Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Reference and Installation Guide
Introduction
Using The System Setup Program
Using the ISA Configuration Utility
Working Inside Your Computer
Installing System Board Options
Installing Drives
Technical Specifications
ISA Configuration Utility Messages
NOTE: You can obtain the latest version of this document from the Dell Web support site at
http://support.dell.com.
Model DCS
Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
© 1994-2000 Dell Computer Corporation. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Computer Corporation is strictly forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell, OptiPlex, DellWare, Dell OpenManage, and the DELL logo are trademarks of Dell Computer
Corporation; Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks, and MMX is a trademark of Intel Corporation; Microsoft, MS-DOS,
Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks, and Windows for Workgroups is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation; IBM
and OS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation; 3Com and EtherLink are registered
trademarks, and Fast EtherLink is a trademark of 3Com Corporation; VESA is a registered trademark of Video Electronics
Standards Association; UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries. As an Energy
Star Partner, Dell Computer Corporation has determined that this product meets the Energy Star guidelines for energy efficiency.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or
their products. Dell Computer Corporation disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and trade names other than its own.
Initial release: 7 Dec 1998
Last revised: 31 Jan 2000
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Back to Contents Page
Introduction: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC
Systems
Overview
Using the Power Switch
System Features
Using the Optional Stand for Vertical
Orientation
Hardware Features
ENERGY STAR® Compliance
Software Features
Accessing Online Documentation
Manageability Features
Getting Help
Connecting Peripheral Devices
Overview
Dell OptiPlex GX1 low-profile Managed PC systems are high-speed, expandable personal computers
designed around the Intel® Pentium® II and Pentium III microprocessors. Each computer system uses a
high-performance Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) design that allows you to configure the
computer system to your initial requirements and then add Dell-supported upgrades as necessary. These
systems also support the Industry-Standard Architecture (ISA) bus for older expansion devices.
System Features
Your system offers the following features: An Intel Pentium II or Pentium III microprocessor.
The Intel Pentium II and Pentium III microprocessors include MMX™ technology designed to handle
complex multimedia and communications software. This microprocessor incorporates new instructions
and data types as well as a technique called single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) that allows the
microprocessor to process multiple data elements in parallel, thereby improving overall system
performance.
A keyboard command (<Ctrl><Alt><\>) that lets you switch between the microprocessor's rated speed
and a slower compatibility speed.
NOTE: This keyboard command is not available under the Microsoft® Windows NT® and IBM®
OS/2® operating systems.
A secondary cache of 512 kilobytes (KB) of static random-access memory (SRAM) included within the
single-edge contact (SEC) cartridge, which also contains the microprocessor.
System memory that can be increased up to 768 megabytes (MB) by installing 32-, 64-, 128-, or 256MB synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs) in
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the three DIMM sockets on the system board. The system also supports both error checking and
correction (ECC) and nonparity DIMMs. See "Adding Memory" for details.
Self-Monitoring and Analysis Reporting Technology II (SMART II) support, which warns you at system
start-up if your hard-disk drive has become unreliable. To take advantage of this technology, you must
have a SMART II-compliant hard-disk drive in your computer. All hard-disk drives shipped with
OptiPlex GX1 systems are SMART II-compliant.
A basic input/output system (BIOS), which resides in flash memory and can be upgraded by diskette, or
remotely over a network, if required.
Full compliance with PCI specification 2.2.
Full Plug and Play version 1.0a capability, which greatly simplifies the installation of expansion cards.
Plug and Play support included in the system BIOS allows you to install Plug and Play expansion cards
without setting jumpers or switches or performing other configuration tasks. The ISA Configuration
Utility (ICU) allows you to configure existing non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards for conflict-free
operation. Also, because the system BIOS is stored in flash memory, it can be updated to support
future enhancements to the Plug and Play standard.
Wakeup On LAN capability, which, when enabled in the System Setup program, allows the system to
be powered up from a server management console. Wakeup On LAN capability also allows remote
computer setup, software downloading and installation, file updates, and asset tracking after hours and
on weekends when network traffic is at a minimum. For more information, refer to "Using the System
Setup Program."
Universal Serial Bus (USB) capability, which can simplify connecting peripheral devices such as mice,
printers, and computer speakers. The USB connectors on your computer's back panel, which are
enabled by default, provide a single connection point for multiple USB-compliant devices. USBcompliant devices can also be connected and disconnected while the system is running.
A modular computer chassis with a minimum number of screws for easy disassembly and improved
serviceability.
Hardware Features
The system board includes the following integrated features:
Three expansion slots on a riser board with one 32-bit PCI slot, one 16-bit ISA slot, and one shared
PCI/ISA slot.
A 64-bit accelerated graphics port (AGP) video subsystem, which includes the ATI 3D Rage Pro super
video graphics array (SVGA) video controller. This video subsystem contains 4 MB (upgradable to 8
MB) of synchronous graphics random-access memory (SGRAM) video memory. Maximum resolutions
are 1600 × 1200 with 65,536 colors noninterlaced and 1280 × 1024 and 1024 × 768 with true-colors
noninterlaced. In 800 × 600 and 640 × 480 resolutions, 16.7 million colors are available for true-color
graphics using a 32-bits per pixel (bpp) format. True-color provides higher performance, but uses more
graphics memory. Table 1 lists the video memory requirements for the Microsoft Windows® 95,
Windows 98, and Windows NT 4.0 operating systems.
Table 1. Video Memory Requirements
Video Resolution
Maximum Color
Depth
Maximum Refresh
Rate
Minimum SGRAM
Required
640 × 480
True-color (32 bpp)
85 Hz
4 MB
800 × 600
True-color (32 bpp)
85 Hz
4 MB
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1024 × 768
True-color (32 bpp)
85 Hz
4 MB
1280 × 1024
True-color (32 bpp)
75 Hz
8 MB
1600 × 1200
65,536 colors (16
bpp)
75 Hz
8 MB
2X AGP provides a dedicated bus from the video subsystem to the system chip set. AGP-based video
subsystems have two significant performance advantages over PCI-based video subsystems:
- The AGP bus reduces bandwidth requirements of the PCI bus, improving overall system performance.
- The AGP bus allows a 3D video subsystem to execute directly from main memory.
A diskette/tape drive interface, which supports a 3.5-inch diskette drive and, optionally, a second
diskette drive or tape drive.
Enhanced integrated drive electronics (EIDE) support. The primary and secondary interface are both
located on the PCI bus to provide faster data throughput. Each interface supports high-capacity EIDE
drives, as well as devices such as ATA 33 hard-disk drives, EIDE CD-ROM drives, and EIDE tape
drives.
Two high-performance serial ports and one bidirectional parallel port for connecting external devices.
The parallel port is fully Enhanced Capabilities Port (ECP)-compliant.
A Personal System/2 (PS/2)-style keyboard port and a PS/2-compatible mouse port.
An optional integrated, 10/100-megabit-per-second (Mbps) 3Com® PCI 3C905B-TX Ethernet network
interface controller (NIC). The NIC is configured using software on the Dell ResourceCD.
A 16-bit, integrated Plug and Play Crystal CS4236B audio controller that provides all the sound
functions of the Sound Blaster Pro expansion card. For information, see your online System User's
Guide.
Software Features
The following software is included with your Dell computer system:
System utilities that safeguard your system and enhance the operation of its features. More information
is available on the Dell ResourceCD.
Video drivers for displaying many popular application programs in high-resolution modes. More
information is available on the Dell ResourceCD.
Audio drivers for enabling the sound functions on the expansion sound card. More information is
available on the Dell ResourceCD.
Bus-mastering EIDE drivers to improve performance by off-loading certain functions from the
microprocessor during multithreaded operation (when several applications are running simultaneously).
More information is available on the Dell ResourceCD.
The System Setup program for quickly viewing and changing the system configuration information for
your system. For more information on this program, see "Using the System Setup Program."
Enhanced security features (a setup password, a system password, a system-password lock option, a
write-protect option for diskette drives, and automatic display of the system's service tag number)
available through the System Setup program. In addition, a customer-definable asset tag number can
be assigned via a software support utility and viewed on the System Setup screens. For more
information, see your online System User's Guide and "Using the System Setup Program."
Advanced power management options that can reduce the energy consumption of your system. For
more information, see "Using the System Setup Program."
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The ICU, which tells you how to configure ISA expansion cards manually. After resources have been
assigned to these cards, the system BIOS can assign resources to PCI and Plug and Play expansion
cards for a conflict-free configuration. For more information, see "Using the ISA Configuration Utility."
Dell Diagnostics for evaluating the computer's components and devices. For information on using the
diagnostics, see the chapter titled "Running the Dell Diagnostics" in the Diagnostics and
Troubleshooting Guide.
Network device drivers for several network operating systems. More information is available on the Dell
ResourceCD.
Desktop Management Interface (DMI) support, which enables the management of your computer
system's software and hardware. DMI defines the software, interfaces, and data files that enable your
system to determine and report information about system components.
Manageability Features
Your Dell OptiPlex GX1 Managed PC system incorporates many hardware and software features to improve
the manageability of the system. Installed features include the following:
Dell OpenManage program
Preboot eXecution Environment (PXE)
Wakeup On LAN
Auto Power On
Temperature monitoring
Security features
Dell OpenManage Program
The Dell OpenManage program is the Dell software-management application interface for DMI. It allows you
to manage system-level information, such as system configuration information and Management Information
Format (MIF) database values (see Figure 1).
Figure 1. Dell OpenManage Program
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On systems running Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows NT 4.0, the Dell OpenManage program is
available in client and administrator versions. The Dell OpenManage administrator version enables system
administrators to view, manage, and inventory remote systems in a Dell DMI client network and incorporates
the following manageability features, which are based on the DMI 2.0 specification.
Fault Management
Fault management features of the Dell OpenManage include the following:
Alerts to warn you about events generated by SMART drives on a local or remote system and about
thermal errors
An event log that stores events in a text file and reports information about the event under the following
options: System Name, Component Name, Date and Time, Event Type, Event Severity, Event Class,
Event System
Configuration Management
Configuration management features of the Dell OpenManage include the following:
Wakeup On LAN support, which allows network administrators to remotely turn on Managed PC
systems with Wakeup On LAN capability in a Dell DMI network.
A System Properties window that enables network administrators to view, set, or disable certain
hardware configuration settings for the local and remote systems in a Dell DMI network.
Support for the Microsoft System Management Server (SMS), which allows the exporting of one or
more groups to an SMS directory that the SMS administrator can access.
A Monitor component for systems running Windows 95 and having a display data channel (DDC)compliant video subsystem and monitor.
Automated inventory control of one or more groups for the remote systems in a Dell DMI network.
Network administrators can automate inventory to occur every day, week, or month at a certain hour,
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on the hour; or you can enable inventory as needed. The Dell OpenManage creates a text file for the
group(s) and saves it to a user-defined directory.
Support for the application program used to create user-definable attributes (UDAs).
Asset Management
Asset management features of the Dell OpenManage include the following:
Support that enables network administrators to remotely view, enter, and modify an asset tag for a
remote system in a Dell DMI network
Automated and manual mapping of one or more groups to a user-defined directory
Security Management
Security management features of the Dell OpenManage include the following:
Password security that enables network administrators to maintain standard attribute values for the
local and remote systems in a Dell DMI network
For more information about the Dell OpenManage, refer to the online Dell OpenManage Help that
accompanied the software.
PXE
The Preboot eXecution Environment (PXE) allows a personal computer to be managed by one or more
configuration management servers running the LANDesk Configuration Manager (LCM) software, which
provides management services for the many Managed PC systems on the network. The LCM allows network
administrators to do the following:
Provide preboot support for a new Managed PC system that depends on the server for its initial
operating system installation
Service the network boot requests from the Managed PC systems
Download diagnostics and BIOS update utilities
Format the hard-disk drive, if required
Download and install the operating system, based on previously established profiles
Download and install applications software
Update the operating system and applications as required
For additional information about the Intel LCM, refer to the documentation that accompanied the software.
Wakeup On LAN
The Wakeup On LAN feature allows you to remotely turn on a Managed PC system that is in a sleep state.
The ability to turn on the Managed PC systems remotely allows you to perform remote computer setup,
software downloading and installation, file updates, and asset tracking after hours and on weekends when
users are not using the systems and network traffic is at a minimum.
To use the Wakeup On LAN feature, each Managed PC system must contain a NIC that supports Wakeup
On LAN. You must also enable the Wakeup On LAN option in the System Setup program.
Auto Power On
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Auto Power On enables you to turn on the computer system automatically on certain days of the week at a
preset time. You can set Auto Power On to turn on the system either every day or every Monday through
Friday.
NOTE: This feature does not work if the system is shut off using a power strip or surge protector.
Temperature Monitoring
Your system includes temperature probes to sense when the processor becomes overheated. In such a
case, a message appears on the screen when Dell OpenManage is running or at the next system start-up
notifying you of the problem.
Security Features
Your Dell OptiPlex GX1 system has the following integrated security features.
Chassis Intrusion
A built-in chassis intrusion alarm displays the status of the system chassis intrusion monitor. If the computer
cover is removed, the setting changes to Detected and the following message appears during the boot
sequence at the next system start-up:
Alert! Cover was previously removed.
The field can be cleared using the System Setup program to enable future intrusions to be detected. For
more information, see "Using the System Setup Program."
Security Cable Slot and Padlock Ring
On the back of the computer are a security cable slot and padlock ring (see Figure 2) for attaching
commercially available antitheft devices. Security cables for personal computers usually include a segment of
galvanized cable with an attached locking device and key. To prevent unauthorized removal of your
computer, loop the cable around an immovable object, insert the locking device into the security cable slot
on the back of your computer, and lock the device with the key provided. Complete instructions for installing
this kind of antitheft device are usually included with the device.
NOTE: Antitheft devices are of differing designs. Before purchasing such a device, make sure it will
work with the cable slot on your computer.
The padlock ring allows you to secure the computer cover to the chassis to prevent unauthorized access to
the inside of the computer. To use the padlock ring, insert a commercially available padlock through the ring
and then lock the padlock.
Figure 2. Security Cable Slot and Padlock Ring
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Passwords
The password feature enables you to set a user-defined password to restrict access to the system.
Additional protection is available through the System Setup program. When the Setup Password option is set
to Enabled, Password Status allows you to prevent the system password from being changed or disabled at
boot time. For more information, see "Using the System Setup Program."
Connecting Peripheral Devices
Figure 3 shows the connectors on the back of your computer for attaching external devices.
Figure 3. I/O Ports, Connectors, and Indicators
When you connect external devices to your computer's back panel, follow these guidelines:
Check the documentation that accompanied the device for specific installation and configuration
instructions.
For example, you must connect most devices to a particular input/output (I/O) port or connector to
operate properly. Also, external devices like a mouse or printer usually require you to load device
drivers into system memory before they will work.
Always attach external devices while your computer is turned off. Then turn on the computer before
turning on any external devices, unless the documentation for the device specifies otherwise. (If the
computer does not seem to recognize the device, try turning on the device before turning on the
computer.)
NOTICE: When you disconnect external devices from the back of the computer, wait 5
seconds after turning off the computer before you disconnect any devices to avoid
possible damage to the system board.
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Parallel Port Connector
The integrated parallel port uses a 25-pin D-subminiature connector on the computer's back panel.
This I/O port sends data in parallel format (where 8 data bits, or 1 byte, are sent simultaneously over eight
separate lines in a single cable). The parallel port is used primarily for printers.
The default designation of your computer's integrated parallel port is LPT1. Port designations are used, for
example, in software installation procedures to identify the port to which your printer is attached, thus telling
your software where to send its output. (An incorrect designation prevents the printer from printing or causes
scrambled print.)
NOTE: The integrated parallel port is automatically disabled if the system detects an installed
expansion card containing a parallel port configured to the same address as specified in the Parallel
Port option in the System Setup Program.
Mouse Connector
Your system uses a PS/2-compatible mouse. The mouse cable attaches to a 6-pin miniature Deutsche
Inductive Norm (DIN) connector on the back panel of your computer. Turn off the computer and any attached
peripherals before connecting a mouse to the computer.
A PS/2-compatible mouse works as does an industry-standard serial mouse or bus mouse except that it has
its own dedicated connector, which frees up the serial ports and does not require an expansion card. Mouse
driver software gives the mouse priority with the microprocessor by issuing interrupt request (IRQ) 12
whenever a new mouse movement is made. The drivers also pass along the mouse data to the application
that is in control.
USB Connectors
Your system contains two USB connectors for attaching USB-compliant devices. USB-compliant devices are
typically peripherals such as keyboards, mice, printers, and computer speakers.
If you reconfigure your hardware, you may need pin number and signal information for the USB connectors.
Integrated NIC Connector
Your system has an integrated 10/100-Mbps 3Com PCI 3C905B-TX Ethernet NIC. The NIC provides all the
functions of a separate network expansion card and supports both the 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX
Ethernet standards.
The NIC includes a Wakeup On LAN feature that enables the computer to be started by a special local area
network (LAN) signal from a server management console. Wakeup On LAN provides remote computer setup,
software downloading and installation, file updates, and asset tracking after hours and on weekends when
LAN traffic is typically at a minimum.
The NIC connector on the computer's back panel has the following indicators:
A yellow activity indicator flashes when the system is transmitting or receiving network data. (A high
volume of network traffic may make this indicator appear to be in a steady "on" state.)
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A dual-colored link integrity indicator, which lights up green when there is a good connection between a
10-Mbps network and the NIC, or it lights up orange when there is a good connection between a 100Mbps network and the NIC. When the green indicator is off, the computer is not detecting a physical
connection to the network.
Audio Connectors
You can use the microphone jack to attach a standard personal computer microphone. Connect the audio
cable from the microphone to the microphone jack. The microphone input is a monaural source with
maximum signal levels of 89 millivolts root-mean-squared (mVrms).
You can use the line-out jack to attach most computer speakers. The line-out jack is amplified, so speakers
with integrated amplifiers are not required. Connect the audio cable from the speakers to this jack.
You can use the line-in jack to attach record/playback devices such as cassette players, CD players, and
VCRs. Connect the line-out cable from any of these devices to the line-in jack on the back of your computer.
Video Connector
The system uses a 15-pin high-density D-subminiature connector on the back panel for attaching a VGAcompatible monitor to your system.
Serial Port Connectors
The serial ports use 9-pin D-subminiature connectors on the back panel. These ports support devices such
as external modems or plotters that require serial transmission (sending one bit of data at a time over one
line).
The default designations for these integrated serial ports are COM1 for serial port 1 and COM2 for serial port
2. Port designations are used in software installation procedures to identify the port used by a device—for
example, specifying the port used by a modem when installing communications software.
