
Fig 43. Set Router Type
8.
Note:
Click the radio button Use a Factory Or User Default.
No Default is used when installing a new system similar to a previously installed one. The
existing configuration is then copied as a basis for the configuration of the new controller.
9.
From the Router Type drop-down list, click the relevant router type.
10. From the Router Configuration drop-down list, click on the relevant row for the router
which has the closest specification to the router being configured.
11. Click Next.
12. A summary screen displays. If any of the parameters on this screen are incorrect,
click Previous to return to the screen that requires amendment. Edit the details, and
continue through the Controller Wizard as before.
Fig 44. Check Controller Details
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13. Confirm that details for the controller configuration are correct.
14. Click Finish.
15. The controller is configured.
Fig 45. Controller Added
16. The Controller Status and Checksum icons show that the controller required further
configuration, see section 5.9.1.
Note:
Create a simulator controller, which is convenient for design purposes, before pushing the
configuration to a hardware controller, see section 5.9.2.
5.4.2 Edit Controller Configuration
To edit the controller configuration, either double-click on a controller, or click the Edit
Controller Config… button. The Controller Configuration window displays, see Fig 46.
Note:
For RollCall Gateway controllers, double-clicking on the controller, or clicking the Edit
Controller Config… button displays the Generic Configuration Editor.
Fig 46. Controller Configuration
The Controller Configuration screen displays with the Devices tab open.
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Configuration
The Tabs at the top of this screen are:
•
Devices - Most controllers have default devices already selected. If there are no
devices selected they must be added before configuration can begin.
See “Configuring Additional Devices” on page 85.
•
Routers - Basic configuration of the router.
See “Configuring a Router” on page 52.
•
Hardware Config - Additional configuration required when using a Nucleus 2450
controller in a router.
See “Hardware Config” on page 68.
•
Local Router Hardware - Additional configuration required when using a 246x
controller in a router.
See “Local Router Hardware” on page 72.
•
Generic - Controller Configuration Editors (advanced configuration). Used to edit a
controller using a logical tree structure format.
See “Controller Configuration Editors” on page 93.
5.5 Configuring a Router
To access the Configuration screen, log in as a user with Configuration permissions, see
section 4.3.
To configure a router:
1.
Select the controller and either double-click, or click the Edit Controller Config...
button.
The Controller Configuration screen displays.
2.
Click on the Routers tab.
Fig 47. Router Configuration
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The controller has a default fixed IP address. If the router is connected directly, or through a
local network, Workbench automatically identifies the controller, and shows it as connected
correctly.
Note:
If the fixed IP addresses of a physical controller causes a conflict on the network, change
both the IP address of the router controller and the IP address of the controller listed in
Workbench.
5.5.1 Router Configuration
•
Click Router Configuration...
The Router Database Configuration window displays.
Fig 48. Router Database Configuration Window
Tab
Description
Controllers Set the number of Matrices and Salvos.
Matrices
The number of Matrices is set on the Controllers tab. For each Matrix, set the
name and number of levels.
Levels
The number of levels for each Matrix is set on the Matrices tab. For each Matrix
and Level, set the name and number of Sources and Destinations. To
automatically calculate the number of Source and Destination Associations,
click the Auto Calculate button. The number of associations can also be
configured manually.
Note: For a single level system the number of associations should match the
level size.
Table 11.
Router Database Configuration Tabs
5.5.2 Names
The Names Editor is used to add/edit the names of the Sources, Destinations and Salvos.
The names can be 4, 8, 12, 16, or 32 characters long. Names within each character length
tab should be unique. All name types can be used with Workbench soft panels.
The character length used is set by the device connected to the controller. For example:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
4-character names
for 6236, 6237 panels and Tx product
8-character names
for 6276, 6277 panels and Under Monitor Displays
12-character names
for 677x panels
16-character names
for UMD devices
32-character names
for RollCall hardware panels
Tag names
See “Tag Names” on page 55.
Only enter names in the character lengths that will be used to avoid needlessly filling the
database. Names entered that are too long for the currently selected character length are
automatically truncated.
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•
Configuration
Click Names...
The Names Editor window displays.
Fig 49. Names Editor
The Names Editor has different main tabs for naming the following:
•
Sources
•
Destinations
•
Source Associations
•
Destination Associations
•
Salvos
A filter is available in a number of the tabs to quickly find sources and destinations.
•
Enter alphanumeric characters into the search bar (for example, “VTR”, or “Edit 1”)
and click on the Filter button. The display changes to show only the items containing
the filter text in the source or destination name.
•
Click on the Clear button to remove a filter.
Fig 50. Filter
The tabs at the bottom display All, 4-character, 8-character, 12-character, 16-character,
32-character, or Tag names. Changing a Source or Destination name in one character format
does not change the corresponding source or destination in all other character formats.
The names default to the names from the 16-character format.
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Import and Export Names
Names can be imported in from, or exported to, a .csv file, using the Import and Export
buttons. This allows names to be easily edited offline, and brought back in as a whole.
Tip: Export a default spreadsheet to give a basic structure into which to add new names.
Note:
5.5.2.1
Configurations may be also copied to and from Excel database configuration forms (the
names must match). To select a range of cells from the Source Associations and
Destination Associations tables, select the first cell in the range, hold down the Shift Key
and then click on the last cell in the range.
Tag Names
Tag Names enable names to be changed while the system is in run mode.
•
Pull the configuration from the controller to view any changes to the tag names.
•
Push the configuration to the controller to update the tag names on it.
Tag names use the 16-character format if selected on screens.
5.5.3 Associations
•
Click Associations...
The Associations Editor window displays.
Associations are used with control panels as a means of switching more than one level of
routing on a single button press. For example, VTR signal levels can be grouped into a single
association:
•
Level 1 = video
•
Level 2 = audio
Source Associations refer to the group of sources, and Destination Associations refer to a
group of signals at a destination. The Association, Source and Destination names can be
changed through the Names Editor, see section 5.5.5.4.
Fig 51. Associations Editor
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For each matrix (tabs on the left), select the Source/Destinations from the drop-down list.
The tabs at the bottom are used to switch between All, 4-character, 8-character, 12-character,
16-character, 32-character, or numeric names. Selecting a different Source or Destination in
one character format selects the corresponding source or destination in all other character
formats.
Note:
Configurations may be copied to and from Excel database configuration forms (the names
must match). To select a range of cells from the Source Associations and Destination
Associations tables, select the first cell in the range, hold down the Shift Key and then click
on the last cell in the range.
A filter is available in a number of the tabs to quickly find sources and destinations.
•
Enter alphanumeric characters into the search bar (for example, “VTR”, or “Edit 1”)
and click on the Filter button. The display changes to show only the items containing
the filter text in the source or destination name.
•
Click on the Clear button to remove a filter.
Fig 52. Filter
5.5.4 Port Configuration
The Port Configuration window specifies which COM port on the host machine is used to
communicate with the controller, and the protocol used.
Note:
The internal COM port usage described is not applicable when using a PC controller.
•
Click Port configuration...
The available COM ports display on the left of the window, see Fig 53.
5.5.4.1
Serial/IP Port Configuration
Fig 53. Serial/IP Port Configuration
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Note:
Configuration
COM1 and COM2 are internal COM ports.
For S800 Series routers Port 1 must be set to Local Controller.
Port 1 is an internal port for setting a simulator on a PC with no COM ports.
For Nucleus controllers, the local port is required for internal crosspoint settings.
COM3 is the first external serial port and connects to Port 1 on the router rear panel, see
Table 12.
COM 5 is used for hardware control panels in the sample router databases. Hardware panels
can be connected to any port, and COM 5 may be used in the same way as other ports.
The Local Control port, and IP ports may be renamed.
Note:
Serial ports cannot be renamed.
Rear Panels
Workbench
Table 12.
•
Note:
Sirius / Cygnus
Pyxis
COM 3
Port 1
Port 1
COM 4
Port 2
Port 2
COM 5
Port 3
Port 3
COM 6
Port 4
None
Com Ports Example
To update the list of available ports, click Interrogate Port.
The list of ports is not automatically updated: To ensure that the list is up-to-date, manually
interrogate the ports.
If the controller is not connected, the interrogation does not work.
To add a port:
Note:
1.
Select a COM port from the list of available ports and click Add. The port displays in
the Configured Ports column.
2.
Highlight the port in the Configured Ports column.
3.
Define the port properties according to whether it is serial or IP. For Serial port
configuration see Table 13. For IP port configuration, see Table 14.
4.
Click Apply to save changes.
Workbench does not automatically verify that COM ports are not in use.
The following table shows the default electrical setup of the serial/IP-based communication
protocols for Workbench:
Protocol
Baud
Rate
Data
Bits
Parity
General Switcher In
38400
8
EVEN
1
Device
General Switcher Out
38400
8
EVEN
1
Controller
General Remote In
38400
8
NONE
1
Device
General Remote Out
38400
8
NONE
1
Controller
Kramer Out
9600
8
NONE
1
Controller/RS232 DTE
Table 13.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Stop RS422 Port Mode
Bits
Default Comms Protocols
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Protocol
Baud
Rate
Data
Bits
Simulated Out
Configuration
Parity
Stop RS422 Port Mode
Bits
No electrical setup parameters
Local Control
ETL Matrix
19200
8
NONE
1
Controller
Leitch Harris Pass Through In
9600
8
NONE
1
Device
GVGES Control In
38400
8
ODD
1
Device
GVGES Control Out
38400
8
ODD
1
Controller
Barco Rosa In [1]
19200
8
NONE
1
Controller
Table 13.
[1]
Default Comms Protocols
An RS422 crossover cable is required for this connection.
IP Port Properties
Description
Controller Type
Select the router controller type from the drop-down list
Single/Dual
Select whether the controller is a Single or Dual device
IP Address (primary)
The IP address of the device
IP Port (primary)
The port number of the device
IP Address (secondary) The IP address of the secondary device (Dual mode only)
IP Port (secondary)
Table 14.
The port number of the secondary device (Dual mode only)
IP Port Configuration
The General Switcher In protocol, over IP, for the Nucleus 2450 controller is configured in the
separate initialization file. See “Configuration Initialization File” on page 197.
5.5.4.2
Matrix Ports
The Matrix Ports tab makes it possible to map the logical arrangement of signals defined in
the Matrix and Levels to the physical inputs and outputs of the routers.
•
To add a Matrix Port, select the Matrix and Level, and click Add Port.
An entry displays in the Matrix Ports list, see Fig 54.
Fig 54. Matrix Ports
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•
Configuration
Highlight the matrix port to edit, and define the port properties according to the
following:
Description
Port
Select a COM port number that communicates with the router from the
drop-down list.
Start Destination
The logical start position the port numbers within a level.
End Destination
The logical end position the port numbers within a level.
Destination Offset
The destination offset applied to the level so that it maps to the
physical router.
Source Offset
The source offset applied to the level so that it maps to the physical
router.
Matrix
Maps the matrix number in the controller to the matrix number in the
controlled router device.
Level
Maps the level number in the controller to the level number in the
controlled router device.
Monitor Offset
The destination offset to the monitor row in the controlled router.
The monitor rows allow the user to view an output or input on a one or
more special monitoring outputs. Some routers have none, some have
one and some have more than one. For example, Sirius800/Cygnus
have four, Sirius 600 has one, Pyxis has none.
Monitor Input Offset This is the offset to the source in the protocol for the first monitored
input. In the protocol, outputs come first followed by inputs. The inputs
normally start at a fixed offset but for different router controllers this
offset is different. For example, for Cygnus the offset is 576.
Port Features
Source Offset
Used in conjunction with the Audio modify commands where all the
levels are stacked on top of each (defines the start of that levels first
source). This is used in the General Switcher Protocol which has no
concept of matrix and level, just sources and destinations, so
matrix/levels are addressed using ranges of source and destination
numbers. This is not limited to General Switcher Protocol, it applies to
any protocol that needs it.
Audio Params
This checkbox, when selected, allows audio modify commands (L-R,
L-L, R-R, R-L, MONO).
Protects
This checkbox, when selected, enables protects on a slaved router.
Connect On Go
This checkbox, when selected, allows accumulated crosspoint
commands to be actioned in one go.
Tally Dump
Allows a controller to get a complete dump of crosspoint tallies from a
router to speed up router interrogation.
Assign Defaults
Configures the ports to a default setting according to the number of
levels and the matrix sizes.
Sync Port
Select the port from the drop-down list to auto-sync names.
Push Names to
Aurora
This checkbox option automatically synchronizes the names used by
the controller with the names. This option only works if the port is
configured for GeneralRemoteOut.
Table 15.
Port Editor Matrix
Example 1 - One Matrix With Two Levels Mapped To One Router
For a single local1 or external2 matrix with two levels, each of which has a start destination of
1 and an end destination of 16, map these signals a single router so that there is an offset of
16. That is, the router has 32 destinations, see Fig 55.
1. Local: Cards in the same frame
2. External: Serial controlled external level
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Level 1
Start Dest 1
End Dest 16
Dest Offset 0
Configuration
Destination 1
Router
Controller
COM1
Port 1
Level 2
Start Dest 1
End Dest 16
Dest Offset 16
Router
Destination 16
Destination 17
Destination 32
Fig 55. Matrix Ports - Example 1
To create the Matrix Ports for this example:
1.
Select Matrix 1.
2.
Select Level 1, and add a Matrix Port. Select the port in the Matrix Ports list.
3.
Set the Start Dest to 1, and set the End Dest to 16.
4.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM1. Click Apply.
5.
Select Level 2, and add a Matrix Port. Select the port in the Matrix Ports list.
6.
Set the Start Dest to 1, set the End Dest to 16, and set the Dest Offset to 16.
7.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM1. Click Apply.
Example 2 - One Matrix With One level Mapped To Two Routers
For a single matrix with one level that must map to two routers, split the destinations so that
destinations 1 to 16 go to Router X, and destinations 17 to 32 go to Router Y, see Fig 56.
Destination 1
Level 1
Start Dest 1
End Dest 16
Dest Offset 0
Level 1
Start Dest 17
End Dest 32
Dest Offset 0
Router X
COM1
Destination 16
Router
Controller
Destination 1
Router Y
COM2
Destination 16
Fig 56. Matrix Ports - Example 2
To create the Matrix Ports for this example:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Select Matrix 1.
2.
Select Level 1, and add a Matrix Port. Select the port in the Matrix Ports list.
3.
Set the Start Dest to 1, and set the End Dest to 16.
4.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM1. Click Apply.
5.
Add a second Matrix Port. Select the port in the Matrix Ports list.
6.
Set the Start Dest to 17, and set the End Dest to 32.
7.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM2. Click Apply.
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Example 3 - Two Matrices Each With One Level Mapped to One Router
In this example video and audio are separated into two matrices each with one level. The
starting destination of each level starts at one, b ut the matrix ports will be setup to run
consecutively and also remove any unused audio destinations. See Fig 57.
Router
Matrix 1
Video
Level 1
Start Dest 1
End Dest 1292
Dest Offset 0
Destination 1
COM4
Port 1
Destination 1292
Router
Controller
Matrix 2
Audio
Destination 2000
Level 1
Start Dest 1
End Dest 16848
Dest Offset 2000
COM5
Port 1
Destination 16848
Fig 57. Matrix Ports - Example 3
To create the Matrix Ports for this example:
1.
Select Matrix 1.
2.
Select Level 1 (Video), and add a Matrix Port. Select the port in the Matrix Ports list.
3.
Set the Start Dest to 1, and set the End Dest to 1292.
4.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM3. Click Apply.
5.
Select Matrix 2.
6.
Select Level 1 (Audio), and add a Matrix Port. Select the port in the Matrix Ports list.
7.
Set the Start Dest to 1, and set the End Dest to 16848, and set the Dest Offset to
2000.
8.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM4. Click Apply.
9.
From the Port drop-down list, select COM1. Click Apply.
Example 4 - Source Offsets
A source offset can also be configured in the port record. This is used when two levels are
configured on a single router as, see Fig 58. The second level requires an offset so that
logical source 1 maps to physical source 16.
Dest 1 Dest 16
Source 1
Level
1
Source 16
Level
2
Fig 58. Source Offsets Example
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Configuration
5.5.5 Advanced Configuration
To access the Advanced Configuration options, click on the Advanced Configuration button
( ).
5.5.5.1
Levels
A level is a logical grouping of inputs and outputs, which may or may not have a direct
correspondence with a particular piece of hardware. Typically, a level depends on operational
requirements, and represents groups of inputs and outputs such as video, or audio, or data.
•
Click Levels...
The Levels Configuration Editor window displays.
Fig 59. Levels Configuration Editor
•
Edit the Levels parameters according the following:
Column
Description
Matrices
Shows the Matrix names. The number of Matrices is set in the Router
Configuration Editor.
Levels
Shows the level name. The number of levels for each Matrix is set in the
Router Configuration Editor.
Type
Select from the list of audio, video and data types.
Park Mode
Only valid if the type is set to RS422. When an RS422 router is in one to one
routing mode, unused destinations must be ‘parked’ at the park source (‘off’
position). To free a source, there are two options:
Automatic - Workbench controls the parking.
•
Manual - The operator must set the parking.
Park Source
Only valid if the type is set to RS422. The park source reference for RS422
routing.
Park Dest.
Only valid if the type is set to RS422. The park destination reference for
RS422 routing.
Routing
Mode
Only valid if the type is set to RS422. Routing mode is either:
Direction
Table 16.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
•
One to One - One source to one destination.
•
Broadcast - One source to multiple destinations.
This sets the direction of signal flow for the current router level. Direction is
either:
•
Forward - Source to Destination.
•
Reverse - Destination to Source.
Levels Configuration Settings
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5.5.5.2
Configuration
Inhibits
Route Inhibits prevent signals from being routed from an input to a specific output. For
example, to prevent a signal from being routed back to itself. This is common if the same
large router is in use for playback of different channel content such as sport and children’s
channels.
Important:
The inhibits cannot be changed from any hardware or soft panels.
•
Click Inhibits...
The Inhibits Editor window displays.
The Inhibit Editor makes it possible to set or remove route inhibits for each level of the
currently selected matrix, see Fig 60.
Fig 60. Inhibits Editor
Note:
5.5.5.3
•
To set/clear an inhibit, select a point, or click and drag to select a group of points, and
click the Inhibit or Clear button.
•
Press the space bar to repeat the previous action, either inhibit or clear, on the next
selected point or group of points.
The maximum size of the Inhibits Editor is 2048 x 2048.
References
This section relates to video references for switch points. For Audio Reference configuration,
see section A.11.
The Switch Point Editor specifies which reference type the signal can switch from, and
whether the switch occurs on field or frame. Freeway routers have both 525 and 625
reference inputs. Sirius 600 and Cygnus routers have 525, 625 and HD reference inputs. A
Nucleus controller (Sirius 800 range, Cygnus and Pyxis routers) automatically detects the
incoming reference. Therefore, it can be configured to switch on a specific standard.
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Important:
Configuration
If there is no reference signal, or the reference is different to the signal being passed, the
router switches on receiving the command, but does not provide a clean switch.
•
Click References...
The Switch Points Editor window displays.
Fig 61. References Editor
The switching points can be set for individual sources and levels. Table 17. lists the switching
point references:
Reference
Description
Ref525i59
525 interlaced 59 Hz
Ref625i50
625 interlaced 50 Hz
Ref720p60
720 progressive 60 Hz
Ref720p59
720 progressive 59 Hz
Ref720p50
720 progressive 50 Hz
Ref1080i60
1080 interlaced 60 Hz
Ref1080i59
1080 interlaced 59 Hz
Ref1080i50
1080 interlaced 50 Hz
Ref1080p60
1080 progressive 60 Hz
Ref1080p59
1080 progressive 59 Hz
Ref1080p50
1080 progressive 50 Hz
RefInput1 to
RefInput4
Override the auto-detection by using a fixed reference input which allows
for the same standard but offset for timing issues to be resolved.
Alternatively, set a derived reference (246x only). See “Derived
References” on page 81.
RefAuto [1]
Sets the reference type based on the signal type detected on the input.
Table 17.
[1]
Issue 1 Rev 4
Switch Points
When using RefAuto, detected 3G dual-link input signals are specified to use the
equivalent 1080i references.
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•
Note:
Configuration
On the Field Frame tab, set the switching point to occur on field or frame.
Field-based switch points can only be applied to interlaced formats.
To set a switching point:
1.
2.
On the Reference tab, select the required reference standards for the matrix. To do
this, do one of the following:
•
Select the Reference standard for each cell individually.
•
Select a group of cells and in the Set drop-down list (in the lower left corner of the
window) select a reference standard, then click Set.
•
Set one cell and then use the Copy and Paste functions to populate the
remainder.
On the Field Frame tab, select Field or Frame as required. Click Apply, and OK to
confirm.
There is an additional reference type that can be set for a source. This is called “RefAuto”, it
automatically sets the reference type based on the signal type detected on the input. This
allows any signal 625, 525, and so on to be connected to that input and the correct reference
used for the switch without having to change the database. This is useful for SD/HD inputs
from the same connection.
5.5.5.4
Audio Modifies
The settings in Audio Modifies specify the manipulation performed on audio streams when
routed through the crosspoint. The settings specified here are the defaults and can be
overridden from a hardware XY control panel during normal operation. Audio modifies can act
on sources, destinations or both.
•
Click Audio Modifies...
The Audio Modifies Editor window displays.
Fig 62. Audio Modifies Editor
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Configuration
Table 18. lists the Source Audio Modifies.
Source
Description
SourceAudioNormal
(Default)
No audio manipulation is performed on the source audio.
SourceAudioLeftBoth
The left channel of a stereo source pair is routed to both the left
and right channels on the output.
SourceAudioRightBoth
The right channel of a stereo source pair is routed to both the left
and right channels on the output.
SourceAudioSwap
The left and right channel of a stereo source pair are swapped
before being routed to the output.
Table 18.
Source Audio Modifies
Table 19. lists the Destination Audio Modifies:
Destination
Description
DestAudioNormal
(Default)
No audio manipulation is performed on the destination audio.
DestAudioSwap
The left and right channel of a stereo source pair are swapped
before being routed to the output.
DestAudioMono
A stereo source pair is routed to a mono destination.
Table 19.
Destination Audio Modifies
After configuring source and destination audio modifies, click Apply to save the setup.
5.5.5.5
Salvos
A salvo is an operation that allows multiple, otherwise unrelated, routes to be selected with a
single button press. They are stored in the controller and fired by a reference from a control
panel.
Salvos are generated by adding crosspoints in the Salvo Editor, or by importing salvos
previously saved as comma-separated text files.
•
Click Salvos
The Salvos Editor window displays.
Fig 63. Salvos Editor
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Configuration
If the number of salvos was set in the Router Configuration (See “Router Configuration” on
page 53.), they are listed in the Salvos Editor.
Salvos are commonly used to restore to a known state. For example, to reset an outside
broadcast truck to its default settings after returning from a venue.
To create a salvo:
1.
Click Add Salvo. A new Salvo is added to the Salvos box. By default, salvos follow a
naming convention of Salvo001, Salvo002, Salvo003, and so on.
2.
Select the required matrix from the drop-down list.
3.
Select a Destination Associations and a Source Associations.
4.
Click Add Entry. The selection displays in the crosspoint list.
5.
Continue adding sources and destinations in this way until the salvo is complete.
6.
Click Apply to save the Salvo.
7.
Click OK to confirm and close the Salvo Editor.
To rename a salvo:
1.
Select the salvo in the Salvos list.
2.
Type a new name in the text box below it.
Alternatively, in the Names Editor, click on the Salvos tab, select the salvo to change
and then enter a new name.
To add a crosspoint into a salvo:
1.
Select a new destination and source combination.
2.
Click Add Entry.
3.
Click Apply to save changes.
To delete a crosspoint from a salvo:
1.
Select the crosspoint from the crosspoint list.
2.
Click Remove Selected Entries, or press the delete key.
3.
Click Apply to save changes.
To export a salvo for future use:
1.
Click on the Export Salvo button
2.
Navigate to the folder in which to save the salvo, and click Save.
To import a salvo:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Click on the Import Salvo button.
2.
Browse to where the salvo is saved, and click Open.
A comma-separated list containing salvo names and matrix, level, destination and source
indexes can be created externally to Workbench and imported as a salvo.
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5.5.5.6
Configuration
Icons
Icons are only displayed in Run mode for soft panels. Icons provide a way of visually grouping
sources and destinations. For example, a picture of a server can represent all server sources.
Icons are not required, but can help operators recognise key sources and destinations.
•
Click Icons...
The Icons Editor window displays.
To add a brush:
1.
Type its name in the Brush Name column. The name must be exactly the same as it is
in the brush repository.
2.
To help with entering the name, click the Brush Repository button and copy the name
from the repository.
3.
Paste the name in the Brush Name column.
The tabs along the bottom make it possible to select the character format. Adding a Brush
Name to one format adds it to all corresponding formats.
In Design mode, set the group behaviors and button behavior, see Table 20.
Group behavior
Button behavior
Router BPX
BPX
Source
Router Dial-up
Destination
Source
Router XY
Table 20.
Destination
Icon checkbox
Show Source/Dest Icon
Show Source Icon
Show Destination Icon
Show Source Icon
Show Destination Icon
Group and Button Behaviors in Design Mode to Show Icons
5.5.6 Hardware Config
When configuring a Nucleus 2450 controller, there is an additional Hardware Config tab. The
settings on this tab provide additional data required by the Nucleus controller, see Fig 64.
Fig 64. Nucleus 2450 Controller
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Configuration
The Nucleus 2450 controller can be fitted to Pyxis, Cygnus, and Sirius 800 range of routers.
Note:
5.5.6.1
If Workbench is not connected to the Nucleus card, the auto-configuration option cannot be
used. In this case, these settings can either be entered manually or copy and paste the
configuration from a spreadsheet.
Auto Configuration
In the Configuration section, the Reference drop-down list specifies the reference control
type. If the Nucleus card is controlling a Cygnus router, set it to TCygnusReferenceControl,
for anything else, set it to TGeneralReferenceControl.
Auto Configure and Auto Configure Video
The auto-configure option is used to configure the settings for the Nucleus controller. To
auto-configure the settings, connect to the controller and click the Auto Configure Video
button. Workbench configures these settings based on the detected physical inputs, outputs,
and modules.These read back from the matrix the ports and modules installed, and update
the configure port and modules.
Auto Configure Video also populates the logical to physical source and destination tables. It
configures them to all be of type video with a 1 to 1 mapping so that the physical sources /
destinations match the logical sources / destinations.
Auto Configure updates the ports and modules but leaves the logical to physical mapping
unchanged. This is often used for audio routers where the logical to physical can be used to
configure the router as either stereo or mono. It is also useful if a custom logical-to-physical
mapping has been configured on a video router and a reconfigure is required without
changing this.
5.5.6.2
Advanced Configuration
Input Ports
If the auto-configure option is used, the number and type of ports are set automatically. Any
input ports that are not present, or not recognized, are identified as TUnknownInput.
To manually configure physical input ports:
1.
In the Number of Ports text field, type the number of physical input ports and then
click Apply. The specified number of ports is added to the table.
2.
For each input port, select the input type from the drop-down list. Continue adding the
input ports in this manner until complete. Or, use the copy and paste function to
complete the entries.
3.
Click Apply or OK.
Output Ports
To specify or modify the number and types of physical output ports, click Edit Outputs…
If the auto-configure option is used, the number and type of ports are automatically set up.
Any output ports that are not present or not recognized are identified as TUnknownOutput.
To manually configure physical output ports:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
In the Number of Ports text field, enter the number of physical output ports and then
click Apply. The specified number of ports is added to the table.
2.
For each output port, select the output type from the drop-down list. Continue adding
the output ports in this manner until complete. Or, use the copy and paste function to
complete the entries.
3.
Click Apply or OK.
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Configuration
Module Configurations
Note:
The term module refers to the card in a router on which the physical inputs and outputs are
situated.
For module configurations for each type of router, see “Routers Reference” on page 206.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
To manually set up module configurations:
1.
In the Number of Configurations text field, enter the number of module
configurations and then click Apply. The specified number of configurations is added
to the table.
2.
For each configuration, select the type from the drop-down list. Continue adding the
configurations in this manner until complete. Or, use the copy and paste function to
complete the entries.
3.
Click Apply or OK.
Module IDs
•
Click Edit Module IDs... to specify the number and types of module IDs.
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module IDs are automatically
set up. The only Module ID available is TGeneralModuleID.
There are a few rules that should be adhered to when entering logical sources and
destinations.
•
The number of physical sources / destinations entered should be based on the signal
type selected:
Video and Audio Mono - 1
Audio Stereo - 2
Audio Dolby E - 6
Additional sources / destinations are ignored.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Physical sources / destinations should be unique. Entering the same physical source /
destination for more then one logical source / destination could result in incorrect tally
information.
•
The physical source / destination relates to the input and output ports. Therefore, the
physical source / destination number specified must be in range of the input / output
ports.
•
It is not possible to use the logical to physical mappings to configure destinations to
follow other destinations because additional source / destinations are ignored.
However, one destination can be set to follow another with the Generic Editor,
Destination Follow.
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Configuration
Logical Sources
•
To specify the logical sources, click Edit Logical Sources...
In instances where a signal that comprises more than one physical source, such as the left
and right channels of a stereo pair, logical sources are used to identify that they should be
routed together. Logical sources can be made up of between one and six physical input
sources.
If the auto-configure option is used, the logical sources are automatically set up.
To manually configure logical sources:
1.
In the Number of Sources, type the required number of logical sources and then
click Apply. The specified number of logical sources are added to the table. For each
logical source, select the signal type from the drop-down list and then type the
physical sources that are comprised by the logical source in the Phy 1 to Phy 6 fields.
Continue adding the logical sources in this manner until complete, or use the copy
and paste function to complete the entries.
2.
Click Apply or OK.
Logical Destinations
•
Click Edit Logical Destinations... to specify the logical destinations.
In instances where a signal that comprises more than one physical destination, such as the
left and right channels of a stereo pair, logical destinations are used to identify that they
should be routed together. Logical destinations can be made up of between one and six
physical outputs.
If the auto-configure option is used, the logical destinations are automatically set up.
To manually configure logical destinations:
1.
In the Number of Destinations text field, type the required number of logical
destinations and then click Apply. The specified number of logical destinations is
added to the table.
2.
For each logical destination, select the signal type from the drop-down list and then
enter the physical outputs that are comprised by the logical destination in the Phy 1 to
Phy 6 fields. Continue adding the logical destinations in this manner until complete.
Or, use the copy and paste function to complete the entries.
3.
Click Apply or OK.
Force Reset of This Card
To ensure that changes are made to a card, after pushing a database, click the Force Reset
of This Card (also available on the main configuration screen).
Force Reset of Other Card
This is only relevant in a dual controller system. It connects to one controller and force a reset
on the other controller. For example, in a dual controller system when the database has been
loaded into the controller, this resets the other controller so that it becomes active.
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Configuration
5.5.7 Local Router Hardware
When configuring a Centra controller, there is an additional Local Router Hardware tab. The
settings on this tab provide additional information that is required by the 246x controller, see
Fig 65.
Fig 65. 246x Controller
The 246x controller can be fitted to the Sirius 800 range of Routers.
Note:
5.5.7.1
If Workbench is not connected to the 246x controller card, the auto-configuration option
cannot be used. In this case, these settings can either be entered manually or copy and
paste the configuration from a spreadsheet.
Reference Control
•
Click the Reference drop-down list and select a reference control type.
If controlling a Cygnus router, set it to TCygnusReferenceControl, for anything else,
set it to TGeneralReferenceControl.
5.5.7.2
Video Configuration
The auto-configure option is used to configure the settings for the 246x controller.
To auto-configure the settings:
•
Connect to the controller and click the Auto Configure Video button.
Workbench configures these settings based on the detected physical inputs, outputs,
and modules. These read back from the matrix the ports and modules installed, and
update the configure port and modules.
Auto Configure Video populates the logical to physical source and destination
tables. It configures them to all be of type video with a 1 to 1 mapping so that the
physical sources / destinations match the logical sources / destinations.
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5.5.7.3
Configuration
Audio Configuration and Mapping
For any logical input and output that is required to have the audio crosspoint control, the
number of signals associated with each is required.
Note:
An extra Port Configuration in the router configuration must be added for each level. See
“Port Configuration” on page 56.
