Emerson 5081-T Instruction manual

Instruction Manual
PN 51-5081A-HT/rev.C
July 2003
Model 5081-A-HT
HART Smart Two-Wire Chlorine, Dissolved Oxygen, and
Ozone Transmitter
ESSENTIAL INSTRUCTIONS
READ THIS PAGE BEFORE PROCEEDING!
Rosemount Analytical designs, manufactures, and tests its products to meet many national and international
standards. Because these instruments are sophisticated technical products, you must properly install, use, and
maintain them to ensure they continue to operate within their normal specifications. The following instructions
must be adhered to and integrated into your safety program when installing, using, and maintaining Rosemount
Analytical products. Failure to follow the proper instructions may cause any one of the following situations to
occur: Loss of life; personal injury; property damage; damage to this instrument; and warranty invalidation.
• Read all instructions prior to installing, operating, and servicing the product. If this Instruction Manual is not the
correct manual, telephone 1-800-654-7768 and the requested manual will be provided. Save this Instruction
Manual for future reference.
• If you do not understand any of the instructions, contact your Rosemount representative for clarification.
• Follow all warnings, cautions, and instructions marked on and supplied with the product.
• Inform and educate your personnel in the proper installation, operation, and maintenance of the product.
• Install your equipment as specified in the Installation Instructions of the appropriate Instruction Manual and per
applicable local and national codes. Connect all products to the proper electrical and pressure sources.
• To ensure proper performance, use qualified personnel to install, operate, update, program, and maintain the
product.
• When replacement parts are required, ensure that qualified people use replacement parts specified by
Rosemount. Unauthorized parts and procedures can affect the product’s performance and place the safe
operation of your process at risk. Look alike substitutions may result in fire, electrical hazards, or improper
operation.
• Ensure that all equipment doors are closed and protective covers are in place, except when maintenance is
being performed by qualified persons, to prevent electrical shock and personal injury.
CAUTION
If a Model 275 Universal Hart® Communicator is used with these transmitters, the software within the Model 275 may require
modification. If a software modification is required, please contact your local Fisher-Rosemount Service Group or National
Response Center at 1-800-654-7768.
About This Document
This manual contains instructions for installation and operation of the Model 5081-A HART Smart
Two-Wire Chlorine, Dissolved Oxygen, and Ozone Transmitter. The following list provides notes concerning all revisions of this document.
Rev. Level
Date
A
1/03
This is the initial release of the product manual. The manual has been
reformatted to reflect the Emerson documentation style and updated to
reflect any changes in the product offering.
B
4/03
Specs updates.
C
6/03
Agency certification update.
Emerson Process Management
Rosemount Analytical Inc.
2400 Barranca Parkway
Irvine, CA 92606 USA
Tel: (949) 757-8500
Fax: (949) 474-7250
http://www.raihome.com
© Rosemount Analytical Inc. 2003
Notes
MODEL 5081-A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MODEL 5081-A MICROPROCESSOR TRANSMITTER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
Title
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................
Features and Applications .......................................................................................
Specifications - General...........................................................................................
Specifications - Oxygen ...........................................................................................
Specifications - Free Chlorine..................................................................................
Specifications - Total Chlorine..................................................................................
Specifications - Ozone .............................................................................................
Transmitter Display During Calibration and Programming ......................................
Infrared Remote Controller .....................................................................................
HART Communication .............................................................................................
Ordering Information ...............................................................................................
Accessories .............................................................................................................
Page
1
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
6
6
2.0
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
INSTALLATION .......................................................................................................
Unpacking and Inspection........................................................................................
Orienting the Display Board .....................................................................................
Installation................................................................................................................
Power Supply/Current Loop.....................................................................................
7
7
7
7
10
3.0
3.1
3.2
3.3
WIRING....................................................................................................................
Wiring Model 499A Oxygen, Chlorine, and Ozone Sensors ....................................
Wiring Model 499ACL-01 (Free Chlorine) Sensors and pH Sensors.......................
Wiring Model Hx438 and Gx448 Sensors................................................................
11
11
12
14
4.0
INTRINSICALLY SAFE AND EXPLOSION PROOF INSTALLATIONS .................
15
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
DISPLAY AND OPERATION...................................................................................
Display Screens .......................................................................................................
Infrared Remote Controller (IRC) - Key Functions...................................................
Menu Tree................................................................................................................
Diagnostic Messages...............................................................................................
Security ....................................................................................................................
Using Hold ...............................................................................................................
25
25
26
27
27
27
27
6.0
6.1
6.2
6.3
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275.............................................................................
Note on Model 275 HART Communicator ...............................................................
Connecting the HART Communicator......................................................................
Operation .................................................................................................................
29
29
29
30
7.0
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
PROGRAMMING.....................................................................................................
General ....................................................................................................................
Default Settings........................................................................................................
Output Ranging........................................................................................................
Temperature Settings...............................................................................................
35
35
35
37
39
i
MODEL 5081-A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS CONT’D
Section Title
Page
7.0
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
PROGRAMMING (continued) ................................................................................
Display .....................................................................................................................
Factory Default.........................................................................................................
HART .......................................................................................................................
Calibration SetUp.....................................................................................................
Line Frequency ........................................................................................................
pH Measurement .....................................................................................................
Barometric Pressure ................................................................................................
35
41
43
43
44
46
47
50
8.0
8.1
8.2
CALIBRATION — TEMPERATURE........................................................................
Introduction ..............................................................................................................
Procedure ................................................................................................................
51
51
52
9.0
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
CALIBRATION — OXYGEN ...................................................................................
Introduction ..............................................................................................................
Procedure — Zeroing the Sensor ............................................................................
Procedure — Air Calibration ....................................................................................
Procedure — In-Process Calibration .......................................................................
53
53
54
55
56
10.0
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
CALIBRATION — FREE CHLORINE .....................................................................
Introduction ..............................................................................................................
Procedure — Zeroing the Sensor ............................................................................
Procedure — Full Scale Calibration.........................................................................
Dual Slope Calibration .............................................................................................
57
57
58
59
60
11.0
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
CALIBRATION — TOTAL CHLORINE ...................................................................
Introduction ..............................................................................................................
Procedure — Zeroing the Sensor ............................................................................
Procedure — Full Scale Calibration.........................................................................
Dual Slope Calibration .............................................................................................
62
62
63
64
65
12.0
12.1
12.2
12.3
CALIBRATION — OZONE ......................................................................................
Introduction ..............................................................................................................
Procedure — Zeroing the Sensor ............................................................................
Procedure — Full Scale Calibration.........................................................................
67
67
68
69
13.0
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
CALIBRATION — pH ..............................................................................................
Introduction ..............................................................................................................
Procedure — Auto Calibration .................................................................................
Procedure — Manual Calibration.............................................................................
Standardization ........................................................................................................
pH Slope Adjustment ...............................................................................................
70
70
71
72
73
74
ii
MODEL 5081-A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS CONT’D
Section Title
Page
14.0
14.1
14.2
CALIBRATION — CURRENT OUTPUT .................................................................
General ....................................................................................................................
Procedure ................................................................................................................
75
75
75
15.0
15.1
15.2
15.3
15.4
DIAGNOSTICS ........................................................................................................
General ....................................................................................................................
Diagnostic Messages for Dissolved Oxygen............................................................
Diagnostic Messages for Ozone and Total Chlorine ................................................
Diagnostic Messages for Free Chlorined.................................................................
76
76
76
76
77
16.0
16.1
16.2
16.3
16.4
16.5
16.6
16.7
16.8
16.9
16.10
16.11
16.12
16.13
TROUBLESHOOTING ...........................................................................................
Warning and Fault Messages ..................................................................................
Troubleshooting When a Warning or Fault Message is Showing ............................
Temperature Measurement and Calibration Problems ............................................
Oxygen Measurement and Calibration Problems ....................................................
Free Chlorine Measurement and Calibration Problems...........................................
Total Chlorine Measurement and Calibration Problems...........................................
Ozone Measurement and Calibration Problems ......................................................
pH Measurement and Calibration Problems ............................................................
Simulating Input Currents — Dissolved Oxygen......................................................
Simulating Input Currents — Chlorine and Ozone...................................................
Simulating Inputs — pH ...........................................................................................
Simulating Temperature ...........................................................................................
Measuring Reference Voltage..................................................................................
78
78
79
83
84
86
88
89
91
93
93
94
95
96
17.0
17.1
17.2
MAINTENANCE ......................................................................................................
Overview ..................................................................................................................
Transmitter Maintenance .........................................................................................
97
97
97
18.0
RETURN OF MATERIAL.........................................................................................
99
Appendix Title
A
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE AS A FUNCTION OF ALTITUDE ..............................
Page
100
LIST OF TABLES
Number Title
7-1
Default Settings .......................................................................................................
17-1 Replacement Parts for Model 5081-A Transmitter ...................................................
iii
Page
36
98
MODEL 5081-A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF FIGURES
Number
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
6-1
6-2
9-1
10-1
10-2
11-1
11-2
11-3
12-1
13-1
14-1
16-1
16-2
16-3
16-4
16-5
16-6
17-1
Title
Transmitter Display During Calibration and Programming .......................................
Infrared Remote Controller.......................................................................................
HART Communication..............................................................................................
Model 5081-A Mounting and Dimensional Drawings ...............................................
Mounting the Model 5081-A on a Flat Surface.........................................................
Using the Pipe Mounting Kit to attach the Model 5081-A to a pipe ..........................
Load/Power Supply Requirements...........................................................................
Power Supply/Current Loop Wiring ..........................................................................
Amperometric sensors with standard cable .............................................................
Amperometric sensors with optimum EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable....................
Free Chlorine sensor with standard cable and 399VP-09 pH sensor without .........
internal preamplifier..................................................................................................
Free Chlorine sensor with standard cable and 399-14 pH sensor with internal ......
preamplifier...............................................................................................................
Free Chlorine sensor with standard cable and 399-09-62 pH sensor without .........
internal preamplifier..................................................................................................
Free Chlorine sensor with optimum EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable and 399VP-09
pH sensor without internal preamplifier ....................................................................
Free Chlorine sensor with optimum EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable and 399-14 ..
pH sensor with internal preamplifier .........................................................................
Free Chlorine sensor with optimum EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable and 399-09-62
pH sensor without internal preamplifier ....................................................................
Hx438 and Gx448 sensors.........................................................................................
FMRC Explosion-Proof Installation ..........................................................................
FM Intrinsically Safe Installation Label .....................................................................
FM Intrinsically Safe Installation...............................................................................
CSA Intrinsically Safe Installation Label...................................................................
CSA Intrinsically Safe Installation.............................................................................
ATEX Intrinsically Safe Installation Label .................................................................
ATEX Intrinsically Safe Installation ...........................................................................
Process Display Screen ...........................................................................................
Program Display Screen ..........................................................................................
Infrared Remote Controller and label .......................................................................
Menu Tree ................................................................................................................
Connecting the HART Communicator ......................................................................
Menu Tree (HART) ...................................................................................................
Sensor Current as a Function of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration .........................
Sensor Current as a Function of Free Chlorine Concentration ................................
Dual Slope Calibration..............................................................................................
Determination of Total Chlorine ................................................................................
Sensor Current as a Function of Total Chlorine Concentration ................................
Dual Slope Calibration..............................................................................................
Sensor Current as a Function of Ozone Concentration ...........................................
Calibration Slope and Offset ....................................................................................
Current Output Calibration .......................................................................................
Simulate dissolved oxygen.......................................................................................
Simulate chlorine and ozone ....................................................................................
Simulate pH..............................................................................................................
Three-wire RTD Configuration .................................................................................
Simulating RTD Inputs .............................................................................................
Checking for a Poisoned Reference Electrode ........................................................
Exploded View of Model 5081-A Transmitter ...........................................................
iv
Page
4
4
4
5
8
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
13
13
13
13
14
15
16
17
19
20
22
23
25
25
26
28
29
31
53
57
60
62
62
65
67
70
75
93
93
94
94
95
96
97
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
• MEASURES dissolved oxygen (ppm and ppb level), free chlorine, total chlorine, and ozone.
• SECOND INPUT FOR pH SENSOR ALLOWS AUTOMATIC pH
CORRECTION for free chlorine measurement. No expensive
reagents needed.
• AUTOMATIC BUFFER RECOGNITION for pH calibration.
• ROBUST NEMA 4X ENCLOSURE protects the transmitter from
hostile environments.
• COMPATIBLE WITH HART SMART communication protocol and
AMS (Asset Management Solutions).
1.1 FEATURES AND APPLICATIONS
The Model 5081-A Transmitter with the appropriate
sensor measures dissolved oxygen (ppm and ppb
level), free chlorine, total chlorine, and ozone in a variety of process liquids. The transmitter is compatible
with Rosemount Analytical 499A amperometric sensors for oxygen, chlorine, and ozone; and with Hx438
and Gx448 steam-sterilizable oxygen sensors.
For free chlorine measurements, both automatic and
manual pH correction are available. pH correction is
necessary because amperometric chlorine sensors
respond only to hypochlorous acid, not free chlorine,
which is the sum of hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ion. To measure free chlorine,most competing
instruments require an acidified sample. Acid lowers
the pH and converts hypochlorite ion to hypochlorous
acid. The Model 5081-A eliminates the need for
messy and expensive sample conditioning by using
the sample pH to correct the chlorine sensor signal. If
the pH is relatively constant, a fixed pH correction can
be used. If the pH is greater than 7.0 and fluctuates
more than about 0.2 units, continuous measurement
of pH and automatic pH correction is necessary.
Corrections are valid to pH 9.5.
The transmitter fully compensates oxygen, ozone, free
chlorine, and total chlorine readings for changes in
membrane permeability caused by temperature
changes.
For pH measurements — pH is available with free
chlorine only — the 5081-A features automatic buffer
recognition and stabilization check. Buffer pH and
temperature data for commonly used buffers are
stored in the analyzer. Glass impedance diagnostics
warn the user of an aging or failed pH sensor.
The transmitter has a rugged, weatherproof, corrosion-resistant enclosure (NEMA 4X and IP65) of
epoxy-painted aluminum. The enclosure also meets
NEMA 7B explosion-proof standards.
Circuits in the Model 5081-A transmitter are designed
and built to be intrinsically safe when used with the
appropriate safety barrier.
The 4 to 20 mA signal is fully scalable over the linear
range of the sensor. During hold and fault conditions,
the output can be programmed to remain at the last
value or go to any value between 3.80 and 22.00 mA.
Measurement results are displayed in 0.8 in. (20 mm)
high seven-segment numerals. Temperature and pH
(chlorine only) appear in 0.3 inch (7 mm) high digits.
Remote communications with the Model 5081-A is easy.
The hand-held, push button infrared remote controller
works from as far away as six feet. The 5081-A also
belongs to the Rosemount SMART FAMILY, so it works
with the Model 275 HART hand-held communicator or
with any host that supports the HART protocol.
®
®
SMART FAMILY is a registered trademark of Rosemount Inc.
HART is a registered trademark of the HART Communication Foundation.
1
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
1.2 SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL
Enclosure: Low copper aluminum with epoxy polyester
coating. NEMA 4X (IP65) and NEMA 7B. Neoprene
O-ring cover seals.
Conduit Openings: ¾-in. FNPT
Ambient Temperature: -4 to 149°F (-20 to 65°C)
Storage Temperature: -22 to 176°F (-30 to 80°C)
Relative Humidity: 0 to 95% (non-condensing)
Weight/Shipping Weight: 10 lb/10 lb (4.5/5.0 kg)
Display: Two-line LCD; first line shows process variable
(pH, ORP, conductivity, % concentration, oxygen,
ozone, or chlorine), second line shows process temperature and output current. For pH/chlorine combination, the second line can be toggled to show pH.
Fault and warning messages, when triggered, alternate with temperature and output readings.
First line: 7 segment LCD, 0.8 in. (20 mm) high.
Second line: 7 segment LCD, 0.3 in. (7mm) high.
Display board can be rotated 90 degrees clockwise or
counterclockwise.
During calibration and programming, messages and
prompts appear in the second line.
Temperature resolution: 0.1°C
Input ranges: 0-330 nA, 0.3-4µA, 3.7-30 µA, 27-100 µA
Repeatability (input): ±0.1% of range
Linearity (input): ±0.3% of range
Temperature range: 0-100°C (0-150°C for steam sterilizable sensors)
Temperature accuracy using RTD: ±0.5°C between 0
and 50°C, ±1°C above 50°C
Temperature accuracy using 22k NTC: ±0.5°C between
0 and 50°C, ±2°C above 50°C
Digital Communications:
HART: PV, SV, TV, and 4V assignable to measurement
(oxygen, ozone, or chlorine), temperature, pH, and
sensor current.
RFI/EMI: EN-61326
Power & Load Requirements:
Supply voltage at the transmitter terminals should be at
least 12 Vdc. Power supply voltage should cover the voltage drop on the cable plus the external load resistor
required for HART communications (250 Ω minimum).
Minimum power supply voltage is 12 Vdc. Maximum power
supply voltage is 42.4 Vdc (30 Vdc for intrinsically safe
operation). The graph shows the supply voltage required to
maintain 12 Vdc (upper line) and 30 Vdc (lower line) at the
transmitter terminals when the current is 22 mA.
Analog Output: Two-wire, 4-20 mA output with superimposed HART digital signal. Fully scalable over the
operating range of the sensor.
Output accuracy: ±0.05 mA
2
HAZARDOUS LOCATION APPROVAL:
Intrinsic Safety:
Class I, II, III, Div. 1
Groups A-G
T4
Tamb = 70°C
Exia Entity
Class I, Groups A-D
Class II, Groups E-G
Class III
T4
Tamb = 70°C
ATEX
0600 II 1 G
Baseefa02ATEX1284
EEx ia IIC T4
Tamb = -20°C to +65°C
Non-Incendive:
Class I, Div. 2, Groups A-D
Dust Ignition Proof
Class II & III, Div. 1, Groups E-G
NEMA 4X Enclosure
Class I, Div. 2, Groups A-D
Suitable for
Class II, Div. 2, Groups E-G
T4 Tamb = 70°C
Explosion-Proof:
Class I, Div. 1, Groups B-D
Class II, Div. 1, Groups E-G
Class III, Div. 1
Class I, Groups B-D
Class II, Groups E-G
Class III
Tamb = 65°C max
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
1.3 SPECIFICATIONS — OXYGEN
1.5 SPECIFICATIONS — TOTAL CHLORINE
Measurement Range: 0-99 ppm (mg/L), 0-200%
saturation
Resolution: 0.01 ppm, 0.1 ppb for 499A TrDO
sensor
Temperature correction for membrane permeability: automatic between 0 and 50°C (can be
disabled)
Calibration: air calibration (user must enter barometric pressure) or calibration against a standard instrument
Measurement Range: 0-20 ppm (mg/L) as Cl2
Resolution: 0.001 ppm (Autoranges at 0.999 to
1.00 and 9.99 to 10.0)
Temperature correction for membrane permeability: automatic between 5 and 35°C (can be
disabled)
Calibration: against grab sample analyzed using
portable test kit.
RECOMMENDED SENSORS — OXYGEN:
Model 499A DO-54 for ppm level
Model 499A TrDO-54 for ppb level
Hx438 and Gx448 steam-sterilizable oxygen sensors
1.4 SPECIFICATIONS — FREE CHLORINE
Measurement Range: 0-20 ppm (mg/L) as Cl2
Resolution: 0.001 ppm (Autoranges at 0.999 to
1.00 and 9.99 to 10.0)
Temperature correction for membrane permeability: automatic between 0 and 50°C (can be
disabled)
pH Correction: Automatic between pH 6.0 and
9.5. Manual pH correction is also available.
Calibration: against grab sample analyzed using
portable test kit.
RECOMMENDED SENSOR — TOTAL CHLORINE:
Model 499A CL-02-54 (must be used with SCS 921)
1.6 SPECIFICATIONS — OZONE
Measurement Range: 0-10 ppm (mg/L)
Resolution: 0.001 ppm (Autoranges at 0.999 to
1.00 and 9.99 to 10.0)
Temperature correction for membrane permeability: automatic between 5 and 35°C (can be
disabled)
Calibration: against grab sample analyzed using
portable test kit.
RECOMMENDED SENSOR — OZONE:
Model 499A OZ-54
RECOMMENDED SENSOR — FREE CHLORINE:
Model 499A CL-01-54
SPECIFICATIONS — pH
Application: pH measurement available with free
chlorine only
Measurement Range: 0-14 pH
Resolution: 0.01 pH
Sensor Diagnostics: Glass impedance (for broken
or aging electrode) and reference offset.
Reference impedance (for fouled reference
junction) is not available.
Repeatability: ±0.01 pH at 25°C
RECOMMENDED SENSOR — pH:
Use Model 399-09-62, 399-14, or 399VP-09.
See pH sensor product data sheet for complete ordering information.
3
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
1.7 TRANSMITTER DISPLAY DURING CALIBRATION AND PROGRAMMING (Figure 1-1)
8
1. Continuous display of oxygen, chlorine, or ozone reading.
7
2
F
A
U
L
T
2. Units: ppm, ppb, or % saturation.
6
3
CALIbrAtE
6. Hold appears when the transmitter is in hold.
8.
ppm
CALIBRATE PROGRAM DIAGNOSE
5. Commands available in each submenu or at each
prompt appear here.
7. Fault appears when the transmitter detects a sensor or
instrument fault.
♥
H
O
L
D
3. Current menu appears here.
4. Submenus, prompts, and diagnostic readings appear
hear.
1
5
EXIT
NEXT
4
ENTER
♥ flashes during HART communication.
FIGURE 1-1. TRANSMITTER DISPLAY DURING
CALIBRATION AND PROGRAMMING
The program display screen allows access to
calibration and programming menus.
1.8 INFRARED REMOTE CONTROLLER
(Figure 1-2)
4.
1. Pressing a menu key allows the user access to calibrate, program, or diagnostic menus.
3.
2. Press ENTER to store data and settings. Press NEXT
to move from one submenu to the next. Press EXIT to
leave without storing changes.
2.
1.
