XT65/XT75
Siemens Cellular Engine
Version:
DocId:
Supported Products:
01.001
XT65_XT75_HD_v01.001
XT65, XT75
Hardware Interface Description
s
XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
s
Document Name:
XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
Version:
01.001
Date:
2007-1-8
DocId:
XT65_XT75_HD_v01.001
Status
Confidential / Released
Supported Products: XT65, XT75
General Notes
Product is deemed accepted by recipient and is provided without interface to recipient’s products. The documentation and/or product are provided for testing, evaluation, integration and information purposes. The documentation and/or product are provided on an “as is” basis only and may contain deficiencies or inadequacies. The
documentation and/or product are provided without warranty of any kind, express or implied. To the maximum
extent permitted by applicable law, Siemens further disclaims all warranties, including without limitation any implied warranties of merchantability, completeness, fitness for a particular purpose and non-infringement of thirdparty rights. The entire risk arising out of the use or performance of the product and documentation remains with
recipient. This product is not intended for use in life support appliances, devices or systems where a malfunction
of the product can reasonably be expected to result in personal injury. Applications incorporating the described
product must be designed to be in accordance with the technical specifications provided in these guidelines. Failure to comply with any of the required procedures can result in malfunctions or serious discrepancies in results.
Furthermore, all safety instructions regarding the use of mobile technical systems, including GSM products,
which also apply to cellular phones must be followed. Siemens or its suppliers shall, regardless of any legal theory upon which the claim is based, not be liable for any consequential, incidental, direct, indirect, punitive or other
damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of business profits, business interruption,
loss of business information or data, or other pecuniary loss) arising out the use of or inability to use the documentation and/or product, even if Siemens has been advised of the possibility of such damages. The foregoing
limitations of liability shall not apply in case of mandatory liability, e.g. under the German Product Liability Act, in
case of intent, gross negligence, injury of life, body or health, or breach of a condition which goes to the root of
the contract. However, claims for damages arising from a breach of a condition, which goes to the root of the
contract, shall be limited to the foreseeable damage, which is intrinsic to the contract, unless caused by intent or
gross negligence or based on liability for injury of life, body or health. The above provision does not imply a
change on the burden of proof to the detriment of the recipient. Subject to change without notice at any time. The
interpretation of this general note shall be governed and construed according to German law without reference
to any other substantive law.
Copyright
Transmittal, reproduction, dissemination and/or editing of this document as well as utilization of its contents and
communication thereof to others without express authorization are prohibited. Offenders will be held liable for
payment of damages. All rights created by patent grant or registration of a utility model or design patent are reserved.
Copyright © Siemens AG 2007
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Contents
s
Contents
0
Document History.................................................................................................................................... 9
1
Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 11
1.1
Related Documents....................................................................................................................... 11
1.2
Terms and Abbreviations .............................................................................................................. 12
1.3
Regulatory and Type Approval Information................................................................................... 15
1.3.1
Directives and Standards............................................................................................... 15
1.3.2
SAR requirements specific to portable mobiles ............................................................. 16
1.3.3
SELV Requirements ...................................................................................................... 17
1.3.4
Safety Precautions......................................................................................................... 17
2
Product Concept.................................................................................................................................... 19
2.1
Key Features at a Glance.............................................................................................................. 19
2.2
XT65/XT75 System Overview ....................................................................................................... 23
2.3
Circuit Concept.............................................................................................................................. 24
3
GSM Application Interface .................................................................................................................... 26
3.1
Operating Modes........................................................................................................................... 27
3.2
Power Supply ................................................................................................................................ 28
3.2.1
Minimizing Power Losses .............................................................................................. 28
3.2.2
Measuring the Supply Voltage VBATT+............................................................................................................ 29
3.2.3
Monitoring Power Supply by AT Command................................................................... 29
3.3
Power-Up / Power-Down Scenarios.............................................................................................. 30
3.3.1
Turn on XT65/XT75 ....................................................................................................... 30
3.3.1.1 Turn on XT65/XT75 Using Ignition Line IGT .................................................................. 30
3.3.1.2 Configuring the IGT Line for Use as ON/OFF Switch .................................................... 33
3.3.1.3 Turn on XT65/XT75 Using the VCHARGE Signal ......................................................... 33
3.3.1.4 Reset XT65/XT75 via AT+CFUN Command.................................................................. 34
3.3.1.5 Reset or Turn off XT65/XT75 in Case of Emergency .................................................... 34
3.3.1.6 Using EMERG_RST Signal to Reset Application(s) or External Device(s) ................... 34
3.3.2
Signal States after Startup............................................................................................. 35
3.3.3
Turn off XT65/XT75 ....................................................................................................... 36
3.3.3.1 Turn off XT65/XT75 Using AT Command ...................................................................... 36
3.3.3.2 Leakage Current in Power-Down Mode......................................................................... 37
3.3.3.3 Turn on/off XT65/XT75 Applications with Integrated USB ............................................. 38
3.3.4
Automatic Shutdown...................................................................................................... 38
3.3.4.1 Thermal Shutdown......................................................................................................... 38
3.3.4.2 Temperature Control during Emergency call ................................................................. 39
3.3.4.3 Undervoltage Shutdown if Battery NTC is Present ........................................................ 39
3.3.4.4 Undervoltage Shutdown if no Battery NTC is Present ................................................... 40
3.3.4.5 Overvoltage Shutdown .................................................................................................. 40
3.4
Automatic EGPRS/GPRS Multislot Class Change........................................................................ 41
3.5
Charging Control ........................................................................................................................... 41
3.5.1
Hardware Requirements................................................................................................ 41
3.5.2
Software Requirements ................................................................................................. 41
3.5.3
Battery Pack Requirements ........................................................................................... 42
3.5.4
Batteries Tested for Use with XT65/XT75 ..................................................................... 43
3.5.5
Charger Requirements .................................................................................................. 44
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Contents
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
4
s
3.5.6
Implemented Charging Technique................................................................................. 44
3.5.7
Operating Modes during Charging................................................................................. 45
Power Saving ................................................................................................................................ 47
3.6.1
Network Dependency of SLEEP Modes ........................................................................ 48
3.6.2
Timing of the CTS0 Signal in CYCLIC SLEEP Mode 7 ................................................. 48
3.6.3
Timing of the RTS0 Signal in CYCLIC SLEEP Mode 9 ................................................. 49
Summary of State Transitions (Except SLEEP Mode) .................................................................. 50
RTC Backup .................................................................................................................................. 51
SIM Interface ................................................................................................................................. 52
3.9.1
Installation Advice.......................................................................................................... 52
Serial Interface ASC0.................................................................................................................... 53
USB Interface ................................................................................................................................ 55
I2C Interface .................................................................................................................................. 56
SPI Interface.................................................................................................................................. 57
Audio Interfaces ............................................................................................................................ 59
3.14.1
Speech Processing........................................................................................................ 60
3.14.2
Microphone Circuit......................................................................................................... 60
3.14.2.1 Single-ended Microphone Input..................................................................................... 60
3.14.2.2 Differential Microphone Input......................................................................................... 61
3.14.2.3 Line Input Configuration with OpAmp ............................................................................ 62
3.14.3
Loudspeaker Circuit....................................................................................................... 63
3.14.4
Digital Audio Interface (DAI) .......................................................................................... 63
3.14.4.1 Master Mode.................................................................................................................. 64
3.14.4.2 Slave Mode.................................................................................................................... 66
Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) ................................................................................................ 68
GPIO Interface .............................................................................................................................. 69
3.16.1
Using the GPIO10 Pin as Pulse Counter....................................................................... 69
Control Signals .............................................................................................................................. 70
3.17.1
Synchronization Signal .................................................................................................. 70
3.17.2
Using the SYNC Pin to Control a Status LED................................................................ 71
3.17.3
Behavior of the RING0 Line (ASC0 Interface only) ....................................................... 72
3.17.4
PWR_IND Signal ........................................................................................................... 72
GPS Application Interface..................................................................................................................... 73
4.1
Operating Principles ...................................................................................................................... 73
4.1.1
Basic Operation Cycle ................................................................................................... 73
4.1.2
GPS Start-Up................................................................................................................. 74
4.1.2.1 Cold Start ....................................................................................................................... 75
4.1.2.2 Warm Start ..................................................................................................................... 75
4.1.2.3 Hot Start......................................................................................................................... 75
4.1.3
Supported Protocols ...................................................................................................... 76
4.1.3.1 NMEA Protocol .............................................................................................................. 76
4.1.3.2 UBX Binary Protocol ...................................................................................................... 76
4.1.3.3 RTCM Protocol .............................................................................................................. 76
4.1.4
Position Accuracy Improvement Possibilities ................................................................ 77
4.1.4.1 Differential GPS (DGPS) ............................................................................................... 77
4.1.4.2 Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) ............................................................ 77
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4.2
4.3
4.4
GPS-GSM Interface ...................................................................................................................... 77
Software Control............................................................................................................................ 78
Power Saving ................................................................................................................................ 78
XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
5
GSM Antenna Interface ......................................................................................................................... 79
5.1
Antenna Installation....................................................................................................................... 79
5.2
Antenna Pad.................................................................................................................................. 80
5.2.1
Suitable Cable Types..................................................................................................... 81
5.3
Antenna Connector ....................................................................................................................... 82
6
GPS Antenna Interface.......................................................................................................................... 86
6.1
Antenna Installation....................................................................................................................... 86
6.2
GPS Antenna ................................................................................................................................ 87
7
Electrical, Reliability and Radio Characteristics ................................................................................ 89
7.1
Absolute Maximum Ratings........................................................................................................... 89
7.2
Operating Temperatures ............................................................................................................... 90
7.3
Storage Conditions........................................................................................................................ 91
7.4
Reliability Characteristics .............................................................................................................. 92
7.5
Pin Assignment and Signal Description ........................................................................................ 93
7.6
Power Supply for Active GPS Antenna ....................................................................................... 101
7.7
Power Supply Ratings ................................................................................................................. 102
7.8
Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part ......................................................................... 105
7.8.1
Setting Audio Parameters by AT Commands .............................................................. 105
7.8.2
Audio Programming Mode ........................................................................................... 106
7.8.3
Characteristics of Audio Modes ................................................................................... 107
7.8.4
Voiceband Receive Path ............................................................................................. 108
7.8.5
Voiceband Transmit Path ............................................................................................ 110
7.9
Air Interface ................................................................................................................................. 111
7.10 Electrostatic Discharge................................................................................................................ 112
8
Mechanics ............................................................................................................................................ 113
8.1
Mechanical Dimensions of XT65/XT75 ....................................................................................... 113
8.2
Mounting XT65/XT75 to the Application Platform ....................................................................... 115
8.3
Board-to-Board Application Connector........................................................................................ 116
9
Sample Application ............................................................................................................................. 120
10
Reference Approval............................................................................................................................. 122
10.1 Reference Equipment for Type Approval .................................................................................... 122
10.2 Compliance with FCC Rules and Regulations ............................................................................ 123
11
Appendix .............................................................................................................................................. 124
11.1 List of Parts and Accessories ...................................................................................................... 124
11.2 Fasteners and Fixings for Electronic Equipment......................................................................... 126
11.2.1
Fasteners from German Supplier ETTINGER GmbH.................................................. 126
11.3 Data Sheets of Tested Batteries ................................................................................................. 129
11.4 Mounting Advice Sheet ............................................................................................................... 132
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
List of Tables
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Tables
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Directives .................................................................................................................................... 15
Standards of North American type approval............................................................................... 15
Standards of European type approval ........................................................................................ 15
Requirements of quality .............................................................................................................. 16
Overview of operating modes ..................................................................................................... 27
Signal states ............................................................................................................................... 35
Temperature dependent behavior .............................................................................................. 39
Specifications of battery packs suitable for use with XT65/XT75 ............................................... 43
AT commands available in Charge-only mode ........................................................................... 45
Comparison Charge-only and Charge mode .............................................................................. 46
State transitions of XT65/XT75 (except SLEEP mode) .............................................................. 50
Signals of the SIM interface (board-to-board connector)............................................................ 52
DCE-DTE wiring of ASC0 ........................................................................................................... 54
Configuration combinations for the PCM interface ..................................................................... 63
Overview of DAI pin functions..................................................................................................... 64
Return loss in the active band .................................................................................................... 79
Product specifications of U.FL-R-SMT connector....................................................................... 82
Material and finish of U.FL-R-SMT connector and recommended plugs.................................... 83
Ordering information for Hirose U.FL Series .............................................................................. 85
Sensitivity degradation................................................................................................................ 87
GPS antenna: Active versus Passive ......................................................................................... 88
Absolute maximum ratings ......................................................................................................... 89
Board temperature...................................................................................................................... 90
Ambient temperature according to IEC 60068-2 (without forced air circulation) ........................ 90
Ambient temperature with forced air circulation (air speed 0.9m/s)............................................ 90
Charging temperature................................................................................................................. 90
Storage conditions ...................................................................................................................... 91
Summary of reliability test conditions ......................................................................................... 92
Signal description ....................................................................................................................... 94
Power Supply for active GPS Antenna ..................................................................................... 101
Power supply ratings ................................................................................................................ 102
Current consumption during Tx burst for GSM 850MHz and GSM 900MHz (w/o GPS) .......... 103
Current consumption during Tx burst for GSM 1800MHz and GSM 1900MHz (w/o GPS) ...... 104
Audio parameters adjustable by AT commands ....................................................................... 105
Voiceband characteristics (typical) ........................................................................................... 107
Voiceband receive path ............................................................................................................ 108
Voiceband transmit path ........................................................................................................... 110
Air interface............................................................................................................................... 111
Measured electrostatic values .................................................................................................. 112
Technical specifications of Molex board-to-board connector.................................................... 116
List of parts and accessories .................................................................................................... 124
Molex sales contacts (subject to change)................................................................................. 125
Hirose sales contacts (subject to change) ................................................................................ 125
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List of Figures
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Figures
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Figure 44:
Figure 45:
Figure 46:
XT65/XT75 system overview ...................................................................................................... 23
XT65/XT75 block diagram .......................................................................................................... 25
Power supply limits during transmit burst ................................................................................... 28
Position of the reference points BATT+ and GND...................................................................... 29
Power-on with operating voltage at BATT+ applied before activating IGT ................................. 31
Power-on with IGT held low before switching on operating voltage at BATT+ ........................... 32
Timing of IGT if used as ON/OFF switch .................................................................................... 33
Signal states during turn-off procedure....................................................................................... 37
Battery pack circuit diagram ....................................................................................................... 42
Power saving and paging ........................................................................................................... 48
Timing of CTS0 signal (if CFUN= 7) ........................................................................................... 48
Timing of RTS0 signal (if CFUN = 9) .......................................................................................... 49
RTC supply from capacitor ......................................................................................................... 51
RTC supply from rechargeable battery....................................................................................... 51
RTC supply from non-chargeable battery................................................................................... 51
Serial interface ASC0 ................................................................................................................. 53
USB circuit .................................................................................................................................. 55
I2C interface connected to VCC of application............................................................................ 56
I2C interface connected to VEXT line of XT65/XT75 .................................................................. 56
SPI interface ............................................................................................................................... 57
Characteristics of SPI modes ..................................................................................................... 58
Audio block diagram ................................................................................................................... 59
Single ended microphone input .................................................................................................. 60
Differential microphone input ...................................................................................................... 61
Line input configuration with OpAmp .......................................................................................... 62
Differential loudspeaker configuration ........................................................................................ 63
Master PCM interface Application .............................................................................................. 64
Short Frame PCM timing ............................................................................................................ 65
Long Frame PCM timing............................................................................................................. 65
Slave PCM interface application................................................................................................. 66
Slave PCM Timing, Short Frame selected.................................................................................. 67
Slave PCM Timing, Long Frame selected .................................................................................. 67
Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) ............................................................................................. 68
SYNC signal during transmit burst.............................................................................................. 70
LED Circuit (Example) ................................................................................................................ 71
Incoming voice/fax/data call........................................................................................................ 72
URC transmission....................................................................................................................... 72
GSP startup behavior ................................................................................................................. 74
GSM antenna connector placement ........................................................................................... 79
Restricted area around antenna pad .......................................................................................... 80
GSM antenna pad placement ..................................................................................................... 81
Mechanical dimensions of U.FL-R-SMT connector .................................................................... 82
U.FL-R-SMT connector with U.FL-LP-040 plug.......................................................................... 83
U.FL-R-SMT connector with U.FL-LP-066 plug.......................................................................... 83
Specifications of U.FL-LP-(V)-040(01) plug................................................................................ 84
GPS antenna connector placement............................................................................................ 86
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List of Figures
Figure 47:
Figure 48:
Figure 49:
Figure 50:
Figure 51:
Figure 52:
Figure 53:
Figure 54:
Figure 55:
Figure 56:
Figure 57:
s
GPS antenna pad placement...................................................................................................... 86
Pin assignment (component side of XT65/XT75) ....................................................................... 93
Audio programming model........................................................................................................ 106
XT65/XT75– top view ............................................................................................................... 113
Dimensions of XT65/XT75 (all dimensions in mm)................................................................... 114
Molex board-to-board connector 52991-0808 on XT65/XT75 .................................................. 118
Mating board-to-board connector 53748-0808 on application .................................................. 119
XT65/XT75 sample application................................................................................................. 121
Reference equipment for Type Approval .................................................................................. 122
Lithium Ion battery from VARTA ............................................................................................... 130
VARTA PoLiFlex® Lithium Polymer battery ............................................................................. 131
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
0 Document History
0
s
Document History
Preceding document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.144
New document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 01.001
Chapter
What is new
3.15
New section Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC). Removed corresponding table footnote
from Table 29.