•
Note:
Click Configure Audio Mapping to open the Audio Mapping Configuration window.
Setup the audio mapping through the tabs.
The audio configuration should be performed within the video matrix.
A filter is available in a number of the tabs to quickly find sources and destinations.
•
Enter alphanumeric characters into the search bar (for example, “VTR”, or “Edit 1”)
and click on the Filter button. The display changes to show only the items containing
the filter text in the source or destination name.
•
Click on the Clear button to remove a filter.
Fig 66. Filter
Source Sizes
Each incoming video stream is capable of carrying up to 32 embedded audio channels.
However, it is unlikely that each source will need that capability. So, to optimize the system,
source sizes should only be set for the system cards carrying embedded or discrete audio.
Note:
Input sources are likely to be in groups of 24 (the number of AES inputs per card).
Multiple channels on source
Discrete audio
Audio size (number of channels)
Audio Address ID setup
Fig 67. Source Size
Audio source sizes can be set individually, or multiple audio source sizes in a level can be set,
when the sizes are to be same across the level, or part of the level.
To setup an individual audio source size:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Check the Multi Source checkbox.
2.
If the input source is discrete audio, rather than audio embedded in a video input,
check the Audio Only checkbox.
3.
Select the number of inputs according to the following:
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Configuration
Mono
1
Stereo
2
SD/HD
16
3G
32
MADI
56/64 - Note: there are only 12 inputs per card using MADI
The default is 0 (zero).
4.
Click on the
button to set Audio Address IDs (these are mono audio addresses).
The Edit Audio Addresses screen displays.
Fig 68. Audio Address IDs
Note:
5.
Enter an ID number in the first address box.
6.
Click on the Make Sequential button (
) immediately to the right of the
address ID entered, to automatically fill the remaining addresses for the current port, if
they are contiguous.
7.
Click OK.
It is good practice to number the address IDs according to the maximum number of
possible inputs regardless of how many inputs are selected. For example, if video port 1
has audio addresses set to 1-16, video port 2 should have audio addresses set to 33-49.
To setup multiple source sizes:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Click on Apply to Matrix at bottom of the screen.
2.
Setup the audio sizes across all levels in the same way in steps 1 - 3 for setup of an
individual audio source.
3.
Check the Set Addresses checkbox.
4.
Enter a starting Address ID.
5.
Change the offset, if necessary (for example, 4 for AES, 16 for MADI). Default is 32.
6.
Either, click on the Set Visible Rows button to apply the settings to all rows as
defined by the current filter, or select rows using the CTRL and Shift keys in
conjunction with the mouse, in the normal manner and click on the Set Selected
Matrix Rows button.
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Configuration
Destination Sizes
As with sources, destinations should also be setup for the size of output. The setup method is
identical to that of the source sizes.
Safe Sources
A safe source is required for each level on each matrix. This default channel must be applied
when there is no other audio routed to a destination track. For example, when a destination
program set is larger than the source routed to it, safe sources are used to fill the empty audio
tracks.
Fig 69. Safe Sources
1.
Select a Source from the drop-down box.
2.
Select a Channel from the source to select a default audio signal, for example a tone,
or silence.
Levels that do not have a safe source attributed to them display
indicating that a safe source needs to be setup for that level.
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Configuration
Mapped Programs
Mapped Programs are a groups of contiguous channels that are routed together when a
source and destination in a mapped program are routed. Mapped Programs is used to
configure the names that display in the track routing screen. Assignments are setup in the
Program Sets tab. See “Program Sets” on page 77.
Fig 70. Mapped Rrograms
To add a new Mapped Program:
1.
Click on the Create button (or the Clone button if defining a Mapped program that is
similar to an existing one).
2.
Type a name for the Mapped Program.
3.
Select a standard from the drop-down list. See Table 21.
This defines the number of channels available in the mapped program.
Standard
Channels
Description
Mono
1
Single audio channel
Stereo
2
Stereo pair
PCM51
6
PCM 5.1 encoded
PCM71
8
PCM 7.1 encoded
User
1-32
Table 21.
User-defined channels
Audio Standards
4.
Add a relevant description, if required.
5.
Enter short names for each channel.
6.
Determine a priority for each channel, if required.
Setting priorities is useful when routing from a larger source to a smaller destination
group, ensuring that the correct channels are routed.
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Configuration
When setting priorities, ensure that each channel is given a unique priority number,
otherwise the error icon (
) displays and the channels will not map correctly.
A red outline displays around any errors to help determine where the fault is.
7.
Determine an order for each channel, if required.
Setting a channel order is useful for shuffling channels when routed.
The Enable Track Ordering checkbox must be checked before ordering the channels.
When setting channel ordering, ensure that each channel is given a unique order
number, otherwise the error icon (
) displays and the channels will not map
correctly.
Fig 71. Example Error
A red outline displays around any errors to help determine where the fault is.
8.
Check the Safe checkbox of a channel that does not require routing.
Where channels are set to “Safe” the safe source for that level is routed.
Program Sets
Combine Mapped Programs and single channels into sets for frequently used setups.
A maximum of 64 channels (32 channels of embedded audio, or 64 MADI) can be grouped
and routed together before being assigned to both sources and destinations.
Fig 72. Program Sets
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Configuration
To create a Program Set:
1.
Type a name for the Program Set.
2.
Set the size of the Program Set, making sure that the size is large enough to
accommodate all the Mapped Programs required.
3.
Click on the drop-down box on a channel and select the Mapped Program to add to
that channel (and the number of channels below depending on the audio standard of
the mapped program selected).
4.
Add a further description title, if required.
5.
Repeat for as many Mapped Programs as required for the set.
When setting a Program Set, ensure that each channel is given a unique order
number, otherwise the error icon (
) displays and the channels will not map
correctly.
Source Assignment
To assign a Program Set to an input:
•
Click on the drop-down menu for an input, and select a Program Set.
Repeat for other inputs as required.
Note:
If a size has not been attributed to a source, or the source is video only, then it is not
possible to assign a Program Set to that source.
Destination Assignment
To assign a Program Set to an output:
•
Click on the drop-down menu for an output, and select a Program Set.
Repeat for other outputs as required.
Note:
5.5.7.4
If a size has not been attributed to a destination, or the destination is video only, then it is
not possible to assign a Program Set to that destination.
Advanced Configuration
Input Ports
If the auto-configure option is used, the number and type of ports are set automatically. Any
input ports that are not present, or not recognized, are identified as TUnknownInput.
To manually configure physical input ports, before going online:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
In the Number of Ports text field, type the number of physical input ports and then
click Apply. The specified number of ports is added to the table.
2.
For each input port, select the input type from the drop-down list. Continue adding the
input ports in this manner until complete. Or, use the copy and paste function to
complete the entries.
3.
Click OK.
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Configuration
Output Ports
•
To specify or modify the number and types of physical output ports, click Edit
Outputs…
If the auto-configure option is used, the number and type of ports are automatically set up.
Any output ports that are not present or not recognized are identified as TUnknownOutput.
To manually configure physical output ports:
1.
In the Number of Ports text field, enter the number of physical output ports and then
click Apply. The specified number of ports is added to the table.
2.
For each output port, select the output type from the drop-down list. Continue adding
the output ports in this manner until complete. Or, use the copy and paste function to
complete the entries.
3.
Click OK.
Module Configurations
Note:
The term module refers to the card in a router on which the physical inputs and outputs are
situated.
For module configurations for each type of router, see “Routers Reference” on page 206.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
To manually set up module configurations:
1.
In the Number of Configurations text field, enter the number of module
configurations and then click Apply. The specified number of configurations is added
to the table.
2.
For each configuration, select the type from the drop-down list. Continue adding the
configurations in this manner until complete. Or, use the copy and paste function to
complete the entries.
3.
Click OK.
Module IDs
•
Click Edit Module IDs... to specify the number and types of module IDs.
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module IDs are automatically
set up. The only Module ID available is TGeneralModuleID.
There are a few rules that should be adhered to when entering logical sources and
destinations.
•
The number of physical sources / destinations entered should be based on the signal
type selected:
Video and Audio Mono - 1
Audio Stereo - 2
Audio Dolby E - 6
Additional sources / destinations are ignored.
•
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Physical sources / destinations should be unique. Entering the same physical source /
destination for more then one logical source / destination could result in incorrect tally
information.
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Configuration
•
The physical source / destination relates to the input and output ports, that are
defined. Therefore, the physical source / destination number specified must be in
range of the input / output ports.
•
It is not possible to use the logical to physical mappings to configure destinations to
follow other destinations because additional source / destinations are ignored.
However, one destination can be set to follow another with the Generic Editor,
Destination Follow. See “Generic Editor” on page 94.
Logical Sources
•
To specify the logical sources, click Edit Logical Sources...
In instances where a signal that comprises more than one physical source, such as the left
and right channels of a stereo pair, logical sources are used to identify that they should be
routed together. Logical sources can be made up of between one and six physical input
sources.
If the auto-configure option is used, the logical sources are automatically set up.
To manually configure logical sources:
1.
In the Number of Sources, type the required number of logical sources and then
click Apply. The specified number of logical sources are added to the table. For each
logical source, select the signal type from the drop-down list and then type the
physical sources that are comprised by the logical source in the Phy 1 to Phy 6 fields.
Continue adding the logical sources in this manner until complete, or use the copy
and paste function to complete the entries.
2.
Click Apply or OK.
Logical Destinations
•
Click Edit Logical Destinations... to specify the logical destinations.
In instances where a signal that comprises more than one physical destination, such as the
left and right channels of a stereo pair, logical destinations are used to identify that they
should be routed together. Logical destinations can be made up of between one and six
physical outputs.
If the auto-configure option is used, the logical destinations are automatically set up.
To manually configure logical destinations:
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1.
In the Number of Destinations text field, type the required number of logical
destinations and then click Apply. The specified number of logical destinations is
added to the table.
2.
For each logical destination, select the signal type from the drop-down list and then
enter the physical outputs that are comprised by the logical destination in the Phy 1 to
Phy 6 fields. Continue adding the logical destinations in this manner until complete.
Or, use the copy and paste function to complete the entries.
3.
Click Apply or OK.
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Derived References
To configure Derived References offline:
Note:
1.
Click Edit Derived References... to define internal references derived from the
physical reference inputs.
2.
Select the Input reference from the drop down list. This will either be a physical input
via BNC, or a reference that is derived from another input.
3.
Select the required derived reference from the drop-down list.
4.
Select the required reference for audio from the drop-down list.
5.
Select the reference rate for audio from the drop-down list.
6.
Click OK.
Derived references are changed online using the relevant run screens (S800 databases
only).
5.6 Configuring Panels
5.6.1 Panel Device
A Panel Device relates to a physical hardware device, for example, a control panel. Control
panels are configured for use with the router to which they are connected, and then setup
using on-screen hardware panel templates.
There are two areas in Workbench that are relevant to Hardware Panels:
•
Configuration - A port on a router controller can be configured to communicate with
Panel Devices.
When configuring a Hardware Panel, set a router COM port to ptMultiDropFullDuplex.
•
Design - The functionality of the Hardware Panels are set in the design mode.
Workbench provides several screen files, each of which is a template for a particular
type of panel. These screen files can be imported to Workbench designer so that
panels and keypads can be easily configured.
Note:
For paired controllers, a new panel can only be created for the primary controller.
There are several ways to create a hardware panel:
Note:
•
Configure a router controller to be a panel device, then create the panel through the
panels wizard.
•
Select one of the pre-defined panels in design mode and link it to a router controller.
•
Create a panel in design mode and link it to a router controller.
By default, Run Mode is disabled for hardware panels. Running a hardware panel displays
an error stating that the initial screen is disabled. This option is changed in the screen
properties window.
The hardware panel requires a valid controller, with a panel and keypad, see “Hardware
Panels Reference” on page 220.
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5.6.1.1
Configuration
Configuring a Router Controller as a Panel Device
To edit the controller:
1.
Open the Configuration window.
To access the Configuration screen, log in as a user with Configuration permissions,
see section 4.3.
2.
Select the controller and click the Edit Controller Config ... button. The Controller
Configuration window displays. The tabs that are available depend on the type of
controller.
3.
Select the Devices tab.
4.
Check the PanelDevice checkbox.
The Panels configuration has two buttons:
5.6.1.2
•
Add Panel...—starts the Add Hardware Panels Wizard, see section 5.6.1.2.
•
Configure Panels...—opens the Hardware Panels Configuration Editor, see
section 5.6.1.3.
Add Hardware Panel Wizard
The Add Hardware Panel Wizard lists several pre-defined screens for creating a layout that
has several parameters already configured.
For each new panel the wizard adds a screen with the following:
•
Controller: The behavior of the panel is set to the controller being configured.
•
Keypad: Each new keypad is labeled “Keypad1”, “Keypad2”, and so on.
•
Panel: Each new panel is labeled “Panel1”, “Panel2”, and so on.
•
Source Sequence Set (For XY dial-up and multi-bus panels): New Sequence sets are
labeled “Sequence3”, “Sequence4”, and so on.
•
Destination Sequence Set (For XY dial-up panels only).
To add a new panel through the wizard:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Either select a screen from the list, or click the
saved screen.
2.
Type a name for the panel.
3.
Click the Create Screen and Edit Panel button. The wizard displays in Design mode
with the selected screen.
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5.6.1.3
Configuration
Hardware Panels Configuration Editor
In the Configuration window, the Hardware Panels Configuration Editor is for configuring the
number of panels, keypads, sequence sets, and communication ports.
Fig 73. Panels Configuration Editor
Panel Config
These settings configure the number of physical control panels in the system. Table 22. lists
the Panel Config options.
Column
Description
Number of
Panels
To specify the number of panels in the system, enter the number of
panels and then click Apply. For each panel, a row is added to the editor.
Name
The name of the panel.
Comms Type
Either Serial or IP. Select the appropriate type from the drop-down list. If
IP is selected, the Address is updated automatically. Unused panels
should be set to “Unassigned”.
Port
The port on which the controller communicates with the panel. The
default port number is 3010. The ports are defined from the Port Config
tab. “Port Configuration” on page 56.
Note: There is no internal mechanism to ensure that the specified COM
port is not already in use.
Address
Enter an address for each panel. The address must match the address
switches on a physical card.
ID
An ID is automatically attributed when using the panels wizard. If
required, change the ID of a panel. The same ID may be attributed to
more than one panel, if required.
Table 22.
Panel Configuration Settings
Keypad Config
These settings configure the number of keypads in the system. The number of keypads
required depends on the type of control panel, and how the specific panels are used. A single
keypad can be used on more than one panel. Table 23. lists the Keypad Config options.
Column
Description
Number of
Keypads
To specify the number of keypads in the system, enter the required
number and then click Apply.
Name
The name of the keypad.
Table 23.
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Keypad Configuration Settings
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A dial-up keypad is configured such that a mnemonic or number is assigned to a button. The
sources and/or destinations can then be selected by making a single, or series of, button
presses to select an input or output.
A keypad that dials up sources only requires a single SourceKeypad sequence set. A keypad
that dials up destinations only requires a single DestinationKeypad sequence set. If a panel
dials up both sources and destinations, it requires both a SourceKeypad sequence set and a
DestinationKeypad sequence set.
Sequence Config
In the Configuration Window, these settings configure the number of sequence sets in the
system. Sequence sets group the key sequences (defined in Design mode) that are required
to enter sources and destinations. Table 24. lists the Sequence Config options.
Column
Description
Number of
Sequence Sets
To specify the number of sequence sets available in the system, enter
the required number and then click Apply.
Name
The name of the sequence set.
Type
For each sequence set, select a type from the drop-down list:
Table 24.
•
SourceKeypad
•
DestinationKeypad
•
SoftSourceKeypad
•
SoftDestinationKeypad
Sequence Configuration Settings
Port Config
In the Configuration window, the Hardware Panels - Port Config tab specifies which COM port
on the host machine is set to communicate with the controller.
Note:
Do not confuse the ports listed in the Hardware Panels Configuration editor with the ports
listed in the Router Controller.
Column
Description
Available Ports
The available COM ports are displayed on the left of the window. Click
Interrogate Ports to update the list of available ports.
Note: The list of ports is not automatically updated: Manually interrogate
the ports to ensure that the list is up-to-date.
Add
Click Add to transfer the port to the Serial Ports Configured section.
Assign
To change the configured port, select a port from the Available column
and a Configured port, and click Assign.
Serial Ports
Configured
For each port in the Serial Ports Configured section, select a Protocol,
Baud Rate, and Flags.
Protocol
The available options are:
Baud Rate
Table 25.
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•
ptUndefined
•
ptMultiDropFullDuplex
•
ptMultiDropHalfDuplex
Do not change the Baud Rate from 38400. The only exception is when
using extremely long cable lengths, and then the baud rate must be set
to 9600.
Port Configuration Settings
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Configuration
Column
Description
Flags
The Flags options are advanced settings and should normally be left
unselected:
IP Panels
•
Embedded Polls: Embeds polls in the message queue.
•
Ignore Inhibits: Causes the controller to ignore any routes inhibits
that have been specified in the database.
Check the checkbox to Enable IP Panels.
The default port number is 3010. If a configuration or database already
exist, this will be set to -1.
Table 25.
Port Configuration Settings
5.7 Configuring Additional Devices
Further devices types may be added to a controller. The devices that are available depend on
the controller type:
Note:
•
Nucleus Controller (2450): This is a controller, configured as a Router controller, and
Panels device only.
•
Centra Controller (2330/246x/PC): This is a hardware controller that can be
configured as any combination of devices, see Table 26.
Some devices cannot be configured on the same controller as other devices. See Table
26. for compatibility.
5.7.1 Add a New Device to the Controller
To add a device:
1.
Click on the Devices Tab.
The current devices assigned to the controller display on the left-hand side of the
screen.
Fig 74. Devices Tab
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2.
Configuration
Click on the Add/Remove Devices button.
The screen now displays the current devices on the right-hand side of the screen, with
a list of the available devices displayed on the left-hand side of the screen.
Fig 75. Add/Remove Devices
3.
Further devices can be viewed by unchecking the Show Routing Devices checkbox.
4.
Click on the
button of the required device.
The device name moves from the Available Devices field to the Assigned Devices
field on the screen.
5.
Add further devices, if required, in the same manner.
6.
Click on the Configure Devices button.
This returns to the previous screen, allowing for configuration of the new device(s).
7.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Select the appropriate device, and then click on the relevant Configure..., Edit..., or
Add... button on the right-hand side of the screen.
Some devices cannot be configured from this screen, and do not display any buttons on
the right-hand side of the screen. Such devices must be configured using the Generic
Editor. See “Generic Editor” on page 94.
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5.7.2 Available Devices
The Devices tab specifies the type of device or devices that are to be controlled. Table 26.
lists the options for a generic controller:
Device
Description
AlarmDevice
For creating local alarms and reporting to Workbench alarm
screens, see section 5.7.3
AxonDevice [1]
Required to connect to Axon modular with supported modules,
see section 5.8.1
DartNetGatewayDevice [1] Required to connect to Vistek modular – requires CANUSB
adapter on PC – can only run on PC not dual redundant, see
section 5.8.1
DensiteDevice [1]
Miranda protocol for modular, see section 5.8.1
FieldStoreDevice
For use as a transient data storage controller – allows use of
screen recall, strings and passing of values to rules service, see
section 5.7.4
GPIDevice
For configuring GPIs, currently on 2330 only, see section 5.7.5
KeypadsDevice [1]
Required for soft panel keypad setup and re-use, see section
5.8.1
LocalRouterDevice
Audio router configuration, see section 5.5.1
LookupDevice [1]
Used to define lookup tables for cases where a value needs
translating to another value, see section 5.8.1
MDUDevice [1]
SNMP interface to GPI collator (TSL MDU box), see section
5.8.1
MultiViewerDevice [1]
To connect to multiviewers and allow screen recalls etc.
Currently only supports Miranda and Snell Multi-Viewers, see
section 5.8.1. For a worked Example of setting up a Multiviewer,
see “Configure a MultiViewer” on page 160
PanelDevice
For configuration of hardware control panels, needed on
Nucleus 2450 or with 2330/246x. This must be on the same
controller as a Router Device, see section 5.6.1
RouterDevice
For controlling one or more routers, see section 5.5
SatelliteDevice [1]
Interface for satellite positioning control, see section 5.8.1
SNMPGenDevice [1]
Control devices via SNMP, see section 5.8.1.
Note: Associated MIB files are required.
SourceQueueDevice
[1]
TestDevice
Not for general use - required for reverse mimic chains and
queuing sources to feed to a clean feed path, see section 5.8.1
Not for general use. May be used for a controller that is no
longer required.
Note: If this device is in use, DO NOT DELETE
TielinesDevice
Tie-line controller talks to one or more router drivers to make
tie-line routes, required for mimic diagram, see section 5.7.6
Note: A Tie-Lines Device cannot be on the same controller as a
Router Device with which it communicates, or on the same
controller as a UMDEngineDevice.
Table 26.
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Available Devices
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Device
Description
UMDDevice
Sending names to an Under Monitor Display (UMD) currently
supports 8+ protocols, different strings over IP and serial ports,
see section 5.7.7
Note: A UMD Device cannot be on the same controller as a
UMDEngineDevice.
UMDEngineDevice
Communicates with a Tie-lines device. The UMD Engine
provides a mechanism to automatically update the text
displayed on the UMDs with the destinations source name in the
tieline tally table, see section 5.7.8
Note: A UMDEngineDevice cannot be on the same controller as
a UMDDevice.
VideoPlayoutDevice [1]
Table 26.
[1]
For connecting to VTRs / video servers, see section 5.8.1
Available Devices
Devices that do not have their own configuration wizard must be configured using
the Generic Editor. See “Generic Editor” on page 94.
More than one device can be selected for each controller. However, some devices cannot run
on the same port. For example, a Tie-Lines device cannot be on the same port as a UMD
Engine device.
5.7.3 Alarm Device
An alarm device is one that creates local Workbench alarms, and reports them to Workbench
alarm screens.
•
Select AlarmDevice, and click on the Edit Alarms... button.
The Alarm controller screen displays.
Fig 76. Alarm Configuration Screen
To
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To add alarms:
1.
Click on the Add button for the Alarm Sets field. An [unnamed] alarm set is added.
2.
Click on the Edit Name button to attribute a name to the Alarm Set.
3.
Click on the Add button for the Alarm field. An Alarm1 alarm is added.
4.
Click on the Edit Name button to attribute a name to the Alarm.
Further alarms may be added to the set and renamed accordingly. Further Alarm Sets
may also be added, if required.
5.
Click OK when all alarms and alarm sets have been added.
The individual alarms must be setup using the Generic Editor, under the Devices branch. See
“Generic Editor” on page 94.
5.7.4 FieldStore Device
A FieldStore Device makes it possible to define DCCP database fields. Typically, to pass
values between soft panels, see section A.5.
•
To open the Fieldstore Editor, click the Edit Fieldstore... button.
The Fieldstore Editor screen displays.
Fig 77. FieldStore Editor Screen
To add a field:
1.
Click the Add New Field button. A new field is added to the list.
2.
Type a Name.
3.
If required, select whether the FieldStore should persist - this determines whether the
value is remembered if the controller is restarted and it powers up in the same state.
FieldStore names, settings and values may be exported and imported to and from a
.CSV file.
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5.7.5 GPI Device
These settings configure the number of General Purpose Interfaces in the system. On a 2330
controller this can be up to 16 GPIs. By using the maximum of 3 additional expansion cards,
up to 160 GPIs are available (48 per expansion card).
•
Select GPIDevice and click the Edit GPIs... button.
The GPIs Editor screen displays.
Fig 78. GPIs Editor Screen
To add GPIs:
1.
Enter a value in the Number GPIs field at the top of the screen, and click the Apply
button.
For each GPI a separate row is displayed to the editor.
2.
Specify the Mode from the drop-down list in the GPI row, either input or Output, for
each of the GPIs.
If all GPIs are to be set the same, use the Change all to: field at the top of the screen,
and select the mode from the drop-down list.
3.
Specify the Operation from the drop-down list in the GPI row, either Pulsing or
Latching, for each of the GPIs.
If all GPIs are to be set the same, use the Change all to: field at the top of the screen,
and select the operation from the drop-down list.
Determine an interval for each GPI (in milliseconds).
When a hardware control panel is in one of the BPX modes it includes a joystick override
feature that allows the GPI to be used as inputs. See “GPI Overrides” on page 177.
5.7.6 Tielines Device
A Tie-Line device represents a series of physical cables that connect multiple destinations on
one level of a matrix to multiple sources on a another level of the matrix; or other matrix. The
tie-line can join video to video, or audio to audio. It cannot connect video to audio.
Tie-Lines can connect to more than one router controller. Up to 40 routers may be added per
tie-line engine.
•
Select TielineDevice, and click on the Edit Tielines... button.
The Tie Lines Editor displays.
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Fig 79. Tie Line Editor
To add a Tie-Line:
1.
Select a Router Controller.
2.
Click on the Add new tie line button, and set the following information:
Column
Description
Name
The name that identifies the Tie-Line.
Auto
Defines whether a tie-line is used automatically, or not.
Group
Allocates tie-lines to a specific group to ensure that routes are available in
smaller sub-sections. For example, if n operators must link to their local
monitors, there must be n+1 groups to make sure that each operator has a
set number of available tie-lines for their use, regardless of how many
tie-lines the other operators are using.
Start Matrix
The matrix on the router from which the signal originates.
Start Level
The level from which the signal originates.
Start Dest
The destination from which the signal originates.
End Matrix
The matrix to which the signal is to be sent.
End Level
The level to which the signal is to be sent.
End Source
Table 27.
3.
Issue 1 Rev 4
The source to which the signal is to be sent.
Tie-Lines Configuration
Click Apply to save the Tie-Line configuration.
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5.7.7 UMD Device
An Under Monitor Display shows the name of a destination, a static text, or a dynamic source
name. The UMD can connect either through serial or IP connection, depending on the type.
The UMD Device driver, configures text to display on a UMD. The text can be grouped into
logical groups. UMDs can be linked together so that the text simultaneously changes when
the group is applied (each UMD must have a different Header number, which is selected
through a switch on the front of the UMD).
To add a new group:
1.
Click the Add Group button. A new group is added to the list, see Fig 80.
Fig 80. UMD Driver Editor
2.
Type a Group Name.
3.
Select the Comms Type from the drop-down list. The options change depending on
the selection (there is no automatic check for valid COM ports).
4.
Select the Protocol from the drop-down list.
5.
For each UMD in the group, click Add UMD. An entry is added to the list.
6.
Enter the UMD Address. Each UMD must have a unique address.
See the UMD manufacturer’s documentation for details.
7.
Type the Caption Text to display, its Alignment, and Brightness (0 = Minimum
8 = Maximum).
8.
If required, select up to four tallies.
Dynamic UMDs can be configured to follow tie-lines. See “Configure Dynamic UMDs” on
page 184.
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5.7.8 UMD Engine Device
The UMD Engine provides a mechanism to automatically update the text displayed on the
UMDs with the destinations source name in the tie-line tally table.
To connect to the Tielines engines and the UMD drivers, configure the UMD Engine to include
at least one Tielines engine (see section 5.7.6) and one UMD driver (see section 5.7.7).
Fig 81. UMD Engine Editor
To add a new UMD driver:
1.
Click the Add UMD Driver button, and a new driver is added to the list. Select the
Driver from the drop-down list.
2.
Click the Add Tie-line Driver button, and select the Tie-line from the drop-down list.
3.
Click the Add a new field button, and a new entry is added to the list. Configure the
engine as required.
5.8 Controller Configuration Editors
The Generic tab has three buttons:
•
Edit Controller - See “Generic Editor” on page 94.
•
Edit Controller Online - See “Online Editor” on page 95.
•
Checksum - See “Checksum” on page 95.
Fig 82. Generic Controller Configuration
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5.8.1 Generic Editor
The Generic Configuration Editor is used to edit a controller in a logical tree structure format,
see Fig 83. It can edit or view any controller, but must be used to edit those that do not have a
specific GUI such as RollCall controllers, Multiviewers, etc.
Fig 83. Generic Configuration Editor (Offline)
Important:
Care should be taken when using the Generic Editor. It is very easy to change the
configuration so that the controller no longer functions correctly, and in a way that is
difficult to fault-find. For example, changing the baud rate can stop the controller from
communicating correctly, if a device has not had the same change in baud rate.
The controller’s configuration parameters display in a tree.
•
Click on a
•
Click on a
symbol to expand the node below it.
symbol to collapse the node.
The nodes depend on the type of device.
Important:
Removing an item from the middle of an array can ‘break’ the controller and links to soft
panels.
There are three types of controls used to build the configuration. Depending on the selection,
the appropriate control displays at the bottom of the screen, see Table 28. and Fig 83.
Control
Description
Plus / minus symbols
These controls add or remove an element below the selected
node.
Drop-down lists
If the selected configuration parameter is defined by a set group of
choices, a drop-down list enables the value to be selected.
Text boxes
If the selected configuration parameter requires a name, a text box
enables the name to be entered.
Table 28.
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Generic Configuration Controls
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5.8.2 Online Editor
The Online Editor displays the current configuration status of the live system. It is mainly used
for diagnostic purposes to identify failures.
Important:
Any changes made to the configuration in the Online Editor occur in real-time on a live
controller. It is generally recommended that configuration changes are made using the
Generic Editor.
The Online Editor must be also used for auto-detection of modular systems.
5.8.3 Checksum
The Checksum button, when clicked, displays the Checksum Information screen. The
information displayed in this screen is mainly for diagnostic purposes.
•
Click the Interrogate button and the checksum information for the current controller
displays.
Fig 84. Checksum Information
This indicates if there is a difference between the controller configuration and the
database configuration.
5.8.3.1
2450 Controller
For a 2450 controller the checksum is calculated using the configuration stored in the
CompactFlash. The checksum is calculated at initial startup, and following a Push operation,
when the new configuration is copied to the CompactFlash from RAM.
If using the Online Editor to make configuration changes, these will not affect the checksum.
Such changes will be overwritten when the controller is rebooted, unless a Pull operation is
performed to copy the configuration from the RAM to the CompactFlash.
See “Push and Pull Configuration” on page 97.
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5.8.3.2
Configuration
246x Controllers
For 246x controllers, the checksum process is as follows:
•
Workbench contains a copy of the configuration, which can be pushed to the
controller, and Workbench generates a checksum against this.
•
When a controller boots, it loads the pushed configuration and calculates its
checksum against this, and caches the result. The cached checksum is returned to
Workbench for it to generate the checksum indication.
The controller then loads any values that are stored in the persistence file into RAM.
Any changes based on this persistence data are not reflected in the checksum.
Persisted controller configuration parameters may be edited on the controller using the
Generic Online Editor. Such edits are stored in the persistence file, and replicated to the
second controller. These edits will NOT result in a checksum mismatch.
To integrate these edits into the Workbench copy of the configuration:
•
Perform a Pull config from controller operation to load persistence data into the
Workbench copy of the configuration, and then perform a Push operation to the
controller to make the checksums match. See “Push and Pull Configuration” on
page 97.
5.9 Controller Management
5.9.1 Edit Controller IP Address or Name
The controller settings dialog box displays the Type, Name, IP Address and the Port for the
controller, see Fig 85.
Fig 85. Controller Settings
Note:
The controller type cannot be changed.
To change the basic settings of an existing controller:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
In the Configuration window, select the controller and click the Edit IP Address or
Name button. The Controller Settings dialog box displays.
2.
Make the required changes to the Name, IP Address, or Port.
3.
If any rules reference the controller these can be updated.
4.
Click OK.
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5.9.2 Push and Pull Configuration
The Push Config to Controller(s) and Pull Config from Controller(s) buttons are for
uploading and downloading configurations to and from the controller. The first time a
controller is run, it is necessary to push from the database to the controller.
When connecting to an existing controller, pull from the controller ensuring that a known
working configuration is used. Pushing to the controller can result in lost data.
Pushing a configuration causes the controller to display the green tick to show the
configuration matches. However, on 2450 controllers, the controller does not take action on
the new configuration until it is reset. To reset the 2450 controller, click the
button.
Note:
As changes to configuration affects both the controller any connected clients (LiveRunner
and other controllers connected via DCCP), it is recommended that these are closed for
the duration of the push, and restarted afterwards.