The system contains a reconfiguration feature to reassign the serial port's designation if you add an
expansion card containing a serial port using this designation.
If you set the system’s integrated serial ports to Auto in the System Setup Program and add an expansion
card containing a serial port configured to a specific designation, the computer automatically maps (assigns)
the integrated ports to the appropriate COM setting as necessary.
Before you add a card with a serial port, check the documentation that accompanied your software to make
sure that the software can be mapped to the new COM port designation.
Keyboard Connector
Your system uses a PS/2-style keyboard. The keyboard cable attaches to a 6-pin miniature DIN connector
on the back panel of your computer.
Network Cable Requirements
Your computer's NIC connector (an RJ45 connector located on the back panel) is designed for attaching an
unshielded twisted pair (UTP) Ethernet cable. Press one end of the UTP cable into the NIC connector until
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the cable snaps securely into place.
Connect the other end of the cable to an RJ45 jack wall plate or to an RJ45 port on a UTP concentrator or
hub, depending on your network configuration.
Using the Power Switch
The power button controls the system's AC input power.
The Microsoft Windows 98 and Windows 98 Second Edition (SE) operating systems let you configure the
function of the power button through the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) feature (see
Table 2).
NOTICE: When you turn off your computer system, perform an orderly system shutdown using the
operating system menu when possible.
Table 2. Power Button Behavior Under Microsoft Windows 98 and Windows 98 SE Operating Systems
With ACPI
Results
System Turned On
and ACPI Enabled
System in Standby
Mode
System Turned Off
Press power button
System goes into
standby mode or turns
off (depending on the
operating system setup)
System turns on
Boots and system turns
on
Hold power button
for 6 seconds*
System turns off
immediately
System turns off
immediately
Boots and system turns
on
Action
* Pressing or holding the power button to shut down the system may result in data loss. Use the power
button to shut down the system only if the operating system is not responding.
Microsoft Windows 95 does not support ACPI. Table 3 shows power button functions for Windows 95 and
Windows 98 operating systems that have the ACPI feature disabled.
Table 3. Power Button Behavior Under Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows 98 (With Dell
AutoShutdown Loaded)
Results
System Turned On
System in Suspend
Mode
System Turned Off
Press power button
System turns off
System turns off
Boots and system turns
on
Hold power button for 6
seconds*
System turns off
immediately
System turns off
immediately
Boots and system turns
on
Action
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* Pressing or holding the power button to shut down the system may result in data loss. Use the power
button to shut down the system only if the operating system is not responding.
Table 4 shows power button functions for Microsoft Windows NT operating systems.
Table 4. Power Button Behavior Under Microsoft Windows NT (With Dell AutoShutdown Loaded)
Results
Action
System Turned On
System Turned Off
Press power button
System shuts down
Boots and system turns on
Hold power button for 6 seconds*
System turns off immediately
Boots and system turns on
* Pressing or holding the power button to shut down the system may result in data loss. Use the power
button to shut down the system only if the operating system is not responding.
If the system does not turn off when you press the power button, the system may be hung. Press and hold
the power button until the system turns off completely (this process may take several seconds). Alternatively,
press the reset button to reset the system and reboot. If the system is hung and both buttons fail to function
properly, unplug the AC power cable from the computer, wait for it to completely stop running, plug in the AC
power cable, and if it the system does not restart, press the power button to restart the system.
Using the Optional Stand for Vertical Orientation
Dell offers an optional stand that you can attach to the computer for a mini tower (vertical) orientation.
Although you can attach (and remove) the stand at any time with a minimum of system disruption, it is
easiest to attach before you set up your computer and connect the back-panel cables.
Attach the stand as follows:
1. Turn the computer onto its right side, so that the drive bays are at the bottom.
2. Fit the stand onto what was the left side of the computer.
Position the stand as shown in Figure 4. Align the large round hole in the stand with the securing
button on the side of the cover, and align the captive thumbscrew in the stand with the screw hole in
the cover.
Figure 4. Attaching the Optional Stand for Vertical Orientation
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As you lower the stand into place, make sure that the locator pin (see Figure 4) fits into the corner hole
of the hole pattern as shown. When the stand is in place, tighten the thumbscrew.
3. Rotate the computer so that the stand is at the bottom and the drives are at the top.
To remove the stand, turn the computer over so the stand is at the top, loosen the screw, lift the stand away,
and place the computer in a horizontal position.
ENERGY STAR® Compliance
Certain configurations of Dell computer systems comply with the requirements set forth by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) for energy-efficient computers. If the front panel of your computer bears the
ENERGY STAR® Emblem (see Figure 5), your original configuration complied with these requirements and
all ENERGY STAR® power management features of the computer are enabled. To disable or change the
operation of these features, you must change the setting for the Power Management option in the System
Setup program. For instructions, see "Using the System Setup Program."
NOTES: As an ENERGY STAR® Partner, Dell Computer Corporation has determined that this
product meets the ENERGY STAR® guidelines for energy efficiency.
Any Dell computer bearing the ENERGY STAR® Emblem is certified to comply with EPA ENERGY
STAR® requirements as configured when shipped by Dell. Any changes you make to this
configuration (such as installing additional expansion cards or drives) may increase the system's
power consumption beyond the limits set by the EPA's ENERGY STAR® Computers program.
Figure 5. ENERGY STAR® Emblem
The EPA's ENERGY STAR® Computers program is a joint effort between the EPA and computer
manufacturers to reduce air pollution by promoting energy-efficient computer products. The EPA estimates
that use of ENERGY STAR® computer products can save computer users up to two billion dollars annually in
electricity costs. In turn, this reduction in electricity usage can reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, the gas
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primarily responsible for the greenhouse effect, and sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, which are the two
primary causes of acid rain.
Computer users can also help to reduce electricity usage and its side effects by turning off their computer
systems when they are not in use for extended periods of time—particularly at night and on weekends.
Accessing Online Documentation
The online System User's Guide installed on your hard-disk drive contains information on the following
topics:
How to use the online System User's Guide
System features
Using drivers and utilities
Using the integrated audio controller
Using the System Setup program
Configuring expansion cards
Securing your computer
Connecting external devices
Maintaining the system
Contacting Dell
The guide also contains a glossary of commonly used terms and abbreviations.
The System User's Guide is located in the Dell Accessories program group or folder.
To print any of the topics from this guide, display the topic you want on your screen and select Print Topic
from the File menu.
Getting Help
Dell provides a number of tools to help you if you don't understand a procedure described in this guide or if
your system does not perform as expected. For information on these help tools, see the chapter titled
"Getting Help" in your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide or the "Contacting Dell" section in the online
System User's Guide.
Back to Contents Page
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Back to Contents Page
Using the System Setup Program: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 LowProfile Managed PC Systems
Overview
Using the System Password Feature
Entering the System Setup Program
Using the Setup Password Feature
System Setup Screens
Disabling a Forgotten Password
Using the System Setup Program
Responding to Error Messages
System Setup Options
Overview
Each time you turn on your computer system or press the reset button, the system compares the hardware
installed in the system to the hardware listed in the system configuration information stored in nonvolatile
random-access memory (NVRAM) on the system board. If the system detects a discrepancy, it generates
error messages that identify the incorrect configuration settings. The system then prompts you to enter the
System Setup program to correct the setting.
You can use the System Setup program as follows:
To change the system configuration information after you add, change, or remove any hardware in your
system
To set or change user-selectable options—for example, the time or date on your system
You can view the current settings at any time. When you change a setting, in many cases you must reboot
the system before the change takes effect.
After you set up your system, run the System Setup program to familiarize yourself with your system
configuration information and optional settings. Dell recommends that you print the System Setup screens
(by pressing the <Print Screen> key) or write down the information for future reference.
Before you use the System Setup program, you need to know the kind of diskette drive(s) and hard-disk
drive(s) installed in your computer. If you are unsure of any of this information, see the Manufacturing Test
Report that was shipped with your system and is located in the Dell Accessories folder.
NOTE: Dell recommends that you upgrade your basic input/output system (BIOS) to the latest
version. Refer to the Dell support Web site at http://support.dell.com for instructions.
Entering the System Setup Program
Enter the System Setup program as follows:
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1. Turn on your system.
If your system is already on, shut it down and then turn it on again.
2. Press <F2> immediately when the F2 = Setup prompt appears in the upper-right corner of the Dell
logo screen.
If you wait too long and your operating system begins to load into memory, let the system complete the load
operation; then shut down the system and try again.
NOTE: To ensure an orderly system shutdown, consult the documentation that accompanied your
operating system.
You can also enter the System Setup program by responding to certain error messages. See "Responding to
Error Messages."
System Setup Screens
The two System Setup screens, Page 1 and Page 2, display the current setup and configuration information
and optional settings for your system. (Typical examples are illustrated in Figure 1.)
Figure 1. System Setup Screens
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Information on the two System Setup screens is organized in five boxed areas:
Title box
The box at the top of both screens lists the system name, page number (Page 1 or Page 2), and the
revision number of the BIOS.
Configuration options
The box on the left half of both screens lists the options that define the installed hardware in your
computer.
Fields beside the options contain options or values; those that appear bright on the screen can be
changed. Options or values that you cannot change because they are determined by the system
appear less bright.
Some options have multiple fields, which may show options or values as bright or less bright depending
upon what options or values you entered in other fields.
Help
The box on the upper-right half of both screens displays help information for the option with a currently
highlighted field.
System data
The box in the lower-right corner of both screens displays information about your system.
Key functions
The line of boxes across the bottom of both screens lists keys and their functions within the System
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Setup program.
Using the System Setup Program
Table 1 lists the keys you use to view or change information on the System Setup screens and to exit the
program.
Table 1. System-Setup Navigation Keys
Keys
Action
Moves to the next field.
Moves to the previous field.
Cycles through the options in a field. In many fields, you can also type the appropriate
value.
Scrolls through help information.
Switches between Page 1 and Page 2.
Exits the System Setup program without rebooting the system and returns the system to
its previous state—the boot routine.
For most of the options, any changes you make are recorded but do not take effect until
the next time you boot the system. For a few options (as noted in the help area), the
changes take effect immediately.
Exits the System Setup program and reboots the system, implementing any changes you
have made.
Resets the selected option to its default setting.
Enters the Device List screen when the Boot Devices menu option is set to Device List.
See Table 2 for more information on the keys you use in the Device List screen.
System Setup Options
The following subsections explain in detail each of the options on the System Setup screens.
Time
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Time resets the time on the computer's internal clock.
Time is kept in a 24-hour format (hours:minutes:seconds). To change the time, press the right-arrow key to
increase the number in the highlighted field or press the left-arrow key to decrease the number. If you prefer,
you can type numbers in each of the appropriate fields.
Date
Date resets the date on the computer's internal calendar.
Your system automatically displays the day of the week corresponding to the settings in the three fields that
follow (month, day-of-month, and year).
To change the date, press the right-arrow key to increase the number in the highlighted field or press the
left-arrow key to decrease the number. If you prefer, you can type numbers in the month and day-of-month
fields.
Diskette Drive A, Diskette Drive B, and Use ZIP as A or B
Diskette Drive A and Diskette Drive B identify the type of diskette drives installed in your computer. With the
standard cabling configuration, Diskette Drive A (the boot diskette drive) is the 3.5-inch diskette drive
installed in the top externally accessible drive bay; Diskette Drive B is any drive installed in the bottom
externally accessible drive bay that is connected to the system's diskette/tape drive interface.
The option settings always match the physical locations of the drives in your computer—the first drive listed
on Page 1 of the System Setup screens is the top drive in your computer.
The options are:
5.25 Inch, 360 KB
5.25 Inch, 1.2 MB
3.5 Inch, 720 KB
3.5 Inch, 1.44 MB
Not Installed
The diskette option labeled "Use ZIP as A or B" is used to control the operation of an internally installed
ATAPI Zip drive. The options are On and Off. When set On, the Zip drive operates as a diskette drive and
can be booted. When set to Off, the Zip drive operates as a normal ATAPI device.
You can have a total of two diskette devices, either diskette drives or Zip drives.
NOTE: Tape drives are not reflected in the Diskette Drive A and Diskette Drive B options. For
example, if you have a single diskette drive and a tape drive attached to the diskette/tape drive
interface cable, set the Diskette Drive A option to match the characteristics of the diskette drive and
set the Diskette Drive B option to Not Installed.
Drives: Primary and Secondary
Primary identifies drives attached to the primary enhanced integrated drive electronics (EIDE) interface
connector (labeled "IDE1") on the system board; Secondary identifies drives connected to the secondary
EIDE interface connector (labeled "IDE2"). Dell recommends that you use the secondary EIDE interface
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connector for EIDE CD-ROM and EIDE tape drives.
NOTES: For all devices from Dell that use the built-in EIDE controller, set the appropriate Drive option
to Auto. For small computer system interface (SCSI) devices, set the appropriate Drive option to
None.
You must have an EIDE device connected to the primary EIDE interface if you have an EIDE device
connected to the secondary EIDE interface.
For older EIDE hard-disk drives not shipped with the system from Dell and less than 528 megabytes (MB) in
capacity, you can use one of the following options if the Autodetect feature does not work:
A specific drive-type number
Usr1 or Usr2
For each drive, seven parameters can be chosen as a group by drive-type number or entered individually
from the keyboard. A drive-type number specifies the parameters of a hard-disk drive, based on a table
recorded in the system's BIOS.
NOTE: Operating systems that bypass the system BIOS may not obtain optimum hard-disk drive
performance.
If you choose the Usr1 or Usr2 option, you must supply the following parameters for the drive:
Type is the drive-type number for the selected hard-disk drive (in this case, Usr1 or Usr2).
Cyls is the number of logical cylinders.
Hds indicates the number of logical heads in the drive.
Pre (precompensation cylinder) is the cylinder number at which the electrical current for the drive head
changes to compensate for differences in data density across the disk surface (this parameter has no
effect for EIDE drives).
Lz is the cylinder number that is used as the drive's landing zone for the heads when the drive is not in
use.
Sec is the number of logical sectors per track.
Size (automatically calculated by the system) indicates the number of millions of bytes of storage
provided by the drive.
Reserved Memory
Reserved Memory allows you to designate a region of system board memory that can be supplied by an
expansion card. You should not enable the reserved memory feature unless you are using an expansion
card that requires special addressing.
For example, you may have a memory expansion card that needs to be addressed starting at 15 MB.
Selecting the 15M - 16M option in the Reserved Memory option specifies that the base memory from 15 to
16 MB comes from the memory expansion card (the base memory below the 15-MB address comes from the
dual in-line memory modules [DIMMs] on the system board).
The Reserved Memory option has the following options:
None (the default option)
512K - 640K
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15M - 16M
CPU Speed
CPU Speed indicates the processor speed at which your system boots.
Press the left- or right-arrow key to toggle the CPU Speed option between the resident microprocessor's
rated speed (the default) and a lower compatibility speed, which lets you accommodate speed-sensitive
application programs. A change to this option takes effect immediately (rebooting the system is not required).
You can also toggle between the rated processor speed and the compatibility speed while the system is
running in real mode by pressing <Ctrl><Alt><\>. (For keyboards that do not use American English, press
<Ctrl><Alt><#>.)
Num Lock
Num Lock determines whether your system boots with the Num Lock mode activated on 101- or 102-key
keyboards (it does not apply to 84-key keyboards).
When Num Lock mode is activated, the rightmost bank of keys on your keyboard provides the mathematical
and numeric functions shown at the tops of the keys. When Num Lock mode is turned off, these keys provide
cursor-control functions according to the label on the bottom of each key.
Chassis Intrusion
Chassis Intrusion displays the status of the system chassis intrusion monitor. The settings for this option are
Enabled, Enabled-Silent, or Disabled. The default is Enabled.
If the computer cover is removed while the intrusion monitor is set to Enabled, the setting changes to
Detected, and the following message appears during the boot sequence at the next system start-up:
Alert! Cover was previously removed.
If the computer cover is removed while the intrusion monitor is set to Enabled-Silent, the setting changes to
Detected, but the alert message is not displayed during the boot sequence at the next system start-up.
If the intrusion monitor is set to Disabled, no intrusion monitoring occurs and no messages are displayed.
To reset the Detected setting, enter the System Setup program during the system's power-on self-test
(POST). Highlight the Chassis Intrusion option and press the left- or right-arrow key to choose Enabled,
Enabled-Silent, or Disabled.
NOTE: When the setup password is enabled, you must enter the setup password before you can
reset the Chassis Intrusion option.
DAC Snoop
DAC Snoop lets you correct video problems that may occur when certain video add-in cards are used. The
default is Off. If you are using a video add-in card and problems such as incorrect colors or blank windows
occur, set DAC Snoop to On.
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ACPI
This option controls the operation of the system's Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)
feature.
When ACPI is set to On, momentarily pressing the power button places the system in a power-saving mode.
To turn the system off completely, press the power button for more than 4 seconds. When ACPI is set to On,
interrupt request (IRQ) line 9 is not available for use by an expansion card.
When ACPI is set to Off, momentarily pressing the power button turns off the system completely. With this
setting, IRQ9 is available for use by an expansion card.
Keyboard Errors
Keyboard Errors enables or disables reporting of keyboard errors during the POST, which is a series of tests
that the system performs on the hardware each time you turn on the system or press the reset button.
This option is useful when applied to self-starting servers or host systems that have no permanently attached
keyboard. In these situations, selecting Do Not Report suppresses all error messages relating to the
keyboard or to the keyboard controller during POST. This option does not affect the operation of the
keyboard itself if a keyboard is attached to the computer.
System Password
System Password displays the current status of your system's password security feature and allows you to
assign and verify a new password. No one can assign a new password unless the current status is Not
Enabled, which is displayed in bright characters.
The settings for the System Password option are the following:
Not Enabled (the default option)
Enabled
Disabled by Jumper
NOTE: Read "Using the System Password Feature" for instructions on assigning a system password
and using or changing an existing system password. See "Disabling a Forgotten Password" for
instructions on disabling a forgotten system password.
Password Status
When Setup Password is set to Enabled, Password Status allows you to prevent the system password from
being changed or disabled at system start-up.
To lock the system password, you must first assign a setup password in the Setup Password option and then
change the Password Status option to Locked. In this state, the system password cannot be changed
through the System Password option and cannot be disabled at system start-up by pressing <Ctrl><Enter>.
To unlock the system password, you must enter the setup password in the Setup Password option and then
change the Password Status option to Unlocked. In this state, the system password can be disabled at
system start-up by pressing <Ctrl><Enter> and then changed through the System Password option.
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Boot Sequence
Boot Sequence can be set to Diskette First (the default), Hard Disk Only, CD-ROM First, or Device List.