3.3.3.2
Updated remark on how to minimize leakage current.
3.8
Modified the RTC backup section to include the GPS receiver’s separate RTC.
6.2
Added information on GSM-GPS antenna coupling.
7.1
Added GPS antenna ratings (Table 22).
7.7
Updated average current consumption for GSM calls in Table 32 and Table 33.
8.3
Added note regarding inverse polarity protection for board-to-board connector.
11.4
New Appendix section Mounting Advice Sheet.
Preceding document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.130
New document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.144
Chapter
What is new
2.1, 4.1.4
Modified values for GPS position accuracy.
3.5.4, 11.3
Added information related to specific types of batteries and specific vendors.
3.10
Added note in Figure 16 on availability of signal pins under Java. See also Chapter 9.
4.4
Added remark on power saving while module is set to SLEEP mode 9 (AT+CFUN=9).
7.2
Added new temperature table (Table 25) listing ambient temerature values with forced
air circulation.
7.6
New chapter Power Supply for Active GPS Antenna listing power supply details for GPS
antenna.
7.7
Modified power supply values in Table 31.
7.8.3
Table 35: Changed output voltage values for EP output signal to Vpp = 4.2V.
Preceding document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.071
New document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.130
Chapter
What is new
1.3.1
Added note on PTCRB approval for applications used in the USA.
2.1
Available FFS memory for Java programs is 1.2MB.
Added GPS sensitivity as feature.
3.3.1.1
Added reference to Section 3.3.1.6 in Figure 5 and Figure 6.
3.14.4.1
Specified jitter from an ideal 512kHz clock. Modified master mode description.
3.14.4.2
Modified slave mode description.
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0 Document History
5
Added remark on given DC electric strength for GSM antenna interface.
7.1
Added remark on SELV compliance.
s
Table 22: Modified values for GSM/GPS antenna.
7.2
Modified tables showing operating temperatures (Table 23, Table 24).
7.8.2
Modified position of <inCalibrate> and <outCalibrate> Figure 49.
7.10
Changed test procedure (RF choke) and Table 39.
8.2
Added note on attachment of cooling elements.
11.1
Added Siemens ordering number for XT65.
New document: "XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description" Version 00.071
Chapter
What is new
All
Initial document version.
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
1 Introduction
1
s
Introduction
This document applies to the following Siemens products:
•
•
XT65 Module
XT75 Module
The document describes the hardware of the XT65 and XT75 modules, both designed to connect to a cellular
device application and the air interface. It helps you quickly retrieve interface specifications, electrical and
mechanical details and information on the requirements to be considered for integrating further components.
The difference between both modules is that the XT75 additionally features EGPRS. Please note that except for
EGPRS specific statements, all information provided below applies to both module types.
Throughout the document, both modules are generally referred to as XT65/XT75.
1.1
Related Documents
Documents supplied with XT65, XT75
[1] XT65 AT Command Set 01.001
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[6]
[7]
[8]
[9]
[10]
[11]
[12]
[13]
[14]
[15]
[16]
[17]
[18]
[19]
XT75 AT Command Set 01.001
XT65/XT75 Release Notes 01.001
DSB75 Support Box - Evaluation Kit for Siemens Cellular Engines
Application Note 02: Audio Interface Design for GSM Applications
Application Note 07: Rechargeable Lithium Batteries in GSM Applications
Application Note 16: Upgrading Firmware
Application Note 17: Over-The-Air Firmware Update
Application Note 22: Using TTY / CTM Equipment
Application Note 24: Application Developer’s Guide
Application Note 26: Power Supply Design for GSM Applications
Application Note 32: Integrating USB into GSM Applications
Application Note 36: GSM Applications with Integrated GPS Receiver
Application Note 37: GPS Antenna Design
Multiplexer User's Guide
Multiplex Driver Developer’s Guide for Windows 2000 and Windows XP
Multiplex Driver Installation Guide for Windows 2000 and Windows XP
Remote SAT User's Guide
Java User’s Guide
Java doc \wtk\doc\html\index.html
Other related documents
[20] Antaris® 4 GPS Modules System Integration Manual (SIM)
Note: Section 4.1 includes information based on and adapted from [20] with permission of u-blox AG, Switzerland.
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1.2 Terms and Abbreviations
1.2
s
Terms and Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
ADC
Analog-to-Digital Converter
AGC
Automatic Gain Control
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
ARFCN
Absolute Radio Frequency Channel Number
ARP
Antenna Reference Point
ASC0
Asynchronous Controller. Abbreviations used for the serial interface of XT65/XT75
B
Thermistor Constant
B2B
Board-to-board connector
BER
Bit Error Rate
BTS
Base Transceiver Station
CB or CBM
Cell Broadcast Message
CE
Conformité Européene (European Conformity)
CHAP
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol
CPU
Central Processing Unit
CS
Coding Scheme
CSD
Circuit Switched Data
CTS
Clear to Send
DAC
Digital-to-Analog Converter
DAI
Digital Audio Interface
dBm0
Digital level, 3.14dBm0 corresponds to full scale, see ITU G.711, A-law
DCE
Data Communication Equipment (typically modems, e.g. Siemens GSM engine)
DCS 1800
Digital Cellular System, also referred to as PCN
DRX
Discontinuous Reception
DSB
Development Support Box
DSP
Digital Signal Processor
DSR
Data Set Ready
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment (typically computer, terminal, printer or, for example, GSM application)
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
DTX
Discontinuous Transmission
EFR
Enhanced Full Rate
EGSM
Enhanced GSM
EIRP
Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power
EMC
Electromagnetic Compatibility
ERP
Effective Radiated Power
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1.2 Terms and Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge
ETS
European Telecommunication Standard
FCC
Federal Communications Commission (U.S.)
FDMA
Frequency Division Multiple Access
FR
Full Rate
GMSK
Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying
GPIO
General Purpose Input/Output
GPRS
General Packet Radio Service
GSM
Global Standard for Mobile Communications
HiZ
High Impedance
HR
Half Rate
I/O
Input/Output
IC
Integrated Circuit
IMEI
International Mobile Equipment Identity
ISO
International Standards Organization
ITU
International Telecommunications Union
kbps
kbits per second
LED
Light Emitting Diode
Li-Ion / Li+
Lithium-Ion
Li battery
Rechargeable Lithium Ion or Lithium Polymer battery
Mbps
Mbits per second
MMI
Man Machine Interface
MO
Mobile Originated
MS
Mobile Station (GSM engine), also referred to as TE
MSISDN
Mobile Station International ISDN number
MT
Mobile Terminated
NTC
Negative Temperature Coefficient
OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer
PA
Power Amplifier
PAP
Password Authentication Protocol
PBCCH
Packet Switched Broadcast Control Channel
PCB
Printed Circuit Board
PCL
Power Control Level
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation
PCN
Personal Communications Network, also referred to as DCS 1800
PCS
Personal Communication System, also referred to as GSM 1900
PDU
Protocol Data Unit
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1.2 Terms and Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
PLL
Phase Locked Loop
PPP
Point-to-point protocol
PSK
Phase Shift Keying
PSU
Power Supply Unit
R&TTE
Radio and Telecommunication Terminal Equipment
RAM
Random Access Memory
RF
Radio Frequency
RMS
Root Mean Square (value)
ROM
Read-only Memory
RTC
Real Time Clock
RTS
Request to Send
Rx
Receive Direction
SAR
Specific Absorption Rate
SELV
Safety Extra Low Voltage
SIM
Subscriber Identification Module
SMS
Short Message Service
SPI
Serial Peripheral Interface
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory
TA
Terminal adapter (e.g. GSM engine)
TDMA
Time Division Multiple Access
TE
Terminal Equipment, also referred to as DTE
Tx
Transmit Direction
UART
Universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter
URC
Unsolicited Result Code
USB
Universal Serial Bus
USSD
Unstructured Supplementary Service Data
VSWR
Voltage Standing Wave Ratio
s
Phonebook abbreviations
FD
SIM fixdialing phonebook
LD
SIM last dialing phonebook (list of numbers most recently dialed)
MC
Mobile Equipment list of unanswered MT calls (missed calls)
ME
Mobile Equipment phonebook
ON
Own numbers (MSISDNs) stored on SIM or ME
RC
Mobile Equipment list of received calls
SM
SIM phonebook
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1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
1.3
s
Regulatory and Type Approval Information
1.3.1
Directives and Standards
XT65/XT75 is designed to comply with the directives and standards listed below. Please note that the product is
still in a pre-release state and, therefore, type approval and testing procedures have not yet been completed.
It is the responsibility of the application manufacturer to ensure compliance of the final product with all provisions
of the applicable directives and standards as well as with the technical specifications provided in the "XT65/XT75
Hardware Interface Description".1
Table 1: Directives
99/05/EC
Directive of the European Parliament and of the council of 9 March 1999 on radio
equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment and the mutual recognition
of their conformity (in short referred to as R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC).
The product is labeled with the CE conformity mark
89/336/EC
Directive on electromagnetic compatibility
73/23/EC
Directive on electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits (Low
Voltage Directive)
95/94/EC
Automotive EMC directive
2002/95/EC
Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 January 2003 on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS)
Table 2: Standards of North American type approval
CFR Title 47
Code of Federal Regulations, Part 22 and Part 24 (Telecommunications, PCS); US
Equipment Authorization FCC
UL 60 950
Product Safety Certification (Safety requirements)
NAPRD.03 V3.6.1
Overview of PCS Type certification review board Mobile Equipment Type Certification and IMEI control
PCS Type Certification Review board (PTCRB)
RSS133 (Issue2)
Canadian Standard
Table 3: Standards of European type approval
3GPP TS 51.010-1
Digital cellular telecommunications system (Phase 2); Mobile Station (MS) conformance specification
ETSI EN 301 511 V9.0.2
Candidate Harmonized European Standard (Telecommunications series) Global
System for Mobile communications (GSM); Harmonized standard for mobile stations in the GSM 900 and DCS 1800 bands covering essential requirements under
article 3.2 of the R&TTE directive (1999/5/EC) (GSM 13.11 version 7.0.1 Release
1998)
1.
Manufacturers of applications which can be used in the US shall ensure that their applications have a PTCRB
approval. For this purpose they can refer to the PTCRB approval of the respective module.
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Table 3: Standards of European type approval
GCF-CC V3.21.0
Global Certification Forum - Certification Criteria
ETSI EN 301 489-1
V1.4.1
Candidate Harmonized European Standard (Telecommunications series) Electro
Magnetic Compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Electro Magnetic
Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 1: Common
Technical Requirements
ETSI EN 301 489-7
V1.2.1 (2000-09)
Candidate Harmonized European Standard (Telecommunications series) Electro
Magnetic Compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Electro Magnetic
Compatibility (EMC) standard for radio equipment and services; Part 7: Specific
conditions for mobile and portable radio and ancillary equipment of digital cellular
radio telecommunications systems (GSM and DCS)
IEC/EN 60950-1 (2001)
Safety of information technology equipment (2000)
Table 4: Requirements of quality
IEC 60068
Environmental testing
DIN EN 60529
IP codes
1.3.2
SAR requirements specific to portable mobiles
Mobile phones, PDAs or other portable transmitters and receivers incorporating a GSM module must be in accordance with the guidelines for human exposure to radio frequency energy. This requires the Specific Absorption
Rate (SAR) of portable XT65/XT75 based applications to be evaluated and approved for compliance with
national and/or international regulations.
Since the SAR value varies significantly with the individual product design manufacturers are advised to submit
their product for approval if designed for portable use. For European and US markets the relevant directives are
mentioned below. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer of the final product to verify whether or not further
standards, recommendations or directives are in force outside these areas.
Products intended for sale on US markets
ES 59005/ANSI C95.1 Considerations for evaluation of human exposure to Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs)
from Mobile Telecommunication Equipment (MTE) in the frequency range
30MHz - 6GHz
Products intended for sale on European markets
EN 50360
Product standard to demonstrate the compliance of mobile phones with the basic
restrictions related to human exposure to electromagnetic fields (300MHz - 3GHz)
IMPORTANT:
Manufacturers of portable applications based on XT65/XT75 modules are required to have their final product certified and apply for their own FCC Grant and Industry Canada Certificate related to the specific portable mobile.
See also Section 10.2.
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1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
1.3.3
s
SELV Requirements
The power supply connected to the XT65/XT75 module shall be in compliance with the SELV requirements
defined in EN 60950-1. See also Section 7.1 for further detail.
1.3.4
Safety Precautions
The following safety precautions must be observed during all phases of the operation, usage, service or repair
of any cellular terminal or mobile incorporating XT65/XT75. Manufacturers of the cellular terminal are advised to
convey the following safety information to users and operating personnel and to incorporate these guidelines into
all manuals supplied with the product. Failure to comply with these precautions violates safety standards of
design, manufacture and intended use of the product. Siemens AG assumes no liability for customer’s failure to
comply with these precautions.