In a dual controller configuration, the following configuration update procedure is
recommended:
1.
Close all connected clients.
2.
Push the new configuration to the Standby controller and wait for it to restart.
3.
Force a reset of the Active controller. This will initiate a fail-over to the Standby
controller, which now has the updated configuration.
4.
Wait for the restarted controller to boot (now as the Standby controller) and push the
new configuration to it.
5.
Force a reset of the Standby controller to activate the new configuration.
6.
Restart the clients closed previously.
Push and pull configurations to part of the database through the Online Editor. See “Online
Editor” on page 95.
Note:
5.9.2.1
Controllers can be configured to restart automatically after a full database push. This is set
in the Generic Editor for 2330/246x/PC controllers. See “Generic Editor” on page 94. For
2450 controllers, this is set in the config.ini file. See “Configuration Initialization File” on
page 197.
Push Failure
If there is a problem pushing as part of the upgrading procedure, remove the .dccp_config file
from the controller (located in the same folder as the controller .exe file), then push the
configuration.
If the controller is not present or has crashed, when pushing from Workbench, a “Failed to
connect” message displays after ten seconds.
If there are problems connecting, the “Failed to push configuration” message displays. This
may be because the configuration is too large and causes a time-out over the DCCP
connection. To stop this from happening, edit the Workbench shortcut so that it increases the
DCCP time-out:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Right-click on the shortcut and select properties.
2.
Add “-dccpTimeout X” to the end of the shortcut, where X is a time-out value in
milliseconds. If the time-out value is already present, increase the time-out value.
3.
Click OK.
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Configuration
5.9.3 Configuration Backup
Configuration files may be exported or imported either singly, or all at the same time, to a file.
Individual files are stored as .DCCP files, and all files are stored as .zip files.
Configurations should be backed up before editing or deleting a controller.
For a full backup use SQL Management Studio, see Appendix F.
5.9.4 Reset
This is the equivalent of pressing the Reset button on the front of the controller. For a 2450
controller, it is necessary to reset the controller after pushing or pulling a configuration.
5.9.5 Dual Redundancy
Note:
Dual redundancy only applies to hardware controllers. Both controllers must be connected
to the network.
Dual redundancy is a method of pairing controllers so that in the event of a failure of one
controller, the other will immediately take over operations. It also provides a way of testing
any changes without interrupting operations by pushing a new configuration to the Standby
controller, test the changes, and either revert to a previous state or update the Active
controller.
Any two hardware controllers of the same type can be paired.
Note:
The configuration information is not shared between controllers. To make controllers
identical, select the controller to copy the configuration from and click the Copy config to
partner button.
Fig 86. Dual Redundancy
To pair two controllers:
Important:
1.
Select two controllers of the same type.
2.
Click the Pair Controllers button. The first controller shows that it is the Primary
controller. Workbench indicates that there is a difference between partners.
The Primary controller is the one that the hardware and software panels make reference
to in Design mode. It does not refer to the physical hardware, or which controller is in
operation.
To unpair two controllers:
1.
Select the two paired controllers.
2.
Click the Unpair Controllers button.
The two controllers split to become individual controllers.
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5.9.5.1
Configuration
Copy Config to Partner
This copies the configuration from the selected controller to the paired controller, the status
shows that both controllers are synchronised. This is particularly useful when installing a
replacement controller card, for example, to copy the current configuration to the new
controller.
5.9.5.2
Swap Controllers
This swaps the Primary controller with the Secondary controller.
After swapping the controllers, push the configuration to the new Primary controller.
Important:
5.9.5.3
Swapping controllers loses the behavior for any hardware or software panels that
references the Primary controller. Reconfigure the panels to reference the new Primary
controller.
Auto-Changeover
Controllers can also be set to switch operation from the Active controller to the Standby
controller in the event of a network failure.
Note:
The changeover occurs only if the Standby controller has a working network connection.
For 2450 controllers, this feature is set using the Generic Editor. See “Generic Editor” on
page 94.
1.
Expand the Controller node.
2.
Expand the Config2450 node.
3.
Expand the Features node.
4.
Edit the AutoChangeOverIfNoNetwork giving a time (in seconds), for which the
network has failed before performing the changeover to the Standby controller.
A time of -1 disables this feature.
For 246x controllers, this feature is set using the Online Editor. See “Online Editor” on
page 95.
1.
Expand the Controller node.
2.
Expand the ConfigurationItems node
3.
Expand the MiscellaneousFeatures node.
4.
Edit the AutoChangeOverIfNoNetwork giving a time (in seconds), for which the
network has failed before performing the changeover to the Standby controller.
A time of -1 disables this feature.
Note:
The AutoChangeOverIfNoNetwork feature under the Features node has no effect.
5.9.6 Refresh
This refreshes the list view of the controllers.
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5.9.7 Advanced
The Advanced section has three buttons:
5.9.7.1
•
Connections, see section 5.9.7.1.
•
OID Rewrite Helper, see section 5.9.7.2.
•
Snapshot Editor, see section 5.9.7.3.
•
Delete RollCall Cache.
Connections
This lists the controllers in a pop-up window indicating the active connections.
5.9.7.2
Important:
OID Rewrite Helper
Back up the database before changing any OID values, see Appendix F.
Each physical entry in a controller’s database has an OID address (Object Identifier). For
example, the address value for a specific control such as the router source for a destination.
The OID Rewrite Helper provides a method to globally change any DCCP reference so that it
points to a new OID address, see Fig 87.
Note:
The OID Rewrite Helper does not change the values of the referenced OID address.
Fig 87. OID Rewrite Helper
To change the OID References:
1.
For each rewrite entry, select the Start Controller from the drop-down list.
2.
Select the Start OID address. Either type or paste the OID value, or click the
button to open the Choose DCCP Field browser. Valid OID values are colored green.
Invalid OID values are colored red.
3.
Select the End Controller from the drop-down list.
4.
Select the End OID address. Either type or paste the OID value, or click the
button
to open the Choose DCCP Field browser. Valid OID values are colored green. Invalid
OID values are colored red.
If the Start and End OID addresses match, the match icon changes from
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5.9.7.3
Configuration
5.
If the entries match, click the Find Usages button. A list of all occurrences displays.
6.
To globally change all the OID references, click the Rewrite OIDs button.
Snapshot Editor
The Snapshot Editor allows all (or a selection of) crosspoints from each controller on the live
system to be saved, for restoring at a later time. Also, saved snapshot files (.csv) can be
edited.
1.
Click Snapshot Editor...
The Snapshot Editor window displays.
Fig 88. Snapshot Editor
2.
Click on the Snapshot button.
All current crosspoints for each controller display.
Fig 89. Snapshot Editor Showing Crosspoints
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Configuration
Controllers that are not currently connected/online have “ - Offline” appended to the
controller name in the display.
Note:
Any of the crosspoints may be edited at any time within the Snapshot Editor window.
Selecting Crosspoints
•
Click
to open a controller, and subsequently the matrices and levels below each, to
view individual destinations (and currently routed source).
•
Click
at each level to close the levels, matrices and controller. Clicking
controller level closes everything below that controller.
•
Toggle the checkboxes, as required, to select/deselect individual or groups of
crosspoints. At the bottom left of the window is a checkbox for selecting and
deselecting all crosspoints.
at the
To select a block of crosspoints on a particular controller, enter start and end values in
the Range boxes.
Saving a Snapshot
•
To save the current router crosspoints as a snapshot file, click Save.
Fig 90. Save Snapshot File
In the dialog box that displays, browse to the location for the file to be saved, enter a
filename, and click Save.
Once the file is saved a dialog box displays indicating the number of crosspoints
saved.
Fig 91. Crosspoints Saved
•
Click OK to close this dialog box.
The snapshot is saved as a .csv file. The contents of the snapshot file may be edited
using an external editor, for example, Microsoft Excel.
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Loading a Snapshot
•
Click Load to load a previously saved snapshot:
Fig 92. Load Snapshot File
In the dialog box that displays, browse to the location where the snapshot files are
saved, select the file, and click Load.
The snapshot is loaded and the screen displays all of the crosspoints that are
available in that snapshot file. Offline crosspoints are shown.
The following options are available:
•
Edit crosspoints and re-save the snapshot file, or save as a new snapshot. See
“Saving a Snapshot” on page 102.
•
Take the selected crosspoints. See “Take” on page 103.
Take
Take sets the crosspoints on the live system to those that are currently selected in the
Snapshot Editor. Unselected crosspoints are not Taken.
•
Click Take.
A dialog box displays asking for confirmation of the Take.
Fig 93. Take Confirmation
•
Click Yes.
A further dialog box displays indicating the number of crosspoints that have been set.
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Fig 94. Crosspoints Set
•
Click OK.
Offline routers are ignored, and any routed sources set to zero are not affected.
Load All
•
Click Load All to take a brand new snapshot of the live system containing all
controllers.
A confirmation dialog box displays. Click Yes.
Note:
Any current selections or crosspoint values made in the Snapshot Editor remain.
Refresh
•
Click Refresh to update the current snapshot with the crosspoints from the live
system.
This will overwrite any current edited or loaded crosspoints. Offline routers will have
their routed sources set to zero.
Controllers on the live system that are not in the snapshot are not loaded.
Note:
Any current selections made in the Snapshot Editor remain.
5.9.8 Delete RollCall Cache
To clear the cache of RollCall menu set data (the menu screens loaded when adding a new or
updated module):
1.
Click on the Delete RollCall Cache button.
2.
A confirmation screen displays. Click OK.
5.9.9 Convert a Nucleus 2450 Controller to a 246x Controller
When replacing Nucleus 2450 controllers with 246x controllers, there is no need to delete the
original controllers and configure new ones.
•
In configuration mode, right-click on the Nucleus 2450 controller, and select Convert
to 246x.
This runs a wizard configuring the 246x controller and updating any screens
connected to that controller. In the case of dual controllers, the conversion need only
be performed on the Primary controller, as the wizard will convert both.
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Configuration
5.9.10 Upgrading
When Workbench is upgraded, it is recommended that PC controllers also be upgraded.
5.9.10.1
Issue 1 Rev 4
PC-based Controllers
1.
Copy the ‘CentraController.exe’ file and overwrite the existing controllers.
2.
Delete the ‘CentraController.dccp_config’ files that are in the controller’s folders (the
config files are unlikely to work across versions and may even crash the controllers).
3.
Restart the controllers.
4.
Push their configurations, see section 5.9.2.
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Design Mode
6. Design Mode
6.1 Description
Design mode allows the creation of new soft panels, and editing of hardware and soft panels.
To open design mode, log in as a user with Design permissions, see section 4.3.
Fig 95.
Note:
Design Mode
By default, the first time the Design window opens, the first screen in the Screens Editor
tab is shown. Subsequently, the design view displays with the default initial screen, see
section 4.2.
6.2 Toolbar
The toolbar buttons are listed in Table 29.:
Button
Description
Edit: Toggle the edit mode of the screen.
Save: Saves the changes to the current screen.
New Screen: Opens the new screen wizard, allowing
creation of a new blank screen, customized video XY
routing screen, or customized audio XY routing screen, see
section 6.4
Export: Exports the screen to transportable XML, see
section 6.4.3
Import: Imports a screen from transportable XML, see
section 6.4.3
Table 29.
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Toolbar Buttons
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Button
Design Mode
Description
Screens: Lists the screens available as tabbed windows at
the right-hand side of the design area:
•
Device Explorer, see section 6.9
•
Property Window, see section 6.8
•
Screens Editor, see section 6.4.2
•
Panel Templates, see section 6.5.3
•
Key Names, see section 6.10
•
Sequences Editor, see section 6.11
•
Toolbox (only available in edit mode), see section
6.7
Click on a screen to open that tabbed window. Alternatively,
click on the relevant window tab.
Undo (Ctrl+Z)
Create Grid: Creates a grid of controls, for example a button
keypad. see section A.1.1.5
All of the items in the Toolbox can be placed individually or
in a grid array.
Zoom: Adjusts the magnification view of the screen.
FIT positions and sizes the whole screen to display within
the design window.
Placement Lock: Locks the contents of the screen so that
panels, buttons etc. cannot be moved. Items can still be
selected for editing as normal.
Brush: Displays the Brush Repository, see section 6.13.
Run Screen: When not in edit mode, test the current screen
by clicking the Run Screen button.
Note: This works differently to the Run button in the main
menu, as it ignores any screen link buttons.
Design Mode: Select Basic or Advanced mode from the
drop-down list. Advanced mode displays extra tools in the
Tool Box, and additional properties in the Property Window.
Table 29.
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Toolbar Buttons
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Design Mode
6.3 Menu
When in edit mode, a right-clicking the main design area of the displays an editing menu:
Delete
Deletes the current selection
Cut
Cuts the current selection
Copy
Copies the current selection
Paste
Pastes the last item cut or copied into the current location
Paste Special...
Paste all widgets into the current Group
Key Sequences
Opens the Key Sequences Editor. See “Key Sequences” on
page 121.
Maximise Panel
Enlarge the panel to the full size of the Screen. See “Screens” on
page 108.
Auto Edit
Opens the Auto Edit dialog box. See “Auto Edit” on page 124.
Add Tab Page
Adds a new tab (when a tab is selected)
Remove Tab Page
Removes the current tab (when a tab is selected)
Create Template
Add a new panel template (when a panel is selected)
Send to Back
Move the current selection to the back of the screen
Send Backwards
Move the current selection one step backwards to behind the next
most forward item
Bring to Front
Move the current selection to the front of the screen
Bring Forwards
Move the current selection one step forwards to in front of the next
most forward item
Properties
Opens the Property window for the current selection
Screen Properties
Opens the Property window for the Screen
Group Properties
Opens the Property window for the Group
6.4 Screens
A screen is a container for one or more panels. Each screen must have at least one Soft
Panel or Hardware Panel, see section 6.5.
The Worked Examples provide guidelines. See Appendix A.
To create a new screen, select one of the following:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Create a new blank screen, and add panels and controls from the toolbar, see section
6.4.1.
•
Select a panel from the Screens Editor tab, make a clone of it, and configure the new
version as required, see section 6.4.2.
The screens listed in the Screens Editor tab are part of the “Example Resources” option of
the Workbench installation.
•
Create a new Hardware Panel through the Add Hardware Panels Wizard. The
wizard has the advantage that many of the parameters are configured for the
controller, see section 5.6.1.
•
Import an existing screen and configure it as required, see section 6.4.3.
•
Screens can be grouped together in folders. Right-click on the Screens Folder, and
click on the New Folder from the menu. Click on the folder name to rename it.
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Design Mode
6.4.1 Create a New Blank Screen
To create a new blank screen:
1.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Screens Editor tab, see section 6.4.2.
2.
Either on the Screens Editor tab click the Add button, or on the toolbar click the
button.
The New Screen wizard displays.
3.
Type a name for the new screen.
4.
From the drop-down list select the type of screen to create:
•
Blank—build up a screen with as many panels as required for any number of
different tasks are necessary.
•
Basic Routing—a video XY routing panel template that can be edited, as
required.
•
Audio Track Routing—an audio XY routing panel template that can be edited,
as required.
If a Blank screen is selected, click Finish. The screen displays, and is ready for
editing.
If a Video or Audio screen is selected, click Next.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
5.
Select a screen size and select a color theme from the drop-down lists.
6.
Click Next.
7.
Select a controller and matrix from the drop-down lists.
8.
Click Finish. The screen displays, and can be edited, as required.
To open any screen in the list, double-click on the thumbnail. Only one screen can open at
a time.
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Design Mode
6.4.2 Screens Editor
The Screens Editor displays the screens available on the system, including Soft screens and
Hardware screen templates.
To open the Screens Editor:
•
Click on the Screens Editor tab.
The Screens Editor window displays.
Fig 96. Screens Editor
Note:
The slider at the bottom of the window resizes the view of the screens in the Screens
Editor.
The screens can be displayed in alphabetical order (default) or by alias (see section 6.4.2.1),
selectable from the drop-down list at the top of the Screens Editor.
Right-clicking on a screen in the Screens Editor displays the following menu:
Edit Alias
Edit the alias number of the screen, see section 6.4.2.1
Clone Screen
Make a copy of the screen. A prompt for a new name displays.
Run Screen
Runs the screen. Screen link buttons are ignored.
Set as start screen
Sets the selected screen as the initial screen for the current user.
See “Users” on page 36.
Delete Screen
Deletes the screen from the Screen Editor.
.
To rename a screen:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Click on the screen title.
•
Edit the title, as required.
After renaming a screen, to display the screens in the correct alphabetical order, select
Screens sorted by alias from the drop-down list at the top of the screen, then re-select
Screens sorted by name.
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6.4.2.1
Design Mode
Screen Alias
The screen alias is a number attributed to a screen to allow the screen to be referenced by
that number. This is particularly useful when a screen is linked by another screen. If the alias
number is used then any subsequent changes to the screen name will not inadvertently break
the link between the screens.
By default all screens have an alias of zero; no alias. A zero alias is not indicated on the
display.
To add an alias:
1.
Right-click on a screen in the Screens Editor, and click Edit Alias.
2.
Enter an alias number and click OK.
The alias number displays under the screen name in the Screens Editor.
6.4.3 Screen Templates
Several screen templates are included with Workbench. By default, panel templates are
located in the Workbench installation folder, under:
...\Workbench\Screens\Hardware Panels
...\Workbench\Screens\Vistek
Screens are also made available to customers who have purchased Snell products such as
hardware control panels and modular screens. These screen templates can be imported to
Workbench, greatly reducing the amount of time required to build screens. Screens can also
be found through the Snell Web site.
To import a screen template:
1.
From the toolbar, click the
button.
2.
In the dialog box that displays, navigate to the template file.
3.
Click Open.
If the screen is to be assigned to a different system, assign the relevant Group. See
“Groups” on page 114.
To export a screen template:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
From the toolbar, click the
button.
2.
In the dialog box that displays, select a location for the file to be saved, and change
the name of the file if required.
3.
Click Save.
Backup and restore screens from Administration | Data Management, see section 4.7.
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Design Mode
6.5 Panels
A panel can have any number of groups and controls. A panel can be either a Soft Panel, or a
Hardware Panel.
Edit the position, size, style, and behaviors of panels using the Properties Window. See
“Property Window” on page 119.
6.5.1 Hardware Panels
A Hardware Panel is a screen template of a physical hardware device, for example, a control
panel. The position of the buttons and other controls closely resemble the positions on the
physical hardware. The hardware panel is configured on-screen which in turn sets up the
operation of the connected control panel.
To add, edit and configure Hardware Panels, see “Panel Device” on page 81.
6.5.2 Soft Panels
A soft panel can be configured to be anything related to the control and monitoring of the
system, and can be designed as simply or intricately as desired, with relevant controls
arranged into Groups, each with specific behaviors. See “Groups” on page 114.
6.5.3 Panel Templates
Any panel can be exported as a template.
To view existing templates:
•
Select the Panel Templates tab, see Fig 97.
Panels created using a template are linked to the template so that any changes in properties
are reflected through all panels created using that template.
Fig 97. Panel Templates
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Design Mode
To create a new panel template:
6.5.3.1
1.
Open the required panel from the Screens Editor tab.
2.
Click the
window.
3.
Right-click on the panel and select Create Template. The panel is added to the Panel
Templates tab, with a default name of New Template.
4.
Click on the Panel Templates tab.
5.
Click on the new panel template title, and rename the panel template.
button to edit the panel. The Toolbox displays at the bottom of the
Use Panel Templates
To use a panel template:
•
Double-click on the panel template from the list and click onto the screen. Repeat the
process to add further panels on the screen.
Any number of panel templates may be added to a screen.
Changing a property of the panel causes all the panels linked to the template to change their
property at the same time. For example, changing the color of a button background on a
panel causes the same button background to change on all panels.
Any changes made to the panels are reflected back to the template, and the template is
updated at the same time.
The properties of a panel can be changed without changing the template. See “Override
Panels” on page 113.
6.5.3.2
Override Panels
A panel created from the panel template can be edited without affecting the template, by
overriding it to change the properties required.
When in override mode, it is not possible to make changes to other panels. Also, it is not
possible to add or remove groups, tabs or controls on the selected panel, in override mode.
To override a panel:
•
Right-click on the panel, and from the menu click on Override Panel.
Any changes made during the override are not reflected on the other panels, nor is
the template updated.
Note:
Changing a property on a panel in override mode affects only that particular property, and
other properties remain as per the template. For example, changing a button color only in
override mode, then changing the size of that button on the template, results in the button
with the override on the color still changing size accordingly with the template.
To return to editing all panels:
•
Right-click on the panel in override mode, and from the menu click on Override
Panel.
The panel is no longer in override mode and any editing of properties affects all
panels.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
It is not possible to override the Behavior property of a group or control, or the Group
property of a control.
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6.5.3.3
Design Mode
Detach a Panel
A panel can be detached from the template, so that any further changes to the template do
not affect the panel, or vice versa.
To detach a panel:
•
Right-click on a panel, and from the menu click on Detach Panel.
6.6 Groups
The group properties determine the behavior of all the controls within the group, and are
specific to the device type or piece of equipment that the controls act upon. For example, in
an alarm group, only the control behaviors appropriate for alarms are available.
Fig 98. Group Tabs
Icon
Description
Adds a new group
Edit group name
Open group properties
Select all controls in group
Delete the current group
Table 30.
Group Buttons
Each screen can have numerous groups, and each group can have a different behavior type.
Table 31. lists the available groups:
Group Name
Description
Alarm
Allows the alarms to trigger button states, and log to the screen. For
example, setting alarms, acknowledgements and automatic resets.
Audio Path
Allows monitoring of the routes that individual audio channels take.
Audio Processing
For defining audio processing screens.
Audio Router XY
Group
Controls for designing audio routing screens allowing groups of
audio, for example, stereo pairs, to be routed and embedded onto a
video stream for output.
Audio Router XY
Track
Controls for designing audio routing screens allowing audio tracks
to be routed and embedded onto a video stream on output.
Device Chain
Not for general use – used with mimic.
Generic
Allows control or status monitoring from any part of any device
through the unique OID identifier. For use with drag and drop
design.
Note: For generic group behaviors it is possible to assign a property
that may be inappropriate for a control.
Generic Dial Up
Allows for large sized routers to be controlled by a single panel.
Hardware Panel BPX
For configuring BPX hardware panels. Using the template in the
Screen Editor is recommended.
Hardware Panel
MultiBus
For configuring 6277 hardware panels. Using the template in the
Screen Editor is recommended.
Table 31.
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Group Behaviors
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Group Name
Description
Hardware Panel XY
For configuring XY hardware panels. Using the template in the
Screen Editor is recommended.
Hardware Panel
XY6276
For configuring 6276 hardware panels. Using the template in the
Screen Editor is recommended.
Mimic
Allows for mimic diagrams to work, requires system architecture
configuration, see section 6.7.7.
Multi Bus
Allows selection of source then destination routing to single router
(normal configuration is to set a destination and then source).
Multi Matrix BPX
Allows for selection of routes across tie-lines.
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Allows selection of source then destination across tie-lines.
Multi Matrix XY
Allows for destination then source selection across tie-lines.
MultiViewer Device
Screen recalls and pushing.
Passive (default)
Used for text labels and other graphics when no other action is
required.
Playout Device
Required for VTR / server control, play list display.
Router BPX
Allows selection of routes as a grid for single button per crosspoint
to single router.
Router Dial Up
Allows for keypad dial-up for routing functions, source and
destination keypads.
Router XY
Allows for destination then source selection on a single router.
Source Queue
For use with reverse mimic chain. Not for general use.
Tag Name Editing
Allows run mode editing of names without altering the configuration.
Table 31.
Group Behaviors
The Group properties determine the behavior of the controls within the group. Add controls
from the Toolbox to the Group, see “Toolbox” on page 115.
For details of the behaviors that can be allocated to each design control, see Appendix E.
6.7 Toolbox
The toolbox has groups of controls, each of which can be toggled open or closed by clicking
on the Group Heading. Fig 99.
The Toolbox displays at the bottom of the screen when in edit mode. The available list of
behaviors on a control depends on the type of controller selected in the group, and the
behavior for the group it is in. For example, a button can be a destination for a router, or a play
button for video server.
Edit the position, size, style, and behaviors of the tools using the Properties Window. See
“Property Window” on page 119.
Group Headings
Fig 99. Toolbox Tabs and Controls
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6.7.1 Layout
A panel is a container for controls such as buttons, tallies, and so on. A screen must
have at least one panel. The behavior can be either Soft Panel or Hardware Panel.
Panels can be imported from, and exported to a template, or added through the Add
Panel Wizard.
When a panel is placed on a screen, it an be repositioned by clicking and dragging.
The current position displays numerically at the bottom left of the panel during
dragging.
A Tab control groups controls onto separate pages.
To add a tab page, right-click on the edge of the tab control and select Add Tab
Page. All controls added to the tab page are only visible when the tab page is
selected. To remove a tab page, right-click and select Remove Tab Page.
Groups: Each tab page can be assigned to a different Group, see section 6.6. All
controls added to a tab page are automatically assigned to the same Group.
Tab Headers: In run mode, it is possible to either show the tab headers, or create
separate buttons to select each tab page (Soft Panels only).
A Titled Box control is simply a black border that is placed around controls to show a
visual grouping of controls, with an editable title to describe the contents.
Fig 100. Layout Panel Controls
6.7.2 Controls
If the Behavior of a control is set to DCCP, the value is set in the relevant property on the
controller. All controls can tally back values too, in the form of text, slider, button colors.
Edit Button: Sets a DCCP text value. Only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic
and Generic Dial-up Groups.
Button: Performs a single action, generally setting a single value. For example, a BPX
button, play on a video server, setting a single value to video gain.
CheckBox: A checkbox can have a state of True or False. Checked and unchecked
values can be defined to give these results. Only valid as DCCP behavior for the
Generic and Generic Dial-up Groups.
Combo Box: A Combo Box allows for selection of a value from a drop-down list.
Image: Adds an image stored in the Brush Repository, see section 6.13. Use to add a
graphic to a button, a logo to a panel, or an image tally.
Table 32.
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Control Panel Controls
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Line: Adds a line. Initially the line is a diagonal. To reposition and resize the line drag
the round nodes at each end of the line.
To make complex lines, right click on the line, and select Add Waypoint to add a
node in the line. Reposition the node to make an angle. Any number of waypoints
may be added and moved in this way.
List Box: Allows selection of a value from a static list. Long lists display a scroll bar for
selection of a value not currently visible.
For Router Devices, Source and Destination names (including their alternative “Tag”
Names) can be changed while in Run mode, see section A.4.
Text Edits: Directly type a value. For example, a tag name or a video server clip.
Label: Displays any property value, or plain text. For example, can tally back on any
routed source.
Table 32.
Control Panel Controls
6.7.3 Numeric
For examples of how to use Numeric controls, see section A.5.
Composite Control: A combination of slider, up, down and reset buttons, and an edit
box in one control.
Slider Control: A slider can set a DCCP value within a specified range.
Up Down Control: Used to increment/decrement numeric property values.
Fig 101. Numeric Panel Controls
6.7.4 Advanced
Hyperion Thumbnail: Connects to a Hyperion playing native Hyperion format video
source.
Jog Shuttle: This is a control that allows configuration of a jog shuttle pro button, but is
not visible in run mode. Performs video server control in the same way as a normal
button but via the external USB Shuttle Pro device.
List Buttons: Automatically, displays all the possible options in a group of buttons. For
example, all options for aspect ratio settings.
Radio Buttons: Sets a DCCP field to the value of the selected radio button.
Source Queue: Used in mimic systems to queue sources.
Fig 102. Advanced Panel Controls
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Media Player: Link to a video streaming service.
Web Browser: This control shows a selected web page.
Fig 102. Advanced Panel Controls
6.7.5 Meters and Charts
Bar Meter: A bar meter displays the current value of a DCCP property. Setup several
meters alongside each other to provide a bar graph, for monitoring purposes, for
example.
Line Graph: A line graph displays the value of a DCCP property as it changes over
time.
Round Gauge: A “speedometer” type gauge that displays a DCCP property value.
Fig 103. Meters and Charts Controls
6.7.6 Mimic
Device Selector: A block of buttons for setting the mimic mode.
Mimic Box: A target block for mimic panels.
Fig 104. Mimic Controls
6.7.7 Device Chain
Device Chain Box: A target block for mimic panels.
Device Selector: A block of buttons for setting the mimic mode.
Fig 105. Device Chain Controls
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6.8 Property Window
The majority of control configuration is done through the Property Window. For example, the
dimensions of a Screen, the behavior of a Group, the position of a Panel, and all the colors,
captions, and behaviors of all the different controls, including buttons, labels, etc.
To view or edit the properties of a control:
1.
On the toolbar, click the
button. The Toolbox displays at the bottom of the window.
2.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Property Window tab.
3.
Select a control. The Property Window displays information that is relevant to the
selected control, see Fig 106.
Fig 106. Property Window
The behaviors available for each individual control, such as a button, depend on the Group
behavior. For example, if the Alarm behavior is selected for a Group then the behaviors
available to the controls within that Group are only those relating to Alarms. For details about
the behaviors available with each Group, see Appendix E.
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6.9 Device Explorer
The device explorer is used to view the DCCP values for all controllers and devices.
To view the properties of a device, at the bottom-right of the window, select the Device
Explorer tab, see Fig 107.
Fig 107. Device Explorer
6.9.1 DCCP Behavior
All controls that have the option for DCCP behaviors (depending on the Group behavior), can
access the controller’s configuration parameter.
Fig 108. List Box - Array Selection
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Each entry in the controller’s database has an OID address (Object Identifier). Navigate to the
required OID either from the Behavior drop-down list, or click the
button to open the
Choose Dccp Field browser, see Fig 108. Valid OID values are colored green. Invalid OID
values are colored red.
The OID can be dragged and dropped, or copied and pasted, to the relevant DCCP behavior
of another control.
Note:
It is possible to globally change the OID address for all Screen Objects and Rules through
the Configuration, OID Rewriter Helper.
6.10 Key Names
Assign names/numbers to buttons, either using the pre-defined key names, or customized
key names, as applicable.
Fig 109. Key Names
To add a caption to a button:
•
Drag a name or a number from the Key Names list to a button on a panel.
The name or number is applied as a caption to the button.
To add a new name:
•
Type a name in the text entry box, and click Add name.
The new name is added to the Key Names list, for future use.
6.11 Key Sequences
6.11.1 Run Mode Key Sequences
Key sequences can be automatically set from a dial-up keypad in Run mode, negating the
need to set them up in the first instance in the Key Sequences Editor.
To set run mode key sequences:
•
Issue 1 Rev 4
In the Property window of a dial-up soft panel, check the Run Mode Auto Sequences
checkbox in the Dial Up group behaviors.
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6.11.2 Key Sequences Editor
Buttons on a keypad group can be configured as dial-up sequences, which are stored in
source and/or destination sequence sets. Sequence sets are only relevant for soft panels.
To open the Key Sequences Editor, do one of the following:
•
Right-click on a panel and select Key Sequences.
•
From the Property window of a dial-up group, click the Key Sequences button.
•
Click on the Key Sequences tab, if it is currently docked, otherwise select it from the
Screens menu item.
Fig 110. Key Sequences Editor
In Design Mode, when the Key Sequences Editor is first opened, the first dial-up group on the
panel is automatically selected.
If there is more than one dial-up group on the panel, use the Group drop-down list to select
the group for which key sequences need to be configured.
6.11.2.1
Automatic Key Sequences
1.
In the Key Sequence Editor, select a group number from the Group drop-down list.
2.
Click on the Tools button.
Fig 111. Sequence Tools
3.
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Check the Auto sequences checkboxes for source associations and destination
associations, as required.
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To create Numeric sequences:
•
Click on the Numeric Auto Sequence button.
All possible sequences within the matrix are generated using the keypad numbers, for
example:
1 -> 0 -> 0
1 -> 1 -> 0
1 -> 1 -> 1
2 -> 0 -> 0 etc.
To create Mnemonic sequences:
•
Click on the Mnemonic Auto Sequence button.
All possible sequences within the matrix are generated using the keypad numbers
and named buttons, for example:
VTR -> 1 -> 1
VTR -> 2 -> 0
VTR -> 2 -> 1
EDIT -> 1 etc.
