Mitsubishi Electric Apricot XEN pentium User`s guide

OWNER'S HANDBOOK
XEN
Pentium
apricot
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Chapter
Microsoft, MS, and MS-DOS are registered trademarks, and Windows is a trademark, of Microsoft
Corporation.
IBM is a registered trademark, and VGA and PS/2 are trademarks, of International Business
Machines Corporation.
Intel is a registered trademark, and Pentium and OverDrive are trademarks, of Intel Corporation.
Information contained in this document is subject to change without notice and does not
represent a commitment on the part of Apricot Computers Limited. Any software described in
this manual is furnished under a license agreement. The software may be used or copied only in
accordance with the terms of this agreement. It is against the law to copy any disk supplied for any
purpose other than the purchaser’s personal use.
All rights reserved; no use or disclosure without written consent.
Copyright © Apricot Computers Limited 1994
Published by
Apricot Computers Limited
3500 Parkside
Birmingham Business Park
Birmingham B37 7YS
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Printed in the United Kingdom
Part No. 15445731
Revision 01
Safety and Regulatory Notices
Safety and Regulatory Notices
Your computer uses a safety ground and must be earthed. The
system unit AC power cord is its “disconnect device”. Ensure
that the system unit is positioned close to the AC power outlet,
and that the plug is easily accessible.
It is imperative that the computer is set to the correct voltage
range before use. If not, the machine may be irreparably damaged.
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords before moving
the system unit, cleaning the computer or removing the system
unit top cover.
The CD-ROM drive contains a laser system which is harmful to
the eyes, and is classified as a CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
according to IEC 825 Radiation Safety of Laser Products (Equipment
Classification: Requirements & User's Guide). Do not attempt to
disassemble the CD-ROM drive; if a fault occurs, call an
authorized maintainer. Use the CD-ROM drive only as described
in this manual; failure to do so may result in exposure to
hazardous radiation.
To prevent fire and electric shock, do not expose any part of
the system unit to rain or moisture.
When positioning the system unit, monitor and keyboard, take
into account any local or national regulations relating to
ergonomic requirements.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
I
Safety
Read the separate Power Connection Guide before using your
computer for the first time. Information in the Owner’s Handbook
relating to connection to the AC power supply may not apply
outside the United Kingdom.
Safety and Regulatory Notices
Safety
Power cord
requirements
The power cord packed with the computer complies with
the safety standards applicable in the country in which it is sold.
Use only this power cord; do not substitute a power cord from
any other equipment.
If you wish to use the computer in another country, you must
ensure that you use a power cord and plug which complies with
the safety standards of that country.
Plug
Standard
Countries
BS1363A
United Kingdom
SHUCO
Austria, Belgium, Finland,
France, Germany, Holland,
Italy, Norway, Sweden
250V
E
L
N
250V
E
N
L
250V
N
L
SRAF 1962/
DB16/87
Denmark
NEMA 5-15P
USA, Canada
ASE 1011
Switzerland
AS 3112-1981
Australia
E
125V
E
N
L
250V
250V
The power cord fittings must bear the certification mark of the
agency responsible for evaluation.
Refer to your authorized supplier if you ever require additional
or alternative power cables.
II
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Safety and Regulatory Notices
UK plug wiring instructions
The wire which is coloured blue must be connected
to the terminal which is marked with the letter N or
coloured black. The wire which is coloured brown
must be connected to the terminal which is marked
with the letter L or coloured red.
This appliance is supplied with a mains lead that
has a non-removable moulded plug. If the socket
outlets are not suitable for the plug supplied with
this appliance, it should be cut off and an
appropriate three-pin plug fitted.
Use a fuse approved by ASTA to BS1362, i.e.
mark.
carries the
ASA
Always replace the fuse cover, never use the plug
with the fuse cover omitted.
Note: The plug severed from the mains lead must
be destroyed, as a plug with the bared flexible
cord is hazardous if engaged in a live socket
outlet.
Replace with same colour fuse cover only.
Replacement fuse covers may be obtained from
your dealer.
The following wiring information should be
employed when adding the replacement plug.
WARNING THIS APPLIANCE MUST BE
EARTHED
The wires in the mains lead are coloured in
accordance with the following code:
Green and Yellow
Blue
Brown
Earth
Neutral
Live
This diagram
shows the wiring
inside the moulded
plug. Use it as a
guideline if you
need to re-fit a plug
of a similar type to
the mains lead.
As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of
this appliance may not correspond with the
coloured markings identifying the terminals in
your plug, proceed as follows.
E
L
N
The wire which is coloured green-and-yellow
must be connected to the terminal in the plug
which is marked with the letter E, or by the earth
symbol
or coloured green or green-andyellow.
Noise levels
German Acoustic Noise Regulation
Sound power level is less than 70 dB(A) according to DIN
45635 Part 19 (ISO 7779).
Die Deutsche Akoustische Lärm-Regulierung
Der Grad der Klangstärke ist weniger als 70 dB(A) je nach DIN
45635 Teil 19 (ISO 7779).
CLASS 1
LASER PRODUCT TO IEC 825
LASER KLASSE 1
PRODUKT NACH IEC 825
The CD-ROM drive is
classified as a CLASS 1
LASER PRODUCT.
The CLASS 1 LASER
PRODUCT label is
located on the under
side of the system unit.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
III
Safety
IMPORTANT Power
Cable Connections
Safety and Regulatory Notices
Safety
Refer to the labels on the rear of your computer to establish which of the following warnings
apply.
FCC Class A
Warning - this equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
computing device, pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC rules. Only peripherals (computer
input/output devices, terminals, printer, etc.) certified to comply with the Class A limits may be
attached to this computer. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause
unacceptable interference to radio and television reception requiring the operator to take
whatever steps are necessary to correct the interference.
FCC Class B
Warning - this equipment has been certified to comply with the limits for a Class B computing
device, pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC rules. Only peripherals (computer input/output
devices, terminals, printer, etc.) certified to comply with the Class B limits may be attached to this
computer. Operation with non-certified peripherals is likely to result in interference with radio
and TV reception.
Radio and television interference
The computer described in this manual generates and uses radio frequency energy for its
operation. If it is not installed and used properly, in strict accordance with the manual, it may
cause interference with radio and television reception.
The computer has been tested and found to comply with the RF emission limits for an FCC Class
B computing device which is intended to provide reasonable protection against such interference
in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation.
If this equipment does cause interference with radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Move the computer away from the receiver being interfered with.
• Turn the computer with respect to the receiver.
• Turn the receiver with respect to the computer.
• Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different branch circuit from the receiver.
• Disconnect and remove any I/O cables that are not being used.
• Unplug and remove any expansion cards that are not being used, and replace the relevant
blanking plates.
• Make sure that the computer is plugged into a grounded outlet.
If you need additional help, consult your supplier. You may find the following booklet helpful: How
to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems. This booklet is available from the US
Government Printing Office: Washington DC 20402 - Stock No. 004-000-000345-4.
DOC Class A
The computer described in this manual complies with: Canadian DOC radio interference
regulations CRCc 1374 governing Class A digital devices.
DOC Class B
The computer described in this manual complies with: Canadian DOC radio interference
regulations CRCc 1374 governing Class B digital devices.
IV
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
CONTENTS
Chapter
Contents
CONTENTS
1
Introducing your computer
2
Getting started with your computer
3
Operating your computer
Using
Using
Using
Using
Using
Using
Using
Using
4
the front panel controls 3/2
the 3.5" diskette drive 3/3
the 5.25" floppy disk drive 3/4
a CD-ROM drive 3/6
the FTD tape drive 3/11
the SCSI QIC tape drive 3/13
the SCSI DDS-DC tape drive 3/16
your computer abroad 3/21
SETUP
Introduction 4/1
Invoking SETUP 4/1
The opening screen 4/2
Using SETUP 4/4
SETUP runs automatically 4/5
System summary 4/5
Devices and I/O ports 4/6
Date and time setup 4/10
System security 4/10
Start options 4/13
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK I
Contents
General advice 2/2
Connecting the components 2/3
Turning on and booting the computer 2/4
Preparing a second hard disk 2/6
The software on your computer 2/7
Using the SETUP utility 2/8
Using Help 2/9
Contents
Advanced SETUP 4/15
ISA Legacy Resources 4/17
Power management 4/18
Error messages 4/20
5
Expanding the system
Contents
Expansion cards 5/2
Memory upgrades 5/6
Processor upgrades 5/10
Installing additional video RAM 5/13
5.25" drives 5/15
3.5" hard disk drive 5/21
6
Caring for your computer
Cleaning your computer 6/2
Transporting your computer 6/6
7
Troubleshooting
Problems when starting 7/2
Checklist 7/4
A
Appendix - Inside your computer
Anti-static precautions A/2
Removing the top cover A/3
Configuring expansion cards A/4
Motherboard jumper settings A/14
B
Appendix - Technical Information
Specifications B/2
Physical characteristics B/6
Electrical characteristics B/6
Port characteristics B/8
II
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
INTRODUCING YOUR COMPUTER
Chapter
Chapter
1
Introducing your computer
1
INTRODUCING YOUR
COMPUTER
The Apricot XEN Pentium range is ideally suited for use as
a general-purpose personal computer, networked business
workstation or workgroup server.
Read the separate Power Connection Guide before
using your computer for the first time.
Chapter 1
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 1/1
Introducing your computer
Standard features
Standard features of the range include:
• Intel Pentium system processor.
• Standard 8 Mbytes of motherboard random access
memory (RAM), upgradable to 128 Mbytes by the use
of single in-line memory modules (SIMMs).
• Second level system memory cache (at least
256kbytes).
• On-board high performance PCI bus video based on
a Cirrus Logic GD543X controller, equipped with at
least 1 Mbyte of video RAM, upgradeable to 2 Mbytes.
• PCI Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) hard disk drive
Chapter 1
interface.
• Fast graphic boot option with SETUP configuration
utility in read-only memory (ROM).
• Full power management.
• Two full-length, one half length 16-bit Industry
Standard Architecture (ISA) expansion card slots and
one full length PCI slot.
• ISA IDE drive interface for use with an ATA-PI CDROM drive.
• Extended keyboard with microphone mount; twobutton mouse, parallel and dual serial ports.
• 1.44 Mbyte 3.5" diskette drive; 3.5" hard disk drive
bay with room for two one-inch drives; one 5.25"
removable media drive bay.
These standard features can be enhanced by more memory,
various hard disk and removable media drives, adapter
cards, and so on. For an outline of these options, see
Chapter 5, “Expanding the system”.
1/2 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Introducing your computer
Unpacking
On unpacking the computer, you should find:
•
•
•
•
System unit.
Monitor and accompanying User’s Guide.
Extended keyboard and two-button mouse.
System unit AC power cord and monitor power cord
appropriate for the country of sale.
• System documentation (Owner’s Handbook, Warranty
Pack, and so on).
• Microsoft MS-DOS pack.
• Microsoft Windows for Workgroups pack (if the system
has a hard disk).
More elaborate systems may include software or hardware
options with accompanying installation diskettes and
additional documentation. Some of these options may have
been factory-configured or installed by your supplier.
Keep the cartons, boxes and packaging materials; you will
need them again if you have to transport the computer
elsewhere.
Make a note of the manufacturer’s data recorded on the
various components (product codes, serial numbers, etc.).
You may need this information if the computer develops a
fault. In particular, note the serial number stamped onto the
caselock keys, in case they get lost and need to be replaced.
Instructions for removing the top cover are given in
Appendix A, “Inside your computer”.
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords
before removing the top cover.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 1/3
Chapter 1
• Two caselock keys.
2
1
3
Chapter 1
4
5
Introducing your computer
1/4 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Introducing your computer
1
POWER
button: press to turn the system on or off.
The green indicator on the button lights when the
system unit is powered.
2
activity indicators, from left to right:
lights when a diskette, floppy disk or floppy tape
drive is accessed (depending on the operating system).
lights when a hard disk drive or SCSI tape drive
is accessed (depending on the operating system).
door (shown closed): hinges down to reveal the
removable-media drive bay.
4
3.5" diskette drive: fitted as standard.
5
top cover caselock: the caselock secures the system
unit top cover; keep the keys for this lock in a secure
place.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 1/5
Chapter 1
3
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
12
11
10
Chapter 1
9
10
13
Introducing your computer
1/6 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Introducing your computer
AC power outlet: where the monitor power cord
can plug in. Only manufacturer-approved monitors
should be powered from this outlet.
2
voltage selection switch: the computer can be
set to operate with a 100-120 volt or 220-240 volt
AC power supply.
3
AC power inlet: where the system unit AC power
cord plugs in.
4
keyboard port: connect the keyboard to this port.
5
mouse port: connect the mouse to this port.
6
serial port 1 (50 baud to 19,200 baud): typically
used for connecting an external modem or a serial
printer signal cable.
7
serial port 2 (50 baud to 19,200 baud): typically
used for connecting an external modem or a serial
printer signal cable.
8
parallel port: typically used for a printer signal
cable. Supports ECP and EPP.
9
monitor port: connect the monitor signal cable to
this port.
10
casing screws: loosen these to remove the top
cover.
11
security loop: you can feed a security chain or cable
through this loop and secure it to prevent theft of
the system unit.
12
blanking plates: for expansion card slots.
13
air vent: do not block this vent or the system will
overheat.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 1/7
Chapter 1
1
Introducing your computer
1
2
3
6
4
Chapter 1
5
7
1
motherboard: see the label inside the system unit
top cover for up-to-date information on the layout
of the motherboard.
2
expansion card slots: Three expansion slots, one
half length and one full length ISA, and one full length
slot which can be used by either an ISA or PCI card.
3
SIMM sockets: every system is fitted with at least 8
Mbytes of memory which can be upgraded to 128
Mbytes by the use of single in-line memory modules.
5
processor socket: replace the existing processor
with a suitable OverDrive processor here to upgrade
the processing power of your computer.
4
5.25" removable-media drive bay: may be
occupied by a removable media drive.
6
3.5" hard-disk drive bay: this bay has room for two
one-inch high IDE hard disk drives.
7
3.5" diskette drive: fitted as standard.
1/8 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
GETTING STARTED WITH YOUR COMPUTER
Chapter
Chapter
2
Getting started with your computer
2
GETTING STARTED WITH YOUR
COMPUTER
You should read this chapter even if you do not read any
other. It provides important information to help you site,
connect, power and configure your computer.
If you are familiar with the operation of personal computers,
this chapter will probably tell you all you need to know in
order to start working with your computer. Chapter 3,
“Operating your computer”, has more information about the
use of the various disk and tape drives which may be fitted
in the system.
Read the separate Power Connection Guide before
using the computer for the first time.
Chapter 2
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 2/1
Getting started with your computer
General advice
The computer is designed to be used in a normal office
environment. Here are a few hints for choosing a suitable
site:
• Place the system unit flat on a sturdy, level surface.
Unlike some other computers, the system unit is not
designed to be stood on its side.
• Site the system away from moisture, direct sunlight,
and extremes of heat and cold. Avoid situations in
which the surrounding temperature or humidity may
change rapidly. See Appendix B, “Technical
Information”, for recommended temperature and
humidity ranges.
• When positioning the system unit, monitor and
Chapter 2
keyboard, take into account any local or national
regulations relating to ergonomic requirements. For
example, you should ensure that little or no ambient
light is reflected off the monitor screen as glare, and
that the keyboard is placed in a comfortable position
for typing.
• Give the system plenty of room so that air can
circulate on all sides. Air is drawn into the system unit
through the vent on the left-hand side. Ensure that
this vent is never obstructed.
• Do not allow any cables, particularly power cords, to
trail across the floor where they can be snagged by
people walking past.
The computer uses the system unit AC power cord
as its “disconnect device”. Ensure that the system
unit is positioned close to the AC power outlet, and
that the plug is easily accessible.
To prevent fire and electric shock, do not expose any
part of the system unit to rain or moisture.