When in a hospital or other health care facility, observe the restrictions on the use of mobiles.
Switch the cellular terminal or mobile off, if instructed to do so by the guidelines posted in sensitive areas. Medical equipment may be sensitive to RF energy.
The operation of cardiac pacemakers, other implanted medical equipment and hearing aids
can be affected by interference from cellular terminals or mobiles placed close to the device.
If in doubt about potential danger, contact the physician or the manufacturer of the device to
verify that the equipment is properly shielded. Pacemaker patients are advised to keep their
hand-held mobile away from the pacemaker, while it is on.
Switch off the cellular terminal or mobile before boarding an aircraft. Make sure it cannot be
switched on inadvertently. The operation of wireless appliances in an aircraft is forbidden to
prevent interference with communications systems. Failure to observe these instructions may
lead to the suspension or denial of cellular services to the offender, legal action, or both.
Do not operate the cellular terminal or mobile in the presence of flammable gases or fumes.
Switch off the cellular terminal when you are near petrol stations, fuel depots, chemical plants
or where blasting operations are in progress. Operation of any electrical equipment in potentially explosive atmospheres can constitute a safety hazard.
Your cellular terminal or mobile receives and transmits radio frequency energy while switched
on. Remember that interference can occur if it is used close to TV sets, radios, computers or
inadequately shielded equipment. Follow any special regulations and always switch off the
cellular terminal or mobile wherever forbidden, or when you suspect that it may cause interference or danger.
Road safety comes first! Do not use a hand-held cellular terminal or mobile when driving a
vehicle, unless it is securely mounted in a holder for speakerphone operation. Before making
a call with a hand-held terminal or mobile, park the vehicle.
Speakerphones must be installed by qualified personnel. Faulty installation or operation can
constitute a safety hazard.
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1.3 Regulatory and Type Approval Information
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IMPORTANT!
Cellular terminals or mobiles operate using radio signals and cellular networks. Because of
this, connection cannot be guaranteed at all times under all conditions. Therefore, you should
never rely solely upon any wireless device for essential communications, for example emergency calls.
Remember, in order to make or receive calls, the cellular terminal or mobile must be switched
on and in a service area with adequate cellular signal strength.
Some networks do not allow for emergency calls if certain network services or phone features
are in use (e.g. lock functions, fixed dialing etc.). You may need to deactivate those features
before you can make an emergency call.
Some networks require that a valid SIM card be properly inserted in the cellular terminal or
mobile.
Bear in mind that exposure to excessive levels of noise can cause physical damage to users!
With regard to acoustic shock, the cellular application must be designed to avoid unintentional
increase of amplification, e.g. for a highly sensitive earpiece. A protection circuit should be
implemented in the cellular application.
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2 Product Concept
2
Product Concept
2.1
Key Features at a Glance
Feature
s
Implementation
General
Frequency bands
Quad band: GSM 850/900/1800/1900MHz
GSM class
Small MS
Output power (according to Class 4 (+33dBm ±2dB) for EGSM850
Release 99, V5)
Class 4 (+33dBm ±2dB) for EGSM900
Class 1 (+30dBm ±2dB) for GSM1800
Class 1 (+30dBm ±2dB) for GSM1900
XT75 only:
Class E2 (+27dBm ± 3dB) for GSM 850 8-PSK
Class E2 (+27dBm ± 3dB) for GSM 900 8-PSK
Class E2 (+26dBm +3 /-4dB) for GSM 1800 8-PSK
Class E2 (+26dBm +3 /-4dB) for GSM 1900 8-PSK
The values stated above are maximum limits. According to Release 99, the maximum output power in a multislot configuration may be lower. The nominal reduction of maximum output power varies with the number of uplink timeslots used
and amounts to 3.0dB for 2Tx, 4.8dB for 3Tx and 6.0dB for 4Tx.
Power supply
3.3V to 4.5V
Ambient operating
temperature according to
IEC 60068-2
Normal operation:
Physical
Dimensions: 34mm x 59mm x 3.5mm
-30°C to +65°C
Restricted operation:-30°C / +85°C
Weight: < 10g
RoHS
All hardware components fully compliant with EU RoHS Directive
GSM / GPRS / EGPRS features
Data transfer
GPRS:
- Multislot Class 12
- Full PBCCH support
- Mobile Station Class B
- Coding Scheme 1 – 4
EGPRS (XT75 only):
- Multislot Class 10
- Mobile Station Class B
- Modulation and Coding Scheme MCS 1 – 9
CSD:
- V.110, RLP, non-transparent
- 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 14.4kbps
- USSD
PPP-stack for GPRS data transfer
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2.1 Key Features at a Glance
Feature
Implementation
SMS
Point-to-point MT and MO
s
Cell broadcast
Text and PDU mode
Storage: SIM card plus 25 SMS locations in mobile equipment
Transmission of SMS alternatively over CSD or GPRS. Preferred mode can be
user defined.
Fax
Group 3; Class 1
Audio
Speech codecs:
- Half rate HR (ETS 06.20)
- Full rate FR (ETS 06.10)
- Enhanced full rate EFR (ETS 06.50/06.60/06.80)
- Adaptive Multi Rate AMR
Speakerphone operation, echo cancellation, noise suppression, DTMF, 7 ringing
tones
GPS Features
Supported Protocol
NMEA-0183, RTCM v2.2, UBX binary protocol
GPS modes
GPS, Assisted GPS (AGPS), Differential GSP (DGPS), Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS)
Position accuracy
2.5 m CEP, 5.0 m SEP; With DGPS/SBAS: 2.0 m CEP, 3.0 m SEP
Start-up times
Hot start < 3.5s
Warm start 33s, average
Cold start 34s, average
Sensitivity
Active antenna:
- Acquisition sensitivity: -141dBm
- Tracking sensitivity: -158dBm
At antenna connector:
- Acquisition sensitivity: -139dBm
- Tracking sensitivity: -156dBm
General
Receiver 16 channel, L1 1575.42 MHz, GPS part controlled by GSM baseband
controller, Java engine or via application (ASC0)
Software
AT commands
AT-Hayes GSM 07.05 and 07.07, Siemens
AT commands for RIL compatibility (NDIS/RIL)
MicrosoftTM compatibility
RIL / NDIS for Pocket PC and Smartphone
Java platform
JDK Version: 1.4.2_09
Java Virtual Machine with APIs for AT Parser, Serial Interface, FlashFileSystem
and TCP/IP Stack.
Major benefits: seamless integration into Java applications, ease of programming, no need for application microcontroller, extremely cost-efficient hardware
and software design – ideal platform for industrial GSM applications.
The memory space available for Java programs is around 1.2 MB in the flash file
system and around 400kB RAM. Application code and data share the space in
the flash file system and in RAM.
SIM Application Toolkit
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2.1 Key Features at a Glance
s
Feature
Implementation
TCP/IP stack
Access by AT commands
IP addresses
IP version 4
Remote SIM Access
XT65/XT75 supports Remote SIM Access. RSA enables XT65/XT75 to use a
remote SIM card via its serial interface and an external application, in addition to
the SIM card locally attached to the dedicated lines of the application interface.
The connection between the external application and the remote SIM card can be
a Bluetooth wireless link or a serial link.
The necessary protocols and procedures are implemented according to the “SIM
Access Profile Interoperability Specification of the Bluetooth Special Interest
Group”.
Firmware update
Generic update from host application over ASC0 or USB. Over-the-air (OTA)
firmware update is possible via SPI interface.
Interfaces
Serial interface (ASC0)
- 8-wire modem interface with status and control lines, unbalanced,
asynchronous
- Fixed bit rates: 300 bps to 460,800 bps
- Autobauding: 1,200 bps to 460,800 bps
- RTS0/CTS0 and XON/XOFF flow control.
- Multiplex ability according to GSM 07.10 Multiplexer Protocol.
USB
Supports a USB 2.0 Full Speed (12Mbit/s) slave interface.
2
IC
I2C bus for 7-bit addressing and transmission rates up to 400kbps. Programmable with AT^SSPI command.
Alternatively, all pins of the I²C interface are configurable as SPI.
SPI
Serial Peripheral Interface for transmission rates up to 6.5 Mbps.
Programmable with AT^SSPI command.
If the SPI is active the I²C interface is not available.
Audio
2 analog interfaces (2 microphone inputs and 2 headphone outputs with microphone power supply)
1 digital interface (PCM)
SIM interface
Supported SIM cards: 3V, 1.8V
Antenna
- 50Ohms. External GSM antenna can be connected via antenna connector.
- 50Ohms. External GPS antenna can be connected via antenna connector.
Module interface
80-pin board-to-board connector
Power on/off, Reset
Power on/off
Switch-on by hardware pin IGT
Switch-off by AT command (AT^SMSO)
Automatic switch-off in case of critical temperature and voltage conditions.
Reset
Orderly shutdown and reset by AT command
Emergency reset by hardware pin EMERG_RST and IGT.
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2.1 Key Features at a Glance
Feature
s
Implementation
Special features
Charging
Supports management of rechargeable Lithium Ion and Lithium Polymer batteries
Real time clock
Timer functions via AT commands
GPIO
10 I/O pins of the application interface programmable as GPIO.
Programming is done via AT commands.
Alternatively, GPIO10 pin is configurable as pulse counter.
Pulse counter
Pulse counter for measuring pulse rates from 0 to 1000 pulses per second.
If the pulse counter is active the GPIO10 pin is not available.
DAC output
Digital-to-Analog Converter which can provide a PWM signal.
Phonebook
SIM and phone
Evaluation kit
DSB75
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DSB75 Evaluation Board designed to test and type approve Siemens cellular
engines and provide a sample configuration for application engineering.
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2.2 XT65/XT75 System Overview
2.2
s
XT65/XT75 System Overview
Figure 1: XT65/XT75 system overview
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2.3 Circuit Concept
2.3
s
Circuit Concept
Figure 2 shows a block diagram of the XT65/XT75 module and illustrates the major functional components:
Baseband block:
•
•
•
•
Digital baseband processor with DSP
Analog processor with power supply unit (PSU)
Flash / SRAM (stacked)
Application interface (board-to-board connector)
RF section:
•
•
•
•
•
RF transceiver
RF power amplifier
RF front end
26MHz VCTCXO module
Antenna connector
GPS section:
•
•
•
GPS Baseband Processor/SRAM/RF Receiver in a Multichip Module
LNA with pre-SAW and post-SAW filter
Antenna connector
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2.3 Circuit Concept
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Figure 2: XT65/XT75 block diagram
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3 GSM Application Interface
3
s
GSM Application Interface
XT65/XT75 is equipped with an 80-pin board-to-board connector that connects to the external application. The
host interface incorporates several sub-interfaces described in the following sections:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Power supply – see Section 3.1
Charger interface – see Section 3.5
SIM interface – see Section 3.9
Serial interface ASC0 – see Section 3.10
Serial interface USB – see Section 3.11
Serial interface I²C/SPI – see Section 3.12 and Section 3.13
Two analog audio interfaces – see Section 3.14
Digital audio interface (DAI) – see Section 3.14 and Section 3.14.4
Analog-to-digital converter (ADC) – see Section 3.15
10 lines GPIO interface – see Section 3.16
Status and control lines: IGT, EMERG_RST, PWR_IND, SYNC – see Table 29
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3.1 Operating Modes
3.1
s
Operating Modes
The table below briefly summarizes the various operating modes referred to in the following chapters.
Table 5: Overview of operating modes
Normal operation
GSM / GPRS SLEEP
Various power save modes set with AT+CFUN command.
Software is active to minimum extent. If the module was registered to the GSM network in IDLE mode, it is registered and paging with the BTS in SLEEP mode, too. Power saving can be
chosen at different levels: The NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode
(AT+CFUN=0) disables the AT interface. The CYCLIC SLEEP
modes AT+CFUN=7 and 9 alternatingly activate and deactivate
the AT interfaces to allow permanent access to all AT commands.
POWER DOWN
GSM IDLE
Software is active. Once registered to the GSM network, paging
with BTS is carried out. The module is ready to send and receive.
GSM TALK
Connection between two subscribers is in progress. Power consumption depends on network coverage individual settings, such
as DTX off/on, FR/EFR/HR, hopping sequences, antenna.
GPRS IDLE
EGPRS IDLE
Module is ready for GPRS/EGPRS data transfer, but no data is
currently sent or received. Power consumption depends on network settings and GPRS/EGPRS configuration (e.g. multislot
settings).
GPRS DATA
EGPRS DATA
GPRS/EGPRS data transfer in progress. Power consumption
depends on network settings (e.g. power control level), uplink /
downlink data rates, GPRS configuration (e.g. used multislot settings) and reduction of maximum output power.
GPS Transparency
GPS transparent mode. The mode is set by AT command. For
more information see Chapter 4 and [1].
Normal shutdown after sending the AT^SMSO command.
Only a voltage regulator is active for powering the RTC. Software is not active. Interfaces
are not accessible. Operating voltage (connected to BATT+) remains applied.
Airplane mode
Airplane mode shuts down the radio part of the module, causes the module to log off from
the GSM/GPRS network and disables all AT commands whose execution requires a radio
connection.
Airplane mode can be controlled by using the AT commands AT^SCFG and AT+CALA:
•
•
•
With AT^SCFG=MEopMode/Airplane/OnStart the module can be configured to enter
the Airplane mode each time when switched on or reset.
The parameter AT^SCFG=MEopMode/Airplane can be used to switch back and forth
between Normal mode and Airplane mode any time during operation.
Setting an alarm time with AT+CALA followed by AT^SMSO wakes the module up into
Airplane mode at the scheduled time.
Charge-only mode Limited operation for battery powered applications. Enables charging while module is
detached from GSM network. Limited number of AT commands is accessible. Chargeonly mode applies when the charger is connected if the module was powered down with
AT^SMSO.
Charge mode during normal operation
Normal operation (SLEEP, IDLE, TALK, GPRS/EGPRS IDLE, GPRS/EGPRS DATA) and
charging running in parallel. Charge mode changes to Charge-only mode when the module is powered down before charging has been completed.
See Table 11 for the various options proceeding from one mode to another.
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3.2 Power Supply
3.2
s
Power Supply
XT65/XT75 needs to be connected to a power supply at the B2B connector (5 pins each BATT+ and GND).
The power supply of XT65/XT75 has to be a single voltage source at BATT+. It must be able to provide the peak
current during the uplink transmission.
All the key functions for supplying power to the device are handled by the power management section of the analog controller. This IC provides the following features:
•
•
•
•
Stabilizes the supply voltages for the GSM baseband using low drop linear voltage regulators.
Switches the module's power voltages for the power-up and -down procedures.
Delivers, across the VEXT pin, a regulated voltage for an external application. This voltage is not available in
Power-down mode.
SIM switch to provide SIM power supply.
3.2.1
Minimizing Power Losses
When designing the power supply for your application please pay specific attention to power losses. Ensure that
the input voltage VBATT+ never drops below 3.3V on the XT65/XT75 board, not even in a transmit burst where
current consumption can rise to typical peaks of 2A. It should be noted that XT65/XT75 switches off when
exceeding these limits. Any voltage drops that may occur in a transmit burst should not exceed 400mV.