Sequences often contain more than one association, for example, VTR -> 2 -> 1 contains
VTR 2 and VTR 21.
In this example the Sequence Keys field of the Key Sequences Editor displays the keys VTR,
2, and 1.
Selecting a key displays the association for that part of the sequence in the Assignments field
of the Key Sequences Editor. For example, selecting the key 2 displays the association for
VTR 2. Selecting the key 1, displays the association for VTR 21.
6.11.2.2
Manual Key Sequences
To set a manual key sequence:
1.
In the Dial Up Sequence section of the Key Sequence Editor, click Start.
2.
Click the buttons on the panel in the desired sequence. Each button press displays in
the Dial Up Sequence box.
3.
To finish entering the key sequence, click the End button. The sequence is added to
the list shown in the Sequences box.
4.
Select the sequence in the Sequences list.
5.
Select a key press in the Sequence Keys list.
6.
On the Sources tab, select a Matrix followed by an Association.
The text that displays on the panel with each key press in the sequence displays in
the Part Entry field. This text is automatically generated using the key names but can
be changed if required.
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7.
Repeat this process until all the sequence keys have been assigned.
8.
Click Store to save the key sequences.
9.
Save and push the configuration to the controller.
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6.12 Auto Edit
6.12.1 Automatically Assign a Dial-up Keypad
To create a dial-up keypad:
Note:
1.
Select, or add, a grid of 4x3 buttons.
2.
Set the group behavior to Router Dial Up, or Generic Dial Up, and the button
properties to Dial Up.
Save the screen before applying a key assignment, as there is no undo available for Auto
Edit.
3.
With the buttons selected, right-click and select Auto Edit...
4.
From the Helpers tab select Dial-up and the appropriate layout and click OK.
Each button has its Lower Text behavior changed to the appropriate keypad number,
see Fig 112.
Fig 112. Automatic Keypad Dial-up
6.12.2 Automatic Key Assignment
Select a group of buttons and Workbench automatically assigns the correct source,
destination, or BPX, to each button.
To auto-assign sources, destinations or BPX:
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Open a screen created through the Add Panel wizard.
2.
On the toolbar, click the
button.
Save the screen before applying a key assignment, as there is no undo available for Auto
Edit.
3.
Select the buttons to assign.
4.
From the Properties Window, change the button’s behavior to Source, or Destination,
or BPX, according to the Group behavior and properties required.
5.
With the buttons selected, right-click, and from the Helpers tab select Sources or
Destinations or BPX.
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Fig 113. Automatic Key Assignment
6.
Select Matrix, and Association from the drop-down lists and click OK.
Each button is assigned a caption.
Note:
To edit the button labels, select the buttons, and from the behavior section select the
Content Type and Destination Name Length.
6.13 Brushes
The Brush Repository is used to create a palette of colors and images. Objects such as
panels and buttons can be colored with a brush from the repository, and graphics or logos
may be added to screens.
To open the Brush Repository, click the
button. The Brush Repository is also available
from the Controller Configuration | Routers | Icons section.
Fig 114. Brush Repository
Note:
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Images in Workbench have a name in the repository. Changing a brush, changes all
occurrences of that brush.
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6.13.1 Add a Brush
To add a brush:
1.
Click the
button.
2.
Rename the Brush.
3.
From the drop-down list, select the Brush Type:
•
Linear Gradient
•
Solid Color
•
Radial Gradient
•
Image
6.13.2 Clone a Brush
A clone of a brush creates an identical copy of an existing brush. The copy can then be edited
as required.
To clone a brush:
1.
Select a brush.
2.
Click the
3.
Rename the Brush.
4.
Edit the brush as required.
button. A copy of the brush is added to the repository named Brush 1.
6.13.3 Solid Color
Solid colors use the standard RGB color model. Colors are created by mixing amounts of
Red, Green, and Blue, see Fig 115.
Fig 115. Solid Color Editor
Set each mixing color by either using the slider or, by directly entering a value from 0 to 255.
When RGB=0, the color is black, and when RGB=255 the color is white.
The bottom slider sets the opacity level. With a value of 255 the color is opaque, with a value
of 0 the color is transparent.
6.13.4 Linear and Radial Gradient
A Gradient fades one color into another. There are three attributes:
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•
A start color
•
A finish color
•
An offset: Sets the start position of the gradient from the edge of the brush.
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Fig 116. Gradient Editor
The default setting for the gradient is fade from one color to another. It is possible to set-up
multiple fades by clicking the Add button. It is also possible to remove a fade by selecting it
and clicking Remove.
6.13.5 Images
An image is stored in the Brush Repository and can be selected as a brush in the same way
as choosing a color. Add the image to the Image Library before using it as a brush.
Fig 117. Image Editor
To add an image:
1.
Click Add new brush. This creates an empty default brush.
2.
To add a new image to the library; click Add image to library. This displays an Add
image dialog box.
3.
Navigate to the image, and click OK.
4.
Select the empty default brush (or one to overwrite) and click on the new image.
6.13.6 Rename a Brush
To rename a brush, select the brush and type the new name in the Brush Name field.
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Rules
7. Rules
7.1 Description
Rules are a custom logical system that can help to automate tasks in Workbench. Rules take
into consideration all the criteria that are set in the rules editor, and return a single boolean
output of TRUE or FALSE. One or more Actions can be set to occur as soon as the conditions
for the Rule are fulfilled.
To open Rules, log in as a user with Rules permissions, see section 4.3. It is available from
the Windows Start Menu:
Note:
Rearrange the Rules Editor, Property Editor and Actions in the Design View so that they
are open at the same time, see Fig 118. and “Mode Windows” on page 33.
Fig 118. Rules Editor Design View
7.2 Rules Editor
The Rules Editor lists the available Rules.
To select which rules are in operation, select
or clear
the Enabled checkbox. The rules
in operation can also be set from the Rules Service, See “Rules Service” on page 135.
To add a new Rule:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Open the Rules Editor tab at the bottom-right of the window.
2.
Right-click on the Rules folder and select Add New Folder. To rename the Folder,
click in the folder name and type directly into the name field.
3.
Right-click on the new folder and select Add New Rule. To rename the Rule, click in
the Rule name and type directly into the name field.
4.
To edit the new Rule, double-click on the Rule. The Rule displays in the Logic
Diagram Editor. By default, the editor shows a single Output.
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Rules
7.3 Toolbar
Table 33. lists the toolbar buttons:
Button
Description
Save: Saves the changes to the current rule.
Export: Exports the rule as a rules language file, or a raw
XML file
Import: Imports a rule from a rules language file, or a raw
XML file
Displays the following editors:
Table 33.
•
Rules Editor
•
Property Editor
•
Actions
•
Toolbox
•
Inputs
•
Logic
Toolbar Buttons
7.4 Toolbox
Fig 119. lists the logical actions in the Design View toolbox.
Fig 119. Toolbox
To place an action, click on the required action and position it in the Logic Diagram Editor.
Inputs are automatically placed at the left of the window. Actions are automatically placed in
the centre of the window, and the Output is always placed at the right of the window.
7.4.1 Inputs
The inputs (colored purple) are:
•
Connected
•
Now
•
DCCP
The Inputs window lists the currently active inputs.
7.4.1.1
Connected
This checks to see whether the selected controller is connected, and returns a boolean TRUE
or FALSE. To add a Connected input, either select it from the toolbox or click the
button.
7.4.1.2
Now
Uses the current date or time (system time) as the input to a Rule. To add a Now input, either
select it from the toolbox or click the
button.
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Note:
Rules
A Now input does not cause an event to fire so it must be used in conjunction with a DCCP
input, see 7.4.1.3.
A now input must be followed by one of three operators: 'Equal To', Less Than' or 'Greater
Than'. For example, an operation equivalent to (Now.Time > '12:00:00') returns TRUE if the
current time is after noon, and FALSE any time before that.
When writing the string into an operator for comparison purposes, several formats are
accepted:
•
Time: One second after noon can be expressed as:
12:00:01 (hh:mm:ss preferred)
120001 (hhmmss)
12:0:1 (h:m:s)
•
Date: The first of January 2009 can be expressed as:
01/01/2009 (dd/mm/yyyy preferred)
01/01/09 (dd/mm/yy. A two-digit year, 2000s is assumed)
01012009 (ddmmyyyy)
010109 (ddmmyy. A two-digit year, 2000s is assumed)
1/1/9 (d/m/y)
•
Day of the Week: The format must be the full day in words.
Monday
7.4.1.3
DCCP
This associates an input with a DCCP field. To add a DCCP input, either select it from the
toolbox, or click the
button from the Inputs editor.
Each physical entry in the controller’s database has an OID address (Object Identifier).
Navigate to the required OID either from the Behavior drop-down list in the Property Editor, or
click the
button to open the Choose Dccp Field browser, see Fig 120.
Fig 120. Select DCCP Field
It is possible to copy the OID and paste it into the relevant DCCP behavior of another control.
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Rules
7.4.2 Operators
The logical operators are:
•
Lookup: A “lookup driver” must be present on a controller. Add a lookup table with
sensible input and output values and then associate the lookup block with this driver.
The block translates its input to an output based on the data in the table.
•
Changed: If the input value changes, the Rule is fired.
•
Delay: The input value must remain the same for at least the value set in the delay (in
seconds). For example, if the delay is set to three seconds, the input must not change
within that time.
The following operators can have multiple inputs:
•
Is Equal To: All input values must equal the set value.
•
Greater Than: All input values must be greater than the set value.
•
Less Than: All input values must be less than the set value.
The Equal To, Greater Than and Less Than actions can be set to either compare a
Threshold value (a set value), or to Compare with each other (boolean). Fig 121. Shows
an example of two methods that return TRUE when both inputs equal 10:
Compare Threshold
Compare With Each Other
Fig 121. Compare Examples
The following logical operators are placed after (to the right) of an Is Equal To, Greater Than
or Less Than, or placed adjacent to another logical operator.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
AND: All input values must be TRUE.
•
NOT: All input values must be FALSE.
•
OR: At least one of the input values must be TRUE.
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Rules
7.4.3 Connections
A Rule must have a valid connection made between all Inputs, Operators and the Output.
Always make connections from left to right.
To make a connection between Inputs, Operators and the Output:
1.
Double-click on the item to be connected. A red connection line extends from the item
to the cursor.
2.
Move the cursor to where a valid connection can be made, the line changes green.
3.
Click to form the connection.
Make a Connection
Valid Connection
Unselected Connection
Selected Connection
Fig 122. Connections
Note:
Until a valid connection is made, the Inputs, Operators and the Output are greyed-out.
7.5 Property Editor
The behaviors of Inputs and Operators are set in the Property Editor.
To view or edit the properties of a control:
1.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Property Editor tab.
2.
Select a control. The Property Editor displays information that is relevant to the
selected control, see Fig 123.
Fig 123. Properties Editor
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Rules
7.6 Actions
Actions determine what to do when a Rule’s Output value is TRUE. There are five types of
Action:
•
Set Value: The Rule sets a DCCP to a specific value, see 7.4.1.3.
•
Copy Value: The Rule copies a DCCP value from one location to another, see
7.4.1.3.
•
Call Function: The Rule calls a function, with the specified parameters, if any, see
7.6.1.
•
Application: The Rule starts an application.
•
DCCP Increment Value: The Rule adds a value (positive or negative) to a DCCP
value. It can also increment dates (units = days) and times (units = seconds).
The default action is to Fire when the Output is TRUE. The color of the Action is Yellow.
Selecting the Active Low checkbox, sets the Rule to Fire when the Output changes from
TRUE to FALSE. The color of the Action is Red.
7.6.1 Functions
A Function Rule can reset a controller. If a controller is set as a Router or Tie-lines device,
there are additional options:
Tie-lines Function
Description
Reset
Resets the hardware on the controller card
ClearTielines
Routes a safe source to a tie-line destination
MakeRouteNative
Makes a route over tie-lines
MakeRouteNativeLocked
Makes a route over tie-lines (with locking)
MakeRoute
Makes a route over tie-lines
MakeRouteLocked
Makes a route over tie-lines (with locking)
Table 34.
Router Function
Description
Reset
Resets the hardware on the controller card
SetCrosspoint
Routes the source to a destination
SetAssoc
Routes the source or destination by association
SetMonitorRow
Routes to a built-in monitoring destination
SetSalvo
Recalls a router salvo
SetProtect
Protects a destination
ClearProtect
Unprotects a destination
SalvoSnapshot
Saves the current crosspoint to a specific salvo
Table 35.
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Tie-lines Functions
Router Functions
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Rules
7.7 Logic
The Logic window shows the Rule as a text string. Add Inputs and Operators to the Rule in
the Logic Diagram Editor, and the Logic string automatically changes to match. Edit the logic
string by typing values and operators, and the changes are reflected in the Logic Diagram
Editor.
To edit the logic text string, type a value or operator directly into the text string. The
background of the Logic window changes to a pale yellow color to indicate that there is a
difference between the Logic string and the Logic Diagram. To update the Logic Diagram click
the
button. If the Logic string is invalid, the background of the Logic window changes to a
red color, and a description of the error is shown at the bottom of the window.
7.7.1 Operator Syntax
Table 36. lists the syntax for all the operators.
Operator
Lookup
Syntax
Lookup(“Controller IP Address:Port Number”, ? , Input Name)
lookup("127.0.0.1:1000", 0, Input1)
Changed
valuechanged Input Name
valuechanged Input2
Delay
(Input Name after 0)
(Input1 after 10)
Is Equal To
Equal to: Compare with Threshold:
(Input1 = "10")
Equal to: Compare with Each Other:
(Input1 = Input 2)
Greater Than
Greater Than: Compare with Threshold:
(Input1 > "10")
Greater Than: Compare with Each Other:
(Input1 > Input 2)
Less Than
Less Than: Compare with Threshold:
(Input1 < "10")
Less Than: Compare with Each Other:
(Input1 < Input 2)
AND
((Condition 1) and (Condition 2))
((Input1 = 10) and (Input2 = 20))
NOT
not (Condition)
not (Input1 = 10)
OR
((Condition 1) or (Condition 2))
((Input1 = 10) or (Input2 = 20))
Table 36.
Note:
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Operator Syntax
A Logic string can be copied from one Rule and pasted into another Rule. However, the
two Rules must have the same Inputs.
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Rules
7.8 Rules Service
The Rules Service is an application that runs independently from Workbench. Multiple
instances of the Rules Service can run together, each of which can run specific Rules, or sets
of Rules.
In order for the rules to be active, the Rules Service must be running. Start the Rules Service
from the Windows Start menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Rules Service
Fig 124. Rules Service
To select which rules are in operation, select
or clear
the checkboxes for the Rule or
Folder. The rules in operation can also be set from the Rules Service, See “Rules Editor” on
page 128.
A folder name can be specified on the command line for the rules service to force it to load
only children of that folder. For example:
RulesService.exe -folder "Router Flip Flop”
The active state of rules is set via the rules editor as well as via the Rules Service GUI.
Note:
If two or more Rules set a value in the same DCCP destination, and there is a conflict, the
value is set by the last Rule in the list that attempts to set a value.
7.8.1 Rules Status
The folders and rules show different colors depending on the status of the rules. Table 37.
lists the possible states.
Icon
Description
Rule: Not Firing. The rule is running, but the conditions have not been met.
That is, the conditions of the Rule are FALSE.
Rule: Firing. That is, the conditions of the Rule are TRUE.
One or more Rules within a folder are firing.
Error: one or more Rules have an error.
Table 37.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Rules Status
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System Architecture
8. System Architecture
8.1 Description
The purpose of the System Architecture diagram is to capture information on system setup,
the devices present, their inputs and outputs, the cables linking them together, and
information on the controllers controlling them.
To open System Architecture, log in as a user with Architecture permissions, see section 4.3.
Fig 125. System Architecture
8.2 Toolbar
Table 38. lists the toolbar buttons:
Button
Description
Edit: Toggle the edit mode of the screen.
Save: Saves the changes to the current drawing.
New Drawing: Adds a new drawing.
Layout View: Add new devices
Cabling View: Add the cabling between devices
Zoom: Adjusts the size of the screen.
Setup tie-lines: Configure a tie-lines controller from the system
architecture information
Table 38.
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Toolbar Buttons
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Button
System Architecture
Description
Screens: Lists the screens available as tabbed windows at the
right-hand side of the drawing area:
•
Property Editor, see section 8.5.2
•
Device Types, see section 8.4
•
Drawings, see section 8.5.1
•
Devices, see section 8.5
Click on a screen to open that tabbed window. Alternatively, click on
the relevant window tab.
Table 38.
Toolbar Buttons
8.3 Menu
When in edit mode, performing a right-click on a device opens an editing menu:
Delete Selected
Deletes the current selection
Edit Pins
Edit the connecting pins for the current device
Show all attached cables
Display all cables attached to devices
Show cables attached on left
Display pins connected the left of the selected device
Show cables attached on right
Display pins connected the right of the selected
device
Show cables attached on top
Display pins connected the top of the selected device
Show cables attached on bottom
Display pins connected the bottom of the selected
device
Properties
Opens the Property window for the current selection
Screen Properties
Opens the Property window for the current drawing
8.4 Device Types
Device types are templates for devices that specify information on a type of device.
To create a new device type:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Select the Device Types tab (bottom-right of the window).
2.
Right-click and select Add New Device Type. The Device Editor displays, see Fig
126.
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System Architecture
Fig 126. Device Types Editor
3.
If the device is a Router, check the Is Router Device checkbox.
4.
A pin description is a either an input or output. For each Pin, click the Add button.
•
Type a pin Name.
•
Select a Pin Type from the drop-down list.
•
Type the Signal Path. This is the number of the pin that the pin is connected to.
Use the buttons near the bottom of the editor to rearrange the order of the pins.
5.
Click OK. The new device type is added to the list of devices, see Fig 127.
Fig 127. Device Types List
8.4.1 Import/Export Device Types
Device types files all have the .devtype file extension.
To import a Device Type:
1.
Right-click anywhere in the Device Types window and select Import.
2.
Browse to the location and select the appropriate .devtype file.
3.
Click Open.
To export a Device Type:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Right-click on the Device Type to be exported and select Export.
2.
By default, the filename is the same as the device name, with the .devtype file
extension. Browse to the location to save the file, and click Save.
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System Architecture
8.5 Devices
Devices and cables exist independently of drawings. Adding a device to a drawing does not
create a new device, it simply copies that particular device from list. Similarly, removing a
device from a drawing does not delete that device from the list.
The Device tab shows all the available devices. Multiple devices can be placed on a single
drawing, and a device can be placed on multiple drawings.
To add a new device.
1.
Select the Device tab (bottom-right of the window).
2.
Right-click and select Add New Device. The Create Device wizard displays.
3.
Type a unique name for the device, and click Next.
4.
Select whether to:
Create a new device based on a device type
a
Select the Device type from the drop-down list.
Create a new device based on a router matrix
5.
a
Select the Controller from the drop-down list.
b
Select the Matrix from the drop-down list.
Click OK. The new device is added to the list of devices, see Fig 128.
Fig 128. Devices List
8.5.1 Add a Device to a Drawing
To add a device to a drawing:
1.
Select the Drawings tab (bottom-right of the window).
2.
Double-click on the required drawing.
3.
On the toolbar, click the
4.
Select the Device tab (bottom-right of the window).
5.
Double-click on the device to be added.
6.
Drag and place the device on the drawing, see Fig 129.
button, and the
button.
Fig 129. Example Device
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System Architecture
8.5.2 Device Properties
To view or edit the properties of a device, open the property editor tab (bottom-right of the
window).
Some properties are specific to the selected device in the drawing, such as the size, show pin
names, show description and so on. The Device Settings properties apply to all instances of
the device, for example, color, controller, mimic settings etc.
Fig 130. Example Device Properties
8.6 Pin Editor
To edit the pins for a device, right-click and select Edit Pins... The Pin Editor displays. Each
pin has an icon that indicates its type, see Table 39.
Icon
Type
Input
Output
Two Way
Table 39.
Pin Types
8.6.1 Names and Connections
The Names and Connections tab is for changing pin names and to managing connections to
other devices, see Fig 131.
Fig 131. Pin Names and Connections
8.6.2 Display
The Display tab is used to change the way that pins are displayed for this particular block on
the drawing.
Note:
Changes are made only to the selected block.
Select which pins are visible, which edge they are displayed on, and in what order. Select
multiple pins to apply edits to more than one pin at the same time, see Fig 132.
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System Architecture
Fig 132. Pin Display
8.6.3 Mimic
A Mimic Diagram shows the cabling and routing between device. Also, explore and
manipulate signal paths through a broadcast system, see Fig 133.
Section A.13 shows a worked example of a simple, single matrix architecture, with two video
servers as inputs, and two multiviewers as outputs.
Fig 133. Mimic Diagram
The basic requirements for a Mimic Diagram are:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
One or more router matrices (linked by tie lines if there are more than one)
•
A set of re-entrant devices, with their inputs and outputs linked into the same matrix
•
A set of inputs and outputs for the system (generally servers, incoming lines,
multiviewers, monitors, and so on)
•
A router controller
•
A tie lines controller
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System Architecture
8.7 Cables
Link devices together with cables.
1.
To link an input to an output, click the
button on the toolbar.
2.
Click on the output pin to be connected. A red connection line extends from the pin to
the cursor.
3.
Move the cursor to an input pin where a valid connection can be made, the line
changes green.
4.
Click to form the connection.
Pins with cables attached are shown with a bold outline.
Fig 134. Cable Connections
8.7.1 Cable Routing
To make system architecture drawings easier to understand, add corners to a cable.
To create corners on a cable:
1.
When in cable mode, move the mouse over the cable. The cursor changes to a pen
shape when over the cable.
2.
Click and drag to position a corner.
3.
Release the mouse button to fixed the position of the corner
Multiple corners can be added to aid clarity of a diagram. Existing corners can be repositioned
by selecting the node and moving it.
Fig 135. Cable Routing
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Worked Examples
Appendix A. Worked Examples
The following examples assume a working installation and pre-configured controllers.
A.1 XY Soft Panel
A.1.1 Create New Panel
Fig 136. shows the finished panel; it has four sources and four destinations. The route for
each signal is set by selecting a destination, then a source, and clicking the Take button.
Fig 136. XY Panel With a Take Button
Prerequisites: A device controller (or simulator) must be attached for the following procedure
to work correctly.
A.1.1.1
Add New Screen
1.
Note:
Note:
A.1.1.2
Issue 1 Rev 4
Open the Workbench Design window.
By default, the first time the Design window is opened, the first screen in the list is shown.
Subsequently, the design view displays the default screen.
2.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Screens Editor tab.
3.
Either on the Screens Editor tab click the Add button, or on the toolbar click the
button. The Add New Screen dialog box displays. Type a name for the new screen
(for example, Screen 1) and click OK. The new screen is added to the list.
To open any screen in the list, double-click on the thumbnail. Only one screen can be open
at a time.
Modify Screen Properties
1.
On the toolbar, click the
button. The Toolbox displays at the bottom of the window.
2.
Next to the Screens Editor tab, select the Property Window tab. Alternatively,
right-click anywhere outside the panel and select Screen Properties.
3.
Change the size of the screen to 390 x 560 (all dimensions are in pixels).
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A.1.1.3
Modify Panel Properties
1.
Note:
Worked Examples
Click anywhere on the panel, and from the property window, set the Sizing to
330 x 500, and the Position to left = 30, top = 30.
The panel can be positioned anywhere on the screen by clicking and dragging the panel.
2.
Click the
button at the top-right of the panel. This creates a new Group tab called
Group 1.
3.
Note:
A.1.1.4
Click the Group 1 tab and then the
property window.
button. The Group properties display in the
Double-click on a panel to lock it in place (the screen color changes).
Modify Group Behavior
1.
From the Behavior drop-down list, select Router XY Behavior. The full properties for
this router are shown.
2.
Select a Matrix and Level from the drop-down lists.
3.
Make sure Takes Required is set to Single.
4.
Make sure the Use Association Names checkbox is checked:
The Association Names are set in the Controller Configuration, Router properties.
A.1.1.5
Add Source Buttons
1.
On the toolbar set the Create Grid button to Rows = 1 and Columns = 4, and click the
Grid button. The background color of the grid button changes indicating that it is
selected.
Fig 137. Grid Button
2.
Note:
From the Toolbox at the bottom of the screen, click the Button control. Drag the
cursor and place the buttons on the screen.
If the Create Grid button is not toggled on, then only a single button is added.
Fig 138. Add Buttons
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A.1.1.6
Worked Examples
Move Buttons
To move the buttons:
1.
Either move them individually, or hold the Ctrl key down and drag the cursor around
the buttons to multiple select them, or hold the Shift key and click individual buttons to
select a number of them.
2.
Drag the buttons to the required positions, or enter values in the property window.
Fig 139. Multiple-select Buttons
A.1.1.7
A.1.1.8
Set Button Sources
1.
Select one or more buttons, and from the property window change the Behavior from
Passive to Source. The color of the buttons change to green.
2.
For each source button in turn, click the Source Association drop-down list and
select a Source.
Add Destination Buttons
1.
Note:
A.1.1.9
To create the destination buttons, either repeat the steps for creating the source
buttons, or copy and paste the source buttons, then change the properties.
Copies of buttons do not retain their labels.
2.
Select one or more buttons, and from the property window, change the Behavior to
Destination. The color of the buttons change to blue.
3.
For each destination button in turn, click the Destination Association drop-down list
and select a Destination.
Add a Take Button
A Take button confirms the selection of a source and destination.
A.1.1.10
1.
From the toolbox at the bottom of the screen, select the Button control, and place a
single button on the screen.
2.
Change the Behavior from Passive to Take. The color of the button changes to red.
Add a Tally
A Tally is a label that confirms that an action has been done.
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
From the toolbar, click the Label control. Add a label below one of the destination
buttons and resize it so that it is the same width as the button.
2.
Either add labels to the other buttons, or copy the label and paste it below the other
destination buttons.
3.
Select the labels and from the property window, change the Behavior to Text tally.
4.
For each tally, from the property window, change the Destination Association and
Level so that it has the same destination as the button above it. The Tally shows the
Source name set in the Controller Configuration: Router properties.
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A.1.1.11
Save the Screen
•
Note:
A.1.1.12
From the toolbar click the
button.
To set the screen as a default, from the Administration page, select the screen from the
Initial Screen drop-down list, see section 4.2.
Test the Screen
1.
Note:
Worked Examples
Select Run from the main menu.
It can take several seconds for the panel to communicate with the controller.
2.
Click one of the destination buttons, the button changes color.
3.
Select a source, the source button changes to a dim light.
4.
Click the Take button to route the selection; the source button changes to a bright
color. When switching between destinations the source button changes with the active
source.
A.1.2 Clone Panel Without a Take Button
Copy and edit the screen created in see section A.1.1 so that it does not have a Take button.
In this case, selecting a destination and then pressing the source also routes the signal.
Fig 140. XY Panel Without a Take Button
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Screens Editor tab. Right-click on the
screen and select Clone Screen. The Enter Screen Name dialog box displays. Type
a name for the new screen (for example, Screen 2) and click OK. The new screen is
added to the list.
2.
Double-click on the new screen to open it in the editor.
3.
On the toolbar, click the
4.
Delete the Take button, and move the destination buttons and tallies up.
5.
Click the Group 1 tab and then the
property window.
6.
On the toolbar, click the
7.
Test the Screen by selecting Run from the main menu.
button.
button. The group properties display in the
button.
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Note:
Worked Examples
It can take several seconds for the panel to communicate with the controller.
8.
Click one of the destination buttons, the button changes color.
9.
Select a source, and the source button changes to a bright color. When switching
between destinations the source button changes with the active source.
A.1.3 Link Panels Together
Add buttons to the two panels, to allow switching between them. A route selected on one
panel is also shown on the other panel.
Fig 141. XY Panels with Buttons for Switching Between Screens
Note:
1.
Open the Panel without a Take Button, see section A.1.1.
2.
Add and resize a new button.
3.
Set the Behavior to Screen, and Behavior Specific to Screen 2 (the panel without a
take button). If necessary, change the Caption to Screen 2 and clear the Show
Screen Name checkbox.
4.
Copy the new button, and save the screen.
5.
Open the Panel without a Take Button.
6.
Edit the panel and paste the new button.
7.
Set the Behavior Specific to Screen 1 (the panel without a take button). If necessary,
change the Caption to Screen 1 and clear the Show Screen Name checkbox.
8.
Save the screen.
9.
Test the Screens by selecting Run from the main menu.
It can take several seconds for the panel to communicate with the controller.
10. On either panel, route the signals as required. When switching between panels, both
panels show the same settings.
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Worked Examples
A.2 BPX Soft Panel
A BPX panel is a one-button per crosspoint style of panel. The operator pushes one of the
buttons and a source to destination route is made.
Fig 142. shows the finished four-by-four panel. The panel allows a monitor to view any of the
four sources. The active route is shown in green and the inactive in red.
Fig 142. BPX Panel
Prerequisites: A device controller (or simulator) must be attached for the following procedure
to work correctly.
A.2.1 Create New Screen
1.
Note:
Note:
Open the Workbench Design window.
By default, the first time the Design window is opened the first screen in the list is shown.
Subsequently, the design view displays with the default screen.
2.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Screens Editor tab.
3.
Either on the Screens Editor tab click the Add button, or on the toolbar click the
button. The Add New Screen dialog box displays. Type a name for the new screen
(for example, Screen 1) and click OK. The new screen is added to the list.
To open any screen in the list, double-click on the thumbnail. Only one screen can be open
at a time.
A.2.2 Modify Screen Properties
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
From the toolbar, click the
window.
button. The Toolbox displays at the bottom of the
2.
Next to the Screens Editor tab, select the Property Window tab. Alternatively,
right-click anywhere outside the panel and select Screen Properties.
3.
Change the size of the screen to 390 x 560 (all dimensions are in pixels).
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Worked Examples
A.2.3 Modify Panel Properties
1.
Note:
Click anywhere on the panel, and from the property window, set the dimensions to
330 x 500, and the Position to left = 30, top = 30.
Click and drag the panel to any position in the screen.
2.
Click the
button at the top-right of the panel. This creates a new Group tab called
Group 1.
3.
Click the Group 1 tab and then the
Property Window.
button. The Group properties open in the
A.2.4 Modify Group Behavior
1.
From the Behavior drop-down list, select Router BPX Behavior. The full properties
for this router are shown.
2.
Select a Matrix and Level from the drop-down list.
A.2.5 Add Buttons
1.
From the toolbar set the Create Grid button to Rows = 4 and Columns = 4, and click
the Grid button. The background color of the grid button changes to blue indicating
that it is selected.
Fig 143. Grid Button
2.
Note:
From the Toolbox at the bottom of the screen, click the Button control. Drag the
cursor and place the buttons on the panel.
If the Create Grid button is not toggled on, then only a single button is added.
Fig 144. Add Buttons
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Worked Examples
A.2.6 Move Buttons
To move the buttons:
1.
Either move them individually, or hold the Ctrl key down and drag the cursor around
the buttons to multiple select them.
2.
Drag the buttons to the required positions, or enter values in the property window.
3.
Select all the buttons and change their Behavior to BPX. The color of the button
changes to red.
A.2.7 Assign a Source and Destination to Each Button
1.
Select the top row of buttons, and select a source association. Repeat the process for
the other three rows, selecting a different source for each row.
2.
Select the first column of buttons, and select a destination association. Repeat the
process for the other three columns, selecting a different destination for each row.
Alternatively sources and destinations can be automatically assigned. See “Add
Buttons to Link Panels” on page 150.
A.2.8 Add Buttons to Link Panels
Add buttons on each of the XY panels to link to the BPX router panel, and from the BPX panel
to each of the XY panels.
Fig 145. Link Panels
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Worked Examples
A.3 Alarm Soft Panel
An alarm panel is useful, for example, to indicate the status of router fans and PSUs. Any unit
failing is immediately obvious from the screen, and action can then be taken.
Fig 146. shows an example alarm panel.
Fig 146. Alarm Screen
A.3.1 Create New Screen
1.
Note:
Note:
Open the Workbench Design window.
By default, the first time the Design window is opened, the first screen in the list is shown.
Subsequently, the design view displays the default screen.
2.
At the bottom-right of the window, select the Screens Editor tab.