2/2 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Getting started with your computer
Connecting the components
See Chapter 1, “Introducing your computer”, if you need
help identifying the various ports on the system unit.
Checking the AC power supply
When your computer is delivered, it is ready for the
commercial AC power supply generally available in the
country in which it is sold. It has been set for the correct
voltage range, and is supplied with an AC power cord and
plug which comply with the relevant safety standards.
Before using your computer in a country other than the one
in which it was originally sold, you must check the voltage
and frequency of that country’s AC power supply, and the
type of power cord required there.
The “Safety and Regulatory Notices” section at the start of
this manual includes advice about suitable power cords.
Installing add-on options
If your computer arrived with uninstalled add-on options,
(such as expansion cards or memory modules) consult
Chapter 5 “Expanding the system” for step-by-step
instructions for installing them. Expansion cards may also
have their own documentation.
Note that some options for which you have installation
guides may have already been installed for you at the factory
or by your supplier.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 2/3
Chapter 2
If necessary, the AC voltage setting of the system can be
adjusted by the voltage selection switch on the rear of the
system unit (see the section on “Using the computer abroad”
in Chapter 3, “Operating your computer”). Note that the
monitor’s voltage setting will probably also need adjusting;
consult the User’s Guide that accompanies the monitor, or
ask your supplier for help.
Getting started with your computer
Connecting the components
Having assured yourself that the voltage settings and the AC
power cords of the computer, the monitor and any other
peripherals are correct:
1.
If your AC power outlets have switches, set them
to their Off positions.
2.
Ensure that the system unit, the monitor, and any
peripherals are turned off.
3.
Connect signal cables and power cords (in that
order) to their respective ports and inlets on the
system unit, the monitor, and any peripherals. Make
sure the cables are connected securely.
Chapter 2
When you plug the keyboard cable into the rear of
the system, be careful not to plug it into the mouse
port by mistake.
4.
Connect the system unit and peripheral power
cords to nearby, grounded AC power outlets.
5.
If your AC power outlets have switches, set them
to their On positions.
Your computer is now ready to use. The rest of this chapter
tells you how to turn your computer on and off, and how
to configure it using the built-in SETUP utility.
Turning on and booting the computer
Turning the power on
To turn on the computer, simply press the POWER button.
The green indicator on the POWER button lights to show that
the system unit is powered. Remember that the monitor
has its own power control; see the monitor’s User’s Guide
for details.
Always make sure that the system is turned on before
turning on any attached peripherals.
2/4 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Getting started with your computer
Power-on self-test
Whenever the computer is turned on, the power-on selftest (POST) routine tests various hardware components,
including memory, and checks the computer’s configuration.
During this time, various BIOS sign-on and POST messages
are displayed, and you have the opportunity of invoking the
built-in SETUP utility to reconfigure the computer
(described later in this chapter).
The boot sequence
Provided that POST succeeds without discovering any
serious errors or configuration discrepancies, the computer
attempts to find an operating system; that is, it attempts
to boot. By default, it will first look for a system diskette,
then for a bootable hard disk partition.
Turning the power off
When you have finished using the system and want to turn
it off, be sure that any information you want to keep is
stored on a diskette or on a hard disk. Any information held
in the computer’s system memory will be lost when you
turn off the computer.
If you are logged-in to a network, log out before turning off
the computer. Similarly, close down or exit from any
software which employs virtual memory or disk-caching (for
example, Microsoft Windows v3.1x with SMARTDrive).
Do not turn off the computer if any of the activity indicators
on the front panel are lit; this means that the computer is
accessing a drive. Wait until that operation is completed
before turning off the computer.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 2/5
Chapter 2
Always turn off any attached peripherals first.
Getting started with your computer
To turn off the computer, simply press the POWER button again.
The green indicator on the button goes out. (Remember that
the monitor is powered from the system unit.)
After you turn the computer off, wait at least 5 seconds before
turning it on again. The computer may not initialize itself
properly if you turn it off then on again in quick succession.
Preparing a second hard disk
Some computers have two hard disk drives, known as
master and slave.
Chapter 2
The master drive is partitioned, formatted and has Microsoft
MS-DOS installed at the factory. The drive is given a single
primary DOS partition, which is the active partition. When
you turn the computer on, it will boot (load its operating
system) from the master drive, which will appear as MS-DOS
drive C.
The slave drive is not partitioned or formatted. You must
partition the slave drive with the MS-DOS Fdisk program,
and format the partitions with the Format command. Until
you do this, you will be unable to use the slave drive. See
your MS-DOS manual for instructions on using Fdisk and
Format.
Caution: When you run Fdisk, it assumes you want to
work with the first, or master, drive (it says the “Current
fixed disk drive” is “1”). To switch attention to the slave
drive, choose Select next fixed disk drive (option 5) from
the main menu.
Of course, you may also want to use Fdisk to repartition
the master drive. If you decide to do this, be sure to make
a back up copy of all the information on the drive first,
including MS-DOS itself, as repartitioning will cause the
master drive’s existing contents to be lost.
2/6 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Getting started with your computer
The software on your computer
All computers with a hard disk arrive with Microsoft MSDOS and Microsoft Windows for Workgroups pre-installed.
Other software may be pre-installed at the factory or by your
supplier.
Hard disks also contain a copy of the Windows display driver
for the video subsystem, but Windows is factory configured
to use the standard VGA driver. For instructions on changing
the Windows display setup refer to the CL543X help file
within Windows.
In addition to a working copy of MS-DOS, Windows and the
Windows display driver, your hard disk will contain images
of the DOS and Windows installation diskettes, and any
drivers diskettes for your computer. A Windows utility is
provided to allow you to create copies of these diskettes.
This utility is run whenever you start Windows.
You will need a copy of the display driver diskettes should you
wish to install a display driver for a non-Windows
application. Refer to the CL543X help file in Windows for
information on the drivers and utilities supplied.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 2/7
Chapter 2
Copies of the DOS and Windows diskettes will safeguard
against hard disk failure, or accidental overwriting or
deletion of files. It is recommended that you use the utility
to create copies of the diskettes soon after setting up your
system.
Getting started with your computer
Using the SETUP utility
What is SETUP?
SETUP is a configuration utility programmed into the
motherboard’s read-only memory (ROM). Because it is
permanently kept in ROM, SETUP does not need an
operating system to function and can be invoked whenever
you turn on or reboot your computer.
SETUP’s purpose is to allow you to view and alter your
computer’s configuration. To configure a computer means
to declare its hardware components, such as the amount
of memory it has or the type of monitor, and to say how
you want them to be used. Configuring your computer is
often necessary to ensure that the software you use can
recognise and exploit the system’s capabilities.
Chapter 2
The configuration data is kept in a special part of the
computer’s memory, known as configuration memory or
CMOS memory. This memory is sustained by a small
battery, so its contents are preserved while the computer
is turned off.
Your computer arrives preconfigured, but may need to be
reconfigured after you add or remove add-on options such
as memory modules or expansion cards. Refer to Chapter
4 “SETUP” for more information.
Invoking SETUP
Each time the computer is turned on or rebooted, it runs
through a power-on self-test (POST) routine. During this,
the SETUP utility can be invoked by pressing the F1 key.
Once you have pressed F1, the SETUP utility usually starts as
soon as POST is completed (if your computer has a lot of
memory to test, this may take several seconds). However, if
the power-on password feature is enabled, you must enter
the password correctly before SETUP will start.
2/8 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Getting started with your computer
Using Help
Along with the diskettes provided with your computer, or
the software preinstalled on its hard disk, you will often find
one or more Help files. These will explain any special features
of the system, and tell you how to install the software needed
to exploit those features.
Help may be supplied in various forms, depending on the
intended operating system; in the MS-DOS/Windows
application environment they are usually windows help files
or ASCII text files.
Viewing Windows help files
Windows help files can be displayed only by the Microsoft
Windows Help program (v3.1 or later). Windows help files
may be identified by their .HLP file extensions, although this
is not an infallible guide as some other help formats use the
.HLP extension. Windows help files are often accompanied
by .ICO icon files of the same name.
If the Windows help file you want to view is not already
installed, or if for any other reason you need to view a
Windows help file directly from a diskette:
1.
Insert the diskette into a suitable drive.
2.
Use Windows File Manager to view the contents of
the diskette.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 2/9
Chapter 2
If your computer has a hard disk on which the Microsoft
Windows application environment has been pre-installed,
copies of some Windows help files may already be available
as icons in Windows. To view a help file, simply double-click
on its icon, or select the icon and press ENTER. For more
information about using Help, see your Windows
documentation.
Getting started with your computer
3.
Choose the .HLP file you want, either by doubleclicking on its filename or by selecting the filename
with the cursor and then pressing ENTER.
The Windows Help program starts, displaying the
first topic in the help file. For more information
about using Help, see your Windows
documentation.
Chapter 2
Alternatively, you can copy the Windows help file from the
diskette to a hard disk or network drive, and create a
program item for it using Program Manager. The help file can
then be viewed at any time simply by double-clicking on its
icon. To do this:
1.
Insert the diskette into a suitable drive. Copy the
.HLP file, and its associated .ICO icon file if it has one,
from the diskette to a hard disk or network drive.
2.
Choose New from the File menu in Program
Manager. Select the Program Item option in the New
Program Object dialog box, then choose OK. The
Program Item Properties dialog box appears.
3.
In the Description text box, type the title of the
diskette from which the help file was copied.
4.
In the Command Line text box, type the path and
filename of the help file (including its .HLP
extension).
5.
Choose Change Icon. The Change Icon dialog box
appears. In the File Name text box, type the path
and filename of the .ICO file. Choose OK.
6.
In the Program Item Properties dialog box, choose
OK.
Viewing text files
ASCII text files, identified by their .TXT file extensions, can
be read by most text editors and wordprocessing programs.
Alternatively they can be displayed, one screenful at a time,
using the DOS commands type and more; for example:
2/10 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Getting started with your computer
type helpfile.txt | more
Version numbers
All the help files provided have a version number so you can
tell whether you’re looking at the most up-to-date version.
You can discover the version number of a Windows help file
by viewing it with Help and choosing About Help from the
Help menu.
Chapter 2
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 2/11
OPERATING YOUR COMPUTER
Chapter
Chapter
3
Operating your computer
3
OPERATING YOUR COMPUTER
This chapter contains all you need to know for the day-today operation of your computer. Note that the monitor has
its own User’s Guide.
Read the separate Power Connection Guide before
using the computer for the first time.
Chapter 3
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 3/1
Operating your computer
Using the front panel controls
The computer has only a few front panel controls and
activity indicators, and is very simple to use.
DISKETTE
ACTIVITY HARD DISK
INDICATOR ACTIVITY
INDICATOR
POWER
BUTTON
The POWER button is used to turn the computer on and off.
The green indicator in the button lights when the system is
powered. This button also controls the power supply through
the AC power outlet to the monitor.
There are two activity indicators on the front panel:
Inactive
Active
Meaning when active
Chapter 3
The computer is using a 3.5"
diskette drive, a 5.25" floppy disk
drive or an FTD (floppy tape
drive).
The computer is using a hard disk
drive, a CD-ROM drive or a SCSI
QIC or SCSI DDS tape drive.
3/2
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
Using the 3.5" diskette drive
The 3.5" diskette drive can read and write double-sided
diskettes with a formatted capacity of either 1.44 Mbytes (if
marked “HD” or “high density”) or 720 Kbytes (if marked
“DD” or “double density”).
Each diskette has a rigid plastic cover with a metal shutter that
guards the disk surface. The drive automatically moves the
shutter aside to read the diskette. Never touch the exposed
surface under the shutter.
Keep diskettes well away from dust, moisture, magnetic
objects, and equipment that generates magnetic fields. Also,
avoid extremes of temperature and exposure to direct
sunlight. Otherwise, data recorded on the diskette may
become corrupted.
Inserting a diskette
Insert the diskette into the slot with the arrowhead on the
face of the diskette pointing towards the drive. Push the
diskette in until it engages with the drive mechanism.
Chapter 3
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 3/3
Operating your computer
Removing a diskette
Before attempting to remove a diskette, ensure that the drive
is not currently in use (the diskette activity indicator must be
unlit).
Press the EJECT button. The drive mechanism disengages and
the diskette is ejected halfway out of the drive.
Write-protecting a diskette
A diskette can be write-protected by sliding the small tab
toward the edge of the diskette to expose the little hole
beneath it (as shown below). With the tab in this position, you
can read or print files from the diskette, but you cannot create,
rename or delete any files.
PROTECTED
UNPROTECTED
Using the 5.25" floppy disk drive
Chapter 3
Your computer may be configured with a 5.25" floppy disk
drive. This drive can read and write double-sided disks with a
formatted capacity of either 1.2 Mbytes (if marked “HD” or
“high density”) or 360 Kbytes (if marked “DD” or “double
density”).
Each floppy disk is sealed into a flexible plastic envelope with
a long, rounded aperture through which the read/write heads
of the disk drive can meet the disk surface. You must never
touch the exposed surface of the disk yourself.
3/4
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
Keep floppy disks well away from dust, moisture, magnetic
objects, and equipment that generates magnetic fields. Also,
avoid extremes of temperature and exposure to direct
sunlight. Otherwise, data recorded on the disk may become
corrupted.
Inserting a floppy disk
Insert the disk into the drive slot with the read/write aperture
foremost. When the disk is fully inserted, turn the locking lever
one-quarter turn clockwise to engage the drive mechanism.
Removing a floppy disk
Before attempting to remove a disk, ensure that the drive is
not currently in use (the drive’s LED must be unlit).
Turn the locking lever one-quarter turn counter-clockwise to
disengage the drive mechanism. The diskette is ejected halfway
out of the drive.
Write-protecting a floppy disk
A floppy disk can be write-protected by covering the small
notch in the edge of the disk envelope with a self-adhesive
tab (such tabs are typically supplied with new floppy disks).
With the tab in this position, you can read or print files from
the disk, but you cannot create, rename or delete any files.
WRITE-PROTECT
NOTCH
WRITE-PROTECT
TAB AFFIXED
Chapter 3
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 3/5
Operating your computer
Using a CD-ROM drive
Your computer may be configured with a CD-ROM drive.
With the appropriate software support, the CD-ROM drive
can retrieve multimedia data from CD-ROM discs and
multisession Photo-CD discs. It can also play commercial audio
CDs.
The software required to control the CD-ROM drive depends
on your operating environment; see the Help provided with
your computer or ask your supplier for details.
The drive has its own headphone jack with associated volume
level control. Alternatively, on systems fitted with a sound card,
sound can be played through the computer’s internal stereo
speakers or the audio output socket.
Do not attempt to move the computer while a CD is in the
drive, especially if the CD is being played at the time.
The laser beam inside the CD-ROM drive is harmful
to the eyes. Do not attempt to disassemble the CDROM drive. If a fault occurs, call an authorized
maintainer.
Direct loading drives
Most CD-ROM drives are of the direct loading variety, where
CDs are placed directly onto the open platter of the drive.
This type of drive is shown in the following illustration.
Chapter 3
DISC DRAWER
COMPACT
HEADPHONE JACK
AND HEADPHONE LEVEL
3/6
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
BUSY
INDICATOR
EMERGENCY
EJECT HOLE
EJECT
BUTTON
Operating your computer
If your CD-ROM drive looks like the illustration above, follow
the instructions below. If your CD-ROM does not look like
the illustration above refer to “CD caddy drives”.
Inserting a compact disc
Press the EJECT button on the front of the drive to eject the
platter; note that the EJECT button will not work unless the
computer is turned on.
If the platter only ejects halfway out of the drive, pull it out to
its fullest extent.
Place the CD face up on the platter and, if the platter ejected
fully, either push the EJECT button again, or gently push the front
of the platter, it will be drawn into the drive. If the platter only
ejected halfway, push the platter in until it engages with the
drive mechanism.
Wait for the CD to spin up to speed before attempting to read
from it.