The measurement network monitors outburst and inburst values. The drop is the difference of both values. The
maximum drop (Dmax) since the last start of the module will be saved. In IDLE and SLEEP mode, the module
switches off if the minimum battery voltage (Vbattmin) is reached.
Example:
VImin = 3.3V
Dmax = 0.4V
Vbattmin = VImin + Dmax
Vbattmin = 3.3V + 0.4V = 3.7V
The best approach to reducing voltage drops is to use a board-to-board connection as recommended, and a low
impedance power source. The resistance of the power supply lines on the host board and of a battery pack
should also be considered.
Note: If the application design requires an adapter cable between both board-to-board connectors, use a flex
cable as short as possible in order to minimize power losses.
Example:
If the length of the flex cable reaches the maximum length of 100mm, this connection may cause, for example,
a resistance of 30mΩ in the BATT+ line and 30mΩ in the GND line. As a result, a 2A transmit burst would add
up to a total voltage drop of 120mV. Plus, if a battery pack is involved, further losses may occur due to the resistance across the battery lines and the internal resistance of the battery including its protection circuit.
Figure 3: Power supply limits during transmit burst
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
3.2 Power Supply
3.2.2
Measuring the Supply Voltage VBATT+
The reference points for measuring the supply voltage VBATT+ on the module are BATT+ and GND, both accessible at a capacitor located close to the board-to-board connector of the module.
Reference
point
BATT+
Reference
point GND
Figure 4: Position of the reference points BATT+ and GND
3.2.3
Monitoring Power Supply by AT Command
To monitor the supply voltage you can also use the AT^SBV command which returns the value related to the
reference points BATT+ and GND.
The module continuously measures the voltage at intervals depending on the operating mode of the RF interface.
The duration of measuring ranges from 0.5s in TALK/DATA mode to 50s when XT65/XT75 is in IDLE mode or
Limited Service (deregistered). The displayed voltage (in mV) is averaged over the last measuring period before
the AT^SBV command was executed.
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3.3 Power-Up / Power-Down Scenarios
3.3
s
Power-Up / Power-Down Scenarios
In general, be sure not to turn on XT65/XT75 while it is beyond the safety limits of voltage and temperature stated
in Section 7.1. XT65/XT75 would immediately switch off after having started and detected these inappropriate
conditions. In extreme cases this can cause permanent damage to the module.
3.3.1
Turn on XT65/XT75
XT65/XT75 can be started in a variety of ways as described in the following sections:
•
•
•
•
Hardware driven start-up by IGT line: starts Normal mode or Airplane mode (see Section 3.3.1.1)
Software controlled reset by AT+CFUN command: starts Normal mode or Airplane mode (see Section
3.3.1.4)
Hardware driven start-up by VCHARGE line: starts charging algorithm and charge-only mode (see Section
3.3.1.3)
Wake-up from Power-down mode by using RTC interrupt: starts Airplane mode
The option whether to start into Normal mode or Airplane mode depends on the settings made with the AT^SCFG
command or AT+CALA. With AT+CALA, followed by AT^SMSO the module can be configured to restart into Airplane mode at a scheduled alarm time. Switching back and forth between Normal mode and Airplane mode is
possible any time during operation by using the AT^SCFG command.
After startup or mode change the following URCs indicate the module’s ready state:
•
•
•
^SYSSTART" indicates that the module has entered Normal mode.
^SYSSTART AIRPLANE MODE" indicates that the module has entered Airplane mode.
^SYSSTART CHARGE ONLY MODE" indicates that the module has entered the Charge-only mode.
These URCs are indicated only if the module is set to a fixed bit rate, i.e. they do not appear if autobauding is
enabled (AT+IPR ≠ 0).
Detailed explanations on AT^SCFG, AT+CFUN, AT+CALA, Airplane mode and AT+IPR can be found in [1].
3.3.1.1
Turn on XT65/XT75 Using Ignition Line IGT
When the XT65/XT75 module is in Power-down mode or Charge-only mode, it can be started to Normal mode
or Airplane mode by driving the IGT (ignition) line to ground. This must be accomplished with an open drain/collector driver to avoid current flowing into this pin.
The module will start up when both of the following two conditions are met:
•
•
The supply voltage applied at BATT+ must be in the operating range.
The IGT line needs to be driven low for at least 400ms in Power-down mode or at least 2s in Charge-only
mode. When released IGT goes high and causes the module to start.
Considering different strategies of host application design the figures below show two approaches to meet this
requirement: The example in Figure 5 assumes that IGT is activated after BATT+ has already been applied. The
example in Figure 6 assumes that IGT is held low before BATT+ is switched on. In either case, to power on the
module, ensure that low state of IGT takes at least 400ms (Power-down mode) or 2s (Charge-only mode) from
the moment the voltage at BATT+ is available. For Charge-only mode see also Section 3.5.7.
Assertion of CTS indicates that the module is ready to receive data from the host application. In addition, if configured to a fixed bit rate (AT+IPR ≠ 0), the module will send the URC "^SYSSTART" or "^SYSSTART AIRPLANE
MODE" which notifies the host application that the first AT command can be sent to the module. The duration
until this URC is output varies with the SIM card and may take a couple of seconds.
Please note that no "^SYSSTART" or "^SYSSTART AIRPLANE MODE" URC will be generated if autobauding
(AT+IPR=0) is enabled.
To allow the application to detect the ready state of the module we recommend using hardware flow control which
can be set with AT\Q or AT+ICF (see [1] for details). The default setting of XT65/XT75 is AT\Q0 (no flow control)
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which shall be altered to AT\Q3 (RTS/CTS handshake). If the application design does not integrate RTS/CTS
lines the host application shall wait at least for the "^SYSSTART" or "^SYSSTART AIRPLANE MODE" URC.
However, if the URCs are neither used (due to autobauding) then the only way of checking the module’s ready
state is polling. To do so, try to send characters (e.g. “at”) until the module is responding.
See also Section 3.3.2 Signal States after Startup
For details on how to use EMERG_RST to reset applications
or external devices see Section 3.3.1.6.
Figure 5: Power-on with operating voltage at BATT+ applied before activating IGT
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For details on how to use EMERG_RST to reset applications
or external devices see Section 3.3.1.6.
Figure 6: Power-on with IGT held low before switching on operating voltage at BATT+
If the IGT line is driven low for less than 400ms the module will, instead of starting up, send only the alert message "SHUTDOWN after Illegal PowerUp" to the host application. The alert message appears on the serial interface ASC0 at a fixed bit rate of 115200bps. If other fixed bit rates or autobauding are set, the URC delivers only
undefined characters. The message will not be indicated on the USB interface.
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Configuring the IGT Line for Use as ON/OFF Switch
The IGT line can be configured for use in two different switching modes: You can set the IGT line to switch on
the module only, or to switch it on and off. The switching mode is determined by the parameter "MEShutdown/
OnIgnition" of the AT^SCFG command. This approach is useful for application manufacturers who wish to have
an ON/OFF switch installed on the host device.
By factory default, the ON/OFF switch mode of IGT is disabled:
at^scfg=meshutdown/onignition
# Query the current status of IGT.
^SCFG: "MEShutdown/OnIgnition","off"
# IGT can be used only to switch on XT65/XT75.
IGT works as described in Section 3.3.1.1.
OK
To configure IGT for use as ON/OFF switch:
at^scfg=meshutdown/onignition,on
# Enable the ON/OFF switch mode of IGT.
^SCFG: "MEShutdown/OnIgnition","on"
# IGT can be used to switch on and off XT65/XT75.
OK
We strongly recommend taking great care before changing the switching mode of the IGT line. To ensure that
the IGT line works properly as ON/OFF switch it is of vital importance that the following conditions are met.
Switch-on condition:If the XT65/XT75 is off, the IGT line must be asserted for at least 400ms before being
released. The module switches on after 400ms.
Switch-off condition:If the XT65/XT75 is on, the IGT line must be asserted for at least 1s before being released.
The module switches off after the line is released.
The switch-off routine is identical with the procedure initiated by AT^SMSO,
i.e. the software performs an orderly shutdown as described in Section 3.3.3.1.
Before switching off the module wait at least 2 seconds after startup.
Figure 7: Timing of IGT if used as ON/OFF switch
3.3.1.3
Turn on XT65/XT75 Using the VCHARGE Signal
As detailed in Section 3.5.7, the charging adapter can be connected regardless of the module’s operating mode.
If the charger is connected to the charger input of the external charging circuit and the module’s VCHARGE pin
while XT65/XT75 is off, and the battery voltage is above the undervoltage lockout threshold, processor controlled
fast charging starts (see Section 3.5.6). XT65/XT75 enters a restricted mode, referred to as Charge-only mode
where only the charging algorithm will be launched.
During the Charge-only mode XT65/XT75 is neither logged on to the GSM network nor is the serial interface fully
accessible. To switch from Charge-only mode to Normal mode the ignition line (IGT) must be pulled low for at
least 2 seconds. When released, the IGT line goes high and causes the module to enter the Normal mode. See
also Section 3.5.7.
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Reset XT65/XT75 via AT+CFUN Command
To reset and restart the XT65/XT75 module use the command AT+CFUN. You can enter AT+CFUN=,1 or
AT+CFUN=x,1, where x may be in the range from 0 to 9. See [1] for details.
If configured to a fix baud rate (AT+IPR ≠ 0), the module will send the URC "^SYSSTART" or "^SYSSTART AIRPLANE MODE" to notify that it is ready to operate. If autobauding is enabled (AT+IPR=0) there will be no notification. To register to the network SIM PIN authentication is necessary after restart.
3.3.1.5
Reset or Turn off XT65/XT75 in Case of Emergency
Caution: Use the EMERG_RST pin only when, due to serious problems, the software is not responding for more
than 5 seconds. Pulling the EMERG_RST pin causes the loss of all information stored in the volatile memory.
Therefore, this procedure is intended only for use in case of emergency, e.g. if XT65/XT75 does not respond, if
reset or shutdown via AT command fails.
The EMERG_RST signal is available on the application interface. To control the EMERG_RST line it is recommended to use an open drain / collector driver.
The EMERG_RST line can be used to switch off or to reset the module. In any case the EMERG_RST line must
be pulled to ground for >10ms. Then, after releasing the EMERG_RST line the module restarts if IGT is held low
for at least 400ms. Otherwise, if IGT is not low the module switches off. In this case, it can be restarted any time
as described in Section 3.3.1.1.
After hardware driven restart, notification via "^SYSSTART" or "^SYSSTART AIRPLANE" URC is the same as
in case of restart by IGT or AT command. To register to the network SIM PIN authentication is necessary after
restart.
3.3.1.6
Using EMERG_RST Signal to Reset Application(s) or External
Device(s)
When the module starts up, while IGT is held low for 400ms, the EMERG_RST signal goes low for 120ms as
shown in Figure 5 and Figure 6. During this 120ms period, EMERG_RST becomes an output which can be used
to reset application(s) or external device(s) connected to the module.
After the 120ms period, i.e. during operation of the module, the EMERG_RST is an input.
Specifications of the input and output mode of EMERG_RST can be found in Table 29.
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3.3.2
Signal States after Startup
Table 6 describes the various states each interface pin passes through after startup and during operation.
As shown in Figure 5 and Figure 6 the pins are in undefined state while the module is initializing. Once the startup
initialization has completed, i.e. when CTS is high and the software is running, all pins are in defined state. The
state of several pins will change again once the respective interface is activated or configured by AT command.
Table 6: Signal states
Signal name
Undefined state
during startup
Defined state after
initialization
Active state after configuration by AT
command
GPIO
SPI
I2C
SYNC
O, L
O, O
CCIN
I, PU(100k)
I, PU(100k)
CCRST
O, L
O, L
CCIO
O, L
O, L
CCCLK
O, L
O, L
CCVCC
O, L
2.9V
RXD0
I, PU
O, H
TXD0
I, PU
I, PD(330k)
CTS0
O, L
O, L
RTS0
I, PU
I, PD(330k)
DTR0
I, PU
I
DCD0
O, L
O, H
DSR0
O, L
O, H
RING0
I, PU
O, H
SPIDI
I
Tristate
I
Tristate
SPICS
I
O, H
O, L
Tristate
I2CDAT_SPIDO
I
Tristate
O, L/H
IO
I2CCLK_SPICLK
I
Tristate
O, L/H
O, OD
GPIO1
I, PU
Tristate
IO
GPIO2
I, PU
Tristate
IO
GPIO3
I, PU
Tristate
IO
GPIO4
I, PD
Tristate
IO
GPIO5
O, L
Tristate
IO
GPIO6
I
Tristate
IO
GPIO7
I
Tristate
IO
GPIO8
O, L
Tristate
IO
GPIO9
I
Tristate
IO
GPIO10
I
Tristate
IO
DAC_OUT
O, L
O, L
DAI0
I
Tristate
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Table 6: Signal states
Signal name
Undefined state
during startup
Defined state after
initialization
Active state after configuration by AT
command
GPIO
SPI
I2C
DAI
DAI1
I
Tristate
I
DAI2
I
Tristate
O, L
DAI3
I
Tristate
O, L
DAI4
I
Tristate
I
DAI5
I
Tristate
I
DAI6
I
Tristate
I
Abbreviations used in the table:
L = Low output level
PD = Pull down with min +15µA and max. +100µA
H = High output level
PD(...k) = Fix pull down resistor
I = Input
PU = Pull up with min -15µA and max. -100µA
O = Output
PU(...k) = Fix pull up resistor
3.3.3
Turn off XT65/XT75
XT65/XT75 can be turned off as follows:
•
•
Normal shutdown: Software controlled by AT^SMSO command
Automatic shutdown: Takes effect if board or battery temperature is out of range or if undervoltage or overvoltage conditions occur.
3.3.3.1
Turn off XT65/XT75 Using AT Command
The best and safest approach to powering down XT65/XT75 is to issue the AT^SMSO command. This procedure
lets XT65/XT75 log off from the network and allows the software to enter into a secure state and safe data before
disconnecting the power supply. The mode is referred to as Power-down mode. In this mode, only the RTC stays
active.
Before switching off the device sends the following response:
^SMSO: MS OFF
OK
^SHUTDOWN
After sending AT^SMSO do not enter any other AT commands. There are two ways to verify when the module
turns off:
•
•
Wait for the URC “^SHUTDOWN”. It indicates that data has been stored non-volatile and the module turns
off in less than 1 second.
Also, you can monitor the PWR_IND pin. High state of PWR_IND definitely indicates that the module is
switched off.
Be sure not to disconnect the supply voltage VBATT+ before the URC “^SHUTDOWN” has been issued and the
PWR_IND signal has gone high. Otherwise you run the risk of losing data. Signal states during turn-off are shown
in Figure 8.
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While XT65/XT75 is in Power-down mode the application interface is switched off and must not be fed from any
other source. Therefore, your application must be designed to avoid any current flow into any digital pins of the
application interface, especially of the serial interface. No special care is required for the USB interface which is
protected from reverse current.