3. Use the editing keys to scroll through lists of allowed
settings or to change a numerical setting to the desired
value.
4. Pressing HOLD puts the transmitter in hold and sends
the output current to a pre-programmed value. Pressing
RESET causes the transmitter to abandon the present
operation and return to the main display.
5. See page 26 for Hazardous Locations information.
FIGURE 1-2. INFRARED REMOTE CONTROLLER
1.9 HART COMMUNICATION (Figure 1-3)
The Model 275 HART Communicator is a hand-held device
that provides a common link to all HART SMART instruments and allows access to AMS (Asset Management
Solutions). Use the HART communicator to set up and control the 5081-A and to read measured variables. Press ON
to display the on-line menu. All setup menus are available
through this menu.
4
4/20 mA + Digital
250
ohm
Model 5081
Smart
Transmitter
Control System
Hand Held
Communicator
(“Configurator”)
Bridge
FIGURE 1-3. HART COMMUNICATION
Computer
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
MILLIMETER
INCH
FIGURE 1-4. MODEL 5081-A MOUNTING AND DIMENSIONAL DRAWINGS
5
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 1.0
DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS
1.10 ORDERING INFORMATION
The Model 5081-A Transmitter is intended for the determination of oxygen (ppm and ppb level), free chlorine,
total chlorine, and ozone. For free chlorine measurements, which often require continuous pH correction, a second input for a pH sensor is available. The transmitter is housed in a weatherproof, corrosion-resistant enclosure. A hand-held infrared remote controller is required to configure and calibrate the transmitter.
MODEL
5081-A
SMART TWO-WIRE MICROPROCESSOR TRANSMITTER
CODE
HT
FF
REQUIRED SELECTION
Analog 4-20 mA output with superimposed HART digital signal
Foundation Fieldbus digital output (Available in May, 2002)
CODE
20
21
REQUIRED SELECTION
Infrared remote controller included
Infrared remote controller not included
CODE
60
67
68
69
AGENCY APPROVALS
No approval
FM approved intrinsically safe and non-incendive (when used with approved sensor and safety barrier)
CSA approved intrinsically safe and non-incendive (when used with approved sensor and safety barrier)
CENELEC approved intrinsically safe (when used with approved sensor and safety barrier)
5081-A
-HT
-20
-67
EXAMPLE
1.11 ACCESSORIES
POWER SUPPLY: Use the Model 515 Power Supply to provide dc loop power to the transmitter. The Model 515
provides two isolated sources at 24Vdc and 200 mA each. For more information refer to product data sheet
71-515.
ALARM MODULE: The Model 230A alarm Module receives the 4-20 mA signal from the 5081-A transmitter and
activates two alarm relays. High/high, low/low, and high/low are available. Hysteresis (deadband) is also
adjustable. For more information, refer to product data sheet 71-230A.
HART COMMUNICATOR: The Model 275 HART communicator allows the user to view measurement values as
well as to program and configure the transmitter. The Model 275 attaches to any wiring terminal across the
output loop. A minimum 250 Ω load must be between the power supply and transmitter. Order the Model
275 communicator from Rosemount Measurement. Call (800) 999-9307.
ACCESSORIES
MODEL/PN
515
230A
6
DESCRIPTION
DC loop power supply (see product data sheet 71-515)
Alarm module (see product data sheet 71-230A)
23572-00
Infrared remote controller (required, one controller can operate any 5081 transmitter)
2002577
2-in. pipe mounting kit
9241178
Stainless steel tag, specify marking
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 2.0
INSTALLATION
SECTION 2.0
INSTALLATION
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
Unpacking and inspection
Orienting the display board
Installation
Power supply/current loop
2.1 UNPACKING AND INSPECTION
Inspect the shipping container. If it is damaged, contact the shipper immediately for instructions. Save the box. If there is
no apparent damage, remove the transmitter. Be sure all items shown on the packing list are present. If items are missing, notify Rosemount Analytical immediately.
2.2 ORIENTING THE DISPLAY BOARD
The display board can be rotated 90 degrees, clockwise or counterclockwise, from the original position. To reposition the
display:
1. Loosen the cover lock nut until the tab disengages from the end, Unscrew the cap.
2. Remove the three bolts holding the circuit board stack.
3. Lift and rotate the display board 90 degrees into the desired position.
4. Position the display board on the standoffs. Replace and tighten the bolts.
5. Replace the end cap.
2.3 INSTALLATION
2.3.1 General information
1. The transmitter tolerates harsh environments. For best results, install the transmitter in an area where temperature
extremes, vibrations, and electromagnetic and radio frequency interference are minimized or absent.
2. To prevent unintentional exposure of the transmitter circuitry to the plant environment, keep the cover lock in place
over the circuit end cap. See Figure 2-1. To remove the circuit end cap loosen the lock nut until the tab disengages
from the cap. Then unscrew the cover.
3. The transmitter has two ¾-inch conduit openings, one on each side of the housing. See Figure 2-1.
4. Use weathertight cable glands to keep moisture out of the analyzer. If both a chlorine and pH sensor are being used,
install a cable gland with a dual hole seal insert.
5. If conduit is used, plug and seal the connections at the transmitter housing to prevent moisture from getting inside
the transmitter.
NOTE
Moisture allowed to accumulate in the housing can affect the performance
of the transmitter and may void the warranty.
7
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 2.0
INSTALLATION
2.3.2 Mounting on a flat surface.
MILLIMETER
INCH
FIGURE 2-1. Mounting the Model 5081-A on a flat surface
8
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 2.0
INSTALLATION
2.3.3 Pipe Mounting.
MILLIMETER
INCH
DWG. NO.
40508104
REV.
G
DWG. NO.
40508103
REV.
C
FIGURE 2-2. Using the pipe mounting kit (PN 2002577) to attach the Model 5081-A to a pipe.
9
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 2.0
INSTALLATION
2.4 POWER SUPPLY/CURRENT LOOP
2.4.1 Power Supply and Load Requirements.
Refer to Figure 2-3.
The supply voltage must be at least 12.0 Vdc at the transmitter terminals. The power supply must be able to cover the
voltage drop on the cable as well as the load resistor (250 Ω
minimum) required for HART communications. The maximum power supply voltage is 42.0 Vdc. For intrinsically
safe installations, the maximum power supply voltage is
30.0 Vdc. The graph shows load and power supply requirements. The upper line is the power supply voltage needed
to provide 12 Vdc at the transmitter terminals for a 22 mA
current. The lower line is the power supply voltage needed
to provide 30 Vdc for a 22 mA current.
The power supply must provide a surge current during the
first 80 milliseconds of startup. The maximum current is
about 24 mA.
FIGURE 2-3. Load/Power Supply Requirements
For digital communications, the load must be at least 250 ohms. To supply the 12.0 Vdc lift off voltage at the transmitter,
the power supply voltage must be at least 17.5 Vdc.
2.4.2 Power Supply-Current Loop
Wiring.
Refer to Figure 2-4.
Run the power/signal wiring through
the opening nearest terminals 15
and 16. Use shielded cable and
ground the shield at the power supply. To ground the transmitter, attach
the shield to the grounding screw on
the inside of the transmitter case. A
third wire can also be used to connect the transmitter case to earth
ground.
NOTE
For
optimum
EMI/RFI
immunity, the power supply/output cable should be
shielded and enclosed in an
earth-grounded metal conduit.
Do not run power supply/signal
wiring in the same conduit or cable
tray with AC power lines or with
relay actuated signal cables. Keep
power supply/signal wiring at least
6 ft (2 m) away from heavy electrical
equipment.
DWG. NO.
REV.
45081A01
A
FIGURE 2-4. Power Supply/Current Loop Wiring
10
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 3.0
SENSOR WIRING
SECTION 3.0
SENSOR WIRING
3.1
3.2
Wiring Model 499A oxygen, chlorine, and ozone sensors
Wiring Model 499ACL-01 (free chlorine) and pH sensors
NOTE
The Model 5081-A transmitter leaves the factory configured for use with the Model 499ADO sensor (ppm dissolved oxygen). If a 499ADO sensor is not being used, turn to Section 7.5.3 and
configure the transmitter for the desired measurement (ppb oxygen, oxygen measured using a
steam-sterilizable sensor, free chlorine, total chlorine, or ozone) before wiring the sensor to the
transmitter. Operating the transmitter and sensor for longer than five minutes while the transmitter is improperly configured will greatly increase the stabilization time for the sensor.
Be sure to turn off power to the transmitter before wiring the sensor.
3.1 WIRING MODEL 499A OXYGEN, CHLORINE, AND OZONE SENSORS
All 499A sensors (499ADO, 499ATrDO, 499ACL-01, 499ACL-02, and 499AOZ) have identical wiring.
Use the pigtail wire and wire nuts provided with the sensor when more than one wire must be attached to a single terminal.
FIGURE 3-1. Amperometric sensors
with standard cable.
FIGURE 3-2. Amperometric sensors with optimum
EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable.
11
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 3.0
SENSOR WIRING
3.2 WIRING MODEL 499ACL-01 (Free Chlorine) SENSORS AND pH SENSORS
If free chlorine is being measured and the pH of the liquid varies more than 0.2 pH unit, a continuous correction for pH
must be applied to the chlorine reading. Therefore, a pH sensor must be wired to the transmitter. This section gives wiring
diagrams for the pH sensors typically used.
When using the 499ACL-01 (free chlorine) sensor with a pH sensor, use the RTD in the pH sensor for measuring
temperature. DO NOT use the RTD in the chlorine sensor.
The pH sensor RTD is needed for temperature measurement during buffer calibration. During normal operation, the RTD
in the pH sensor provides the temperature measurement required for the free chlorine membrane permeability correction.
Refer to the table to select the appropriate wiring diagram. Most of the wiring diagrams require that two or more shield
wires be attached to a single terminal. Use the pigtail wire and wire nuts provided with the chlorine sensor to make the
connection. Insulate and tape back unused wires.
Free chlorine sensor cable
pH sensor
Figure
Standard
399VP-09
3-3
Standard
399-14
3-4
Standard
399-09-62
3-5
EMI/RFI or Variopol
399VP-09
3-6
EMI/RFI or Variopol
399-14
3-7
EMI/RFI or Variopol
399-09-62
3-8
FIGURE 3-3. Free chlorine sensor with
standard cable and 399VP-09 pH sensor without
internal preamplifier.
12
FIGURE 3-4. Free chlorine sensor with standard cable
and 399-14 pH sensor with internal preamplifier.
If the preamplifier is in the sensor, a default setting in the
transmitter must be changed. See Section 7.8.3.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 3.0
SENSOR WIRING
FIGURE 3-5. Free chlorine sensor with standard
cable and 399-09-62 pH sensor without internal
preamplifier.
FIGURE 3-6. Free chlorine sensor with optimum
EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable and 399VP-09 pH
sensor without internal preamplifier.
FIGURE 3-7. Free chlorine sensor with optimum
EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable and 399-14 pH
sensor with internal preamplifier.
If the preamplifier is in the sensor, a default setting in
the transmitter must be changed. See Section 7.8.3.
FIGURE 3-8. Free chlorine sensor with optimum
EMI/RFI cable or Variopol cable and 399-09-62 pH
sensor without internal preamplifier.
13
MODEL 5081-A
3.3 WIRING Hx438 AND Gx448 SENSORS
FIGURE 3-9. Hx438 and Gx448 Sensors.
14
SECTION 3.0
SENSOR WIRING
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 4.0
INTRINSICALLY SAFE & EXPLOSION PROOF INSTALLATIONS
SECTION 4.0
FIGURE 4-1. FMRC Explosion-Proof Installation
INTRINSICALLY SAFE & EXPLOSION PROOF INSTALLATIONS
15
16
FIGURE 4-2. FM Intrinsically Safe Installation Label
17
FIGURE 4-3. FM Intrinsically Safe Installation (1 of 2)
18
FIGURE 4-3. FM Intrinsically Safe Installation (2 of 2)
19
FIGURE 4-4. CSA Intrinsically Safe Installation Label
20
FIGURE 4-5. CSA Intrinsically Safe Installation (1 of 2)
21
FIGURE 4-5. CSA Intrinsically Safe Installation (2 of 2)
22
FIGURE 4-6. ATEX Intrinsically Safe Installation Label
23
FIGURE 4-7. ATEX Intrinsically Safe Installation (1 of 2)
24
FIGURE 4-7. ATEX Intrinsically Safe Installation (2 of 2)
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 5.0
DISPLAY AND OPERATION
SECTION 5.0
DISPLAY AND OPERATION
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
Display Screens
Infrared Remote Controller (IRC) - Key Functions
Menu Tree
Diagnostic Messages
Security
Using Hold
5.1 DISPLAY SCREENS
Figure 5-1 shows the process display screen. Figure 5-2 shows the program display screen.
Concentration of oxygen,
ozone, or chlorine
Transmitter output signal in
mA or % of full scale
Temperature in °C or °F
FIGURE 5-1. Process Display Screen
If the transmitter is configured to measure free chlorine, a second screen showing pH can be displayed by
pressing the é or ê key on the remote controller.
Appears during HART and AMS
operations
Appears when a disabling
condition has occurred
(see Section 8.3.2)
Concentration of oxygen, ozone, or chlorine
F
A
U
L
T
♥
ppm
H
O
L
D
Appears when transmitter
is in hold (see Section 8.3.2)
Units of display
(ppm, ppb, or %)
Active menu: CALIBRATE,
PROGRAM, or DIAGNOSE
CALIBRATE PROGRAM DIAGNOSE
CALIbrAtE
Commands for submenus,
prompts, or diagnostics
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
Submenus, prompts, and
diagnostic measurements
appear here
FIGURE 5-2. Program Display Screen
The program display screen allows access to calibration and programming menus.
25
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 5.0
DISPLAY AND OPERATION
5.2 INFRARED REMOTE CONTROLLER (IRC) - KEY FUNCTIONS
The infrared remote controller is used to calibrate and program the transmitter and to display diagnostic messages. See Figure 5-3 for a description of the function of the keys.
Hold the IRC within 6 feet of the transmitter, and not more than 15 degrees from the center of the display window.
RESET - Press RESET to end the current operation and return to the main
display. Changes will NOT be saved.
RESET does NOT return the transmitter to factory default settings.
ARROW KEYS - Use é and ê keys to
increase or decrease a number or to
scroll through items in a list. Use the ç
or è keys to move the cursor across a
number. A flashing word or numeral
shows the position of the cursor.
CAL - Press CAL to access the calibration menu.
PROG - Press PROG to access the program menu.
HOLD - Press HOLD to access the
prompts used for turning on or off the
hold function.
ENTER - Press ENTER to move from a
submenu to the first prompt under the
submenu. Pressing ENTER also stores
changes in memory and advances to the
next prompt.
NEXT - Press NEXT to advance to the
next submenu or to leave a message
screen.
EXIT - Press EXIT to end the current
operation. Changes are NOT saved.
DIAG - Press DIAG to read diagnostic
messages.
FIGURE 5-3. Infrared Remote Controller and label.
26
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 5.0
DISPLAY AND OPERATION
5.3 MENU TREE
The Model 5081-A transmitter has three menus: CALIBRATE, PROGRAM, and DIAGNOSE. Under the Calibrate and
Program menus are several submenus. Under each submenu are a number of prompts. The DIAGNOSE menu shows
the reader diagnostic variables that are useful in troubleshooting. Figure 5-4, on the following page, shows the complete
menu tree.
5.4 DIAGNOSTIC MESSAGES
Whenever a warning or fault limit has been exceeded, the transmitter displays diagnostic fault messages. The display
alternates between the main display and the diagnostic message. See Section 15.0 for the meaning of fault and warning
messages.
5.5 SECURITY
5.5.1 Purpose. Use the security code to prevent program settings and calibrations from accidentally being changed.
To program a security code, refer to Section 7.5.
PROGRAM
Id
EXIT
0 00
ENTER
1. If settings are protected with a security code, pressing PROG or CAL on the remote
controller causes the Id screen to appear.
2.
Use the arrow keys to enter the security code. Press ENTER.
3. If the security code is correct, the first submenu appears. If the code is incorrect, the
process display reappears.
4. To retrieve a forgotton code number, enter 555 at the Id prompt. The present security
code will appear.
5.6 USING HOLD
During calibration, the sensor may be exposed to solutions having concentration outside the normal range of the process.
To prevent false alarms and undesired operation of chemical dosing pumps, place the transmitter in hold during calibration. Activating hold keeps the transmitter output at the last value or sends the output to a previously determined value.
See Section 7.3, Output Ranging, for details.
After calibration, reinstall the sensor in the process stream. Wait until readings have stabilized before deactivating Hold.
To activate or deactivate Hold:
1. Press HOLD on the remote controller.
2. The HoLd prompt appears in the display. Press é or ê to toggle Hold between On and OFF.
3. Press ENTER to save.
27
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 5.0
DISPLAY AND OPERATION
FIGURE 5-4. Menu Tree
28
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.1
Note on Model 275 HART Communicator
Connecting the HART Communicator
Operation
Note on Model 275 HART Communicator
The Model 275 HART Communicator is a product of Rosemount Measurement. This section contains selected
information on using the Model 275 with the Rosemount Analytical Model 5081-A Transmitter. For complete information on the Model 275 Communicator, see the Model 275 instruction manual. For technical support on the Model
275 Communicator, call Rosemount Measurement at (800) 999-9307 within the United States. Support is available
worldwide on the internet at http://rosemount.com.
6.2
Connecting the HART Communicator
Figure 6-1 shows how the Model 275 HART Communicator connects to the output lines from the Model 5081-A
Transmitter.
CAUTION
For intrinsically safe CSA and FM
wiring connections, see the Model
275 instruction manual.
4-20 mA + Digital
250
ohm
Model 5081-A
Smart
Transmitter
Control System
Hand Held
Communicator
(“Configurator”)
Bridge
Computer
FIGURE 6-1. Connecting the HART Communicator
29
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
6.3
Operation
6.3.1
Off-line and On-line Operation
The Model 275 Communicator features off-line and on-line communications. On-line means the communicator is
connected to the transmitter in the usual fashion. While the communicator is on line, the operator can view measurement data, change program settings, and read diagnostic messages. Off-line means the communicator is not
connected to the transmitter. When the communicator is off line, the operator can still program settings into the
communicator. Later, after the communicator has been connected to a transmitter, the operator can transfer the
programmed settings to the transmitter. Off-line operation permits settings common to several transmitters to be
easily stored in all of them.
6.3.2
Use of Infrared Remote Controller
In multi-drop operation, polling addresses can be more conveniently set and debugging more conveniently performed using the infrared remote controller.
PROGRAM
1. Press PROG on the infrared remote controller.
HArt
EXIT
NEXT
Address
EXIT
00
NEXT
PreAMb
EXIT
Id
ENTER
05
NEXT
ENTER
NEXT
ENTER
burSt
EXIT
ENTER
2. Press NEXT until the screen at left appears. Press ENTER.
3. The HART menu tree is shown at left. Use the arrow keys to change settings. Press ENTER to store. Press NEXT to move to the next item on the
menu.
Off
0000000
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
6.3.3
Menu Tree
Figure 6-2 shows the menu tree for the Model 5081-A transmitter. Figure 6-3 shows the menu tree for the Model
5081-A transmitter.
30
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------5081A 275 Menu Tree
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Device setup
Process variables
View Fld Dev Vars
Oxygen *
Temp
Snsr Cur
pH #
pH mV #
GI #
Temp Res
View PV-Analog 1
PV is Oxygen *
PV
PV % rnge
PV AO
View SV
SV is Temp **
SV
View TV
TV is Snsr Cur ***
TV
View 4V
4V is Temp Res ****
4V
View Status
Diag/Service
Test device
Loop test
View Status
Master Reset
Fault History
Hold Mode
Calibration
Zero Main Sensor
Air Calibration
In-process Cal
Dual Range Cal #####
Adjust Temperature
pH 2-Pt Cal #
pH Auto Cal #
Standardize pH #
D/A trim
FIGURE 6-2. Menu Tree (HART)
31
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
Diagnostic Vars
Oxygen
Snsr Cur
Sensitivity
Zero Current
pH Value #
pH mV #
pH Slope #
pH Zero Offset #
GI #
Temp
Temp Res
Noise rejection
Basic setup
Tag
PV Range Values
PV LRV
PV URV
PV
PV % rnge
Device information
Distributor
Model
Dev id
Tag
Date
Write protect
Snsr text
Descriptor
Message
Revision #'s
Universal rev
Fld dev rev
Software rev
Hardware rev
Detailed setup
Sensors
Oxygen *
Oxygen Unit [ppm, ppb, %sat] *, *****
Oxygen Sensor [ADO, TRDO, SSDO1, SSDO2] ##
Salinity ###
Bar Press Unit [inHg, mmHg, bar, kPa, atm] ##
Man Bar Press ##
Sensor SST
Sensor SSS
Sensor Zero Limit
Dual Range Cal [Disable, Enable] ####
FIGURE 6-2. Menu Tree (HART) - continued
32
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
pH #
pH Value
pH Comp [Auto, Manual]
Manual pH
Preamp loc [Sensor, Xmtr]
Autocal [Manual, Standard, DIN 19267, Ingold, Merck]
pH Slope
pH SST
pH SSS
pH Zero Offset Limit
pH Diagnostics
Diagnostics [Off, On]
GFH
GFL
Imped Comp [Off, On]
Temperature
Temp Comp [Auto, Manual]
Man. Temp
Temp unit [ºC, ºF]
Temp Snsr
Signal condition
LRV
URV
AO Damp
% rnge
Xfer fnctn
AO lo end point
AO hi end pt
Output condition
Analog output
AO
AO Alrm typ
Fixed
Fault
Loop test
D/A trim
HART output
PV is Oxygen *
SV is Temp **
TV is Snsr Cur ***
4V is pH ****
Poll addr
Burst option [PV, %range/current, Process vars/crnt]
Burst mode [Off, On]
Num req preams
Num resp preams
FIGURE 6-2. Menu Tree (HART) - continued
33
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 6.0
OPERATION WITH MODEL 275
Device information
Distributor
Model
Dev id
Tag
Date
Write protect
Snsr text
Descriptor
Message
Revision #'s
Universal rev
Fld dev rev
Software rev
Hardware rev
Local Display
AO LOI Units [mA, %]
Xmtr ID
Noise rejection
Load Default Conf.