The term boot refers to the system's start-up procedure. When turned on, the system "bootstraps" itself into
an operational state by loading into memory a small program, which in turn loads the necessary operating
system. Boot Sequence tells the system where to look for the files that it needs to load.
Diskette First
Selecting Diskette First causes the system to boot from drive A first. If the system finds a diskette that is not
bootable in the drive or finds a problem with the drive itself, it displays an error message. If it does not find a
diskette in the drive, the system boots from the hard-disk drive (drive 0), then from the CD-ROM drive, and
finally from the Plug and Play network adapters in the order found.
Hard Disk Only
Selecting Hard Disk Only causes the system to boot first from the hard-disk drive and then from the Plug and
Play network adapters in the order found.
CD-ROM First
Selecting CD-ROM First causes the system to boot from the CD-ROM drive first. If the system finds a CD
that is not bootable in the drive or finds a problem with the drive itself, it displays an error message. If it does
not find a CD in the drive, the system boots from drive A, then from drive C, and finally from the Plug and
Play network adapters in the order found.
Device List
Device List provides access to the Device List screen, where you can choose from a list of available boot
devices to boot from and specify the order in which your computer attempts to boot from these devices. To
view the Device List screen, press <Ctrl> and the right-arrow key. Table 2 lists other navigation keys used on
the Device List screen.
Table 2. Device-List Screen Navigation Keys
Keys
Action
Returns the boot device lists to the default settings
Moves the selected item up or down in the boot sequence
Exits to Page 2 of the System Setup screens
Moves the selected item from one Boot Device Priority list to the other
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NOTICE: Only a technically knowledgeable person should change the settings in the Device List
screen.
The Device List screen (see Figure 2) provides three options for listing and prioritizing the available boot
devices in your system.
Figure 2. Sample Device List Screen
Boot Device Priority
The Boot Device Priority option lists all bootable devices (hard-disk drives, CD-ROM drives, and so on)
that are controlled by the system BIOS and any Plug and Play network adapters installed in the
computer.
Exclude From Boot Device Priority
The Exclude From Boot Device Priority option allows you to remove from the Boot Device Priority option
any boot devices that you want the system to ignore during system start-up.
Device Controller Priority
The Device Controller Priority option lists the system BIOS controller; any non-Plug and Play devices,
such as network adapter cards; and any secondary controller cards, such as a SCSI adapter, installed
in the computer.
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NOTE: Non-Plug and Play devices appear in this list as Adapters without ID support.
When determining the order of devices to boot from, the system first considers the order of the devices listed
under the Device Controller Priority option, then the order of devices under Boot Device Priority.
To specify your priority preferences, order the devices under these options so that the highest-priority
controller is at the top of the Device Controller Priority option and the highest-priority device is at the top of
the Boot Device Priority option. Order the remainder of the devices in the Boot Device Priority option
according to your preferences. Move any devices that you want the system to ignore during system start-up
into the Exclude From Boot Device Priority option.
NOTE: The system defines drive C in the Boot Device Priority option as the first hard-disk drive
attached to the highest-priority device controller. Therefore, if you have a SCSI adapter installed in
your computer and you want SCSI drive 0 to be drive C, you must move the SCSI adapter item to the
top of the Device Controller Priority option.
To change the order of the devices, press <Ctrl> and the up- or down-arrow key. If you want to revert to the
original Boot Device Priority option settings, press <Ctrl><Del>.
NOTE: If you exit the Device List option by pressing <Esc> or <Alt><b> without making any changes,
the Boot Sequence option is set to the Device List option.
Setup Password
Setup Password indicates whether a password is required before you can change option settings on the
System Setup screen. The settings for this option are normally Enabled or Not Enabled. A third setting,
Disabled By Jumper, displays if the Setup Password option is deactivated. (You can set a jumper on the
system board to deactivate the Setup option.)
If Setup Password is set to Enabled, you must enter the correct setup password before you can change the
settings for the majority of the System Setup options. If you do not enter the correct password in three tries,
the system lets you view, but not change, the settings on the System Setup screen, with one exception: if
Password Status is Unlocked, you may change the system password.
NOTE: Read "Using the Setup Password Feature" for instructions on assigning a setup password and
using or changing an existing setup password. See "Disabling a Forgotten Password" for instructions
on disabling a forgotten setup password.
Auto Power On
Auto Power On allows you to set the time and days of the week to turn on the computer system
automatically. You can set Auto Power On to turn on the system either every day or every Monday through
Friday.
NOTE: This feature does not work if you turn off your system using a power strip or surge protector.
Time is kept in a 24-hour format (hours:minutes). To change the start-up time, press the right-arrow key to
increase the number in the highlighted field or press the left-arrow key to decrease the number. If you prefer,
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you can type numbers in both fields.
The default for Auto Power On is Disabled.
Power Management
For certain types of monitors and most EIDE hard-disk drives, you can reduce system power consumption by
enabling the power management feature. With Power Management enabled, these monitors and drives
automatically switch into low-power mode during periods of system inactivity.
Power Management can be implemented at three levels—Maximum, Regular, and Minimum. (The different
levels apply to the monitor only; hard-disk drive operation is the same for all three.) The default for this
option is Disabled.
Saving Monitor Power
If you have a Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA®) Display Power Management Signaling
(DPMS)-compliant monitor, enabling the Power Management option reduces monitor power consumption
during periods of keyboard and mouse inactivity
NOTICE: Check your monitor documentation to make sure you have a DPMS-compliant monitor
before you enable this feature. Otherwise, you risk damaging the monitor.
NOTE: The power management feature monitors activity of a mouse connected to the Personal
System/2 (PS/2)-compatible mouse port.
By setting Power Management to Maximum, Regular, or Minimum, you can set predefined time-out periods
(see Table 3) for the two successive monitor shutdown stages, standby and off.
NOTE: Each monitor manufacturer defines the details of the shutdown stages for its own monitors.
But in all cases, power consumption decreases with each stage from "on" (full power) to "standby"
(reduced power; the display image usually disappears) to "off" (where power consumption is minimal).
To define these stages for your monitor, see the documentation that came with the monitor.
From either shutdown stage, you can return full power to the monitor in one of the following ways:
For most DPMS-compliant monitors, any subsequent activity—including moving the mouse—should
return full power to the monitor.
A few DPMS-compliant monitors require that you turn monitor power off and then on again to return to
full power.
Check your monitor documentation for information on how your monitor is designed to operate.
Saving EIDE Hard-Disk Drive Power
For most systems, enabling Power Management at any level causes EIDE hard-disk drives to switch to lowpower mode after about 20 minutes of system inactivity (see Table 3).
NOTES: All EIDE drives shipped with your system support this feature. (For more information on
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ENERGY STAR® systems, see "ENERGY STAR® Compliance".)
However, not all EIDE hard-disk drives support this feature. Enabling this feature for drives that do not
support it may cause the EIDE drive to become inoperable until the computer is restarted and the
Power Management option is disabled.
In low-power mode, the disks inside the drive stop spinning. They remain idle until the next drive access,
which causes them to start spinning again. (Because the disks take a few seconds to regain full speed, you
may notice a slight delay when you next access the hard-disk drive.)
When Power Management is set to Disabled (the default), the disks spin constantly as long as the system is
turned on.
Table 3. Power Time-Out Periods
Power
Management
Setting
EIDE Drive
Spindown
Time-Outs
Monitor
Standby
Time-Outs
Monitor Off
Time-Outs
Disabled
Never
Never
Never
Maximum
20 minutes
10 minutes
1 hour
Regular
20 minutes
20 minutes
1 hour
Minimum
20 minutes
1 hour
Never
Wakeup On LAN
Wakeup On LAN determines whether the Wakeup On LAN feature is set to On or Off. You must reboot your
system before a change takes effect.
Sound
Sound determines whether the integrated audio controller is On or Off. You must reboot your system before
a change takes effect.
NIC
NIC determines whether an integrated network interface controller (NIC) is On or Off. You must reboot your
system before a change takes effect.
Mouse
Mouse enables or disables the system's built-in PS/2-compatible mouse port. Disabling the mouse allows an
expansion card to use IRQ 12.
For more information about built-in ports, port designations, IRQs, and the remapping of ports, see
"Connecting External Devices" in your online System User's Guide.
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Serial Port 1 and Serial Port 2
Serial Port 1 and Serial Port 2 configure the system's built-in serial ports. These options can be set to Auto
(the default) to automatically configure a port, to a particular designation (COM1 or COM3 for Serial Port 1;
COM2 or COM4 for Serial Port 2), or to Off to disable the port.
If you set a serial port to Auto and add an expansion card containing a port configured to the same
designation, the system automatically remaps the built-in port to the next available port designation that
shares the same IRQ setting as follows:
COM1 (input/output [I/O] address 3F8h), which shares IRQ4 with COM3, is remapped to COM3 (I/O
address 3E8h).
COM2 (I/O address 2F8h), which shares IRQ3 with COM4, is remapped to COM4 (I/O address 2E8h).
NOTES: When two COM ports share an IRQ setting, you can use either port as necessary, but you
may not be able to use them both at the same time. If the second port (COM3 or COM4) is also in
use, the built-in port is turned off.
If you are using the Microsoft® Windows® 95 or IBM® OS/2® operating system, you cannot use both
serial ports at the same time.
For more information about built-in ports, port designations, IRQs, and the remapping of ports, see
"Connecting External Devices" in your online System User's Guide.
Parallel Port
Parallel Port configures the system's built-in parallel port. This option can be set to 378h (the default), to
alternate addresses 278h or 3BCh, or to Off to disable the port.
NOTE: Do not set Parallel Port to 278h if you have an Enhanced Capabilities Port (ECP) device
connected to the port.
Parallel Mode
Parallel Mode controls whether the system's built-in parallel port acts as an AT-compatible (unidirectional) or
PS/2-compatible (bidirectional) port.
Your system also supports ECP mode, which can be used by Windows 95 and Windows 98. Windows 95 and
Windows 98 use ECP protocol automatically if the operating system detects an ECP-capable device,
eliminating the need for an ECP setting in this option.
Set this option according to the type of peripheral device connected to the parallel port. To determine the
correct mode to use, see the documentation that came with the device.
IDE Hard Disk
IDE Hard Disk enables or disables the system's built-in EIDE hard-disk drive interface.
With Auto (the default) selected, the system turns off the built-in EIDE interface when necessary to
accommodate a controller card installed in an expansion slot.
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As part of the boot routine, the system first checks for a primary hard-disk drive controller card installed in an
expansion slot. If no card is found, the system enables the built-in EIDE interface to use IRQ14 and IRQ15.
If a primary controller is detected on the expansion bus, the built-in EIDE interface is disabled.
Selecting Off disables the built-in EIDE interface.
Diskette
Diskette controls the operation of the system's built-in diskette drive controller.
With Auto (the default) selected, the system turns off the built-in diskette drive controller when necessary to
accommodate a controller card installed in an expansion slot.
With Write Protect selected, nothing can be written to diskette drives and tape drives using the system's
built-in diskette drive controller. (The system can still read from the drives.) When this option is selected, the
Auto option (whereby the system turns off the built-in diskette drive controller as necessary) is also in effect.
Selecting Off turns off the built-in diskette/tape drive controller; this option is used primarily for
troubleshooting purposes.
Speaker
Speaker determines whether the on-board speaker is On (the default) or Off. A change to this option takes
effect immediately (rebooting the system is not required).
System Data Options
The following options, which are not selectable, display information about the system. The microprocessor
type is also listed in the System Data box.
Level 2 Cache displays the size of the integrated cache.
System Memory indicates the entire amount of installed memory detected in your system, except for
memory on Expanded Memory Specification (EMS) expansion cards. After adding memory, check this
option to confirm that the new memory is installed correctly and is recognized by the system.
Video Memory displays the amount of video memory detected in your system.
Service Tag displays the system's five-character service tag number, which was programmed into
NVRAM by Dell during the manufacturing process. Refer to this number during technical assistance or
service calls. The service tag number is also accessed by certain Dell support software, including the
diagnostics software.
Asset Tag displays the customer-programmable asset tag number for the system if an asset tag
number has been assigned. You can use the Asset Tag utility, which is included with your system
utilities, to enter an asset tag number up to ten characters long into NVRAM. More information is
available on the Dell ResourceCD.
Using the System Password Feature
NOTICE: The password features provide a basic level of security for the data on your system.
However, they are not foolproof. If your data requires more security, it is your responsibility to
obtain and use additional forms of protection, such as data encryption programs.
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Your Dell system is shipped to you without the system password feature enabled. If system security is a
concern, you should operate your system only with system password protection.
You can assign a system password, as described in "Assigning a System Password," whenever you use the
System Setup program. After a system password is assigned, only those who know the password have full
use of the system.
When the System Password option is set to Enabled, the computer system prompts you for the system
password just after the system boots.
To change an existing system password, you must know the password (see "Deleting or Changing an
Existing System Password"). If you assign and later forget a system password, you need to be able to
remove the computer cover to change a jumper setting that disables the system password feature (see
"Disabling a Forgotten Password"). Note that you erase the setup password at the same time.
Assigning a System Password
NOTICE: If you leave your system running and unattended without having a system password
assigned, or if you leave your computer unlocked so that someone can disable the password by
changing a jumper setting, anyone can access the data stored on your hard-disk drive.
Before you can assign a system password, you must enter the System Setup program and check the System
Password option.
When a system password is assigned, the setting shown in the System Password option is Enabled. When
the system password feature is disabled by a jumper setting on the system board, the option shown is
Disabled by Jumper. You cannot change or enter a new system password if either of these options is
displayed.
When no system password is assigned and the password jumper on the system board is in the enabled
position (its default), the option shown for the System Password option is Not Enabled. Only when this option
is set to Not Enabled can you assign a system password, using the following procedure:
1. Verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.
For instructions on changing the setting for Password Status, see "Password Status."
2. Highlight the System Password option, and then press the left- or right-arrow key.
The option heading changes to Enter Password, followed by an empty seven-character field in square
brackets.
3. Type your new system password.
You can use up to seven characters in your password.
As you press each character key (or the spacebar for a blank space), a placeholder appears in the field.
The password assignment operation recognizes keys by their location on the keyboard, without
distinguishing between lowercase and uppercase characters. For example, if you have an M in your
password, the system recognizes either M or m as correct.
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Certain key combinations are not valid. If you enter one of these combinations, the speaker emits a
beep.
To erase a character when entering your password, press the <Backspace> key or the left-arrow key.
NOTE: To escape from the field without assigning a system password, press the <Tab> key or
the <Shift><Tab> key combination to move to another field, or press the <Esc> key at any time
prior to completing step 5.
4. Press <Enter>.
If the new system password is less than seven characters, the whole field fills with placeholders. Then
the option heading changes to Verify Password, followed by another empty seven-character field in
square brackets.
5. To confirm your password, type it a second time and press <Enter>.
The password setting changes to Enabled. Your system password is now set; you can exit the System
Setup program and begin using your system. Note, however, that password protection does not take
effect until you reboot the system by pressing the reset button or by turning the system off and then on
again.
Using Your System Password to Secure Your System
Whenever you turn on your system, press the reset button, or reboot the system by pressing the
<Ctrl><Alt><Del> key combination, the following prompt appears on the screen when the Password Status
option is set to Unlocked:
Type in the password and...
- press <ENTER> to leave password security enabled.
- press <CTRL><ENTER> to disable password security.
Enter password:
If the Password Status option is set to Locked, the following prompt appears:
Type the password and press <Enter>.
After you type the correct system password and press <Enter>, your system boots and you can use the
keyboard and/or mouse to operate your system as usual.
NOTE: If you have assigned a setup password (see "Using the Setup Password Feature"), the system
accepts your setup password as an alternate system password.
If a wrong or incomplete system password is entered, the following message appears on the screen:
** Incorrect password. **
Enter password:
If an incorrect or incomplete system password is entered again, the same message appears on the screen.
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The third and subsequent times an incorrect or incomplete system password is entered, the system displays
the following message:
** Incorrect password. **
Number of unsuccessful password attempts: 3
System halted! Must power down.
The number of unsuccessful attempts made to enter the correct system password can alert you to an
unauthorized person attempting to use your system.
Even after your system is turned off and on, the previous message is displayed each time an incorrect or
incomplete system password is entered.
NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with System Password and Setup
Password to further protect your system from unauthorized changes. For more information, see
"Password Status."
Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password
To delete or change an existing system password, perform the following steps:
1. Enter the System Setup program, and verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.
Refer to "Entering the System Setup Program." For instructions on changing the setting for Password
Status, see "Password Status."
2. Reboot your system to force it to prompt you for a system password.
3. When prompted, type the system password.
4. Press the <Ctrl><Enter> key combination to disable the existing system password, instead of pressing
<Enter> to continue with the normal operation of your system.
5. Confirm that Not Enabled is displayed for the System Password option of the System Setup program.
If Not Enabled appears in the System Password option, the system password has been deleted. If you
want to assign a new password, continue to step 6. If Not Enabled is not displayed for the System
Password option, press the <Alt><p> key combination to reboot the system, and then repeat steps 3
through 5.
6. To assign a new password, follow the procedure in "Assigning a System Password."
Using the Setup Password Feature
Your Dell system is shipped to you without the setup password feature enabled. If system security is a
concern, you should operate your system with setup password protection.
You can assign a setup password, as described in "Assigning a Setup Password," whenever you use the
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System Setup program. After a setup password is assigned, only those who know the password have full
use of the System Setup program.
To change an existing setup password, you must know the setup password (see "Deleting or Changing an
Existing Setup Password"). If you assign and later forget a setup password, you need to remove the
computer cover to change a jumper setting that disables the setup password feature (see "Disabling a
Forgotten Password"). Note that you erase the system password at the same time.
Assigning a Setup Password
A setup password can be assigned (or changed) only when the Setup Password option is set to Not
Enabled. To assign a setup password, perform the following steps:
1. Enter the System Setup program and go to Page 2 of the System Setup screens.
Refer to "Entering the System Setup Program." Press the <Alt><p> key combination to move to Page 2
of the System Setup screens.
2. Highlight the Setup Password option and press the left- or right-arrow key.
The system prompts you to enter and verify the password. If a character is illegal for password use, the
system emits a beep.
NOTE: The setup password can be the same as the system password.
3. Enter and verify the password, and click OK.
A change to the Setup Password option becomes effective immediately (rebooting the system is
not required).
Highlight the Setup Password option and press the left- or right-arrow key. The system prompts
you to enter and verify the password. If a character is illegal for password use, the system emits
a beep.
NOTES: The setup password can be the same as the system password.
If the two passwords are different, the setup password can be used as an alternate system
password. However, the system password cannot be used in place of the setup password.
After you verify the password, the Setup Password setting changes to Enabled. The next time
you enter the System Setup program, the system prompts you for the setup password.