Figure 8: Signal states during turn-off procedure
Note 1: Depending on capacitance load from host application
3.3.3.2
Leakage Current in Power-Down Mode
The leakage current in Power-down mode varies: If the supply voltage at BATT+ was disconnected and then
applied again without starting up the XT65/XT75 module, the leakage current is undeterminately higher than if
the XT65/XT75 module was started and then powered down again.
In order to minimize leakage current the following steps should therefore be completed after initially applying
BATT+:
•
•
•
•
•
Power up the module (see Section 3.3).
Power up the module’s GPS receiver either in Transparent mode (AT^SGPSS=1,1) or in AT mode
(AT^SGPSS=1,0). For more information on how to use the command AT^SGPSS and on how to control the
GPS receiver see [1] and [12].
Wait at least 1 second.
Turn the module’s GPS receiver off again by using AT^SGPSS=0.
Switch the module off by using AT^SMSO.
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Turn on/off XT65/XT75 Applications with Integrated USB
In a Windows environment, the USB COM port emulation causes the USB port of XT65/XT75 to appear as a
virtual COM port (VCOM port). The VCOM port emulation is only present when Windows can communicate with
the module, and is lost when the module shuts down. Therefore, the host application or Terminal program must
be disconnected from the USB VCOM port each time the module is restarted.
Restart after shutdown with AT^SMSO:
After entering the power-down command AT^SMSO on one of the interfaces (ASC0, USB) the host application
or Terminal program used on the USB VCOM port must be closed before the module is restarted by activating
the IGT line.
Software reset with AT+CFUN=x,1:
Likewise, when using the reset command AT+CFUN=x,1 on one of the interfaces (ASC0, USB) ensure that the
host application or Terminal program on the USB VCOM port be closed down before the module restarts.
Note that if AT+CFUN=x,1 is entered on the USB interface the application or Terminal program on the USB
VCOM port must be closed immediately after the response OK is returned.
3.3.4
Automatic Shutdown
Automatic shutdown takes effect if:
•
•
•
the XT65/XT75 board is exceeding the critical limits of overtemperature or undertemperature
the battery is exceeding the critical limits of overtemperature or undertemperature
undervoltage or overvoltage is detected
See Charge-only mode described in Section 3.5.7 for exceptions.
The automatic shutdown procedure is equivalent to the Power-down initiated with the AT^SMSO command, i.e.
XT65/XT75 logs off from the network and the software enters a secure state avoiding loss of data.
Alert messages transmitted before the device switches off are implemented as Unsolicited Result Codes
(URCs). The presentation of these URCs can be enabled or disabled with the two AT commands AT^SBC and
AT^SCTM. The URC presentation mode varies with the condition, please see Section 3.3.4.1 to Section 3.3.4.4
for details. For further instructions on AT commands refer to [1].
3.3.4.1
Thermal Shutdown
The board temperature is constantly monitored by an internal NTC resistor located on the PCB. The NTC that
detects the battery temperature must be part of the battery pack circuit as described in Section 3.5.3 The values
detected by either NTC resistor are measured directly on the board or the battery and therefore, are not fully
identical with the ambient temperature.
Each time the board or battery temperature goes out of range or back to normal, XT65/XT75 instantly displays
an alert (if enabled).
•
URCs indicating the level "1" or "-1" allow the user to take appropriate precautions, such as protecting the
module from exposure to extreme conditions. The presentation of the URCs depends on the settings selected
with the AT^SCTM write command:
AT^SCTM=1: Presentation of URCs is always enabled.
AT^SCTM=0 (default): Presentation of URCs is enabled for 15 seconds time after start-up of XT65/XT75.
After 15 seconds operation, the presentation will be disabled, i.e. no alert messages can be generated.
•
URCs indicating the level "2" or "-2" are instantly followed by an orderly shutdown. The presentation of these
URCs is always enabled, i.e. they will be output even though the factory setting AT^SCTM=0 was never
changed.
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The maximum temperature ratings are stated in Section 7.2. Refer to Table 7 for the associated URCs.
Table 7: Temperature dependent behavior
Sending temperature alert (15s after XT65/XT75 start-up, otherwise only if URC presentation enabled)
^SCTM_A: 1
Caution: Battery close to overtemperature limit.
^SCTM_B: 1
Caution: Bboard close to overtemperature limit.
^SCTM_A: -1
Caution: Battery close to undertemperature limit.
^SCTM_B: -1
Caution: Board close to undertemperature limit.
^SCTM_A: 0
Battery back to uncritical temperature range.
^SCTM_B: 0
Board back to uncritical temperature range.
Automatic shutdown (URC appears no matter whether or not presentation was enabled)
^SCTM_A: 2
Alert: Battery equal or beyond overtemperature limit. XT65/XT75 switches off.
^SCTM_B: 2
Alert: Board equal or beyond overtemperature limit. XT65/XT75 switches off.
^SCTM_A: -2
Alert: Battery equal or below undertemperature limit. XT65/XT75 switches off.
^SCTM_B: -2
Alert: Board equal or below undertemperature limit. XT65/XT75 switches off.
3.3.4.2
Temperature Control during Emergency call
If the temperature limit is exceeded while an emergency call is in progress the engine continues to measure the
temperature, but deactivates the shutdown functionality. If the temperature is still out of range when the call ends,
the module switches off immediately (without another alert message).
3.3.4.3
Undervoltage Shutdown if Battery NTC is Present
In applications where the module’s charging technique is used and an NTC is connected to the BATT_TEMP
terminal, the software constantly monitors the applied voltage. If the measured battery voltage is no more sufficient to set up a call the following URC will be presented:
^SBC: Undervoltage.
The message will be reported, for example, when you attempt to make a call while the voltage is close to the
shutdown threshold of 3.2V and further power loss is caused during the transmit burst. In IDLE mode, the shutdown threshold is the sum of the module’s minimum supply voltage (3.2V) and the value of the maximum voltage
drop resulting from earlier calls. This means that in IDLE mode the actual shutdown threshold may be higher than
3.2V. Therefore, to properly calculate the actual shutdown threshold application manufacturers are advised to
measure the maximum voltage drops that may occur during transmit bursts.
To remind you that the battery needs to be charged soon, the URC appears several times before the module
switches off.
This type of URC does not need to be activated by the user. It will be output automatically when fault conditions
occur.
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Undervoltage Shutdown if no Battery NTC is Present
The undervoltage protection is also effective in applications, where no NTC connects to the BATT_TEMP terminal. Thus, you can take advantage of this feature even though the application handles the charging process or
XT65/XT75 is fed by a fixed supply voltage. All you need to do is executing the write command AT^SBC=<current> which automatically enables the presentation of URCs. You do not need to specify <current>.
Whenever the supply voltage falls below the value of 3.2V the URC
^SBC: Undervoltage
appears several times before the module switches off.
This type of URC does not need to be activated by the user. It will be output automatically when fault conditions
occur.
3.3.4.5
Overvoltage Shutdown
The overvoltage shutdown threshold is 100mV above the maximum supply voltage VBATT+ specified in Table 31.
When the supply voltage approaches the overvoltage shutdown threshold the module sends the following URC
as an alert:
^SBC: Overvoltage warning.
The alert is sent once. When the overvoltage shutdown threshold is exceeded the module will send a further URC
before it shuts down cleanly:
^SBC: Overvoltage shutdown,
This type of URC does not need to be activated by the user. It will be output automatically when fault conditions
occur.
Keep in mind that several XT65/XT75 components are directly linked to BATT+ and, therefore, the supply voltage
remains applied at major parts of XT65/XT75, even if the module is switched off. Especially the power amplifier
is very sensitive to high voltage and might even be destroyed.
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Automatic EGPRS/GPRS Multislot Class Change
Temperature control is also effective for operation in EGPRS Multislot Class 10 (XT75 only), GPRS Multislot
Class 10 and GPRS Multislot Class 12. If the board temperature rises close to the limit specified for normal operation (see Section 7.2 for limits) while data is transmitted over EGPRS or GPRS, the module automatically
reverts:
•
•
•
from EGPRS Multislot Class 10 (2Tx slots) to EGPRS Multislot Class 8 (1Tx),
from GPRS Multislot Class 12 (4Tx slots) to GPRS Multislot Class 8 (1Tx)
from GPRS Multislot Class 10 (2Tx slots) to GPRS Multislot Class 8 (1Tx)
This reduces the power consumption and, consequently, causes the board’s temperature to decrease. Once the
temperature drops by 5 degrees, XT65/XT75 returns to the higher Multislot Class. If the temperature stays at the
critical level or even continues to rise, XT65/XT75 will not switch back to the higher class.
After a transition from EGPRS Multislot Class 10 to EGPRS Multislot Class 8 a possible switchback to EGPRS
Multislot Class 10 is blocked for one minute. The same applies when a transition occurs from GPRS Multislot
Class 12 or 10 to GPRS Multislot Class 8.
Please note that there is not one single cause of switching over to a lower Multislot Class. Rather it is the result
of an interaction of several factors, such as the board temperature that depends largely on the ambient temperature, the operating mode and the transmit power. Furthermore, take into account that there is a delay until the
network proceeds to a lower or, accordingly, higher Multislot Class. The delay time is network dependent. In
extreme cases, if it takes too much time for the network and the temperature cannot drop due to this delay, the
module may even switch off as described in Section 3.3.4.1.
3.5
Charging Control
XT65/XT75 integrates a charging management for rechargeable Lithium Ion and Lithium Polymer batteries. You
can skip this chapter if charging is not your concern, or if you are not using the implemented charging algorithm.
The following sections contain an overview of charging and battery specifications. Please refer to [5] for greater
detail, especially regarding requirements for batteries and chargers, appropriate charging circuits, recommended
batteries and an analysis of operational issues typical of battery powered GSM/GPRS applications.
3.5.1
Hardware Requirements
XT65/XT75 has no on-board charging circuit. To benefit from the implemented charging management you are
required to install a charging circuit within your application according to the Figure 54.
3.5.2
Software Requirements
Use the command AT^SBC, parameter <current>, to enter the current consumption of the host application. This
information enables the XT65/XT75 module to correctly determine the end of charging and terminate charging
automatically when the battery is fully charged. If the <current> value is inaccurate and the application draws a
current higher than the final charge current, either charging will not be terminated or the battery fails to reach its
maximum voltage. Therefore, the termination condition is defined as: current consumption dependent on operating mode of the ME plus current consumption of the external application. If used the current flowing over the
VEXT pin of the application interface must be added, too.
The parameter <current> is volatile, meaning that the factory default (0mA) is restored each time the module is
powered down or reset. Therefore, for better control of charging, it is recommended to enter the value every time
the module is started.
See [1] for details on AT^SBC.
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Battery Pack Requirements
The charging algorithm has been optimized for rechargeable Lithium batteries that meet the characteristics listed
below and in Table 8. It is recommended that the battery pack you want to integrate into your XT65/XT75 application is compliant with these specifications. This ensures reliable operation, proper charging and, particularly,
allows you to monitor the battery capacity using the AT^SBC command. Failure to comply with these specifications might cause AT^SBC to deliver incorrect battery capacity values.
•
•
Li-Ion or Lithium Polymer battery pack specified for a maximum charging voltage of 4.2V and a capacity
higher than 500mAh.
Since charging and discharging largely depend on the battery temperature, the battery pack should include
an NTC resistor. If the NTC is not inside the battery it must be in thermal contact with the battery. The NTC
resistor must be connected between BATT_TEMP and GND.
The B value of the NTC should be in the range: 10kΩ +5% @ 25°C, B25/85 = 3423K to B =3435K ± 3% (alternatively acceptable: 10kΩ +2% @ 25°C, B25/50 = 3370K +3%). Please note that the NTC is indispensable for
proper charging, i.e. the charging process will not start if no NTC is present.
•
•
•
•
•
Ensure that the pack incorporates a protection circuit capable of detecting overvoltage (protection against
overcharging), undervoltage (protection against deep discharging) and overcurrent. Due to the discharge current profile typical of GSM applications, the circuit must be insensitive to pulsed current.
On the XT65/XT75 module, a built-in measuring circuit constantly monitors the supply voltage. In the event
of undervoltage, it causes XT65/XT75 to power down. Undervoltage thresholds are specific to the battery
pack and must be evaluated for the intended model. When you evaluate undervoltage thresholds, consider
both the current consumption of XT65/XT75 and of the application circuit.
The internal resistance of the battery and the protection should be as low as possible. It is recommended not
to exceed 150mΩ, even in extreme conditions at low temperature. The battery cell must be insensitive to rupture, fire and gassing under extreme conditions of temperature and charging (voltage, current).
The battery pack must be protected from reverse pole connection. For example, the casing should be
designed to prevent the user from mounting the battery in reverse orientation.
It is recommended that the battery pack be approved to satisfy the requirements of CE conformity.
Figure 9 shows the circuit diagram of a typical battery pack design that includes the protection elements
described above.
Figure 9: Battery pack circuit diagram
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3.5 Charging Control
s
Table 8: Specifications of battery packs suitable for use with XT65/XT75
Battery type
Rechargeable Lithium Ion or Lithium Polymer battery
Nominal voltage
3.6V / 3.7V
Capacity
> 500mAh
NTC
10kΩ ± 5% @ 25°C
approx. 5kΩ @ 45°C
approx. 26.2kΩ @ 0°C
B value range: B (25/85)=3423K to B =3435K ± 3%
Overcharge detection voltage
4.325 ± 0.025V
Overdischarge detection voltage
2.4V
Overdischarge release voltage
2.6V
Overcurrent detection
3 ± 0.5A
Overcurrent detection delay time
4 ~ 16ms
Short detection delay time
50µs
Internal resistance
<130mΩ
Note: A maximum internal resistance of 150mΩ should not
be exceeded even after 500 cycles and under extreme conditions.
3.5.4
Batteries Tested for Use with XT65/XT75
When you choose a battery for your XT65/XT75 application you can take advantage of one of the following two
batteries offered by VARTA Microbattery GmbH. Both batteries meet all requirements listed above. They have
been thoroughly tested by Siemens and proved to be suited for XT65/XT75.
•
LIP 653450 TC, type Lithium Ion
This battery is listed in the standard product range of VARTA. It is incorporated in a shrink sleeve and has
been chosen for integration into the reference setup.
•
PLF 503759C.PCM, type PoLiFlex® Lithium Polymer
This battery has been especially designed by VARTA for use with electronic applications like mobile phones,
PDAs, MP3 players, security and telematic devices. It has the same properties as the above Li-Ion battery,
except that it is type Polymer, is smaller, lighter and comes without casing.
Specifications, construction drawings and sales contacts for both VARTA batteries can be found in Section 11.3.
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3.5 Charging Control
3.5.5
s
Charger Requirements
For using the implemented charging algorithm and the reference charging circuit recommended in [5] and in Figure 54, the charger has to meet the following requirements:
Output voltage: 5.2Volts ±0.2V (stabilized voltage)
Output current: 500mA
Chargers with a higher output current are acceptable, but please consider that only 500mA
will be applied when a 0.3Ohms shunt resistor is connected between VSENSE and ISENSE.
See [5] for further details.
3.5.6
Implemented Charging Technique
If all requirements listed above are met (appropriate external charging circuit of application, battery pack,
charger, AT^SBC settings) then charging is enabled in various stages depending on the battery condition:
Trickle charging:
•
•
Trickle charge current flows over the VCHARGE line.