3.
Either on the Screens Editor tab click the Add button, or on the toolbar click the
button. The Add New Screen dialog box displays. Type a name for the new screen
(for example, Alarm Screen) and click OK. The new screen is added to the list.
To open any screen in the list, double-click on the thumbnail. Only one screen can be open
at a time.
A.3.2 Modify Screen Properties
1.
On the toolbar, click the
button. The Toolbox displays at the bottom of the window.
2.
Next to the Screens Editor tab, select the Property Window tab. Alternatively,
right-click anywhere outside the panel and select Screen Properties.
3.
Change the size of the screen to 390 x 560 (all dimensions are in pixels).
A.3.3 Modify Panel Properties
1.
Note:
Click anywhere on the panel, and from the property window, set the Sizing to
330 x 500, and the Position to left = 30, top = 30.
The panel can be positioned anywhere on the screen by clicking and dragging the panel.
2.
Click the
button at the top-right of the panel. This creates a new Group tab called
Group 1.
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3.
Note:
Click the Group 1 tab and then the
property window.
Worked Examples
button. The Group properties display in the
Double-click on a panel to lock it in place (the screen color changes).
A.3.4 Modify Group Behavior
1.
From the Behavior drop-down list, select Alarm Behavior.
2.
Define a name for the group, if required, for example “Alarms”.
A.3.5 Add an Image Tally
1.
From the Toolbox at the bottom of the screen, click the Image control. Drag the cursor
and place the image Tally on the panel.
2.
In the Property Window, select the Group defined above from the drop-down list.
3.
Select Image Tally from the Behavior drop-down list.
4.
Click on the OID Browse button (
).
The Choose DCCP Field window displays.
Fig 147. Fan Fault OID
5.
Navigate to Fan Fault 1. and click OK.
In this example the associated OID is 1.1.22.3.2.4.1.1 This number will be of use later.
6.
Click on the Brush/Value Settings button.
The Tally Brush Editor displays.
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Worked Examples
Fig 148. Tally Brush Editor
7.
Note:
From the drop-down lists, select colors for the Image Tally to display when the fan is
OK, or in fault status.
In the example screen, the Image Tally displays red when the status is True, i.e. the Fan is
in fault mode, and displays green when the status is False, i.e. the fan is not in fault mode.
8.
Click OK.
A.3.6 Add a Label
1.
From the Toolbox at the bottom of the screen, click the Label control. Drag the cursor
and place the label on the panel directly below the Image Tally.
2.
In the Property Window, select the Group defined above from the drop-down list.
3.
Select Passive from the Behavior drop-down list.
4.
Edit the text to change the name to “Fan 1”.
A.3.7 Add More Image Tallies
Due to the similar nature of the alarms being setup in this example, there are various
shortcuts that can be taken to create the panel.
1.
Copy and paste the Image Tally and Label.
2.
Select the copied Label, and from the Property window, change the name to “Fan 2”.
3.
Select the copied Image Tally, and in the Property Window, click on the OID Browse
button ( ).
4.
The existing OID from the first Image tally will be present. Navigate to Fan Fault 2 and
click OK.
In this example the associated OID is 1.1.22.3.2.4.2.1
Compare this to the OID of the first image tally (1.1.22.3.2.4.1.1), and it is apparent
that in this case just the penultimate number has changed from “1” to “2”. It can
therefore be determined that for Fan 3 the fault OID be 1.1.22.3.2.4.3.1.
5.
To create further Fan Fault Image Tallies, simply copy and paste an Image Tally and
Label, edit the text of the label, and edit the OID of the Image Tally.
The PSU Image Tallies in this example were created in exactly the same way, but with a
starting OID of 1.1.22.3.2.2.1.1 for PSU 1, and then again changing the penultimate number
for subsequent PSU faults.
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Worked Examples
A.4 Live Renaming of Sources and Destinations
For Router Devices, the Source and Destination names (including their alternative Tag
Names) can be changed while in Run mode.
1.
Add a new Group, set the Group behavior to Tag Name Editing Behavior, and set
the Controller to a valid Router Device Controller.
2.
Add a List Box, and give it an appropriate name. Set the behavior to Property
Selection.
3.
From the Behavior Specific section, set the Array to SourceAssocs (or
DestAssocs), see Fig 149.
Fig 149. List Box - Array Selection
4.
From the Behavior Specific section, set the Property to the name to be selected,
see Fig 150. In Run mode, the list box displays the list of Names.
Fig 150. List Box - Property Selection
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Worked Examples
A.5 Numeric Controls
This example shows how to configure a Slider, Up and Down, or Composite controller control
to set a value in a controller.
1.
Create a new panel.
2.
Add a new Group and set it to Generic behavior.
3.
Add a Numeric control and set the Minimum and Maximum values (For example, 1
and 10). For Composite sliders, set the Calibrated Value.
4.
Set the Behavior to DCCP.
5.
Set Oid property to an appropriate DoubleValue, see Fig 151.
Fig 151. List Box - Property Selection
To show that the Numeric Control works at run time, add a Label that displays the slider value:
6.
Add a Label control, and assign it to the same group as the slider.
7.
Set the behavior to DCCP.
8.
Copy the OID value from the slider, and paste it into the label behavior specific OID.
9.
Save and run the example. As the slider is moved, the label displays the current
value.
A.6 Radio Buttons
This example shows how to configure a Radio Button control to set a value in a controller.
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Create a new panel.
2.
Add a new Group and set it to Generic behavior.
3.
Add a Radio Button control.
4.
Set the behavior to DCCP.
5.
Set Oid property to an appropriate field (use numeric values for DoubleValue fields).
For example, see Fig 152.
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Fig 152. Radio Button Property Selection
6.
Click the Lookup Values button. The Lookup Values dialog box displays, see Fig
153.
Fig 153. Radio Button Lookup Values
7.
Click Add for each option.
8.
For each option, type a Name and the required DCCP Value.
9.
Click OK.
10. Save and run the example. As the slider is moved, the label displays the current
value.
Note:
The radio buttons are not visible until runtime.
To show that the Radio Button control works at run time, add a Label that displays the Radio
Button’s value:
11. Add a Label control, and assign it to the same group as the Radio Button.
12. Set the behavior to DCCP.
13. Copy the OID value from the Radio Button, and paste it into the label behavior specific
OID.
14. Save and run the example. As the Radio Buttons are selected, the label displays the
current value, see Fig 154.
Fig 154. Radio Button Example
Issue 1 Rev 4
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A.7 Monitor Buttons
Buttons can be added to a screen to monitor outputs. The monitors work on a single matrix
and single level. Monitors are only available on Nucleus controllers.
A.7.1 Add Monitor Buttons to an XY Panel
1.
Add a panel with an XY router group, and Source and Destination buttons. See “XY
Soft Panel” on page 143.
2.
Add a new button, and set the behavior to Monitor.
3.
Set the Row property to the required monitor number (according to the router
connected).
Fig 155. Monitor Button Properties
4.
Repeat for up to three further buttons, ensuring that the row is appropriately set for
each monitor output.
5.
If required, add a text tally using the Monitor Tally behavior, and setting the Row
property to the appropriate monitor number.
A.7.2 Monitoring on an XY Panel
1.
Click on a Monitor button.
The button lights denoting that monitor mode is active.
If the selected monitor is currently routed to a source or destination the relevant
button will light.
2.
Click on a Source or Destination button.
The button selected changes to its Preset color. Only one preset can be active at a
time.
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Fig 156. XY Panel Monitor Button Example
3.
Click the Take button.
The Preset button changes to Active and the output is visible on the monitor.
The panel remains in monitor mode until the Monitor button is clicked again.
Note:
When in monitor mode, buttons not part of the monitor set (for example, salvos, protect
buttons) are ignored.
A.7.3 Monitoring on a Dial-up Panel
Monitor buttons can also be a added to a panel with the Router Dial Up Behavior.
When in monitor mode, dial up a source or destination (the current selected one is applied
when clicking the Take button.
In the following example, clicking Take routes destination 2 to monitor 1.
Fig 157. Dial-up Panel Monitor Button Example
Issue 1 Rev 4
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A.8 Destination Follow
It is not possible to use the logical to physical mappings to configure destinations to follow
other destinations because additional source / destinations are ignored. However,
destinations can be set to follow other destinations with the Generic Editor. See “Generic
Editor” on page 94.
Example to set Destination 5 to follow Destination 1:
1.
Open Configuration Mode.
2.
Select a controller and click Edit Controller Config...
3.
Select the Generic tab and click Edit Controller... The Generic Configuration Editor
displays.
4.
Navigate to FollowDestinations, see Fig 158.
Fig 158. Destination Follow
Issue 1 Rev 4
5.
To add an element to the array, click Add Branch.
6.
Set the Destination to 5.
7.
Click Push Branch to Controller.
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A.9 Configure a MultiViewer
The MultiViewer driver supports the following MultiViewer property-based control and
monitoring features:
•
Setting captions (UMDs) either in Run mode, or upon a configuration push to the
controller.
•
Setting a layout either in Run mode, or upon a configuration push to the controller.
•
Receiving alarms in real-time in Run mode.
To add a MultiViewer to a controller:
1.
Select the controller from the Configuration screen, and click the Edit Controller
Config... button.
2.
From the Devices tab, check the checkbox for a MultiViewerDevice.
3.
Open the Generic tab and click the Edit Controller button to open the Generic Editor.
Fig 159. MultiViewer Configuration
Issue 1 Rev 4
4.
Under Devices, open the MultiViewerDevice branch.
5.
Set the Comms type, either IP or Serial.
6.
Set the Alarms type.
7.
Define all other alarm settings in the MultiViewer branch as required.
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A.10 Audio and Video Routing and Processing
Standard screens have been included for the provision of routing and processing video with
embedded audio, and discrete audio signals. These screens can be adapted or recreated in
the normal manner, as necessary for a particular router.
Note:
A valid license is required and must be installed for Audio Processing.
The 246x controller on the router must first be configured. See “Configuring Controllers” on
page 48.
The Main Menu screen provides access to the routing and processing screens.
Fig 160. Main Menu
Click on any of the boxes in the Main Menu to go to the appropriate screen:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Video Input: Audio Processing—apply delay, gain, mix channels, and shuffle
channels on the de-embedded audio
•
Video Input: Frame Sync—synchronize input video to a specified reference at a
particular standard, or add a delay
•
Audio Input: Processing (AES)—apply gain and select stereo mode
•
Audio Input: Processing (MADI)—apply gain and select stereo mode
•
Video Routing—XY routing of video
•
Video with Audio Track Routing—XY routing of video with routing of audio tracks
onto the video for embedding
•
Audio Routing—XY routing of audio channels
•
Video Output: Audio Processing—mix channels, shuffle channels, apply gain, and
delay on the audio prior to re-embedding.
•
Video Output: Frame Sync—synchronize output video to a specified reference at a
particular standard, or add a delay.
•
Audio Output: Processing (AES)—apply sample rate conversion, delay, gain and
select stereo mode
•
Audio Output: Processing (MADI)—apply sample rate conversion, delay, gain and
select stereo mode
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To return to the Main Menu from any of these screens, click on the Menu button at the bottom
left of each screen.
The Video Routing and Audio Routing screens can be accessed directly from each other
without the need to return to the Main Menu.
A.10.1 Audio Processing
Note:
Audio processing is live, so any changes to the audio are immediately applied. However,
mixed channels are not apparent until they are shuffled.
Within all processing screens, the selectable processes display at the top of each screen.
A.10.1.1
Dial-up Keypad
For each of the screens, use the dial-up keypad on the left of the screen to select the signal
for processing (either video with embedded audio, or discrete audio).
Fig 161. Dial-up Keypad
When using the video input and output screens, additional mnemonics buttons display to
allow for quick dial-up of named sources/destinations. These buttons can be further defined in
Design mode.
Fig 162. Mnemonic Keypad
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
If both the upper and lower text fields have been entered when setting up the mnemonic
buttons, the upper text is used for the first press in a sequence, and the lower text for
remaining button presses in the same sequence.
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Worked Examples
Shuffling
The shuffling controls are used to replace existing embedded audio channels on a video
stream with audio channels from the mixer or from a discrete audio stream. Also existing
embedded channels may be reorganized.
The output channels Ch 1 to Ch 16 display in columns across the screen. Within each
channel column an input channel is selected via a radio button. Each output channel can
have only one input. However, an input can be output to a number of channels, if required.
Before selecting the input channel, the audio type must be defined, for example, embedded.
Fig 163. Shuffling Controls
To shuffle a channel:
1.
Click on the appropriate audio type button of a channel. See Table 40.
2.
Click the radio button for the number of the audio channel to shuffle to:
Table 40.
Note:
A.10.1.3
Source Audio
Destination Audio
Embedded
Embedded
Processed
Audio Xpt
Mixer
Mixer
Silence
Silence
Shuffle Audio Types
All channels may be selected/deselected by clicking on the relevant button under All.
Delay
To add a delay to a channel:
1.
Click on the Enabled button.
2.
Enter a delay value in seconds.
To set the delay back to zero:
•
Click on the 0 sec button.
To disable the delay:
•
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Click again on the Enabled button.
All channels may be enabled/disabled, or set to zero seconds by clicking on the relevant
button under All.
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Worked Examples
Gain
To alter the gain of a channel, either:
•
Type a gain value directly into the numeric box, or
•
Move the slider for coarse control - 1 dB increments/decrements
•
Fine-tune with the up and down arrow keys - 0.1 dB steps (Mixer
screens only)
•
To return to 0 dB, click the 0 dB button (or Unity button in the
Mixer screens)
Other processing in the Gain screen:
Note:
A.10.1.5
•
Mute the source by clicking the Mute button (
).
•
Invert the phase by clicking on the Phase Invert button.
All channels may be selected/deselected for 0 dB gain, Mute/Un-mute, or Phase
Invert/Normal by clicking on the relevant buttons under All.
Mixing
Mix audio channels prior to shuffling.
For embedded audio there are 16 mixers each of which can mix-down up to 16 channels into
a single audio channel.
Fig 164. Mixing Controls
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Click on a Mixer button at the top of the panel.
2.
Using the up and down arrow keys at the top right of the panel define the number of
channels to mix down.
Configure the channels to mix-down starting with Ch 1, Ch 2 and so on without leaving any
gaps. For example, if mixing-down six channels, ensure that these channels are set up on
Ch 1 to Ch 6.
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3.
Click the appropriate button to set where the audio source is coming from. See Table
41.
4.
Set the channel number in the Input Index box, and click Set.
5.
If required, apply processing to each of the channels in the same way as in the Gain
screen. See “Gain” on page 164.
Source Audio
Destination Audio
Embedded
Embedded
Processed (Gain applied)
Audio Xpt
Off
Table 41.
A.10.1.6
Mixer Audio Types
Stereo Mode
For AES and MADI inputs and outputs, the stereo pairings can be adjustment using the
relevant buttons on the audio processing screen:
A.10.1.7
LR Swap
Swap the left and right channels of a stereo pair
Left Both
The left channel of a stereo pair is duplicated for both channels
Right Both
The right channel of a stereo pair is duplicated for both channels
Mono Mix
The two channels are mixed down to a mono channel
Normal
Standard left and right channel pairing
Sample Rate Conversion
Sample Rate Conversion (SRC) allows the sample rate of audio from the audio crosspoint to
be converted to a different sample rate either, asynchronously, or synchronously to an input
reference.
For example, sample rate conversion might be used when audio has been recorded on Mini
Disc at 44.1 kHz and it needs to be converted to 48 kHz for broadcast.
Note:
A separate valid license is required and must be installed for Sample Rate Conversion.
SRC Setup
1.
Select the SRC Rate from the drop-down list.
2.
Select the SRC Reference from the drop-down list, if required.
The reference can be any of the video references or an AES reference.
3.
Check the SRC Enable checkbox.
4.
Check the Use SRC checkbox. On AES audio screens check the appropriate Use
SRC checkboxes for each of the appropriate stereo audio pairs.
SRC Operation
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
AES - Sample rate conversion is applied to groups of eight audio pairs rather than
individual channels. All selected pairs in the group will be synchronous to each other
and output at the same selected sample rate. Deselected pairs will pass through with
their sample rates unchanged.
•
MADI - Sample rate conversion is applied to all pairs in the MADI output stream rather
than individual channels. All pairs in the MADI stream will be synchronous to each
other and output at the same selected sample rate.
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•
Channels within a pair must be the same initial sample rate and synchronous to each
other. If they are asynchronous to each other then sample drop or repeat is used on
the right channel to match the left channel.
•
Pairs within an AES group or MADI output stream can be asynchronous to each other
and can be different sample rates to each other when they enter the sample rate
conversion process.
•
The output from the sample rate conversion can be locked to the AES reference input
or one of the four physical video reference inputs.
•
If no reference signal is present on the selected reference input, all the SRCs on
output using that reference input will be free running and locked together. They
will not be locked to the free running SRCs on the other outputs that are using the
same reference.
Dolby Signals
•
Dolby signals must be routed as a synchronous AES pair. The Dolby signal will
automatically bypass the SRC even if the pair is selected for sample rate conversion.
Any reference locking is achieved by dropping or repeating Null samples in the guard
band.
Reference lock only mode
•
A group of pairs or a MADI stream can be locked to the AES reference or one of the
four physical video reference inputs without sample rate conversion being enabled.
•
Note:
If no reference signal is present on the selected reference input, all the SRCs on
output using that reference input will be free running and locked together. They
will not be locked to the free running SRCs on the other outputs that are using the
same reference.
AES - If channels within a pair are asynchronous to each other then sample drop or repeat
is used on the right channel to match the left channel.
MADI - If channels from the audio crosspoint are asynchronous to each other then sample
drop or repeat is used on all channels to match the first active channel in the MADI stream.
SRC straight through mode
•
Note:
If an AES pair doesn't have sample rate conversion enabled and doesn’t have a
reference selected then that pair will be output at the same sample rate as the left
channel of each pair. In the case of a MADI stream all of the pairs will be output at the
same sample rate as the first active channel of the MADI stream. For example, this
method can be used to pass Varispeed MADI.
The maximum sample rate that can be input to the SRC in straight through mode is
50 kHz.
AES - If channels within a pair are asynchronous to each other then sample drop or repeat
is used on the right channel to match the left channel.
MADI - If channels from the audio crosspoint are asynchronous to each other then sample
drop or repeat is used on all channels to match the first active channel in the MADI stream.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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A.10.2 Frame Sync
Synchronize or delay video on input or output to a specified reference at a particular standard.
Note:
A separate valid license is required and must be installed for Frame Sync.
The Frame Sync screen indicates the standard detected on the current signal.
Setup as many frame synchronizations or delays as required, selecting the relevant tabs. On
the input frame sync screen a Summary tab (and separate button) is available which, when
selected (clicked) displays an overview of the current frame sync configuration for all
standards.
To setup frame synchronization for a specific standard:
1.
Select the relevant standard from the tabbed pages.
Fig 165. Frame Sync Setup
2.
Note:
Choose an input reference to synchronize to, or allow to Lock to Input (Delay).
The input reference must have the same frame rate as the frame sync to synchronize to.
3.
Select Freeze Frame or Black Screen as the action to take in case of data loss.
4.
Define the offset, Frame, Line and Pixel (pixel only if synchronizing by line), or by a
delay (in milliseconds), as required.
The available offsets differ according to the standard being setup.
To enable frame synchronization:
1.
Determine if the synchronization is to be performed by Frame or by Line, by clicking
on the relevant button.
2.
Select the Audio:
Pre - the audio will not be synchronized
Post - the audio is synchronized along with the video
3.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Click on the Frame Sync Enabled button to turn it green.
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A.10.3 Routing
All audio whether embedded, or discrete (AES or MADI), is considered as mono channels for
processing, and all can be routed independently of, or with, video.
Routing of audio can be performed as follows:
Source
Destination
Audio embedded in video
Audio embedded in video
Audio embedded in video
Discrete AES audio
Discrete AES audio
Audio embedded in video
Discrete AES audio
Discrete AES audio
Table 42.
A.10.3.1
Possible Audio Routes
Audio Routing
Route audio channels using a standard XY panel.
Fig 166. Audio Routing
To navigate directly to the Video Routing screen:
•
Issue 1 Rev 4
Click on the Video XY button.
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A.10.3.2
Worked Examples
Video Routing
Route video using a standard XY panel.
Fig 167. Video Routing
To navigate directly to the Audio Routing screen:
•
A.10.3.3
Click on the Audio XY button.
Video with Audio Track Routing
Route audio tracks onto video, so that the new audio is embedded into the video on output.
Fig 168. Video with Audio Track Routing
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To route audio tracks onto video:
1.
Select a destination.
The In Use tally displays the current audio track selection.
2.
Select a new source.
3.
Click on the Track Preset button.
4.
Click the button for the destination audio track.
5.
Click the button for the source audio track.
The Preset tally indicates the audio selected for the destination track.
6.
Repeat steps 4 and 5 until all audio tracks required are setup.
7.
Click on the Take button.
8.
The audio sources are routed to the destination.
A.11 Audio Reference
A controller can be configured to distribute an AES reference around the router so that the
audio output cards can lock to it. The AES reference generated is either a free-running clock
set to a selectable AES clock rate, or it can be locked to a physical input reference on the
router (either of the incoming AES references, or one of the video references).
To lock to an internally generated reference the Generic Configuration Editor is used. For all
controllers the audio reference controls are in the BaseReference section of
ReferenceControl branch. See Fig 169. for an example where the ReferenceControl is
situated in a 246x controller tree. For a 2450 controller the ReferenceControl is under the
Config2450 branch.
Note:
Changes to any of these configuration values will require a push to the controller.
Fig 169. Audio Reference Configuration
Issue 1 Rev 4
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The fields for configuring the reference control are:
ControlAudioRefForControl
Controls whether the reference is set to that of the
incoming AES reference (True - default), or not
(False).
If the incoming AES reference is invalid, or not
present) the reference is set to free-run at the
ControlDefaultCtrlAudioRate.
ControlVideoRefForControl
Controls whether the reference is set to that of the
incoming video reference (True - default), or not
(False).
If the incoming video reference is invalid, or not
present) the reference is set to free-run at the
ControlDefaultCtrlAudioRate.
Note:
ControlPrefVideoRefForControl
Sets which video reference is used (0=video reference
1, 1=video reference 2 and so on.
ControlDefaultCtrlAudioRate
Defines the default audio rate for when a free-running
reference is set. Valid rates are 32k, 44.1k, 48k, 88.2k,
96k, 176.4k and 192k
If both ControlAudioRefForControl and ControlVideoRefForControl are set to True
then the ControlAudioRefForControl takes precedence.
A.12 Logging Configuration
Logging is configured through the Generic Editor.
1.
Open Configuration Mode.
Fig 170. Logging Configuration
2.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Select a controller and click Edit Controller Config...
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3.
Select the Generic tab and click Edit Controller... The Generic Configuration Editor
displays.
4.
Expand the controller branch.
5.
Depending on the controller used, expand either the LoggingSettings branch, or the
ConfigurationItems > Logging branch, and set the following parameters:
•
Enabled - True to enable logging output.
•
Output - UDP or Console (UDP logging is recommended)
On a Centra Controller, enabling Console sends all log information to the monitor,
via VGA on 2330, or HDMI on 246x controllers.
The 2450 controller does not have a VGA output so selecting Console sends log
messages to serial port COM1. This can be monitored using a terminal emulator
configured to 9600 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity.
Logging to the console can cause problems on the controller when setting
multiple crosspoints. This is because crosspoint log messages are quite large, so
setting multiple crosspoints results in the output queue filling up which causes the
Nucleus controller to stall waiting for space in the queue. This was addressed in
release 1.1.7 (Workbench V3.10) by restricting log messages sent to the console
to be warning (level 4) or above (DCCP-265). Earlier versions should either not
enable logging to the console, or manually set the Level parameter to 4.
Note:
COM1 is not available externally to Sirius 800 routers.
•
Level - Minimum level of messages to log (0 - 6). Setting to zero means every log
event is recorded.
The level numbers correspond to the following:
0: Debug
1: Trace
2: Verbose
3: Information
4: Warning
5: Error
6: Fatal error
•
Address - IP address to send log messages to (UDP logging).
•
Port - IP port to send log messages on (UDP logging).
UDP logging can cause a problem if the log client is not switched on. If logging is
enabled and configured to an IP address of a PC which is not switched on, each
time a log message is sent, the controller attempts to locate the device using an
ARP message. This can cause a delay setting crosspoints if the logging level is
set so that a log message is sent every time a crosspoint is set. To prevent this,
ensure the log client is running if UDP logging has been enabled.
Logging information sent on a UDP port can be gathered with the Database Log
Pump.
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A.13 Mimic Diagrams
The following example is a simple, single matrix architecture with two video servers as inputs
and two multiviewers as outputs. Fig 171. shows the inputs and outputs.
Fig 171. Pin Editor - Mimic
Six re-entrant modular devices are connected to the router, see Fig 172.
Fig 172. Re-entrant Modular Devices
A.13.1 Inputs
Each of the multiviewer outputs is connected to the router. Each output is set to display
individually on the mimic diagram. The mimic tab is used to set up how each pin displays on
the mimic.
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Check the Show on Mimic checkbox to display the pin as a block.
2.
Enter a category in the edit box to help organise the pins, see Fig 173.
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A.13.2 Outputs
Each of the multiviewer inputs are set up to be outputs of the example system. This is done in
exactly the same way as for the server outputs, see Fig 173.
Fig 173. Pin Settings
A.13.3 Router Matrix
The matrix device on the system architecture must also be associated with a matrix within a
router controller. This is done via the Property Editor, see Fig 174.
Fig 174. Router Matrix
A.13.4 Re-entrant Devices
The device must be displayed as a block. This is also done via the Property Editor.
Fig 175. Re-entrant Devices
A signal path must be set up within the device.
Since the modular devices here are not router devices, the mimic requires some information
on which pins connect to which. This is done via the Mimic tab in the pins editor, see Fig 175.
For each pin, enter the number of the pin to which it connects. Fig 176. shows the signals that
are to be traced from pin 1 and pin 5.
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Fig 176. Mimic Pin Settings
A.13.5 Setup a Mimic Soft Panel
To setup a mimic diagram on a soft panel, only two special controls are used: the mimic box
and the block selector. All the other controls are standard buttons and labels. Fig 177. shows
a completed mimic screen in design mode.
Fig 177. Completed Mimic Screen
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To set up a basic mimic panel:
1.
Create a new panel.
2.
Create a group and set the group behavior to Mimic Behavior.
3.
Set up the group behavior by assigning a tie-lines controller and choosing a
monitoring device and input.
4.
Add a Mimic box to the panel, ensure it is in the correct group and set the behavior to
Mimic Box. Various display options are available in the property editor for this control.
5.
Add a Block Selector to the panel and set the behavior to Block Selector. Various
display options are available in the Property Editor for this control.
6.
Add five buttons to set the mimic mode: Monitor, Route, Insert, Remove and Replace.
Set the button text and behavior as appropriate.
7.
Add a text label and set the behavior to Prompt Message. This displays instructions.
Alter the wording of the messages via the property editor.
8.
Add a text label and set the behavior to Target Block. This displays the name of the
selected target block.
9.
Add buttons for Previous Chain and Next Chain and set the text and behavior
properties as appropriate.
10. Add two text labels and set the behaviors to Active Chain and Chain Count. These
display the number of chains discovered and the index of the currently active chain.
Setup of the mimic diagram is complete.
A.14 RollCall Screens
When a RollCall Gateway controller has been configured, a screen can be designed to
control and monitor devices on the RollCall network.
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Create a screen and add a Generic behavior group to the default panel.
2.
Assign the RollCall controller as the group's controller setting.
3.
Add a label to the panel.
4.
Set the label's behavior to DCCP behavior.
5.
Set the label's OID property to a property underneath the Frames node of the
controller configuration.
6.
Save the screen and run it to see the results.
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A.15 GPI Overrides
When a hardware control panel is in one of the BPX modes it includes a joystick override
feature that allows the GPI to be used as inputs.
A.15.1 GPI Ports on a Panel
The15-way D-type connector on the rear of a hardware control panel provides opto-coupled
GPI ports.
Note:
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
GPIO1
9
GPIO9
2
GPIO2
10
GPIO10
3
GPIO3
11
GPIO11
4
GPIO4
12
GPIO12
5
GPIO5
6
GPIO6
13
+5 V 0.2 A
(current limited)
7
GPIO7
14
GND
8
GPIO8
15
GND
When using a 2330 or 2450 controller, or non-IP hardware control panels, only ports 1 - 8
are available.
A.15.2 Configuring GPI Overrides
When configuring a hardware panel in Design mode:
1.
Select the Panel Properties, and click on the Advanced button in the Panel Type
Specific section.
The Advanced Panel Configuration screen displays.
Fig 178. Example GPI Override Setup
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2.
Worked Examples
Define a number of groups, and click on the Apply button (in this example, “1”).
Groups allow GPIs to be allocated together, or separately, as desired.
For example: a single group may contain a number of GPIs that route sources to one
destination on a single matrix, or a number of groups each with one GPI controlling a
different input to a different output, or, any combination in between.
3.
Select a group to highlight it for editing.
4.
Click on the Matrix drop-down list and select a matrix.
5.
Select an output from the list of destinations.
A.16 Set Controller Dual Redundancy Over IP
To enable remote changeover of dual controllers over IP, the IP port configuration must be
configured.
Note:
This is relevant for Centra Controllers only. 2450 controllers are set up using the
configuration files.
1.
From the Configuration screen, edit the primary controller, and select Router
Configuration.
2.
Click on the Port configuration button.
3.
Add a new port, and configure it as an IP port, using the SW-P-02 protocol.
4.
Set the Controller type to Centra Controller.
5.
Set Single/Dual mode to Dual.
6.
Define the primary and secondary IP addresses.
Fig 179. Port Configuration Example
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7.
Click on the Matrix Ports tab.
8.
Select the Video level, and click on the Add Port button.
9.
Select the port just defined from the drop-down list in the Port: box.
Worked Examples
10. Edit the End Dest: to match that used in the LocalControl port.
Fig 180. Matrix Ports Example
A.17 Set up Tie-lines
In this example, two single level matrices are already setup, and a 2330 controller is used as
a tie-line controller for three tie-lines between the routers.
A.17.1 Set up a Tie-line Controller
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
From the Configuration screen, add a new blank Centra controller.
2.
Edit the controller, and add a TielinesDevice.
3.
Click on the Configure Devices button.
4.
Click on the Edit Tie Lines... button.
5.
The Tie Lines Editor screen displays.
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Fig 181. Tie Lines Editor
Note:
6.
Select a controller and click on the Add button. Repeat for the second controller.
7.
Click on the Add new tie line button.
8.
Enter a Name, Group and Owner for the tie-line.
The Owner field is used to link tie-lines to specific soft panels. See “Assign Specific
Tie-lines to the Soft Panel” on page 182.
9.
Select the Start and End point for the tie-line from the drop-down boxes.
10. Add a second and a third tie-line, and repeat.
Fig 182. Tie Lines Added
11. Click on the Apply button.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Worked Examples
A.17.2 Configure a Safe Source
A safe source (or park channel on RS422 router) is set up in the Generic Editor.
1.
Select the Tie-line controller from the Configuration screen, and click on the Generic
Editor... button.
2.
Navigate to the Safe Source parameter, as indicated in Fig 183.
Fig 183. Safe Source
3.
Click on the Safe Source parameter, and enter a port value in box at the bottom of the
Window.
4.
Click Set.
5.
Repeat for the second safe source, and click OK.
A.17.3 Configure a Soft Panel for Tie-lines
The soft panel will require four groups, one for each of the three controllers, and a
miscellaneous one for label, lines, etc.
The following behaviors should be assigned to each group:
Group
Behavior
Group Content
Matrix 1
Router XY
Standard router XY on Matrix 1 controller, with text tallies on
the Tie-line management section indicating tie-line output
ports
Matrix 2
Router XY
Standard router XY on Matrix 2 controller, with forward tallies
in the Tie-line Management section indicating tie-line input
ports
Tie-line
Multi-Matrix
Source and destination buttons in the Multi-Matrix section,
and Clear Tie-line buttons in the Tie-line Management section
Miscellaneous Passive
Issue 1 Rev 4
Lines, labels and backgrounds that don’t point to a controller
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Worked Examples
Fig 184. Example Tie-lines Soft Panel
A.17.3.1
Assign Specific Tie-lines to the Soft Panel
In the soft panel used for managing the tie lines, a link must be made to the relevant tie-lines
setup in the Tie-line Editor screen.