Operating With a Setup Password Enabled
If Setup Password is set to Enabled, you must enter the correct setup password before you can
modify the majority of the System Setup options.
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When you start the System Setup program, Page 2 of the System Setup screens appears with the
Setup Password option highlighted, prompting you to type the password.
If you do not enter the correct password in three tries, the system lets you view, but not modify, the
System Setup screens—with the following exceptions:
If System Password is not enabled and is not locked via the Password Status option, you
can assign a system password (however, you cannot disable or change an existing system
password).
NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with Setup Password to protect
the system password from unauthorized changes. For more information, see "Password Status."
Deleting or Changing an Existing Setup Password
To delete or change an existing setup password, perform the following steps:
1. Enter the System Setup program and go to Page 2 of the System Setup screens.
Refer to "Entering the System Setup Program." Press the <Alt><p> key combination to move to
Page 2 of the System Setup screens.
2. Highlight the Setup Password option, type in the setup password, and press the left- or rightarrow key to delete the existing setup password.
The setting changes to Not Enabled.
3. If you want to assign a new setup password, follow the procedure in "Assigning a Setup
Password."
Disabling a Forgotten Password
If you forget your system or setup password, you cannot operate your system or change settings in
the System Setup program until you remove the computer cover, change the password jumper
setting to disable the passwords, and erase the existing passwords.
To disable a forgotten password, perform the following steps.
CAUTION: Before you begin, see "Safety First — For You and Your Computer."
1. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
2. Remove the jumper plug from the PSWD jumper to disable the password feature.
Refer to "Jumpers" for jumper information and for the location of the password jumper (labeled
"PSWD") on the system board.
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3. Replace the computer cover.
4. Reconnect your computer and peripherals to their power sources, and then turn them on.
Booting your system with the PSWD jumper plug removed erases the existing password(s).
5. Enter the System Setup program and verify that the password is disabled. Proceed to step 6 if
you want to assign a new password.
NOTE: Before you assign a new system and/or setup password, you must replace the PSWD
jumper plug.
6. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
7. Replace the PSWD jumper plug.
8. Replace the computer cover, and then reconnect the computer and peripherals to their power
sources and turn them on.
Booting with the PSWD jumper installed reenables the password feature. When you enter the
System Setup program, both password options appear as Not Enabled, meaning that the
password feature is enabled but that no password has been assigned.
9. Assign a new system and/or setup password.
To assign a new system password, see "Assigning a System Password." To assign a new setup
password, see "Assigning a Setup Password."
Responding to Error Messages
If an error message appears on your monitor screen while the system is booting, make note of the
message. Then, before entering the System Setup program, refer to your Diagnostics and
Troubleshooting Guide for an explanation of the message and suggestions for correcting any errors.
However, it is normal to receive an error message the first time you boot the system after a memory
upgrade. In that case, you do not need to refer to the Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide;
instead, refer to the instructions in "Adding Memory."
If you are given an option of pressing either <F1> to continue or <F2> to run the System Setup
program, press the <F2> key.
Back to Contents Page
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Using the ISA Configuration Utility: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Back to Contents Page
Using the ISA Configuration Utility: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 LowProfile Managed PC Systems
Overview
Adding an Unlisted Card
Quick Start
Modifying a Card
About the ICU
Removing a Card
When to Run the ICU
Viewing Resources
Preparing to Use the ICU
Saving the System Configuration
Starting the ICU
Exiting From the ICU
Adding a Listed Card
Locking and Unlocking Cards
Overview
The ISA Configuration Utility (ICU) is used by the system to track what expansion cards are installed and
what resources are used. With this information, the system automatically configures Plug and Play expansion
cards and Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) expansion cards and can tell you how to configure nonPlug and Play Industry-Standard Architecture (ISA) expansion cards manually by setting jumpers or
switches. Plug and Play and PCI expansion cards do not contain jumpers and switches; they are configured
only through software.
NOTICE: The ICU is intended only for configuring non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards. It should
not be used for assigning resources to Plug and Play expansion cards and PCI expansion cards.
These cards should be configured automatically by the basic input/output system (BIOS).
NOTES: The Microsoft® Windows NT® operating system does not provide full Plug and Play support.
Therefore, some Plug and Play cards (such as modem, sound, and network cards) may not work with
Windows NT. If your system is running a Dell-installed Windows NT operating system and you want to
use Plug and Play expansion cards, Dell recommends that you use the card manufacturer's
configuration utility to set the card to legacy mode, enter the card's resources through the
manufacturer's utility, and then use the ICU to add the Plug and Play expansion card to your system
configuration. On systems with a Dell-installed Windows NT operating system, the ICU is installed on
the hard-disk drive as a diskette image. Use the Dell Program Diskette Maker (in the Dell Accessories
folder) to make an ICU diskette from this diskette image.
If you are using the Microsoft Windows® 95 or Windows 98 operating system, the functions provided
by the ICU are handled by the Device Manager, which can be accessed by double-clicking the
System icon in the Control Panel. See your Windows 95 or Windows 98 documentation for
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instructions on using the Device Manager to manage resources and resolve conflicts.
The remainder of this chapter describes the various features of, and the various ways to use, the ICU.
Quick Start
To quickly get started using this utility, follow these steps:
1. Determine whether you need to run the ICU.
See "When to Run the ICU" for detailed instructions.
2. Perform any required preparatory steps before starting the utility.
Preparatory steps include making a program diskette, copying your mouse driver to this diskette, and
making a backup copy of this diskette. See "Preparing to Use the ICU" for detailed instructions.
3. Start the system using your ICU diskette.
Verify that the Boot Sequence option in the System Setup program is set to Diskette First. Then insert
the backup copy of the ICU diskette into drive A and turn on your computer or press the reset button.
NOTE: The ICU takes a few minutes to load. During this time, the cursor may appear as an
hourglass rather than as an pointer.
When the utility has finished loading, the ICU window (see Figure 1) is displayed.
4. Add, modify, or remove a card, or view resources for a card or other device.
Depending on what you need to accomplish with the ICU, you may need to perform one or more of
these tasks:
If you are adding a non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card, see your online System User's Guide
or "Adding a Listed Card" for detailed instructions. If the card you are adding does not have a
configuration file, see your online System User's Guide or "Adding an Unlisted Card" for detailed
instructions.
If you are modifying a card that is already installed, see your online System User's Guide or
"Modifying a Card" for detailed instructions.
If you are removing a card, see your online System User's Guide or "Removing a Card" for
detailed instructions.
If you want to examine the resources already assigned in the system, see your online System
User's Guide or "Viewing Resources" for detailed instructions.
5. Save your configuration and exit the utility.
See your online System User's Guide or "Saving the System Configuration" and "Exiting From the ICU"
for detailed instructions.
About the ICU
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Before your system was shipped from Dell, a technician used the ICU to enter the correct information for the
expansion cards initially installed in your computer.
If your system was shipped with Dell-installed software, the ICU diskette image (from which you can make an
ICU diskette) is installed on your hard-disk drive. (Your system may also be accompanied by an ISA
Configuration Utility Diskette.)
The ICU is also available through online services such as Dell's TechConnect bulletin board service (BBS).
See your online System User's Guide or the chapter titled "Getting Help" in your Diagnostics and
Troubleshooting Guide for information on accessing the BBS.
Whenever you add or remove a non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card, use the ICU to reconfigure your
system. The utility reads the card's corresponding configuration file (.cfg file), which describes the card's
characteristics and required system resources. After the resources identified in these configuration files are
assigned to all non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards, the system assigns resources to all Plug and Play
expansion cards, as well as PCI expansion cards, thereby creating a conflict-free configuration.
ICU Database
The ICU provides a database of configuration files for a large variety of non-Plug and Play ISA expansion
cards. The database is located in the \db subdirectory. Listed cards are non-Plug and Play ISA expansion
cards that have configuration files stored in this database.
Unlisted cards are non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards that do not have configuration files stored in the
ICU database. Unlisted cards are not displayed in the list of cards provided for the various card categories.
The unlisted cards may be cards for which no configuration file exists or new cards that include a
manufacturer-supplied configuration file on diskette.
When you supply a configuration file and the ICU is running from the hard-disk drive, the configuration file is
copied to the directory that contains the rest of the ICU database.
When to Run the ICU
Whenever you add or remove non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards, you must run the ICU to ensure that
no two cards attempt to use the same resources (such as interrupt request [IRQ] lines).
Run the program before adding or removing any non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards. The ICU can
identify and resolve any resource conflicts and indicate the proper jumper and switch settings for each
expansion card to avoid such conflicts. Running the program first helps you determine how to configure a
non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card before you install it in your computer.
After you have run the ICU for your non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards and it has configured all your
Plug and Play and PCI expansion cards, you can use the utility to lock the configuration of your Plug and
Play and PCI expansion cards so that they are always assigned the same resources. See your online
System User's Guide or "Locking and Unlocking Cards" for details.
Preparing to Use the ICU
Before using the ICU for the first time, you must complete the following steps:
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1. Make an ICU program diskette of the utility from the Dell ResourceCD.
NOTE: If you received an ISA Configuration Utility Diskette with your system, skip to step 2.
Follow the instructions displayed on the screen to create an ICU program diskette.
2. If you want to use your mouse with the ICU, copy your mouse driver file (mouse.exe) to your ICU
diskette.
3. Make a backup copy of your ICU diskette, as described in the next subsection, "Backing Up the ICU
Diskette."
Use the backup copy whenever you run the utility; store the original diskette in a safe place.
Backing Up the ICU Diskette
Before using the ICU, make a backup copy of the ICU diskette by performing the following steps.
NOTE: If you received an ISA Configuration Utility Diskette with your system, use this procedure to
create a backup of that diskette.
1. Make sure you have a blank, high-density, 3.5-inch diskette.
2. Turn on your computer system if it is not already on.
3. Make a copy of the ICU program diskette.
See your operating system documentation for instructions on making a copy of a diskette.
4. Store your original ICU diskette in a safe place.
Use only the backup diskette when running the ICU.
Starting the ICU
After you have completed the procedures in "Preparing to Use the ICU," insert the backup copy of the ICU
diskette into drive A. Then either turn on your system or reboot it by pressing the reset button.
Accessing Help
You can access online help in the ICU in four ways:
Select Contents from the Help menu to display a list of topics. Select a topic and click Help. Help text
on that topic appears in a dialog box.
For most dialog boxes, you can click Help to display information on the action you are performing.
From the ICU window, press the <F1> key to display a list of available help topics.
To redisplay the last message you received from the ICU, select Previous Message from the Help
menu.
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Making Selections in the ICU
The ICU window is the main window of the utility and the starting point for making expansion-card changes.
This window lists all non-Plug and Play ISA, Plug and Play, and PCI expansion cards currently installed in
the computer. The ICU window contains menus and a tool bar, as shown in Figure 1. When you choose a
course of action, the ICU displays dialog boxes to guide you through the various steps.
Figure 1. ICU Window
You can maneuver through each menu and dialog box using a mouse. If a mouse is not available, you can
use the keys shown in Table 1.
Each menu and menu option has an underlined character in its name; when you press the <Alt> key in
conjunction with the key for the underlined character, that menu or menu option is selected.
Table 1. ICU Keys
Key(s)
Action
<Alt><x><y> Displays the menu containing the underlined letter x and performs the operation indicated
by the menu item containing the underlined letter y. For example, to save a file (that is, to
display the File menu and select the Save menu option), press <Alt><f> and <s>.
<Tab>
Moves from one control button or list to another.
Up- and
down-arrow
keys
Moves up and down through items in a list.
Spacebar
Highlights an item in a list.
<Enter>
Selects the highlighted button or item in a list.
Adding a Listed Card
NOTE: If you want to add a configuration file that you received on diskette with a new expansion card,
you must copy the configuration file to the \db subdirectory on the backup copy of the ICU diskette.
You should then reboot your system and perform the following procedure to add the expansion card.
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Use the following procedure to add a listed card with the ICU:
1. Start the ICU as described in "Starting the ICU."
2. From the ICU window, click Add or select Add Card from the Configure menu.
3. Click the name of the category of card that you want to add. If you clicked Add in step 2, click OK.
A dialog box like the one in Figure 2 appears, listing the names of all available cards of that type.
Figure 2. Add Network Card Dialog Box
4. Select the name of the card you want to add.
If the card is not listed, see "Adding an Unlisted Card."
5. If you want the ICU to select the resources for the card, click OK. Otherwise, skip to step 6.
The ICU uses the default resources set by the card manufacturer whenever possible. If the ICU cannot
find a resource that is valid for the card and available in the system, the utility generates an error
message. See "ISA Configuration Utility Messages" for an explanation of the message and a possible
solution to the conflict.
If you are satisfied with the default resources assigned to the card, you can skip the remainder of this
procedure.
6. To select the resources yourself, click Advanced.
The Card Configuration dialog box (see Figure 3) displays all resources used by the card. Some cards
have multiple functions, each having one or more resources associated with it. For example, a
communications card can have fax, modem, and scanner functions, each of which may have one or
more associated resources.
Figure 3. CardConfiguration Dialog Box
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7. To change any of the resource settings for the card, select the resource setting and then click Settings.
The Configuration Settings dialog box (see Figure 4) displays the name of the resource that you
selected in the upper-left corner of the box. The resource values currently associated with the selected
function are displayed in the Resources for Choice box. The resource values displayed are IRQ, DMA,
Memory (Hex), and I/O Port (Hex).
Figure 4. Configuration Settings Dialog Box for Assigning an IRQ Line
8. To change the resource settings, click the down arrow next to the Configuration Choice box. Then click
the new resource setting from the list of available settings (see Figure 5).
You cannot manually enter a value; you must choose a setting from the list. If there is only one setting
listed, no other settings are available.
The setting that you select may affect the resources available. For example, if you are offered the
Disabled option and select it, all resource values are blank, indicating that a disabled setting uses no
resources.
Figure 5. Available Settings List Box
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9. To change individual resource values for the current configuration setting, select the resource value
that you want to change and click the Options button located below the resource values (see Figure 6).
For example, when you click the value under DMA, the Options button changes to the DMA Options
button. When you click this button, a smaller dialog box appears. By clicking the down arrow next to the
current resource value, you can display a list of the available values for the resource.
Figure 6. Configuration Settings Dialog Box for Assigning a DMA Channel
Choose the desired value and click OK. The value you selected is displayed under the resource
heading in the Configuration Settings dialog box.
The Options button is disabled if no alternative values are available for the selected resource.
NOTE: If you change one or more resource values using the Options button and later change
the setting in the Configuration Choice box, the changes that you made to the resource values
are overwritten by the default values for the new configuration choice.
10. Click OK in the Configuration Settings dialog box when you have finished selecting resources for the
function.
NOTE: After modifying the system configuration, you must turn off the system to install, remove, or
change jumper settings on the non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards to match the settings you
selected in the ICU.
Adding an Unlisted Card
Unlisted cards are non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards that do not have configuration files stored in the
ICU database.
NOTE: If you want to add a configuration file that you received on diskette with a new expansion card,
see "Adding a Listed Card."
To add an unlisted card with the ICU, perform the following steps:
1. Start the ICU as described in "Starting the ICU."
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2. From the ICU window, click Add or select Add Card from the Configure menu.
3. Click the name of the category of card that you want to add. If you clicked Add in step 2, click OK.
A dialog box appears listing the names of all available cards of that type.
4. Select Unlisted Card from the bottom of the list of cards displayed in the dialog box that appears. Then
click OK.
5. Click No when the ICU asks if you have a configuration file for the card.
The Configure Unlisted Card dialog box appears with blank fields.
6. Enter the name of the card that you want to add in the Card Name field.
7. For each resource you want to assign to the card, click the box beneath the name of the resource to be
assigned and then click Add.
For example, if you click the box beneath IRQ, the button changes to Add Interrupt. When you click this
button, a Specify dialog box (in this case, Specify Interrupt) appears. Figure 7 shows the Configure
Unlisted Card dialog box with the Specify Interrupt dialog box opened.
Figure 7. Specify Interrupt Dialog Box
If you are providing a value for the IRQ or DMA resource, click the down arrow beneath Available
Resources. A smaller Specify list box appears (see Figure 8). Click the value you want to assign to the
resource. Then click OK.
Figure 8. Specify Interrupt List Box
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If none of the values for the DMA or IRQ resources match the allowable values for your unlisted card
(as indicated in the card's documentation), select one of the available values offered by the utility and
click OK.
If you are providing values for the input/output (I/O) port or memory resources, you must enter the
starting and ending addresses in hexadecimal format using the two fields provided by the Specify
Memory or Specify I/O Port dialog box (see Figure 9). Click each box in succession to enter the
beginning and ending addresses, and then click OK to complete the selection.
Figure 9. Specify I/O Port Dialog Box
8. When you have finished selecting resources for the unlisted card, click OK in the Configure Unlisted
Card dialog box.
A message box appears, notifying you either that the card is using its default settings or that it cannot
use its default settings and must be reconfigured.
9. Click OK. If the card must be reconfigured, record the resource settings recommended by the ICU.
Click Close to accept the resource settings currently displayed.
10. If you had to assign a disallowed resource value to the card in steps 7, 8, and 9, click each of the other
cards, and then click View until you find another card using a resource value that is allowed for the
unlisted card. Reassign the resource setting for this other card using the procedure in "Modifying a
Card." Then modify the resource settings for the unlisted card so that it uses an allowable value.
NOTE: After modifying the system configuration, you must turn the system off to install, remove, or
change jumper settings on the non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards to match the settings you
selected in the ICU.
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Modifying a Card
Modifying a card allows you to change the system resources used by a card. This feature is helpful when you
want to add a card that requires resources already in use by other cards or devices in your computer. You
can allocate different resources to the cards currently in your computer to free the resources necessary for
the card you want to install.
You can also use this feature to force Plug and Play or PCI expansion cards to use specific resource values.
This procedure is called locking a card. You should lock a card only if it uses static device drivers. See
"Locking and Unlocking Cards" for more information.
NOTE: You cannot modify the resources of a Plug and Play or PCI expansion card. You can only
view the resources currently assigned and lock or unlock them.
To modify the resource settings for a listed or unlisted card, complete the following steps:
1. Start the ICU as described in "Starting the ICU."
2. Select the card from the list of installed cards in the ICU window, and choose Modify Card from the
Configure menu or click Modify.
If the Card Configuration dialog box appears, the selected card is listed (it has a configuration file in the
ICU database). Continue with step 3.
If the Configure Unlisted Card dialog box appears, the card is unlisted (it does not have a configuration
file). Proceed to step 5.
NOTE: When you modify an unlisted card, the ICU cannot show you the valid resources for the
card. Therefore, you must have documentation from the card manufacturer that describes the
resources and resource settings that the card can use.