Removing a compact disc
Before attempting to remove a CD, ensure that the drive is
not currently in use (the drive’s activity indicator must be unlit).
Press the EJECT button. The drive mechanism disengages and
the platter is ejected. If the platter only ejects halfway out of
the drive, pull it out to its fullest extent.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 3/7
Chapter 3
The EJECT button can be disabled by the software controlling
the CD-ROM drive. In this case pressing the EJECT button will
have no effect.
Operating your computer
To eject the drawer manually (for example, during a power
failure) you must first ensure that the computer is turned off.
Then insert a thin metal rod (such as an unwound paper clip)
into the emergency eject hole and push (see below).
COMPACT
Keep CDs well away from dust and moisture, and avoid
touching the surface of the CD. Also, avoid extremes of
temperature and exposure to direct sunlight.
CD caddy drives
A few CD-ROM drives need a CD caddy in order to play CDs.
To identify one of these drives compare your drive to the
illustration below.
DISC CADDY SLOT
Chapter 3
CD Caddy
COMPACT
HEADPHONE JACK
AND HEADPHONE LEVEL
3/8
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
BUSY
INDICATOR
EJECT
BUTTON
EMERGENCY
EJECT HOLE
Operating your computer
Caddy drives have a flap over the drive slot. When the drive
is empty the legend “CD caddy” is visible on the flap, when a
CD caddy is loaded the legend “CADDY LOADED” is visible.
If your CD-ROM drive looks like the illustration above, follow
the instructions below.
Inserting a compact disc
Caddy CD-ROM drives use a special removable disc caddy to
hold a CD within the drive mechanism. The caddy has a metal
shutter that guards the disc’s surface; the drive automatically
moves the shutter aside to read the disc. One disc caddy is
provided free with the drive; more can be obtained from your
supplier. Use only approved disc caddies.
Do not confuse a CD’s storage case with a proper disc
caddy; if you attempt to insert a disc storage case you
will damage the drive.
1.
Ensure that the computer is turned on and that the
drive is empty (the legend “CD Caddy” should appear
on the flap covering the drive slot).
2.
If there is a protective film on the centre of the caddy
lid, remove it before using the caddy.
3.
To open the caddy, press the tabs on both edges at
the end opposite the shutter.
Chapter 3
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 3/9
Operating your computer
4.
Set the disc, with its label upward, in the caddy. Handle
the disc only by its edge.
5.
Close the lid of the caddy firmly.
6.
Insert the caddy into the slot of the drive with the
disc’s label facing up and the arrow on the caddy
pointing towards the drive (that is, shutter end
foremost). Push the caddy in until it is completely
swallowed up by the drive.
The drive begins reading the disc’s table of contents. The
drive’s activity indicator lights while the table of contents is
being read. When the activity indicator goes out, the drive is
ready for use.
If the activity indicator remains on, this may indicate that the
disc is not properly positioned within the caddy. In this case,
press the EJECT button to remove the caddy and try again. If
the problem persists, consult your supplier or an authorized
maintainer.
Note too that the software controlling the CD-ROM drive
may be able to prevent the insertion of a disc.
Chapter 3
Removing a compact disc
1.
Ensure that the computer is turned on (otherwise the
EJECT button will not work) and that the drive is not
currently in use (the drive’s activity indicator must be
unlit).
2.
Press the EJECT button. The drive mechanism
disengages and the caddy is partially ejected from the
drive.
The EJECT button can be disabled by the software
controlling the CD-ROM drive. In this case pressing
the EJECT button will have no effect.
3/10
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
To eject the drawer manually (for example, after a power
failure) you must first ensure that the computer is turned off.
Then insert a thin metal rod (such as an unwound paper clip)
into the emergency eject hole and push hard (see below). The
rod must be at least 35 mm long.
CADDY LOADED
COMPACT
Keep CDs and caddies well away from dust and moisture.
Avoid touching the surface of the disc; for example, when the
disc is inside a caddy, do not open the shutter manually and
touch the disc. Also, avoid extremes of temperature and
exposure to direct sunlight.
Using the FTD tape drive
Your computer may be configured with a 120 Mbyte FTD
(floppy tape drive). The FTD is so called because it uses the
on-board diskette/floppy disk interface and so does not require
an additional drive controller card like most other tape drives.
Note that, although the drive is intended for use with 120
Mbyte cartridges, it is possible to read data previously
recorded on 40 Mbyte cartridges.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
3/11
Chapter 3
The software required to control the tape drive depends on
your operating environment; ask your supplier for details.
Operating your computer
The tape drive can be damaged by incorrect insertion or
removal of cartridges, so always observe the following
procedures:
Inserting a cartridge
1.
Remove the cartridge from its plastic holder.
2.
Hold the cartridge so that the metal plate faces
downwards, as shown below. Slide the cartridge into
the drive slot until you feel a slight resistance.
ACTIVITY
INDICATOR
WRITE-PROTECT
TAB
METAL PLATE
3.
Carefully push the cartridge in a bit further until it
engages with the drive mechanism.
Chapter 3
Removing a cartridge
3/12
1.
Do not attempt to remove a cartridge while it is being
accessed by the computer (the drive’s activity
indicator must be unlit).
2.
Grasp the cartridge between thumb and forefinger
and pull it carefully out of the drive slot.
3.
Return the cartridge to its plastic holder. This protects
the cartridge and prevents dust from collecting on the
surface of the tape.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
Write-enabling a cartridge
A cartridge is normally write protected but can be writeenabled by sliding the tag labelled <RECORD in the direction of
the arrow (that is, to the left). A cartridge must be writeenabled if you intend to write data onto the tape.
Keep your tape cartridges well away from magnetic objects,
and equipment that generates magnetic fields. Avoid extremes
of temperature and exposure to direct sunlight; otherwise,
the data recorded on the tape may become corrupted.
Using the SCSI QIC tape drive
Your computer may be configured with a SCSI QIC tape drive
for quarter-inch tape cartridges. The software required to
control the QIC tape drive depends on your operating
environment; ask your supplier for details.
Currently 150 Mbyte and 525 Mbyte QIC tape drives are
suplied. However, these capacities depend on the type of
cartridge and the recording format used.
•
The 525 Mbyte drive can use either DC6320 (600 ft,
320 Mbyte) or DC6525 (1000 ft, 525 Mbyte)
cartridges and can read and write in QIC-525, QIC150 and QIC-120 formats.
•
The 150 Mbyte drive can use DC6150 (600 ft, 150
Mbyte) cartridges and can read and write in QIC-150
and QIC-120 formats.
The drive automatically senses the cartridge type and uses the
maximum density QIC format possible for that cartridge
(thereby giving its nominal capacity) unless the cartridge has
already been used in a lower-density format.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
3/13
Chapter 3
Both drives can also read from (but not write to) a QIC-24
formatted tape.
Operating your computer
The use of 1000 ft, 250 Mbyte cartridges with the 150 Mbyte
drive is not supported or recommended. If you must use
1000 ft cartridges with the 150 Mbyte drive, do not use
600 ft cartridges on the same drive. The different
cartridges produce different patterns of wear on the read/
write heads, resulting in increased error rates and reduced
head life. Standardize on one length only (preferably 600 ft)
to get the best performance from your drive.
The tape drive can be damaged by incorrect insertion or
removal of cartridges, so always observe the following
procedures:
Inserting a cartridge
Check that the green indicator on the tape drive is
not lit. This indicates that the drive is ready to accept
a cartridge.
2.
Remove the cartridge from its plastic holder.
3.
Insert the cartridge as shown below. Push the
cartridge gently into the drive as far as it will go.
Chapter 3
1.
3/14
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
4.
Push the control lever to the right to engage the
mechanism.
Removing a cartridge
1.
Do not attempt to remove the cartridge while it is
being accessed by the computer (that is, while the
green indicator is lit).
2.
Push the control lever to the left to release the
mechanism.
3.
Push the control lever further to the left (you will feel
a slight resistance as you do so) until the cartridge
springs a short way out of the drive.
Chapter 3
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
3/15
Operating your computer
4.
Pull the cartridge out of the drive slot.
5.
Return the cartridge to its plastic holder. This protects
the cartridge and prevents dust from collecting on the
surface of the tape.
Write-protecting a cartridge
A cartridge can be write-protected by turning the circular
plastic plug in the top left corner of the cartridge so that it
points to SAFE. The plug can be turned with a screwdriver or
the edge of a coin.
SAFE
SAFE
POSITION
SAFE
UNSAFE
POSITION
With the plug in this position, data can be read from the tape
but not written to it.
Keep your tape cartridges well away from magnetic objects,
and equipment that generates magnetic fields. Avoid extremes
of temperature and exposure to direct sunlight; otherwise,
the data recorded on the tape may become corrupted.
Using the SCSI DDS-DC tape drive
Chapter 3
Your computer may be configured with a SCSI DDS-DC
(Digital Data Storage with Data Compression) tape drive. The
software needed to control the drive depends on your
operating environment; ask your supplier for details.
The DDS-DC drive has a built-in compression algorithm which
can typically double, and in some cases quadruple, tape
capacity. Data compression and decompression is transparent
to the host software.
3/16
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
The DDS-DC drive is illustrated below.
CASSETTE INSERTION SLOT
CASSETTE IN PLACE (GREEN)
EJECT BUTTON
DRIVE BUSY (AMBER)
The DDS-DC drive uses standard 60-metre or 90-metre digital
cassettes bearing the DDS symbol. The drive writes
compressed data by default, unless it finds uncompressed data
already on the cassette. The drive can also write uncompressed
data under software control. When reading a cassette, the
DDS-DC drive automatically distinguishes compressed and
uncompressed data and either decompresses it or passes it
through unaltered as appropriate.
Use only cassettes bearing the DDS symbol; you
cannot play audio DAT cassettes with this drive.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
3/17
Chapter 3
The DDS-DC drive writing uncompressed data has a nominal
capacity of 1.3 Gbytes on a 60-metre cassette or 2.0 Gbytes
on a 90-metre cassette, with a sustained transfer rate of 366
Kbytes/second. At a data compression ratio of 4:1 the drive
has a nominal maximum capacity of 5.2 Gbytes on a 60-metre
cassette or 8.0 Gbytes on a 90-metre cassette; the sustained
transfer rate is increased by the same ratio. However, the
actual compression ratio and transfer rate achievable in any
particular case depend on the characteristics of the data being
compressed, and may be higher or lower than these nominal
figures.
Operating your computer
Interpreting the LED indicators
There are two LED (light-emitting diode) indicators on the
drive’s front panel. The Cassette in Place (green) and Drive
Busy (amber) LEDs show the status of the drive:
Green
Amber
Drive status
On
Off
Cassette inserted
On
On
Cassette inserted: tape
being read or written
Flashing slowly
On/Off
Media warning
Flashing rapidly On
Drive could not write to
tape correctly
On/Off
Hardware error or high
humidity
Flashing rapidly
Media warning
A media warning, when the Cassette in Place (green) LED
flashes slowly, indicates that the tape may be becoming
unreliable, although at this point no data has been lost. First,
clean the tape head cylinder with a cleaning cassette, then try
the data cassette again. If the warning persists, copy the data
onto a new cassette and discard the old one.
A media warning can also indicate that a prerecorded audio
DAT cassette has been inserted by mistake.
Drive could not write to tape
Chapter 3
If the Cassette in Place (green) LED flashes rapidly, this means
that the drive could not write to the tape correctly, and
indicates that the tape has become unreliable. Remove the
cassette and use another.
3/18
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Operating your computer
Hardware error or high humidity
If the Drive Busy (amber) LED flashes rapidly, this indicates
either a hardware error or dew (high humidity). If this happens
soon after powering-up the computer, the drive’s diagnostic
test may have failed, in which case the drive will not operate.
Request help from your supplier or an authorized maintainer.
If the drive detects high humidity, the tape is automatically
ejected. As soon as the drive detects that the humidity is at
an acceptable level, it will return to normal operation.
Automatic drive operation
To prolong the life of the tape and the drive mechanism, the
drive “relaxes” during periods of inactivity (no read or write
operations):
• After 30 seconds, the capstan and pinch roller are
released and tape tension is removed.
•
After 90 seconds, the tape is pulled away from the head
cylinder, and the cylinder stops rotating.
Inserting a cassette
Insert the cassette into the slot with the triangular arrowhead
on the cassette pointing towards the drive. As the tape is
inserted, the drive takes it and automatically loads it into the
drive mechanism. A load sequence checks ambient humidity,
the tape format and data integrity. Unless the tape is blank
the tape log, which contains a history of usage of the tape, is
read into the drive’s memory.
Chapter 3
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
3/19
Operating your computer
The drive will automatically format a blank tape when data is
first written to it. Remember to allow time for the formatting
process when you use a new tape.
Removing a cassette
Before attempting to remove a cassette, ensure that the drive
is not currently in use (the amber Drive Busy indicator must
be unlit).
Press the EJECT button on the front of the drive (depending on
your operating environment, the EJECT button may be disabled
while the drive is in use). If the tape is write-enabled, a copy
of the tape log, held in the drive’s memory, is written back to
tape. The drive rewinds to the beginning of the tape, unthreads
it, and ejects the cassette. Several seconds may pass between
the button being pressed and the cassette being ejected, so
be careful not to turn off the computer before the operation
is completed.
Write-protecting a cassette
A cassette can be write-protected by sliding the white tab on
the cassette so that the recess is revealed. In this position,
data can be read from the tape but not written to it.
Chapter 3
WRITE
ENABLED
3/20
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
WRITE
PROTECT
Operating your computer
The tape log, which includes a record of data integrity failures,
cannot be updated while the cassette is write-protected. It
follows that the tape log becomes inaccurate if a cassette is
used while write-protected, and the media warning LED status
cannot be relied upon to determine if the cassette needs to
be copied and replaced.
Keep your cassettes well away from magnetic objects, and
equipment that generates magnetic fields. Avoid extremes of
temperature and exposure to direct sunlight; otherwise, the
data recorded on the tape may become corrupted.
Using your computer abroad
Your computer arrives ready to work with the commercial
AC power supply available in the country in which it is first
sold.
If you plan to use your computer in another country, you
should first check the following facts about your destination:
1.
The voltage and frequency of the commercial AC
power supply.
2.
The type of plug required for the AC power outlets.
The computer can function within two alternative AC power
supply ranges, according to the position of the voltage selection
switch on the rear of the system unit:
AC power supply
(voltage and frequency)
115
100 - 120 volt AC, 50 - 60 Hz
230
220 - 240 volt AC, 50 - 60 Hz
It is imperative that the computer is set to the correct voltage
range before use. If not, the machine may be irreparably
damaged.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
3/21
Chapter 3
Switch setting
Operating your computer
The voltage setting of the monitor must always be the same
as the voltage setting of the system unit. See the User’s Guide
that accompanies the monitor or consult your supplier to find
out how to change the voltage setting.
Make sure that the computer and its monitor are returned to
their original voltage settings when you return home.
The AC power cord and plug supplied with the computer
comply with the safety standards applicable in the country in
which it is first sold. If you plan to use your computer in
another country, you must get a power cord that complies
with the safety standards of the destination country. For
further details, see the “Safety and Regulatory Notices” section
at the start of this handbook.
Chapter 3
See Chapter 6, “Caring for your computer”, for more
information about transportation.
3/22
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
Chapter
Chapter
4
SETUP
4
SETUP
Your computer’s motherboard is fitted with a small area of
memory which is used to store information about the
configuration of the computer. The computer’s configuration
is modified using a SETUP utility provided in Read Only
Memory (ROM) on the motherboard.
A rechargeable battery on the motherboard maintains the
configuration memory when the computer is switched off.
Invoking SETUP
Each time the computer is switched on, or rebooted, it runs
through a self test procedure. During this period the SETUP
utility can be invoked by pressing the F1 key.
An icon in the form of a box, a little over one inch square,
appears in the top right corner of the screen during the period
that SETUP can be invoked. An illustration of the icon is shown
below.