•
Using the soft panel example in the next section as a guide, set the Locked parameter
to the Owner/Lock name setup in the Tie Line Editor screen.
Fig 185. Group Behavior
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Worked Examples
A.18 Router Follow
The source or destination selection of a group can be configured to follow the source or
destination selection of one or more other routing groups.
For example, an Audio Processing behavior may be configured to follow the source or
destination selection of a Router Dial-up behavior.
When a source or destination on a routing group changes, any following groups automatically
change accordingly.
Note:
The followed groups reflect the change immediately if the followed group is on the same
screen, or reflect the change at the point when a screen containing the followed groups
displays.
To set up a router follow:
1.
Open the Group properties of a router screen.
2.
Click on the Follow Selection Configure... button.
The Follow Selection screen displays.
Fig 186. Router Follow
3.
Click on the Add button.
A new configuration row is added in the main area of the screen.
Note:
4.
In the new configuration row, select a router screen to follow, from the Screen
drop-down list.
5.
Select the group on that screen to follow, from the Group drop-down list.
6.
Determine whether it is sources, destinations, or both, that re to be followed. Select
from the Follow selection type drop-down list.
7.
Check the Follow routing selection checkbox.
Unchecking the Follow routing selection checkbox allows the router follow to be left
configured without actually following the router.
To remove a router follow:
•
Issue 1 Rev 4
Select the row to remove (click on the area outside of the drop-down lists), and click
on the Remove button.
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Worked Examples
A.19 Configure Dynamic UMDs
To configure dynamic UMDs to follow tie-line routes, a minimum of two controllers are
required, configured for the following devices:
•
A Router device
•
A Tie-lines device
•
A UMD Engine device
•
A UMD Driver device
A.19.1 Configure the Controllers
In this example two controllers are used to configure the devices. More controllers may be
used if required.
Note:
At least two 2330/246x/PC controllers are required, as a Tie-line device cannot be on the
same controller as a Router device. Similarly, a UMD engine cannot be on the same
controller as Tie-line device, or a UMD device.
Controller 1 - Router and UMD Engine
1.
Add a controller, and configure it as a Router device.
2.
From the Devices tab in the Controller Configuration screen, add the
UMDEngineDevice to the controller configuration.
Fig 187. Controller Configuration Screen
Issue 1 Rev 4
3.
In the UMD Engine Editor, click the Add UMD Driver button, and a new driver is
added to the list. Select the Driver from the drop-down list.
4.
Click the Add Tie-line Driver button, and select the Tie-line from the drop-down list.
5.
Click the Add a new field button, and a new entry is added to the list. Configure the
engine as required.
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Fig 188. UMD Engine Editor
Controller 2 - Tie-lines and UMD Device
1.
Add a second controller, and configure it as a Tie-Line device.
2.
In the Tie-line Editor screen, select a Router Controller.
3.
Click on the Add new tie line button, and set the following information:
Column
Description
Name
The name that identifies the Tie-Line.
Auto
Defines whether a tie-line is used automatically, or not.
Group
This allocates tie-lines to a specific group to ensure that routes are
available in smaller sub-sections. For example, if n operators must link to
their local monitors, there must be n+1 groups to make sure that each
operator has a set number of available tie-lines for their use, regardless
of how many tie-lines the other operators are using.
Start Matrix
The matrix on the router from which the signal originates.
Start Level
The level from which the signal originates.
Start Dest
The destination from which the signal originates.
End Matrix
The matrix to which the signal is to be sent.
End Level
The level to which the signal is to be sent.
End Source
The source to which the signal is to be sent.
Table 43.
4.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
Tie-Lines Configuration
Click Apply to save the Tie-Line configuration.
For UMDs the configuration can be left empty. Select a router device and click the
Synchronise Tie-line tally table button.
5.
From the Devices tab in the Controller Configuration screen, add the UMDDevice to
the controller configuration.
6.
In the UMD Device Editor screen, click the Add Group button. A new group is added
to the list, see Fig 189.
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Fig 189. UMD Driver Editor
7.
Type a Group Name.
8.
Select the Comms Type from the drop-down list. The options change depending on
the selection (there is no automatic check for valid COM ports).
9.
Select the Protocol from the drop-down list.
10. For each UMD in the group, click Add UMD. An entry is added to the list.
11. Enter the UMD Address. Each UMD must have a unique address.
See the UMD manufacturer’s documentation for details.
12. Type the Caption Text to display, its Alignment, and Brightness (0 = Minimum
8 = Maximum).
13. If required, select up to four tallies.
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Appendix B. Controllers Reference
B.1 2330 Controller
A 2330 Controller can either run on a 2330 Controller Card, or it can run on a PC.
One of the advantages of running a 2330 controller on the PC is that soft screens can be
designed without the danger of causing inadvertent disruption to a hardware controller. When
a design is completed, push the database to the hardware controller. Although this is a
software controller, it can see real devices that are connected to the computer’s COM ports.
B.1.1 PC Controller
To create a new 2330 Controller on a PC:
Note:
1.
From Windows, browse to the Workbench installation folder...
\MCM\Controllers\Win32, and copy CentraController.exe.
2.
Create a new folder on the hard drive (where Administration rights are granted) and
paste the CentraController.exe into the folder.
3.
Create a shortcut to CentraController.exe.
4.
Right-click on the shortcut and select Properties.
5.
At the end of the Target (after ...Controller.exe”), type -port 2007. Where 2007 is the
port number of the controller.
6.
Click OK.
7.
Double-click the shortcut to run the dummy controller. A command window displays.
If multiple controllers are required, repeat steps 1. to 7. and give each controller a different
port number and folder (each instance has its own .dccp-config file).
8.
From Workbench, open Configuration mode.
9.
Click the Add Controller... button. The Controller Settings dialog box displays.
10. Select the Type from the drop-down list. For 2330 controllers, select Controller.
11. Type a Name for the controller.
12. Set the Port to 2007 (or the port number set in step 5.).
13. Click OK. The new 2330 controller is added to the list of controllers.
Configure the 2330 controller in the same way as any other controller, see section 5.4.2.
RESET
RST
POK
HD
ACT
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
LK
AC
SP
B.1.2 2330 Controller LEDs
Front edge of card
Fig 190. 2330 Controller LEDs
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Table 44. Lists the Nucleus Controller LEDs.
LED
Description
0
ON - Controller Active
OFF - Controller Standby
1
ON - Watchdog enabled
OFF - Watchdog disabled
2
Flashing - indicates controller running
3
Not used
4
Not used
5
Not used
6
Not used
7
Not used
POK
Power OK
RST
Card is being reset. Reboot follows
ACT
Indicates the active card of a redundant pair
HD
Hard disk activity (if fitted)
SP
Not used
AC
Ethernet Activity. Flickers on send/receive
LK
Ethernet Link Status. Lights when active
Table 44.
2330 Controller LEDs
B.1.3 Updating 2330 Controller Cards
Note:
The 2330 Controller can be run as software on a PC.
All 2330 cards store their configuration information on a standard CompactFlash card. The
Pbak Deployment tool, which is installed along with Workbench, is used to write the required
configuration information to the boot sector of the CompactFlash card.
1.
Open Pbak Deploy Tool. From the Windows Start menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Pbak Deploy Tool
2.
From the File menu, select Configuration. The Settings dialog box displays.
3.
Select the folder and drive locations.
Target Drive
From the drop-down list, select the drive to which the CompactFlash
card is attached.
RTB directory
Specify the directory that contains the RTB executable file. To ensure
correct operation, use the most current router RTB file available.
DAT directory
The DAT directory contains configuration files required by the Morpheus
Automation system. This is not relevant for Workbench.
On time tools
directory
Specify the directory that contains the PbakDeploy.exe file.
Show Makedisk
progress
Select this option to display progress information when writing to the
CompactFlash card.
Table 45.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Pbak Deploy Settings
4.
Click OK.
5.
In the main window, select the Pbl2330Controller.RTB, and click Write to CF.
6.
When the configuration has been written to the CompactFlash card, click OK.
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7.
Controllers Reference
Update the config.xml file to reflect the controller’s actual IP address.
By default, the file is located in the Workbench installation folder... \MCM\PbakDeploy.
8.
Save the file and copy it to the CompactFlash card.
B.1.4 2330 Configuration File
The following code shows a sample config.xml file. Update the config.xml file to reflect the
controller’s IP address and SNMP details.
<Config>
<IP>
<Adapter>
<Number>0</Number>
<DHCP>false</DHCP>
<Address>10.1.0.10</Address>
<Port>2007</Port>
<SubNetMask>255.255.254.0</SubNetMask>
<DefaultGateway>0.0.0.0</DefaultGateway>
</Adapter>
</IP>
<RollCall>
<Enabled>false</Enabled>
<StartupDelay>5</StartupDelay>
<SharePort>2050</SharePort>
<BridgePort>2600</BridgePort>
<BridgeRemoteAddress>128.1.1.1</BridgeRemoteAddress>
<BridgeAutoConnect>false</BridgeAutoConnect>
<Name>Router</Name>
<Information1>Info1</Information1>
<Information2>Info2</Information2>
<NetNibbles>1000</NetNibbles>
<UseLongNames>false</UseLongNames>
</RollCall>
<SNMP>
<Enabled>false</Enabled>
<Contact>Snell Employee</Contact>
<Location>Test Lab</Location>
<SysName>Test System</SysName>
<EnableSnellTraps>true</EnableSnellTraps>
<DisableInitialNotify>true</DisableInitialNotify>
<TrapManagers>
<Address>172.31.7.133</Address> (up to 10 addresses)
<Address>172.31.7.134</Address> (for trap managers)
<Address>172.31.7.135</Address> (may be configured)
</TrapManagers>
<CommunityGetNames>
<Name>getonly</Name>
</CommunityGetNames>
<CommunitySetNames>
<Name>setonly</Name>
</CommunitySetNames>
</SNMP>
<Clock>
<!-- PAL configuration -->
<Format>NonDropFrame</Format>
<FrameRate>Pal</FrameRate>
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<VitcLine1>19</VitcLine1>
<VitcLine2>21</VitcLine2>
<GenerateVitc>false</GenerateVitc>
<BurnInColumn>100</BurnInColumn>
<BurnInLine>50</BurnInLine>
<SyncLine>7</SyncLine>
</Clock>
</Config>
B.1.5 RollCall Operation
In order for RollCall to operate the relevant templates must be copied on the controller’s
compact flash card. The templates are included with the Workbench installer, and deployed
(by default) to the Workbench installation folder... \MCM\Controllers\RollCall Templates\2330.
In this folder, the folders “Matrix,”, “Nucleus”, and “XYPanel” are required. Optionally, the
folder “WebContent” can be copied to allow web browser access to the controller.
RollCall also needs to be enabled in the config.xml file. See “2330 Configuration File” on
page 189.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
The RollCall templates must be updated if the controller software is updated. Both are
included in the Workbench installer.
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B.2 Nucleus 2450 Controller
A Nucleus 2450 controller maps the physical inputs and outputs of the router to the software
inputs (sources) and outputs (destinations).
To access the Configuration screen, log in as a user with Configuration permissions, see
section 4.3.
A Nucleus 2450 controller must be set as a Nucleus Controller (2450), which is a Router
controller, with the ability to connect to Panel devices. See “Configuring Controllers” on
page 48.
B.2.1 Features
Table 46. lists the main features of the Nucleus 2450 Controller:
Feature
Explanation
Mapping
Logical to physical source and destination mapping. Source
and destinations addressed by external controllers can be
mapped to different physical sources and destinations on the
frame.
Source / Destination
numbering and expansion
Non-contiguous source and destination numbering on one
level. The mapping capabilities of Workbench makes
expansion possible without moving existing modules.
Number of controllable
levels
Unlimited.
Expansion / Slaving
Commands received via SW-P-02 can control all levels on a
multi level system if levels are slaved using the RJ45
expansion link (for example, Pyxis to Pyxis).
Commands received via SW-P-02 cannot control any router
slaved using any serial protocol (for example, SW-P-02 /
SW-P-08) out (for example, a Freeway slaved from a Pyxis).
This applies to routing and audio modifiers.
Commands received via SW-P-08 and GVG-ES in can control
all frames and levels of a multi level system. This applies
whether they are slaved using the RJ45 expansion (Pyxis to
Pyxis) or SW-P-02 out on RS422 (for example, Pyxis to
Freeway). This includes audio modify commands.
Cygnus does not have an RJ45 expansion output, so slaving
from Cygnus is not possible.
Level sizes
There is currently a limit for the physical port mapping of a total
of 1152 input ports and 1432 output ports with the router
expansion bus: The first level is mapped as 576x576 (even on
a 17x17 Pyxis), each subsequent level occupies an additional
544 input ports and 544 output ports. This results in a current
maximum of 3 levels, depending on level size.
Expansion with serial ports does not have this limitation.
Router levels can be configured to any size when slaved via
SW-P-02 or SW-P-08 out.
Audio capability
Table 46.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Embedded audio is routed along with video. No separate audio
routing is available.
Nucleus 2450 Controller Features
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B.2.2 Nucleus 2450 Firmware
The Nucleus 2450 firmware runs on an FPGA within the controller. This is loaded every time
the controller is booted and consists of the file PA864.rtf on the CompactFlash.
There are two methods to update the firmware:
•
FTP access to the controller
•
Removing the CompactFlash card and plugging it directly into a PC
Update Through FTP
Open a FTP connection to the controller:
1.
Open a terminal connection to the Controller (the TCP port is 50000).
2.
At the command prompt, type: login.
User:2450
Password:xyz
3.
Type the command: Programdiskimage pbl2450controller.
4.
Wait for the message The new boot image was installed successfully.
5.
To reboot the controller, type Reboot. Alternatively, click the Force Reset of
Controller button.
Update Through Pbak
To update the software through the Pbak utility:
1.
Open Pbak Deploy Tool. From the Windows Start menu browse to:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Pbak Deploy Tool
Note:
2.
Make a backup copy of the existing PA864.rtf file, either on the PC or in a folder on
the CompactFlash card. If anything goes wrong as a result of this update, restore the
original FPGA firmware by putting the backup copy into the root folder of the
CompactFlash.
3.
Copy the new file “PA864.rtf” onto the CompactFlash card.
4.
Force Reset of Controller.
The archive (.zip) file has a firmware revision letter after the PA864 title, but the .rtf file used
does not have a revision letter. This is because the Nucleus software always looks for the
file with the fixed name PA864.rtf on the CompactFlash card. The version letter can be
found under “Version” branch in the Generic Editor. See “Generic Editor” on page 94.
B.2.3 Nucleus 2450 LEDs
D4
D5
D6
D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16
Fig 191. Nucleus 2450 Controller LEDs
Table 47. Lists the Nucleus Controller LEDs.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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LED
Controllers Reference
Description
Active / Standby
D4
•
Blue = Active
•
Purple (Blue + Red) = Standby
100 Mb Ethernet
D5
•
Green = 100 Mb (Ethernet)
•
Off = 10 Mb Ethernet/No activity
Ethernet Link
D6
•
Flashes = Ethernet activity
Crosspoint Switch
D9
•
Flashes Blue = Crosspoint switched
D10 Not used
D11
Not used
D12 Not used
Communications to other processor
D13
•
Green = Communications to other processor
•
Off = No communications to other processor
LTC
•
Flashes Blue = 625 TC present
•
Green = 525 TC present
•
Off = TC not present
D14
An FPGA interface validation error occurs if the software detects a difference
between the modules configured in the database and the configuration last written to
the modules in the frame. This can happen when a reconfigure is done to recognise
new cards and the Nucleus Controller is rebooted.
When the Nucleus Controller powers up, if it detects a difference between what was
configured last and the current configuration, it applies the new configuration and the
D15 LED shows an FPGA validation error, see Fig 191. The next time the Nucleus
D15 Controller is rebooted there is no mismatch and therefore the D15 LED is off. If the
D15 LED remains on, it could indicate a fault in the interface to the modules.
On a dual processor system, the D15 LED can indicate a mismatch between the
databases on the two controllers.
•
Red = FPGA interface validation error
•
Off = no error
Active / Standby
D16
Table 47.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Flashes Green = Active
•
Red = Standby
Nucleus 2450 Controller LEDs
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B.2.4 Network Initialization File
Each controller has its own configuration file that defines the network connections. The
Network.ini file can be edited using a text editor, for setting the IP address, for example.
The following fields are required in the Network.ini file:
[NETWORK]
Force10M=1
The “Force10M” flag specifies whether the network speed of the
controller is limited to 10Mbits per second or 100Mbits per
second. If this value is set to 1 then the network speed is limited
to 10Mbits per second. If it is set to 0 the network connection
can operate up to 100Mbits per second. If this value is omitted
from the .ini file the connection defaults to 10Mbits per second.
For Cygnus routers this must be set to 1.
For maximum compatibility and reliability, set this value to 1.
IPAddress=
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
This specifies a standard 4 byte IPv4 address. This value is not
used if “UseDHCP” is set to 1.
SubNetMask=
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn.
This specifies a standard 4 byte IPv4 subnet mask. This value is
not used if “UseDHCP” is set to 1.
DefaultGateway=
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
This specifies a standard 4 byte IPv4 address of the default
gateway. This value is not used if “UseDHCP” is set to 1.
DNSAddress=
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
This specifies a standard 4 byte IPv4 address of the domain
name server. This value is not used if “UseDHCP” is set to 1.
UseDHCP=1
The “UseDHCP” parameter is used to specify if the Nucleus
controller should obtain an IP address via DHCP (as opposed to
the address specified in the ini file). If this is set to 1 then the IP
address of the controller is assigned by the local DHCP server
and the IPAddress, SubNetMask, DefaultGateway and
DNSAddress settings in the ini file are ignored. If it is set to 0
then the ini file settings is used. If “UseDHCP” is not specified in
the ini file then it defaults to 1.
UseSNMP=1
The “UseSNMP” flag enables or disables the SNMP features on
the controller card. If set to 0 no SNMP features are activated on
the card. If set to 1 the SNMP features are activated (subject to
the restrictions in the next section). Note. If this changes, the
card requires a restart. If this entry is omitted from the ini file it
defaults to 0.
[SNMP]
Issue 1 Rev 4
Version=Version
Description Text
The “Version” variable is the text that is returned when the
sysDescr SNMP request (.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.1) is received by the
card.
Contact=Unknown
The “Contact” variable is the text that is returned when the
sysContact SNMP request (.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.4) is received by the
card. This can be set to the name and/or contact details
responsible for this equipment.
Location=Unknown
The “Location” variable is the text that is returned when the
sysLocation SNMP request (.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.6) is received by the
card. This can be set to the physical location of the equipment in
the facility.
SysName=2450
The “SysName” variable is the text that is returned when the
SysName SNMP request (.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.5) is received by the
card. This can be set to the name by which the equipment is
locally referred to.
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[SNMP]
NumberCommunityGet
Names=1
The “NumberCommunityGetNames” variable is used to specify
how many community get names are listed in the ini file using
the CommunityGetNameN variable. Up to 2 community strings
of up to 20 characters in length can be specified for get
operations. This is typically set to 1.
NumberCommunitySet
Names=1
The “NumberCommunitySetNames” variable is used to specify
how many community get names are listed in the ini file using
the CommunitySetNameN variable. Up to 2 community strings
of up to 20 characters in length can be specified for set
operations. This is typically set to 1.
TrapManager=1
The “TrapManager” variable is used to specify how many trap
manager addresses are listed in the ini file using the
TrapManagerAddrN variable. Up to 10 trap manager addresses
can be specified. Any more than this is ignored. This is typically
set to 1.
TrapManagerAddrN=172. The “TrapManagerAddrN” variable is used to specify the IP
31.7.133
address for trap managers. The N should be replaced by the
number of the trap manager (1-10).
CommunityGetName
N=public
The “CommunityGetNameN” variable is used to specify 1 of the
community strings used for get operations. The N should be
replaced by a unique digit (either 1 or 2).
CommunitySetName
N=private
The “CommunitySetNameN” variable is used to specify 1 of the
community strings used for set operations. The N should be
replaced by a unique digit (either 1 or 2).
EnableSnellTraps=1
The “EnableSnellTraps” variable is used to specify whether
traps are sent for changes to certain Snell specific variables. If
this is set to 0 MIBv2 system traps are sent, but no Snell specific
traps (for example, routed source change) are sent.
TrapMessageDelay=10
The “TrapMessageDelay” variable specifies the number of
milliseconds minimum that occurs between consecutive Snell
trap messages. For example if it is set to 10 there is a gap of at
least 10ms between each Snell specific trap message that is
sent. The reason for this is that when large numbers of
crosspoints are changed simultaneously (for example) a large
number of traps can be sent in quick succession, which can
cause unnecessary loading on the controller and management
station. It is recommended that this variable is set to a value
between 0 and 100.
Note: No traps are discarded as a result of this setting they are
simply queued up and sent at the specified intervals.
DisableInitialNotify=1
Issue 1 Rev 4
The “DisableInitialNotify” flag can be used to prevent the
controller card from sending power on startup traps for each
variable type that supports traps. The reason for implementing
this flag is that in a router with a large number of destinations
(512 for example) there are 5 trappable parameters per
destination. On startup this particular router would result in 2560
traps for the destination variables alone. By setting this variable
to 1 these initial traps are not sent (but all subsequent ones are).
This is global setting that affects all Snell specific variables.
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B.2.4.1
Controllers Reference
Example INI File
The following is an example of the Network.ini file:
[NETWORK]
Force10M=1
IPAddress=172.31.9.111
SubNetMask=255.255.224.0
DefaultGateway=172.31.1.6
DNSAddress=0.0.0.0
UseDHCP=0
UseSNMP=0
[DEBUG]
RTIPDiag=0
[ROLLCALL]
Enable=0
StartupDelay=5
SharePort=2050
BridgePort=2600
BridgeRemoteAddress=128.1.1.1
BridgeAutoConnect=0
Name=2450
Information1=Info1
Information2=Info2
NetNibbles=1000
UseLongNames=0
[SNMP]
Contact=Unknown
Location=Unknown
SysName=2450
NumberCommunityGetNames=1
NumberCommunitySetNames=1
TrapManager=1
TrapManagerAddr1=172.31.7.133
CommunityGetName1=getonly
CommunitySetName1=setonly
EnableSnellTraps=1
TrapMessageDelay=100
DisableInitialNotify=1
DisableOutputSignalTraps=1
DisableInputSignalTraps=1
DisableCrossPointTraps=1
DisableProtectStateTraps=1
DisableSrcAudioModifyTraps=1
DisableDestAudioModifyTraps=1
DisableFanFaultTraps=0
DisablePSUFaultTraps=0
DisableOutputStandardTraps=1
DisableInputStandardTraps=1
DisableModuleTypeTraps=1
DisableModulePresentTraps=1
DisableControllerCommsTraps=1
DisableMonitorRowPortTraps=1
DisableMonitorRowInputNotOutputTraps=1
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Controllers Reference
B.2.5 Configuration Initialization File
The following entries are required in the Config.ini file:
[DEBUG]
TestMode=0
Internal testing only. Set to “=0”
[ROUTING]
Set_Delay=-1
A delay in milliseconds before setting a crosspoint following
the first crosspoint received. The default is -1 (disabled). The
purpose is to ensure multiple crosspoints, sent serially, are
set on a single frame boundary. For example, if an external
controller is setting two crosspoints serially using general
switcher protocol, and the external controller cannot tell
where in the frame it is sending the messages, it is possible
for one crosspoint to go on one frame, and the second on
the next, if the serial commands straddled a frame. By
configuring a Set Delay of two milliseconds (the time to send
the second crosspoint), both crosspoints will have been
received when they are set. That way both crosspoints will
go on the same frame.
[CONFIG]
ResetAfterConfigPush=1
Configure the action to be taken after a configuration push.
Set to “1” to restart the controller after a full database push.
Default “0” disables automatic restart.
[O2overIP]
Enable=true
Enables SW-P-02 protocol over IP control.
Note: The default setting for this parameter is Enabled, so if
the parameter is missing, or commented out, it will still be
enabled.
TCP_IP_Port=2000
Port used for TCP/IP server connection. Default port is 2000.
UDP_Connect_Port=2001
Port used for UDP broadcast messages for connecteds.
Default port is 2001.
UDP_Stat6_Port=2002
Port used for UDP broadcast messages for status 6
changes. Default port is 2002.
Connect_MC_addr=224.1.1.1 Multi-cast address used for connecteds. Default address is
224.1.1.1
Issue 1 Rev 4
Stat6_MC_addr=224.1.1.2
Multi-cast address used for status 6 changes. Default
address is 224.1.1.2
TCP_IP_Link_Time=0
Time (in milliseconds on SC12/SC13, seconds on 2450) that
the link remains open after the last message is received. A
value of 0 causes the link to remain open indefinitely. Default
is 60000 / 60 (1 minute).
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Controllers Reference
Polltime=1000
The frequency (in milliseconds) SC12 polls the router for
status. Default value is every 1000 milliseconds. Increasing
this value reduces the load on SC12 and the router by
polling it less frequently. However, it does in crease the time
before an error is reported. It may be necessary to do this on
a heavily loaded SC12 or router. Reducing this value
reduces the time before an error is reported but increases
the load on the SC12 and the router. The value should not be
set lower than the TIMEOUT value.
Timeout=50
This is the timeout in milliseconds for a response from the
router. The default is 50 milliseconds. This should be
sufficient for most routers when single commands are sent in
a TCP/IP packet. If multiple connect messages are sent in a
single TCP/IP packet the timeout should be increased to 200
milliseconds. Also if the router is heavily loaded this value
may need to be increased. The number of TCP/IP
connections to the SC12 should not effect the timeout, since
this is the timeout on the serial port to the router. The clients
connecting to the SC12 may need to adjust their timeout for
the response on the network due to messages on multiple
TCP/IP connections being serialized to the router.
Return_Status_5=true
This determines whether status request 1 messages return
the status response 5 message, or whatever response is
returned from the router. The default is YES. Setting this to
NO means that status response 1 to 4 are returned
depending on what router the SC12 is connected to (See
SW-P-02 for which routers return which responses). This is
intended for use with existing equipment that does not
support the status response 5 message.
TCP_Connecteds=true
Used to switch on or off unsolicited connects on the TCP
connection. When set to false a connected messages are
only sent on a TCP port in response to a connect on that
TCP port. When set to true it behaves more like the serial
ports in that whenever a crosspoint is set a connected is sent
on all open TCP connections, even if not set by a command
on that port, for example, a panel. The default =true.
Connect_MC_ENA=true
Enables the multi-cast address used for connecteds.
Default=true.
Stat6_MC_ENA=true
Enables the multi-cast address used for status 5 changes.
Default=true.
[PyxisVideoInputMonitoring]
Issue 1 Rev 4
Output=17
This entry specifies which output on the router is used for
checking the signal lock on the inputs. Each input is routed
to this output in turn and if the output obtains a signal lock
then the input is deemed to have a valid input signal. This
feature enables input signal presence monitoring without
dedicated hardware. This value must be a valid (and
unused) output port on the router. To disable the Video
Input monitoring feature completely set this value to 0.
FirstInput=1
This entry specifies the first input port on the router that
input signal monitoring is enabled for. This is the first input
that is routed to the output port listed above for monitoring
purposes. This value must be a valid input port on the
router.
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[PyxisVideoInputMonitoring]
LastInput=17
This entry specifies the last input port on the router that
input signal monitoring is enabled for. This is the last input
that is routed to the output port listed above for monitoring
purposes. This value must be a valid input port on the
router. The video input monitoring algorithm continually
cycles through all inputs between in FirstInput and
LastInput values (inclusive).
ReadTime=400
This entry specifies the time (in milliseconds) that each
input is sampled for before switching to the next input. This
time must be sufficient to enable the crosspoint to switch
and the signal to lock. The recommended minimum time
for this is 400. The time it takes the SNMP interface to
recognise a loss of input signal is no greater than this
value multiplied by the number of sources being
monitored. For example, for 17 sources and a ReadTime
of 400 it would take SNMP no longer than (17 x 400)
6800ms (6.8s).
SignalPresentFromLocked=true This entry specifies whether the SNMP input signal
presence value should be set when the signal is locked. It
is recommended this is always set to true. If it is set to
false, only the input standard locked value is set.
B.2.6 RollCall Operation
In order for RollCall to operate the relevant templates must be copied on the controller’s
compact flash card. The templates are included with the Workbench installer, and deployed
(by default) to the Workbench installation folder... \MCM\Controllers\RollCall Templates\2450.
In this folder, the folders “Matrix,”, “Nucleus”, and “XYPanel” are required. Optionally, the
folder “WebContent” can be copied to allow web browser access to the controller.
RollCall also needs to be enabled in the network.ini file. See “Example INI File” on page 196.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
The RollCall templates must be updated if the controller software is updated. Both are
included in the Workbench installer.
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Controllers Reference
B.3 246x Controllers
A 246x (2462, 2463, etc) controller maps the physical inputs and outputs of the router to the
software inputs (sources) and outputs (destinations).
To access the Configuration screen, log in as a user with Configuration permissions, see
section 4.3.
A 246x controller must be set as a Router controller with RouterDevice and
LocalRouterDevice selected.
B.3.1 Features
Table 48. lists the main features of the 246x Controller:
Feature
Explanation
Mapping
Logical to physical source and destination mapping. Source and
destinations addressed by external controllers can be mapped to
different physical sources and destinations on the frame.
Source / Destination
numbering and
expansion
Non-contiguous source and destination numbering on one level.
The mapping capabilities of Workbench makes expansion
possible without moving existing modules.
Number of controllable
levels
Unlimited.
Level sizes
There is a limit for the physical port mapping input ports and
output ports with the router expansion bus. See the appropriate
router manual for the number of input and output ports available.
Expansion with serial ports does not have this limitation. Router
levels can be configured to any size within the limits of the
protocol when slaved via SW-P-02 or SW-P-08 out.
Audio capability
Up to 32 channels of Mono, Stereo or Dolby ‘grouped’ routing and
processing on a per channel basis.
See compatible routers for details of audio capabilities.
Table 48.
246x Controller Features
B.3.2 246x Firmware Update
1.
Locate the Standby 246x controller, see Fig 192. for LED positions:
LED 1:
Standby = Flashing Blue
Active = Flashing Green
2.
Check that the LED confirms the controller is in Standby.
3.
Insert the USB memory stick in the USB connector on the front of Standby controller
(see Fig 192.).
For details of the contents of the USB memory stick, see the relevant router manual.
Issue 1 Rev 4
4.
Press the Reset button (see Fig 192.).
5.
The controller will reboot and the new software will be copied to the controller.
6.
When all of the LEDs on the controller flash green the process is complete and the
controller can be rebooted.
7.
Remove the USB memory stick and press the Reset button to reboot the controller.
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B.3.2.1
Important:
Controllers Reference
Updating the Software in the Second Controller
1.
If the second controller remains Active press its Reset button (see Fig 192.). The
Active and Standby controllers swap over.
2.
Repeat the procedure from step 2. on page 200 to step 7. on page 200 for the second
controller.
Remove the USB memory stick before shutting the door on a router. Leaving the USB
memory stick in the controller will result in damage to the USB memory stick and the
controller.
B.3.3 246x Controller LEDs
USB Connector
Reset Button
Power OK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Fig 192. 246x Controller LEDs
Table 47. Lists the Nucleus Controller LEDs.
LED
Description
Power OK
Power OK
•
Green = Power is connected and OK
•
Off = Power is not connected or not OK
Active / Standby
1
Table 49.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Flashes Green = Active
•
Flashing Blue = Standby
246x Controller LEDs
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LED
Controllers Reference
Description
Master / Slave
2
•
Green = Master Controller
•
Blue = Slave Controller
Watchdog Status
3
•
Flashing Green = Watchdog enabled and running
•
Flashing Orange = Watchdog disabled
Serial Link Between Controllers
Displays the status of the serial link between the active and idle controllers. See
LED 5 for further information.
4
•
Blue pulsing Green = Link okay, data is being transferred.
•
Green pulsing Blue = Link okay, no data is being transferred.