Review
Sensors
Outputs
Device information
PV
PV AO
PV LRV
PV URV
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Notes:
*
Can be Oxygen, Free Cl, Ozone, Ttl Cl, or Chlrmn
**
Can be *, Temp, pH, GI
***
Can be *, Snsr Cur, Temp, pH, GI
**** Can be *, Snsr Cur, Temp, pH, GI, Temp Res, Not Used
***** Units for Ozone can be ppm or ppb. For any of the chlorines, unit is
always ppm.
#
Valid when PV = Free Cl
##
Valid when PV = Oxygen
###
Valid when PV = Oxygen and unit = %sat
#### Valid when PV = Free Cl, Ttl Cl, or Chlrmn
##### Valid when Dual Range Cal = Enable
FIGURE 6-2. Menu Tree (HART) - continued
34
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
General
Default Settings
Output Ranging
Temperature Settings
Display
Factory Default
HART
Calibration Setup
Line Frequency
pH Measurement
Barometric Pressure
7.1 GENERAL
This section describes how to do the following:
1. assign values to the 4 and 20 mA outputs
2. set the current generated by the transmitter during hold
3. set the current generated by the transmitter when a fault is detected
4. change sensor diagnostic limits
5. enable and disable automatic temperature correction
6. program the type measurement (oxygen, ozone, or chlorine)
7. setup stabilization criteria for calibration
8. enable automatic pH correction for chlorine measurements
9. choose units for barometric pressure (oxygen only)
10. choose limits for diagnostic fault messages
7.2 DEFAULT SETTINGS
Table 7-1 lists the default settings for the 5081-A transmitter. The transmitter is configured at the factory to measure
oxygen.
IMPORTANT
Before changing any default settings, configure the transmitter for the measurement you want to
make: oxygen, free chlorine, total chlorine, or ozone. Changing the measurement ALWAYS returns
the transmitter to factory default settings.
35
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
TABLE 7-1. Default Settings
ITEM
CHOICES
DEFAULT
-9999 to 9999 ppm
-9999 to 9999 ppb
-9999 to 9999 %
-9999 to 9999 ppm
00.00 ppm
000.0 ppb
00.00 ppm
00.00 ppm
HOLd
FAULt
dPn
tESt
-9999 to 9999 ppm
-9999 to 9999 ppb
-9999 to 9999 %
-9999 to 9999 ppm
3.80 to 22.00 mA
3.80 to 22.00 mA
0 to 255 seconds
3.80 to 22.00 mA
10.00 ppm
100.0 ppb
200%
10.00 ppm
21.00 mA
22.00 mA
0 seconds
0.00 mA
tEMP
tAUtO
tMAn
On or Off
-25.0 to 150°C
On
25°C
Display
Type of measurement
Units (oxygen only)
Units (ozone only)
Sensor (oxygen only)
Temperature units
Output current units
Security code
dISPLAY
tYPE
Unit
Unit
SEnSor
tEMP
OutPut
CodE
Oxygen, ozone, free chlorine, total chlorine
ppm, ppb, or %
ppm or ppb
499ADO, 499ATrDO, Hx438 or Gx338, other biopharm
°C or °F
mA or % of full scale
000 to 999
oxygen
ppm
ppm
499ADO
°C
mA
000
D. Calibration Setup
1. Stabilization criteria
a. time
b. change
if oxygen (ppm or ppb)
if oxygen (%)
if ozone
if chlorine
2. Salinity (oxygen only)
3. Slope (chlorine only)
4. Maximum zero limit
a. if oxygen (ppm)
b. if oxygen (ppb)
c. if oxygen (%)
d. if ozone
e. if chlorine
CAL SEtUP
StAbiLiSE
tiME
dELtA
00 to 99 sec
10 sec
0.01 to 9.99 ppm
1 to 100 %
0.01 to 9.99 ppm
0.01 to 9.99 ppm
0.0 to 36.0
single or dual
0.05 ppm
1%
0.01 ppm
0.05 ppm
0.0
single
00.00 to 10.00 ppm
000.0 to 999.9 ppb
000.0 to 999.9 %
00.00 to 10.00 ppm
00.00 to 10.00 ppm
0.05 ppm
2.0 ppb
1%
0.01 ppm
0.05 ppm
A. Outputs
1. 4 mA setting
if oxygen (ppm)
if oxygen (ppb)
if oxygen (% saturation)
if chlorine or ozone
2. 20 mA setting
if oxygen (ppm)
if oxygen (ppb)
if oxygen (% saturation)
if chlorine or ozone
3. Hold
4. Fault
5. Dampen
6. Test current
B. Temperature compensation
1. Automatic
2. Manual
C.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
MNEMONIC
OutPut
4MA
20MA
SALntY
SLOPE
LiMit
E. Line Frequency
LinE FrEq
50 or 60 Hz
60 Hz
F.
1.
2.
3.
4.
HART
Address
Preamble
Burst
ID
HArt
AddrESS
PrEAMb
bUrSt
Id
00 to 15
05 to 20
on or off
0000000 to 9999999
00
05
off
0000000
G.
1.
2.
3.
4.
pH Settings (free chlorine only)
Automatic pH correction
Manual pH correction
Location of preamplifier
pH sensor diagnostics
on or off
0.00 to 14.00
transmitter or sensor
on
7.00
transmitter
36
pH
MAn
PAMP
dIAgnOStIC
Table 7-1 continued on following page
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
TABLE 7-1. Default Settings (continued)
a. reference offset
b. diagnostics
(1) glass impedance temperature
correction
(2) glass impedance high
(3) glass impedance low
5. Calibration settings
a. automatic buffer calibration
b. buffer selection list
c. stabilization criteria
(1) time
(2) change
rOFFSEt
diAG
IMPtC
0 to 999
on or off
on or off
60
off
on
GFH
GFL
PH CAL
bAUtO
buFFEr
StAbiLiSE
tiME
dELtA
0 to 2000 MΩ
0 to 900 MΩ
1000 MΩ
10 MΩ
on or off
see table in Section 13.1
standard
0 to 99 sec
0.02 to 0.50
10 sec
0.02
H. Pressure settings (oxygen only)
a. units
b. pressure for % sat calculations
BAr PrESS
Unit
% SAt P
mm hg, kPa, atm, bar, in Hg
0 to 9999
mm Hg
760 mm Hg
7.3 OUTPUT RANGING
7.3.1 Purpose
This section describes how to do the following:
1. assign values to the 4 and 20 mA outputs
2. set the output current generated during hold
3. set the output current generated when a fault is detected
4. control the amount of dampening on the output signal
5. generate a test current.
7.3.2 Definitions
1. CURRENT OUTPUTS. The transmitter provides a continuous 4 - 20 mA output directly proportional to the concentration of the analyte. The analyte is the substance being determined (oxygen, chlorine, or ozone).
2. HOLD. During calibration and maintenance the transmitter output may be outside the normal operating range. Placing
the transmitter on hold prevents false alarms or the unwanted operation of chemical dosing pumps. The transmitter
output can be programmed to remain at the last value or to generate any current between 3.80 and 22.00 mA. During
hold, the transmitter displays the present concentration and temperature. The word HOLD appears in the display.
3. FAULT. A fault is a system disabling condition. When the transmitter detects a fault, the following happens:
a. The display flashes.
b. The words FAULT and HOLD appear in the main display.
c. A fault or diagnostic message appears in the display.
d. The output signal remains at the present value or goes to the programmed fault value. Permitted values
are between 3.80 and 22.00 mA.
e. If the transmitter is in HOLD when the fault occurs, the output remains at the programmed hold value. To alert the
user that a fault exists, the word FAULT appears in the main display, and the display flashes. A fault or diagnostic
message also appears.
f. If the transmitter is simulating an output current when the fault occurs, the transmitter continues to generate the simulated current. To alert the user that a fault exists, the word FAULT appears in the display, and the display flashes.
4. DAMPEN. Output dampening smooths out noisy readings. But it also increases the response time of the output. To
estimate the time (in minutes) required for the output to reach 95% of the final reading following a step change, divide
the setting by 20. Thus, a setting of 140 means that, following a step change, the output takes about seven minutes
to reach 95% of final reading. The output dampen setting does not affect the response time of the process display. The
maximum setting is 255.
5. TEST. The transmitter can be programmed to generate a test current.
37
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.3.3 Procedure
PROGRAM
OutPut
EXIT
1. Press PROG on the remote controller. The OutPut submenu appears.
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
4MA
0 0.00
EXIT
ENTER
2. Press ENTER. The screen displays the 4 MA prompt. Use the arrow keys to change
the setting. Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
20MA
1 0.00
EXIT
ENTER
3. The screen displays the 20 MA prompt. Use the arrow keys to change the setting.
Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
HoLd
2 1.00
EXIT
ENTER
PROGRAM
FAULt
EXIT
2 2.00
ENTER
4. The screen displays the HoLd prompt. Use the arrow keys to change the setting to
the output desired when the transmitter is in hold. The range is 3.80 to 22.00 mA.
Entering 00.00 causes the transmitter to hold the output at the value it was when
placed in hold. The hold setting overrides the fault setting. Press ENTER to save.
5. The screen displays the FAULt prompt. Use the arrow keys to change the setting to
the output desired when the transmitter detects a fault. The range is 3.80 to 22.00 mA.
Entering 00.00 causes the transmitter to hold the output at the value it was when the
fault occurred. Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
dPn
0 00
EXIT
ENTER
6. The screen displays the dPn prompt. Use the arrow keys to change the setting. The
range is 0 to 255. Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
test
EXIT
1 2.00
ENTER
7. The screen displays the tESt prompt. Use the arrow keys to enter the desired test current. Press ENTER to start the test. Press EXIT to end the test.
8. Press RESET to return to the process display.
38
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.4 TEMPERATURE SETTINGS
7.4.1 Purpose
This section describes how to do the following:
1. Enable and disable automatic temperature compensation
2. Set a manual temperature compensation value for oxygen, chlorine, ozone, and pH measurements
3. Tell the transmitter the type of temperature element in the sensor
7.4.2 Definitions
1. AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION - OXYGEN, CHLORINE, AND OZONE. The oxygen, chlorine, and ozone sensors used with the 5081-A transmitter are membrane-covered amperometric sensors. The
permeability of the membrane, or the ease with which the analyte passes through the membrane, is a function of temperature. As temperature increases, permeability increases, and the analyte diffuses more readily
through the membrane. Because sensor current depends on diffusion rate, a temperature increase will cause
the sensor current and transmitter reading to increase even though the concentration of analyte remained constant. A correction equation in the software automatically corrects for changes in membrane permeability
caused by temperature. Temperature is also used in the pH correction applied to free chlorine readings and in
automatic air calibration of oxygen sensors. In automatic temperature correction, the transmitter uses the temperature measured by the sensor for all calculations in which temperature is used.
2. MANUAL TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION - OXYGEN, CHLORINE, AND OZONE. In manual temperature
compensation, the transmitter uses the temperature entered by the user for membrane permeability and pH
corrections and for air calibration calculations. It does not use the actual process temperature. Do NOT use
manual temperature correction unless the measurement and calibration temperatures differ by no more than
about 2°C. Manual temperature correction is useful if the sensor temperature element has failed and a replacement sensor is not available.
3. AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION - pH. The transmitter uses a temperature-dependent factor
to convert measured cell voltage to pH. In automatic temperature compensation the transmitter measures the
temperature and automatically calculates the correct conversion factor. Temperature is also used in automatic buffer calibration. For maximum accuracy, use automatic temperature correction.
4. MANUAL TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION - pH. In manual temperature compensation, the transmitter
converts measured voltage to pH using the temperature entered by the user. It does not use the actual process
temperature. Do NOT use manual temperature compensation unless the process temperature varies no more
than about 2°C or the pH is between 6 and 8. Manual temperature compensation is useful if the sensor temperature element has failed and a replacement sensor is not available.
39
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.4.3 Procedure
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
PROGRAM
tEMP
EXIT
2. Press NEXT until the tEMP submenu appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
tAUtO
EXIT
ON
ENTER
PROGRAM
tMAn
EXIT
0 25.0
ENTER
3. The screen displays the tAUtO (automatic temperature compensation) prompt.
Press é or ê to toggle between On and OFF. Press ENTER to save.
4. If you disable tAuto, the tMAN prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the
temperature to the desired value. To enter a negative number, press è or ç until no
digit is flashing. Then press é or ê to display the negative sign. The temperature
entered in this step will be used in all measurements (oxygen, chlorine, ozone,
or pH), no matter what the process temperature is. Press ENTER to save.
5. Press RESET to return to the process display.
40
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.5 DISPLAY
7.5.1 Purpose
This section describes how to do the following:
1. Configure the transmitter to measure oxygen, free chlorine, total chlorine, or ozone
2. Choose concentration units
3. Set the temperature units to °C or °F
4. Set the output to current or percent of full scale
5. Enter a security code.
7.5.2 Definitions
1. MEASUREMENT. The transmitter can be configured to measure dissolved oxygen (ppm and ppb level), free chlorine,
total chlorine, or ozone.
2. FREE CHLORINE. Free chlorine is the product of adding sodium hypochlorite (bleach), calcium hypochlorite (bleaching
powder), or chlorine gas to fresh water. Free chlorine is the sum of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypochlorite ion (OCl-)
3. TOTAL CHLORINE. Total chlorine is the sum of free and combined chlorine. Combined chlorine generally refers to
chlorine oxidants in which chlorine is combined with ammonia or organic amines. Monochloramine, used to disinfect
drinking water, is an example of combined chlorine. The term total chlorine also refers to other chlorine oxidants such
as chlorine dioxide. To measure total chlorine, the sample must first be treated with a mixture of acetic acid and potassium iodide. Total chlorine reacts with iodide to produce an equivalent amount of iodine, which the sensor measures.
4. OUTPUT CURRENT. The transmitter generates a 4-20 mA output signal directly proportional to the concentration of oxygen, chlorine, or ozone in the sample. The output signal can be displayed as current (in mA) or as percent of full scale.
5. SECURITY CODE. The security code unlocks the transmitter and allows access to all menus.
7.5.3 Procedure
PROGRAM
dISPLAY
EXIT
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
NEXT
ENTER
3. Press é or ê to display the desired measurement. Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
tYPE
EXIT
02
ENTER
PROGRAM
Unit
EXIT
PPb
ENTER
PROGRAM
sensor
EXIT
2. Press NEXT until the diSPLAy submenu appears. Press ENTER.
Sd01
ENTER
O2
CLrA
tCL
FCL
O3
Dissolved oxygen (go to step 4)
Monochloramine
Total chlorine
Free chlorine
Ozone (go to step 7)
Although monochloramine is a choice, a monochloramine sensor is NOT currently
available from Rosemount Analytical.
4. If you chose O2 in step 3, the screen at left appears. Press é or ê to display the desired units: ppm, ppb, or %. Press ENTER to save. Also, refer to step 6 for recommended settings to make for different types of sensors.
5. The screen at left appears. Press é or ê to display the type of sensor. Press ENTER
to save.
AdO
trdO
SdO1
SdO2
499ADO
499ATrDO
Hx438 or Gx448 steam-sterilizable sensor
Steam-sterilizable sensor from other manufacturer
Refer to step 6 for recommended sensor/unit combinations.
Procedure continued on following page.
41
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
6. For best results make the following settings based on the sensor being used.
Sensor
499ADO
499ATrDO
Gx448
Hx438
Units
ppm or %
ppb
ppm or %
ppm or %
PROGRAM
Unit
EXIT
PPb
ENTER
7. If you chose O3 in step 3, the screen at left appears. Press é or ê to toggle between
ppm and ppb. Press ENTER to save.
8. Press RESET to return to the main display.
42
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.6 FACTORY DEFAULT
7.6.1 Purpose
This section describes how to erase ALL user-defined configuration settings and return the transmitter to factory default
settings.
7.6.2 Procedure
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
PROGRAM
dISPLAY
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
tYPE
3. Use é or ê to toggle between nO and yES. With yES showing, press ENTER to return
to factory default settings.
02
EXIT
2. Press NEXT until the dEFAULt appears in the display. Press ENTER.
ENTER
7.7 HART
For more information, see Section 6.3.2.
43
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.8 CALIBRATION SETUP
7.8.1 Purpose
This section describes how to do the following:
1. Enter stabilization criteria for calibration
2. Enter an upper limit for sensor zero
3. Enter a salinity value for air calibration of dissolved oxygen sensors
4. Enable dual slope calibration for free and total chlorine sensors.
7.8.2 Definitions
1. STABILIZATION CRITERION. The transmitter can be programmed not to accept calibration data until the reading has
remained within a specified concentration range for a specified period of time. For example, a stability criterion of
0.05 ppm for 10 seconds means that calibration data will not be accepted until the reading changes less than 0.05 ppm
over a 10-second period. The transmitter calculates the concentration using the present calibration data, or in the case
of a first time calibration, the default sensitivity.
2. SENSOR ZERO LIMIT. Even in the complete absence of the substance being determined, all amperometric sensors
generate a small current called the zero or residual current. The transmitter compensates for the residual current by
subtracting it from the measured current before converting the result to a concentration value. The zero current varies
from sensor to sensor. The transmitter can be programmed not to accept a zero current until the value has fallen below
a reasonable limit.
3. SALINITY (DISSOLVED OXYGEN ONLY). The solubility of oxygen in water depends on the concentration of dissolved
salts in the water. Increasing the concentration decreases the solubility. If the salt concentration is greater than about
1000 ppm, the accuracy of the measurement can be improved by applying a salinity correction. Enter the salinity as
parts per thousand (‰). One percent is ten part per thousand.
4. DUAL SLOPE CALIBRATION (FREE AND TOTAL CHLORINE ONLY). Free and total chlorine sensors from
Rosemount Analytical (Model 499ACL-01 and 499ACL-02) become non-linear at high concentrations of chlorine. Dual
slope calibration allows the analyzer to correct for the non-linearity of the sensor. For more information see Section
10.4 or 11.4.
7.8.3 Procedure
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
PROGRAM
Cal setUp
EXIT
2. Press NEXT until the CAL SEtUP submenu appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
span Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
4. The screen displays the StABiLiSE prompt. Press ENTER.
stabilise
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
5. Set the stabilization time between 0 and 99 seconds. The default value is 10 seconds. Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
tIME
EXIT
3. The screen displays the SPAn CAL prompt. To set the stabilization criteria, press
ENTER.
10
ENTER
Procedure continued on following page.
44
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
PROGRAM
delta
0.05
EXIT
ENTER
PROGRAM
Stabilise
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
slope
SngL
EXIT
ENTER
PROGRAM
salnty
0.00
EXIT
6. Set the stabilization range to between 0.01 and 9.99 ppm. The default values are
shown in the table. Press ENTER to save.
Oxygen
Free chlorine
Total chlorine
Ozone
0.05
0.05
0.05
0.01
ppm or 1%
ppm
ppm
ppm
7. The display returns to the StABiLiSE prompt. Press NEXT. The next screen depends
on the measurement being made. For free or total chlorine see step 8. For oxygen,
see step 9. For ozone see step 10.
8. If the measurement is free or total chlorine, the SLOPE prompt appears. Use é or ê
to toggle between SnGL (single) or duAL (dual) slope. Press ENTER. Go to step 10.
NOTE
For the vast majority of applications, single slope calibration is acceptable. Dual slope calibration is useful in fewer than 5 % of applications.
9. If the measurement is oxygen, the SALnty (salinity) prompt appears. Use the arrow
keys to enter the salinity of the water. Press ENTER. Go to step 10.
ENTER
10. The display returns to the SPAn CAL screen. Press NEXT.
PROGRAM
span Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
11. The 0 CAL screen appears. Press ENTER.
PROGRAM
0 Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
limit
EXIT
00.00
ENTER
12. Enter the desired zero limit. The units are the same as the units programmed in Section 7.5. Default limits are given in the table.
Oxygen (ppm)
Oxygen (ppb)
Oxygen (% saturation)
Free chlorine
Total chlorine
Ozone
0.05 ppm
2.0 ppb
1%
0.05 ppm
0.05 ppm
0.01 ppm or 10 ppb
13. Press RESET to return to the main display.
45
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.9 LINE FREQUENCY
7.9.1 Purpose
This section describes how to maximize noise rejection by entering the frequency of the mains power into the transmitter.
7.9.2 Procedure
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
PROGRAM
2. Press NEXT until the LinE FrEq submenu appears. Press ENTER.
line fre9
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
3. Use é or ê to toggle the line frequency between 50 and 60 Hz. Press ENTER to
save.
PROGRAM
line
EXIT
46
60
ENTER
4. Press RESET to return to the main display.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.10 pH MEASUREMENT
NOTE
The pH measurement submenu appears only if the transmitter has been configured to measure
free chlorine. pH is not available with any other meassurement.
7.10.1 Purpose
This section describes how to do the following:
1. Enable and disable automatic pH correction for free chlorine measurements
2. Set a pH value for manual pH correction
3. Enable and disable pH sensor diagnostics
4. Set upper and lower limits for glass impedance diagnostics
5. Enable and disable automatic pH calibration
6. Set stability criteria for automatic pH buffer calibration.
7.10.2 Definitions
1. AUTOMATIC pH CORRECTION. Free chlorine is the sum of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypochlorite ion (OCl-).
The relative amount of each depends on pH. As pH increases, the concentration of HOCl decreases and the concentration of OCl- increases. Because the sensor responds only to HOCl, a pH correction is necessary to properly convert the sensor current into a free chlorine reading. The transmitter uses both automatic and manual pH correction. In
automatic pH correction the transmitter continuously monitors the pH of the sample and corrects the free chlorine reading for changes in pH. In manual pH correction, the user enters the pH of the sample. Generally, if the pH changes
more than about 0.2 units over short periods of time, automatic pH correction is best. If the pH is relatively steady or
subject only to seasonal changes, manual pH correction is adequate.