~~~~
~~~~
~~~~
~~~
~~~
~~~
There may be a delay of a few seconds, while the self test
procedure is completed, before the SETUP screen appears.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 4/1
Chapter 4
Introduction
SETUP
Chapter 4
The opening screen
Once you invoke SETUP, a menu appears on the screen. This
menu, called the Main Menu throughout this publication, is a
list of sub-menus and commands. The sub-menu selections
categorize system setup options, the commands affect the
whole of the SETUP program. Menu items which are used to
access sub-menus are indicated by bullets alongside them.
The sub-menus available are:
Item
Function
System Summary
Displays a screen of information about
the system. Items such as processor
type and speed, memory and disk drives
are covered.
Devices and I/O Ports Allows you to change settings for serial
and parallel ports, IDE interfaces, and
video.
4/2
Date and Time
Change the settings of the date and
time maintained on the motherboard.
Security Setup
This menu allows you to view or
change access settings for hard and
diskette drives, and to set or modify
user and administrator passwords.
Start Options
Choose this item to change options that
affect the actions of the system on
startup. Areas affected include: startup
device, keyboard speed, Power On Self
Test (POST).
Advanced Setup
Allows you to view or change the
settings of the cache, ROM shadowing
and hard disk drive interface.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
This menu allows you to register
resources used by ISA cards installed in
the system. Resources affected are:
memory, I/O ports, DMA, and
interrupts used by ISA expansion cards.
Power Management
Choose this item to view or change
settings of the system’s power
management features.
Each item in the table above is described in detail later.
The Main Menu commands are:
Item
Function
Save Settings
Saves the new values of all the settings
you have changed since starting SETUP.
If you choose Exit Setup, described
below, before choosing Save Settings
or Restore Settings, you are prompted
to save before ending the session.
Restore Settings
Restores all configuration values to
those that were in effect when you
invoked SETUP.
Load Default Settings Resets all configuration values to the
defaults provided in the BIOS.
Exit Setup
Ends the SETUP session. If you have
changed any values and have not chosen
to save or restore the settings, you will
be offered the choice of saving any
changes you made during the current
SETUP session.
You can elect to save and exit, to exit
without saving, or to return to the
Main Menu.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 4/3
Chapter 4
ISA Legacy Resources
SETUP
Chapter 4
Using SETUP
A number of options are available to you in every menu,
including context-sensitive help. For each menu a banner
across the bottom of the screen indicates which keys are
currently valid. The following list explains the function of each
key.
F1
Pressing the F1 key at any time displays
help for the item currently selected.
Pressing F1 a second time will display
the general help screen. The general
help screen is scrollable, that is you
can use the UP and DOWN ARROW keys
to display more information than can
fit on a single screen.
ESC
You can exit SETUP, or individual
menus by pressing the ESC key. If you
are in the Main Menu, pressing ESC acts
like choosing Exit Setup. If you are
in a submenu, pressing ESC closes that
submenu and returns to the previous
menu.
UP
and DOWN ARROW
ENTER
LEFT
4/4
and RIGHT ARROW
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
You can scroll through a list of
configurable items using the UP and
DOWN ARROW keys.
You select a menu or command by highlighting it and pressing ENTER. Typically,
when you press ENTER, another menu
will appear. Editable items are not
affected by pressing ENTER.
These keys are available whenever
you are in a menu where the values
for items can be scrolled or toggled
to select an option, or where you can
move between several fields on the
same line.
SETUP
These keys are available only when
you are in an editable menu where
values can be typed (numbers only).
F9
The F9 key can be used to restore the
current item to the setting in effect
when the current SETUP session was
invoked.
Note
Date and time settings cannot be
restored in this way.
F10
The F10 key can be used to restore
the current item to the default setting
stored in the BIOS.
SETUP Runs Automatically
If the system configuration has changed since the last time the
computer was booted, SETUP will be invoked automatically.
If SETUP runs automatically, error code screens may appear
before the Main Menu. The meaning of these error codes is
given in a table at the end of this publication.
When SETUP runs automatically, arrowheads appear alongside
Main Menu items affected by the changes detected.
System Summary
When you choose System Summary, a window appears with
a collection of system specific information such as: processor
type and speed, amount of memory and number and capacity
of disk drives
Items on this list are not editable. Changes you make in other
menus may be reflected on this summary menu. You may find
system summary useful for checking current settings.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 4/5
Chapter 4
+, –, 0-9
SETUP
Chapter 4
Devices and I/O Ports
This menu allows you to change values for serial and parallel
ports, drives and drive interfaces, video and mouse.
Serial Ports 1 and 2
Use these two fields to select the I/O ports and interrupts
used by the two motherboard serial ports. The defaults
correspond to the logical ports COM1 and COM2
respectively.
PCI AT Disk Interface
This item selects whether the PCI IDE interface is enabled,
and if it is, sets the data transfer rate. All hard disk drives
supplied with the system support the Fast mode, older disks
may require the Normal setting.
ISA AT Disk Interface
This item selects whether the ISA IDE interface is enabled. In
this application the ISA IDE interface is intended primarily for
ATA-PI compliant CD-ROM drives, and the interface can safely
be disabled unless such a drive is connected to the ISA IDE
interface.
ISA AT Disk Interface Address
This item selects whether the ISA IDE interface is addressed
at the primary or secondary set of addresses. By default the
ISA IDE interface uses the secondary set of addresses, in order
for it to use the primary addresses the PCI IDE interface must
be disabled.
Note
In order for the ISA IDE interface to act as the primary IDE interface,
the PCI IDE interface must be physically disabled and the ISA
interface connected to IRQ 14, this is accomplished by jumpers on
the motherboard. Refer to Appendix A of this manual.
4/6
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
Parallel Port
Note
The parallel port cannot support the full range of extended modes
when the primary (default) set of I/O ports is selected. In order to
use the ECP and EPP modes one of the alternate sets of ports must
be selected.
Parallel Port Mode
This field allows you to select either standard or extended
modes of operation. Standard mode is simple, output only,
operation. Selecting Extended enables the Parallel Port
Extended Mode field.
Parallel Port Extended Mode
When the Parallel Port Mode field is set to Extended this
field allows you to select which of three enhanced modes the
parallel port operates in. The three options are:
Bidirectional, simple two directional data transfer.
EPP, Enhanced Parallel Port compatible operation.
ECP, operation as an Extended Capabilities Port.
If you wish to use either ECP or EPP modes of operation make
sure that the device you are connecting to the port supports
that mode of operation.
Mouse
You can use this item to indicate to the system whether a
mouse is connected to the mouse port or not. The presence
or absence of a mouse is detected during self test, and you
should not normally have to change this option manually.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 4/7
Chapter 4
Use this field to select the I/O ports and interrupt used by
the motherboard parallel port.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Diskette Drive A and B
These two items indicate to the system the type of floppy drive
installed in each of the two drive bays. The options for each drive
are: None, 360KB 5.25", 1.2MB 5.25", 1.44MB 3.5" and 2.88MB 3.5".
Diskette Drive A is always a 1.44MB 3.5" drive, if a second
floppy drive is fitted it will normally be a 1.2MB 5.25" drive.
The other options are provided for compatibility reasons.
Video Setup
The Video Setup menu shows you the type of video controller
and amount of video RAM fitted to the motherboard, and allows
you to configure the video subsystem to suit your monitor.
The Video Controller and Video Memory items are displayed
for information only and are not editable.
Video Display
This option lets you choose between a number of monitor
types, or to select Custom.
The options alter the timings of video signals at the video
connector to suit a variety of different types of monitor, it is
important to ensure that you have made the correct selection.
The choices are:
4/8
Selection
Monitors supported
SVGA
Choose this if you are using an SVGA
monitor i.e. a monitor that supports
800x600
non-interlaced
and
1024x768 interlaced video modes, in
addition to standard VGA modes.
VGA/EVGA
This option should be chosen for VGA
monitors, and for EVGA monitors to
run at normal refresh rates. EVGA
monitors support 800x600 and
1024x768 non-interlaced video, modes
in addition to standard VGA modes.
Some EVGA monitors may also support
the 1280x1024 resolution.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
EVGA (high refresh)
This option can be used if your EVGA
monitor supports high refresh rates.
If this option is chosen: 640x480,
800x600 and 1024x768 display modes
use high refresh rates, typically 75Hz.
Some EVGA monitors may also
support the 1280x1024 resolution.
The video timings in these high refresh
rate modes are VESA compatible.
VGA and SVGA monitors will not
work if this option is selected.
Custom
Selecting this option allows you to
manually configure the refresh rates for
each of the supported video resolutions.
Refresh Rates
The Refresh Rate options are only configurable when Video
Display Type is set to Custom. If your monitor does not
match one of the combinations of refresh rates provided by
the other three Video Display Type selections you can
configure the refresh rate for each resolution independently.
Supported refresh rates are:
640X480
75 Hz or 60 Hz
800X600
75 Hz, 60 Hz, 56 Hz or Not
Supported
1024X768
75 Hz, 72 Hz, 70 Hz, 60 Hz, 43 Hz
interlaced or Not Supported
1280X1024 60 Hz, 43 Hz interlaced or
Not Supported
Refer to the documentation supplied with your monitor to
determine which refresh rates and resolutions it supports.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 4/9
Chapter 4
Note
VGA monitors will not correctly display
resolutions greater than 640x480.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Date and Time Setup
This menu allows you to set the system date and time which
are maintained by the Real Time Clock (RTC) in the system.
The RTC is maintained even when the system is switched off.
System Time
To set or change the values in this field, type a number or use
the + and - keys to increase or decrease the current number.
To move between fields, i.e., to change the value for the minute
and the second after changing the value for the hour, use the
LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to move to the right or left,
respectively.
Time is in 24-hour format: Hour / Minute / Second
System Date
To set or change the values in this field, type a number or use
the + and - keys to increase or decrease the current number.
To move between fields, i.e., to change the value for the day
but not the month, use the LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to move
to the right or left, respectively.
The date is in UK format: Day / Month / Year
Day:
01, 02, ...31
Month:
01, 02, ...12
Year
1993, 1994, ... 2099
System Security
You can protect your system from unauthorized use by
selecting the System Security menu. This menu lets you set,
change or delete user and administrator passwords and
control access to hard disk and diskette drives.
4/10
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
Secure Hard Disk and Diskette Drives
Note
This menu can interact with the Start Options menu. You must
ensure that a user has access to a Startup Device or they will
not be able to use the system at all.
User Password
If you choose the User Password option a menu appears. This
menu allows you to set or delete a user password, and to
choose whether a password prompt is displayed.
When a user password is enabled the password must be
entered every time the system is powered on or rebooted.
Enter User Password
If you wish to enter or change the user password, type the
password in this field (letters and numbers only).
Enter User Password Again
Re-type the password entered above.
Set or Change User Password
Select this when you have entered and confirmed (by reentering) the new password. This accepts the password as the
one used in future sessions.
If you have not changed the password using the above two fields
before choosing this item, a menu appears prompting you to press
ENTER to confirm the deletion of any existing passwords. In effect,
you are setting the password to “no password” and deleting any
existing password from the system. If you have made a mistake,
press the ESC key to return to the Main Menu.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
4/11
Chapter 4
This menu allows you to select whether a user will have access
to hard or floppy disk drives. Hard and floppy disk access are
not linked and each can be enabled or disabled independently.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Delete User Password
Choose this to delete an existing password (if any). Use this
method when you want to remove or clear the old password
without assigning a new one. A menu appears prompting you
to press ENTER to confirm the deletion. Press the ESC key to
return to the Main Menu and stop the deletion.
Password Prompt
This option allows you to choose whether or not you are
prompted for a password when the system is powered on or
rebooted. When the prompt is disabled you still have to enter
the password, but you may not want the prompt to appear for
security reasons.
Administrator Password
If you choose the Administrator Password option a menu appears.
This menu allows you to set or delete an Administrator password,
and to choose whether a user can change the user password.
When an administrator password is enabled the password
must be entered every time SETUP is invoked. If SETUP is
invoked and the User password entered the only options
available are System Summary and, optionally, the User
Password option of System Security.
Enter Administrator Password
If you wish to enter or change the administrator password,
type the password in this field (letters and numbers only).
Enter Administrator Password Again
Re-type the password entered above.
Set or Change Administrator Password
Select this when you have entered and confirmed (by reentering) the new password. This accepts the password as the
one used in future sessions.
4/12
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
Delete Administrator Password
Choose this to delete an existing password (if any). Use this
method when you want to remove or clear the old password
without assigning a new one. A menu appears prompting you
to press ENTER to confirm the deletion. Press the ESC key to
return to the Main Menu and stop the deletion.
User password changeable by user
This option can be set to Yes or No. When it is set to No,
and an Administrator password is set, only the Administrator
can change the User Password.
If this option is set to Yes the User Password can be changed
by anyone who knows the current password.
Start Options
This menu allows you to set or change the actions of the
system on startup or boot.
Keyboard NumLock State
This option sets whether or not keyboard number lock is on
(numeric keypad enabled) or off (numeric keypad disabled)
when you boot the system. Default is On.
Keyboard Speed
This option sets whether or not keyboard repeat speed is
normal or fast when you boot the system. Default is Fast.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
4/13
Chapter 4
If you have not changed the password using the above two fields
before choosing this item, a menu appears prompting you to press
ENTER to confirm the deletion of any existing passwords. In effect,
you are setting the password to “no password” and deleting any
existing password from the system. If you have made a mistake,
press the ESC key to return to the Main Menu.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Disketteless Operation
When this option is set to Disabled the Power On Self Test
(POST) will report the absence of a floppy drive and halt the
boot process. If this option is set to Enabled, POST by-passes
the floppy test and the system will start provided a boot device
is available.
Displayless Operation
When this option is set to Disabled POST will report the
absence of a monitor and halt the boot process. If this option
is set to Enabled, POST by-passes the test and the system
will start without a monitor.
Keyboardless Operation
When this option is set to Disabled POST will report the
absence of a keyboard and halt the boot process. If this option
is set to Enabled, POST by-passes the keyboard test and the
system will start without a keyboard.
Startup Devices
These four menu items allow you to control the sequence in
which the system looks for a bootable drive. The default
sequence is diskette drive 0, then hard disk drive 0. Use these
four options if you wish to alter this sequence, for example
to always boot from the hard disk drive.
Power On Self Test
Power On Self Test (POST) can be configured to run either
only a basic set of tests, or a more comprehensive test suite.
Use this option to select either the Quick set of tests, or to
run the Enhanced tests.
Virus Detection
A virus detection utility is included in the BIOS. This item
allows you to select whether or not the utility is run when
you start the system.
4/14
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
Advanced Setup
Cache Control
When you choose Cache Control, a new two line submenu
appears, the lines are cache state and cache size.
Cache State
Under this category, you can elect to enable or disable the
second level cache i.e. the cache external to the processor.
The default setting is Enabled, and this should normally be
used. If you use old, speed sensitive, software you may find
that it requires the cache to be Disabled.
Cache Size
This line duplicates one of the items in the System Summary
display. It reports the amount of cache fitted to the
motherboard and is not editable.
ROM Shadowing
ROM shadowing is a process where the contents of Read Only
Memory (ROM) are copied into faster Random Access Memory
(RAM) during system startup. RAM is inherently quicker than
ROM, and once the information is copied into RAM it can be
accessed much faster, improving system performance.
When you choose ROM Shadowing, a submenu containing
seven lines appears. Six of these seven lines split the memory
address range between C0000h and F0000h into 32k segments,
the seventh covers the standard ISA 64k BIOS area from
F0000h to FFFFFh.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
4/15
Chapter 4
This menu allows you change settings for cache, ROM
shadowing and hard disks. When you select Advanced Setup,
a menu appears which includes a warning telling you that if
these advanced hardware features are incorrectly configured,
the system may malfunction.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Note
If you find the terminology used in these descriptions confusing, refer
to Appendix A of this manual.