3. Follow steps 7 through 9 in "Adding a Listed Card." Then continue with step 4 of this procedure.
4. Click OK to complete the card modifications and return to the ICU window.
You have completed this procedure; do not proceed to step 5.
5. To add, modify, or remove a resource value, select the box beneath the resource to be assigned, and
then click Add, Modify, or Remove, respectively.
For example, if you click the box beneath IRQ, the Add, Modify, and Remove buttons change to Add
Interrupt, Modify Interrupt, and Remove Interrupt. When you click one of these buttons, a smaller
Specify list box (in this case, Specify Interrupt) appears.
If you are providing a value for the IRQ or DMA resource, click the down arrow beneath Available
Resources. Click the value you want to assign to the resource. If the resource can be shared with
another card or device, click Sharable. Then click OK.
If none of the values for the DMA or IRQ resource match the allowable values for your unlisted card (as
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indicated in the card's documentation), select one of the available values offered by the utility and click
OK.
If you are providing values for the I/O port or memory resource, you must enter the starting and ending
addresses in hexadecimal format using the two fields provided by the Specify Memory or Specify I/O
Port dialog box.
6. When you have finished selecting resources for the unlisted card, click OK in the Configure Unlisted
Card dialog box.
A message box appears, notifying you either that the card is using its default settings or that it cannot
use its default settings and must be reconfigured.
7. Click OK. If the card must be reconfigured, record the resource settings recommended by the ICU.
Click Close to accept the resource settings currently displayed.
8. If you had to assign a disallowed resource value to the card in steps 5, 6, and 7, click each of the other
cards, and then click View until you find another card using a resource value that is allowed for the
unlisted card. Reassign the resource setting for this other card. Then modify the resource settings for
the unlisted card so that it uses an allowable value.
NOTE: After modifying the system configuration, you must turn off the system to install, remove, or
change jumper settings on the non-Plug and Play ISA expansion cards to match the settings you
selected in the ICU.
Removing a Card
Before you remove a non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card from your computer, you must use the ICU to
remove the card from the system configuration.
NOTE: When you remove a Plug and Play or PCI expansion card from your computer, you do not
need to run the ICU. To remove a Plug and Play or PCI expansion card, complete steps 2 through 9
in "Removing an Expansion Card."
Use the following procedure to remove a non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card from your computer:
1. Start the ICU as described in "Starting the ICU."
2. Select the card from the current system configuration list in the ICU window.
3. Select Remove Card from the Configuration menu, or click Remove.
The ICU requests verification that you want to remove the card.
4. Click Yes to free the resources allocated to the card and remove the card name from the list of active
cards, or click No to cancel the operation.
The ICU returns to the ICU window.
NOTICE: After removing a card from the system configuration using the ICU, you must turn off
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the system and physically remove the card. Failure to do so can damage your system.
5. Remove the non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card from the computer.
See "Removing an Expansion Card" for instructions.
Viewing Resources
The ICU displays all resources currently used by your system.
To view all system resources, select System Resources from the View menu or click View. The System
Resource Usage dialog box (see Figure 10) displays all resources currently used by the system.
Figure 10. System Resource Usage Dialog Box
To determine which card uses a particular resource shown in the System Resource Usage dialog box, select
the resource in question and then click Used By Card. The Card Resource Usage dialog box appears with
the information.
To view the resources that a particular card is using, select the card from the list displayed in the ICU
window, and then select Card Resources from the View menu or click View. The Card Resource Usage
dialog box displays the resources assigned to that card. Figure 11 shows resources that might be assigned
to a network adapter card.
Figure 11. Card Resource Usage Dialog Box
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You can save the information displayed in the Card Resource Usage dialog box by clicking Print To File. The
ICU then prompts you for a filename.
Saving the System Configuration
You can save the system configuration to nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) as you configure
each card's resources. To do so, select Save from the File menu and continue with your operation.
Exiting From the ICU
At the ICU window, select Exit from the File menu to exit the utility. If you have made any changes to the
system configuration, you are asked whether you want to save the changes.
If you click Yes, the ICU saves the updated system configuration information into NVRAM. If you click No,
you exit the ICU without saving any of your configuration changes. If you click Cancel, nothing is saved and
the utility continues to operate.
Locking and Unlocking Cards
The ICU includes a locking mechanism that enables you to allocate the system resources for all or for some
functions of Plug and Play and PCI expansion cards. These expansion cards are dynamic, which means that
they are allocated resources at system start-up. Device drivers that do not support this dynamic card
configuration are referred to as static device drivers.
To determine whether your expansion card has static device drivers, check the documentation that came
with the drivers. If you are using a static device driver, you need to permanently associate resources with a
Plug and Play expansion card, instead of relying on the default Plug and Play behavior. Otherwise, the
device driver might not be able to find the card the next time the system boots. This procedure is referred to
as locking a card.
NOTE: The locking feature of the ICU is valid only for Plug and Play and PCI expansion cards.
Locking and Unlocking All Resources
To lock or unlock all the resources and configurations for a Plug and Play or PCI expansion card, perform
the following steps:
1. If it is not already installed, install the Plug and Play or PCI expansion card. Then turn on the system.
Complete steps 2 through 10 in "Installing an Expansion Card."
2. Start the ICU.
See "Starting the ICU."
3. Select Locking Enabled from the Advanced menu in the ICU window.
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A check mark next to Locking Enabled signifies that the feature is active; a Lock button appears on the
tool bar.
4. Select the Plug and Play or PCI expansion card that you want to lock or unlock from the Cards
Configured in System list.
5. Click Lock or select Lock/Unlock Card from the Advanced menu.
Both options toggle the lock state of the selected card.
Locking and Unlocking Configuration Resources
You can also lock and unlock individual resources for a Plug and Play or PCI expansion card. To do so,
perform the following steps:
1. If it is not already installed, install the Plug and Play or PCI expansion card. Then turn on the system.
Complete steps 2 through 10 in "Installing an Expansion Card."
2. Start the ICU.
See "Starting the ICU."
3. Select Locking Enabled from the Advanced menu in the ICU window.
A check mark next to Locking Enabled signifies that the feature is active; a Lock button appears on the
tool bar.
4. Select the Plug and Play or PCI expansion card that you want to lock or unlock from the Cards
Configured in System list.
5. Click Modify or select Modify Card from the Configure menu.
6. From the Card Configuration dialog box, select the function you want to lock or unlock.
7. Click Settings.
8. Modify the resource setting and/or resources offered on the Configuration Settings dialog box, if
necessary.
See "Modifying a Card" for more information.
9. Select Lock Resources.
The Lock Resources box toggles the lock state of the selected configuration setting.
10. Repeat steps 6 through 9 for any other configuration settings that you want to lock or unlock.
11. Click OK in the Card Configuration dialog box when you have finished making your selections.
Back to Contents Page
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Working Inside Your Computer: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Back to Contents Page
Working Inside Your Computer: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 Low-Profile
Managed PC Systems
Overview
Replacing the Computer Cover
Before You Begin
Inside Your Computer
Removing the Computer Cover
Removing and Replacing the Expansion-Card
Cage
Overview
Your Dell computer system supports a variety of internal options that expand system capabilities. This
section prepares you to install options inside the computer. It describes how to remove and replace the
computer cover and expansion-card cage. It also familiarizes you with the internal components you may
handle if you install Dell hardware options.
Before You Begin
To make working inside your computer easier, make sure you have adequate lighting and a clean work
space. If you temporarily disconnect cables or remove expansion cards, note the position of the connectors
and slots so that you can reassemble the system correctly.
You will use the information in this section every time you install a hardware option inside your computer.
Read this section carefully, because the information is not repeated in detail elsewhere.
Safety First — For You and Your Computer
Working inside your computer is safe—if you observe the following precautions.
CAUTION FOR YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY AND PROTECTION OF YOUR EQUIPMENT
Before starting to work on your computer, perform the following steps in the sequence indicated:
1. Touch an unpainted metal surface on the computer chassis, such as the power supply, before touching
anything inside your computer.
While you work, periodically touch an unpainted metal surface on the computer chassis to dissipate
any static electricity that might harm internal components. Also avoid touching components or contacts
on a card and avoid touching pins on a chip.
2. Turn off your computer and all peripherals.
3. Disconnect your computer and peripherals from their AC power sources. Also, disconnect any
telephone or telecommunication lines from the computer. Doing so reduces the potential for personal
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injury or shock.
4. If you are disconnecting a peripheral from the computer or are removing a component from the system
board, wait 5 seconds after turning off the computer before disconnecting the peripheral or removing
the component to avoid possible damage to the system board.
In addition, Dell recommends that you periodically review the safety instructions in your System Information
Guide.
Unpacking Your Hardware Option
When you remove an option from its shipping carton, you may find it wrapped in antistatic packing material
designed to protect it from electrostatic damage. Do not remove the packing material until you are ready to
install the option.
Removing the Computer Cover
NOTE: If your chassis has an optional stand for vertical orientation attached to it, remove the optional
stand before you remove the computer cover.
Use the following procedure to remove the computer cover:
1. Turn off your computer and peripherals, and observe the Caution for Your Personal Safety and
Protection of Your Equipment described in "Safety First — For You and Your Computer."
2. If you have installed a padlock through the padlock ring on the back panel (see Figure 1), remove the
padlock.
Figure 1. Padlock Installed
3. Remove the cover.
Face the front of the computer and press in the two securing cover-release buttons that are located on
the sides of the cover toward the back (see Figure 2).
With the buttons depressed, lift the cover at the back, allowing it to pivot up toward you.
Disengage the plastic hooks that secure the cover to the front of the chassis, and lift the cover away.
Figure 2. Removing the Computer Cover
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Replacing the Computer Cover
Use the following procedure to replace the computer cover:
1. Check all cable connections, especially those that might have come loose during your work. Fold
cables out of the way so that they do not catch on the computer cover. Make sure cables are not
routed over the drive cage—they will prevent the cover from closing properly.
2. Check to see that no tools or extra parts (including screws) are left inside the computer's chassis.
3. Replace the cover.
Face the front of the computer and hold the cover at a slight angle as shown in Figure 3. While aligning
the back of the cover with the chassis, insert the cover hooks into the rectangular slots on the chassis.
(It may be helpful to look down into the chassis to verify that the hooks are in place.)
Pivot the cover down toward the back and into position. With both hands, press against the top edge of
the cover to make sure that the securing buttons click into place.
Figure 3. Replacing the Computer Cover
4. If you are using the optional floor stand, reattach it.
See "Using the Optional Stand for Vertical Orientation" for instructions.
5. If you are using a padlock to secure your system, reinstall the padlock.
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Inside Your Computer
Figure 4 shows an overhead view of your computer to help orient you when installing hardware options.
Unless otherwise specified, locations or directions relative to the computer are as shown.
Figure 4. Computer Orientation View
Figure 5 shows your computer with its cover removed. Refer to this illustration to locate interior features and
components discussed in this guide.
When you look inside your computer, note the DC power cables coming from the power supply. These
cables supply power to the system board; to internal diskette drives, hard-disk drives, and tape drives; and
to certain expansion cards that connect to external peripherals.
The flat ribbon cable in Figure 5 is typical of the interface cables for internal drives. An interface cable
connects a drive to a connector on the system board or on an expansion card.
The system board—the large printed circuit board at the bottom of the chassis—holds the computer's control
circuitry and other electronic components. Some hardware options are installed directly onto the system
board.
During an installation procedure, you may be required to change a jumper setting on the system board and/or
a jumper setting on an expansion card or on a drive. Jumpers provide a convenient and reversible way of
reconfiguring the circuitry on a printed circuit board. For more information, see "Jumpers."
Figure 5. Inside the Chassis
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Jumpers
Jumpers are small blocks on a circuit board with two or more pins emerging from them. Plastic plugs
containing a wire fit down over the pins. The wire connects the pins and creates a circuit.
To change a jumper setting, pull the plug off its pin(s) and carefully fit it down onto the pin(s) indicated.
NOTICE: Make sure your system is turned off before you change a jumper setting. Otherwise,
damage to your system or unpredictable results may occur.
A jumper is referred to as open or unjumpered when the plug is pushed down over only one pin or if there is
no plug at all. When the plug is pushed down over two pins, the jumper is referred to as jumpered. In some
documents, the jumper setting may be shown in text as two numbers, such as 1-2. The number 1 is printed
on the circuit board so that you can identify each pin number based on the location of pin 1.
Figure 6 shows the location and default settings of the jumper blocks on your system board. See Table 1 for
the designations, default settings, and functions of your system's jumpers.
Figure 6. System Board Jumpers
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Table 1. System-Board Jumper Settings
Jumper
Setting
PSWD
Description
Password features are enabled.
Password features are disabled.
BIOS
Reserved (do not change).
BUS66M
Reserved (do not change).
266MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
300MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
333MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
350MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
400MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
450MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
500MHZ*
Reserved (do not change).
* The correct microprocessor speed is automatically detected and set by the system. Do not change the
settings of these jumpers.
The system can operate with a microprocessor speed up to 600 megahertz (MHz).
NOTE: For the full name of an abbreviation or acronym used in this table, see the Glossary in your online
System User's Guide.
jumpered
unjumpered
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System Board and Riser Board Labels
Table 2 lists the labels for connectors and sockets on your system board and riser board, and it gives a brief
description of their functions.
Table 2. System Board and Riser Board Connectors and Sockets
Connector or
Socket
Description
AMC
ATI multimedia channel
BATTERY
Battery socket
CD_IN
CD-ROM audio interface connector
DIMM_x
DIMM socket
DSKT
Diskette/tape drive interface connector
ENET
NIC connector (optional)
FAN
Microprocessor fan connector
HDLED
Hard-disk drive LED connector (on riser board)
IDEn
EIDE interface connector
INTRUSION
Chassis intrusion switch connector
ISAn*
ISA expansion-card connector (on riser board)
KYBD
Keyboard connector
LINE-IN
Audio line-in jack
LINE-OUT
Audio line-out jack (amplified source)
MIC
Microphone jack
MONITOR
Video connector
MOUSE
Mouse connector
P1
Wakeup On LAN power connector (on riser board)
PANEL
Control panel connector
PARALLEL
Parallel port connector; sometimes referred to as
LPT1
PCIn*
PCI expansion-card connector (on riser board)
POWER_1
Main power input connector
POWER_2
3.3-V power input connector
RISER
Riser board connector
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SERIALn
Serial port connectors
SLOT1
Pentium® II processor SEC cartridge connector
TAPI
Telephony connector
USB
USB connectors
VIDEO_UPGRADE Video-memory upgrade socket
* For information on ISA and PCI connectors, see "Expansion Cards."
NOTE: For the full name of an abbreviation or acronym used in this table, see the Glossary in your online
System User's Guide.
Removing and Replacing the Expansion-Card Cage
Your Dell computer has a removable expansion-card cage, which greatly simplifies many installation
procedures by allowing you to remove the riser board and all installed expansion cards in a single step.
Removing the Expansion-Card Cage
Use the following procedure to remove the expansion-card cage.
CAUTION: Before you remove the computer cover, see "Safety First — For You and Your
Computer."
1. Remove the computer cover as instructed in "Removing the Computer Cover."
2. Check any cables connected to expansion cards through the back-panel openings. Disconnect any
cables that will not reach to where the cage must be placed upon removal from the chassis.
3. Locate the securing lever (see Figure 7). Rotate the lever upward until it stops in an upright position.
Figure 7. Removing the Expansion-Card Cage
4. Slide the expansion-card cage out of the chassis.
5. Lift the expansion-card cage up and away from the chassis.
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Replacing the Expansion-Card Cage
Use the following procedure to replace the expansion-card cage:
1. With the securing lever in the upright position, align the slots in the left side of the expansion-card cage
with the tabs on the left side of the chassis (see Figure 7).
2. Rotate the securing lever downward until it is flush with the top of the chassis. Make sure that the riser
board is fully seated in the RISER connector on the system board.
3. Reconnect any cables you removed in step 2 of "Removing the Expansion-Card Cage."
4. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
Back to Contents Page
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Installing System Board Options: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Back to Contents Page
Installing System Board Options: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 LowProfile Managed PC Systems
Overview
Adding Video Memory
Expansion Cards
Upgrading the Microprocessor
Adding Memory
Replacing the System Battery
Overview
This section describes how to install the following options:
Industry-Standard Architecture (ISA) and Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) expansion cards
System memory
Video memory
Microprocessor
This section also includes instructions for replacing the system battery, if necessary.
Use Figure 1 to locate the system board features.
Figure 1. System Board Features
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Expansion Cards
Expansion cards are installed on the computer's riser board (see Figure 3). The riser board plugs into the
RISER connector on the system board (see Figure 1) and is considered an extension of the system board.
The system accommodates up to three expansion cards, which can be a mix of 32-bit PCI expansion cards,
and 8- and 16-bit ISA expansion cards. (See Figure 2 for examples of ISA and PCI expansion cards.)
Figure 2. Expansion Cards
Expansion Slots
Four expansion-card connectors reside on the riser board (see Figure 3). Because two expansion slots are
shared, a maximum of three expansion cards can be installed on the riser board.
Expansion-card connectors ISA1–ISA2 support 8- or 16-bit ISA expansion cards.
Expansion-card connectors PCI1–PCI2 support 32-bit PCI expansion cards.
NOTES: On shared expansion slots, only one card of either type can be installed in the common slot.
An expansion-card installed in connector PCI1 cannot exceed 8.75 inches in length.
Figure 3. Riser-Board Expansion-Card Connectors
Installing an Expansion Card
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
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disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
Follow this procedure to install an expansion card:
1. If you are installing a non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card, enter the ISA Configuration Utility (ICU)
and add the new expansion card to your configuration.
See "Using the ISA Configuration Utility" for instructions.
NOTE: If you install a PCI or Plug and Play expansion card, your system automatically performs
any required configuration tasks during the boot routine.
2. Prepare the expansion card for installation, and remove the computer cover according to the
instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
See the documentation that came with the expansion card for information on configuring the card,
making internal connections, or otherwise customizing the card for your system.
CAUTION: Some network cards automatically start up the system when they are
connected. To guard against electrical shock, be sure to unplug your computer from its
electrical outlet before you install any expansion cards.
3. Remove the expansion-card cage as instructed in "Removing the Expansion-Card Cage."
4. Unscrew and remove the metal filler bracket that covers the card-slot opening for the expansion slot
you intend to use (see Figure 4).
Save the screw to use when installing the expansion card later in this procedure.
Figure 4. Removing the Filler Bracket
5. Install the expansion card.
Insert the card-edge connector firmly into the expansion-card connector on the riser board. Gently rock
the card into the connector until the card is fully seated (see Figure 5).