2. REFERENCE OFFSET. The transmitter reading can be changed to match the reading of a second pH meter. If the difference (converted to millivolts) between the transmitter reading and the desired value exceeds the programmed limit,
the transmitter will not accept the new reading. To estimate the millivolt difference, multiply the pH difference by 60.
3. pH SENSOR DIAGNOSTICS. The transmitter continuously monitors the pH sensor for faults. A fault means that the
sensor has failed or is possibly nearing failure. The only pH sensor diagnostic available in the 5081-A is glass impedance.
4. GLASS IMPEDANCE. The transmitter monitors the condition of the pH-sensitive glass membrane in the sensor by
continuously measuring the impedance across the membrane. Typical impedance is 100 to 500 MΩ. A low impedance
(<10 MΩ) means the glass membrane has cracked and the sensor must be replaced. An extremely high impedance
(>1000MΩ) implies that the sensor is aging and may soon need replacement. High impedance might also mean that
the glass membrane is no longer immersed in the process liquid.
5. AUTOMATIC pH CALIBRATION. The transmitter features both automatic and manual pH calibration. In automatic calibration, screen prompts direct the user through a two-point buffer calibration. The transmitter recognizes the buffers
and uses temperature-corrected values in the calibration. The table in Section 13.1 lists the standard buffers the transmitter recognizes. The transmitter also recognizes several technical buffers: Merck, Ingold, and DIN 19267. During
automatic calibration, the transmitter does not accept data until programmed stability limits have been met.
6. MANUAL pH CALIBRATION. If automatic pH calibration is deactivated, the user must perform a manual calibration. In
manual calibration the user judges when readings are stable and manually enters the buffer values. Because manual calibration greatly increases the chance of making an error, the use of automatic calibration is strongly recommended.
47
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.10.3 Procedure
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
PROGRAM
pH
EXIT
On
NEXT
ENTER
2. Press NEXT until the PH submenu appears. On will be flashing, indicating that the pH
measurement and automatic pH correction of free chlorine has been enabled.
To keep automatic pH correction enabled, press ENTER. Go to step 3.
To disable automatic pH correction, use é or ê to change On to OFF and press
ENTER. The MAn prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to enter the pH of the sample. Press ENTER to save. Press RESET to return to the main display.
PROGRAM
pamp =
EXIT
trans
NEXT
ENTER
3. The screen displays the PAMP (preamplifier) prompt. Press é or ê to toggle between
trAnS and SnSr.
trAnS Preamplifier is in the transmitter
SnSr Preamplifier is in the sensor or in a remote junction box
Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
4. The screen displays the dIAgnOStIC submenu header. Prompts under this header
allow the user to change the reference offset and pH sensor diagnostic limits.
dIagnostIC
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
The default settings are: reference offset
60 mV
pH sensor diagnostics off
To keep the default settings, press NEXT. Go to step 11.
To change the reference offset or to enable or make changes to the glass diagnostic
settings, press ENTER. Go to step 5.
PROGRAM
rOffset
0 60
EXIT
ENTER
PROGRAM
dIag
EXIT
Off
EXIT
On
ENTER
PROGRAM
GfH
EXIT
6. The dIAg (diagnostics) prompt appears. Press é or ê to toggle between OFF (disable) or On (enable). Press ENTER to save.
ENTER
PROGRAM
ImptC
5. The rOFFSEt (reference offset) prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the
offset to the desired value in mV. Press ENTER to save.
1 000
ENTER
7. The IMPtC (glass impedance temperature correction) prompt appears. Press é or ê
to toggle between OFF (disable) or On (enable). Because glass impedance is a
strong function of temperature, correcting glass impedance for temperature effects is
strongly recommended. Press ENTER to save.
8. The GFH (glass fault high) prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the setting to the desired value. The default setting is 1000 MΩ. Entering 0000 disables the
feature. Press ENTER to save.
When the glass electrode impedance exceeds the limit, the transmitter displays the
GLASSFAIL diagnostic message and sets a fault condition.
PROGRAM
GfL
EXIT
0 010
ENTER
9. The GFL (glass fault low) prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the setting
to the desired value. The default setting is 10 MΩ. Entering 0000 disables the feature.
Press ENTER to save.
When the glass electrode impedance falls below the limit, the transmitter displays the
GLASSFAIL diagnostic message and sets a fault condition.
48
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
PROGRAM
dIagnostIC
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
PH Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
10. Once diagnostic limits have been set, the display returns to the dIAgnOStIC submenu header. Press NEXT.
11. The PH CAL submenu header appears. Prompts under this header allow the user to
enable or disable automatic buffer calibration, select the buffers to be used, and set
stabilization criteria for pH calibration. The default settings are:
Automatic buffer calibration
Buffers
Stabilization
On
Standard (see Section 7.10.2)
<0.02 pH in 10 seconds
To make changes to the pH calibration parameters, press ENTER. Go to step 12.
To leave settings at their default values press EXIT to leave the submenu.
PROGRAM
baUtO
EXIT
On
ENTER
12. The bAUtO (automatic buffer calibration) prompt appears. Press é or ê to toggle
between OFF (disable) or On (enable). Press ENTER to save. Keeping automatic
buffer calibration enabled is strongly recommended.
PROGRAM
buffer
EXIT
Std
ENTER
13. The buFFEr prompt appears. Press é or ê to scroll through the list of available
buffers. See Section 13.1 for a list of the buffer values.
Std
ErC
InG
din
Standard buffers
Merck buffers
Ingold buffers
DIN 19267 buffers
Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
stabilise
EXIT
ENTER
14. The StAbiLiSE (stabilize) prompt appears. To change stabilization criteria, press
ENTER. To leave stabilization criteria at the default values, press EXIT.
PROGRAM
time
EXIT
1 .0
ENTER
PROGRAM
delta
EXIT
0 .02
ENTER
15. Set the stabilization time between 0 and 99 seconds. The default value is 10 seconds.
Press ENTER to save.
16. Set the stabilization range to between 0.02 and 0.50 pH. Press ENTER to save.
17. Press RESET to return to the main display.
49
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 7.0
PROGRAMMING
7.11 BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
NOTE
The barometric pressure submenu appears only if
the transmitter has been configured to measure oxygen.
7.11.1 Purpose
This section describes how to do the following
1. Set the units for barometric pressure
2. Enter a pressure other than the calibration pressure for percent saturation measurements.
7.11.2 Definitions
1. BAROMETRIC PRESSURE. Because the current generated by an amperometric oxygen sensor is directly proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen, the sensor is generally calibrated by exposing it to water saturated air. See
Section 9.1 for more information. To calculate the equivalent concentration of oxygen in water in ppm, the transmitter
must know the temperature and barometric pressure. This submenu lets the user specify the units for barometric pressure.
2. PERCENT SATURATION PRESSURE. Oxygen is sometimes measured in units of percent saturation. Percent saturation is the concentration of oxygen divided by the maximum amount of oxygen the water can hold (the saturation
concentration) at the temperature and pressure of the measurement. Generally, the pressure during the measurement
is assumed to be the same as the pressure when the sensor was calibrated. If the measurement and calibration pressures differ, the measurement pressure can be entered as a separate variable.
7.11.3 Procedure
1. Press PROG on the remote controller.
PROGRAM
bar press
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
PROGRAM
Unit
nnHG
EXIT
ENTER
2. Press NEXT until the bAr PRESS submenu appears. Press ENTER.
3. The Unit prompt appears. Press é or ê to scroll through the list of units:
nnHG
1000PA
Atn
bAr
InHG
mm Hg
kPa
atm
bar
in Hg
Press ENTER to save.
PROGRAM
% sat p
EXIT
4. If % saturation units were selected in Section 7.5, the % SAt P (saturation pressure)
prompt appears. Press NEXT.
NEXT
PROGRAM
p man
EXIT
7 60
5. Use the arrow keys to enter the desired pressure. The transmitter will use this pressure to calculate percent saturation. Press ENTER.
ENTER
6. Press RESET to return to the main display.
50
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 8.0
CALIBRATION — TEMPERATURE
SECTION 8.0
CALIBRATION — TEMPERATURE
8.1 INTRODUCTION
All four amperometric sensors (oxygen, ozone, free chlorine, and total chlorine) are membrane-covered sensors. As
the sensor operates, the analyte (the substance to be determined) diffuses through the membrane and is consumed
at an electrode immediately behind the membrane. The reaction produces a current that depends on the rate at
which the analyte diffuses through the membrane. The diffusion rate, in turn, depends on the concentration of the
analyte and how easily it passes through the membrane (the membrane permeability). Because the membrane permeability is a function of temperature, the sensor current will change if the temperature changes. To correct for
changes in sensor current caused by temperature, the transmitter automatically applies a membrane permeability
correction. Although the membrane permeability is different for each sensor, the change is about 3%/°C at 25°C, so
a 1°C error in temperature produces about a 3% error in the reading.
Temperature plays an additional role in oxygen measurements. Oxygen sensors are calibrated by exposing them
to water-saturated air, which, from the point of view of the sensor, is equivalent to water saturated with atmospheric
oxygen (see Section 9.1 for more information). During calibration, the transmitter calculates the solubility of atmospheric oxygen in water using the following steps. First, the transmitter measures the temperature. From the temperature, the transmitter calculates the vapor pressure of water and, using the barometric pressure, calculates the
partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen. Once the transmitter knows the partial pressure, it calculates the equilibrium solubility of oxygen in water using a temperature-dependent factor called the Bunsen coefficient. Overall, a
1°C error in the temperature measurement produces about a 2% error in the solubility calculated during calibration and about the same error in subsequent measurements.
Temperature is also important in the pH measurement required to correct free chlorine readings.
1. The transmitter uses a temperature dependent factor to convert measured cell voltage to pH. Normally, a slight
inaccuracy in the temperature reading is unimportant unless the pH reading is significantly different from 7.00.
Even then, the error is small. For example, at pH 12 and 25°C, a 1°C error produces a pH error less than ±0.02.
2. During auto calibration, the transmitter recognizes the buffer being used and calculates the actual pH of the
buffer at the measured temperature. Because the pH of most buffers changes only slightly with temperature,
reasonable errors in temperature do not produce large errors in the buffer pH. For example, a 1°C error causes at most an error of ±0.03 in the calculated buffer pH.
Without calibration the accuracy of the temperature measurement is about ±0.4°C. Calibrate the transmitter if
1. ±0.4°C accuracy is not acceptable
2. the temperature measurement is suspected of being in error. Calibrate temperature by making the transmitter
reading match the temperature measured with a standard thermometer.
51
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 8.0
CALIBRATION — TEMPERATURE
8.2. PROCEDURE
1. Place the sensor and a calibrated reference thermometer in a container of water at ambient temperature. Be
sure the temperature element in the sensor is completely submerged by keeping the sensor tip at least three
inches below the water level. Stir continuously. Allow at least 20 minutes for the standard thermometer, sensor, and water to reach constant temperature.
CALIBRATE
tEMP AdJ
EXIT
NEXT
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
tEMP
EXIT
52
0 25.0
ENTER
3. Press NEXT until the tEMP AdJ submenu appears. Press Enter.
4. The tEMP prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the display to
match the temperature measured using the standard thermometer.
Press ENTER to save.
5. The tEMP AdJ sub-menu appears. Press RESET to return to the main
display.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 9.0
CALIBRATION — OXYGEN
SECTION 9.0
CALIBRATION — OXYGEN
9.1 INTRODUCTION
As Figure 9-1 shows, oxygen sensors generate a current directly proportional to the concentration of dissolved
oxygen in the sample. Calibrating the sensor requires exposing it to a solution containing no oxygen (zero standard) and to a solution containing a known amount of oxygen (full-scale standard).
The zero standard is necessary because oxygen sensors, even when no oxygen is present in the sample, generate a small current called the residual current. The analyzer compensates for the residual current by subtracting it
from the measured current before converting the result to a dissolved oxygen value. New sensors require zeroing
before being placed in service, and sensors should be zeroed whenever the electrolyte solution is replaced. The
recommended zero standard is 5% sodium sulfite in water, although oxygen-free nitrogen can also be used.
The Model 499A TrDO sensor, used for the determination of trace (ppb) oxygen levels, has very low residual current and does not normally require zeroing. The residual current in the 499A TrDO sensor is equivalent
to less than 0.5 ppb oxygen.
The purpose of the full-scale standard is to establish the slope of the calibration curve. Because the solubility of
atmospheric oxygen in water as a function of temperature and barometric pressure is well known, the natural
choice for a full-scale standard is air-saturated water. However, air-saturated water is difficult to prepare and use,
so the universal practice is to use air for calibration. From the point of view of the oxygen sensor, air and air-saturated water are identical. The equivalence comes about because the sensor really measures the chemical potential of oxygen. Chemical potential is the force that causes oxygen molecules to diffuse from the sample into the
sensor where they can be measured. It is also the force that causes oxygen molecules in air to dissolve in water
and to continue to dissolve until the water is saturated with oxygen. Once the water is saturated, the chemical
potential of oxygen in the two phases (air and water) is the same.
Oxygen sensors generate a current directly proportional to the rate at which oxygen molecules diffuse through a
membrane stretched over the end of the sensor. The diffusion rate depends on the difference in chemical potential between oxygen in the sensor and oxygen in the sample. An electrochemical reaction, which destroys any oxygen molecules entering the sensor, keeps the concentration (and the chemical potential) of oxygen inside the sensor equal to zero. Therefore, the chemical potential of oxygen in the sample alone determines the diffusion rate
and the sensor current.
When the sensor is calibrated, the chemical potential of oxygen in the standard determines the sensor current.
Whether the sensor is calibrated in air or air-saturated water is immaterial. The chemical potential of oxygen is the
same in either phase. Normally, to make the calculation of solubility in common units (like ppm DO) simpler, it is
convenient to use water-saturated air for calibration.
Automatic air calibration is standard. The user simply exposes the sensor to water-saturated air and keys in the
barometric pressure. The transmitter monitors the sensor current. When the current is stable, the transmitter stores
the current and measures the temperature. From the temperature, the transmitter calculates the saturation vapor
pressure of water. Next, it calculates the pressure of dry air by subtracting the vapor pressure from the barometric pressure. Using the fact that dry air always contains
20.95% oxygen, the transmitter calculates the partial pressure of oxygen. Once the transmitter knows the partial pressure of oxygen, it uses the Bunsen coefficient to calculate the
equilibrium solubility of atmospheric oxygen in water at the
prevailing temperature. At 25°C and 760 mm Hg, the equilibrium solubility is 8.24 ppm.
Often it is too difficult or messy to remove the sensor from the
process liquid for calibration. In this case, the sensor can be
calibrated against a measurement made with a portable laboratory instrument. The laboratory instrument typically uses a
membrane-covered amperometric sensor that has been calibrated against water-saturated air.
FIGURE 9-1. Sensor Current as a Function
of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration
53
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 9.0
CALIBRATION — OXYGEN
9.2 PROCEDURE — ZEROING THE SENSOR
1. Place the sensor in a fresh solution of 5% sodium sulfite (Na2SO3) in water. Be sure air bubbles are not
trapped against the membrane. The current will drop rapidly at first and then gradually reach a stable zero
value. To monitor the sensor current, go to the main display. Press DIAG followed by NEXT. The SenSor Cur
prompt appears. Press ENTER to view the sensor current. Note the units: nA is nanoamps; µA is microamps.
The table gives typical zero values for Rosemount Analytical sensors.
Sensor
499ADO
499ATrDO
Hx438 and Gx448
Zero Current
<50 nA
<5 nA
<1 nA
499ATrDO sensors usually do not require zeroing. However,
the zero current of a new sensor should ALWAYS be checked.
A new sensor or a sensor in which the electrolyte solution has been replaced may require several hours (occasionally as long as overnight) to reach a minimum current. DO NOT START THE ZERO ROUTINE UNTIL THE
SENSOR HAS BEEN IN ZERO SOLUTION FOR AT LEAST TWO HOURS.
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
3. The SEnSor O prompt appears. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
sensor 0
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
0 at
0.05
EXIT
ENTER
4. The screen shows the value (in units selected in Section 7.5.3) below
which the reading must be before the zero current will be accepted.
Assume the units are ppm. The screen shows 0.02. Therefore, the reading must be below 0.02 ppm before the zero will be accepted. For a
499ADO sensor 0.02 ppm corresponds to about 50 nA. To change the
zero limit value, see Section 7.8.3. Press ENTER.
NOTE
The number shown in the main display may change. During the zero
step, the previous zero current is suppressed, and the concentration
shown in the main display is calculated assuming the residual current is zero. Once the transmitter accepts the new zero current, it is
used in all subsequent measurements.
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
CALIBRATE
ENTER
5. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the zero current is
below the concentration limit shown in the previous screen. If the current
is already below the limit, tiME dELAy will not appear. To bypass the
time delay, press ENTER.
6. O donE shows that the zero step is complete. Press EXIT.
0 done
EXIT
54
7. Press RESET to return to the main display.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 9.0
CALIBRATION — OXYGEN
9.3 PROCEDURE — AIR CALIBRATION
1. Remove the sensor from the process liquid. Use a soft tissue and a stream of water from a wash bottle to clean
the membrane. Blot dry. The membrane must be dry during air calibration.
2. Pour some water into a beaker and suspend the sensor with the membrane about 0.5 inch (1 cm) above the
water surface. To avoid drift caused by temperature changes, keep the sensor out of the direct sun.
3. Monitor the dissolved oxygen reading and the temperature. Once readings have stopped drifting, begin the
calibration. It may take 10 -15 minutes for the sensor reading in air to stabilize. Stabilization time may be even
longer if the process temperature is appreciably different from the air temperature. For an accurate calibration,
temperature measured by the sensor must be stable.
4. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
5. Press NEXT. The SEnSor CAL submenu appears. Press ENTER.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
6. The Air CAL prompt appears. Press ENTER.
A ir Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
7. The screen shows the units selected for barometric pressure. Press
NEXT.
nnHG
EXIT
NEXT
CALIBRATE
Press
7 60.0
EXIT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
ENTER
8. Use the arrow keys to enter the barometric pressure. Press ENTER.
NOTE
Be sure to enter the actual barometric pressure. Weather
forecasters and airports usually report barometric pressure
corrected to sea level; they do not report the actual barometric pressure. To estimate barometric pressure from altitude, see Appendix A.
9. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass the time
delay, press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Cal dOne
EXIT
10. This screen appears when the calibration is complete. The concentration
shown in the main display is the solubility of atmospheric oxygen in
water at ambient temperature and barometric pressure. Press EXIT.
11. To return to the main display, press RESET.
12. During calibration, the transmitter calculates the sensitivity (nA/ppm) of
the sensor. To check the sensitivity, go to the main display. Press DIAG.
Press NEXT until the SenSitvtY (sensitivity) prompt appears. Press
ENTER to display the sensitivity in nA/ppm. Typical values at 25°C are
given in the table.
Sensor
499ADO
499ATrDO
Hx438 and Gx448
nA/ppm
1,800 - 3,100
3,600 - 6,100
4.8 - 9.8
55
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 9.0
CALIBRATION — OXYGEN
9.4 PROCEDURE — IN-PROCESS CALIBRATION
1. The transmitter and sensor can be calibrated against a standard instrument. For oxygen sensors installed in
aeration basins in waste treatment plants, calibration against a second instrument is often preferred. For an
accurate calibration be sure that:
a. The standard instrument has been zeroed and calibrated against water-saturated air following the manufacturer's instructions.
b. The standard sensor is inserted in the liquid as close to the process sensor as possible.
c.
Adequate time is allowed for the standard sensor to stabilize before calibrating the process instrument.
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
3. Press NEXT. The SEnSor CAL submenu appears. Press ENTER.
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
4. Press NEXT. The Air CAL prompt appears. Press NEXT.
A ir Cal
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
5. The In ProCESS prompt appears. Press ENTER.
In ProCess
EXIT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
6. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass the time
delay, press ENTER.
time delay
EXIT
NEXT
CALIBRATE
7. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) message appears. Press ENTER.
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
Cal
EXIT
3 .20
8. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing display to the value indicated
by the standard instrument. Press ENTER to save.
ENTER
9. Press RESET to return to the main display.
56
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 10.0
CALIBRATION - FREE CHLORINE
SECTION 10.0
CALIBRATION — FREE CHLORINE
10.1 INTRODUCTION
As Figure 10-1 shows, a free chlorine sensor generates a current directly proportional to the concentration of free
chlorine in the sample. Calibrating the sensor requires exposing it to a solution containing no chlorine (zero standard) and to a solution containing a known amount of chlorine (full-scale standard).
The zero standard is necessary because chlorine sensors, even when no chlorine is in the sample, generate a
small current called the residual current. The transmitter compensates for the residual current by subtracting it
from the measured current before converting the result to a chlorine value. New sensors require zeroing before
being placed in service, and sensors should be zeroed whenever the electrolyte solution is replaced. Either of the
following makes a good zero standard:
•
Deionized water containing about 500 ppm sodium chloride. Dissolve 0.5 grams (1/8 teaspoonful) of table
salt in 1 liter of water. DO NOT USE DEIONIZED WATER ALONE FOR ZEROING THE SENSOR. THE
CONDUCTIVITY OF THE ZERO WATER MUST BE GREATER THAN 50 µS/cm.
•
Tap water known to contain no chlorine. Expose tap water to bright sunlight for at least 24 hours.
The purpose of the full-scale standard is to establish the slope of the calibration curve. Because stable chlorine
standards do not exist, the sensor must be calibrated against a test run on a grab sample of the process liquid. Several manufacturers offer portable test kits for this purpose. Observe the following precautions when taking and testing the grab sample.
•
Take the grab sample from a point as close to the sensor as possible. Be sure that taking the sample does
not alter the flow of the sample to the sensor. It is best to install the sample tap just downstream from the
sensor.
•
Chlorine solutions are unstable. Run the test immediately after taking the sample. Try to calibrate the sensor when the chlorine concentration is at the upper end of the normal operating range.
Free chlorine measurements made with the 499ACL-01 sensor also require a pH correction. Free chlorine is the sum of
hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hyprochlorite ion (OCl-). The relative amount of each depends on the pH. As pH increases, the concentration of HOCl decreases and the concentration of OCl- increases. Because the sensor responds only
to HOCl, a pH correction is necessary to properly convert the sensor current into a free chlorine reading.