E0000h - FFFFFh
The first three lines of this menu are for information only. The
address range from E0000h to FFFFFh is always shadowed.
C8000h - DFFFFh
These areas are normally used by option ROMs on ISA adapter
cards. If you have installed an ISA card with such a ROM, you
may wish to enable ROM shadowing for the address range that
the cards option ROM uses. Refer to the documentation
supplied with the adapter card.
C0000h - C7FFFh
This line allows you to enable or disable ROM shadowing for
the 32k segments between C0000h and C7FFFh. This option
only affects video BIOS on ISA adapter cards.
This option defaults to Enabled, and should only be Disabled
if you encounter a problem with the operation of an ISA video
card.
Hard disk control
This menu contains two options, IDE translation mode, and
read-ahead.
IDE Translation Mode
This option can be set to either Extended CHS or Standard
CHS, the default is extended.
Standard CHS limits the maximum number of cylinders
which can be accessed on a hard disk to 1023. This restricts
the maximum capacity of each hard disk drive to approximately
500 Mbytes. Extended CHS overcomes this restriction,
supporting hard disk drives with capacities greater than 500
Mbytes.
4/16
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
Read-ahead
Many IDE hard disk drives incorporate a read-ahead buffer.
This option allows you to disable the buffer.
The default setting is Enabled, and this offers a performance
advantage. If you use old, speed sensitive, software you may
find that it requires the read-ahead buffer to be Disabled.
ISA Legacy Resources
When you install an ISA adapter in your system you should
use the ISA Legacy Resources menu to register the resources
that the adapter card uses.
The system cannot detect the resources used by ISA cards.
Unless you use this menu to declare resources used by ISA
cards, the system cannot auto-configure PCI cards to avoid
clashes, and Plug and Play (PnP) cannot correctly configure
your system.
If you find the terminology in the descriptions that follow
confusing, refer to Appendix A of this manual.
The resources affected are: memory, I/O ports, DMA channels
and interrupts. Each type of resource has an independent
menu. These menus allow you to define, in detail, which
resources are used by ISA adapter cards.
Some resources are shown as Allocated by the system.
These, are shown for your information, and resources used
on the motherboard are not exhaustively listed. For detailed
information refer to Appendix A of this manual.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
4/17
Chapter 4
For drives with capacities less than 500 Mbytes Extended
CHS functions identically to Standard CHS. Some non-DOS
operating systems may require this option to be set to
Standard CHS for drives of greater than 500 Mbytes.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Each user definable resource can be set to either Available
or Not available.
Resources that are Available are assumed by the system not
to be in use by an ISA adapter, and can therefore be allocated
by the PCI and PnP auto-configuration processes. Those
resources that are Not available are assumed to be in use
and are excluded from the auto-configuration process.
Menu
Resource Allocation
Memory Resources
This menu divides the memory map
between A0000h and E0000h into 16k
segments, and between 100000h and
FFFFFFh into 1M segments.
Note
The E0000h to FFFFFh area is always
allocated by the system.
I/O Port Resources
The I/O map is split into blocks of four
ports.
DMA Resources
Each DMA channel
independently allocated.
Interrupt Resources
Each interrupt can be independently
allocated.
can
be
Power management
The Power Management menu gives you control over the
system’s power saving features. These are: System Standby,
Hard Disk Standby, Monitor Power Management, and
Security Mode.
System Standby
This option can be set to Disabled, After 5 minutes, After
15 minutes or After 60 minutes.
4/18
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
SETUP
From the standby mode normal operation is resumed as soon
as any keyboard or mouse activity occurs.
Hard Disk Standby
When this option is enabled, hard disk drives drop into a low
power consumption mode after 20 minutes without a hard
disk access.
A hard disk drive in the low power mode will automatically
resume normal operation on the next hard disk access.
Monitor Power Management
Enabling this option will turn on the Display Power
Management System (DPMS) compliant Monitor Power
Management feature. Refer to the Windows help files supplied
with your system for details of DPMS.
Warning
If you are using a monitor which is not DPMS compliant enabling
this feature may damage your monitor.
Security Mode
If this option is Disabled, to resume normal operation of the
system from System Standby mode the user needs simply
to move the mouse, or press any key on the keyboard.
If this option is Enabled, and a user password is defined (see
System Security), to resume normal operation from
System Standby mode, the user password must be entered.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
4/19
Chapter 4
When an After X minutes setting is selected the system will
drop into a power saving (standby) mode after X minutes of
user inactivity. User inactivity is defined as, no keyboard input
and no mouse movement.
SETUP
Chapter 4
Error Messages
The table below lists error messages you might see when
SETUP is invoked.
Code
101
102
106
110
114
151
161
162
162
163
164
175
176
177
178
182
183
184
185
186
189
201
201
229
303
301
301
301
301
604
604
605
662
762
1762
1780
1781
1782
1783
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1962
2400
2462
5962
8603
4/20
Causes
Timer tick interrupt failure
Timer 2 test failure
Diskette controller failure
System Board Memory Parity interrupt
Option ROM checksum failure
Real time clock failure
Real time clock battery failure
CMOS RAM checksum failure
Invalid configuration information
Time of day not set -preboot
Memory size does not match CMOS
Bad EEPROM CRC #1
System tampered
Bad PAP checksum
EEPROM is not functional
PAP Update Required
PAP is needed
Bad POP checksum
Corrupted Boot Sequence
Hardware problem
Excessive password attempts
Base memory error
Extended memory error
External cache failure
Keyboard controller failure
Keyboard failure
Keyboard clock line failure
Keyboard data line failure
Keyboard stuck key failure
Diskette drive 0 failure
Diskette drive 1 failure
Diskette unlocked problem
diskette drive config
coprocessor configuration
hard disk configuration
Fixed disk 0 failure
Fixed disk 1 failure
Fixed disk 2 failure
Fixed disk 3 failure
no more IRQ available
no more room for option ROM
no more I/O space available
no more memory (above 1MB) available
no more memory (below 1MB) available
checksum error or 0 size Opt. ROM
no bootable device
Display adapter failed; using alternate
Video configuration
IDE CDROM configuration
Pointer device has been removed
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
EXPANDING THE SYSTEM
Chapter
Chapter
5
Expanding the system
5
EXPANDING THE SYSTEM
This chapter contains instructions on installing add-ons and
upgrades in your computer. The areas covered include:
expansion cards
additional memory
upgrade processor
video RAM
additional drives
Read this chapter before purchasing an add-on or upgrade.
If, having read the relevant instructions, you are not confident
about installing the upgrade, you may wish to have your
supplier or service organisation install it for you.
Before you start installing the upgrade you should be
thoroughly familiar with all the relevant instructions.
Warning
Never carry out any work on the equipment with power applied.
Always switch off at the mains and remove the power lead from
the equipment before starting work.
Appendix A “Inside your computer” provides: a guide to
recommended anti-static precautions, instructions on
removing the system unit top cover, and information on
motherboard jumpers and expansion card configuration.
The only tool required to complete the installation of any
of the upgrades is a small cross-head screwdriver.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 5/1
Chapter 5
•
•
•
•
•
Expanding the system
Inside the system unit
The illustration below identifies the major components inside
the system unit that are affected by the installation instructions
later in this section.
Chapter 5
BLANKING
PLATES
POWER
SUPPLY
EXPANSION
CARD
CONNECTORS
SIMM
SOCKETS
3.5"
DRIVE BAY
PROCESSOR
SOCKET
CARD
GUIDES
5.25"
DRIVE BAY
Expansion cards
Expansion cards, sometimes known as expansion boards,
options or adapters, are small self-contained circuit boards
which extend the capabilities of your computer. Here are just
two examples:
• A graphics card can provide more specialized video
functions than those offered by the on-board video subsystem.
• A modem or fax card can provide a connection to a
telephone line.
5/2
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
The system has three expansion slots: one half length and one
full length 16-bit Industry Standard Architecture (ISA), and one
full length slot which can be used by either an ISA or PCI card.
If your computer has a Small Computer Systems Interface
(SCSI) device such as a QIC tape drive, one of the ISA slots
will be occupied by a SCSI drive controller. Other cards may
be pre-installed at the factory or by your supplier.
Installation
Installation of an expansion card in your computer is a simple
process requiring the removal of only the system unit cover
and a blanking plate. The following instructions and illustrations
describe how to install a card in a simple step-by-step
sequence.
1.
Power the system down.
2.
Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the
system unit cover.
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the
system unit cover refer to the appendices at the rear
of this manual.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 5/3
Chapter 5
Expansion cards are a relatively cheap way of upgrading your
system. Moreover, they are usually quite easy to install,
requiring no more than a cross-head screwdriver and a steady
hand.
Expanding the system
3.
With the system unit cover removed, the space for
expansion cards will be visible. It is on the left side of
the system unit behind the activity indicators and the
volume control. Use the illustration below to help you
identify this area.
Chapter 5
EXPANSION CARD
CONNECTORS
BLANKING PLATES
CARD GUIDES
At the rear of the area are three metal blanking plates,
one for each expansion card slot. These plates cover
slots in the rear of the system unit which will be used
by expansion cards.
At the front of the area are three guides. These ensure
that the front edge of any full length ISA card is
secured.
4.
The blanking plates described above are each secured
by a screw. Using the following guidelines decide in
which of the available slots you wish to install the card,
then remove the appropriate blanking plate.
In general it is easiest to start with the lowest slot
and work towards the top, but there a few exceptions:
a. If you are installing a PCI card it must go in the top
slot.
b. If you are installing an ISA video card which uses
the video feature connector on the motherboard then
it is best to install the card in the lowest slot.
c. If you are installing a drive controller card that you
want to connect to a drive in the 5.25" drive bay, then
it is easiest to install it in the top slot.
5/4
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
To remove the blanking plate, first unscrew the
securing screw, then slide the plate out of its slot.
Keep the screw, you will use it later to secure the
card.
5.
You are now ready to install the card. However,
before you do so you must first ensure that the card
is correctly configured for your system.
6.
Position the expansion card alongside the slot in which
you wish to install it. Align the rear of the card with
the slot in the rear of the system unit, and, if the card
is full length, the front of the card with the card guide.
Note
If the card uses the video feature connector on the
motherboard, you must plug the video feature cable into
the motherboard socket before you install the card.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 5/5
Chapter 5
Information on configuring cards for use in your
computer is given in the appendices at the rear of this
manual. Use this information in conjunction with the
documentation supplied with your card to configure
the card so that it will not clash with any of the
features on the motherboard, or any other expansion
cards already installed.
Chapter 5
Expanding the system
7.
Slide the card into the slot ensuring that the card edge
connector engages correctly with the expansion card
connector.
8.
Carefully push the card fully home. Do not apply
excessive pressure.
9.
Secure the card by replacing the screw that you
removed in step 4.
10. Connect any signal cables to the card.
11. Replace the system unit cover.
Memory upgrades
Configurations
The motherboard is fitted with sockets for four SIMMs (Single
In-line Memory Modules). The sockets support standard 70nS
4 Mbyte (1MX32), 8 Mbyte (2MX32), 16 Mbyte (4MX32) and
32 Mbyte (8MX32) SIMMs, and are arranged in two pairs.
Note
Standard 70nS SIMMs will always work in systems with a 60MHz
base clock frequency, Pentium 60 and 90 systems. Systems with a
66MHz base clock frequency, Pentium 66 and 100 systems, may
require 60nS SIMMs for optimum performance. If you are uncertain
check with your supplier.
Each pair of sockets forms a single 64-bit wide memory bank.
If a bank is populated it must always be fitted with a matched
pair of SIMMs, giving upgrade capacities of 8, 16, 32 and 64
Mbytes. Optimum performance is achieved when all four
sockets are populated with matched SIMMs.
Each bank can be populated, or fitted with a pair of matching
SIMMs of any of the capacities supported. The two banks are
numbered 0 and 1, and the sockets have text alongside them
identifying the banks.
5/6
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
The illustration below shows the location of the sockets, and
identifies the two banks.
Chapter 5
BANK 1
BANK 0
Installation
In order to install a memory upgrade you must:
1.
Power the system down.
2.
Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the
system unit cover.
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the
system unit cover refer to the appendices at the rear
of this manual.
The SIMM connectors are located beneath the 5.25"
drive bay. In order to install a memory upgrade you
must remove the 5.25" drive bay.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 5/7
Expanding the system
3.
If there is a drive fitted, disconnect the power and
signal cables from the rear of the drive.
4.
Remove the two screws that secure the drive bay and
slide the bay backwards.
5.
Lift the bay out of the system unit and put it down on
a safe flat surface.
Chapter 5
Removing SIMMs
If you wish to install an upgrade in a bank which is already
occupied you must first remove the existing SIMMs.
1.
Lever the metal clips on each end of the socket gently
away from the SIMM using your forefingers.
2.
Place your thumbs on the top edge of the SIMM and
move it gently towards the vertical.
3.
When the SIMM has rotated through 20°, taking care
to avoid touching any of the components on the SIMM,
grip the top corners of the SIMM between thumb and
first finger and carefully pull the SIMM out of the
socket.
4.
Repeat steps 1 to 3 for the second SIMM.
Inserting SIMMs
To fit SIMMs:
1.
The SIMMs will only install in one orientation. There
is a cutout at one end of the SIMM next to the
connector strip.
Hold the SIMM with the cutout towards the front of
the system, and the metal connector strip nearest the
motherboard.
5/8
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
Position the SIMM above the socket with the SIMM
tilted slightly to the left.
3.
Lower the SIMM into the socket, and ensure that the
SIMM is properly located in the connector.
4.
Pushing gently on the top corners rotate the SIMM
towards the horizontal until it clips into place. Do not
use excessive force.
If the SIMM will not rotate easily remove it and start
again.
5.
If the SIMM is properly located the SIMM should
remain in position held by the securing clips, and with
a small plastic lug through the holes on either side of
the SIMM.
6.
Repeat steps 1 to 5 for the second SIMM.
Once you have completed installation you can replace the
5.25" drive bay and reassemble the system.
1.
Replace the 5.25" bay in the system unit.
2.
Slide the bay forwards until the two holes in the bay
line up with those in the hard drive assembly and the
system unit brace.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 5/9
Chapter 5
2.
Expanding the system
3.
Replace the two screws which secure the 5.25" drive
bay.
4.
If there is a drive in the bay reconnect its power and
signal cables.
5.
Replace the system unit cover.
Chapter 5
The next time you power the system up the SETUP utility will
be invoked automatically.
Processor upgrades
Pentium 60 and 66 systems are fitted with an Intel Socket 4
Zero-Insertion-Force (ZIF) socket. This socket is ready to
accept any 5V Pentium variant with a Socket 4 compatible
pinout, and an external clock speed which matches the original
processor.
Pentium 90 and 100 systems are fitted with an Intel Socket 5
Zero-Insertion-Force (ZIF) socket. This socket is ready to
accept any 3.3V Pentium variant with a Socket 5 compatible
pinout, and an external clock speed which matches the original
processor.
Removing the processor
Before installing the upgrade processor you must first remove
the existing processor. The processor is at the front left of
the motherboard. Instructions on locating the socket and
removing a processor are given below.
1.
Power the system down.
2.
Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the
system unit cover.
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the
system unit cover refer to the appendices at the rear
of this manual.
3.
5/10
Identify the processor socket.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
intel
i 486 DX2-66
TM
Chapter 5
The processor is installed in a ZIF socket. A lever
attached to the socket clamps the processor securely
in the socket when it is parallel to the motherboard.
4.
Carefully rotate the lever from the secure position
until it is perpendicular to the motherboard
FREE
LOCKED
The first and last 15° of movement may require
considerable effort. Apply just enough pressure to
overcome the resistance offered by the lever.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/11
Expanding the system
5.
Once the processor is free of its socket lift it out of
the system unit and place it on the anti-static foam
provided with the upgrade processor.
1.
The upgrade processor and socket are keyed to
ensure that the processor can only be installed in one
orientation. The inside of one corner of the socket
has a key hole, and correspondingly the processor has
a extra pin. The corner of the processor which has
the extra pin is identified by having a small flat across
the corner.