•
Magenta pulsing Blue = Link error, no connection with the other
controller.
Indicates; the other controller is not present/not running or the serial link
is not working.
•
Orange Pulses = Error, received data for unconfigured device
Indicates; the other controller is configured differently from the controller
receiving the data or it has no configuration.
•
Red Pulses = Error, received data with invalid format.
Serial Data Replication (Local Router Device)
The Serial Link is used to replicate LocalRouter device data between the active
and idle controllers. Replicated data includes; crosspoint status, module
configuration and port configuration.
5
6
7
Table 49.
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Off = Active Controller
•
Flashing Green = Idle controller, receiving background update data.
•
Flashing Orange = Idle controller, data synchronisation with Active
controller in progress.
Not used
Not used
246x Controller LEDs
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Controllers Reference
B.3.4 246x Configuration File
The following code shows a sample config.xml file. Update the config.xml file to reflect the
controller’s IP address and other networking and SNMP details.
<Config>
<IP>
<Adapter>
<Number>0</Number>
<DHCP>false</DHCP>
<Address>10.1.0.10</Address>
<Port>2007</Port>
<SubNetMask>255.255.254.0</SubNetMask>
<DefaultGateway>0.0.0.0</DefaultGateway>
</Adapter>
</IP>
<RollCall>
<Enabled>false</Enabled>
<StartupDelay>5</StartupDelay>
<SharePort>2050</SharePort>
<BridgePort>2600</BridgePort>
<BridgeRemoteAddress>128.1.1.1</BridgeRemoteAddress>
<BridgeAutoConnect>false</BridgeAutoConnect>
<Name>Router</Name>
<Information1>Info1</Information1>
<Information2>Info2</Information2>
<NetNibbles>1000</NetNibbles>
<UseLongNames>false</UseLongNames>
</RollCall>
<SNMP>
<Enabled>true</Enabled>
<Contact>Snell Employee</Contact>
<Location>Test Lab</Location>
<SysName>Test System</SysName>
<EnableSnellTraps>true</EnableSnellTraps>
<DisableInitialNotify>true</DisableInitialNotify>
<TrapManagers>
<Address>172.31.7.133</Address> (up to 10 addresses)
<Address>172.31.7.134</Address> (for trap managers)
<Address>172.31.7.135</Address> (may be configured)
</TrapManagers>
<CommunityGetNames>
<Name>getonly</Name>
</CommunityGetNames>
<CommunitySetNames>
<Name>setonly</Name>
</CommunitySetNames>
</SNMP>
<Clock>
<!-- PAL configuration -->
<Format>NonDropFrame</Format>
<FrameRate>Pal</FrameRate>
<VitcLine1>19</VitcLine1>
<VitcLine2>21</VitcLine2>
<GenerateVitc>false</GenerateVitc>
<BurnInColumn>100</BurnInColumn>
<BurnInLine>50</BurnInLine>
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Controllers Reference
<SyncLine>7</SyncLine>
</Clock>
<Replication>
<Name />
<Address />
<Port>0</Port>
</Replication>
<FeatureFlags>
<AutoChangeOverIfNoNetworkTime>
-1</AutoChangeOverIfNoNetworkTime>
<ResetAfterConfigurationPush>
true</ResetAfterConfigurationPush>
</FeatureFlags>
<Watchdog>
<Enabled>true</Enabled>
</Watchdog>
</Config>
B.3.5 RollCall Operation
In order for RollCall to operate the relevant templates must be copied on the controller. The
templates are included with the Workbench installer, and deployed (by default) to the
Workbench installation folder... \MCM\Controllers\RollCall Templates\S800.
Copy all sub-folders to the controller.
RollCall also needs to be enabled. This is set in the Generic Online Editor, under the
ConfigurationItems node. Expand the RollCall node, and set Enabled to “True”.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
The RollCall templates must be updated if the controller software is updated. Both are
included in the Workbench installer.
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Controllers Reference
B.4 RollCall Gateway
To configure a RollCall Gateway:
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Navigate to the configuration screen and add a RollCall controller.
2.
Ensure that connection to the controller has been established by checking the
connection state icon.
3.
When connection has been established, Workbench automatically initiates discovery
of the RollCall network. Note that it may take several minutes to complete discovery of
a network the first time round. Information about the network is cached in order to
speed up future discovery attempts.
4.
Open the online generic editor and expand the Frames Detected branch. The branch
may be populated with a set of one or more subnets, each of which may be populated
with a set of one or more racks.
5.
Close the online editor and pull the controller's configuration.
6.
Open the offline generic editor. The Frames Detected branch should contain a
snapshot of the live network.
7.
Right-click on the Frames Detected node and select Copy. Right-click on the
Frames node and select Paste. A copy of the detected branch should appear
underneath the Frames node.
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Routers Reference
Appendix C. Routers Reference
C.1 Pyxis Routers
C.1.1 Install the Sample Pyxis Database
The sample database for Pyxis routers has several example controllers and hardware panels,
and are installed as part of the Workbench installation. To install the sample database:
1.
Browse to:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Example Databases
2.
The example databases are in .zip folders. Right-click the
DefaultPyxisControllersV3_9.zip and select Extract All... the Extraction Wizard
displays.
3.
Browse to an appropriate location for the files, and click Next. The files are extracted
to the selected location. Click Finish.
4.
Make sure that Workbench is NOT open.
5.
Open SQL server management express and connect to the server.
6.
Right-click on the Workbench database and select Tasks | Restore | Database.
7.
In the Source for restore section, select From device and click the
button. The Specify Backup dialog box displays, click Add.
8.
Locate the WorkBenchPyxisDefaultControllersMCMV3_9.bak file, select it and
then click OK.
9.
In the Specify Backup dialog box, click OK.
(browse)
10. Select the file from the Select the backup sets to restore section of the Restore
Database dialog box.
11. In the Select a page section, click Options. Select Overwrite the existing database
and Leave the database ready to use... (RESTORE WITH RECOVERY).
12. Click OK.
13. Start Workbench.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Routers Reference
C.1.2 Sample Controllers
Each controller has a standard set of control panels supplied in the sample database.
C.1.2.1
Pyxis AES - 144x144 Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 144x144 AES (actual router size is dependent on cards and rear
connectors fitted to Pyxis frame). All MADI Inputs and Outputs have been hidden (mapped
out) in the Logical to Physical port mapping tables so that controller is purely the AES inputs
and outputs only.
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
C.1.2.2
Pyxis AA - 144x144 Stereo Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 144x144 Stereo (actual router size is dependent on cards and rear
connectors fitted to Pyxis frame). All MADI Inputs and Outputs have been hidden (mapped
out) in the Logical to Physical port mapping tables so that controller is purely the Stereo
inputs and outputs only
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
C.1.2.3
Pyxis AA - 272x272 Stereo (64 MADI) Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 272x272 Stereo (actual router size is dependent on cards and rear
connectors fitted to Pyxis frame). All MADI Inputs and Outputs are exposed in the Logical to
Physical port mapping tables as pairs so that they are controllable, please refer to the Pyxis
handbook “Audio Port Numbering” section for more details
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
Issue 1 Rev 4
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C.1.2.4
Routers Reference
Pyxis AA - 288x288 Mono Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 288x288 MONO (actual router size is dependent on cards and rear
connectors fitted to Pyxis frame). All MADI Inputs and Outputs have been hidden (mapped
out) in the Logical to Physical port mapping tables so that controller is purely the MONO
inputs and outputs only
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
C.1.2.5
Pyxis AA - 544x544 Mono (64 MADI) A Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 544x544 MONO (actual router size is dependent on cards and rear
connectors fitted to Pyxis frame). All MADI Inputs and Outputs are exposed in the Logical to
Physical port mapping tables on to one so that they are controllable please refer to the Pyxis
handbook “Audio Port Numbering” section for more details
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
C.1.2.6
Pyxis Video - 72x72 Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 72x72 Video (Video signal format and actual router size is dependent on
cards and rear connectors fitted to Pyxis frame)
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
Issue 1 Rev 4
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C.1.2.7
Routers Reference
Pyxis Timecode - 128x128 Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 128x128 Time Code
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
C.1.2.8
Pyxis RS422 - 128x128 A Ref1
Dual 2450 Nucleus controller configured with independent IP address that controls a single
level of routing up to 128x128 RS422
Pyxis Serial port configuration:
Port 1 (Workbench COM 3) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 2 (Workbench COM 4) = General Switcher In (SW-P-02) for Aurora control
Port 3 (Workbench COM 5) = Panel Protocol with a 6276 X-Y configured for numerical
control of all inputs and outputs on address 1
Reference 1 has been configured as the primary reference source for all inputs
C.1.3 Sample Panels
The sample panels match the controllers:
Note:
•
AAMono 6276-00 - The default controller is: PyxisAnalogueAudio288x288MonoRef1
•
AAStereo 6276-00 - The default controller is:
PyxisAnalogueAudio144x144StereoRef1
•
AES 6276-00 - The default controller is: PyxisAES144x144Ref1
•
Video 6276-00 - The default controller is: PyxisVideo72x72Ref1
All the sample screens have an identical layout, see Fig 193.
Fig 193. Pyxis Screens
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Routers Reference
C.1.4 Pyxis Module Locations
For each router, it is important that the correct module addresses are set in the Workbench
controller configuration.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
Fig 194. shows the Pyxis card locations.
Controller Slot 1
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Slot 4
Controller Slot 2
PSU1
PSU2
Output Port
Number range
Input Port
Number range
Notes
Edit Module
Configuration
Number
Offset
Level Hex SW
Fig 194. Pyxis Card Locations
Cont A
0
0
10
XPT 2
Cont B
0
1
11
XPT 3
PSU 1
0
2
12
XPT 4
PSU 2
0
3
13
1 - 544
XPT 1
1 - 544
Pyxis Frame 1
Cont A
1
0
20
XPT 2
Cont B
1
1
21
XPT 3
PSU 1
1
2
22
XPT 4
PSU 2
1
3
23
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
1 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 1
577 - 1120
XPT 1
577 - 1120
Pyxis Frame 2 (Level 2)
0
30
XPT 2
Cont B
2
1
31
XPT 3
PSU 1
2
2
32
XPT 4
PSU 2
2
3
33
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
2 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 2
1121 - 1664
2
1665 - 2208
Cont A
1121 - 1664
XPT 1
1665 - 2208
Pyxis Frame 3 (Level 3)
Pyxis Frame 4 (Level4)
XPT 1
Cont A
3
0
40
XPT 2
Cont B
3
1
41
XPT 3
PSU 1
3
2
42
XPT 4
PSU 2
3
3
43
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
3 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 3
Pyxis Frame 5 (Level 5)
Table 50.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Pyxis Module Address Locations
Page 210
© 2013 Snell Limited
4
0
50
XPT 2
Cont B
4
1
51
XPT 3
PSU 1
4
2
52
XPT 4
PSU 2
4
3
53
Output Port
Number range
Input Port
Number range
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
4 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 4
2209 - 2752
Cont A
2209 - 2752
XPT 1
Routers Reference
Notes
Edit Module
Configuration
Number
Offset
www.snellgroup.com
Level Hex SW
Workbench
Cont A
5
0
60
XPT 2
Cont B
5
1
61
XPT 3
PSU 1
5
2
62
XPT 4
PSU 2
5
3
63
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
5 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 5
2753 - 3296
XPT 1
2753 - 3296
Pyxis Frame 6 (Level 6)
0
70
XPT 2
Cont B
6
1
71
XPT 3
PSU 1
6
2
72
XPT 4
PSU 2
6
3
73
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
6 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 6
3297 - 3840
6
3841 - 4384
Cont A
3297 - 3840
XPT 1
3841 - 4384
Pyxis Frame 7 (Level 7)
Pyxis Frame 8 (Level 8)
XPT 1
Cont A
7
0
80
XPT 2
Cont B
7
1
81
XPT 3
PSU 1
7
2
82
PSU 2
7
3
83
XPT 4
Table 50.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Slave 2452 (Only Knows
7 about ACTIVE card) Address
switch set to 7
Pyxis Module Address Locations
Page 211
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Routers Reference
C.2 Sirius 800 Routers
C.2.1 Sirius 850 Module Locations
For each router, it is important that the correct module addresses are set in the Workbench
controller configuration.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
Expansion O/P Modules
x24
Crosspoint Modules x5
Multiviewer O/P Modules
x2
Multiviewer Crosspoint
Modules x1 or Input Monitor
Module
Input Modules x12 (each
side of the Alarm Module)
Control Fan-out Modules x2
Audio Crosspoint Modules
x1 or x2
Crosspoint Modules x5
Multiviewer O/P Modules
x2
Nucleus Controllers x2
Output Modules x12 (each
side of the Controllers)
O/P Monitor Module
Fig 195. Sirius 850 Card Locations - Front View
Issue 1 Rev 4
Page 212
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13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
XPT 1
198
XPT 2
199
R [1]
202
200
XPT 4
201
MV Output 1
246
MV Output 2
247
MV XPT 1
245
Input Row
and Fan
Controllers
Audio XPT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
237
238
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
XPT 3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
XPT
1
2
233
234
XPT 1
193
XPT 2
194
XPT
R[1]
197
196
Table 51.
[1]
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
XPT 4
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
195
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
XPT 3
Outputs and
Monitor
Issue 1 Rev 4
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
Expansion
Modules
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Sirius 850 - Controller Module Addresses
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
1
C.2.1.1
Routers Reference
Sirius 850 Slot / Module Address Locations
Redundant Crosspoint Module
Page 213
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Routers Reference
C.2.2 Sirius 840 Module Locations
For each router, it is important that the correct module addresses are set in the Workbench
controller configuration.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
Multiviewer O/P Modules x3
Multiviewer Crosspoint
Module or Input Monitor
Module
BNC Re-clocking Input
Modules or Fiber
Re-clocking Input
Modules
Control Fan-out
Modules x2
Audio Crosspoint
Modules x1 or x2
Video Crosspoint
Modules x4 or x5
Nucleus Controllers x2
BNC Re-clocking Output
Modules or Fiber
Re-clocking Output
Modules
O/P Monitor Module
Fig 196. Sirius 840 Card Locations - Front View
Issue 1 Rev 4
Page 214
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Workbench
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248
MV Output 2
247
MV Output 1
246
MV XPT
245
Input Row
and Fan
Controllers
Audio XPT
1
2
233
234
XPT 1
193
XPT 2
194
XPT
R [1]
197
196
Table 52.
[1]
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
XPT 4
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
195
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
XPT 3
Outputs and
Monitor
Issue 1 Rev 4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
MV Output 3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
237
238
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Sirius 840 - Controller Module Addresses
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
1
C.2.2.1
Routers Reference
Sirius 840 Slot / Module Address Locations
Redundant Crosspoint Module
Page 215
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Routers Reference
C.2.3 Sirius 830 Module Locations
For each router, it is important that the correct module addresses are set in the Workbench
controller configuration.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
Multiviewer Output
Modules
Multiviewer Crosspoint
Module, or Input/Output
Monitoring Module
Video Crosspoint
Modules
Audio Crosspoint
Modules
Control Fan Out
Modules
Nucleus Controllers x 2
Input Modules
Output Modules
Fig 197. Sirius 830 Card Locations - Front View
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Sirius 830 - Controller Module Addresses
MV Output 3
248
MV Output 1
247
MV Output 2
246
MV XPT 1
245
R [1]
194
XPT
XPT M
193
Audio XPT
1
2
233
234
Table 53.
[1]
Issue 1 Rev 4
1
97
2
98
3
99
4
100
5
101
6
102
Input and
Outputs
237
238
Fan
Controllers
7
103
8
104
9
105
10
106
11
107
12
108
C.2.3.1
Routers Reference
Sirius 830 Slot / Module Address Locations
Redundant Crosspoint Module
Page 217
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Routers Reference
C.3 Cygnus Routers
C.3.1 Module Locations
For each router, it is important that the correct module addresses are set in the Workbench
controller configuration.
Note:
If the auto-configuration option is used, the number and types of module configurations are
automatically set. Any modules that are not present or not recognized are identified as
TUnknownModule.
Table 55. shows a summary of the module address ranges.
Module
Address Range (dec)
Inputs
1 to 48 (Top Input row = 1 to 24, Bottom Input Row = 25 to 48)
Outputs
129 to 152
Crosspoints
257 to 260
Monitors
270 to 272
Resilient crosspoints 261 to 264
Table 54.
Cygnus Module Address Ranges
Fig 198. shows the Cygnus card locations.
Input Cards (1 to 24)
Monitor Card Master (MON1 and 2)
Crosspoint Cards (XPT1 & XPT2)
Control Cards (CTRL1 & CTRL2)
Output Cards (129 to 152)
Crosspoint Cards (XPT3 & XPT4)
Input Cards (25 to 48)
Blank Slot
Monitor Card Slave
Fig 198. Cygnus Card Locations - Front View
Issue 1 Rev 4
Page 218
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Routers Reference
MON1
MON2
Workbench
Top
Input
row
1
13
2
14
3
15
4
16
5
17
6
18
270
271
7
19
8
20
9
21
10
22
11
23
12
24
XPT 1
257
XPT 2
258
Output
Row
129
141
130
142
131
143
132
144
133
145
134
146
N/A CTRL1
N/A CTRL2
135
147
136
148
137
149
138
150
139
151
140
152
Input
XPT 1
259
XPT 2
260
Bottom
Input
Row
48
36
47
35
46
34
45
33
44
32
43
31
<none> SPARE
MON3
272
42
30
41
29
40
28
39
27
38
26
37
25
Input
Output
Output
Input
Input
Table 55.
Cygnus Slot / Module Address Locations
C.3.2 Example Module IDs…
Issue 1 Rev 4
1 to 24
TDigitalVideoInputModule
25 to 128
TUnknownModule
129 to 152
TDigitalVideoOutputModule
153 to 256
TUnknownModule
257 to 258
TVideoCrosspointModule
259 to 269
TUnknownModule
270 to 271
TDigitalVideoOutputModule
272 to 280
TUnknownModule
Page 219
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Hardware Panels Reference
Appendix D. Hardware Panels Reference
D.1 Supported Hardware Panels
D.1.1 1U Panels
-
Panel
Mode
Description
6705
Split XY
16 sources to 16 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
4-bus XY
32 sources to 4 destinations, protect and panel lock
Split BPX
(16 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
BPX
32 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
Split XY
24 sources to 24 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
32x16 XY
32 sources to 16 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
4-bus XY
48 sources to 4 destinations, protect and panel lock
Split BPX
(24 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
BPX
48 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
XY
16 sources to 16 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
Split BPX
(16 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
6708
XY
24 sources to 12 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
6709
4-bus XY
16 sources to 4 destinations, protect and panel lock
Split XY
8 sources to 8 destinations with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
Split BPX
(8 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
BPX
16 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
36x18 X-Y
36 sources to 18 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
36x36 X-Y
36 sources to 36 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
72 BPX
72 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
18x18 X-Y
18 sources to 18 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
36BPX
36 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
6706
6707
6736 and
6028000
6759 and
6028100
Table 56.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Supported 1U Panel Types
Page 220
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Panel
Mode
Description
6028000 and
7028000
16x16 X-Y BPX
16 sources to 16 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 32 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
16x4 X-Y BPX
16 sources to 4 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 20 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
24x12 X-Y BPX
24 sources to 12 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 36 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
24x24 X-Y BPX
24 sources to 24 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 48 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
32x16 X-Y BPX
32 sources to 16 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 48 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
32x4 X-Y BPX
32 sources to 4 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 36 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
48 way BPX
48 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
48x4 X-Y BPX
48 sources to 4 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 52 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
72 way BPX
72 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
Dual 16 split BPX
(16 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
Dual 16+16 BPX
16 sources to 2 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
Dual 24 split BPX
(24 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
Dual 8 split BPX
(8 sources to 1 destination) x 2 with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock
6028100 and
7028100
16x16 X-Y BPX
16 sources to 16 destinations with 4 level buttons,
protect and panel lock, or 32 sources to 1 destination
with 4 level buttons, protect and panel lock
6028201 and
7028201
16 way BPX
16 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
32 way BPX
32 sources to 1 destination with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock
8x8 X-Y BPX
8 sources to 8 destinations with 4 level buttons, protect
and panel lock, or 16 sources to 1 destination with 4
level buttons, protect and panel lock
Table 56.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Hardware Panels Reference
Supported 1U Panel Types (Continued)
Page 221
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.1.2 2U Panels
Panel
Description
6276-00
All sources to all destinations, 8 level buttons
6276-01
All sources to 1 or 2 destinations (with alt-dest button), 8 level buttons
6277-20
All sources to 2 or 4 destinations (with alt-dest button), 8 level buttons
6277-40
All sources to 4 or 8 destinations (with alt-dest button), 8 level buttons
6277-60
All sources to 6 or 12 destinations (with alt-dest button), 8 level buttons
6277-80
All sources to 8 or 16 destinations (with alt-dest button), 8 level buttons
6026776
As panel 6276-00
6026777
As panel 6277-60 or 6277-80
6026778
Table 57.
As panel 6277-20 or 6277-40
Supported 2U Panel Types
D.2 Panel Features
This section describes features encountered across the range of hardware panel types.
Note:
Where features relate to panel types 6276 and 6277, the features are also applicable to
panels that mimic these panel types.
D.2.1 Special Functions
6276 and 6277 type panels have special functions displayed to the left of the source/dest
keypad. These buttons can each be assigned a different function, see Fig 199. See individual
panel features for special functions supported.
Protect
Line-Up
Source / Destination Keypad
Previous
Next
Fig 199. 6276 Panel Special Functions
D.2.2 Protect
Any control panel with a Protect button may lock any destination it has access to, which then
prevents any device using the same control system from changing that destination. The only
exception to this is a ‘Master’ panel. Any panel type may have a Protect button assigned; with
6276 and 6277 panels the function must be assigned to one of the special function buttons.
Protect operates on the destination assigned to each level for the destination association that
was protected.
If a control device attached to the multi-drop device ports attempts to set crosspoints on a
protected destination then an error message is shown on control devices with displays.
If they are assigned to the same destination, setting a protected destination causes protect
button LEDs on other BPX type panels to flash.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.2.3 Line-up
This is a continuous toggle (once a second) of the preset and program sources to the
selected destination, allowing easy comparison of sources. This is only available on 6276 and
6277 panels using the special function buttons. Line-up of sources is selected as follows:
Note:
•
Route source to be aligned to desired destination.
•
Make sure the level of the sources to be aligned is the most significant active level.
•
Select reference source as the preset source.
•
Press LINE-UP button on panel. The LED associated with the LINE-UP button lights
up to indicate that the button has been pressed.
•
Press TAKE button of desired destination. The source routed toggles between the
reference source and the source to be aligned.
•
Line-up of sources on a destination is cancelled by pressing the LINE-UP button
again. This cancels line-up altogether on the control device.
•
The source being aligned is returned as the source routed to the destination being
used and also the LED associated with the LINE-UP button is extinguished.
•
Pressing another TAKE button on the same panel causes the original source to be
routed to the previous destination and then start the line-up sequence on the new
destination.
All control devices power-up with line-up inactive.
D.2.4 Next and Previous
Each time the NEXT or PREVIOUS button is pressed, the source or destination association
number selected, depending on the active keypad, is increased or decreased. The panel
displays are updated accordingly. These functions only work on 6276 and 6277 panels.
D.2.5 Alt-dest
ALT-DEST allows a 6277 multi-destination panel to access more destinations than are
usually configured, that is, one per status display. When pressed, the panel changes control
to the alternate set of assigned destination associations configured in the database. When the
LED to the left of the ALT-DEST button is illuminated, the panel is then controlling the second
set of destination associations assigned to the panel. This function must use a special
function button.
D.2.6 Dest-ident
The DEST-IDENT button is used to identify the destination associations assigned to the
TAKE buttons on a 6277 multi-destination panel. Pressing and holding down the
DEST-IDENT button changes the STATUS to show the 8-character name for the assigned
destination association for the current set of destination associations. This button is especially
useful when an ALT-DEST button has been assigned.
D.2.7 Level Buttons
Many panel types have level buttons in their configuration. These allow ‘breakaway’ route
selections to be made, that is, routes that are made by selecting parts of an association.
Each button operates in a toggle on/off manner with the level button active indicated by an
illuminated button, or associated LED/lamp. The levels that each button controls are
individually configurable.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.2.8 Alt-lev
The Alternate level shift function is used on panels where there are more levels than level
buttons, allowing individual control of all levels. It operates in a toggle on/off manner with an
LED/lamp used to indicate the level shift - when the LED/lamp is off then the non-shifted
levels are controllable and when the LED/lamp is on the shifted levels are controllable.
The level shift function is button programmable on all panel types (BPX and X-Y). Any source
or destination button can be configured as a level shift button.
D.2.9 Clear
This key is used as a source preset or destination clear key and is generally assigned to the
bottom right key on the keypad of a 6276 or 6277 panel.
D.2.10 Controllable Destinations
This applies to X-Y panels only. Any destination can be configured to be controllable (default)
from a given X-Y panel. Routes may be viewed but cannot be changed.
D.2.11 Destination Keypads
All X-Y style panels have a destination keypad. This is either button-per-destination (BPD) as
on 1U XY panels, or dial-up (multiple button presses) as on 6276 panels. These are
configured in the database.
Press a destination button (BPD) or a sequence of buttons (dial-up) to select a destination
association. The advantage of a dial-up keypad is that many more destinations may be
accessed from the same size keypad.
The pressed button either illuminates if it has a valid associated destination association index,
or has alphanumerics to display the name of the selected destination association.
On power-up no destination button is selected, so all destination buttons are extinguished,
and any destination displays on X-Y panels are blank.
D.2.12 Source Keypads
All control panels have a source keypad. This is either a button-per-source (BPS) as on 1U
panels or dial-up (multiple button presses) as on 6276/6277 panels. These are configured in
the database.
Press a source button (BPS) or a sequence of buttons (dial-up) to select a source
association. The advantage of a dial-up keypad is that many more sources may be accessed
from the same size keypad.
The source keypads on 6276/6277 panels are used to pre-select sources, not route them.
These panels have <TAKE> buttons to confirm the selections.
The pressed button either illuminates if it has a valid associated source association index, or
has alphanumerics to display the name of the selected source association.
D.2.13 Panel Swap Mode
Panel Swap Mode is available for 6276 and 6277 panels. When activated in the database, it
causes the taken source and the preselected source to swap, or interchange, and therefore
allows the previously taken source to be re-routed with another TAKE. This could be
considered to be an undo facility, for quickly reverting to the previous selection.
This feature is currently supported on a 2450 controller only.
Issue 1 Rev 4
Page 224
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.2.14 Override Salvo Protects
This mode is only available for the 6276 XY panel, and is configured in the panel details.
When enabled, any Salvos fired from this panel overrides any system protects, from whatever
source they have been applied. This ensures that all crosspoints configured in a Salvo is
always set. Enabling this mode automatically enables the Master mode.
This feature is not currently supported.
D.2.15 Mask with Destination
This mode is available with all XY panels, including the 6276 and any 6700 series panels
configured as XY and is configured in the panel properties. When enabled, any destination
assigned to the panel that does not have a primary level association indicates this by flashing
the primary level panel lamp, and showing the next active level source in the status display.
This feature is not currently supported.
D.2.16 Display Audio Parameters
This feature can be applied to 6276 X-Y and 6277 multi-bus panels only. It is enabled by
assigning one of the special function buttons to be of the DISPLAY AUD type. When pressed,
source and destination audio parameters are indicated by the eighth character in the source
and destination displays for the most significant stereo Analogue Audio level in the system,
this may require the level buttons to be toggled on or off in order to show the desired audio
level.
This feature is currently supported on a 2450 controller only.
Table 58.defines the symbols used.
Symbol
Description
Space
Indicates normal source or destination
Steady ‘S’
Indicates destination is Swapped
Steady ‘M’
Indicates destination is Mono
Flash ‘N’ and ‘?’
Normal destination pre-selected
Flash ‘S’ and ‘?’
Swapped destination pre-selected
Flash ‘M’ and ‘?’
Mono destination pre-selected
Flashing ‘L’
Left channel of source routed to both channels
Flashing ‘R’
Right channel of source routed to both channels
Flashing ‘S’
Left and right channels swapped
NRM or NRM?
Source is Normal or pre-selected to be Normal
L-R or L-R?
Source is L-R or pre-selected to be L-R
R-L or R-L?
Source is R-L or pre-selected to be R-L
SWP or SWP?
Source L/R swapped or pre-selected to be L/R swapped
525 or 525?
Source using 525 trigger or pre-selected to use 525
625 or 625?
Source using 625 trigger or pre-selected to use 625
Steady ‘→’
No audio parameters on current most significant active level but other
levels configured with audio parameters
Flashing ‘→’ with No audio parameters pre-selected on most significant active level but
‘?’
other levels configured with audio parameter pre-selected
TRG?
AUP?
Table 58.
Issue 1 Rev 4
No source pre-select on level thus unknown trigger
No source pre-select on level thus unknown audio parameter
Audio Parameters
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.2.17 Configure Audio Parameters
This feature can be applied to 6276 X-Y and 6277 multi-bus panels only. It is enabled by
assigning one of the special function buttons to be of the <CONFIG AUD> type. When
pressed, not only are the source and destination audio parameters indicated by the eighth
character of the display, as in the previous table, but they may also be changed. When
enabled this feature allows pre-selection of destination AUD parameters for stereo analogue
audio levels. If panel is a Master 6276 X-Y then enabling this feature allows AUD parameters
to be assigned to sources and destinations and allows trigger type to be assigned to sources.
This feature is currently supported on a 2450 controller only.
D.2.18 Override Inputs
Some panels allow a number of override inputs to momentarily override the current source
routed to a destination with another source.
When all overrides are released the original source that was routed before any overrides
were activated is restored. Shorting an override input pin to 0 V, activates the override.
Each override input can have any source assigned to it and can be assigned to operate on
any level. If more than one override input is active on a panel, then the lowest number
override has priority.
When a destination is overridden no other crosspoint can be set on that destination by any
means unless it is a higher priority override.
The maximum number of overrides available to a panel is 16. Current supported panel s have
8 or 12 overrides available.
D.2.19 Panel Lock
Most panels have the ability to disable the takes, keypads and TAKE keys.
This can be done either using a panel lock button, or by connecting a key switch or similar to
the remote panel disable input.
Lock Button
The position of the panel lock button is set in the database configuration. It will also have an
associated LED/lamp.
Toggling the Lock button changes the panel between locked and unlocked with its associated
LED/lamp illuminating to indicate the state (ON = panel locked).
Remote Panel Disable Input
The remote panel disable input is enabled in the database panel configuration.
The system detects a locked panel through pin 8 of the Overrride (AUX) inputs located on the
socket connector on the rear of the panel.
To lock the panel pin 8 needs to be connected to 0 V.
Operation
When the panel is locked, the associated lock button LED/lamp is illuminated, and for panels
with alphanumeric displays, the Preset display indicates ‘LOCKED!’ The panel is thus
prevented from pre-selecting and routing sources.
The Panel Disable Input takes priority over the lock button on the front, and whilst the Panel
Disable Input is active the Lock button has no action.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.2.20 Making selections
'Crosspoint' selections (or routes) are made provided:
•
The destination and source are valid for the level
•
The destination is controllable
•
The level is active and controllable
•
The route is not inhibited
•
Destination is not protected
•
An override is not active on this destination unless the source is a higher priority
override
D.2.21 Panels with Displays
6276 and 6277 panels have alphanumeric displays for 8-character messages. The table
below defines warning messages used throughout the range.
Valid source selections are shown on ‘PRESET’ or ‘STATUS’ displays as defined by:
•
‘SSSSSSSS’ for 8-character.
•
‘PRESET’ warning messages are enclosed by ?. . . . ?
•
‘STATUS’ warning messages are enclosed by <. . . . >
Message
Explanation
‘<No Dst>’
No destination association selected
‘<No Src>’
No source selected because no destination assigned for any level in
destination association
‘<↓↓↓↓>’
‘<↑↑↑↑>’
No destination assigned in the selected destination association on the most
significant active level, but there are destinations on the lower levels
No destination assigned in the selected destination association on the most
significant active level, but there are destinations on the upper levels
‘<--¯¯>’
No destination assigned in the selected destination association on the most
significant active level, but there are destinations on the upper and lower
levels
‘?No Src?’