The transmitter uses both automatic and manual pH correction. In automatic pH correction, the transmitter continuously monitors the pH of the solution and corrects the free chlorine reading for changes in pH. In manual pH
correction, the transmitter uses a fixed pH value entered by the user to make the correction. Generally, if the pH
changes more than about 0.2 units over short periods of time, automatic pH correction is best. If the pH is relatively steady or subject only to seasonal changes, manual pH correction is adequate.
During calibration, the transmitter must know the pH of the sample. If the transmitter is using automatic pH correction, the pH sensor (properly calibrated) must be in the process liquid before starting the calibration. If the
transmitter is using manual pH correction, be sure to enter the pH value before starting the calibration.
The Model 499ACL-01 free chlorine sensor loses sensitivity at high
concentrations of chlorine. The
5081-A transmitter has a dual
slope feature that allows the user
to compensate for the non-linearity of the sensor. However, for the
vast majority of applications, dual
slope calibration is unnecessary.
FIGURE 10-1. Sensor Current as a Function of Free Chlorine Concentration
57
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 10.0
CALIBRATION - FREE CHLORINE
10.2 PROCEDURE — ZEROING THE SENSOR
1. Place the sensor in the zero standard (see Section 10.1). Be sure no air bubbles are trapped against the membrane. The sensor current will drop rapidly at first and then gradually reach a stable zero value. To monitor the
sensor current, go to the main display. Press DIAG followed by NEXT. The SEnSor Cur prompt appears.
Press ENTER to view the sensor current. Note the units: nA is nanoamps; µA is microamps. Typical zero current for a free chlorine sensor is -10 to +10 nanoamps.
A new sensor or a sensor in which the electrolyte solution has been replace may require several hours (occasionally as long as overnight) to reach a minimum zero current. DO NOT START THE ZERO ROUTINE UNTIL
THE SENSOR HAS BEEN IN ZERO SOLUTION FOR AT LEAST TWO HOURS.
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor 0
EXIT
3. The SEnSor O prompt appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
0 at
0.02
EXIT
ENTER
4. The screen shows the value (in units ppm) below which the reading
must be before the zero current will be accepted. The screen shows
0.02. Therefore, the reading must be below 0.02 ppm before the zero
will be accepted. For a typical 499ACL-01 sensor, 0.02 ppm corresponds to about 7 nA. To change the zero limit value, see Section 7.8.3.
Press ENTER.
NOTE
The number shown in the main display may change. During the
zero step, the previous zero current is suppressed, and the concentration shown in the main display is calculated assuming the
residual current is zero. Once the transmitter accepts the new zero
current, it is used in all subsequent measurements.
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
ENTER
5. The tiME dELAY message appears and remains until the zero current
is below the concentration limit shown in the previous screen. If the current is already below the limit, tiME dELAy will not appear. To bypass
the time delay, press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
0 dOne
EXIT
58
6. O donE shows that the zero step is complete. Press EXIT.
7. Press RESET to return to the main display.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 10.0
CALIBRATION - FREE CHLORINE
10.3 PROCEDURE — FULL SCALE CALIBRATION
1. Place the sensor in the process liquid. If automatic pH correction is being used, calibrate the pH sensor (see
Section 13.0) and place it in the process liquid. If manual pH correction is being used, measure the pH of the
process liquid and enter the value (see Section 7.6). Adjust the sample flow until it is within the range recommended for the chlorine sensor. Refer to the sensor instruction sheet.
2. Adjust the chlorine concentration until it is near the upper end of the control range. Wait until the reading is
stable before starting the calibration.
3. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
4. Press NEXT. The SEnSor CAL submenu appears.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
5. Press ENTER. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until
the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.6. To
bypass the time delay, press ENTER.
NEXT
NOTE
As soon as the stability criteria are met (or ENTER is
pressed to bypass the time delay), the transmitter stores
the sensor current. Therefore, if the chlorine level in the
process liquid drifts while the sample is being tested, there
is no need to compensate for the change when entering
test results in step 7.
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
6. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of free
chlorine in the sample. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Cal
EXIT
3 .20
ENTER
7. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing display to the concentration
of chlorine determined in the grab sample. Press ENTER to save.
8. Press RESET to return to the main display.
9. During calibration, the transmitter calculates the sensitivity (nA/ppm) of
the sensor. To check the sensitivity, go to the main display. Press DIAG.
Press NEXT until the SenSitvtY (sensitivity) prompt appears. Press
ENTER to display the sensitivity in nA/ppm. The sensitivity of a
499ACL-01 sensor is 250 - 350 nA/ppm at 25°C and pH 7.
59
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 10.0
CALIBRATION - FREE CHLORINE
10.4 DUAL SLOPE CALIBRATION
Figure 10-2 show the principle of dual slope calibration. Between zero and concentration C1, the sensor response
is linear. When the concentration of chlorine becomes greater than C1, the response is non-linear. In spite of the
non-linearity, the response can be approximated by a straight line between point 1 and point 2.
Dual slope calibration is rarely needed. It is probably useful in fewer than 5% of applications.
1. Be sure the transmitter has been configured for
dual slope calibration. See Section 7.8.
2. Zero the sensor. See Section 10.2.
3. Place the sensor in the process liquid. If automatic pH correction is being used, calibrate the
pH sensor (Section 13.0) and place it in the
process liquid. If manual pH correction is being
used, measure the pH of the process liquid and
enter the value. See Section 7.8. Adjust the
sample flow until it is within the range recommended for the chlorine sensor. Refer to the
sensor instruction sheet.
FIGURE 10-2. Dual Slope Calibration
4. Press CAL on the remote controller. Press NEXT.
CALIBRATE
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
5. The SEnSor CAL prompt appears. Press ENTER.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
Cal pt1
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
6. The CAL Pt 1 prompt appears. Adjust the chlorine concentration until it
is near the upper end of the linear range of the sensor. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
7. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass the time
delay, press ENTER.
time delay
EXIT
NEXT
NOTE
As soon as the stability criteria are met (or ENTER is pressed
to by-pass the time delay), the transmitter stores the sensor
current. Therefore, if the chlorine level in the process liquid
drifts while the sample is being tested, there is no need to
compensate for the change when entering test results.
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
60
ENTER
8. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of free
chlorine in the sample. Press ENTER.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 10.0
CALIBRATION - FREE CHLORINE
CALIBRATE
Pt1
3 .00
EXIT
ENTER
9. The Pt1 prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing
display to the concentration of chlorine determined in the grab sample.
Press ENTER to save.
CALIBRATE
Cal pt2
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
10. The CAL Pt 2 prompt appears. Adjust the concentration of chlorine until
it is near the top end of the range, i.e., near concentration C2 shown in
Figure 10-2. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
11. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass the time
delay, press ENTER.
time delay
EXIT
NEXT
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
12. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of free
chlorine in the sample. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Pt2
EXIT
6 .00
ENTER
13. The Pt2 prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing
display to the concentration of chlorine determined in the grab sample.
Press ENTER to save.
14. Press RESET to return to the main display.
61
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 11.0
CALIBRATION - TOTAL CHLORINE
SECTION 11.0
CALIBRATION — TOTAL CHLORINE
9.1 INTRODUCTION
Total chlorine is the sum of free and combined chlorine. The continuous determination of total chlorine requires
two steps. See Figure 11-1. First, the sample flows into a conditioning system (SCS 921) where a pump continuously adds acetic acid and potassium iodide to the sample. The acid lowers the pH, which allows total chlorine in
the sample to quantitatively oxidize the iodide in the reagent to iodine. In the second step, the treated sample flows
to the sensor. The sensor is a membrane-covered amperometric sensor, whose output is proportional to the concentration of iodine. Because the concentration of iodine is proportional to the concentration of total chlorine, the
analyzer can be calibrated to read total chlorine.
Figure 11-2 shows a typical calibration curve for a total chlorine sensor. Because the sensor really measures
iodine, calibrating the sensor requires exposing it to a solution containing no iodine (zero standard) and to a solution containing a known amount of iodine (full-scale standard).
The zero standard is necessary because the sensor, even when no iodine is present, generates a small current
called the residual current. The transmitter compensates for the residual current by subtracting it from the measured current before converting the result to a total chlorine value. New sensors require zeroing before being
placed in service, and sensors should be zeroed whenever the electrolyte solution is replaced. The best zero standard is sample without reagent added.
The purpose of the full-scale standard is to
establish the slope of the calibration curve.
Because stable total chlorine standards do not
exist, the sensor must be calibrated against
a test run on a grab sample of the process
liquid. Several manufacturers offer portable
test kits for this purpose. Observe the following
precautions when taking and testing the grab
sample.
•
•
Take the grab sample from a point as close
as possible to the inlet of the SCS921 sample conditioning system. Be sure that taking
the sample does not alter the flow through
the SCS921. Sample flow must remain
between 80 and 100 mL/min.
FIGURE 11-1. Determination of Total Chlorine
Chlorine solutions are unstable. Run the
test immediately after taking the sample.
Try to calibrate the sensor when the chlorine concentration is at the upper end of
the normal operating range.
The Model 499ACL-02 (total chlorine) sensor
loses sensitivity at high concentrations of chlorine. The 5081-A transmitter has a dual slope
feature that allows the user to compensate for
the non-linearity of the sensor. However, for
the vast majority of applications, dual slope
calibration is unnecessary.
FIGURE 11-2. Sensor Current as a Function of Total
Chlorine Concentration
62
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 11.0
CALIBRATION - TOTAL CHLORINE
11.2 PROCEDURE — ZEROING THE SENSOR
1. Complete the startup sequence described in the SCS921 instruction manual. Adjust the sample flow to
between 80 and 100 mL/min, and set the sample pressure to between 3 and 5 psig.
2. Remove the reagent uptake tube from the reagent bottle and let it dangle in air. The peristaltic pump will simply pump air into the sample.
3. Let the system run until the sensor current is stable. The current will drop rapidly at first and then gradually
reach a stable value. To monitor the sensor current, go to the main display. Press DIAG followed by NEXT.
The SEnSor Cur prompt appears. Press ENTER to view the sensor current. Note the units: nA is nanoamps;
µA is microamps. Typical zero current for a total chlorine sensor is -10 to +30 nanoamps.
A new sensor or a sensor in which the electrolyte solution has been replaced may require several hours (occasionally as long as overnight) to reach a minimum zero current. DO NOT START THE ZERO ROUTINE UNTIL
THE SENSOR HAS BEEN IN ZERO SOLUTION FOR AT LEAST TWO HOURS.
4. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor 0
EXIT
5. The SEnSor O prompt appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
0 at
0.02
EXIT
ENTER
6. The screen shows the value (in units ppm) below which the reading
must be before the zero current will be accepted. The screen shows
0.02. Therefore, the reading must be below 0.02 ppm before the zero
will be accepted. For a typical 499ACL-02 sensor, 0.02 ppm corresponds to about 20 nA. To change the zero limit value, see Section
7.8.3. Press ENTER.
NOTE
The number shown in the main display may change. During the
zero step, the previous zero current is suppressed, and the concentration shown in the main display is calculated assuming the
residual current is zero. Once the transmitter accepts the new zero
current, it is used in all subsequent measurements.
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
ENTER
7. The tiME dELAY message appears and remains until the zero current
is below the concentration limit shown in the previous screen. If the current is already below the limit, tiME dELAy will not appear. To bypass
the time delay, press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
0 dOne
EXIT
8. O donE shows that the zero step is complete. Press EXIT.
9. Press RESET to return to the main display.
63
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 11.0
CALIBRATION - TOTAL CHLORINE
11.3 PROCEDURE — FULL SCALE CALIBRATION
1. If the sensor was just zeroed, place the reagent uptake tube back in the bottle. Once the flow of reagent starts,
it takes about one minute for the sensor current to begin to increase. It may take an hour or longer for the reading to stabilize. Be sure the sample flow stays between 80 and 100 mL/min and the pressure is between 3 and
5 psig.
2. Adjust the chlorine concentration until it is near the upper end of the control range. Wait until the transmitter
reading is stable before starting the calibration.
3. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
4. Press NEXT. The SEnSor CAL submenu appears.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
5. Press NEXT. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the
sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass
the time delay, press ENTER.
NEXT
NOTE
As soon as the stability criteria are met (or ENTER is
pressed to bypass the time delay), the transmitter stores
the sensor current. Therefore, if the chlorine level in the
process liquid drifts while the sample is being tested, there
is no need to compensate for the change when entering
test results in step 7.
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
6. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of total
chlorine in the sample. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Cal
EXIT
3 .20
ENTER
7. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing display to the concentration
of chlorine determined in the grab sample. Press ENTER to save.
8. Press RESET to return to the main display.
9. During calibration, the transmitter calculates the sensitivity (nA/ppm) of
the sensor. To check the sensitivity, go to the main display. Press DIAG.
Press NEXT until the SenSitvtY (sensitivity) prompt appears. Press
ENTER to display the sensitivity in nA/ppm. The sensitivity of a
499ACL-02 sensor is about 1300 nA/ppm at 25°C.
64
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 11.0
CALIBRATION - TOTAL CHLORINE
11.4 DUAL SLOPE CALIBRATION
Figure 11-3 show the principle of dual slope calibration. Between zero and concentration C1, the sensor response
is linear. When the concentration of chlorine becomes greater than C1, the response is non-linear. In spite of the
non-linearity, the response can be approximated by a straight line between point 1 and point 2.
Dual slope calibration is rarely needed. It is probably useful in fewer than 5% of applications.
1. Be sure the transmitter has been configured for
dual slope calibration. See Section 7.8.
2. Zero the sensor. See Section 11.2.
3. If the sensor was just zeroed, place the
reagent uptake tube back in the bottle. Once
the flow of reagent starts, it takes about one
minute for the sensor current to begin to
increase. It may take an hour or longer for the
reading to stabilize. Be sure the sample flow
stays between 80 and 100 mL/min and the
pressure is between 3 and 5 psig.
FIGURE 11-3. Dual Slope Calibration
4. Press CAL on the remote controller. Press NEXT.
CALIBRATE
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
5. The SEnSor CAL prompt appears. Press ENTER.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
Cal pt1
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
6. The CAL Pt 1 prompt appears. Adjust the chlorine concentration until it
is near the upper end of the linear range of the sensor. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
7. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass the time
delay, press ENTER.
time delay
EXIT
NEXT
NOTE
As soon as the stability criteria are met (or ENTER is pressed
to by-pass the time delay), the transmitter stores the sensor
current. Therefore, if the chlorine level in the process liquid
drifts while the sample is being tested, there is no need to
compensate for the change when entering test results.
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
8. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of total
chlorine in the sample. Press ENTER.
65
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 11.0
CALIBRATION - TOTAL CHLORINE
CALIBRATE
Pt1
3 .00
EXIT
ENTER
9. The Pt1 prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing
display to the concentration of chlorine determined in the grab sample.
Press ENTER to save.
CALIBRATE
Cal pt2
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
10. The CAL Pt 2 prompt appears. Adjust the concentration of chlorine until
it is near the top end of the range, i.e., near concentration C2 shown in
Figure 11-3. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
11. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.8. To bypass the time
delay, press ENTER.
time delay
EXIT
NEXT
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
12. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of total
chlorine in the sample. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Pt2
EXIT
6 .00
ENTER
13. The Pt2 prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing
display to the concentration of chlorine determined in the grab sample.
Press ENTER to save.
14. Press RESET to return to the main display.
66
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 12.0
CALIBRATION - OZONE
SECTION 12.0
CALIBRATION — OZONE
12.1 INTRODUCTION
As Figure 12-1 shows, an ozone sensor generates a current directly proportional to the concentration of ozone in
the sample. Calibrating the sensor requires exposing it to a solution containing no ozone (zero standard) and to a
solution containing a known amount of ozone (full-scale standard).
The zero standard is necessary because ozone sensors, even when no ozone is in the sample, generate a small
current called the residual current. The transmitter compensates for the residual current by subtracting it from the
measured current before converting the result to an ozone value. New sensors require zeroing before being
placed in service, and sensors should be zeroed whenever the electrolyte solution is replaced. Either of the following makes a good zero standard:
•
Deionized water.
•
Tap water known to contain no ozone. Expose tap water to ozone-free air for several hours.
The purpose of the full-scale standard is to establish the slope of the calibration curve. Because stable ozone standards do not exist, the sensor must be calibrated against a test run on a grab sample of the process liquid.
Several manufacturers offer portable test kits for this purpose. Observe the following precautions when taking and
testing the grab sample.
•
Take the grab sample from a point as close to the sensor as possible. Be sure that taking the sample does not
alter the flow of the sample to the sensor. It is best to install the sample tap just downstream from the sensor.
•
Ozone solutions are unstable. Run the test immediately after taking the sample. Try to calibrate the sensor
when the ozone concentration is at the upper end of the normal operating range.
FIGURE 12-1. Sensor Current as a Function of Ozone Concentration
67
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 12.0
CALIBRATION - OZONE
12.2 PROCEDURE — ZEROING THE SENSOR
1. Place the sensor in the zero standard (see Section 12.1). Be sure no air bubbles are trapped against the membrane. The sensor current will drop rapidly at first and then gradually reach a stable zero value. To monitor the
sensor current, go to the main display. Press DIAG followed by NEXT. The SEnSor Cur prompt appears.
Press ENTER to view the sensor current. Note the units: nA is nanoamps; µA is microamps. Typical zero current for an ozone sensor is -10 to +10 nanoamps.
A new sensor or a sensor in which the electrolyte solution has been replace may require several hours (occasionally as long as overnight) to reach a minimum zero current. DO NOT START THE ZERO ROUTINE UNTIL
THE SENSOR HAS BEEN IN ZERO SOLUTION FOR AT LEAST TWO HOURS.
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor 0
EXIT
3. The SEnSor O prompt appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
0 at
0.02
EXIT
ENTER
4. The screen shows the value (in units ppm) below which the reading
must be before the zero current will be accepted. The screen shows
0.02. Therefore, the reading must be below 0.02 ppm before the zero
will be accepted. For a typical ozone sensor, 0.02 ppm corresponds to
about 7 nA. To change the zero limit value, see Section 7.8.3. Press
ENTER.
NOTE
The number shown in the main display may change. During the
zero step, the previous zero current is suppressed, and the concentration shown in the main display is calculated assuming the
residual current is zero. Once the transmitter accepts the new zero
current, it is used in all subsequent measurements.
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
ENTER
5. The tiME dELAY message appears and remains until the zero current
is below the concentration limit shown in the previous screen. If the current is already below the limit, tiME dELAy will not appear. To bypass
the time delay, press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
0 dOne
EXIT
68
6. O donE shows that the zero step is complete. Press EXIT.
7. Press RESET to return to the main display.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 12.0
CALIBRATION - OZONE
12.3 PROCEDURE — FULL SCALE CALIBRATION
1. Place the sensor in the process liquid. Adjust the sample flow until it is within the range recommended for the
sensor. Refer to the sensor instruction sheet.
2. Adjust the ozone concentration until it is near the upper end of the control range. Wait until the reading is stable before starting the calibration.
3. Press CAL on the infrared remote controller.
CALIBRATE
Sensor Cal
EXIT
NEXT
4. Press NEXT. The SEnSor CAL submenu appears.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
time delay
EXIT
5. Press NEXT. The tiME dELAy message appears and remains until the
sensor reading meets the stability criteria set in Section 7.6. To bypass
the time delay, press ENTER.
NEXT
NOTE
As soon as the stability criteria are met (or ENTER is
pressed to bypass the time delay), the transmitter stores
the sensor current. Therefore, if the chlorine level in the
process liquid drifts while the sample is being tested, there
is no need to compensate for the change when entering
test results in step 7.
CALIBRATE
Grab spl
EXIT
ENTER
6. The GrAb SPL (grab sample) prompt appears. Take a sample of the
process liquid and immediately determine the concentration of ozone in
the sample. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Cal
EXIT
3 .20
ENTER
7. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing display to the concentration
of ozone determined in the grab sample. Press ENTER to save.
8. Press RESET to return to the main display.
9. During calibration, the transmitter calculates the sensitivity (nA/ppm) of
the sensor. To check the sensitivity, go to the main display. Press DIAG.
Press NEXT until the SenSitvtY (sensitivity) prompt appears. Press
ENTER to display the sensitivity in nA/ppm. The sensitivity of a
499AOZ sensor is about 350 nA/ppm at 25°C.
69
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 13.0
CALIBRATION - pH
SECTION 13.0
CALIBRATION — pH
13.1 INTRODUCTION
A new pH sensor must be calibrated before use. Regular recalibration is also necessary.
A pH measurement cell (pH sensor and the solution to be measured) can be pictured as a battery with an extremely high internal resistance. The voltage of the battery depends on the pH of the solution. The pH meter, which is
basically a voltmeter with a very high input impedance, measures the cell voltage and calculates pH using a conversion factor. The value of the voltage-to-pH conversion factor depends on the sensitivity of the pH sensing element (and the temperature). The sensing element is a thin, glass membrane at the end of the sensor. As the glass
membrane ages, the sensitivity drops. Regular recalibration corrects for the loss of sensitivity. pH calibration standards, also called buffers, are readily available.
Two-point calibration is standard. Both automatic calibration and manual calibration are available. Auto calibration
avoids common pitfalls and reduces errors. Its use is recommended.
In automatic calibration the transmitter recognizes the buffer and uses temperature-corrected pH values in the calibration. The table below lists the standard buffers the controller recognizes. The transmitter also recognizes several technical buffers: Merck, Ingold, and DIN 19267. Temperature-pH data stored in the controller are valid
between at least 0 and 60°C.
pH at 25°C
(nominal pH)
Standard(s)
1.68
NIST, DIN 19266, JSI 8802, BSI (see note 1)
3.56
NIST, BSI
3.78
NIST
4.01
NIST, DIN 19266, JSI 8802, BSI
6.86
NIST, DIN 19266, JSI 8802, BSI
7.00
(see note 2)
7.41
NIST
9.18
NIST, DIN 19266, JSI 8802, BSI
10.01
NIST, JSI 8802, BSI
12.45
NIST, DIN 19266
Note 1: NIST is National Institute of Standards,
DIN is Deutsche Institute für Normung, JSI is
Japan Standards Institute, and BSI is British
Standards Institute.