2.
Carefully position the upgrade processor above the
socket with the keyed corner of the processor over
the keyed corner of the socket and the securing lever
in the perpendicular position.
Chapter 5
Installation
PROCESSOR
IN CENTRE
Warning
If the processor is misaligned it will not go into the socket,
and any attempt to force it will damage the processor, or
the socket, or both.
5/12
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
3.
Gently insert the upgrade processor making sure that
it is correctly aligned with the socket and that you
do not bend or otherwise damage the pins.
4.
Once you are certain that all the pins on the processor
are in the holes in the socket carefully move the
securing lever to the locked position.
5.
You may now reassemble the system unit.
Intel OverDrive® processors
When installing an Intel OverDrive processor, you must
ensure there is sufficient air space around it. If you don’t leave
enough air space, the processor may overheat. So, ensure that
no obstructions (such as cables or expansion cards) intrude
upon the open air space shown below.
0.2"/0.5cm
0.2"/0.5cm
0.4"/1.1cm
FAN/HEATSINK
1.0"/2.54cm
PROCESSOR
SOCKET
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/13
Chapter 5
The lever may require a considerable amount of force
in order to lock the processor in place. Take care to
exert no more force than is necessary.
Expanding the system
Note
Installing an OverDrive processor in the system will prevent a full
length card from being installed in slot 1. However, shorter cards
may be fitted in slot 1, provided they do not intrude upon the
OverDrive’s open air space.
Chapter 5
Installing additional video RAM
The motherboard is fitted with two sockets which allow the
video RAM to be expanded from 1 Mbyte to 2 Mbytes using
70nS 256k x 16 DRAM chips.
1.
Power the system down.
2.
Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the
system unit cover.
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the
system unit cover refer to the appendices at the rear
of this manual.
The video RAM sockets connectors are located in the
left rear corner of the system unit beneath the adapter
card slots. In order to install a video RAM upgrade
you must remove any adapter cards installed in the
system.
5/14
3.
If there are adapter cards fitted, disconnect any cables
connected to the cards.
4.
Remove the screws that secure the cards to the rear
of the system unit.
5.
Remove the cards.
6.
Identify the video RAM sockets from the following
illustration.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
Pin 1
Chapter 5
7.
One by one, carefully align the video RAM chips over
the sockets. Make sure that they are in the correct
orientation.
The chips have pin 1 clearly marked, pin 1 is also
marked on the motherboard at the left end of the
sockets.
8.
Carefully replace the cards, reconnect any cables and
reassemble the system.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/15
Expanding the system
5.25" drives
Chapter 5
The 5.25" drive bay in the system unit can contain any standard
size half height 5.25" device. A range of tape and CD-ROM
drives, and a 5.25" floppy drive, are available for this bay.
The following instructions describe the installation of a drive
in the bay. The Generic instructions apply to all drives, and
describe the physical installation of a drive.
Instructions specific to each drive type are given after the
generic instructions.
Generic
1.
Power the system down.
2.
Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the
system unit cover.
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the
system unit cover refer to the appendices at the rear
of this manual.
SECURING SCREWS
3.
5/16
Remove the two screws that secure the drive bay and
slide the bay backwards.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
4.
Lift the bay out of the system unit.
5.
The aperture in the chassis at the front of the drive bay
is obscured by a blanking plate. The blanking plate is
attached to the top of the chassis and must be removed
in order to install a drive in the 5.25" drive bay.
Open the drive bay door and identify the blanking
plate.
Chapter 5
BLANKING PLATE
6.
Break the blanking plate out by bending it backwards
and returning it to the vertical several times.
7.
Remove the drive from its packaging. With the drive
there should be four screws and a signal cable. Some
drives may be supplied with additional items.
8.
If necessary configure the drive. Drives purchased
from an authorized supplier will be correctly
configured for installation in your computer.
For information on how these drives are configured
see the drive specific information following these
installation instructions.
9.
Identify the top and bottom of the drive.
10. Rest the drive, top down, on a suitable anti-static
surface.
11. With the drive bay upside-down place it over the
drive. Make sure that the bay and the drive are in the
same orientation.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/17
Expanding the system
12. Line up the holes in the underside of the drive with
those in the base of the drive bay.
Chapter 5
SECURING
SCREW
HOLES
ACT
COMP
13. Insert the four drive securing screws, and tighten them
until they are finger tight.
SECURING SCREWS
ACT
COMP
14. Gently tighten the four screws.
5/18
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
15. Turn the drive bay over and replace it in the system
unit.
16. Slide the bay forwards until the two holes in the bay
line up with those in the hard drive assembly and the
system unit brace.
17. Replace the two screws that secure the drive bay.
5.25" DRIVE
POWER CABLE
19. The drive has now been installed and connected to a
power cable. You must now connect it to a signal
cable. Instructions on connecting each of the types
of drive to a signal cable is given under the appropriate
heading overleaf.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/19
Chapter 5
18. Connect the spare power cable in the loom behind
the drive to the drive power connector.
Expanding the system
5.25" floppy or FTD
Cabling
The 5.25" floppy and FTD drives come complete with a suitable
signal cable. The signal cable must be connected between the
signal connector on the rear of the drive, the 3.5" floppy drive
and the socket marked floppy on the motherboard.
Chapter 5
Configuration
The only configuration on these drives is via the drive select
jumpers at the rear of the drive. The jumpers should be set
to drive select 1 (DS1).
Warning
Check the label on the inside of the system unit cover to make sure
you are using the correct connector. Failure to do so may damage
the drive or the system board.
ATA-PI CD-ROM
Cabling
The ATA-PI CD-ROM drive is supplied with two signal cables.
The wide data cable must be connected between the rear of
the CD-ROM drive and ISA IDE connector (PL12) on the
motherboard. The narrow audio cable must be connected
between the drive and a suitable connector on an expansion
card with audio functionality.
Warning
Check the label on the inside of the system unit cover to make sure
you are using the correct connector. Failure to do so may damage
the drive or the motherboard.
Configuration
The ISA IDE interface supports two drives, Master or Slave.
The CD-ROM drive can be configured to be either. When the
CD-ROM is the only drive connected to the ISA IDE interface
it should be configured as Master.
5/20
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
If a second drive is connected to the ISA IDE interface you
must ensure that one drive is configured as Master, and the
other as Slave.
DOS drivers for the CD-ROM drive are described in help files
on a diskette supplied with the drive.
SCSI drives
Authorized upgrade kits are supplied with a suitable signal
cable. The cable should be connected between the SCSI card
and the rear of the drive.
The following illustration shows a typical routing of the cable.
SCSI CABLE
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/21
Chapter 5
Cabling
Expanding the system
Configuration
Each SCSI drive is assigned an identity on the SCSI bus, these
are known as SCSI IDs. All authorized SCSI tape drives are
supplied configured with SCSI ID 2, the SCSI CD-ROM drive
is configured with ID 5.
Chapter 5
All authorized SCSI drives are supplied with termination
resistors fitted.
3.5" hard disk drive
The system unit supports one 1.6" high or two 1" high, 3.5"
hard disk drives.
Preparation
To install a hard disk drive you must first remove the 3.5" drive
bay:
1.
Power the system down.
2.
If there is a diskette in the 3.5" floppy drive, remove
it.
3.
Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the
system unit cover.
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the
system unit cover refer to the appendices at the rear
of this manual.
In order to remove the 3.5" drive bay you must first
remove the 5.25" drive bay.
5/22
4.
If there is a drive fitted in the 5.25" bay disconnect
the power and signal cables from the rear of the drive.
5.
Remove the two screws that secure the 5.25" drive
bay and slide the bay backwards.
6.
Lift the 5.25" bay out of the system unit and put it
down on a safe flat surface.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
7.
Disconnect the cable from the rear of the 3.5" floppy
drive.
8.
If a 3.5" hard disk is fitted remove the signal and power
cables from the rear of the drive.
9.
The 3.5" drive bay is secured by two screws and two
lugs in the system unit base. Identify the screws and
lugs from the following illustration.
Chapter 5
SECURING
SCREWS
10. Remove the two securing screws shown in the
illustration above.
11. Slide the 3.5" drive bay backwards and lift it out of
the system unit.
Drive configuration
The 3.5" drive bay supports two 1" high hard disk drives. In
order for the drive or drives to operate they must be correctly
configured.
The PCI IDE interface supports a maximum of two drives.
These drives are known as Master and Slave. A single drive,
or the boot device in a dual drive system, must be configured
as Master. The second, non-bootable, drive in a dual drive
system must be configured as Slave.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/23
Expanding the system
IDE drives are normally configured using jumpers on the drive.
Configuration details may vary from drive to drive. Authorized
drives are supplied with documentation describing how to
configure the drive.
Chapter 5
If you are uncertain about configuring the drive, check with
your supplier.
Installing the drive
1.
Having configured the drive, turn the drive bay upsidedown and rest it on a flat surface with the front of
the floppy drive towards you.
2.
Slide the hard disk drive you are installing into the bay
from the front, with the drive circuit board up, and
its connectors away from you.
Warning
If there is a drive in the bay already, be careful to ensure
that the new drive does not touch it.
Warning
It is possible to damage hard disk drives when attaching
them using side mounting holes. When installing hard disk
drives from an authorized supplier make sure that you
use the screws supplied with the drive.
5/24
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Expanding the system
When installing drives supplied by third parties, be
careful to ensure that securing screws do not come
into contact with drive circuit boards. If in doubt
check with your supplier.
3.
Line up the screw holes on the sides of the drive with
those in the bay, insert the securing screws supplied
with the drive and tighten them until they are finger
tight.
4.
Carefully tighten the screws.
5.
Turn the bay over.
Reassembling the system
1.
Replace the 3.5" drive bay in the system unit. Make
sure that the cutouts in the bay align with the lugs in
the base of the system unit.
2.
Carefully slide the 3.5" drive bay forwards. The bay
is in position when the floppy drive operating button
protrudes through the front bezel and the two screw
holes in the bay line up with those in the base of the
system unit.
3.
Replace the two securing screws.
4.
Connect the 3.5" hard disk(s) to their signal and
power cables.
5.
Reconnect the 3.5" floppy drive cable.
6.
Replace the 5.25" bay in the system unit.
7.
Slide the bay forwards until the two holes in the bay
line up with those in the hard drive assembly and the
system unit brace.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
5/25
Chapter 5
Note
If you are installing a hard disk drive in a system that
previously had only a floppy drive, there will be two sets
of holes available in the bay. Install the hard drive in the
position closer to the floppy drive.
Expanding the system
8.
Replace the two screws which secure the 5.25" drive
bay.
9.
If there is a drive in the bay reconnect its power and
signal cables.
Chapter 5
10. Replace the system unit cover.
5/26
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
CARING FOR YOUR COMPUTER
Chapter
Chapter
6
Caring for your computer
6
CARING FOR YOUR COMPUTER
This chapter provides information on how to care for your
computer. Your computer requires little physical
maintenance other than occasional cleaning. But you must
take care when transporting it to avoid damage to its delicate
components, particularly the hard disks.
Chapter 6
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 6/1
Caring for your computer
Cleaning your computer
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords before
cleaning it.
If you have any problems which can’t be resolved by cleaning,
consult Chapter 7 “Troubleshooting” .
The system unit
Do not use sprays, solvents or abrasives that might damage
the computer’s surface. Do not use cleaning fluids or sprays
near air vents, ports, or removable-media drives.
• Occasionally wipe the system unit with a soft, slightly
damp, lint-free cloth.
Chapter 6
• Occasionally wipe the air vents on the rear and sides
of the system unit. Dust and fluff can block the vents
and limit the airflow.
• Occasionally clean the diskette drive using a
proprietary head cleaner.
The monitor
Occasionally wipe the monitor with a soft, slightly damp,
lint-free cloth. It is best to use anti-static glass cleaner on
the monitor screen, but do not spray glass cleaner directly
onto the screen; it could run down inside the case and
damage the circuitry.
The keyboard
When necessary, clean the keycaps with a slightly damp
cloth and a minimum amount of a non-abrasive cleaning
agent.
Take care not to spill any liquid onto the keyboard. Follow
these steps if you spill something on the keyboard and it
stops working:
6/2 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Caring for your computer
1.
If the liquid is viscous, unplug the keyboard and call
your supplier or authorized maintainer.
2.
If the liquid is thin and clear, try unplugging the
keyboard, turning it upside down to let the liquid
drain out, and drying it for at least 24 hours at room
temperature. If the keyboard still won’t work, call
your supplier or authorized maintainer.
If a solid object drops between the keys, turn the keyboard
upside down and shake it; do not probe between the keys
as this may cause damage.
The mouse
Dust and dirt may accumulate in the ball tracking mechanism
of the mouse. To clean the mouse:
Unplug the mouse, turn it upside down and locate
the plastic cover that holds the ball in place.
Depending on the model, the plastic cover can be
removed either by rotating it anti-clockwise or by
sliding it forward slightly.
2.
Remove the cover and set it aside.
3.
Cupping one hand over the underside, turn the mouse
back the right way up. The ball will drop into your
hand.
4.
Blow gently into the mouse to remove any dust that
has collected there.
5.
Inside the mouse there are three plastic rollers.
Using a cotton swab moistened with a solvent
cleaner, gently wipe off any oil or dust that has
collected on the rollers, rotating them to reach all
surfaces.
6.
Use clear water, or water with a mild detergent, to
clean the ball. Then dry it with a clean, lint-free
cloth.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 6/3
Chapter 6
1.
Caring for your computer
7.
Put the ball back in its socket and replace the plastic
cover. It should click into place.
The FTD tape drive
You should clean the read/write head and the capstan of the
FTD frequently to prevent the accumulation of dust and
metallic particles.
If you notice read or write errors, or many bad blocks when
using the drive, be sure to clean the head and capstan
thoroughly before concluding that the drive or your tapes
are defective.
Chapter 6
The read/write head and the capstan are accessible through
the flip-up drive door, as shown below.
Although it is possible to use special kits to clean the drive, it
is recommended that you use 90% isopropyl alcohol and
several non-abrasive, lint free swabs, as follows:
6/4 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Caring for your computer
1.
Gently rub an alcohol-dampened swab against the
surface of the read/write head. If the swab becomes
too discoloured, use additional swabs until there is
no further discolouration.
2.
Rub an alcohol-dampened swab against the surface of
the capstan using an up and down motion. Gently
rotate the capstan and continue rubbing until the
entire surface is clean.
3.
Wait for at least one minute before using the tape
drive. This allows any residual alcohol to evaporate.
If you clean the read/write head first, and the swab is not
too discoloured, you may use the same swab to clean the
capstan. But if you clean the capstan first, you must not use
the same swab to clean the read/write head.
You should clean the SCSI QIC tape drive after every 8 hours’
use, using the special cleaning kit available from your supplier.
Full instructions for cleaning are provided with this kit.
It is also advisable to clean the tape drive after the first use of
a new tape.
The SCSI DDS-DC tape drive
The read/write heads in the tape drive are protected during
normal operation by a built-in cleaning roller. In addition, a
special cleaning cassette is available from your supplier. This
cassette should be used:
•
•
Every 25 operating hours.
When a media warning status is indicated.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 6/5
Chapter 6
The SCSI QIC tape drive
Caring for your computer
When you insert the cleaning cassette, the drive recognises
it as a cleaning cassette, runs it for about 20 seconds, then
ejects it automatically. Each time the cleaning cassette is used
the tape advances over an unused portion of the tape. If the
drive ejects the cleaning cassette immediately after you insert
it, this means that the entire tape has been used and a new
cleaning cassette is required. You cannot rewind a cleaning
cassette.
Do not attempt to use an ordinary audio DAT cleaning
cassette. The drive will be unable to recognise it as a cleaning
cassette.
Chapter 6
Transporting your computer
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords before
moving the computer.