Trickle charging is done when a charger is present (connected to VCHARGE) and the battery is deeply discharged or has undervoltage. If deeply discharged (Deep Discharge Lockout at VBATT+= <2.5V) the battery is
charged with 5mA, in case of undervoltage (Undervoltage Lockout at VBATT+= 2.5…3.2V) it is charged with
30mA
Software controlled charging:
•
•
•
Controlled over the CHARGEGATE.
Temperature conditions: 0°C to 45°C
Software controlled charging is done when the charger is present (connected to VCHARGE) and the battery
voltage is at least above the undervoltage threshold. Software controlled charging passes the following
stages:
-
Power ramp: Depending on the discharge level of the battery (i.e. the measured battery voltage VBATT+)
the software adjusts the maximum charge current for charging the battery. The duration of power ramp
charging is very short (less than 30 seconds).
-
Fast charging: Battery is charged with constant current (approx. 500mA) until the battery voltage reaches
4.2V (approx. 80% of the battery capacity).
-
Top-up charging: The battery is charged with constant voltage of 4.2V at stepwise reducing charge current
until full battery capacity is reached.
Duration of charging:
•
XT65/XT75 provides two charging timers: a software controlled timer set to 4 hours and a hardware controlled
timer set to 4.66 hours.
-
The duration of software controlled charging depends on the battery capacity and the level of discharge.
Normally, charging stops when the battery is fully charged or, at the latest, when the software timer expires
after 4 hours.
-
The hardware timer is provided to prevent runaway charging and to stop charging if the software is not
responding. The hardware timer will start each time the charger is plugged to the VCHARGE line.
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3.5 Charging Control
3.5.7
s
Operating Modes during Charging
Of course, the battery can be charged regardless of the engine's operating mode. When the GSM module is in
Normal mode (SLEEP, IDLE, TALK, GPRS IDLE or GPRS DATA mode), it remains operational while charging
is in progress (provided that sufficient voltage is applied). The charging process during the Normal mode is
referred to as Charge mode.
If the charger is connected to the charger input of the external charging circuit and the module’s VCHARGE pin
while XT65/XT75 is in Power-down mode, XT65/XT75 goes into Charge-only mode.
While the charger remains connected it is not possible to switch the module off by using the AT^SMSO command
or the automatic shutdown mechanism. Instead the following applies:
•
•
•
If the module is in Normal mode and the charger is connected (Charge mode) the AT^SMSO command
causes the module to shut down shortly and then start into the Charge-only mode.
In Charge-only mode the AT^SMSO command is not usable.
In Charge-only mode the module neither switches off when the battery or the module exceeds the critical limits of overtemperature or undertemperature.
In these cases you can only switch the module off by disconnecting the charger.
To proceed from Charge-only mode to another operating mode you have the following options, provided that the
battery voltage is at least above the undervoltage threshold.
•
•
•
To switch from Charge-only mode to Normal mode you have two ways:
-
Hardware driven: The ignition line (IGT) must be pulled low for at least 2 seconds. When released, the IGT
line goes high and causes the module to enter the Normal mode.
-
AT command driven: Set the command AT^SCFG=MEopMode/Airplane,off (please do so although the
current status of Airplane mode is already “off”). The module will enter the Normal mode, indicated by the
“^SYSSTART” URC.
To switch from Charge-only mode to Airplane mode set the command AT^SCFG=MEopMode/Airplane,on.
The mode is indicated by the URC “^SYSSTART AIRPLANE MODE”.
If AT^SCFG=MEopMode/Airplane/OnStart,on is set, driving the ignition line (IGT) activates the Airplane
mode. The mode is indicated by the URC “^SYSSTART AIRPLANE MODE”.
Table 9: AT commands available in Charge-only mode
AT command
Use
AT+CALA
Set alarm time, configure Airplane mode.
AT+CCLK
Set date and time of RTC.
AT^SBC
Query status of charger connection.
AT^SBV
Monitor supply voltage.
AT^SCTM
Query temperature range, enable/disable URCs to report critical temperature ranges
AT^SCFG
Enable/disable parameters MEopMode/Airplane or MEopMode/Airplane/OnStart
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Table 10: Comparison Charge-only and Charge mode
Charge
mode
How to activate mode
Description of mode
Connect charger to charger input of host
application charging circuit and module’s
VCHARGE pin while XT65/XT75 is
•
•
•
•
operating, e.g. in IDLE or TALK mode
in SLEEP mode
Battery can be charged while GSM module
remains operational and registered to the GSM
network.
In IDLE and TALK mode, the serial interface is
accessible. All AT commands can be used to
full extent.
NOTE: If the module operates at maximum power
level (PCL5) and GPRS Class 12 at the same time
the current consumption is higher than the current
supplied by the charger.
Chargeonly mode
Connect charger to charger input of host
application charging circuit and module’s
VCHARGE pin while XT65/XT75 is
•
•
•
•
in Power-down mode
in Normal mode: Connect charger to •
the VCHARGE pin, then enter
AT^SMSO.
Battery can be charged while GSM engine is
deregistered from GSM network.
Charging runs smoothly due to constant current consumption.
The AT interface is accessible and allows to
use the commands listed below.
NOTE: While trickle charging is in
progress, be sure that the host application
is switched off. If the application is fed
from the trickle charge current the module
might be prevented from proceeding to
software controlled charging since the
current would not be sufficient.
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3.6 Power Saving
3.6
s
Power Saving
Intended for power saving, SLEEP mode reduces the functionality of the XT65/XT75 to a minimum and thus minimizes the current consumption. Settings can be made using the AT+CFUN command. For details see [1].
SLEEP mode falls in two categories:
•
•
NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode: AT+CFUN = 0
CYCLIC SLEEP modes, AT+CFUN = 7 or 9.
The functionality level AT+CFUN=1 is where power saving is switched off. This is the default after startup.
NON-CYCLIC SLEEP mode permanently blocks the serial interface. The benefit of the CYCLIC SLEEP mode is
that the serial interface remains accessible and that, in intermittent wake-up periods, characters can be sent or
received without terminating the selected mode. This allows the XT65/XT75 to wake up for the duration of an
event and, afterwards, to resume power saving. Please refer to [1] for a summary of all SLEEP modes and the
different ways of waking up the module.
For CYCLIC SLEEP mode both the XT65/XT75 and the application must be configured to use hardware flow
control. This is necessary since the CTS0 signal is set/reset every 0.9-2.7 seconds in order to indicate to the
application when the UART is active. Please refer to [1] for details on how to configure hardware flow control for
the XT65/XT75.
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3.6 Power Saving
3.6.1
s
Network Dependency of SLEEP Modes
The power saving possibilities of SLEEP modes depend on the network the module is registered in. The paging
timing cycle varies with the base station. The duration of a paging interval can be calculated from the following
formula:
t = 4.615 ms (TDMA frame duration) * 51 (number of frames) * DRX value.
DRX (Discontinuous Reception) is a value from 2 to 9, resulting in paging intervals from
0.47-2.12 seconds. The DRX value of the base station is assigned by the network operator.
In the pauses between listening to paging messages, the module resumes power saving, as shown in Figure 10.
Figure 10: Power saving and paging
The varying pauses explain the different potential for power saving. The longer the pause the less power is consumed.
3.6.2
Timing of the CTS0 Signal in CYCLIC SLEEP Mode 7
Figure 11 illustrates the CTS0 signal timing in CYCLIC SLEEP mode 7 (CFUN=7).
Figure 11: Timing of CTS0 signal (if CFUN= 7)
With regard to programming or using timeouts, the UART must take the varying CTS inactivity periods into
account.
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3.6 Power Saving
3.6.3
s
Timing of the RTS0 Signal in CYCLIC SLEEP Mode 9
In SLEEP mode 9 the falling edge of RTS0 can be used to temporarily wake up the ME. In this case the activity
time is at least the time set with AT^SCFG="PowerSaver/Mode9/ Timeout",<psm9to> (default 2 seconds). RTS0
has to be asserted for at least a dedicated debounce time in order to wake up the ME. The debounce time specifies the minimum time period an RTS0 signal has to remain asserted for the signal to be recognized as wake up
signal and being processed. The debounce time is defined as 8*4.615 ms (TDMA frame duration) and is used to
prevent bouncing or other fluctuations from being recognized as signals. Toggling RTS0 while the ME is awake
has no effect on the AT interface state, the regular hardware flow control via CTS/RTS is unaffected by this RTS0
behaviour.
Figure 12: Timing of RTS0 signal (if CFUN = 9)
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3.7 Summary of State Transitions (Except SLEEP Mode)
3.7
Summary of State Transitions (Except SLEEP Mode)
The following table shows how to proceed from one mode to another (grey column = present mode, white columns = intended modes).
Table 11: State transitions of XT65/XT75 (except SLEEP mode)
Further mode -->
POWER DOWN
Normal mode1
Charge-only mode2
---
If AT^SCFG= MeOpMode/Airplane/OnStart,off: Connect charger to
VCHARGE
IGT >400 ms at low level, then release IGT
Airplane mode
Present mode
POWER DOWN
mode
If AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/Airplane/OnStart,on:
IGT >400 ms at low level, then release IGT.
Regardless of AT^SCFG configuration: scheduled wake-up set with AT+CALA.
Normal mode1
AT^SMSO
---
AT^SMSO if charger
is connected
AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/Airplane,on.
If AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/Airplane/OnStart,on:
AT+CFUN=x,1 or EMERG_RST + IGT >400 ms.
Charge-only mode
2
Disconnect
charger
Hardware driven: If AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/
Airplane/OnStart,off:
---
AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/Airplane,on.
If AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/Airplane/OnStart,on:
IGT >2s at low level
IGT >2s at low level, then release IGT
AT command driven:
AT^SCFG= MeOpMode/Airplane,off
Airplane mode
1.
2.
AT^SMSO
AT^SCFG=MeOpMode/Airplane,off
AT^SMSO if charger
is connected
---
Normal mode covers TALK, DATA, GPRS/EGPRS, IDLE and SLEEP modes
See Section 3.5.7 for details on the charging mode
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3.8 RTC Backup
3.8
s
RTC Backup
The Real Time Clock (RTC) of the module’s GSM unit is supplied from a separate voltage regulator in the analog
controller. The RTC of the GPS receiver is supplied from an external voltage regulator. Both RTCs are also
active, if XT65/XT75 is in POWER-DOWN mode. An alarm function is provided that allows to wake up the module’s GSM part to Airplane mode without logging on to the GSM network.
In addition, you can use the VDDLP pin on the board-to-board connector to backup the RTCs from an external
capacitor or a battery (rechargeable or non-chargeable). The capacitor is charged from the BATT+ line of XT65/
XT75. If the voltage supply at BATT+ is disconnected, the RTC can be powered by the capacitor. The size of the
capacitor determines the duration of buffering when no voltage is applied to XT65/XT75, i.e. the greater the
capacitor the longer XT65/XT75 will save the date and time. It is also possible to connect a battery.
A serial 1kΩ resistor placed on the board next to VDDLP limits the charge current of an empty capacitor or battery. The following figures show various sample configurations. Please refer to Table 29 for the parameters
required.
Figure 13: RTC supply from capacitor
Figure 14: RTC supply from rechargeable battery
Figure 15: RTC supply from non-chargeable battery
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3.9 SIM Interface
3.9
s
SIM Interface
The baseband processor has an integrated SIM interface compatible with the ISO 7816 IC Card standard. This
is wired to the host interface (board-to-board connector) in order to be connected to an external SIM card holder.
Six pins on the board-to-board connector are reserved for the SIM interface.
The SIM interface supports 3V and 1.8V SIM cards. Please refer to Table 29 for electrical specifications of the
SIM interface lines depending on whether a 3V or 1.8V SIM card is used.
The CCIN pin serves to detect whether a tray (with SIM card) is present in the card holder. Using the CCIN pin
is mandatory for compliance with the GSM 11.11 recommendation if the mechanical design of the host application allows the user to remove the SIM card during operation. To take advantage of this feature, an appropriate
SIM card detect switch is required on the card holder. For example, this is true for the model supplied by Molex,
which has been tested to operate with XT65/XT75 and is part of the Siemens reference equipment submitted for
type approval. See Chapter 11 for Molex ordering numbers.
Table 12: Signals of the SIM interface (board-to-board connector)
Signal
Description
CCGND
Separate ground connection for SIM card to improve EMC.
Be sure to use this ground line for the SIM interface rather than any other ground pin or plane on
the module. A design example for grounding the SIM interface is shown in Figure 54.
CCCLK
Chipcard clock, various clock rates can be set in the baseband processor.
CCVCC
SIM supply voltage.
CCIO
Serial data line, input and output.
CCRST
Chipcard reset, provided by baseband processor.
CCIN
Input on the baseband processor for detecting a SIM card tray in the holder. If the SIM is removed
during operation the SIM interface is shut down immediately to prevent destruction of the SIM. The
CCIN pin is active low.
The CCIN pin is mandatory for applications that allow the user to remove the SIM card during operation.
The CCIN pin is solely intended for use with a SIM card. It must not be used for any other purposes.
Failure to comply with this requirement may invalidate the type approval of XT65/XT75.
Note: No guarantee can be given, nor any liability accepted, if loss of data is encountered after removing the SIM
card during operation. Also, no guarantee can be given for properly initializing any SIM card that the user inserts
after having removed the SIM card during operation.
3.9.1
Installation Advice
The total cable length between the board-to-board connector pins on XT65/XT75 and the pins of the external
SIM card holder must not exceed 100mm in order to meet the specifications of 3GPP TS 51.010-1 and to satisfy
the requirements of EMC compliance.
To avoid possible cross-talk from the CCCLK signal to the CCIO signal be careful that both lines are not placed
closely next to each other. A useful approach is using the CCGND line to shield the CCIO line from the CCCLK
line.
To meet EMC requirements it is strongly recommended to add several capacitors as shown in Figure 54. Take
care to place the capacitors close to the SIM card holder.
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3.10 Serial Interface ASC0
3.10
s
Serial Interface ASC0
XT65/XT75 offers an 8-wire unbalanced, asynchronous modem interface ASC0 conforming to ITU-T V.24 protocol DCE signalling. The electrical characteristics do not comply with ITU-T V.28. The significant levels are 0V
(for low data bit or active state) and 2.9V (for high data bit or inactive state). For electrical characteristics please
refer to Table 29.
XT65/XT75 is designed for use as a DCE. Based on the conventions for DCE-DTE connections it communicates
with the customer application (DTE) using the following signals:
•
•
Port TXD @ application sends data to the module’s TXD0 signal line
Port RXD @ application receives data from the module’s RXD0 signal line
Figure 16: Serial interface ASC0
Features:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Includes the data lines TXD0 and RXD0, the status lines RTS0 and CTS0 and, in addition, the modem control
lines DTR0, DSR0, DCD0 and RING0.
ASC0 is primarily designed for controlling voice calls, transferring CSD, fax and GPRS data and for controlling
the GSM engine with AT commands.
Full Multiplex capability allows the interface to be partitioned into three virtual channels, yet with CSD and fax
services only available on the first logical channel. For more details on Multiplex mode see [14].
The DTR0 signal will only be polled once per second from the internal firmware of XT65/XT75.