Note 2: pH 7 buffer is not a standard buffer. It is
a popular commercial buffer in the United
States.
During automatic calibration, the controller also measures
noise and drift and does not accept calibration data until
readings are stable. Calibration data will be accepted as
soon as the pH reading is constant to within the factory-set
limits of 0.02 pH units for 10 seconds. The stability settings
can be changed. See Section 7.10.
In manual calibration, the user judges when pH readings are
stable. He also has to look up the pH of the buffer at the
temperature it is being used and enter the value in the transmitter.
Once the transmitter completes the calibration, it calculates
the calibration slope and offset. The slope is reported as the
slope at 25°C. Figure 13-1 defines the terms.
The transmitter can also be standardized. Standardization is
the process of forcing the transmitter reading to match the
reading from a second pH instrument. Standardization is
sometimes called a one-point calibration.
70
FIGURE 13-1. Calibration Slope and Offset
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 13.0
CALIBRATION - pH
13.2 PROCEDURE — AUTO CALIBRATION
1. Verify that auto calibration has been enabled. See Section 7.10.
2. Obtain two buffer solutions. Ideally, the buffer pH values should bracket the range of pH values to be measured.
3. Remove the sensor from the process liquid. If the temperature of the process and buffer are appreciably different, place the sensor in a container of tap water at the buffer temperature. Do not start the calibration until
the sensor has reached the buffer temperature. Thirty minutes is usually adequate.
4. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
PH Cal
EXIT
5. Press NEXT until the PH CAL submenu appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
AUtO CAL
EXIT
NEXT
6. The AUtO CAL submenu appears. Press ENTER.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
CAL bF1
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
bf1
EXIT
ENTER
7. The CAL bF1 prompt appears. Rinse the sensor and place it in the first
buffer. Be sure the glass bulb and reference junction are completely
submerged. Swirl the sensor. The main display will show the pH of the
buffer based on the previous calibration. Press ENTER.
8. bF1 flashes until the pH reading meets the stability criteria programmed
in Section 7.10.
CALIBRATE
bf1
4.01
EXIT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
CAL bF2
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
9. Once the reading is stable, the display changes to look like the figure
at left. The flashing number is the nominal pH, that is, the pH of the
buffer at 25°C. If the flashing number does not match the nominal pH,
press é or ê until the correct pH appears. Press ENTER to save.
10. The CAL bF2 prompt appears. Remove the sensor from the first buffer.
Rinse the sensor and place it in the second buffer. Be sure the glass
bulb and reference junction are completely submerged. Swirl the sensor. The display will show the pH of the buffer based on the previous
calibration. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
bF2
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
11. bF2 flashes until the pH reading meets the stability criteria programmed
in Section 7.10.
CALIBRATE
bf2
EXIT
10.00
ENTER
12. Once the reading is stable, the display changes to look like the figure
at left. The flashing number is the nominal pH, that is, the pH of the
buffer at 25°C. If the flashing number does not match the nominal pH,
press é or ê until the correct pH appears. Press ENTER to save.
13. Press RESET to return to the main display.
71
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 13.0
CALIBRATION - pH
13.3 PROCEDURE — MANUAL CALIBRATION
1. Verify that manual calibration has been enabled. See Section 7.10.
2. Obtain two buffer solutions. Ideally, the buffer pH values should bracket the range of pH values to be measured. Also obtain a reliable thermometer.
3. Remove the sensor from the process liquid. If the temperature of the process and buffer are appreciably different, place the sensor in a container of tap water at the buffer temperature. Do not start the calibration until
the sensor has reached the buffer temperature. Thirty minutes is usually adequate.
4. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
PH CAL
EXIT
5. Press NEXT until the PH CAL prompt appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
MAn CAL
EXIT
NEXT
6. The MAn CAL message appears. Press ENTER.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
CAL bf1
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
bf1
0 4.01
EXIT
ENTER
7. The CAL bF1 prompt appears. Rinse the sensor and the thermometer
and place them in the first buffer. Be sure the glass bulb and reference
junction are completely submerged. Swirl the sensor. The main display
will show the pH of the buffer based on the previous calibration. Press
ENTER.
8. Wait until the pH reading in the main display is constant. Use the arrow
keys to change the flashing display to the value of the buffer at the
measurement temperature. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
CAL bf2
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
9. The CAL bF2 prompt appears. Rinse the sensor and the thermometer
and place them in the second buffer. Be sure the glass bulb and reference junction are completely submerged. Swirl the sensor. The main
display will show the pH of the buffer based on the previous calibration.
Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
bf2
EXIT
1 0.00
ENTER
10. Wait until the pH reading in the main display is constant. Use the arrow
keys to change the flashing display to the value of the buffer at the
measurement temperature. Press ENTER.
11. Press RESET to return to the main display.
72
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 13.0
CALIBRATION - pH
13.4 STANDARDIZATION
1. The pH measured by the transmitter can be changed to match the reading from a second or reference instrument. The process of making the two readings agree is called standardization, or one-point calibration.
2. During standardization, the difference between the two pH values is converted to the equivalent voltage. The
voltage, called the reference offset, is added to all subsequent measured cell voltages before they are converted to pH. If a sensor that has been calibrated with buffers is then standardized and placed back in a buffer,
the measured pH will differ from the buffer pH by an amount equivalent to the standardization offset.
3. Install the sensor in the process liquid. Once readings are stable, measure the pH of the liquid using a reference instrument. Normally, it is acceptable to test a grab sample. Because the pH of the process liquid may
change if the temperature changes, measure the pH immediately after taking the grab sample. For poorly
buffered samples, it is best to determine the pH of a continuously flowing sample from a point as close as possible to the process sensor.
4. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
PH CAL
EXIT
5. Press NEXT until the PH CAL submenu appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
Std PH
EXIT
6. Press NEXT until the Std PH submenu appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
Std
EXIT
0 7.00
ENTER
7. Be sure the process pH and temperature are stable. Measure the pH of
the process liquid using the reference instrument. Use the arrow keys
to change the flashing display to match the reading from the reference
meter. Press ENTER to save.
8. Press RESET to return to the main display.
73
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 13.0
CALIBRATION - pH
13.5 pH SLOPE ADJUSTMENT
1. If the slope of the glass electrode is known form other measurements, it can be entered directly into the transmitter. The slope must be entered as the slope at 25°C. To calculate the slope at 25°C from the slope at temperature t°C, use the equation:
slope at 25°C = (slope at t°C)
298
t°C + 273
Changing the slope overrides the slope determined from the previous buffer calibration.
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
pH CAL
EXIT
3. Press NEXT until PH CAL appears. Press ENTER.
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
4. Press NEXT until PH SLOPE appears. Press ENTER.
pH slOpe
EXIT
NEXT
ENTER
CALIBRATE
slOpe
EXIT
5 9.16
5. The SLOPE prompt appears. Use the arrow keys to change the flashing display to the desired slope. Press ENTER to save.
ENTER
6. Press RESET to return to the main display.
74
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 14.0
CALIBRATION — CURRENT OUTPUT
SECTION 14.0
CALIBRATION — CURRENT OUTPUT
14.1 GENERAL
Although the transmitter outputs are calibrated at the factory, they can be trimmed in the field to match the reading from a standard current meter. Both the 4 mA and the 20 mA outputs can be trimmed. During output calibration the transmitter is in Hold. The output current will go to the value programmed in Section 7.3.
14.2 PROCEDURE
1. Wire an accurate milliammeter as shown in Figure 14-1.
FIGURE 14-1. Current Output Calibration
2. Press CAL on the remote controller.
CALIBRATE
OUtpUt CAL
EXIT
NEXT
3. Press NEXT until the OUtPUt CAL submenu appears. Press ENTER.
ENTER
CALIBRATE
Cur
EXIT
4 .000
NEXT
ENTER
4. Use the arrow keys to change the display to match the reading from the
milliammeter. Press ENTER.
CALIBRATE
Cur
EXIT
2 0.00
NEXT
ENTER
5. Use the arrow keys to change the display to match the reading from the
milliammeter. Press ENTER. Press RESET to return to the main display.
75
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 15.0
DIAGNOSTICS
SECTION 15.0
DIAGNOSTICS
15.1 GENERAL
The 5081-A transmitter can display diagnostic information that is useful in troubleshooting. The diagnostics available depend on the measurement being made. To read diagnostic information, go to the main display and press
DIAG on the infrared remote controller. Press NEXT until the mnemonic for the desired information appears. Refer
to the appropriate section below for more information.
15.2 DIAGNOSTIC MESSAGES FOR DISSOLVED OXYGEN
TYPE O2
SEnSor Cur
Transmitter is measuring oxygen. Press NEXT to view diagnostics.
Press ENTER to display raw current from sensor (note units).
SEnSitvtY
Press ENTER to display sensitivity. Sensitivity is calculated during calibration. It is the
measured current divided by concentration.
O CurrEnt
Press ENTER to display the zero current measured during calibration (note units).
bAr PreSS
Press ENTER to display the barometric pressure used by the transmitter during air calibration.
5081-A-Ht
This is the model number. Press ENTER to display the software revision (SFtr) level. Press
NEXT to show the hardware revision (HArdr) level.
FAULtS
Press ENTER to scroll through existing fault messages.
15.3 DIAGNOSTIC MESSAGES FOR OZONE AND TOTAL CHLORINE
TYPE O3 or tCL
SEnSor Cur
Press ENTER to display raw current from sensor (note units).
SEnSitvtY
Press ENTER to display sensitivity. Sensitivity is calculated during calibration. It is the
measured current divided by concentration.
O CurrEnt
Press ENTER to display the zero current measured during calibration (note units).
5081-A-Ht
This is the model number. Press ENTER to display the software revision (SFtr) level.
Press NEXT to show the hardware revision (HArdr) level.
FAULtS
76
Transmitter is measuring ozone (or total chlorine). Press NEXT to view diagnostics.
Press ENTER to scroll through existing fault messages.
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 15.0
DIAGNOSTICS
15.4 DIAGNOSTIC MESSAGES FOR FREE CHLORINE
TYPE FCL
SEnSor Cur
Transmitter is measuring free chlorine. Press NEXT to view diagnostics.
Press ENTER to display raw current from sensor (note units).
SEnSitvtY
Press ENTER to display sensitivity. Sensitivity is calculated during calibration. It is the measured
current divided by concentration.
O CurrEnt
Press ENTER to display the zero current measured during calibration (note units).
PH
InPut
Press ENTER to view pH diagnostics. Press NEXT to skip pH diagnostics.
Current pH sensor input voltage in millivolts.
SLOPE
Sensor slope in millivolts per unit pH. Slope is calculated during buffer calibration. See Figure 13.1.
OFFSt
Sensor voltage in millivolts in pH 7 buffer.
GIMP
Glass impedance in MΩ.
5081-A-Ht
FAULtS
This is the model number. Press ENTER to display the software revision (SFtr) level. Press
NEXT to show the hardware revision (HArdr) level.
Press ENTER to scroll through existing fault messages.
77
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.1
16.2
16.3
16.4
16.5
16.6
16.7
16.8
16.9
16.10
16.11
16.12
16.13
WARNING AND FAULT MESSAGES
TROUBLESHOOTING WHEN A WARNING OR FAULT MESSAGE IS SHOWING
TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
OXYGEN MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
FREE CHLORINE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
TOTAL CHLORINE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
OZONE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
pH MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
SIMULATING INPUT CURRENTS - DISSOLVED OXYGEN
SIMULATING INPUT CURRENTS - CHLORINE AND OZONE
SIMULATING INPUTS - pH
SIMULATING TEMPERATURE
MEASURING REFERENCE VOLTAGE
16.1 WARNING AND FAULT MESSAGES
The Model 5081-A transmitter continuously monitors the sensor and transmitter for conditions that cause erroneous measurements. When a problem occurs, the transmitter displays either a warning or fault message. A warning alerts the user
that a potentially disabling condition exists. There is a high probability that the measurement is in error. A fault alerts the
user that a disabling condition exists. If a fault message is showing, all measurements should be regarded as erroneous.
When a WARNING condition exists:
1. The main display remains stable; it does not flash.
2. A warning message appears alternately with the temperature and output readings in the second line of the display. See
Section 16.4 for an explanation of the warning messages and suggested ways of correcting the problem.
When a FAULT exists:
1. The main display flashes.
2. The words FAULT and HOLD appear in the main display.
3. A fault message appears alternately with the temperature and output readings in the second line of the display. See
Section 16.4 for an explanation of the fault messages and suggested ways of correcting the problem.
4. The output current will remain at the present value or go to the programmed fault value. See Section 7.3 for details on
how to program the current generated during a fault condition.
5. If the transmitter is in HOLD when the fault occurs, the output remains at the programmed hold value. To alert the user
that a fault exists, the word FAULT appears in the main display, and the display flashes. A fault or diagnostic message
also appears.
6. If the transmitter is simulating an output current when the fault occurs, the transmitter continues to generate the simulated current. To alert the user that a fault exists, the word FAULT appears in the display, and the display flashes.
78
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.2 TROUBLESHOOTING WHEN A FAULT OR WARNING MESSAGE IS SHOWING
Message
Explanation
See Section
OuEr rAnGE
Over range, measurement exceeds display limit
16.2.1
AMP FAIL
Amperometric sensor failure, sensor current is too high
16.2.1
bAd SEnSor
Bad sensor, sensor current is a large negative number
16.2.2
0 too biG
Zero current is too large, sensor was zeroed while current exceeded 100 nA
16.2.3
CAL Error
Calibration error, sensitivity (nA/ppm) is too high or too low
16.2.4
nEEd 0 CAL
Sensor needs re-zeroing, reading is too negative
16.2.5
bAd rtd
Bad temperature reading
16.2.6
TEMP HI
Temperature reading exceeds 150°C
16.2.6
TEMP LO
Temperature reading is less than -15°C
16.2.6
rtd OPEn
RTD or thermistor is open
16.2.6
SenSE OPEn
Sense line is not connected
16.2.7
PH in
Raw millivolt reading from pH sensor is too large
16.2.8
SLOPE HI
pH sensor slope exceeds 62 mV/pH
16.2.9
SLOPE LO
pH sensor slope is less than 40 mV/pH
16.2.9
-0- OFFSEt
Zero offset during standardization exceeds programmed limit
16.2.10
GLASS FAIL
Measured glass impedance is less than programmed limit
16.2.11
FACt FAIL
Unit has not been factory-calibrated
16.2.12
CPU FAIL
Internal CPU tests have failed
16.2.13
ROM FAIL
Internal memory has failed
16.2.13
AdC
Analog to digital conversion failed
16.2.14
bAd Gnd
Bad ground
16.2.15
In too biG
mV signal from pH sensor is too large
16.2.16
RitE Err
CPU PCB jumper (JP-1) has been removed
16.2.17
16.2.1 OuEr rAnGE and AMP FAIL.
These error messages appear if the sensor current is too high. Normally, excessive sensor current implies that the amperometric sensor is miswired or the sensor has failed.
1. Verify that wiring is correct and connections are tight. Be sure to check connections at the junction box if one is being
used. See Section 3.0.
2. Replace the sensor membrane and electrolyte solution and clean the cathode if necessary. See the sensor instruction
sheet for details.
3. Replace the sensor.
79
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.2.2 bAd SEnSor.
Bad sensor means that the sensor current is a large negative number.
1. bAd SEnSor may appear for a while when the sensor is first placed in service. Observe the sensor current (go to
SEnSor Cur under the diagnostic menu). If the sensor current is moving in the positive direction, there is probably
nothing wrong and the error message should soon disappear.
2. Verify that wiring is correct. Pay particular attention the anode and cathode connections.
3. Verify that the transmitter is configured for the correct measurement. Configuring the measurement sets (among other
things) the polarizing voltage. Applying the wrong polarizing voltage to the sensor can cause a negative current.
4. Replace the sensor membrane and electrolyte solution and clean the cathode if necessary. See the sensor instruction
sheet for details.
5. Replace the sensor.
16.2.3 0 too bIG
Normally, the transmitter will not accept a zero current until the current has fallen below a reasonable value. See the calibration section for the analyte being determined for typical zero currents. However, the user can force the transmitter to
accept the present current as the zero value. The 0 too bIG warning appears if the current at the time the sensor is zeroed
is greater than 100 nA. Because the transmitter subtracts the zero current from the measured current before converting
the result to a concentration, zeroing too soon will cause readings to be low.
1. Allow adequate time, possibly as long as overnight, for the sensor to stabilize before starting the zero routine.
2. Verify that the solution used for zeroing the sensor contains no analyte. Refer to the appropriate calibration section for
details.
3. Replace the sensor membrane and electrolyte solution and clean the cathode if necessary. See the sensor instruction
sheet for details.
4. Replace the sensor.
16.2.4 CAL Error
At the end of the calibration step, the transmitter calculates the sensitivity in nA/ppm. If the sensitivity is outside the range
normally expected, the transmitter displays the CAL Error message and the transmitter does not update the calibration.
For assistance, refer to the troubleshooting section specific for the sensor.
16.2.5 nEEd 0 CAL
nEEd 0 CAL means that the concentration of the analyte is too negative.
1. Check the zero current (go to 0 CurrEnt under the diagnostic menu). If the zero current is appreciably greater than the
measurement current, the nEEd 0 CAL warning will appear.
2. Verify that the zero current is close to the value given in the calibration section for the analyte being determined.
3. Rezero the sensor. Refer to the calibration and troubleshooting sections for the sensor for more information.
16.2.6 bAd rtd, TEMP HI, TEMP LO, and rtd OPEn
These messages usually mean that the RTD (or thermistor in the case of the Hx438 and GX448 sensors) is open or shorted or there is an open or short in the connecting wiring.
1. Verify all wiring connections, including wiring in a junction box if one is being used.
2. Disconnect the RTD IN, RTD SENSE, and RTD RETURN leads or the thermistor leads at the transmitter. Be sure to
note the color of the wire and where it was attached. Measure the resistance between the RTD IN and RETURN leads.
For a thermistor, measure the resistance between the two leads. The resistance should be close to the value in the
table in Section 16.11. If the temperature element is open or shorted, replace the sensor. In the meantime, use manual temperature compensation.
3. For oxygen measurements using the HX438, the Gx448, or other steam-sterilizable sensor using a 22kNTC, the TEMP
HI error will appear if the controller was not properly configured. See Section 7.5.3.
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16.2.7 SenSE OPEn
Most Rosemount Analytical sensors use a Pt100 or Pt1000 in a three-wire configuration (see Figure 16.5). The in and
return leads connect the RTD to the measuring circuit in the analyzer. A third wire, called the sense line, is connected to
the return lead. The sense line allows the analyzer to correct for the resistance of the in and return leads and to correct for
changes in lead wire resistance with changes in ambient temperature.
1. Verify all wiring connections, including wiring in a junction box if one is being used.
2. Disconnect the RTD SENSE and RTD RETURN wires. Measure the resistance between the leads. It should be less
than 5 Ω. If the sense line is open, replace the sensor as soon as possible.
3. The transmitter can be operated with the sense line open. The measurement will be less accurate because the
transmitter can no longer compensate for lead wire resistance. However, if the sensor is to be used at approximately
constant ambient temperature, the lead wire resistance error can be eliminated by calibrating the sensor at the
measurement temperature. Errors caused by changes in ambient temperature cannot be eliminated. To make the
error message disappear, connect the RTD SENSE and RETURN terminals with a jumper.
16.2.8 pH In
pH In means the voltage from the pH measuring cell is too large.
1. Verify all wiring connections, including connections in a junction box.
2. Check that the pH sensor is completely submerged in the process liquid.
3. Check the pH sensor for cleanliness. If the sensor looks fouled or dirty, clean it. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for cleaning procedures.
4. Replace the sensor.
16.2.9 SLOPE HI or SLOPE LO
Once the two-point (manual or automatic) pH calibration is complete, the transmitter automatically calculates the sensor
slope at 25°C. If the slope is greater than 62 mV/pH the transmitter displays the SLOPE HI error. If the slope is less than
45 mV/pH, the transmitter displays the SLOPE LO error. The transmitter will not update the calibration.
1. Check the buffers. Inspect the buffer solutions for obvious signs of deterioration, such as turbidity or mold growth.
Neutral and slightly acidic buffers are highly susceptible to molds. Alkaline buffers (pH 9 and greater), if they have been
exposed to air for long periods, may also be inaccurate. Alkaline buffers absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere,
which lowers the pH. If a high pH buffer was used in the failed calibration, repeat the calibration using fresh buffer. If
fresh buffer is not available, use a lower pH buffer. For example, use pH 4 and pH 7 buffer instead of pH 7 and pH 10
buffer.
2. Allow adequate time for temperature equilibration. If the sensor was in a process liquid substantially hotter or colder
than the buffer, place it in a container of water at ambient temperature for at least 20 minutes before starting the calibration.
3. If manual calibration was done, verify that correct pH values were entered.
4. Verify all wiring connections, including connections at a junction box.
5. Check the pH sensor for cleanliness. If the sensor looks fouled or dirty, clean it. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for cleaning procedures.
6. Replace the sensor.
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16.2.10 -0- OFFSEt
The -0- OFFSEt message appears if the standardization offset (in mV) exceeds the programmed limit. The default limit is
60 mV, which is equivalent to about a unit change in pH. Before increasing the limit to make the -0- OFFSEt message disappear, check the following:
1. Verify that the reference pH meter is working properly and is properly calibrated.
2. Verify that the process pH sensor is working. Check its response in buffers.
3. If the transmitter is standardized against pH determined in a grab sample, be sure to measure the pH before the temperature of the grab sample changes more than a few degrees.
4. Verify that the process sensor is fully immersed in the liquid. If the sensor is not completely submerged, it may be
measuring the pH of the liquid film covering the sensor. The pH of this film may be different from the pH of the bulk liquid.