Source association with no sources on any level has been selected
‘*LOCKED*’
Panel <TAKE> button and source buttons are disabled via lock button or
remote panel disable
‘**PROT**’
Source cannot be routed as destination is protected. After a few seconds the
panel name is displayed before reverting back to showing the current source
routed a few seconds later
‘PROTECT?’ When flashing, it indicates that destination is protected on the next take
‘*OVRIDE*’
Source cannot be routed as destination has overridden source routed. After a
few seconds the name of the device responsible for the override is displayed
before reverting back to showing the current source routed or preset a few
seconds later
‘ROUTE
INH’
Source cannot be routed as route inhibited. Displayed in Preset display
‘?↓↓↓↓?’
‘?↑↑↑↑?’
Table 59.
Issue 1 Rev 4
No source preselected on the most significant active level, but there are
sources preselected on the lower levels
No source preselected on the most significant active level, but there are
sources preselected on the upper levels
Panels with Displays
Page 227
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Message
‘?↑↑↓↓?’
Hardware Panels Reference
Explanation
No source preselected on the most significant active level, but there are
sources preselected on the higher and lower levels
‘SALVO’
Displayed in STATUS or IN-USE displays to indicate that a salvo has been
preselected
‘NO XPT!’
Error message displayed in STATUS or IN-USE to indicate that a crosspoint
cannot be set as card not present
‘LEV CON’
Error message displayed in STATUS or IN-USE to indicate that a crosspoint
was not made on a level because the level was not controllable from that
panel
‘DST CON’
Error message displayed in STATUS or IN-USE to indicate that a crosspoint
was not made because the X-Y panel attempting to set it is not allowed to
control the destination
Table 59.
Panels with Displays
The brightness of displays on applicable panels may be changed by reconfiguring the
database. It is not possible to have different brightness levels for different displays on the
same panel.
D.3 Audio Modify/Video Reference Operations
D.3.1 Common Rules
While ‘config AUD parameters’ is enabled then only AUD parameters can be pre-selected
(i.e. sources and destinations cannot be dialled up). Press <CLEAR>, while in this mode to
return the panel to its previous state.
If the ‘display audio parameters’ function is disabled then full 8-character names is displayed
with no AUD parameter, even if the first level is Analogue Audio.
Selecting ‘display audio’ function results in the eighth character of the displays showing the
AUD parameter assigned for the most significant active level.
Assuming ‘display audio parameters’ is enabled then:
The eighth character in PRESET and STATUS displays is:
•
Steady (non-flashing) when source AUD parameter is NORMAL
•
Flashing when source AUD parameter is NOT NORMAL, for example, SWAP
Eighth character in PRESET window displays AUD parameter of the pre-selected source
displayed for the most significant active level in the system.
Eighth character in STATUS displays AUD parameter of combined source and destination
taken for the most significant active level.
Eighth character in DESTINATION displays the destination AUD parameter of the destination
displayed for the most significant active level in the system.
If <CONFIG AUDIO> is pressed to enable configuration of AUD parameters and no buttons
are pressed within a 1 minute time-out period then this function is automatically disabled and
the panel is returned to its previous state.
Enabling configuration of audio parameters always results in ‘display audio parameters’ being
enabled.
The 'N' character to denote Normal is only used in AUD parameter pre-selecting. Usually
eighth character is left blank to denote Normal.
If pre-selected route is found to be inhibited (from either editable route inhibit table or internal
system inhibit table) then the destination AUD parameter pre-selected is thrown away.
Issue 1 Rev 4
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Hardware Panels Reference
If a route is protected then AUD parameters and trigger type cannot be changed.
D.3.2 Rules for 6276 X-Y Panels (not designated master)
Only Destination AUD parameters can be assigned from this panel type.
Eighth character in DESTINATION display is also used to show the pre-selected destination
AUD parameter when character alternating with '?'.
Enabling configuration of AUD parameters by pressing <CONFIG AUDIO> always results in
selector LED being lit against DESTINATION display.
Operation 1:
Press <DISPLAY AUDIO> to enable audio parameters to display (optional).
Select DESTINATION display.
Dial up destination (for example, VT 3)
Press <CONFIG AUDIO> (selector LED lit against DESTINATION display) followed by the
required AUD parameter. The pre-selected AUD parameter is displayed (flashing alternately
with '?') in the eighth character of the DESTINATION display.
Press <TAKE> to:
•
Assign AUD parameter to destination
•
Update eighth character of DESTINATION display to indicate new AUD parameter
•
Update eighth character of STATUS display with combined source and destination
AUD parameter
•
Auto cancel ‘config AUD parameters’ mode
Operation 2:
Press <DISPLAY AUDIO> to enable audio parameters to display (optional).
Select DESTINATION display (selector LED lit against DESTINATION display)
Dial up destination (for example, VT 3)
Select PRESET display (selector LED lit against PRESET display)
Dial up a source (for example, VT 7)
Press <CONFIG AUDIO> (selector LED lit against DESTINATION display) followed by an
AUD parameter. The pre-selected AUD parameter is displayed (flashing alternately with '?') in
the eighth character of the DESTINATION display.
Press <TAKE> to:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Assign AUD parameter to destination
•
Update eighth character of DESTINATION display to indicate new AUD parameter
•
Update eighth character of STATUS display with combined source and destination
AUD parameter
•
Auto cancel ‘config AUD parameters’ mode
Page 229
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Hardware Panels Reference
D.3.3 Rules for 6277 Multi-output Panels
Only Destination AUD parameters can be assigned from this panel type.
When DEST-IDENT activated the eighth character in STATUS displays AUD parameter of the
destination for the most significant active level in the system.
Eighth character in PRESET display normally displays AUD parameter of the pre-selected
source displayed for the most significant active level in the system. It is also used to show the
pre-selected destination AUD parameter.
Operation 1:
Press <DISPLAY AUDIO> to enable audio parameters to display (optional).
Clear PRESET display.
Press <CONFIG AUDIO> and select an AUD parameter. An 8-character name is displayed in
the PRESET display to indicate destination AUD parameter pre-selected.
Press <TAKE> to:
•
Assign AUD parameter to destination
•
Update eighth character of STATUS display with combined source and destination
AUD parameter
•
Auto cancel ‘config AUD parameters’ mode and blank PRESET display
Operation 2:
Press <DISPLAY AUDIO> to enable audio parameters to display (optional).
Dial up source in PRESET display.
Press <CONFIG AUDIO> and select an AUD parameter. The pre-selected AUD parameter is
displayed (flashing alternately with '?') in the eighth character of the PRESET display.
Press <TAKE> to:
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Assign AUD parameter to destination
•
Update eighth character of STATUS display with combined source and destination
AUD parameter
•
Revert to showing source AUD parameter in eighth character of PRESET display
•
Auto cancel ‘config AUD parameters’ mode
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Control Behaviors
Appendix E. Control Behaviors
E.1 Panel Behaviors
A Panel can be set to Hardware Panel behavior, or Soft Panel Behavior.
XY6276Panel
x
x
x
MultiBusPanel
XY BPXPanel
Auto Display Tally
BPXPanel
Behavior
Dest Delegate
x
Dest Soft Assign
x
Display Source Assoc Name
x
GPI Panel Lock
x
x
x
Level Button Operation
MonitorBusPanel
For Hardware Panels, the following Panel Type behaviors are available:
x
x
Log Takes
x
x
x
Mask Levels With Dest
x
x
Master Panel
x
x
Override Salvo Protects
x
x
Swap Mode
x
x
x
Use Salvos
x
x
x
x
Use Tielines
x
x
x
x
For Soft Panels, Design controls such as buttons, sliders, and so on, must first be allocated to
a group, so that relevant control behaviors can be attributed to them.
The Group that a design control is allocated to defines which behaviors are available and can
be applied to that control.
E.2 Design Controls
E.2.1 Tab Control
A Tab Control has a passive behavior for all Groups.
E.2.2 Titled Box
A Titled Box has a passive behavior for all Groups.
Behavior
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel MultiBus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
MultiViewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
E.2.3 Button
Add
Alarm
Table 60.
Issue 1 Rev 4
x
x
Button Behaviors
Page 231
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Control Behaviors
Behavior
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel MultiBus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
MultiViewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Workbench
Alarm Screen
x
Alarm Screen Alias
x
Alarm Set
x
Alt Dest
x x x x
Alt Level
x x x x
Application
x x x x x x x x
Assign Alias
x x
Audio Modify
x
Base OID
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x x
x x
x
x
x
x
x
x x
Block Select
x
BPX
x
Break In
x
x
Button Select Layout
x
Call Function
x
x x
Clear
x x x x
Clear Routing Selection
x
x
Clear Selection
x
x
Clear Tie-line
x x x
Config Audio
x x x x
Connect Start to End
x
Copy Value Behavior
x
x x
Cue Clip
x
Cue To
x
DCCP Behavior
x
x x
DCCP Wildcard Behavior
x
x x
Delegate
x x x x
Dest Assign
x x x x
Dest Group
x
Dest Ident
x x x x
Dest Match
x x x x
Dest Source Select
x x x x
Dest Track
x
Destination
x x
Destination Alias
x x
Dial Up
x
x x x x
x
x
x
x
x x
x x
x x
x
x
x
Dial Up Enter
x
Display Audio
x x x x
Duration
x
Enqueue
x
Exit Run-mode
x x x x x x x x
Extended Page
Goto Page
Table 60.
Issue 1 Rev 4
x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x x
x x
x
x
x
Button Behaviors
Page 232
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Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel MultiBus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
MultiViewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Control Behaviors
Group Preset
x
Information
x
Input Monitor Source
Selection
x x
x x
Insert
x
x
Jog
x
Level
x
x x
x x x x
Line Up
x x x x
x x x
x x x x
Married Lamp
x x x
Mon Dest Select
x x x x
Monitor
x
x
Monitor Matrix
x
Monitor On
x
Monitor Row
x
Multi-Set
x x
x x
x
Navigate Back
x x
x x x x x x x x
Next
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x
Next Chain
x
Next Page
x x x
x x
x
Out of Service
Output Monitor Source
Selection
x
x x
x
x x
Page Index Preset Clear
x
x x
Page Index Preset Enter
x
x x
x
x x
Page Index Preset Key
Panel Lock
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Passive (default)
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Pause
x
Play
x
Preset All
x x
Previous
x x x x
Previous Chain
x
Previous Page
x x x
Protect
x x
x x
x
x x x x
Protect Lamp
Refresh
x
x
x
x
x
x x x
Recall Position
x
x
Refresh Clips
x
Remove
x
x
x
Replace
x
x
x
Reverse Chain Tested
x
Route
x
Salvo
Table 60.
Issue 1 Rev 4
x
x
x x
x x x x
x
x
x
Button Behaviors
Page 233
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Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel MultiBus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
MultiViewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Control Behaviors
Salvo & Screen
x
Salvo Snapshot
x x
Salvo Toggle
x x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Screen
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Screen Alias
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Select From Monitor
x
Select Play Port
Selected Alarm
x
x
Shuttle
x
Snapshot Editor
x
x x
x
x
x
Snapshot Run
x
x x
x
x
x
Snapshot Save
x
x x
x
x
x
Source
x x
Source Alias
x x
Source Group
x
x
x
x
x x
x
x x
x
Source Select
x
Source Track
x
Stop
x
Store Position
Tab Page
x
x x x x x x x x
Take
x
x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
Take Next
x x x x
Take Previous
x x x x
Toggle Button Behavior
x
Track Preset
Undo Take
x x
x
x x
x
x
x x
VAR
Table 60.
x x
x x x x
x x x
x
Button Behaviors
E.2.4 CheckBox
The CheckBox control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial-up
Groups. The CheckBox sets a value in a DCCP field to TRUE or FALSE.
Note:
Issue 1 Rev 4
The DCCP field must be a text field, such as a Name, UseLastRunViewChanges or
StringValue. If the DCCP field is set to change a DoubleValue field, an error displays at
runtime.
Page 234
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Control Behaviors
Behavior
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
E.2.5 Combo Box
Active Alarms
x
DCCP behavior
x
x x
Device Chain End Device
x
Device Chain End Device
Input
x
Device Chain Start Device
x
Device Chain Start Device
Output
x
Forward Tally
x x x x
x
x
x
Passive (default)
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Screen List
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Selected Clip
x
Selected Layout
x
Selected Playout Device
x
Snapshot List
Table 61.
x
x x
x
x
x
Combo Box Behaviors
E.2.6 Edit Button
The Edit Button control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial-up
Groups. The Edit Button sets a value in a DCCP field to a text value.
Note:
The DCCP field must be a text field, such as a Name, UseLastRunViewChanges or
StringValue. If the DCCP field is set to change a DoubleValue field, an error displays at
runtime.
E.2.7 Image
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Alt Dest
x x x x
Alt Level
x x x x
Config Audio
x x x x
Delegate
x x x x
Dest Assign
x x x x
Dest Source Select
x x x x
Dest Source Select Tally
x
Display Audio
Image Tally
Table 62.
Issue 1 Rev 4
x x x x
x
x x
x
Image Behaviors
Page 235
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Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Control Behaviors
Level
x x x x
Line Up
x x x x
Married Lamp
x x x x
Married Tally
x x
x
Panel Lock
x x x x
Passive (default)
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Protect
x x x x
Protect Lamp
x x x x
Protect Tally
x x
Tracks Married
Table 62.
x
x
x
x
Image Behaviors
E.2.8 Line
Line can be added to interconnect elements, or add defining regions. The line control is
passive only.
Behavior
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
E.2.9 List Box
Active Alarms
x
Alarm Events
x
Audio Destination Delays
x
Audio Destination Gains
x
Audio Destination Signal
Rate Conversion
x
Audio Destination Swaps
x
Audio Source Gains
x
Audio Source Swaps
x
Crosspoint Destination
Tracks
x
Crosspoint Source Tracks
x
DCCP behavior
x x
Device Chain End Device
x
Device Chain End Device
Input
x
Device Chain Start Device
x
Device Chain Start Device
Output
x
Table 63.
Issue 1 Rev 4
x
x
List Box Behaviors
Page 236
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Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panel BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Control Behaviors
Forward Tally
Passive (default)
x
x x
x
x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Property Selection
x
Router Destination Names
x
Router Destination Out Pins
x
Router Source In Pins
x
Router Source Mames
x
Screen
x
Screen List
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Selected Clip
x
Selected Layout
x
Selected Playout Device
x
Snapshot List
x
Video Destination Delays
x
Video Destination Gains
x
Video Destination Origin
Types
x
Video Destination Shuffle
x
Video Source Delays
x
Video Source Gains
x
Video Source Origin Types
x
Video Source Shuffle
x
Table 63.
x x
x
x
x
List Box Behaviors
E.2.10 Edit Box
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panels BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Base OID Value
x
x x
Cue To
x
DCCP behavior
x
x x
Duration
x
Page Index
x
Passive (default)
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Property List Editor
x
Selected Clip
Table 64.
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x
x x
x
x
Edit Box Behaviors
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Control Behaviors
E.2.11 Label
Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panels BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Active Chain
x
Base OID Value
x
x x
Block Information
x
Chain Count
x
Controller Active
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Controller Connection
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Cue To
x
DCCP behavior
x
Destination Main Signal
Name
x
Destination Main Signal Pin
x
x x
Dial Up Selection Tally
x
Duration
x
Forward Tally
x
x x
x
x x x
Get Position
x
Group Preset Tally
x
Group Tally
x
Local Time [1]
x x x x x x x x
Monitor Tally
x
x x
x x
Page Index
x
x x
Page Index Preset
x
x x
Page Number
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x x
x
x
x
Passive (default)
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Prompt Message
x
Routed Monitoring Point
Tally
Selected Destination
x
x
Selected Layout
Selected Source
x
x
Selection Tally
x x
Source Main Signal Delay
x
Source Main Signal Frame
Sync
x
Source Main Signal Line
Sync
x
Source Main Signal Name
x
Source Main Signal Pin
x
x
Target Block
Text Tally
x x
x x x x
x x x
x x x x
x x
Track Preset Tally
x
Track Tally
x
Table 65.
x
x
Text Display
Issue 1 Rev 4
x
Label Behaviors
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Alarm
Audio Path
Audio Processing
Audio Router XY Group
Audio Router XY Track
Device Chain
Generic
Generic Dial Up
Hardware Panels BPX
Hardware Panel Multi Bus
Hardware Panel XY
Hardware Panel XY6276
Mimic
Multi Bus
Multi Matrix BPX
Multi Matrix Multi Bus
Multi Matrix XY
Multi Viewer Device
Passive (default)
Playout Device
Router BPX
Router Dial Up
Router XY
Source Queue
Tag Name Editing
Behavior
Undo Tally
x x
Version Info
Table 65.
[1]
Control Behaviors
x x x x x x x x
x x x
x x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
Label Behaviors
Pre-defined times, or Microsoft custom date and time format strings.
E.2.12 Composite Slider
The Composite Slider control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial
Up Groups.
E.2.13 Slider
The Slider control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial Up
Groups.
E.2.14 Up Down
The Up Down control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial Up
Groups.
E.2.15 Hyperion Thumbnail
The Hyperion Thumbnail control is valid for all Groups.
E.2.16 Jog Shuttle
The Jog Shuttle control is only valid for the Playout Device Group. The available behaviors
are:
•
Cue Clip
•
Cue To
•
Jog
•
Pause
•
Play
•
Shuttle
•
Stop
•
VAR
E.2.17 List Buttons
The List Buttons control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial Up
Groups.
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Control Behaviors
E.2.18 Media Player
The Media Player control is valid for all Groups except Hardware.
E.2.19 Radio Buttons
The Radio Buttons control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial
Up Groups.
E.2.20 Source Queue
The Source Queue control is only valid as a Source Queue behavior for the Source Queue
Group.
E.2.21 Web Browser
The Web Browser control is valid for all Groups.
E.2.22 Bar Meter
The Bar Meter control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial Up
Groups.
E.2.23 Line Graph
The Line Graph control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial Up
Groups.
E.2.24 Round Gauge
The Round Gauge control is only valid as DCCP behavior for the Generic and Generic Dial
Up Groups.
E.2.25 Device Selector
This Device Selector control is only valid as Block Select behavior for the Mimic Group.
E.2.26 Mimic Box
The Mimic Box control is only valid as a Mimic Forward Chain, and Mimic Backward Chain
behaviors for the Mimic Group.
E.2.27 Device Chain Box
The Device Chain control is only valid as a Device Chain behavior for the Device Chain
Group.
E.2.28 Device Selector
This Device Selector control is only valid as Device Selector behavior for the Device Chain
Group.
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Databases
Appendix F. Databases
F.1 SQL Server Management Studio
F.1.1 Restore a Database
Note:
Before restoring a database, ensure that the current database has been backed up first.
The Workbench CD contains several optional example databases. If the example databases
are installed, they are installed in the Workbench installation folder... \Workbench\Databases
To install a new database:
1.
Make sure Workbench is not active.
2.
If necessary, copy .bak file to the computer.
3.
Open SQL server management express and connect to the server using the following:
Login: WorkbenchUser
Password: probel
Fig 200. SQL Log-in
4.
Right-click on the Workbench database and select Tasks | Restore | Database
The Restore Database - Workbench screen displays. This screen has two pages
selectable from the Select a page area at the top-left of the screen. By default the
General page is open on startup.
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Fig 201. Select Database to Restore
5.
In the Source for restore section, select From device and click the
button.
(browse)
The Specify Backup dialog box displays.
Fig 202. Select Backup File
6.
Click Add.
7.
Locate the backup file, select it and click OK.
8.
Click OK.
9.
Check the checkbox to Select the backup sets to restore.
10. Select the Options page from the top-left of the screen.
11. Select Overwrite the existing database and Leave the database ready to
use…(RESTORE WITH RECOVERY).
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Fig 203. Restore Options
12. Click OK.
13. Start Workbench, the database needs to be updated. Fig 204. shows the initial
screen.
Fig 204. Update Database
To view the differences between the databases, click the
button. The Database Analyzer
displays, indicating the parts of the database that will change when the database is updated,
see Fig 205.
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Databases
Fig 205. Database Analyzer
F.1.2 Backup a Database
A backup of the Workbench database should be kept.
To backup a database:
1.
Make sure Workbench is not active.
2.
Open SQL server management express and connect to the server.
3.
Right click on the Workbench database and select Tasks | Back Up...
The Backup Database - Workbench screen displays, see Fig 206.
Fig 206. Backup Database
Issue 1 Rev 4
4.
Select a database backup destination.
5.
Click OK.
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Databases
F.2 SQLDBTool
The SQLDBTool is available from the Windows Start Menu:
Start | All Programs | Snell | SQLDBTOOL | SQLDBTool
Fig 207. SQLDBTool Screen
1.
Select the server name from the drop-down list at the top of the screen.
2.
Click Connect and Get Databases.
F.2.1 Restore a Database
Note:
Before restoring a database, ensure that the current database has been backed up first.
1.
Ensure the Restore Mode radio button is selected.
2.
Click Retrieve file names from backup.
3.
Click Restore Database. When prompted to Overwrite existing database, click Yes.
4.
When the restore is complete, a dialog box displays. Click OK.
F.2.2 Backup a Database
Issue 1 Rev 4
1.
Ensure the Backup Mode radio button is selected.
2.
Browse to the path of where the backup files for the database are to be saved.
3.
Click Backup Database.
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Databases
F.3 Aurora/Nebula Importer
This section describes how to import Aurora or Nebula configuration files from a legacy
database into the current Workbench database.
To open Aurora/Nebula Importer, from the Windows Start menu browse to:
Start | All Programs | Snell | MCM | Utilities | Aurora Database Importer
Fig 208. Aurora/Nebula Importer
F.4 Importing a Database
1.
Select the type of database from the drop-down list: Aurora or Nebula.
2.
Select the type of controller from the drop-down list: Type2330 or Type2450.
3.
Type a Controller Name. If the controller already exists, a prompt displays inquiring
whether to overwrite, use a default name, or cancel the import.
4.
Click Import. Browse to the location of the legacy configuration file.
Nebula files have the extension .ne1, .ne2 and so on. Aurora files have a .aur
extension.
5.
Click Open. The controller is imported into Workbench, see Fig 209.
Fig 209. Aurora/Nebula Importer - Log File
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Databases
When the import is complete, the window lists all the items in the database that are
imported.
6.
To save the log, click Save Log.
The imported controllers are listed in Workbench Configuration mode.
F.5 Imported Data
The following data is imported:
•
Matrices
•
Levels
•
Sources
•
Source Associations (if enabled in the legacy database)
•
Destination Associations
•
Salvos
•
Panel configuration
Defaulted Data
Issue 1 Rev 4
•
Destinations
•
Source Associations (if disabled in the legacy database)
•
Inhibits
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Index
Index
2330 Controller ............................... 48, 187
Configuration File........................... 189
2450 Controller ............................... 48, 191
Configuration Initialization File....... 197
Network Initialization File ............... 194
246x
Firmware........................................ 200
246x Controller
Configuration File........................... 203
246x Controllers.................................... 200
A
Active Status ........................................... 46
Add a New Controller.............................. 48
Administration ......................................... 36
Alarm Device........................................... 88
Architecture............................................. 10
Architecture Menu................................. 137
Audio
Assignments .................................... 78
Configuration ................................... 73
Delay.............................................. 163
Destination Assignment ................... 78
Destination Sizes ............................. 75
Gain ............................................... 164
Mapped Programs ........................... 76
Mapping ........................................... 73
Mixing ............................................ 164
Processing ..................................... 162
Program Sets................................... 77
Reference ...................................... 170
Routing .......................................... 168
Safe Source ..................................... 75
Shuffling......................................... 163
Source Assignment.......................... 78
Source Sizes.................................... 73
Auto Calculate
Destination Associations.................. 53
Source Associations ........................ 53
Auto Configure ................................ 71, 171
Auto Edit ............................................... 124
Assign Dial-up Keypad .................. 154
Key Sequence ............................... 124
Auto-Changeover.................................... 99
B
Backup
Configuration ................................... 98
Behavior
Control ................................... 116, 231
DCCP..................................... 120, 130
Group............................................. 114
BPX Soft Panel ..................................... 148
Brush..................................................... 125
Clone ............................................. 126
Color .............................................. 126
Fill .................................................. 126
Gradient ......................................... 126
Image............................................. 127
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C
Centra
Controller ......................................... 48
Checksum
Status ............................................... 45
Configuration
Backup ............................................. 98
Controller ......................................... 48
Database............................................ 9
File ......................................... 197, 203
Router .............................................. 52
Configuration Menu ................................. 46
Configure
Devices ............................................ 85
Connection
Status ............................................... 45
Controller
2330 ......................................... 48, 187
2450 ........................................... 48, 85
246x ............................................... 200
Add a New Controller ....................... 48
Centra .............................................. 48
Configuration............................ 44, 187
Nucleus ............................................ 48
Partner ....................................... 46, 98
PC .................................................. 187
RollCall..................................... 48, 205
Status ............................................... 45
Swap ................................................ 99
Version ............................................. 46
Controllers ............................................... 44
D
Database
Aurora ............................................ 246
Backup ........................................... 244
Configuration...................................... 9
Import ............................................. 246
Nebula............................................ 246
Restore .......................................... 241
SQL................................................ 241
DCCP
Behavior ......................................... 130
Numeric Control Examples ............ 155
Radio Button Examples ................. 155
Rules .............................................. 130
Default
Users................................................ 36
Design Menu ......................................... 108
Design Mode ......................................... 106
Brush.............................................. 125
Device Explorer.............................. 120
Groups ........................................... 114
Panel Templates ............................ 112
Property Editor ............................... 119
Screen Templates .......................... 111
Screens Editor ............................... 110
Toolbar ........................................... 106
Toolbox .......................................... 115
Destination Follow ................................. 157
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Device
Alarm ............................................... 88
Explorer ................................. 120, 133
FieldStore ........................................ 89
GPI................................................... 90
Panel................................................ 81
Tie-lines ........................................... 90
UMD................................... 91, 92, 185
UMD Engine .................................... 93
Devices ................................................... 85
Dial-up Keypad ..................................... 124
Dual Redundancy ........................... 98, 178
Dynamic UMDs ..................................... 184
Index
H
Hardware Panels........................... 112, 220
Configuration Editor ......................... 83
Function Buttons ............................ 222
Key Sequences .............................. 121
Panel Features............................... 222
Panel Switch Settings .................... 222
Ports................................................. 84
Special Functions........................... 222
Supported Panels .......................... 220
Wizard .............................................. 82
Home Screen .......................................... 32
I
E
Embedded Audio Size ............................ 73
Examples .............................................. 143
Alarm Panel ................................... 151
Audio Processing........................... 161
Audio Reference ............................ 170
Audio Routing ................................ 161
BPX Soft Panel .............................. 148
Configure A MultiViewer ................ 160
Destination Follow ......................... 159
Dynamic UMDs.............................. 184
Link Panels Together..................... 147
Live Renaming............................... 154
Mimic Diagrams ............................. 173
Monitor Buttons.............................. 157
Numeric Controls ........................... 155
Panel Without a Take Button ......... 146
Radio Buttons ................................ 155
RollCall Screens ............................ 176
Router Follow................................. 183
Set Controller Redundancy Over IP 178
Set up Tie-lines.............................. 179
Video Processing........................... 161
XY Soft Panel ................................ 143
F
FieldStore Device.................................... 89
Firmware
Update ................................... 192, 200
Force Reset .................................... 71, 171
Frame Sync........................................... 167
FTP
Update Controller........................... 192
Function Buttons ................................... 222
G
Generic Editor ................................. 94, 159
GPI Device.............................................. 90
GPI Overrides ....................................... 177
Group
Behaviors....................................... 114
Groups .................................................. 114
Image
Brush.............................................. 127
Installation ............................................... 14
Requirements................................... 14
IP Port Configuration ............................... 57
K
Key Assignment ....................................
Key Sequence .......................................
Key Sequence Generation ....................
Keypad
Dial-up............................................
124
121
124
124
L
Levels
Configuration Editor ......................... 62
Router Configuration ........................ 53
Link Panels.................................... 147, 150
Loading a Snapshot .............................. 103
Log .......................................................... 35
Logging Configuration ........................... 171
Logical Destinations .......................... 71, 80
M
Matrices
Router Configuration ........................ 53
Matrix
Ports................................................. 58
Membership ............................................ 39
Menu
Architecture .................................... 137
Configuration.................................... 46
Design ............................................ 108
Mimic Diagrams ............................ 141, 173
Mixing .................................................... 164
Module
IDs.............................................. 70, 79
Module Locations
Cygnus ........................................... 218
Pyxis .............................................. 210
Sirius ...................................... 212, 214
MultiViewer............................................ 160
N
Networks ................................................. 44
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Nucleus
Auto Configure......................... 71, 171
Controller ......................................... 48
Features................................. 191, 200
Firmware........................................ 192
Force Reset ............................. 71, 171
Logging Configuration............ 171, 192
Logical Destinations................... 71, 80
Logical Sources ......................... 71, 80
Module IDs................................. 70, 79
Index
Routing ..................................................
Audio ..............................................
Video ..............................................
Rules .....................................................
Service ...........................................
Status .............................................
Toolbar ...........................................
Toolbox ..........................................
Rules Menu ...........................................
168
168
169
128
135
135
129
129
128
S
O
OID Rewrite Helper............................... 100
Online Editor ........................................... 95
P
Panel
Device.............................................. 81
Hardware ............................... 112, 222
Soft ................................................ 112
Templates ...................................... 112
Panels ................................................... 112
Partner .............................................. 46, 98
Password ................................................ 29
Pbak Deploy
Nucleus Update ............................. 192
Software Tool................................... 31
PC Controller ........................................ 187
Permissions
Screens...................................... 40, 41
Port Configuration
IP ..................................................... 58
Serial................................................ 56
Property Editor ...................................... 119
Property Window................................... 119
Push and Pull Configuration ................... 97
Push Failure............................................ 97
Pyxis
Module Locations........................... 210
Routers .......................................... 206
Sample Database .......................... 206
R
Radio Buttons Example ........................ 155
Redundancy............................................ 98
Reference
Audio.............................................. 170
Video........................................ 63, 170
Reset....................................................... 98
Restore
Database ....................................... 241
Roles....................................................... 38
Adding.............................................. 38
Default ............................................. 38
Membership ..................................... 39
RollCall
Controller ................................. 48, 205
Generic Editor.................................. 51
Screens.......................................... 176
Router
Configuration ................................... 52
Hardware Config.............................. 68
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Safe Source ............................................ 75
Salvos
Configuration.................................... 53
Sample Panels
Pyxis .............................................. 209
Sample Rate Conversion ...................... 165
Screen
Design Mode .................................. 108
Templates ...................................... 111
Screens
Permissions ..................................... 40
Sequence Sets ........................................ 84
Serial Port Configuration ......................... 56
Shuffling ................................................ 163
Sirius
Module Locations ........................... 214
Snapshot
Editor.............................................. 101
Load ............................................... 103
Save ............................................... 102
Soft Panels .................................... 108, 112
BPX................................................ 148
Mimic.............................................. 175
XY .................................................. 143
Special Function Keys........................... 222
SQL Databases..................................... 241
Status
Activity.............................................. 46
Checksum ........................................ 45
Connection ....................................... 45
Controller ......................................... 45
Partner ............................................. 46
Stereo Mode.......................................... 165
Swap Controllers ..................................... 99
System Architecture .............................. 136
Devices Types ............................... 137
Toolbar ........................................... 136
T
Tag Names.............................................. 55
Take Button ........................................... 145
Tie-lines................................................. 179
Tie-Lines Device ..................................... 90
Toolbar
Architecture .................................... 136
Design Mode .................................. 106
Rules .............................................. 129
Toolbox
Design Mode .................................. 115
Rules .............................................. 129
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Index
U
UMD Device............................................ 92
UMD Engine Device................................ 93
UMDs ...................................... 91, 184, 185
Users
Adding.............................................. 37
Default ............................................. 36
Roles................................................ 38
V
Version
Controller ......................................... 46
W
Window
Docking............................................ 33
Wizards
Auto Configure......................... 71, 171
Hardware Panels ............................. 82
Workbench................................................ 9
Worked Examples
See ’Examples’ .............................. 143
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