The RING0 signal serves to indicate incoming calls and other types of URCs (Unsolicited Result Code). It can
also be used to send pulses to the host application, for example to wake up the application from power saving
state. See [1] for details on how to configure the RING0 line by AT^SCFG.
By default, configured for 8 data bits, no parity and 1 stop bit. The setting can be changed using the AT command AT+ICF and, if required, AT^STPB. For details see [1].
ASC0 can be operated at fixed bit rates from 300 bps to 460,800 bps.
Autobauding supports bit rates from 1,200 to 460,800 bps.
Autobauding is not compatible with multiplex mode.
Supports RTS0/CTS0 hardware flow control and XON/XOFF software flow control.
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3.10 Serial Interface ASC0
Table 13: DCE-DTE wiring of ASC0
V.24 circuit
DCE
DTE
Pin function
Signal direction
Pin function
Signal direction
103
TXD0
Input
TXD
Output
104
RXD0
Output
RXD
Input
105
RTS0
Input
RTS
Output
106
CTS0
Output
CTS
Input
108/2
DTR0
Input
DTR
Output
107
DSR0
Output
DSR
Input
109
DCD0
Output
DCD
Input
125
RING0
Output
RING
Input
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3.11 USB Interface
3.11
s
USB Interface
XT65/XT75 supports a USB 2.0 Full Speed (12Mbit/s) device interface. It can be operated on a USB 2.0 Full
Speed or High Speed root hub (a PC host), but not on a generic USB 2.0 High Speed hub which translates High
Speed (480 Mbit/s/) to Full Speed (12 Mbit/s).
The USB port has different functions depending on whether or not Java is running. Under Java, the lines may be
used for debugging purposes (see [18] for further detail). If Java is not used, the USB interface is available as a
command and data interface and for downloading firmware.
The USB I/O-pins are capable of driving the signal at min 3.0V. They are 5V I/O compliant.
To properly connect the module’s USB interface to the host a USB 2.0 compatible connector is required. Furthermore, the USB modem driver delivered with XT65/XT75 must be installed as described below.
The USB host is responsible for supplying, across the VUSB_IN line, power to the module’s USB interface, but
not to other XT65/XT75 interfaces. This is because XT65/XT75 is designed as a self-powered device compliant
with the “Universal Serial Bus Specification Revision 2.0”2.
Figure 17: USB circuit
To properly connect the module's USB interface to the host a USB 2.0 compatible connector is required. For
more information on how to install a USB modem driver and on how to integrate USB into XT65/XT75 applications see [11].
2.
The specification is ready for download on http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/
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3.12 I2C Interface
3.12
s
I2C Interface
I2C is a serial, 8-bit oriented data transfer bus for bit rates up to 400kbps in Fast mode. It consists of two lines,
the serial data line I2CDAT and the serial clock line I2CCLK.
The XT65/XT75 module acts as a single master device, e.g. the clock I2CCLK is driven by module. I2CDAT is a
bi-directional line.
Each device connected to the bus is software addressable by a unique 7-bit address, and simple master/slave
relationships exist at all times. The module operates as master-transmitter or as master-receiver. The customer
application transmits or receives data only on request of the module.
To configure and activate the I2C bus use the AT^SSPI command. If the I2C bus is active the two lines I2CCLK
and I2DAT are locked for use as SPI lines. Vice versa, the activation of the SPI locks both lines for I2C. Detailed
information on the AT^SSPI command as well explanations on the protocol and syntax required for data transmission can be found in [1].
The I2C interface can be powered from an external supply or via the VEXT line of XT65/XT75. If connected to
the VEXT line the I2C interface will be properly shut down when the module enters the Power-down mode. If you
prefer to connect the I2C interface to an external power supply, take care that VCC of the application is in the
range of VVEXT and that the interface is shut down when the PWR_IND signal goes high. See figures below as
well as Section 9 and Figure 54.
In the application I2CDAT and I2CCLK lines need to be connected to a positive supply voltage via a pull-up resistor.
For electrical characteristics please refer to Table 29.
Figure 18: I2C interface connected to VCC of application
Figure 19: I2C interface connected to VEXT line of XT65/XT75
Note: Good care should be taken when creating the PCB layout of the host application: The traces of I2CCLK
and I2CDAT should be equal in length and as short as possible.
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3.13 SPI Interface
3.13
s
SPI Interface
The SPI (serial peripheral interface) is a synchronous serial interface for control and data transfer between the
XT65/XT75 module and the connected application. Only one application can be connected to the module’s SPI.
The interface supports transmission rates up to 6.5Mbit/s. It consists of four lines, the two data lines SPIDI/
SPIDO, the clock line SPICLK and the chip select line SPICS.
The XT65/XT75 module acts as a single master device, e.g. the clock SPICLK is driven by module. Whenever
the SPICS pin is in a low state, the SPI bus is activated and data can be transferred from the module and vice
versa. The SPI interface uses two independent lines for data input (SPIDI) and data output (SPIDO).
Figure 20: SPI interface
To configure and activate the SPI bus use the AT^SSPI command. If the SPI bus is active the two lines I2CCLK
and I2DAT are locked for use as I2C lines. Detailed information on the AT^SSPI command as well explanations
on the SPI modes required for data transmission can be found in [1].
In general, SPI supports four operation modes. The modes are different in clock phase and clock polarity. The
module’s SPI mode can be configured by using the AT command AT^SSPI. Make sure the module and the connected slave device works with the same SPI mode.
Figure 21 shows the characteristics of the four SPI modes. The SPI modes 0 and 3 are the most common used
modes.
For electrical characteristics please refer to Table 29.
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3.13 SPI Interface
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Figure 21: Characteristics of SPI modes
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3.14 Audio Interfaces
3.14
s
Audio Interfaces
XT65/XT75 comprises three audio interfaces available on the board-to-board connector:
•
•
Two analog audio interfaces, both with balanced or single-ended inputs/outputs.
Serial digital audio interface (DAI) designed for PCM (Pulse Code Modulation).
This means you can connect up to three different audio devices, although only one interface can be operated at
a time. Using the AT^SAIC command you can easily switch back and forth.
Figure 22: Audio block diagram
To suit different types of accessories the audio interfaces can be configured for different audio modes via the
AT^SNFS command. The electrical characteristics of the voiceband part vary with the audio mode. For example,
sending and receiving amplification, sidetone paths, noise suppression etc. depend on the selected mode and
can be altered with AT commands (except for mode 1).
Both analog audio interfaces can be used to connect headsets with microphones or speakerphones. Headsets
can be operated in audio mode 3, speakerphones in audio mode 2. Audio mode 5 can be used for direct access
to the speech coder without signal pre or post processing.
When shipped from factory, all audio parameters of XT65/XT75 are set to interface 1 and audio mode 1. This is
the default configuration optimized for the Votronic HH-SI-30.3/V1.1/0 handset and used for type approving the
Siemens reference configuration. Audio mode 1 has fix parameters which cannot be modified. To adjust the settings of the Votronic handset simply change to another audio mode.
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3.14.1
Speech Processing
The speech samples from the ADC or DAI are handled by the DSP of the baseband controller to calculate e.g.
amplifications, sidetone, echo cancellation or noise suppression depending on the configuration of the active
audio mode. These processed samples are passed to the speech encoder. Received samples from the speech
decoder are passed to the DAC or DAI after post processing (frequency response correction, adding sidetone
etc.).
Full rate, half rate, enhanced full rate, adaptive multi rate (AMR), speech and channel encoding including voice
activity detection (VAD) and discontinuous transmission (DTX) and digital GMSK modulation are also performed
on the GSM baseband processor.
3.14.2
Microphone Circuit
XT65/XT75 has two identical analog microphone inputs. There is no on-board microphone supply circuit, except
for the internal voltage supply VMIC and the dedicated audio ground line AGND. Both lines are well suited to
feed a balanced audio application or a single-ended audio application.
The AGND line on the XT65/XT75 board is especially provided to achieve best grounding conditions for your
audio application. As there is less current flowing than through other GND lines of the module or the application,
this solution will avoid hum and buzz problems.
While XT65/XT75 is in Power-down mode, the input voltage at any MIC pin must not exceed ±0.3V relative to
AGND (see also Section 7.1). In any other operating state the voltage applied to any MIC pin must be in the range
of +2.7V to -0.3V, otherwise undervoltage shutdown may be caused.
If VMIC is used to generate the MICP-pin bias voltage as shown in the following examples consider that VMIC
is switched off (0V) outside a call. Audio signals applied to MICP in this case must not fall below -0.3V.
If higher input levels are used especially in the line input configuration the signal level must be limited to 600mVpp
outside a call, or AT^SNFM=,1 should be used to switch on VMIC permanently.
3.14.2.1
Single-ended Microphone Input
Figure 23 as well as Figure 54 show an example of how to integrate a single-ended microphone input.
RA = typ. 2k
RB = typ. 5k
RVMIC = typ. 470Ohm
Ck = typ. 100nF
CF = typ. 22µF
VMIC = typ. 2.5V
Vbias = 1.0V … 1.6V, typ. 1.5V
Figure 23: Single ended microphone input
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RA has to be chosen so that the DC voltage across the microphone falls into the bias voltage range of 1.0V to
1.6V and the microphone feeding current meets its specification.
The MICNx input is automatically self biased to the MICPx DC level. It is AC coupled via CK to a resistive divider
which is used to optimize supply noise cancellation by the differential microphone amplifier in the module.
The VMIC voltage should be filtered if gains larger than 20dB are used. The filter can be attached as a simple
first order RC-network (RVMIC and CF).
This circuit is well suited if the distance between microphone and module is kept short. Due to good grounding
the microphone can be easily ESD protected as its housing usually connects to the negative terminal.
3.14.2.2
Differential Microphone Input
Figure 24 shows a differential solution for connecting an electret microphone.
RA = typ. 1k
RVMIC = 470Ohm
CK = typ. 100nF
CF = typ. 22µF
VMIC = typ. 2.5V
Vbias = 1.0V … 1.6V, typ. 1.5V
Figure 24: Differential microphone input
The advantage of this circuit is that it can be used if the application involves longer lines between microphone
and module.
While VMIC is switched off, the input voltage at any MIC pin should not exceed ±0.25V relative to AGND (see
also Section 7.1). In this case no bias voltage has to be supplied from the customer circuit to the MIC pin and
any signal voltage should be smaller than Vpp = 0.5V.
VMIC can be used to generate the MICP-pin bias voltage as shown below. In this case the bias voltage is only
applied if VMIC is switched on.
Only if VMIC is switched on, can the voltage applied to any MIC pin be in the range of 2.4V to 0V. If these limits
are exceeded undervoltage shutdown may be caused.
Consider that the maximum full scale input voltage is Vpp = 1.6V.
The behavior of VMIC can be controlled with the parameter micVccCtl of the AT command AT^SNFM (see [1]):
•
•
•
micVccCtl=2 (default). VMIC is controlled automatically by the module. VMIC is always switched on while the
internal audio circuits of the module are active (e.g., during a call). VMIC can be used as indicator for active
audio in the module.
micVccCtl=1. VMIC is switched on continuously. This setting can be used to supply the microphone in order
to use the signal in other customer circuits as well. However, this setting leads to a higher current consumption in SLEEP modes.
micVccCtl=0. VMIC is permanently switched off.
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3.14.2.3
Line Input Configuration with OpAmp
Figure 25 shows an example of how to connect an opamp into the microphone circuit.
RA = typ. 47k
RVMIC = 470Ohm
Ck = typ. 100nF
CF = typ. 22µF
VMIC = typ. 2.5V
Vbias = typ. ½ VMIC = 1.25V
Figure 25: Line input configuration with OpAmp
The AC source (e.g. an opamp) and its reference potential have to be AC coupled to the MICPx resp. MICNx
input terminals. The voltage divider between VMIC and AGND is necessary to bias the input amplifier. MICNx is
automatically self biased to the MICPx DC level.
The VMIC voltage should be filtered if gains larger than 20dB are used. The filter can be attached as a simple
first order RC-network (RVMIC and CF). If a high input level and a lower gain are applied the filter is not necessary.
Consider that if VMIC is switched off, the signal voltage should be limited to Vpp = 0.5V and any bias voltage
must not be applied. Otherwise VMIC can be switched on permanently by using AT^SNFM=,1. In this case the
current consumption in SLEEP modes is higher.
If desired, MICNx via CK can also be connected to the inverse output of the AC source instead of connecting it
to the reference potential for differential line input.
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3.14.3
Loudspeaker Circuit
The GSM module comprises two analog speaker outputs: EP1 and EP2. Output EP1 is able to drive a load of
8Ohms while the output EP2 can drive a load of 32Ohms. Each interface can be connected in differential and in
single ended configuration. Figure 26 shows an example of a differential loudspeaker configuration.
Loudspeaker impedance
EPP1/EPN1
ZL = typ. 8Ohm
EPP2/EPN2
ZL = typ. 32Ohm
Figure 26: Differential loudspeaker configuration
3.14.4
Digital Audio Interface (DAI)
The DAI can be used to connect audio devices capable of PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) or for type approval.
The following chapters describe the PCM interface functionality.
The PCM functionality allows the use of a codec like for example the MC145483. This codec replaces the analog
audio inputs and outputs during a call, if digital audio is selected by AT^SAIC.
The PCM interface is configurable with the AT^SAIC command (see [1]) and supports the following features:
•
•
•
Master and slave mode
Short frame and long frame synchronization
256 kHz or 512 kHz bit clock frequency
For the PCM interface configuration the parameters <clock>, <mode> and <framemode> of the AT^SAIC command are used. The following table lists possible combinations:
Table 14: Configuration combinations for the PCM interface
Configuration
<mode>
<framemode>
Master, 256kHz, short frame 0
0
0
Master, 256kHz, long frame
0
0
1
Master, 512kHz, short frame 1
0
0
Master, 512kHz, long frame
1
0
1
Slave, 256kHz, short frame
0 or 11
1
0
Slave, 256kHz, long frame
0 or 1
1
1
Slave, 512kHz, short frame
0 or 1
1
0
Slave, 512kHz, long frame
0 or 1
1
1
1.
<clock>
In slave mode the BCLKIN signal is directly used for data shifting. Therefore, the clock frequency setting is
not evaluated and may be either 0 or 1.
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In all configurations the PCM interface has the following common features:
•
•
•
•
•
16 Bit linear
8kHz sample rate
the most significant bit MSB is transferred first
125µs frame duration
common frame sync signal for transmit and receive
Table 15 shows the assignment of the DAI0...6 pins to the PCM interface signals. To avoid hardware conflicts
different pins are used as inputs and outputs for frame sync and clock signals in master or slave operation. The
table shows also which pin is used for master or slave. The data pins (TXDAI and RXDAI) however are used in
both modes. Unused inputs have to be tied to GND, unused outputs must be left open.
Table 15: Overview of DAI pin functions
Signal name on
B2B connector
Function for PCM Interface
Input/Output
DAI0
TXDAI
Master/Slave
O
DAI1
RXDAI
Master/Slave
I
DAI2
FS (Frame sync)
Master
O
DAI3
BITCLK
Master
O
DAI4
FSIN
Slave
I
DAI5
BCLKIN
Slave
I
DAI6
nc
3.14.4.1
I
Master Mode
To clock input and output PCM samples the PCM interface delivers a bit clock (BITCLK) which is synchronous
to the GSM system clock. The frequency of the bit clock is 256kHz or 512kHz. Any edge of this clock deviates
less than ±100ns (Jitter) from an ideal 256-kHz clock respectively deviates less than ±320ns from an ideal 512kHz clock.