5. Check the pH sensor for cleanliness. If the sensor looks fouled or dirty, clean it. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for cleaning procedures.
6. A large standardization offset may be caused by a poisoned reference electrode. Poisoning agents can cause the pH
to be offset by as much as two pH units. To check the reference voltage, see Section 16.13.
16.2.11 GLASS FAIL
GLASS FAIL means the pH sensor glass impedance is outside the programmed limits. To read the glass impedance, go
to the main display and press DIAG. Scroll to the PH prompt and press ENTER. Press NEXT until GIMP (glass impedance) is showing. The default lower limit is 10 MΩ. The default upper limit is 1000 MΩ. Low glass impedance means the
glass membrane is broken or cracked. High glass impedance means the membrane is aging and nearing the end of its
useful life. High impedance can also mean the pH sensor is not completely submerged in the process liquid.
1. Check sensor wiring, including connections in a junction box.
2. Verify that the sensor is completely submerged in the process liquid.
3. Verify that the software switch identifying the position of the preamplifier is properly set. See Section 7.10.3.
4. Check the sensor response in buffers. If the sensor can be calibrated, it is in satisfactory condition. To disable the
GLASS FAIL message reprogram the glass impedance limits to include the measured impedance. If the sensor cannot be calibrated, it has failed and must be replaced.
16.2.12 FACt FAIL
FACt FAIL means the unit has not been factory calibrated. Call the factory. The transmitter will probably need to be
returned to the factory for calibration.
16.2.13 CPU FAIL and ROM FAIL
CPU FAIL means that the processing unit has failed internal tests. ROM FAIL means that the internal memory has failed.
1. Cycle the power. Leave the transmitter without power for at least 30 seconds before returning power to it.
2. If cycling the power fails to clear the error message, the CPU board probably needs replacing. Call the factory for assistance.
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16.2.14 AdC
AdC means the analog to digital converter has failed.
1. Verify that sensor wiring is correct and connections are tight. Be sure to check connections at the junction box if one
is being used. See Section 3.0.
2. Disconnect sensor(s) and simulate temperature and sensor input.
To simulate
See Section
Dissolved oxygen
16.9
Ozone or chlorine
16.10
pH
16.11
Temperature
16.12
3. If the transmitter does not respond to simulated signals, the analog PCB has probably failed. Call the factory for assistance.
16.2.15 bAd Gnd
bAd Gnd usually means a problem with the analog PCB. Call the factory for assistance.
16.2.16 In too biG
In too biG means the raw millivolt signal from the pH sensor is too large.
1. Verify that sensor wiring is correct and connections are tight. Be sure to check connections at the junction box if one
is being used. See section 3.0.
2. Replace the pH sensor with a sensor known to be working.
3. If replacing the pH sensor does not cause the message to disappear, call the factory for assistance.
16.2.17 RitE Err
Program settings in the 5081-A can be protected against accidental changes by setting a three-digit security code. Settings
can further be protected by removing a jumper (JP-1) from the CPU board. If JP-1 has been removed program, settings
cannot be changed.
16.3 TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
16.3.1 Temperature measured by standard was more than 1°C different from transmitter.
1. Is the standard thermometer, RTD, or thermistor accurate? General purpose liquid-in-glass thermometers, particularly ones that have been mistreated can have surprisingly large errors.
2. Is the temperature element in the sensor completely submerged in the liquid?
3. Is the standard temperature sensor submerged to the correct level?
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16.4 OXYGEN MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
Problem
See Section
Zero current is substantially greater than the value in Section 9.2
16.4.1
Zero reading is unstable
16.4.2
Sensor current during air calibration is substantially different from the value in Section 9.3
16.4.3
Process and standard instrument readings during in-process calibration are substantially different
16.4.4
Process readings are erratic
16.4.5
Readings drift
16.4.6
Sensor does not respond to changes in oxygen level
16.4.7
Readings are too low
16.4.8
16.4.1 Zero current is substantially greater than the value in Section 9.2.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0.
2. Is the membrane completely covered with zero solution and are air bubbles not trapped against the membrane? Swirl
and tap the sensor to release air bubbles.
3. Is the zero solution fresh and properly made? Zero the sensor in a solution of 5% sodium sulfite in water. Prepare the
solution immediately before use. It has a shelf life of only a few days.
4. If the sensor is being zeroed with nitrogen gas, verify that the nitrogen is oxygen-free and the flow is adequate to prevent back-diffusion of air into the chamber.
5. The major contributor to the zero current is dissolved oxygen in the electrolyte solution inside the sensor. A long zeroing period usually means that an air bubble is trapped in the electrolyte. To ensure the 499ADO or 499A TrDO sensor
contains no air bubbles, carefully follow the procedure in the sensor manual for filling the sensor. If the electrolyte solution has just been replaced, allow several hours for the zero current to stabilize. On rare occasions, the sensor may
require as long as overnight to zero.
6. Check the membrane for damage and replace the membrane if necessary
16.4.2 Zero reading is unstable.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0. Verify that all wiring connections are tight.
2. Readings are often erratic when a new or rebuilt sensor is first placed in service. Readings usually stabilize after an
hour.
3. Is the space between the membrane and cathode filled with electrolyte solution and is the flow path between the electrolyte reservoir and the membrane clear? Often the flow of electrolyte can be started by simply holding the sensor with
the membrane end pointing down and sharply shaking the sensor a few times as though shaking down a clinical thermometer. If shaking does not work, perform the checks below. Refer to the sensor instruction manuals for additional
information.
For 499ADO and 499A TrDO sensors, verify that the holes at the base of the cathode stem are open (use a straightened
paperclip to clear the holes). Also verify that air bubbles are not blocking the holes. Fill the reservoir and establish electrolyte flow to the cathode. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for the detailed procedure.
For Gx438 and Hx438 sensors, the best way to ensure that there is an adequate supply of electrolyte solution is to
simply add fresh electrolyte solution to the sensor. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for details.
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16.4.3 Sensor current during air calibration is substantially different from the value in Section 9.3.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0. Verify that all connections are tight.
2. Is the membrane dry? The membrane must be dry during air calibration. A droplet of water on the membrane during
air calibration will lower the sensor current and cause an inaccurate calibration.
3. If the sensor current in air is very low and the sensor is new, either the electrolyte flow has stopped or the membrane
is torn or loose. For instructions on how to restart electrolyte flow see Section 16.4.2 or refer to the sensor instruction
manual. To replace a torn membrane, refer to the sensor instruction manual.
4. Is the temperature low? Sensor current is a strong function of temperature. The sensor current decreases about 3%
for every °C drop in temperature.
5. Is the membrane fouled or coated? A dirty membrane inhibits diffusion of oxygen through the membrane, reducing the
sensor current. Clean the membrane by rinsing it with a stream of water from a wash bottle or by gently wiping the
membrane with a soft tissue. If cleaning the membrane does not improve the sensor response, replace the membrane
and electrolyte solution. If necessary, polish the cathode. See the sensor instruction sheet for more information.
16.4.4 Process and standard instrument readings during in-process calibration are substantially different.
This error warning appears if the current process reading and the reading it is being changed to, ie, the reading from the
standard instrument, are appreciably different.
1. Is the standard instrument properly zeroed and calibrated?
2. Are the standard and process sensor measuring the same sample? Place the sensors as close together as possible.
3. Is the process sensor working properly? Check the response of the process sensor in air and in sodium sulfite solution.
16.4.5 Process readings are erratic.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Readings are often erratic when a new sensor or a rebuilt sensor is first placed in service. The current usually stabilizes after
a few hours.
Is the sample flow within the recommended range? High sample flow may cause erratic readings. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for recommended flow rates.
Gas bubbles impinging on the membrane may cause erratic readings. Orienting the sensor at an angle away from vertical
may reduce the noise.
The holes between the membrane and electrolyte reservoir might be plugged (applies to Models 499A DO and 499A TrDO
sensors only). Refer to Section 16.4.2.
Verify that wiring is correct. Pay particular attention to shield and ground connections.
Is the membrane in good condition and is the sensor filled with electrolyte solution? Replace the fill solution and electrolyte.
Refer to the sensor instruction manual for details.
16.4.6 Readings drift.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Is the sample temperature changing? Membrane permeability is a function of temperature. For the 499ADO and 499ATrDO
sensors, the time constant for response to a temperature change is about five (5) minutes. Therefore, the reading may drift
for a while after a sudden temperature change. The time constant for the Gx438 and Hx448 sensors is much shorter; these
sensors respond fairly rapidly to temperature changes.
Is the membrane clean? For the sensor to work properly oxygen must diffuse freely through the membrane. A coating on the
membrane will interfere with the passage of oxygen, resulting in slow response.
Is the sensor in direct sunlight? If the sensor is in direct sunlight during air calibration, readings will drift as the sensor warms
up. Because the temperature reading lags the true temperature of the membrane, calibrating the sensor in direct sunlight
may introduce an error.
Is the sample flow within the recommended range? Gradual loss of sample flow will cause downward drift.
Is the sensor new or has it been recently serviced? New or rebuilt sensors may require several hours to stabilize.
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16.4.7 Sensor does not respond to changes in oxygen level.
1.
2.
3.
If readings are being compared with a portable laboratory instrument, verify that the laboratory instrument is working.
Is the membrane clean? Clean the membrane and replace it if necessary. Check that the holes at the base of the cathode
stem are open. Use a straightened paper clip to clear blockages. Replace the electrolyte solution.
Replace the sensor.
16.4.8 Oxygen readings are too low.
1.
2.
Low readings can be caused by zeroing the sensor before the residual current has reached a stable minimum value. Residual
current is the current the sensor generates even when no oxygen is in the sample. Because the residual current is subtracted
from subsequent measured currents, zeroing before the current is a minimum can lead to low results.
Example: the true residual (zero) current for a 499ADO sensor is 0.05 µA, and the sensitivity based on calibration in watersaturated air is 2.35 µA/ppm. Assume the measured current is 2.00 µA. The true concentration is (2.00 - 0.05)/2.35 or
0.83 ppm. If the sensor was zeroed prematurely when the current was 0.2 µA, the measured concentration will be
(2.00 - 0.2)/2.35 or 0.77 ppm. The error is 7.2%. Suppose the measured current is 5.00 µA. The true concentration is 2.11
ppm, and the measured concentration is 2.05 ppm. The error is now 3.3%. The absolute difference between the readings
remains the same, 0.06 ppm.
Sensor response depends on flow. If the flow is too low, readings will be low and flow sensitive. Verify that the flow past the
sensor equals or exceeds the minimum value. See the sensor instruction manual for recommended flows. If the sensor is in
an aeration basin, move the sensor to an area where the flow or agitation is greater.
16.5 FREE CHLORINE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
Problem
See Section
Zero current is substantially outside the range -10 to 10 nA
16.5.1
Zero reading is unstable
16.5.2
Sensor current during calibration is substantially less than about 250 nA/ppm at 25°C and pH 7
16.5.3
Process readings are erratic
16.5.4
Readings drift
16.5.5
Sensor does not respond to changes in chlorine level
16.5.6
Chlorine reading spikes following rapid change in pH (automatic pH correction only)
16.5.7
Readings are too low
16.5.8
16.5.1 Zero current is substantially outside the range -10 to 10 nA.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0.
2. Is the zero solution chlorine-free? Take a sample of the solution and test it for free chlorine level. The concentration
should be less than 0.02 ppm.
3. Has adequate time been allowed for the sensor to reach a minimum stable residual current? It may take several hours,
sometimes as long as overnight, for a new sensor to stabilize.
4. Check the membrane for damage and replace it if necessary.
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16.5.2 Zero reading is unstable.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0. Verify that all wiring connections are tight.
2. Readings are often erratic when a new or rebuilt sensor is first placed in service. Readings usually stabilize after about
an hour.
3. Is the conductivity of the zero solution greater than 50 µS/cm? DO NOT USE DEIONIZED OR DISTILLED WATER TO
ZERO THE SENSOR. The zero solution should contain at least 0.5 grams of sodium chloride per liter.
4. Is the space between the membrane and cathode filled with electrolyte solution and is the flow path between the electrolyte reservoir and membrane clear? Often the flow of electrolyte and be started by simply holding the sensor with
the membrane end pointing down and sharply shaking the sensor a few times as though shaking down a clinical thermometer.
If shaking does not work, try clearing the holes around the cathode stem. Hold the sensor with the membrane end
pointing up. Unscrew the membrane retainer and remove the membrane assembly. Be sure the wood ring remains
with the membrane assembly. Use the end of a straightened paper clip to clear the holes at the base of the cathode
stem. Replace the membrane.
Verify that the sensor is filled with electrolyte solution. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for details.
16.5.3 Sensor current during calibration is substantially less than 250 nA/ppm at 25°C and pH 7.
1. Is the temperature low or is the pH high? Sensor current is a strong function of pH and temperature. The sensor current decreases about 3% for every °C drop in temperature. Sensor current also decreases as pH increases. Above
pH 7, a 0.1 unit increase in pH lowers the current about 5%.
2. Sensor current depends on the rate of sample flow past the sensor tip. If the flow is too low, chlorine readings will be
low. Refer to the sensor instruction sheet for recommended sample flows.
3. Low current can be caused by lack of electrolyte flow to the cathode and membrane. See step 4 in Section 16.5.2.
4. Is the membrane fouled or coated? A dirty membrane inhibits diffusion of free chlorine through the membrane, reducing the sensor current and increasing the response time. Clean the membrane by rinsing it with a stream of water from
a wash bottle. DO NOT use a membrane or tissue to wipe the membrane.
5. If cleaning the membrane does not improve the sensor response, replace the membrane and electrolyte solution. If
necessary, polish the cathode. See the sensor instruction sheet for details.
16.5.4 Process readings are erratic.
1. Readings are often erratic when a new sensor or a rebuilt sensor is first placed in service. The current usually stabilizes after a few hours.
2. Is the sample flow within the recommended range? High sample flow may cause erratic readings. Refer to the sensor
instruction sheet for recommended flow rates.
3. Are the holes between the membrane and the electrolyte reservoir open. Refer to Section 16.5.2.
4. Verify that wiring is correct. Pay particular attention to shield and ground connections.
5. If automatic pH correction is being used, check the pH reading. If the pH reading is noisy, the chlorine reading will also
be noisy. If the pH sensor is the cause of the noise, use manual pH correction until the problem with the pH sensor
can be corrected.
6. Is the membrane in good condition and is the sensor filled with electrolyte solution? Replace the fill solution and electrolyte. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for details.
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16.5.5 Readings drift.
1. Is the sample temperature changing? Membrane permeability is a function of temperature. The time constant for the
499ACL-01 sensor is about five minutes. Therefore, the reading may drift for a while after a sudden temperature
change.
2. Is the membrane clean? For the sensor to work properly, chlorine must diffuse freely through the membrane. A coating on the membrane will interfere with the passage of chlorine, resulting in slow response. Clean the membrane by
rinsing it with a stream of water from a wash bottle. DO NOT use a membrane or tissue to wipe the membrane.
3. Is the sample flow within the recommended range? Gradual loss of sample flow will cause a downward drift.
4. Is the sensor new or has it been recently serviced? New or rebuilt sensors may require several hours to stabilize.
5. Is the pH of the process changing? If manual pH correction is being used, a gradual change in pH will cause a gradual change in the chlorine reading. As pH increases, chlorine readings will decrease, even though the free chlorine
level (as determined by a grab sample test) remained constant. If the pH change is no more than about 0.2, the change
in the chlorine reading will be no more than about 10% of reading. If the pH changes are more than 0.2, use automatic
pH correction.
16.5.6 Sensor does not respond to changes in chlorine level.
1. Is the grab sample test accurate? Is the grab sample representative of the sample flowing to the sensor?
2. Is the pH compensation correct? If the transmitter is using manual pH correction, verify that the pH value in the transmitter equals the actual pH to within ±0.1 pH. If the transmitter is using automatic pH correction, check the calibration
of the pH sensor.
3. Is the membrane clean? Clean the membrane and replace it if necessary. Check that the holes at the base of the cathode stem are open. Use a straightened paper clip to clear blockages. Replace the electrolyte solution.
4. Replace the sensor.
16.5.7 Chlorine readings spike following sudden changes in pH.
Changes in pH alter the relative amounts of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypochlorite ion (OCl-) in the sample.
Because the sensor responds only to HOCl, an increase in pH causes the sensor current (and the apparent chlorine
level) to drop even though the actual free chlorine concentration remained constant. To correct for the pH effect, the
transmitter automatically applies a correction. Generally, the pH sensor responds faster than the chlorine sensor. After
a sudden pH change, the transmitter will temporarily over-compensate and gradually return to the correct value. The
time constant for return to normal is about five (5) minutes.
16.5.8 Chlorine readings are too low.
1. Was the sample tested as soon as it was taken? Chlorine solutions are unstable. Test the sample immediately after
collecting it. Avoid exposing the sample to sunlight.
2. Low readings can be caused by zeroing the sensor before the residual current has reached a stable minimum value.
Residual current is the current the sensor generates even when no chlorine is in the sample. Because the residual current is subtracted from subsequent measured currents, zeroing before the current is a minimum can lead to low results.
See Section 16.4.8 for more information.
3. Sensor response depends on flow. If the flow is too low, readings will be low and flow sensitive. Verify that the flow
past the sensor equals or exceeds the minimum value. See the sensor instruction manual for recommended flows.
16.6 TOTAL CHLORINE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
Refer to the instruction manual for the SCS921 for a complete troubleshooting guide.
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16.7 OZONE MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
Problem
See Section
Zero current is substantially outside the range -10 to 10 nA
16.7.1
Zero reading is unstable
16.7.2
Sensor current during calibration is substantially less than about 350 nA/ppm at 25°C
16.7.3
Process readings are erratic
16.7.4
Readings drift
16.7.5
Sensor does not respond to changes in ozone level
16.7.6
Ozone readings are too low
16.7.7
16.7.1 Zero current is substantially outside the range -10 to 10 nA.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0.
2. Is the zero solution ozone free? Test the zero solution for ozone level. The concentration should be less than 0.02 ppm.
3. Has adequate time been allowed for the sensor to reach a minimum stable residual current? It may take several hours,
sometimes as long as overnight, for a new sensor to stabilize.
4. Check the membrane for damage and replace it if necessary.
16.7.2 Zero reading is unstable.
1. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0. Verify that all wiring connections are tight.
2. Readings are often erratic when a new or rebuilt sensor is first placed in service. Readings usually stabilize after about
an hour.
3. Is the space between the membrane and cathode filled with electrolyte solution and is the flow path between the electrolyte reservoir and membrane clear? Often the flow of electrolyte and be started by simply holding the sensor with
the membrane end pointing down and sharply shaking the sensor a few times as though shaking down a clinical thermometer.
If shaking does not work, try clearing the holes around the cathode stem. Hold the sensor with the membrane end
pointing up. Unscrew the membrane retainer and remove the membrane assembly. Be sure the wood ring remains
with the membrane assembly. Use the end of a straightened paper clip to clear the holes at the base of the cathode
stem. Replace the membrane.
Verify that the sensor is filled with electrolyte solution. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for details.
16.7.3 Sensor current during calibration is substantially less than 350 nA/ppm at 25°C.
1. Sensor current is a strong function of temperature. The sensor current decreases about 3% for every °C drop in temperature.
2. Sensor current depends on the rate of sample flow past the sensor tip. If the flow is too low, ozone readings will be
low. Refer to the sensor instruction sheet for recommended sample flows.
3. Low current can be caused by lack of electrolyte flow to the cathode and membrane. See step 3 in Section 16.7.2.
4. Is the membrane fouled or coated? A dirty membrane inhibits diffusion of ozone through the membrane, reducing the
sensor current and increasing the response time. Clean the membrane by rinsing it with a stream of water from a wash
bottle or gently wipe the membrane with a soft tissue.
If cleaning the membrane does not improve the sensor response, replace the membrane and electrolyte solution. If
necessary, polish the cathode. See the sensor instruction sheet for details.
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16.7.4 Process readings are erratic.
1. Readings are often erratic when a new sensor or a rebuilt sensor is first placed in service. The current usually stabilizes after a few hours.
2. Is the sample flow within the recommended range? High sample flow may cause erratic readings. Refer to the sensor
instruction sheet for recommended flow rates.
3. Are the holes between the membrane and the electrolyte reservoir open. Refer to Section 16.7.2.
4. Verify that wiring is correct. Pay particular attention to shield and ground connections.
5. Is the membrane in good condition and is the sensor filled with electrolyte solution? Replace the fill solution and electrolyte. Refer to the sensor instruction manual for details.
16.7.5 Readings drift.
1. Is the sample temperature changing? Membrane permeability is a function of temperature. The time constant for the
499AOZ sensor is about five minutes. Therefore, the reading may drift for a while after a sudden temperature change.
2. Is the membrane clean? For the sensor to work properly, ozone must diffuse freely through the membrane. A coating
on the membrane will interfere with the passage of ozone, resulting in slow response. Clean the membrane by rinsing
it with a stream of water from a wash bottle, or gently wipe the membrane with a soft tissue.
3. Is the sample flow within the recommended range? Gradual loss of sample flow will cause a downward drift.
4. Is the sensor new or has it been recently serviced. New or rebuilt sensors may require several hours to stabilize.
16.7.6 Sensor does not respond to changes in ozone level.
1. Is the grab sample test accurate? Is the grab sample representative of the sample flowing to the sensor?
2. Is the membrane clean? Clean the membrane and replace it if necessary. Check that the holes at the base of the cathode stem are open. Use a straightened paper clip to clear blockages. Replace the electrolyte solution.
3. Replace the sensor.
16.7.7 Ozone readings are too low.
1. Was the sample tested as soon as it was taken? Ozone solutions are highly unstable. Test the sample immediately
after collecting it.
2. Low readings can be caused by zeroing the sensor before the residual current has reached a stable minimum value.
Residual current is the current the sensor generates even when no ozone is in the sample. Because the residual current is subtracted from subsequent measured currents, zeroing before the current is a minimum can lead to low results.
See Section 16.4.8 for more information.
3. Sensor response depends on flow. If the flow is too low, readings will be low and flow sensitive. Verify that the flow
past the sensor equals or exceeds the minimum value. See the sensor instruction manual for recommended flows.