Figure 5. Installing an Expansion Card
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6. When the card is firmly seated in the connector and the card-mounting bracket is flush with the
brackets on either side of it, secure the bracket with the screw you removed in step 4.
7. If you are installing an optional Wakeup On LAN network card, attach the three-wire power cable that
came with the card to the P1 connector on the riser board (see Figure 3) and to the network interface
controller (NIC) card.
8. Replace the expansion-card cage in the chassis as instructed in "Replacing the Expansion-Card
Cage."
9. Connect any cables that should be attached to the card.
See the documentation that came with the card for information about its cable connections.
10. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
Removing an Expansion Card
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
Follow this procedure to remove an expansion card:
1. If you are removing a non-Plug and Play ISA expansion card, enter the ICU and remove the expansion
card from your configuration.
See "Using the ISA Configuration Utility" for instructions.
2. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
3. If necessary, disconnect any cables connected to the card.
4. Remove the expansion-card cage as instructed in "Removing the Expansion-Card Cage."
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5. Unscrew the mounting bracket of the card you want to remove.
6. Grasp the card by its outside corners, and ease it out of its connector.
7. If you are removing the card permanently, install a metal filler bracket over the empty card-slot
opening.
NOTE: Installing filler brackets over empty card-slot openings is necessary to maintain Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) certification of the system. The brackets also keep dust
and dirt out of your computer.
8. Replace the expansion-card cage in the chassis as instructed in "Replacing the Expansion-Card
Cage."
9. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
Adding Memory
Memory can be increased to a maximum of 768 megabytes (MB) by installing combinations of 32-, 64-, 128-,
or 256-MB dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs) in the three DIMM sockets on the system board. Figure 6
shows the DIMMs and DIMM sockets.
Your system can support both error checking and correction (ECC) and nonparity synchronous dynamic
random-access memory (SDRAM) DIMMs. However, ECC support is available only if all DIMMs are ECC
DIMMs. ECC DIMMs enable your system to correct all single-bit memory errors and detect multibit memory
errors.
When you add system memory, you may install DIMMs in any socket. For optimum operation, Dell
recommends that you install a DIMM in socket A first (closest to the processor) before installing a DIMM in
another socket.
Figure 6. DIMMs and DIMM Sockets
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Table 1 lists sample memory configurations and shows valid DIMM combinations and socket placements for
each configuration.
Table 1. Sample DIMM Configuration Options
Total
Desired
Memory
DIMM Socket
A
B
C
32 MB
32 MB
64 MB
64 MB
64 MB
32 MB
32 MB
96 MB
32 MB
32 MB
32 MB
128 MB
64 MB
64 MB
128 MB
128 MB
160 MB
128 MB
32 MB
192 MB
128 MB
64 MB
192 MB
128 MB
32 MB
32 MB
256 MB
128 MB
128 MB
320 MB
128 MB
128 MB
64 MB
384 MB
128 MB
128 MB
128 MB
512 MB
256 MB
256 MB
768 MB
256 MB
256 MB
256 MB
Performing a Memory Upgrade
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
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Follow this procedure to perform a memory upgrade:
1. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
2. Determine the DIMM sockets into which you will install DIMMs or replace existing DIMMs.
See Figure 1 and Table 1.
3. Install or replace DIMMs as necessary to reach the desired memory total.
Follow the instructions in "Installing a DIMM" or "Removing a DIMM," as appropriate.
4. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
The system detects that the new memory does not match the existing system configuration information
and generates the following message:
The amount of system memory has changed.
Strike the F1 key to continue, F2 to run the setup utility 5. Press <F2> to enter the System Setup program and check the System Memory under System Data
Options.
The system should have already changed the value of System Memory to reflect the newly installed
memory modules. Verify the new total. If it is correct, skip to step 7.
6. If the memory total is incorrect, turn off and disconnect your computer and peripherals from their
electrical outlets. Remove the computer cover, and check the installed DIMMs to make sure that they
are seated properly in their sockets. Then repeat steps 4 and 5.
7. When the System Memory total is correct, press the <Esc> key to exit the System Setup program.
8. Run the Dell Diagnostics to verify that the DIMMs are operating properly.
See your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for information on running the Dell Diagnostics and
troubleshooting any problems that may occur.
Installing a DIMM
Use the following procedure to install a DIMM:
1. Locate the first empty socket in which you plan to install a DIMM.
For optimum performance, DIMMs should be installed in consecutive sockets beginning with socket A.
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2. Locate the plastic securing clips at each end of the socket. Press the clips outward until they snap
open.
3. Orient the DIMM to the socket by aligning the notches in the DIMM's edge connector with the
crossbars in the socket.
4. Press the DIMM straight into the slot running down the center of the socket (see Figure 7) until the
securing clips snap into place around the ends of the DIMM.
Figure 7. Installing a DIMM
Removing a DIMM
To remove a DIMM, press the securing clips outward (see Figure 8) simultaneously until the DIMM
disengages from the socket (it should pop up slightly).
Figure 8. Removing a DIMM
Adding Video Memory
You can upgrade video memory from 4 to 8 MB by installing a video-memory upgrade module. Upgrading the
video memory increases video performance and allows you to use video modes for application programs that
require high resolutions and many colors.
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
To upgrade the video memory, perform the following steps:
1. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
2. Remove the expansion-card cage as described in "Removing the Expansion-Card Cage."
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3. Locate the video-memory upgrade socket (labeled "VIDEO_UPGRADE") on the system board.
See Figure 1.
4. Orient the module as shown in Figure 9. Then install it in the socket.
Video memory modules are keyed, or designed to fit in the socket in only one direction.
The socket on the system board is notched so that the video memory module can be firmly
seated only one way:
a. Align the video memory module's edge connector with the slot in the center of the socket.
b. Press the video memory module's edge connector firmly into the socket.
c. Pivot the module down until it clicks into place.
d. If you do not hear a sharp click, you should remove the module and reinstall it.
Figure 9. Installing a Video-Memory Upgrade Module
5. Replace the expansion-card cage as described in "Replacing the Expansion-Card Cage."
6. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
7. Enter the System Setup program and check the Video Memory under System Data Options.
8. If the video memory total is incorrect, turn off and disconnect your computer and peripherals from their
electrical outlets. Remove the computer cover, and check the video memory upgrade to make sure that
it is seated properly in its socket. Then repeat steps 6 and 7.
9. Run the Video Test Group in the Dell Diagnostics to test the new video memory.
See your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for information on running the Dell Diagnostics and
troubleshooting any problems that may occur.
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Upgrading the Microprocessor
To take advantage of future options in speed and functionality, you can replace the microprocessor on your
system board with any Dell-supported microprocessor upgrade. Call your Dell sales representative for
information on available microprocessor upgrades.
The microprocessor upgrade kit includes a new single-edge contact (SEC) cartridge with heat sink assembly.
CAUTION: Before you remove the computer cover, see "Safety First — For You and Your
Computer."
The following procedure describes how to replace the microprocessor.
NOTE: Dell recommends that only a technically knowledgeable person perform this procedure.
1. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
CAUTION: The SEC cartridge and heat sink can get extremely hot during system
operation. Be sure the assembly has had sufficient time to cool before you touch it.
2. Locate the SEC cartridge connector (labeled "SLOT1") and the microprocessor fan connector (labeled
"FAN") on the system board.
See Figure 1.
3. Disconnect the microprocessor fan cable from the connector on the system board.
4. Remove the SEC cartridge/heat sink assembly from the system board connector (see Figure 10).
Press outward and hold the guide-bracket assembly latches, grasp the SEC cartridge/heat sink
assembly firmly, and pull away from the connector on the system board. Lift the SEC cartridge/heat
sink assembly from the guide bracket assembly.
NOTE: You must use up to 15 pounds of force to disengage the SEC cartridge from the
connector.
Figure 10. Removing the Microprocessor
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5. Insert the new SEC cartridge/heat sink assembly into the system board connector.
Orient the SEC cartridge/heat sink assembly with the heat sink facing the right (as you face the front of
the chassis). Align the sides of the heat sink with the guide brackets and press the SEC firmly into its
connector until it is fully seated. The guide brackets will snap into place, securing the SEC cartridge in
the connector on the system board.
NOTE: You must use up to 25 pounds of force to fully engage the SEC cartridge in the
connector.
6. Connect the microprocessor fan cable to the connector on the system board.
7. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
8. Enter the System Setup program and confirm that the installed microprocessor is correctly identified.
As the system boots, it detects the new microprocessor and automatically changes the system
configuration information in the System Setup program.
9. Run the Dell Diagnostics to verify that the new microprocessor is operating correctly.
See your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for information on running the Dell Diagnostics and
troubleshooting any problems that may occur.
Replacing the System Battery
A 3.0-volt (V) CR2032 coin-cell battery installed on the system board maintains system configuration, date,
and time information in a special section of memory.
The operating life of the battery can extend up to ten years. The battery may need replacing if an incorrect
time or date is displayed during the boot routine along with a message such as:
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Time-of-day not set - please run SETUP program
or
Invalid configuration information - please run SETUP program
or
Strike the F1 key to continue, F2 to run the setup utility
To determine whether the battery needs replacing, reenter the time and date through the System Setup
program (not through the MS-DOS® time and date commands) and exit the program properly to save the
information (see "Using the System Setup Program" for instructions). Turn off your system and disconnect it
from AC power for a few hours; then reconnect and turn on your system. Enter the System Setup program. If
the date and time are not correct in the System Setup program, replace your battery.
You can operate your system without a battery; however, without a battery, the system configuration
information is erased if the system is turned off or unplugged from AC power. In this case, you must enter the
System Setup program and reset the configuration options.
CAUTION: There is a danger of the new battery exploding if it is incorrectly installed. Replace
the battery only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Discard
used batteries according to the manufacturer's instructions.
CAUTION: Before you remove the computer cover, see "Safety First — For You and Your
Computer."
Use the following procedure to replace the system battery with another CR2032 coin-cell battery:
1. If you have not already done so, make a copy of your system configuration information in the System
Setup program.
If the settings are lost while you are replacing the battery, refer to your written or printed copy of the
system configuration information to restore the correct settings. See "Using the System Setup
Program" for instructions.
2. Remove the computer cover according to the instructions in "Removing the Computer Cover."
3. To access the battery on the system board, remove the expansion-card cage as described in
"Removing the Expansion-Card Cage."
NOTICE: If you pry the battery out of its socket with a blunt object, be careful not to touch the
system board with the object. Make certain that the object is inserted between the battery and
the socket before attempting to pry out the battery. Otherwise, you may damage the system
board by prying off the socket or by breaking circuit traces on the system board.
4. Locate the battery and remove it.
The battery (see Figure 1) is mounted in a socket labeled "BATTERY," in the front-right corner of the
system board (as you face the front of the system).
Pry the battery out of its socket with your fingers or with a blunt, nonconductive object, such as a plastic
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screwdriver.
5. Install the new battery.
Orient the battery with the side labeled "+" facing up (see Figure 11). Then insert the battery into the
socket, and snap it into place.
Figure 11. System Battery and Battery Socket
6. Replace the expansion-card cage as described in "Replacing the Expansion-Card Cage."
7. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their electrical outlets
and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
8. Enter the System Setup program and confirm that the battery is operating properly.
9. Enter the correct time and date through the System Setup program's Time and Date categories. Also,
use the copy you made in step 1 to restore the correct settings for other system configuration
information. Then exit the System Setup program.
10. Turn off your computer, and unplug it for at least 10 minutes.
11. After 10 minutes, plug in the computer, turn it on, and enter the System Setup program. If the time and
date are still incorrect, see the chapter titled "Getting Help" in your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
Guide for instructions on obtaining technical assistance.
Back to Contents Page
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Installing Drives: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Back to Contents Page
Installing Drives: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC
Systems
Overview
Installing a Drive in the 5.25-Inch Drive Bay
Removing and Replacing Front-Panel Inserts
Installing an EIDE Hard-Disk Drive
Connecting Drives
Installing SCSI Devices
Overview
Your Dell computer has three drive bays for installing the following types of drives (see Figure 1)
The externally accessible drive bays at the front of the computer consist of one 3.5-inch drive bay
(dedicated to a 3.5-inch diskette drive) and one 5.25-inch bay that can hold one half-height, 5.25-inch
device—typically a tape drive or CD-ROM drive. Alternately, a 3.5-inch device can be installed in the
5.25-inch bay using adapters available from Dell.
The hard-disk drive bay (located to the left of the externally accessible drive bays) can hold a 3.5-inch
enhanced integrated drive electronics (EIDE) or small computer system interface (SCSI) hard-disk
drive.
The next two subsections contain information that you will need in several of the installation procedures
described later in this section. The remaining subsections cover each type of drive installation.
NOTE: In all of the following procedures, left and right refer to your left and right as you face the
front of the computer.
Figure 1. Drive Locations
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Removing and Replacing Front-Panel Inserts
Empty drive bays contain a front-panel insert to protect the inside of the computer from dust particles and
ensure proper airflow within the computer. Before you install a drive in an empty drive bay, you must first
remove the front-panel insert.
To remove the insert covering a 5.25-inch bay, follow these steps:
CAUTION: Before you remove the computer cover, see "Safety First — For You and Your
Computer."
1. Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect all the AC power cables from
their power sources.
2. Remove the computer cover as instructed in "Removing the Computer Cover."
3. Lay the computer cover upside down on a flat work surface, with the front of the cover facing toward
you.
4. With your thumbs, press in each end of the insert until it snaps free of the cover (see Figure 2).
Figure 2. Removing the Front-Panel Insert for a 5.25-Inch Bay
To replace a front-panel insert for a 5.25-inch bay, work from inside the cover. Position the insert behind the
bay opening, insert the two ring-tabs (one on each end of the insert) over the posts on the inside of the
opening, and firmly press both ends of the insert into place (see Figure 2).
To remove the insert covering the 3.5-inch bay, follow these steps:
1. Complete steps 1 and 2 of the procedure for removing a 5.25-inch insert.
2. Inside the cover, locate the eject button mechanism for the 3.5-inch bay (see Figure 3). Press the
mechanism toward the front panel to snap the plastic insert out of its opening.
Figure 3. Removing the Front-Panel Insert for the 3.5-Inch Bay
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To replace the front-panel insert for the 3.5-inch bay, work from outside the cover. Place the insert in
position, and press it into the opening.
Connecting Drives
When installing a drive, you connect two cables—a DC power cable and an interface cable—to the back of
the drive. Your drive's power input connector (to which you connect the DC power cable) resembles the
connector shown in Figure 4.
Figure 4. DC Power Cable Connector
The drive's interface connector is a card-edge connector or a header connector, as shown in Figure 5.
Figure 5. Drive Interface Connectors
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When attaching the interface cable to a drive, be sure to match the colored strip on the cable to pin 1 of the
drive's interface connector. For the location of pin 1 on the drive's interface connector, see the documentation
that came with the drive.
When disconnecting an interface cable from the system board, be sure to press in on the locking tabs on the
cable connector before disconnecting the cable. When attaching an interface cable to the system board, be
sure that the locking tabs snap into place, ensuring that the cable is firmly attached to the connector on the
system board.
NOTICE: When connecting an interface cable, do not reverse the interface cable (do not place the
colored strip away from pin 1 of the connector). Reversing the cable prevents the drive from
operating and could damage the controller, the drive, or both.
Most interface connectors are keyed for correct insertion; that is, a notch or a missing pin on one connector
matches a tab or a filled-in hole on the other connector (see Figure 5). Keying ensures that the pin-1 wire in
the cable (indicated by the colored strip along one edge of the cable) goes to the pin-1 end of the connector.
The pin-1 end of a card-edge connector is usually identified by a notch cut about a quarter of an inch from
the end of the connector, as shown in Figure 5. A header connector is usually keyed by the omission of one
of its pins (see Figure 5), with the corresponding hole filled in on the connector cable.
The pin-1 end of a connector on a board or a card is usually indicated by a silk-screened "1" printed directly
on the board or card.
Installing a Drive in the 5.25-Inch Drive Bay
The 5.25-inch drive bays can accommodate any of the following types of drives:
A diskette drive or tape drive that uses the diskette/tape drive interface on the system board
A CD-ROM or tape drive that uses an EIDE interface on the system board
A CD-ROM or tape drive that uses its own controller card
NOTE: For information on configuring, connecting, and installing SCSI drives, see "Installing SCSI
Devices."
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
To install a drive in a 5.25-inch drive bay, follow these steps.
NOTICE: When you unpack the drive, do not set it on a hard surface, which may damage the drive.
Instead, set the drive on a surface, such as a foam pad, that will sufficiently cushion it.
1. Unpack the drive and prepare it for installation.
Check the documentation that accompanied the drive to verify that the drive is configured for your
computer system. Change any settings necessary for your configuration.
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NOTE: If you are installing a non-EIDE tape drive, check the documentation for the drive to
determine the jumper or switch settings used to designate the drive as drive address DS4 (not
DS2 or DS3 as may be indicated in the drive documentation). Unless the drive is already set to
drive 4, reconfigure its jumper or switch setting (see "Jumpers.")
If you are installing an EIDE CD-ROM or EIDE tape drive, configure the drive for the Cable Select
setting.
2. Remove the computer cover as instructed in "Removing the Computer Cover."
3. Remove the 3.5-inch diskette drive/bracket assembly.
Press outward on the two tabs on the left side of the drive bay to disengage the bracket from the
chassis (see Figure 6). Then rotate the bracket upward, and remove it from the chassis.
Figure 6. Removing the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive/Bracket Assembly
4. Lift the 5.25-inch drive bracket straight up and out of the chassis (see Figure 7).
If a drive is already installed in the bay and you are replacing it, be sure to disconnect the DC power
cable and interface cable from the back of the drive before removing the drive/bracket assembly. To
remove the old drive from the bracket, turn the drive/bracket assembly upside down and unscrew the
four screws that secure the drive to the bracket (see Figure 7).
Figure 7. Removing the 5.25-Inch Diskette Drive/Bracket
5. Attach the bracket to the new drive.
Turn the drive upside down, and locate the four screw holes around its perimeter. Fit the bracket over
the drive so that the notched end aligns with the front of the drive.
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Use the score marks on the drive bracket to help align the screw holes on the drive with the screw
holes on the bracket (see Figure 8).
Figure 8. Installing the 5.25-Inch Diskette Drive Bracket
To further ensure proper positioning of the drive in the chassis, insert and tighten all four screws in the
order in which the holes are numbered (the holes are marked "1" through "4").
6. Reinstall the 5.25-inch drive/bracket assembly in the chassis.
Align the notches on the front of the drive bracket (see Figure 8) with the front of the computer. Hold
the bracket level, and lower the assembly straight down into place (see Figure 9).