Use common sense when handling your computer; hard
disks in particular can be damaged if the computer is
dropped or handled roughly. As a precaution, back up (copy)
the contents of your hard disks to tape or diskettes before
moving the computer.
Don’t try to move the computer while it is plugged into the
AC power supply or with any other cables, including
network cables, still attached.
When lifting and carrying the computer, grip the metal
underside of the system unit. Do not lift the unit by the
plastic side trims or the front bezel. Never attempt to use
the door as a carrying handle. Never attempt to lift the
system unit with a monitor on top.
If you need to transport the computer any great distance,
use the original packing materials.
If you intend to use your computer in another country, see
Chapter 3, “Operating your computer “, for some important
advice.
6/6 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
TROUBLESHOOTING
Chapter
Chapter
7
Troubleshooting
7
TROUBLESHOOTING
This chapter offers advice if you suspect a fault with your
computer. If in doubt, turn off the computer and unplug all
power cords before consulting your supplier or an
authorized maintainer.
This chapter is concerned only with problems caused by the
computer itself; remember that problems can also arise from
other sources such as your network cabling, operating
system or application software.
Chapter 7
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 7/1
Troubleshooting
Problems when starting
Power-on self-test
Whenever the computer is turned on or reset, the poweron self-test (POST) routine tests various hardware
components, including memory, and compares the actual
configuration of the machine with that recorded in
configuration (CMOS) memory.
A configuration discrepancy could arise if you have just
installed or removed a hardware option (for example, if you
have added or replaced SIMMs). In this case you are
prompted to invoke the SETUP utility.
If POST detects a hardware fault, one or more error
messages are displayed. You may also be prompted to “Press
the F1 key to continue”.
Chapter 7
Your first action should be to turn the computer off, wait
at least 30 seconds, then turn it on again to see if the error
condition is transient or persistent. Persistent POST error
messages may indicate a fault in your system. If you press
F1, the computer attempts to boot despite the error
indication (for example, if a memory chip fails POST, the
computer can continue with less memory). If the problem
persists, make a note of the error messages and the
conditions under which they occur, and consult your
supplier or an approved maintainer.
Beep codes
The computer uses special audio beep codes to signal
certain hardware faults. If you hear a beep code which is not
accompanied by a POST error message (see above), call your
supplier or an authorized maintainer.
7/2 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Troubleshooting
Failure to boot
On the completion of POST, the computer attempts to boot
from a system diskette then a bootable hard disk partition.
MS-DOS is normally pre-installed on systems with a hard
disk.
If necessary, your operating system manuals should tell you
how to format a blank diskette as a system diskette (for
example, DOS uses the Format a: /s command) or how to
partition and format a hard disk (DOS uses the Fdisk utility
and Format command).
The rest of this section lists some of the error messages
that can be displayed when the computer fails to boot.
Non-system disk or disk error
Press the F1 key to continue
The diskette drive contains a non-system diskette. Replace
it with a system diskette and press F1.
Diskette read failure
Press the F1 key to continue
No boot sector on fixed disk
Press the F1 key to continue
The hard disk has no active, bootable partition or is not
formatted. Insert a system diskette, press F1, and format
the hard disk as described in your operating system manuals.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 7/3
Chapter 7
The diskette is either not formatted or defective. Replace
it with a system diskette and press F1.
Troubleshooting
Fixed disk read failure
Press the F1 key to continue
The hard disk may be defective. Press F1 to retry. If the
problem persists, insert a system diskette, press F1, backup the data held on the defective hard disk and try
reformatting it.
No boot device available
Press the F1 key to continue
This may indicate a fault in the diskette or hard disk drive,
or perhaps a damaged system diskette. Press F1 to retry,
using another system diskette if possible. If the problem
persists, consult your supplier or an approved maintainer.
Checklist
If you encounter a problem with your computer the
following list suggests a number of checks to make before
you ring your dealer or support organisation. The checks
listed cover the causes of common problems.
Chapter 7
Connections
Check that all power and signal cables are securely
connected to the correct socket on the computer.
The keyboard and mouse are particularly easy to plug into
the wrong connector. Although the connectors are identical
the keyboard will not work if it is connected to the mouse
port and vice versa.
The two serial ports are also identical, if you have a problem
make sure that cable is connected to the port you are trying
use.
7/4 XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Troubleshooting
Power
Check that the AC power supply is switched on, and that
the fuse in the AC plug has not blown. If the system still
does not seem to be getting power, try another power cord.
Display
If there is no display check: that the monitor is turned on,
and the brightness and contrast controls are set
appropriately.
Expansion cards
If an expansion card does not work, check: that all cables
are securely connected to the card, that the card is
configured correctly and does not clash with another card
or a motherboard feature, and that software which drives
or uses the card is correctly configured.
Floppy drives
Hard disk drives
If you have problems accessing a hard disk drive, check: that
the controller the drive is connected to is enabled, that the
disk has been correctly formatted, and that the file attributes
allow you to perform the current operation.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK 7/5
Chapter 7
If you have problems accessing a floppy disk or diskette,
check: that the disk is inserted correctly, the disk has been
correctly formatted, that the disk is not write protected
and that the file attributes allow you to perform the current
operation.
INSIDE YOUR COMPUTER
Chapter
Appendix
A
Inside your computer
A
INSIDE YOUR COMPUTER
This appendix provides step-by-step instructions on
obtaining access to the inside of your computer’s system
unit. Note that instructions for installing upgrade options
are provided in Chapter 5 “Upgrading your computer”.
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords
before removing the top cover.
Also included here is information on configuring expansion
cards, and on motherboard jumper settings.
Appendix A
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/1
Inside your computer
Anti-static precautions
Static electricity can cause permanent damage to electronic
components. You should be aware of this risk, and take
precautions against the discharge of static electricity into
your computer.
Anyone can generate static electricity by moving on a chair,
brushing against desks or walls, or simply walking across an
ordinary carpet. Items handed from one person to another,
or being wrapped or unwrapped, can acquire a static charge.
Air conditioning systems can also result in ambient static.
Clothing made of synthetic fibres is particularly likely to
generate static electricity; this static electricity is often
completely unnoticed by the wearer, but can be sufficient
to cripple or impair an electronic component.
Your computer is at risk from static discharge while the top
cover is off. This is because the electronic components of
the motherboard are exposed. Expansion cards, SIMMs and
OverDrive processors are other examples of electrostatic
sensitive devices (ESDs).
Appendix A
All work that involves removing the computer’s top cover
must be done in an area completely free of static electricity.
In order to ensure this it is recommended that you use a
Special Handling Area (SHA) as defined by EN 100015-1: 1992.
This means that working surfaces, floor coverings and chairs
must be connected to a common earth reference point, and
you should wear an earthed wrist strap and anti-static clothing.
It is also a good idea to use an ionizer or humidifier to remove
static from the air.
When installing any add-on, be sure you understand what
the installation procedure involves before you start. This will
enable you to plan your work, and so minimize the amount
of time that sensitive components are exposed.
Do not remove the computer’s top cover, nor the anti-static
bag or wrapping of any add-on, until you need to.
A/2
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Inside your computer
Handle static-sensitive items with extreme care. Hold
expansion cards and add-on components only by their
edges, avoiding their electrical contacts. Never touch the
components or electrical contacts on the motherboard or
on expansion cards. In general, do not handle static-sensitive
items unnecessarily.
Keep all conductive material, and food and drink, away from
your work area and the open computer.
Removing the top cover
1.
Turn off both the system unit and the monitor.
2.
If your AC power outlets have switches, set them
to their Off positions.
3.
Unplug all power cords from rear of the system unit.
4.
If the system unit has a caselock (on the right-hand
side), turn the caselock key to the unlocked position.
5.
Loosen the two casing screws.
6.
Slide the top cover rearwards slightly, then lift it off.
Refitting the cover is the reverse of removal. Take effective
anti-static precautions while the top cover is off.
Appendix A
CASING SCREW
CASING SCREW
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/3
Inside your computer
Configuring expansion cards
Many expansion cards have a number of configurable options.
These options can include items such as: the interrupt used,
the DMA channel used, where any ROM on the card will
appear in the processor’s memory map and which I/O ports
are used to control the card.
How to select options like this varies from card to card and
will be described in documentation supplied with the card.
Remember to check any floppy disks supplied with the card
for README or Help files.
Most ISA cards use jumpers and/or switches to select their
configuration options. If this is the case then the card should
be configured before you install it. A few cards are configured
using a software utility supplied with the card, this can only
be done after the card is installed.
PCI cards are automatically configured by a utility in the BIOS.
A PCI configuration screen is provided in SETUP. This screen
is provided for completeness and it is unlikely that you will
need to use it. A description of the options on the screen is
provided in Chapter 4 “SETUP”.
If you are not familiar with the concepts of interrupts, DMA
channels, memory maps and I/O ports the following text
attempts to explain what they are, and how to decide which
option to select.
Appendix A
For the following explanations it should be understood that a
peripheral can be either, a subsystem on the motherboard,
or an expansion card.
A/4
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Inside your computer
Interrupts (IRQ)
Your computer (like every other ISA compatible PC) supports
15 (IRQ) hardware interrupts. These interrupts are used to
alert the processor that a peripheral (e.g. the keyboard
controller, or an expansion card) requires a particular piece
of software to be executed. This piece of software is known
as an interrupt service routine.
Each peripheral has a unique interrupt service routine that is
executed in response to the interrupt assigned to that
peripheral.
When an interrupt occurs, the processor stops executing its
current task, executes the interrupt service routine, then
returns to its original task. The processor is, literally,
interrupted.
A hardware interrupt may be referred to as an IRQ. This is
because the motherboard signals used to generate the
interrupts are labelled IRQx where x is a number between 0
and 15, excluding 2.
Some interrupts are assigned to standard functions and are
essential for the operation of the board. Examples of these
are, IRQ0 which is used to maintain the system time, and
IRQ13 which is used by the coprocessor.
Appendix A
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/5
Inside your computer
Selecting IRQs for cards
The table below lists the interrupts available on the
motherboard and their default functions. The notes explain
whether the default function can be disabled, if so how, and
under what circumstances it is safe to do so.
Interrupts
Default
Notes
Function
IRQ5, IRQ9
IRQ10, IRQ11
Not used
These interrupts are not used by
the motherboard and are available
for expansion cards.
IRQ7
Parallel port
IRQ7 is not normally used, and can
be used by expansion cards without
affecting the operation of the
parallel port. It is possible for
software to enable the parallel
port’s use of IRQ7. This is rare but
could cause problems with a card
using IRQ7.
Appendix A
If you are not using the parallel port
it can be disabled using SETUP,
freeing IRQ7 to be used by an
expansion card.
A/6
IRQ15
Secondary IDE
interface
This interrupt can be used if a
secondary IDE interface is disabled,
or not fitted.
IRQ3
IRQ4
Serial port 2
Serial port 1
Each of the serial ports, can be
individually disabled using SETUP.
When a port is disabled, the
interrupt assigned to it is free and
can be used by an expansion card.
You should only disable a port if you
are certain that you will not be
using it.
IRQ1
IRQ6
IRQ8
IRQ12
IRQ14
Keyboard
These interrupts cannot be used
Floppy disk controller by an expansion card under any
Real time clock
circumstances.
Mouse
Hard disk controller
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Inside your computer
Refer to the table above, and the documentation supplied with
the card to establish which IRQ, if any, to use and how to select
it.
DMA channels
ISA compatible PCs are equipped with a seven channel DMA
(Direct Memory Access) controller. This DMA subsystem
allows peripherals to access motherboard memory directly.
Without the DMA subsystem every memory access would
have to involve the processor. Using DMA, peripherals can
access memory without stopping the processor executing its
current task.
On the motherboard DMA channel 2 is used by the floppy
controller and channel 3 by the Enhanced Capabilities Port,
the other channels are all available for use by expansion cards.
Expansion card memory
Some expansion cards are fitted with ROM. Typically
expansion card ROM contains extensions to the motherboard
BIOS providing additional functionality.
Expansion card ROM (sometimes known as slot ROM) must
be addressed somewhere in the processor’s memory map. An
area of the memory map of an ISA compatible PC is allocated
for expansion card ROM.
Numbers and computers
For a variety of reasons, in computer literature and
terminology, numbers are sometimes in hexadecimal notation
rather than the decimal that we are all familiar with.
Hexadecimal is a long word and it is often shortened to hex.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/7
Appendix A
If you are unfamiliar with the concept of memory maps, and
the hexadecimal numbering system the following text attempts
to explain them. If you are familiar with the memory map of
an ISA PC then continue to Configuring expansion ROM.
Inside your computer
If you think of the decimal system using columns:
1000
(10x10x10)
100
(10x10)
10
(10)
1
(1)
10
1
1
9
The number 1019 is:
1000
1
100
0
Each time you add 1 to a column that contains 9, that column
goes back to 0 and you add 1 to the column to the left. The
columns represent powers of 10: 10x10, 10x10x10 and so on,
and the decimal system is said to be base 10.
The hex numbering system uses a base of 16. Hex numbering
works in exactly the same way as the decimal system, except
you must add 1 to a column that contains 15 before you add
1 to the column to the left.
As we have no single character to represent the numbers 10
to 15, we substitute the first six letters of the alphabet, so
that:
A represents 10
B represents 11
C represents 12
D represents 13
E represents 14
F represents 15
Appendix A
The example number 1019 can then be represented in hex
by:
4096
(16x16x16)
0
A/8
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
256
(16x16)
3
16
(16)
F
1
(1)
B
Inside your computer
We can demonstrate that 3FB is exactly the same as 1019 by:
(4096x0)+(256x3)+(16xF)+(1xB)=768+240+11=1019
Note
A lower case h is often used at the end of a number to ensure that
you realise it is in hex format e.g. 3FBh.
A larger hex number, and one that you will come across in
the Memory map description below, is A0000h. To see this as
a decimal number:
16x16x16x16
16x16x16
16x16
16
1
A
0
0
0
0
16x16x16x16=65536
So A0000h is 65536x10=655360.
If you have Microsoft Windows 3.1 on your computer you may
find it helpful to use the Windows Calculator. In Scientific View
the calculator allows you to enter decimal numbers and
convert them to hex, and vice versa.
Another commonly used notation is to describe numbers as
xK or xM. Where 1K=1024 and 1M=1048576
(1048576=1024x1024). In this notation 655360 (that is
A0000h) is 640K.
All memory, whether it is on the motherboard or an expansion
card, is accessed somewhere in the processor’s address space.
The processor’s address space can be thought of as a list of
locations, the locations are each identified by a number. The
first, or bottom, location is address 0.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/9
Appendix A
Memory maps
Inside your computer
Every address contains 8-bits of data, a byte. Each bit can be
thought of as a switch which can be either on or off. A byte is
like a bank of 8-switches, where each switch can be on or off.
ON
OFF
ON
1
OFF
1
2
3
4
BIT
5
6
7
8
BYTE
So 1Mbyte of memory consists of 1048576 (see Numbers and
computers) locations each containing one byte of data.
When installing expansion cards it is the first (bottom) Mbyte
of address space that is of most interest. The following diagram
shows how the bottom 1M of address space is used in your
computer. Diagrams like these are called memory maps, and
are a convenient way of representing processor address space.
1M-1
960K
FFFFFh
BIOS
RESERVED
896K
F0000h
E0000h
EXPANSION CARD ROM
800K
768K
VIDEO BIOS
C8000h
C0000h
VIDEO MEMORY
A0000h
640K
Appendix A
DOS
0
A/10
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
00000h
Inside your computer
Note
The top location of this first Mbyte is 1M-1 or FFFFFh. This is because
in the first Mbyte there are 1M locations, starting at 0. Location
1M is the start of the second Mbyte of address space.
The memory map above shows the uses of the first Mbyte of
address space. The memory map is arranged in this way in
order to be compatible with the ISA standard.
The region from 0 to 640k-1 (00000h to 9FFFFh) is used by
DOS. The operating system is loaded at the bottom of this
area and it uses the remainder to load applications and data.