90
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.8 pH MEASUREMENT AND CALIBRATION PROBLEMS
Problem
See Section
SLOPE HI or SLOPE LO message is showing
16.8.1
-0- OFFSEt message is showing
16.8.2
Transmitter will not accept manual slope
16.8.3
Sensor does not respond to known pH changes
16.8.4
Process pH is slightly different from the expected value
16.8.5
Process pH reading changes when flow changes
16.8.6
Process pH is grossly wrong and/or noisy
16.8.7
Process readings are noisy
16.8.8
16.8.1 SLOPE HI or SLOPE LO message is showing.
Refer to Section 16.2.9 for assistance.
16.8.2 -0- OFFSEt message is showing.
Refer to Section 16.2.10 for assistance.
16.8.3 Transmitter will not accept manual slope.
If the sensor slope is known from other sources, it can be entered directly into the transmitter. The transmitter will not
accept a slope (at 25°) outside the range 45 to 60 mV/pH. If the user attempts to enter a slope less than 45 mV/pH, the
transmitter will automatically change the entry to 45. If the user attempts to enter a slope greater than 60 mV/pH, the transmitter will change the entry to 60 mV/pH. See Section 14.8.1 for troubleshooting sensor slope problems.
16.8.4 Sensor does not respond to known pH changes.
1. Did the expected pH change really occur? If the process pH reading was not what was expected, check the performance of the sensor in buffers. Also, use a second pH meter to verify the change.
2. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter?
3. Is the glass bulb cracked or broken? Check the glass electrode impedance. See Section 14.1
4. Is the transmitter working properly. Check the transmitter by simulating the pH input.
16.8.5 Process pH is slightly different from the expected value.
Differences between pH readings made with an on-line instrument and a laboratory or portable instrument are normal. The
on-line instrument is subject to process variables, for example ground potentials, stray voltages, and orientation effects that
may not affect the laboratory or portable instrument. To make the process reading agree with a reference instrument, see
Section 13.4.
16.8.6 Process pH reading changes when flow changes.
The 399 pH sensor recommended for use with the 5081A transmitter has some degree of flow sensitivity, i.e., changing
the sample flow causes the pH reading to change. Flow sensitivity varies from sensor to sensor. Flow sensitivity can be a
source of error if the pH and chlorine sensor flow cells are connected in series. The chlorine sensor requires a fairly rapidly flowing sample, and high flows may affect the pH reading. Typically, the difference in pH reading from a 399 pH sensor in a rapidly (16 gph) and slowly (<2 gph) flowing sample is less than about 0.05. If the change is greater than 0.05, the
pH and chlorine sensors should be installed in parallel streams.
91
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.8.7 Process pH is grossly wrong and/or noisy.
Grossly wrong or noisy readings suggest a ground loop (measurement system connected to earth ground at more than
one point), a floating system (no earth ground), or noise being brought into the transmitter by the sensor cable. The problem arises from the process or installation. It is not a fault of the transmitter. The problem should disappear once the sensor is taken out of the system. Check the following:
1. Is a ground loop present?
a. Verify that the system works properly in buffers. Be sure there is no direct electrical connection between the buffer
containers and the process liquid or piping.
b. Strip back the ends of a heavy gauge wire. Connect one end of the wire to the process piping or place it in the
process liquid. Place the other end of the wire in the container of buffer with the sensor. The wire makes an electrical connection between the process and sensor.
c. If offsets and noise appear after making the connection, a ground loop exists.
2. Is the process grounded?
a. The measurement system needs one path to ground: through the process liquid and piping. Plastic piping, fiberglass tanks, and ungrounded or poorly grounded vessels do not provide a path. A floating system can pick up
stray voltages from other electrical equipment.
b. Ground the piping or tank to a local earth ground.
c. If noise still persists, simple grounding is not the problem. Noise is probably being carried into the instrument
through the sensor wiring.
3. Simplify the sensor wiring.
a. First, verify that pH sensor wiring is correct.
b. Disconnect all sensor wires at the transmitter except pH/mV IN, REFERENCE IN, RTD IN and RTD RETURN. See
the wiring diagrams in Section 3.0. If the sensor is wired to the transmitter through a remote junction box containing a preamplifier, disconnect the wires at the sensor side of the junction box.
c. Tape back the ends of the disconnected wires to keep them from making accidental connections with other wires
or terminals.
d. Connect a jumper wire between the RTD RETURN and RTD SENSE terminals (see wiring diagrams in Section 3.0).
e. If noise and/or offsets disappear, the interference was coming into the transmitter through one of the sensor wires.
The system can be operated permanently with the simplified wiring.
4. Check for extra ground connections or induced noise.
a. If the sensor cable is run inside conduit, there may be a short between the cable and the conduit. Re-run the cable
outside the conduit. If symptoms disappear, there is a short between the cable and the conduit. Likely a shield is
exposed and touching the conduit. Repair the cable and reinstall it in the conduit.
b. To avoid induced noise in the sensor cable, run it as far away as possible from power cables, relays, and electric
motors. Keep sensor wiring out of crowded panels and cable trays.
c. If ground loops persist, consult the factory. A visit from a service technician may be required to solve the problem.
16.8.8 Process readings are noisy.
1. What is the conductivity of the sample? Measuring pH is samples having conductivity less than about 50uS/cm can be
very difficult. Special sensors (for example, the Model 320HP) are often needed and special attention must be paid to
grounding and sample flow rate.
NOTE:
Measuring free chlorine in samples having low conductivity can also be a problem. Generally,
for a successful chlorine measurement, the conductivity should be greater than 50 µS/cm.
2. Is the sensor dirty or fouled? Suspended solids in the sample can coat the reference junction and interfere with the
electrical connection between the sensor and the process liquid. The result is often a noisy reading.
3. Is the sensor properly wired to the transmitter? See Section 3.0.
4. Is a ground loop present? Refer to Section 16.8.7.
92
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.9 SIMULATING INPUT CURRENTS - DISSOLVED OXYGEN
To check the performance of the transmitter, use a decade box to simulate the current from the oxygen sensor.
A. Disconnect the anode and cathode leads from terminals 13 & 14 and connect a decade box as shown in Figure 16-1.
It is not necessary to disconnect the RTD leads.
B. Set the decade box to the resistance shown in the table.
Sensor
Polarizing Voltage
Resistance
Expected Current
499ADO
-675 mV
34 kΩ
20 mA
499ATrDO
-800 mV
20 kΩ
40 mA
Hx438 and Gx448
-675 mV
8.4 MΩ
80 nA
C. Note the sensor current. To view the sensor current, go to the
main display and press DIAG. Then press NEXT. SEnSor
Cur will appear in the display. Press ENTER. The display will
show the sensor current. Note the units: µA is microamps:
nA is nanoamps.
D. Change the decade box resistance and verify that the correct
current is shown. Calculate the current from the equation:
current (µA) =
voltage (mV)
resistance (kΩ)
FIGURE 16-1. Simulate dissolved oxygen.
16.10 SIMULATING INPUT CURRENTS - CHLORINE AND OZONE
To check the performance of the transmitter, use a decade box and a battery to simulate the current from the sensor. The
battery, which opposes the polarizing voltage, is necessary to ensure that the sensor current has the correct sign.
A. Disconnect the anode and cathode leads from terminals 13 & 14 and connect a decade box and battery as shown in
Figure 16-2. It is not necessary to disconnect the RTD leads.
B. Set the decade box to the resistance shown in the table.
Sensor
Polarizing Voltage
Resistance
Expected Current
499ACL-01 (free chlorine)
200 mV
28 MΩ
500 nA
499ACL-02 (total chlorine)
250 mV
675 kΩ
2000 nA
499AOZ
200 mV
2.7 MΩ
500 nA
C. Note the sensor current. It should be close to the value in the table. The actual value depends on the voltage of the
battery. To view the sensor current, go to the main display and press DIAG. Then, press NEXT. SEnSor Cur will appear
in the display. Press ENTER. The display will show the sensor current. Note the units: uA is microamps: nA is
nanoamps.
D. Change the decade box resistance and verify that the correct
current is shown. Calculate the current from the equation:
current (µA) =
Vbattery – Vpolarizing (mV)
resistance (kΩ)
The voltage of a fresh 1.5 volt battery is about 1.6 volt (1600 mV).
FIGURE 16-2. Simulate chlorine and ozone.
93
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.11 SIMULATING INPUTS - pH
16.11.1 General
This section describes how to simulate a pH input into the transmitter. To simulate a pH measurement, connect a standard
millivolt source to the transmitter. If the transmitter is working properly, it will accurately measure the input voltage and convert it to pH. Although the general procedure is the same, the wiring details depend on whether the preamplifier is in the
sensor, a junction box, or the transmitter.
16.11.2 Simulating pH input when the preamplifier is in the analyzer.
1. Turn off automatic temperature correction and set the manual temperature to 25°C (Section 7.4).
2. Disconnect the pH sensor. Also, disconnect the chlorine sensor anode lead. Connect a jumper wire between the pH IN
and REF IN terminals.
3. Confirm that the transmitter is reading the correct mV value. With the main display showing, press DIAG. Press NEXT
until the display shows PH. Press ENTER. The display will show InPUt followed by a number. The number is the raw
input signal in millivolts. The measured voltage should be 0 mV.
4. Confirm that the transmitter is reading the correct pH value. Go to the main display. Press é or ê. The second line of
the display will show the pH. The pH should be approximately 7.00. Because calibration data stored in the analyzer
may be offsetting the input voltage, the displayed pH may not be exactly 7.00.
5. If a standard millivolt source is available, disconnect the jumper wire between the pH IN and REF IN terminals and
connect the voltage source as shown in Figure 16-3.
6. Calibrate the transmitter using the procedure in Section 13.3. Use 0.0 mV for Buffer 1 (pH 7.00) and -177.4 mV for
Buffer 2 (pH 10.00). If the analyzer is working properly, it should accept the calibration. The slope should be 59.16 mV/pH,
and the offset should be zero.
7. To check linearity, set the voltage source to the values shown in the table and verify that the pH and millivolt readings
match the values in the table.
Voltage (mV)
pH (at 25°)
295.8
2.00
177.5
4.00
59.2
6.00
59.2
8.00
177.5
10.00
295.8
12.00
FIGURE 16-3. Simulate pH.
16.11.3 Simulating pH input when the preamplifier is in a junction box.
The procedure is the same as described in section 16.11.2. Keep the connection between the analyzer and the junction
box in place. Disconnect the sensor at the sensor side of the junction box and connect the voltage source to the sensor
side of the junction box.
16.11.4 Simulating pH input when the preamplifier is in the sensor.
The preamplifier in the sensor converts the high impedance signal into a low impedance signal without amplifying it. To
simulate pH values, follow the procedure in Section 16.11.2.
94
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
TROUBLESHOOTING
16.12 SIMULATING TEMPERATURE
16.12.1 General
The transmitter accepts either a Pt100 RTD (used in pH,
499ADO, 499ATrDO, 499ACL-01, 499ACL-02, and 499AOZ
sensors) or a 22k NTC thermistor (used in HX438 and Gx448
DO sensors and most steam-sterilizable sensors from other
manufacturers). The Pt100 RTD has a three-wire configuration. See Figure 16-4. The thermistor has a two-wire configuration.
16.12.2 Simulating temperature
To simulate the temperature input, wire a decade box to the
analyzer or junction box as shown in Figure 16-5.
FIGURE 16-4. Three-Wire RTD Configuration.
Although only two wires are required to connect
the RTD to the analyzer, using a third wire allows
the analyzer to correct for the resistance of the
lead wires and for changes in the lead wire resistance with temperature.
To check the accuracy of the temperature measurement, set
the resistor simulating the RTD to the values indicated in the
table and note the temperature readings. The measured temperature might not agree with the value in the table. During
sensor calibration an offset might have been applied to make
the measured temperature agree with a standard thermometer. The offset is also applied to the simulated resistance. The
controller is measuring temperature correctly if the difference
between measured temperatures equals the difference
between the values in the table to within ±0.1°C.
For example, start with a simulated resistance of 103.9 Ω,
which corresponds to 10.0°C. Assume the offset from the
sensor calibration was -0.3 Ω. Because of the offset, the analyzer calculates temperature using 103.6 Ω. The result is
9.2°C. Now change the resistance to 107.8 Ω, which corresponds to 20.0°C. The analyzer uses 107.5 Ω to calculate
the temperature, so the display reads 19.2°C. Because the
difference between the displayed temperatures (10.0°C) is
the same as the difference between the simulated temperatures, the analyzer is working correctly.
FIGURE 16-5. Simulating RTD Inputs.
The figure shows wiring connections for sensors
containing a Pt 100 RTD. For sensors using a 22k
NTC thermistor (Hx438 and Gx448 sensors), wire
the decade box to terminals 1 and 3 on TB6.
Temp. (°C)
0
10
20
25
30
40
50
60
70
80
85
90
100
Ω)
Pt 100 (Ω
100.0
103.9
107.8
109.7
111.7
115.5
119.4
123.2
127.1
130.9
132.8
134.7
138.5
Ω)
22k NTC (kΩ
64.88
41.33
26.99
22.00
18.03
12.31
8.565
6.072
4.378
3.208
2.761
2.385
1.798
95
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 16.0
MAINTENANCE
16.13 MEASURING REFERENCE VOLTAGE
Some processes contain substances that poison or shift the
potential of the reference electrode. Sulfide is a good example.
Prolonged exposure to sulfide converts the reference electrode
from a silver/silver chloride electrode to a silver/silver sulfide
electrode. The change in reference voltage is several hundred
millivolts. A good way to check for poisoning is to compare the
voltage of the reference electrode with a silver/silver chloride
electrode known to be good. The reference electrode from a
new sensor is best. See Figure 16-6. If the reference electrode
is good, the voltage difference should be no more than about
20 mV. A poisoned reference electrode usually requires
replacement
FIGURE 16-6. Checking for a Poisoned
Reference Electrode.
Refer to the sensor wiring diagram to identify the
reference leads. A laboratory silver/silver chloride
electrode can be used in place of the second sensor.
96
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 17.0
MAINTENANCE
SECTION 17.0
MAINTENANCE
17.1 OVERVIEW
This section gives general procedures for routine maintenance of the 5081-A transmitter. The transmitter needs
almost no routine maintenance.
17.2 TRANSMITTER MAINTENANCE
Periodically clean the transmitter window with household ammonia or glass cleaner. The detector for the infrared
remote controller is located behind the window at the top of the transmitter face. The window in front of the detector must be kept clean.
Most components of the transmitter are replaceable. Refer to Figure 17-1 and Table 17-1 for parts and part numbers.
FIGURE 17-1. Exploded View of Model 5081-A Transmitter
Three screws (part 13 in the drawing) hold the three circuit boards in place. Removing the screws allows the display board (part 2) and the CPU board (part 3) to be easily removed. A ribbon cable connects the boards. The cable
plugs into the CPU board and is permanently attached to the display board. A 16 pin and socket connector holds
the CPU and analog (part 4) boards together. Five screws hold the terminal block (part 5) to the center housing
(part 7), and the 16 pins on the terminal block mate with 16 sockets on the back side of the analog board. Use caution when separating the terminal block from the analog board. The pin and socket connection is tight.
97
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 17.0
MAINTENANCE
TABLE 17-1. Replacement Parts for Model 5081-A Transmitter
Location in
Figure 17-1
PN
1
23992-00
PCB stack consisting of the CPU (part 3) and analog (part 4) boards,
display board is not included, CPU and analog boards are factorycalibrated as a unit and cannot be ordered separately
1 lb/0.5 kg
2
23638-01
LCD display PCB
1 lb/0.5 kg
5
33337-02
Terminal block
1 lb/0.5 kg
6
23593-01
Enclosure cover, front with glass window
3 lb/1.5 kg
7
33360-00
Enclosure, center housing
4 lb/1.5 kg
8
33362-00
Enclosure cover, rear
3 lb/1.0 kg
9
6560135
Desiccant in bag, one each
1 lb/0.5 kg
10
9550187
O-ring (2-252), one, front and rear covers each require an O-ring
1 lb/0.5 kg
12
note
Screw, 8-32 x 0.5 inch, for attaching terminal block to center housing
*
13
note
Screw, 8-32 x 1.75 inch, for attaching circuit board stack to center
housing
*
14
33342-00
Cover lock
1 lb/0.5 kg
15
33343-00
Locking bracket nut
1 lb/0.5 kg
16
note
Description
Screw, 10-24 x 0.38 inch, for attaching cover lock and locking bracket
nut to center housing
NOTE: For information only. Screws cannot be purchased from Rosemount Analytical.
* Weights are rounded up to the nearest whole pound or 0.5 kg.
98
Shipping
Weight
*
MODEL 5081-A
SECTION 18.0
RETURN OF MATERIAL
SECTION 18.0
RETURN OF MATERIAL
18.1 GENERAL.
18.3 NON-WARRANTY REPAIR.
To expedite the repair and return of instruments, proper
communication between the customer and the factory
is important. Call 1-949-757-8500 for a R e t u r n
Materials Authorization (RMA) number.
The following is the procedure for returning for repair
instruments that are no longer under warranty:
1.
Call Rosemount Analytical for authorization.
2.
Supply the purchase order number, and make
sure to provide the name and telephone number
of the individual to be contacted should additional
information be needed.
3.
Do Steps 3 and 4 of Section 18.2.
18.2 WARRANTY REPAIR.
The following is the procedure for returning instruments still under warranty:
1.
Call Rosemount Analytical for authorization.
2.
To verify warranty, supply the factory sales order
number or the original purchase order number. In
the case of individual parts or sub-assemblies, the
serial number on the unit must be supplied.
3.
Carefully package the materials and enclose your
“Letter of Transmittal” (see Warranty). If possible,
pack the materials in the same manner as they
were received.
4.
Send the package prepaid to:
NOTE
Consult the factory for additional information regarding service or repair.
Rosemount Analytical Inc., Uniloc Division
Uniloc Division
2400 Barranca Parkway
Irvine, CA 92606
Attn: Factory Repair
RMA No. ____________
Mark the package: Returned for Repair
Model No. ____
99
MODEL 5081-A
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX A
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE AS A FUNCTION OF ALTITUDE
The table shows how barometric pressure changes with altitude. Pressure values do not take into account
humidity and weather fronts.
Altitude
100
Barometric Pressure
m
ft
bar
mm Hg
in Hg
kPa
0
0
1.013
760
29.91
101.3
250
820
0.983
737
29.03
98.3
500
1640
0.955
716
28.20
95.5
750
2460
0.927
695
27.37
92.7
1000
3280
0.899
674
26.55
89.9
1250
4100
0.873
655
25.77
87.3
1500
4920
0.846
635
24.98
84.6
1750
5740
0.821
616
24.24
82.1
2000
6560
0.795
596
23.47
79.5
2250
7380
0.771
579
22.78
77.1
2500
8200
0.747
560
22.06
74.7
2750
9020
0.724
543
21.38
72.4
3000
9840
0.701
526
20.70
70.1
3250
10,660
0.679
509
20.05
67.9
3500
11,480
0.658
494
19.43
65.8
WARRANTY
Goods and part(s) (excluding consumables) manufactured by Seller are warranted to be free from defects in workmanship and material under normal use and service for a period of twelve (12) months from the date of shipment by Seller.
Consumables, pH electrodes, membranes, liquid junctions, electrolyte, O-rings, etc. are warranted to be free from defects
in workmanship and material under normal use and service for a period of ninety (90) days from date of shipment by Seller.
Goods, part(s) and consumables proven by Seller to be defective in workmanship and / or material shall be replaced or
repaired, free of charge, F.O.B. Seller's factory provided that the goods, parts(s), or consumables are returned to Seller's
designated factory, transportation charges prepaid, within the twelve (12) month period of warranty in the case of goods
and part(s), and in the case of consumables, within the ninety (90) day period of warranty. This warranty shall be in effect
for replacement or repaired goods, part(s) and consumables for the remaining portion of the period of the twelve (12)
month warranty in the case of goods and part(s) and the remaining portion of the ninety (90) day warranty in the case of
consumables. A defect in goods, part(s) and consumables of the commercial unit shall not operate to condemn such commercial unit when such goods, parts(s) or consumables are capable of being renewed, repaired or replaced.
The Seller shall not be liable to the Buyer, or to any other person, for the loss or damage, directly or indirectly, arising
from the use of the equipment or goods, from breach of any warranty or from any other cause. All other warranties,
expressed or implied are hereby excluded.
IN CONSIDERATION OF THE STATED PURCHASE PRICE OF THE GOODS, SELLER GRANTS ONLY THE ABOVE
STATED EXPRESS WARRANTY. NO OTHER WARRANTIES ARE GRANTED INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
EXPRESS AND IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
RETURN OF MATERIAL
Material returned for repair, whether in or out of warranty, should be shipped prepaid to:
Rosemount Analytical Inc.
Uniloc Division
2400 Barranca Parkway
Irvine, CA 92606
The shipping container should be marked:
Return for Repair
Model _______________________________
The returned material should be accompanied by a letter of transmittal which should include the following information
(make a copy of the "Return of Materials Request" found on the last page of the Manual and provide the following thereon):
1. Location type of service, and length of time of service of the device.
2. Description of the faulty operation of the device and the circumstances of the failure.
3. Name and telephone number of the person to contact if there are questions about the returned material.
4. Statement as to whether warranty or non-warranty service is requested.
5. Complete shipping instructions for return of the material.
Adherence to these procedures will expedite handling of the returned material and will prevent unnecessary additional
charges for inspection and testing to determine the problem with the device.
If the material is returned for out-of-warranty repairs, a purchase order for repairs should be enclosed.
The right people,
the right answers,
right now.
ON-LINE ORDERING NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE
http://www.raihome.com
Credit Cards for U.S. Purchases Only.
Emerson Process Management
Rosemount Analytical Inc.
2400 Barranca Parkway
Irvine, CA 92606 USA
Tel: (949) 757-8500
Fax: (949) 474-7250
http://www.raihome.com
© Rosemount Analytical Inc. 2003