Figure 9. Inserting the Drive into the Drive Bay
7. If you are installing a drive that has its own controller card, install the controller card in an expansion
slot.
See "Installing an Expansion Card."
8. Connect a DC power cable to the power input connector on the back of the drive (see Figure 10).
NOTICE: You must match the colored strip on the cable with pin 1 on the drive's interface
connector to avoid possible damage to your system.
9. Connect the appropriate interface cable to the interface connector on the back of the drive (see Figure
10).
If your system came with an EIDE CD-ROM or tape drive, use the spare connector on the existing
interface cable. Otherwise, use the EIDE interface cable provided in the drive kit.
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Figure 10. Attaching Cables to a Drive in the 5.25-Inch Drive Bay
10. For an EIDE tape drive or CD-ROM drive, connect the other end of the interface cable to the interface
connector labeled "IDE2" on the system board.
For a diskette drive or non-EIDE tape drive, connect the cable from the drive to the interface connector
labeled "DSKT" on the system board.
For a drive that comes with its own controller card, connect the other end of the interface cable to the
controller card.
Check all cable connections. Fold cables out of the way to provide airflow for the fan and cooling vents.
11. If the 5.25-inch drive bay was previously empty, remove the front-panel insert from the computer
cover.
See "Removing and Replacing Front-Panel Inserts."
12. Replace the computer cover.
If the bezel on your drive is not flush with the bezel on your computer, remove the drive and adjust the
position of the drive on the bracket, making sure to insert and tighten the screws in the order marked.
Replace the drive in the drive bay, and then replace the computer cover.
13. Reconnect your computer and peripherals to an electrical outlet and turn them on.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
14. Enter the System Setup program and update your system configuration information.
For a diskette drive, update the appropriate Diskette Drive option (A or B) on Page 1 of the System
Setup screens to reflect the size and capacity of your new diskette drive.
If you installed a non-EIDE tape drive as the second drive, set the Diskette Drive B option to Not
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Installed.
For EIDE CD-ROM and tape drives, set the appropriate Drive option (0 or 1) under Drives: Secondary
to Auto.
15. Run the Dell Diagnostics to verify that your system works correctly.
See your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for information on running the Dell Diagnostics and
troubleshooting any problems that may occur. Use the following guidelines to determine which test to
use:
If you installed a diskette drive, test it by running all of the subtests in the Diskette Drive(s) Test
Group of the Dell Diagnostics.
If you installed a CD-ROM drive, see the documentation that came with the drive for instructions
on loading device drivers and using the drive. If it is an EIDE CD-ROM drive, test it by running all
of the subtests in the IDE CD-ROM Drives Test Group of the Dell Diagnostics.
If you installed a tape drive, first verify that your diskette drive is still operating correctly by running
all of the subtests in the Diskette Drive(s) Test Group of the Dell Diagnostics. Then perform a
tape backup and verification test with the drive as instructed in the tape-drive software
documentation that came with the tape drive.
NOTE: The tape drives sold by Dell come with their own operating software and documentation.
After you install a tape drive, refer to the documentation that came with the drive for instructions
on installing and using the tape drive software.
Installing an EIDE Hard-Disk Drive
This section includes information on installing, partitioning, and formatting EIDE hard-disk drives. An EIDE
drive (which must be 1-inch high or less) can be installed in the hard-disk drive bracket in the left front corner
of the chassis. For instructions on installing, partitioning, and formatting SCSI hard-disk drives, see "Installing
SCSI Devices."
EIDE Drive Addressing
All EIDE devices should be configured for the Cable Select jumper position, which assigns master and slave
status to devices by their position on the interface cable. When two EIDE devices are connected to a single
EIDE cable and are configured for the Cable Select jumper position, the device attached to the last
connector on the interface cable is the master, or boot, device (drive 0) and the device attached to the
middle connector on the interface cable is the slave device (drive 1). Refer to the drive documentation in
your upgrade kit for information on setting devices to the Cable Select jumper position.
NOTE: If you want to install a second EIDE drive that is a different type from the first drive but you do
not have the specifications for the first drive, do one of the following:
If you purchased the drive from Dell, you can contact Dell for the necessary reconfiguration
information. (See the chapter titled "Getting Help" in the Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide
for instructions on obtaining technical assistance.)
If you did not purchase the drive from Dell, call the drive manufacturer.
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With the two EIDE interface connectors on the system board, your system can support up to four EIDE
devices. EIDE hard-disk drives should be connected to the EIDE interface connector labeled "IDE1." (EIDE
tape drives and CD-ROM drives should be connected to the EIDE interface connector labeled "IDE2.")
Installing an EIDE Hard-Disk Drive in the Hard-Disk Drive Bracket
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
Install an EIDE hard-disk drive in the hard-disk drive bracket as follows:
1. If you are replacing a hard-disk drive that contains data you want to keep, be sure to make a backup of
your files before you begin this procedure.
NOTICE: When you unpack the drive, do not set it on a hard surface, which may damage the
drive. Instead, set the drive on a surface, such as a foam pad, that will sufficiently cushion it.
2. Unpack the drive and prepare it for installation.
Check the documentation that accompanied the drive to verify that the drive is configured for your
computer system. Change any settings necessary for your configuration.
NOTE: If you are installing a non-EIDE tape drive, check the documentation for the drive to
determine the jumper or switch settings used to designate the drive as drive address DS4 (not
DS2 or DS3 as may be indicated in the drive documentation). Unless the drive is already set to
drive 4, reconfigure its jumper or switch setting (see "Jumpers.")
If you are installing an EIDE CD-ROM or EIDE tape drive, configure the drive for the Cable Select
setting.
3. Remove the computer cover as instructed in "Removing the Computer Cover."
4. Remove the expansion-card cage as instructed in "Removing and Replacing the Expansion-Card
Cage."
5. Remove the hard-disk drive bracket from the chassis.
If a hard-disk drive is already installed on the drive bracket and you are replacing it, disconnect the DC
power cable and EIDE cable from the drive. Loosen the captive screw that secures the hard-disk drive
bracket to the chassis. Then rotate the bracket upward, and lift it out of the chassis (see Figure 11).
Detach the hard-disk drive from the bracket by removing the four screws.
Figure 11. Removing the Hard-Disk Drive Bracket
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6. Secure the drive bracket to the new drive.
Turn the drive upside down, and locate the four screw holes around its perimeter.
Orient the drive bracket so that the end labeled "CONNECTOR" faces the side of the drive containing
the interface and power connectors. Place the bracket on the drive, and secure it with four screws (see
Figure 12).
Figure 12. Securing the Hard-Disk Drive to the Bracket
7. Reinstall the hard-disk drive/bracket assembly in the chassis.
Grasp the bracket by the tab containing the captive screw, and hold the bracket at a 45-degree angle
to the chassis floor. Align the two tabs on the other side of the bracket with the score marks on the
chassis floor. Insert the two tabs into the slots in the chassis floor divider, and rotate the assembly
downward. Then tighten the captive screw until the bracket is securely fastened to the chassis floor
(see Figure 11).
NOTICE: You must match the colored strip on the EIDE cable with pin 1 on the drive's interface
connector to avoid possible damage to your system.
8. Connect one end of the EIDE cable to the 40-pin interface connector on the back of the hard-disk drive
(see Figure 13).
The cable is keyed so that the colored edge of the EIDE cable lines up with the pin-1 end of the
interface connector.
Figure 13. Attaching Hard-Disk Drive Cables
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9. If it is not already connected, connect the other end of the EIDE cable to the IDE1 connector on the
system board.
NOTICE: You must match the colored strip on the EIDE cable with pin 1 on the system
board connector to avoid possible damage to your system.
To locate the system board IDE connector, see "System Board Features."
10. Connect a DC power cable to the power input connector on the back of the drive (see Figure 13).
Check all connectors to be certain that they are properly cabled and firmly seated.
11. Replace the expansion-card cage as instructed in "Replacing the Expansion-Card Cage."
12. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their power sources.
13. Turn on the peripherals connected to the computer.
14. Start the computer system.
NOTE: If the drive you just installed is the primary drive and no operating system is installed, you
must start the computer using a bootable diskette or CD.
To boot the system from a diskette, insert a bootable diskette (such as an operating system
installation or recovery diskette) into diskette drive A, and turn on the computer.
To boot the system from a CD, enter the System Setup program and set the Boot Sequence to
CD-ROM First. Insert a bootable CD (such as an operating system installation CD or the Dell
ResourceCD) into CD-ROM drive, and turn on the computer.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
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15. Enter the System Setup program and update the Drives: Primary and Secondary options.
After you update the System Setup options, reboot the system.
16. Partition and logically format your drive, as described in "Partitioning and Logically Formatting Your
EIDE Hard-Disk Drive," before proceeding to the next step.
17. Run the Hard-Disk Drive(s) Test Group in the Dell Diagnostics to verify that the new hard-disk drive is
operating properly.
See your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for information on running the Dell Diagnostics and
troubleshooting any problems that may occur.
18. If the drive you just installed is the primary drive, install the operating system on the hard-disk drive.
Refer to the documentation that came with the operating system.
Partitioning and Logically Formatting Your EIDE Hard-Disk Drive
EIDE hard-disk drives must be physically formatted, partitioned, and logically formatted before they can be
used to store data. Every hard-disk drive from Dell is physically formatted before it is sent to you.
NOTE: On systems with hard-disk drives larger than 2 gigabytes (GB), create a primary partition of 2
GB and divide the remaining capacity into partitions of 2 GB or less. For example, a system with a
2.5-GB hard-disk drive would have a primary partition of 2 GB (drive C) and a second partition of 500
megabytes (MB) (drive D).
Hard-disk drives must be partitioned this way because MS-DOS®-based operating systems (including
Microsoft® Windows NT® when you use a file allocation table [FAT] 16 file system) do not support
drive partitions larger than 2 GB.
To partition and logically format your hard-disk drive, use the program(s) offered by your operating system.
For MS-DOS, use the fdisk and format commands to perform these procedures. The fdisk and format
commands are described in the MS-DOS reference documentation.
NOTICE: If you format your hard-disk drive under the OS/2 High Performance File System (HPFS),
you cannot reformat the drive for MS-DOS without losing all HPFS data. See your OS/2
documentation for details.
For OS/2®, see the discussion on partitioning and logical formatting in the documentation that came with the
operating system.
NOTICE: If you format your hard-disk drive under the Windows NT File System (NTFS), you cannot
reformat the drive for MS-DOS without losing all NTFS data. See your Windows NT documentation
for details.
For Windows NT, see the discussion on partitioning and logical formatting in the documentation that came
with the operating system.
For the UNIX® operating system, refer to your UNIX documentation.
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Installing SCSI Devices
To use SCSI devices in your Dell computer, you must have a SCSI host adapter card, which comes with its
own SCSI cable. This cable can be used to attach a variety of SCSI devices (hard-disk drives, tape drives,
and so on). The SCSI host adapter configures the devices attached to it as one subsystem—not as
independent devices.
Although SCSI devices are installed essentially the same way as other devices, their configuration
requirements are different.
SCSI Configuration Guidelines
For details on configuring your SCSI subsystem, refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI
devices and/or your host adapter card. The following subsections offer some general guidelines.
SCSI ID Numbers
Each device attached to a SCSI host adapter card, as well as the card itself, must have a unique SCSI ID
number from 0 to 7. When SCSI devices are shipped from Dell, the default SCSI ID numbers are assigned
as follows:
A SCSI host adapter card is configured as SCSI ID 7 (typically the default ID for a host adapter card).
A SCSI tape drive or digital audio tape (DAT) drive is configured as SCSI ID 6 (typically the default ID
number for a tape drive).
A SCSI CD-ROM drive is configured as SCSI ID 5.
SCSI hard-disk drives are usually configured as SCSI ID 0. (The drive used to boot your system should
always be configured as SCSI ID 0.)
NOTE: There is no requirement that SCSI ID numbers be assigned sequentially or that devices be
attached to the cable in order by ID number.
SCSI Cable and SCSI Termination
The type of cabling you receive with your SCSI device depends on the type of device you are installing.
If you are installing internal SCSI devices (such as CD-ROM, hard-disk, or tape drives), you have
internal SCSI cables as shown in Figure 14. Narrow SCSI devices use a 50-pin cable; wide SCSI
devices use a 68-pin SCSI cable. One end of each cable attaches to the SCSI host adapter. The
connectors on the other end of the cable attach to the internal SCSI devices.
If you are installing an external SCSI device, you have a shielded external cable that connects to the
external SCSI connector on the SCSI host adapter card. You have a separate power cable to connect
the SCSI device to an AC power source.
Before installing SCSI devices in your computer, you may need to configure the termination on your SCSI
device(s). Both types of internal SCSI cables contain terminators on the device end of the cables, so the
devices connected to these cables must have termination disabled (see Figure 14). External SCSI cables do
not have terminators, so termination must be enabled on the SCSI device itself.
Figure 14. Internal SCSI Cables
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NOTICE: Do not connect devices to all three connectors (internal narrow connector, internal wide
connector, and external connector) on a single SCSI host adapter card. Such a configuration is a
violation of the SCSI specification. You can safely connect devices to any two of these three
connectors on a single SCSI host adapter card.
If you are installing only internal SCSI devices, verify that termination is enabled on the SCSI host adapter
and disabled for all other internal SCSI devices. If you are installing both internal and external SCSI devices,
verify that termination is enabled on the external SCSI device and disabled for the SCSI host adapter and all
internal SCSI devices.
General Procedure for Installing SCSI Devices
CAUTION: To avoid the possibility of electric shock, turn off the computer and any peripherals,
disconnect them from their electrical outlets, and then wait at least 5 seconds before you
remove the computer cover. Also, before you install an expansion card, see "Safety First —
For You and Your Computer."
Configure and install one or more SCSI devices in your computer as follows:
1. Determine which connector on the internal SCSI cable you will attach to each SCSI device.
See "SCSI Configuration Guidelines."
NOTICE: When you unpack the drive, do not set it on a hard surface, which may damage the
drive. Instead, set the drive on a surface, such as a foam pad, that will sufficiently cushion it.
2. Unpack each SCSI device and prepare it for installation.
Configure the device for a SCSI ID number and, if necessary, enable or disable termination. For
instructions, see the documentation that came with the SCSI device and "SCSI Configuration
Guidelines."
3. Remove the computer cover as instructed in "Removing the Computer Cover."
4. If you are installing a SCSI host adapter card, configure the adapter card.
For instructions on configuring the card, see the documentation that came with the adapter card and
"SCSI Configuration Guidelines."
5. Install the SCSI devices as appropriate.
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To install an internal SCSI hard-disk drive, complete steps 3 through 7 of " Installing an
EIDE Hard-Disk Drive in the Hard-Disk Drive Bracket." Then continue with step 5 of this
procedure.
To install a SCSI tape drive, CD-ROM drive, or DAT drive, complete steps 2 through 6 of
"Installing a Drive in a 5.25-Inch Drive Bay." Then continue with step 5 of this procedure.
To install an external SCSI tape drive, continue with step 5 of this procedure.
6. If you are installing a new SCSI host adapter card, install it in an expansion slot now.
See "Installing an Expansion Card."
If a SCSI host adapter card is already installed, remove, reconfigure, and reinstall the card at this time.
See the documentation that came with the SCSI host adapter card, "Removing an Expansion Card,"
and "Installing an Expansion Card."
Connect the hard-disk drive access cable to the SCSI host adapter card and to the HDLED connector
on the riser board (see "Riser-Board Expansion-Card Connectors"). This cable carries a signal from
the SCSI host adapter card to the hard-disk drive access indicator on the computer's front panel
whenever one of the SCSI hard-disk drives is accessed.
7. Attach a SCSI cable to each SCSI device.
For additional instructions on connecting SCSI devices, see "SCSI Cable and SCSI Termination."
NOTICE: You must match the colored strip on the cable with pin 1 on the drive's interface
connector to avoid possible damage to your system.
If you are installing an internal SCSI device, firmly press the SCSI cable's header connector onto the
50- or 68-pin connector on the back of the device.
The connectors on narrow SCSI cables are keyed for proper positioning - a raised area on the outside
of the header connector fits into a notch on the device connector. The connectors on wide SCSI cables
are shaped so that they can be attached one way only.
If you are installing an external SCSI device, connect one end of the external SCSI cable to the SCSI
bus connector on the back of the device.
8. Attach the SCSI cable to the connector on the SCSI host adapter card.
NOTICE: You must match the colored strip on the internal SCSI cable with pin 1 on the adapter
card connector to avoid possible damage to your system.
If you are installing an internal SCSI device, connect the colored edge on the internal SCSI cable
to the pin-1 end of the 50-pin connector (for a narrow SCSI device) or the 68-pin connector (for a
wide SCSI device) on the adapter card, and then press the cable connector firmly onto the
adapter card connector.
If you are installing an external SCSI device, connect the other end of the external SCSI cable to
the external connector on the adapter card.
For additional instructions, see the documentation that came with the adapter card.
9. Connect the SCSI device(s) to power.
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If you are installing an internal SCSI device, connect a DC power cable to the power input
connector on the SCSI device.
If you are installing an external SCSI device, connect the socket end of the power cable into the
AC power receptacle on the back of the SCSI device. Connect the other end of the power cable
into a standard electrical wall outlet.
Check all other cable connections. Fold all internal cables out of the way to provide airflow for the fan
or cooling vents.
10. If you installed an externally accessible device, remove a front-panel insert for the drive bay.
See "Removing and Replacing Front-Panel Inserts" for instructions.
11. Replace the computer cover, and reconnect your computer and peripherals to their power sources.
12. Turn on the peripherals connected to the computer.
13. Start the computer system.
NOTE: If the device you just installed is the primary hard-disk drive and no operating system is
installed, you must start the computer using a bootable diskette or CD.
To boot the system from a diskette, insert a bootable diskette (such as an operating system
installation or recovery diskette) into diskette drive A, and turn on the computer.
To boot the system from a CD, enter the System Setup program and set the Boot Sequence to
CD-ROM First. Insert a bootable CD (such as an operating system installation CD or the Dell
ResourceCD) into CD-ROM drive, and turn on the computer.
NOTE: If Enabled, the Chassis Intrusion option will cause the following message to be displayed
at the next system start-up:
ALERT! Cover was previously removed.
14. If necessary, enter the System Setup program and update the system configuration information.
If you installed a SCSI hard-disk drive, set the Drive Type option for the appropriate drive under Drives:
Primary and Secondary to None.
NOTE: Tape drives attached to a SCSI host adapter card are not part of the system
configuration information.
After you update the System Setup options, reboot the system.