Motherboard video adapter memory is accessed between 640k
and 768k-1 (A0000h to BFFFFh). In your computer the
motherboard video BIOS is addressed between 768k and
800k-1 (C0000h to C7FFFh).
The region from 800k to 896k-1 (C8000h to DFFFFh) is
available for expansion card ROM, other than video BIOS. The
region from 896k to 960k-1 (E0000h to EFFFFh) is reserved.
While address space from 960k to 1M-1 (F0000h to FFFFFh)
is used by the motherboard BIOS.
When installing expansion cards the area of most interest is
between 768k and 896k-1 (C0000h to DFFFFh).
Configuring expansion ROM
Expansion card ROM is addressed in the C0000h to DFFFFh
region of processor address space.
Note
If your video card does not allow you to configure the address range
of its BIOS it will be set to the C0000h range.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/11
Appendix A
Motherboard video BIOS is accessed from C0000h to C7FFFh.
If you are installing a video card it should be configured with
its BIOS occupying this region.
Inside your computer
The region from C8000h to DFFFFh is available for expansion
card ROM other than video BIOS. It is recommended that you
configure expansion card ROM at the bottom of this region,
with the address ranges as close together as possible without
any overlapping.
This will leave the maximum amount of memory free for use
as UMB space. For information on UMB space refer to your
DOS documentation, and the help files supplied with your
computer.
I/O ports
I/O ports are used by the processor to control the operation
of peripherals. Some expansion cards are controlled via an I/O
port or group of ports.
Appendix A
Which port or ports the card uses can normally be selected
on the card. The following table lists the I/O ports used by
the motherboard. Any ports not listed below may be used by
an expansion card. Refer to the table, and the documentation
supplied with the card to establish which ports, if any, to use
and how to select them.
A/12
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Inside your computer
I/O ports (Hex)
Used by
000 - 01F
020 - 027
030 - 037
040 - 047
050 - 057
060 - 06F
070 - 07F
080 - 09F
0A0 - 0BF
0C0 - 0DF
0F0, 0F1
0F8 - 0FF
1F0 - 1F8
178, 17A
278 - 27F
2F8 - 2FF
35F, 36F
37F
378 - 37F
3F0 - 3F7
3F8 - 3FF
928 - 92F
DMA controller 1
Interrupt controller 1
Interrupt controller 1
System timer
System timer
Keyboard controller
Real time clock, NMI mask
DMA page register
Interrupt controller 2
DMA controller 2
Math coprocessor
Math coprocessor
Hard disk drive controller
Power-saving port
Parallel port 2
Serial port 2
Power-saving port
Reserved
Parallel port 1
Diskette drive controller
Serial port 1
Motherboard control ports
Note
I/O ports are always given in hex notation. If you are unfamiliar
with this notation refer to Numbers and Computers earlier in
this appendix.
Appendix A
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/13
Inside your computer
Motherboard jumper settings
The motherboard is fitted with a number of jumpers that are
used to configure the operation of the system. The following
illustration shows the position of the jumpers.
J4
J3
J12
J9
J13
J14
J11
J2
All the jumpers are three pin. These can be configured with a
jumper clip connecting the centre pin and either of the two
end pins. The function of each jumper is described in the
following paragraphs, text printed on the motherboard
alongside each jumper identifies the positions described below.
Appendix A
Jumper J2 - CMOS clear
This jumper is used to clear the motherboard configuration
memory. During normal operation the jumper clip should be
in the position marked NOR on the motherboard.
If you have reason to clear the configuration memory then,
with the system powered down, move the jumper clip to the
position marked CLR for a few seconds.
A/14
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Inside your computer
Jumper J3 - Flash ROM program
This jumper is used to enable programming of the
motherboard flash ROM to upgrade the BIOS. During normal
operation the flash ROM is write protected and the jumper
clip should be in the position marked WP on the motherboard.
Note
Upgrading the BIOS should only be carried out by your supplier or
an authorized maintainer.
In order to reprogram the flash ROM chip; with the system
powered down, move the jumper clip to the position marked
EN. Once you have upgraded the BIOS power the system
down and return the jumper to the WP position.
Jumper J4 - BIOS recover
This jumper is provided to allow recovery from a failed attempt
to upgrade the BIOS. During normal operation the jumper clip
should be in the position marked NOR on the motherboard.
If an attempt to reprogram the flash ROM chip with an updated
BIOS fails and the system will not boot; with the system
powered down, move the jumper clip to the position marked
REC.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/15
Appendix A
With the jumper in the REC position the system uses a minimal
bootable BIOS in a small area of the ROM that is always write
protected. Once you have recovered from the problem,
power the system down and return the jumper to the NOR
position.
Inside your computer
Jumper J9 - VGA enable
This jumper is provided to allow a hardware disable of the
on-board VGA controller. During normal operation the
jumper clip should be in the position marked EN on the
motherboard. For the majority of systems there will be no
need to move this jumper.
With the jumper in the EN position the on-board video
controller is automatically enabled unless another VGA
compatible controller is found on an expansion card. If a VGA
compatible expansion card is fitted the on-board video
controller is automatically disabled.
If you install a video expansion card and have a problem, with
the system powered down, move the jumper clip to the
position marked DIS.
Jumper J11 - PCI IDE enable
This jumper is provided to allow a hardware disable of the
PCI IDE controller. During normal operation the jumper clip
should be in the position marked EN on the motherboard.
For the majority of systems there will be no need to move
this jumper.
If for any reason you wish to disable the PCI IDE controller,
with the system powered down, move the jumper clip to the
position marked DIS.
Appendix A
Notes
This jumper is only fitted on systems which are equipped with a
PCI IDE controller.
If you do disable the PCI IDE controller you must move jumper
J12 to make the ISA IDE controller the primary controller.
A/16
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Inside your computer
Jumper J12 - ISA IDE interrupt
This jumper is provided to allow the ISA IDE controller to be
configured as either the primary or secondary IDE controller.
On systems fitted with a PCI IDE controller this jumper clip
will be in the position marked SEC.
On systems not fitted with a PCI IDE controller, or where
the PCI IDE controller is disabled, the jumper clip must be in
the position marked PRI.
Jumpers J13 and J14 - Cache module type
These two jumpers are only fitted on motherboards which
support a cache module.
Normally both jumpers should be in the position marked
ASYNC, to suit an asynchronous cache module.
If you install a synchronous cache module both jumpers must
be moved to the position marked SYNC.
Appendix A
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK A/17
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Chapter
Appendix
B
Technical Information
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
This appendix provides some technical information about
your computer. More detailed information is available from
your supplier.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK B/1
Appendix B
B
Appendix B
Technical Information
Specifications
System
processor
Intel Pentium
Processor
clock speed
60, 66, 90, 100
BIOS ROM
1 or 2Mbit flash device
(reprogrammable in situ)
Memory
Four 32-bit 70ns SIMMs (128
Mb maximum)
Video
controller
I/O ports
Video RAM
Resolutions
Serial
Parallel
Keyboard
Mouse
Cirrus Logic GD5434
1 Mb or 2 Mb
EVGA 1280 x 1024
EVGA 1024 x 768
SVGA 800 x 600
VGA 640 x 480
dual 9-way male D-type RS232
25-way female D-type
102 key AT-compatible
PS/2-compatible two-button
Diskette
drive
Capacity
Access time
1.44 Mb
94 ms (average)
Hard disk
drive bay
Interface
Form factor
Capacity
Removable
media drive
bay
Form factor
Interfaces
IDE
3.5"
One 1.6" drive or Two 1"
drives
Half-height 5.25"
Floppy disk/tape/CD-ROM
B/2
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Technical Information
Discs
Acceptable discs
Disc diameter
Transfer rate
Burst
300 Kbyte/s (Mode 1)
342.2 Kbyte/s (Mode 2)
4.0 Mbyte/s
Full stroke
Average (random)
450ms (typical)
250ms (typical)
Audio output
Line
Headphone
0.75 V at 47 kOhm
0.55 V at 32 Ohm
Power
requirement
Voltage
+5 V dc + 5%
+12 V dc + 10%
+5 V: 100 mVp-p
+12 V: 200 mVp-p
+5 V: 800 mA at tray
open/close
+12 V: 1.8 A at tray open/close
Access time
Sustained
CD-ROM mode 1 data discs
CD-ROM mode 2 data discs
CD audio discs
Audio-combined CD-ROM
Multisession Photo-CD
12 cm, 8 cm
Ripple
Current (max)
Reliability
Laser
MTBF
100,000 power on hours
Type
Wavelength
Output power
GaAlAs semiconductor
780 nm
0.6 mW
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK B/3
Appendix B
ATA-PI CD-ROM drive (CDU55E)
Appendix B
Technical Information
SCSI DDS-DC tape drive
Performance specifications apply when using data compression.
Power specifications are measured at the tape drive power
connector and are nominal values.
Nominal
capacity
60-metre cassette
90-metre cassette
Transfer
rate
Sustained
1
Unrecoverable
errors
Recording
format
Power
specification
1.3 Gbyte (1:1 base)
2.6 Gbyte (2:1 typical)
5.2 Gbyte (4:1 max1)
2.0 Gbyte (1:1 base)
4.0 Gbyte (2:1 typical)
8.0 Gbyte (4:1 max1)
366 Kbyte/s (1:1 base)
732 Kbyte/s (2:1 typical)
1464 Kbyte/s (4:1 max1)
Nominal maximum only; can be exceeded for highly-compressible data.
Less than 1 in 1015 data bits
ANSI/ECMA Digital Data Storage with Data Compression
(DDS-DC)
Voltage
Ripple
Current (max)
+12 V dc + 10%
+5 V dc + 7%
+12 V: 100 mVp-p
+5 V: 100 mVp-p
1.40 A @ +12 V dc
1.30 A @ +5 V dc
SCSI CD-ROM drives
Common
Discs
Acceptable discs
Disc diameter
B/4
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
CD-ROM mode 1 data discs
CD-ROM mode 2 data discs
CD audio discs
Audio-combined CD-ROM
Photo-CD discs
12 cm, 8 cm
Technical Information
Line
Headphone
Host
interface
Power
specification
Laser
0.75 V at 47 kOhm
0.55 V at 32 Ohm
SCSI-2
Voltage
+5 V dc + 5%
+12 V dc + 10%
Type
Wavelength
Output power
GaAlAs semiconductor
780 nm
0.6 mW
Sustained
Burst across
SCSI bus
300 Kbyte/s
2.1 Mbyte/s (asynchronous)
4.0 Mbyte/s (synchronous)
Full stroke
Average
Ripple
520 ms (typical)
295 ms (typical)
+5 V: 0.05 Vp-p
+12 V: 0.1 Vp-p
+5 V: 1.6 A at Spin up
+12 V: 1.8 A at Spin up
CDU561
Transfer rate
Access time
Power
Specification
Current (max)
CDU55S
Transfer rate
Access time
Power
Specification
Sustained
Burst across
SCSI bus
360 Kbyte/s (Mode 1)
410.6 Kbyte/s (Mode 2)
2.5 Mbyte/s (asynchronous)
4.0 Mbyte/s (synchronous)
Full stroke
Average
450 ms (typical)
220 ms (typical)
Ripple
+5 V: 100 mVp-p
+12 V: 200 mVp-p
+5 V: 800 mA at tray
open/close
+12 V: 1.8 A while Seeking
Current (max)
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK B/5
Appendix B
Audio output
Appendix B
Technical Information
Physical characteristics
Weight and dimensions
Component
Height
Depth
System unit
94 mm
430 mm 428 mm 9.5-12 kg 1
Keyboard
40 mm
205 mm 488 mm 1.4 kg
1
Width
Mass
depending on configuration
Temperature ranges
The equipment is designed to operate in a normal office and
humidity environment, but during storage and
transportation the system is more tolerant of environmental
factors.
Range
Temperature
Relative
humidity
with no condensation
Storage/
Transport
0 to +55°C
20% to 80%
Operational
+10 to +35°C
20% to 80%
Electrical characteristics
Voltage range
The PSU voltage range is initially set to that appropriate for
the country in which the computer is first sold.
Setting
AC Voltage
Frequency
115V
100 to 120 V
50 to 60 Hz
230V
220 to 240 V
50 to 60 Hz
The voltage range setting of the monitor must always agree
with that of the system unit PSU.
B/6
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Technical Information
The power cord supplied complies with the safety standards
applicable in the country in which it is first sold. If you wish
to use the computer in another country, you must ensure
that you use a power cord which complies with the safety
standards of that country.
Current ratings
AC power inlet
4.5 A at 100-120 V
3.0 A at 220-240 V
AC power outlet
1.5 A at 100-120 V
1.0 A at 220-240 V
Connect only manufacturer-approved monitors to the AC
power outlet.
Expansion slots
Total available power for all three ISA expansion slots:
8.0 A at 5 V
1.0 A at 12 V
0.3 A at -5V
0.3 A at -12V
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK B/7
Appendix B
Power cords
Appendix B
Technical Information
Port characteristics
Serial ports
9-way male D-type (COM1/COM2)
1
5
9
6
10101
B/8
Pin
I/O
Function
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
I
I
O
O
NA
I
O
I
I
Data carrier detect
Receive data
Transmit data
Data terminal ready
Signal ground
Data set ready
Request to send
Clear to send
Ring indicate
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Technical Information
25-way female D-type (LPT1)
13
1
25
14
Pin
I/O
Function
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I
I
I
I
O
I
O
O
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
-STROBE
Data bit 0
Data bit 1
Data bit 2
Data bit 3
Data bit 4
Data bit 5
Data bit 6
Data bit 7
-ACK
BUSY
PE
SLCT
-AUTO FEED
-ERROR
-INIT
-SLCT IN
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK B/9
Appendix B
Parallel port
Appendix B
Technical Information
Monitor port
15-way female D-type (VGA)
5
1
6
10
15
11
Pin I/O
Output
Monochrome Colour
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Red
Green
Blue
Reserved
Digital G
Red Rtn
Green Rtn
Blue Rtn
Plug
Digital G
Reserved
Reserved
Hsync
Vsync
Reserved
No pin
Mono
No pin
No pin
Self test
Key pin
Mono Rtn
No pin
No pin
Digital G
No pin
Digital G
Hsync
Vsync
No pin
O
O
O
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
O
O
NA
Red
Green
Blue
No pin
Self test
Red Rtn
Green Rtn
Blue Rtn
No pin
Digital G
Digital G
No pin
Hsync
Vsync
No pin
Red Rtn, Green Rtn, Blue Rtn = Analog grounds
Digital G = Digital ground for sync returns and self test.
B/10
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
Technical Information
Both the keyboard and mouse ports accept 6-pin miniature
DIN connectors. The voltages and signals are the same for
both connectors.
5
6
6
3
4
4
1
2
5
3
2
Pin
I/O
Function
1
2
3
4
5
6
I/O
NA
NA
NA
I/O
NA
Data
Reserved
Ground
+5 Vdc
Clock
Reserved
1
Although the keyboard and mouse ports are physically and
electrically compatible, neither the keyboard nor the mouse
will operate if plugged into the other’s socket.
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK B/11
Appendix B
Keyboard and mouse ports
Appendix B
Technical Information
Video feature connector
The motherboard video adapter provides a video feature
connector. The connector on the motherboard uses a
standard pinout and a standard cable may be used to
connect the feature connector to an expansion card. In case
you have difficulty obtaining a cable the pinout of the
motherboard connector is given in the following table.
B/12
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
Ground
Ground
Ground
-EVIDEO
-ESYNC
-EDCLK
No connect
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
P0
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
DCLK
-BLNK
HSYNC
VSYNC
Ground
XEN OWNER'S HANDBOOK
apricot
APRICOT COMPUTERS LIMITED
3500 PARKSIDE
BIRMINGHAM BUSINESS PARK
BIRMINGHAM B37 7YS.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Part No 15390631
Revision No 01