15. If you installed a SCSI hard-disk drive, partition and format the drive, as described in "Partitioning and
Formatting SCSI Hard-Disk Drives," before proceeding to the next step.
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16. Run the SCSI Device(s) test group of the Dell Diagnostics to verify that the new SCSI device is
operating properly.
See your Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for information on running the Dell Diagnostics and
troubleshooting any problems that may occur.
To test a SCSI tape drive, refer to the documentation for the tape drive software to perform a tape drive
backup and verification test.
17. If the device you just installed is the primary hard-disk drive, install the operating system on the harddisk drive.
Refer to the documentation that came with the operating system.
Partitioning and Formatting SCSI Hard-Disk Drives
You may need to use different programs than those provided with the operating system to partition and
format SCSI hard-disk drives. Refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI software drivers for
information on installing the appropriate drivers and preparing your SCSI hard-disk drive for use.
NOTE: On systems with hard-disk drives larger than 2 GB, create a primary partition of 2 GB and
divide the remaining capacity into partitions of 2 GB or less. For example, a system with a 2.5-GB
hard-disk drive would have a primary partition of 2 GB (drive C) and a second partition of 500 MB
(drive D). Hard-disk drives must be partitioned this way because MS-DOS-based operating systems
(including Windows NT when using a FAT16 file system) do not support drive partitions larger than 2
GB.
Back to Contents Page
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Technical Specifications: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Back to Contents Page
Technical Specifications: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 Low-Profile
Managed PC Systems
Microprocessor
Video
System Information
Key Combinations
Expansion Bus
Controls and Indicators
Memory
Power
Drives
Physical
Ports
Environmental
Microprocessor
Microprocessor type
Intel® Pentium® II or Pentium III microprocessor
Internal cache
32 KB (16-KB data cache, 16-KB instruction cache)
L2 cache memory
512-KB pipeline burst, 4-way set-associative, write-back SRAM
Math coprocessor
internal to Pentium II or Pentium III microprocessor
System Information
System chip set
Intel 82440BX PCI/AGP
Data bus width
64 bits
Address bus width
32 bits
DMA channels
eight
Interrupt levels
15
System BIOS
2-Mb flash chip
System clock
66 or 100 MHz (matches external processor speed)
Expansion Bus
Bus types
PCI and ISA
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Bus speed
PCI: 33 MHz
ISA: 8.33 MHz
PCI expansion-card connectors
two (one PCI connector shares an expansion-card slot with an ISA
connector)
ISA expansion-card connectors
two (one ISA connector shares an expansion-card slot with a PCI
connector)
ISA expansion-card connector
size
98 pins
ISA expansion-card connector
data width (maximum)
16 bits
PCI expansion-card connector
size
120 pins
PCI expansion-card connector
data width (maximum)
32 bits
Memory
Architecture
64-bit (non-ECC) or 72-bit (ECC), noninterleaved, "PC100" 100 MHz
DIMM sockets
three
DIMM capacities
32-, 64-, 128-, and 256-MB SDRAM
Standard RAM
32 MB minimum
Maximum RAM
768 MB
BIOS address
F0000h
Drives
Externally accessible bays
one 5.25-inch bay for diskette, tape, or CD-ROM drive; one 3.5-inch
bay for a diskette drive
Internally accessible bays
one 3.5-inch bay for a 1-inch-high hard-disk drive
Ports
Externally accessible:
Serial (DTE)
two 9-pin connectors; 16550-compatible
Parallel
one 25-hole connector (bidirectional)
Video
one 15-hole connector
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Technical Specifications: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Optional integrated
NIC
RJ45 connector
PS/2-style keyboard
6-pin mini-DIN
PS/2-compatible
mouse
6-pin mini-DIN
USB
two USB-compliant connectors
Audio line-in
miniature audio jack
Audio line-out
(amplified source)
miniature audio jack
Microphone
miniature audio jack
Internally accessible:
Primary EIDE harddisk drive
40-pin connector on PCI local bus
Secondary EIDE
hard-disk drive
40-pin connector on PCI local bus
Diskette drive
34-pin connector
Video
Video type
ATI 3D Rage Pro AGP 2X controller
Video memory
4 MB standard (upgradable to 8 MB)
Maximum resolution
1600 x 1200 pixels, 256 colors
Key Combinations
<Ctrl><Alt><Del>
restarts (reboots) the system
<Ctrl><Alt><Enter>
starts System Setup program (during POST only)
<Ctrl><Alt><\>
toggles microprocessor speeds on 101-key keyboard (in MS-DOS® real
mode only)
<Ctrl><Alt><#>
toggles microprocessor speeds on 102-key keyboard (in MS-DOS real
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Technical Specifications: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
mode only)
<Ctrl><Enter>
disables the system password at start-up
Controls and Indicators
Reset control
push button
Power control
push button
Power indicators
green LEDs (one on front panel, one on riser board); blinking green in
sleep state
Hard-disk drive access indicator
green LED
Link integrity indicator
(on optional integrated NIC
connector)
green LED
Activity indicator
(on optional integrated NIC
connector)
yellow LED
Power
DC power supply:
Wattage
145 W
Heat dissipation
913 BTUs (fully loaded system without monitor)
Voltage
90 to 135 V at 60 Hz; 180 to 265 V at 50 Hz
Backup battery
3-V CR2032 coin cell
Physical
Height
10.9 cm (4.3 inches)
Width
40.89 cm (16.1 inches)
Depth
43.69 cm (17.2 inches)
Weight
10.89 kg (24 lb) or more, depending on options installed
Environmental
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Technical Specifications: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Temperature:
Operating
10° to 35°C (50° to 95°F)
Storage
–40° to 65°C (–40° to 149°F)
Relative humidity
8% to 80% (noncondensing)
Maximum vibration:
Operating
0.25 G at 3 to 200 Hz at 1 octave/min
Storage
0.5 G at 3 to 200 Hz at 1 octave/min
Maximum shock:
Operating
left side (vertical orientation) and bottom half-sine pulse with a change
in velocity of 20 inches/sec (50.8 cm/sec)
Storage
27-G faired square wave with a velocity change of 200 inches/sec (508
cm/sec)
Altitude:
Operating
–16 to 3048 m (–50 to 10,000 ft)
Storage
–16 to 10,600 m (–50 to 35,000 ft)
NOTE: For the full name of an abbreviation or acronym used in this table, see the Glossary in the online
System User's Guide.
Back to Contents Page
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ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Back to Contents Page
ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX1 LowProfile Managed PC Systems
Overview
Configuration Manager Messages
ICU Error Messages
Overview
The ISA Configuration Utility (ICU) and its Configuration Manager are capable of identifying problems and
alerting you to them. Both utilities can alert you to problems with card configuration and problems that
prevent proper operation of the utility. This appendix describes each type of message and lists the possible
causes and actions you can take to resolve problems indicated by a message. See the following tables to
locate your message and identify possible corrective actions.
ICU Error Messages
The ICU displays a variety of error messages while in operation. These messages alert you to problems that
prevent the ICU from running correctly and inform you of resource conflicts that prevent the configuration of
various cards in your computer. If you receive a message from the ICU, see the following table for
suggestions on resolving problems indicated by the message.
Message
Probable Cause
Out of memory
Disable any TSR programs or any
Either of these
messages can appear if unneeded device drivers.
the system runs out of
memory during
operation of the utility.
Memory allocation failed
Not enough memory to run
the ICU
This message appears
when you start the ICU
if the system does not
have enough memory
to run the utility.
Corrective Action
Disable any TSR programs or any
unneeded device drivers.
Can't open index file. This The ICU cannot find the Make sure to switch to drive A before
attempting to start the utility.
file is required for ICU to index file for its
database.
run.
No Configuration Manager.
The device driver
needed by the ICU is
corrupted or is not
correctly configured.
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Verify that the following device statement
appears in your config.sys file:
device=drive:\directory\
ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
drivers\dos\dwcfgmg.sys
In this statement, drive and directory
represent the drive and directory where
the driver resides. The default is
c:\plugplay.
At least one Plug and Play
card in your system is not
configured due to
conflicts. These are marked
"config err" in the list of
configured cards.
You must reconfigure the conflicting
The Configuration
card(s). To find the conflicting card,
Manager or the ICU
perform the following steps:
cannot configure at
least one Plug and Play
1. Select the Plug and Play expansion
expansion card
card marked with config err,
because of resource
and
then click the Modify button.
conflicts with one or
more cards.
Due to conflicts, the ICU
The Card Configuration dialog box
displays the functions assigned to
could only configure some
the Plug and Play expansion card. Plug and Play cards in your
system. Unconfigured cards
2. Select a function and then click
are marked "config err" in
Settings. Click Cancel if the ICU
the list of configured
does not display a message naming
cards.
the conflicting card.
3. Repeat step 2 until the ICU displays
a message box naming the
conflicting card and the resource(s)
in conflict. See the following table
entry for an explanation of this
message box.
This device is
unconfigurable because of a
resource conflict with card
card_name. The conflicting
resource is resource_name. To fix,
reconfigure the conflicting card.
Perform the following procedure:
The selected card is
unconfigurable because
1. Make a note of the card name and
one of its resources is
the type of conflicting resource.
already being used by
another device.
2. Follow the procedure in "Modifying
a Card" and change the value for
resource_name used by
card_name.
The ICU has successfully
configured all Plug and
Play cards in your system.
For the new configuration
to take effect, save the
configuration, then reboot
your system.
The ICU has
successfully configured
all of the Plug and Play
expansion cards that
were not configured by
the Configuration
Manager.
To accept these settings, save the
configuration information into NVRAM by
selecting Exit from the File menu and
then selecting Yes to save. You must
reboot your system for these settings to
take effect.
The loaded card is not a
The category you have
Select OK. The ICU automatically opens
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ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
category card. Press OK to
proceed.
chosen is not the
correct category under
which to add this card.
the correct category's dialog box.
Continue the procedure for adding the
card as described in "Adding a Listed
Card" or "Adding an Unlisted Card."
No more DMA values can be
added.
No more values are
available for the
resource you are trying
to add or modify.
The maximum number of values for each
resource is as follows:
No more interrupt values
can be added.
No more memory values can
be added.
4 DMA channels
7 IRQ lines
9 memory address blocks
20 I/O ports
To free values for the resource you are
trying to add or modify, delete some of
the values listed in the resource box for
the card. If your card requires all of the
values listed, contact your card
manufacturer to resolve the issue.
No more I/O port values can
be added.
The ICU detects a resource
conflict between this card
and conflicting_card. The
conflicting resource was:
resource.
You added or modified
a card that now
requires a resource
value already in use by
conflicting_card.
Try each of the following options until the
problem is resolved:
The configuration (.cfg)
This message appears
Use the following procedure:
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Modify the card you are adding so
that it uses a different value for
resource. See "Modifying a Card"
for instructions.
Modify conflicting_card so
that it uses a different value for
resource. See "Modifying a Card"
for instructions.
If conflicting_card is not the
system board, remove it from the
computer. See "Removing a Card"
for instructions.
Remove all expansion cards from
the ICU, and then add them back
one at a time, beginning with the
new card and resolving resource
conflicts as they arise. See
"Removing a Card" and "Adding a
Listed Card" or "Adding an Unlisted
Card" for instructions.
If you cannot resolve the resource
conflict by any of the preceding
methods, remove the new card. If
you were modifying an existing
card, reset the modified card to its
previous resource value.
ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
file used by the ICU for
this card is now invalid or
does not exist. Do you wish
to load the file?
when you try to add a
listed card and the
configuration file for this
card has been
corrupted or deleted
from the database.
No configuration (.cfg)
file exists for the card
This message appears
being modified. Do you want when you modify a card
to load one?
and its configuration file
does not exist or has
been deleted.
1. Insert the original ICU diskette into
the diskette drive.
You can create an ISA
Configuration Utility diskette from
the Dell ResourceCD. See
"Preparing to Use the ICU."
2. Change to the db subdirectory on
the diskette drive.
For example, type cd a:\db.
3. Use a text editor to search the
icu.ndx file for the card ID of the
card you want to add or modify.
The card ID forms part of the name
of the configuration file. For
example, if the card ID is ICU0200,
the configuration file is
!icu0200.cfg.
4. Copy the configuration file from the
original ICU diskette to the backup
diskette.
This is an EISA system. Use This message appears To use the ICU, you must load the utility
if you attempt to run the onto a non-EISA system.
an ECU, not the ICU, to
ICU on an EISA
configure your system.
system.
You have added a card using This message can
appear in two
settings different from
situations:
factory default.
Reconfigure the card to the
You added an ISA
settings in the next
expansion card,
display (see the card's
selected OK, and
manual) before installing
the ICU had to
it.
use resource
values different
from the card's
defaults to avoid
conflicts.
You added an ISA
expansion card,
selected
Advanced, and
chose resource
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Make note of the new card configuration
shown in the Card Resource Usage
dialog box displayed after this message.
Change jumper settings on the ISA
expansion card to match the new card
configuration.
ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
values different
from the card's
defaults.
NOTE: For the full name of an abbreviation or acronym used in this table, see the Glossary in the online
System User's Guide.
Configuration Manager Messages
The Configuration Manager for the ICU identifies problems following system boot and generates messages if
necessary. These messages alert you to any unsuccessful attempts to configure Plug and Play or Peripheral
Component Interconnect (PCI) expansion cards, as well as any problems that interfere with the operation of
the Configuration Manager. If you receive a message from the Configuration Manager, see the following
table for suggestions on resolving problems indicated by the message.
Message
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
Found Plug and Play ISA
card: Plug and Play ISA
Card Name.
This message
appears at system
start-up for each Plug
and Play ISA
expansion card
recognized by the
Configuration
Manager.
Status message; no action is required.
NOTICE: Boot Device Not
Active! CSN=Card Select
Number.
A boot device was
found to be inactive.
Status message; no action is required. The
Configuration Manager automatically
configures and activates the device.
One or more active devices
have been reconfigured system requires reboot.
Press any key to reboot
system.
You modified the
resource values of
one or more PCI or
Plug and Play ISA
expansion cards.
Reboot the system to reconfigure the
card(s).
The Plug and Play ISA card
has been successfully
configured.
The Configuration
Manager has
successfully
configured the given
number of cards.
If this message does not match the number
of Plug and Play ISA expansion cards
installed in your computer, reinstall any
Plug and Play expansion cards not listed
and reboot the system.
There is not enough
memory available to
the Configuration
Disable any TSR programs or any
unneeded device drivers.
Card Count Plug and Play
ISA cards have been
successfully configured.
ERROR: Insufficient CM
Memory
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ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Manager for it to run.
ERROR: Fatal BIOS error
Internal Error Code.
A BIOS call failed with See "Getting Help" in your Diagnostics and
an internal error. The Troubleshooting Guide for instructions on
most likely cause is an obtaining technical assistance.
incompatibility
between the BIOS
and the Configuration
Manager.
ERROR: Could not read NVS,
Error=Internal Error Code.
An attempt to read the See "Getting Help" in your Diagnostics and
NVRAM failed.
Troubleshooting Guide for instructions.
ERROR: Failed NVS write.
Error=Internal Error Code.
An attempt to write to
NVRAM failed.
Run the Dell Diagnostics to verify the
integrity of your system NVRAM. See
"Running the Dell Diagnostics" in your
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for
instructions.
If you are unable to determine the cause of
the error, see "Getting Help" in your
Diagnostics and Troubleshooting Guide for
instructions.
ERROR: Failed to activate
device, CSN=Card Select
Number.
A Plug and Play
expansion card could
not be activated.
Use the following procedure:
1. Exit the ICU and turn off your system.
2. Remove the Plug and Play expansion
card that could not be activated.
Follow steps 2 through 6 of
"Removing an Expansion Card" and
then return to this procedure.
3. Reinstall the Plug and Play expansion
card.
Follow steps 5 through 10 of
"Installing an Expansion Card" and
then return to this procedure.
If you still receive the error message,
contact the manufacturer of the Plug and
Play expansion card for assistance.
WARNING: Could not
configure Plug and Play
Card Name.
The card(s)
mentioned are not
fully configured due to
resource conflicts.
WARNING: Could not
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If you have documentation that lists the
allowable resource values for your Plug
and Play or PCI expansion card, you can
use the following procedure to locate and
resolve the resource conflict.
ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
configure PCI device,
ID=DeviceID.
NOTE: If you do not have documentation
listing the allowable resource values, see
the corrective action for these messages in
the next table entry.
Failed to configure Number
of Total Count Plug and
Play ISA devices. Use your
system's configuration
utility to resolve
conflicts. Press any key to
continue.
1. Start the ICU.
Any Plug and Play or PCI expansion
cards that could not be configured
should be marked with config err
on the list of cards in the ICU window.
2. Select the System Resources option
from the View menu.
The System Resource Usage dialog
box displays all resources currently
used by the system.
3. Select one of the resources used by
your Plug and Play or PCI expansion
card, and click Used By Card.
The Card Resources Usage dialog
box identifies which device is using
the resource.
4. Repeat step 3 until you have
identified all conflicting resources and
the cards that use them.
5. Modify the cards, as needed, to free
the resources required by the
unconfigured Plug and Play or PCI
expansion card.
See "Modifying a Card" for
instructions.
WARNING: Could not
configure Plug and Play
Card Name.
The card(s)
mentioned are not
fully configured due to
resource conflicts.
WARNING: Could not
configure PCI device,
ID=DeviceID.
Failed to configure Number
of Total Count Plug and
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If you do not know the allowable resource
values for your Plug and Play or PCI
expansion card, use the following
procedure to locate and resolve the
resource conflict:
1. Remove all card configurations from
the ICU.
See "Removing a Card" for
instructions.
ISA Configuration Utility Messages: Dell OptiPlex GX1 Low-Profile Managed PC Systems
Play ISA devices. Use your
system's configuration
utility to resolve
conflicts. Press any key to
continue.
2. Reboot your system.
The ICU should automatically
configure your Plug and Play or PCI
expansion card.
3. Add the ISA expansion cards back
into the ICU, resolving any resource
conflicts as they arise.
See "Adding a Listed Card" for
instructions.
If your Plug and Play or PCI expansion
card is not automatically configured when
you reboot the system with all other cards
removed, you should contact the
manufacturer of the card or see "Getting
Help" in your Diagnostics and
Troubleshooting Guide.
One of the devices is
WARNING: Boot Device
conflict detected! CSN=Card attempting to use one
Select Number Error=Error. or more resources
assigned to the
system's boot device.
Perform the following procedure:
1. Start the ICU.
2. Identify the card marked config
err.
This card is attempting to use one or
more resources required by the
system's boot device.
3. Follow the procedure for the
preceding error message in this table.
NOTE: For the full name of an abbreviation or acronym used in this table, see the Glossary in the online
System User's Guide.
Back to Contents Page
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