The frame sync signal (FS) has a frequency of 8kHz and is high for one BITCLK period before the data transmission starts if short frame is configured. If long frame is selected the frame sync signal (FS) is high during the
whole transfer of the 16 data bits. Each frame has a duration of 125µs and contains 32 respective 64 clock
cycles.
Figure 27: Master PCM interface Application
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The timing of a PCM short frame is shown in Figure 28. The 16-bit TXDAI and RXDAI data is transferred simultaneously in both directions during the first 16 clock cycles after the frame sync pulse. The duration of a frame
sync pulse is one BITCLK period, starting at the rising edge of BITCLK. TXDAI data is shifted out at the next
rising edge of BITCLK. RXDAI data (i.e. data transmitted from the host application to the module's RXDAI line)
is sampled at the falling edge of BITCLK.
Figure 28: Short Frame PCM timing
The timing of a PCM long frame is shown in Figure 29. The 16-bit TXDAI and RXDAI data is transferred simultaneously in both directions while the frame sync pulse FS is high. For this reason the duration of a frame sync
pulse is 16 BITCLK periods, starting at the rising edge of BITCLK. TXDAI data is shifted out at the same rising
edge of BITCLK. RXDAI data (i.e. data transmitted from the host application to the module's RXDAI line) is sampled at the falling edge of BITCLK.
Figure 29: Long Frame PCM timing
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3.14.4.2
s
Slave Mode
In slave mode the PCM interface is controlled by an external bit clock and an external frame sync signal applied
to the BCLKIN and FSIN pins and delivered either by the connected codec or another source. The bit clock frequency has to be in the range of 256kHz -125ppm to 512kHz +125ppm.
Data transfer starts at the falling edge of FSIN if the short frame format is selected, and at the rising edge of FSIN
if long frame format is selected. With this edge control the frame sync signal is independent of the frame sync
pulse length.
TXDAI data is shifted out at the rising edge of BCLKIN. RXDAI data (i.e. data transmitted from the host application to the module's RXDAI line) is sampled at the falling edge of BCLKIN.
The deviation of the external frame rate from the internal frame rate must not exceed ±125ppm. The internal
frame rate of nominal 8kHz is synchronized to the GSM network.
The difference between the internal and the external frame rate is equalized by doubling or skipping samples.
This happens for example every second, if the difference is 125ppm.
The resulting distortion can be neglected in speech signals.
The pins BITCLK and FS remain low in slave mode.
Figure 30 shows the typical slave configuration. The external codec delivers the bit clock and the frame sync
signal. If the codec itself is not able to run in master mode as for example the MC145483, a third party has to
generate the clock and the frame sync signal.
Figure 30: Slave PCM interface application
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The following figures show the slave short and long frame timings. Because these are edge controlled, frame
sync signals may deviate from the ideally form as shown with the dotted lines.
Figure 31: Slave PCM Timing, Short Frame selected
Figure 32: Slave PCM Timing, Long Frame selected
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3.15 Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
3.15
s
Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
The ADC of the XT65/XT75 consists of 2 independent, unbalanced, multiplexed analog inputs that can be used
for measuring external DC voltages in the range of 0mV…+2400mV. The ADC has a resolution of 12 bits.
Use the command AT^SRADC described in [1] to select the analog inputs ADC1_IN or ADC2_IN, to set the measurement mode and read out the measurement results. The measured values are indicated in mV.
There is no out of range detection. Voltages beyond these limits cannot be measured:
Underflow: Values = -25mV
Overflow: Values > 2425mV
The sample period is adjustable from 30s up to 100ms by AT^SRADC
Only during sample time (ts~400µs) the S&H Switch is closed.
Figure 33: Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
Restrictions during SLEEP Mode
During SLEEP mode the ADC is shut down temporarily (by default). Please make sure that during SLEEP mode
shutdown the ADCx_IN input voltage does not exceed ±0.3V. The input current (reverse feeding) may reach
3mA! If SLEEP mode is activated there are three protection possibilities:
•
•
•
Use the RC combination as shown in Figure 30 for current limitation.
Advantages: Lowest current consumption at SLEEP mode, small component count, high input resistance
Disadvantages: Lower input resistance at SLEEP mode (100k only).
Use the AT^SNFM=,1 command to enable the ADC supply continuously.
Advantages: No additional component components needed.
Disadvantages: Higher current consumption in SLEEP mode (about 2mA).
Detect presence of VMIC-voltage. If VMIC is off, make sure that ADCx_IN input voltage does not exceed
±0.3V
Advantages: Lowest current, high input resistance.
Disadvantages: Effort for SLEEP mode (VMIC) detection.
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3.16 GPIO Interface
3.16
s
GPIO Interface
The XT65/XT75 has 10 GPIOs for external hardware devices. Each GPIO can be configured for use as input or
output. All settings are AT command controlled.
The GPIO related AT commands are the following: AT^SPIO, AT^SCPIN, AT^SCPOL, AT^SCPORT,
AT^SDPORT, AT^SGIO, AT^SSIO. A detailed description can be found in [1].
3.16.1
Using the GPIO10 Pin as Pulse Counter
The GPIO10 pin can be assigned two different functions selectable by AT command:
•
•
The AT^SCPIN command configures the pin for use as GPIO.
With AT^SCCNT and AT^SSCNT the pin can be configured and operated as pulse counter.
Both functions exclude each other. The pulse counter disables the GPIO functionality, and vice versa, the GPIO
functionality disables the pulse counter. Detailed AT command descriptions can be found in [1].
The pulse counter is designed to measure signals from 0 to 1000 pulses per second. It can be operated either
in Limit counter mode or Start-Stop mode. Depending on the selected mode the counted value is either the number of pulses or the time (in milliseconds) taken to generate a number of pulses specified with AT^SCCNT.
In Limit counter mode, the displayed measurement result (URC "^SSCNT: <count>") implies an inaccuracy
<5ms. In Start-Stop mode, you can achieve 100% accuracy if you take care that no pulses are transmitted before
starting the pulse counter (AT^SSCNT=0 or 1) and after closing the pulse counter (AT^SSCNT=3).
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3.17 Control Signals
3.17
3.17.1
s
Control Signals
Synchronization Signal
The synchronization signal serves to indicate growing power consumption during the transmit burst. The signal
is generated by the SYNC pin. Please note that this pin can adopt three different operating modes which you can
select by using the AT^SSYNC command: the mode AT^SSYNC=0 described below, and the two LED modes
AT^SSYNC=1 or AT^SSYNC=2 described in [1] and Section 3.17.2.
The first function (factory default AT^SSYNC=0) is recommended if you want your application to use the synchronization signal for better power supply control. Your platform design must be such that the incoming signal
accommodates sufficient power supply to the XT65/XT75 module if required. This can be achieved by lowering
the current drawn from other components installed in your application.
The timing of the synchronization signal is shown below. High level of the SYNC pin indicates increased power
consumption during transmission.
Figure 34: SYNC signal during transmit burst
*)
The duration of the SYNC signal is always equal, no matter whether the traffic or the access burst are active.
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3.17 Control Signals
3.17.2
s
Using the SYNC Pin to Control a Status LED
As an alternative to generating the synchronization signal, the SYNC pin can be configured to drive a status LED
that indicates different operating modes of the XT65/XT75 module. To take advantage of this function the LED
mode must be activated with the AT^SSYNC command and the LED must be connected to the host application.
The connected LED can be operated in two different display modes (AT^SSYNC=1 or AT^SSYNC=2). For
details please refer to [1].
Figure 35: LED Circuit (Example)
Especially in the development and test phase of an application, system integrators are advised to use the LED
mode of the SYNC pin in order to evaluate their product design and identify the source of errors.
To operate the LED a buffer, e.g. a transistor or gate, must be included in your application. A sample circuit is
shown in Figure 35. Power consumption in the LED mode is the same as for the synchronization signal mode.
For details see Table 29, SYNC pin.
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3.17.3
Behavior of the RING0 Line (ASC0 Interface only)
The RING0 line is available on the serial interface ASC0 (see also Section 3.10). The signal serves to indicate
incoming calls and other types of URCs (Unsolicited Result Code).
Although not mandatory for use in a host application, it is strongly suggested that you connect the RING0 line to
an interrupt line of your application. In this case, the application can be designed to receive an interrupt when a
falling edge on RING0 occurs. This solution is most effective, particularly, for waking up an application from
power saving. Note that if the RING0 line is not wired, the application would be required to permanently poll the
data and status lines of the serial interface at the expense of a higher current consumption. Therefore, utilizing
the RING0 line provides an option to significantly reduce the overall current consumption of your application.
The behavior of the RING0 line varies with the type of event:
•
When a voice/fax/data call comes in the RING0 line goes low for 1s and high for another 4s. Every 5 seconds
the ring string is generated and sent over the /RXD0 line.
If there is a call in progress and call waiting is activated for a connected handset or handsfree device, the
RING0 line switches to ground in order to generate acoustic signals that indicate the waiting call.
4s
4s
1s
Ring
string
1s
Ring
string
1s
Ring
string
Figure 36: Incoming voice/fax/data call
•
All other types of Unsolicited Result Codes (URCs) also cause the RING0 line to go low, however for 1 second
only.
RING0
1s
URC
Figure 37: URC transmission
3.17.4
PWR_IND Signal
PWR_IND notifies the on/off state of the module. High state of PWR_IND indicates that the module is switched
off. The state of PWR_IND immediately changes to low when IGT is pulled low. For state detection an external
pull-up resistor is required.
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4 GPS Application Interface
4
s
GPS Application Interface
The XT65/XT75 module integrates a GPS receiver which offers the full performance of GPS technology. The
GPS receiver continuously tracks all satellites in view, thus providing accurate satellite position data.
The GPS block can be used even if the XT65/XT75 module is deregistered from the GSM network.
4.1
Operating Principles
This section contains a brief overview of basic GPS operating principles (see also [20]).
4.1.1
Basic Operation Cycle
When the receiver is powered up, it steps through a sequence of states until it can initially determine position,
velocity and time. Afterwards, the satellite signals are tracked continuously and the position is calculated periodically.
In order to perform a navigation solution (3D solution), the receiver needs distances (pseudo ranges) for at least
4 SVs (Space Vehicles or satellites) and ephemeris data for the SVs it will use in the navigation solution.
The initial position calculation is made using a least-squares algorithm. Successive position calculations are performed with a Kalman filter. To generate a position calculation (3D solution) the receiver needs at least 4 measurements to different satellites; to calculate a position (Lat/Long/Height) for a 2D solution with an estimated
altitude, 3 different satellites are required.
Pseudo range and carrier phase information is available to the position determination algorithms once the
receiver has found a SV (acquisition) and can track the signal thereafter.
Ephemeris data for a SV can be decoded from orbit data once the GPS signal has been acquired. Each SV transmits its own ephemeris data, the broadcast lasts for 18 seconds, repeating every 30 seconds.
The receiver stores ephemeris data in battery-backup memory (supplied by VDDLP). This data is valid for 2
hours and can be used in future startups to improve the time to first fix (TTFF). Ephemeris can also be supplied
to the receiver.
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4.1 Operating Principles
4.1.2
s
GPS Start-Up
Depending on the receiver’s knowledge of last position, current time and ephemeris data, the receiver will apply
different strategies to start-up, namely:
Figure 38: GSP startup behavior
The startup time (i.e., TTFF = Time-To-First-Fix) may vary and depends on the start-up-mode:
•
•
•
Cold start: 34 seconds
Warm start: 33 seconds
Hot start: less than 3.5 seconds
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4.1 Operating Principles
4.1.2.1
s
Cold Start
Cold Start without Aiding
With a cold start, the GPS receiver has no knowledge of its last position or time. This may be the case if:
•
•
the RTC of the GPS receiver has not been running and the battery backup memory is lost (i.e., VDDLP and
BATT+ have been off),
no valid ephemeris data or almanac data is available, i.e, the receiver has never been navigating or was shut
down while moving to a different area (>300km).
Aided Cold Start / AGPS
To reduce the cold start startup time Assisted GPS (AGPS) may be used as an aid.
If position-, time-, ephemeris- and/or almanac data feeds from the current location are available - e.g., provided
by the GSM network operator - this data should be polled by the GSM part and forwarded to the GPS part during
cold start. Depending on the information provided the GPS receiver will perform the best possible startup scenario.
Figure 38: Cold start with AGPS
4.1.2.2
Warm Start
A warm start is performed whenever the GPS receiver has access to valid almanac data only, and has not significantly moved since the last valid position calculation. This is typically the case, if the receiver had been shut
off for more than 2 hours, but has still knowledge of its last position, time and almanac. This allows the receiver
to predict the current visible SVs. (Space Vehicle or satellite) However, since ephemeris data is not available or
outdated, the receiver has to wait for the ephemeris broadcast to be completed.
4.1.2.3
Hot Start
A hot start is performed whenever the GPS receiver has still access to valid ephemeris data and the precise time.
This is typically the case, if the receiver had been shut off for less than 2 hours and the RTC had been running
during that time. Furthermore, during the previous session, the GPS receiver must have been navigating, i.e.,
decoding and storing ephemeris data).
With a hot start, the GPS receiver can predict the currently visible SVs, and is therefore able to quickly acquire
and track the signal. Because ephemeris is already known, there is no need to wait for the ephemeris broadcast
to be completed.
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4.1 Operating Principles
4.1.3
s
Supported Protocols
The GPS receiver supports three implemented protocols – NMEA, RTCM and UBX. It is able to recognize input
messages from any of these protocols (e.g., GGA, RMC GSA, GSV) and respond to them accordingly. Input
messages can be arbitrarily mixed.
Initially the NMEA protocol is enabled for outputs.
4.1.3.1
NMEA Protocol
The NMEA protocol is an industry standard protocol developed for marine electronics. It was originally designed
to allow data exchange between various sensors and navigation equipment aboard ships.
Nowadays, it is a de-facto standard for GPS receiver data output. For more information on the NMEA Standard
please refer to http://www.nmea.org.
4.1.3.2
UBX Binary Protocol
UBX is a proprietary protocol (developed by u-blox AG, Switzerland) used to transmit GPS data to a host computer. The protocol has the following key features:
•
•
•
Compact. 8 Bit binary data is used
Checksum protected, using a low-overhead checksum algorithm
Modular, using a 2-stage Message Identifier (Class- and Message ID)
UBX protocol offers a greater flexibility and more powerful messages than NMEA protocol.
It’s optimized to get the best performance and optimal debugging.
4.1.3.3
RTCM Protocol
The RTCM (Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services) protocol is a unidirectional protocol (input to the
receiver) supplying the GPS receiver with real-time differential correction data (DGPS). The RTCM protocol
specification is available from http://www.rtcm.org. The GPS receiver supports the RTCM version 2.2 Correction
Type Messages 1, 2, 3 and 9.
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4.1 Operating Principles
4.1.4
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Position Accuracy Improvement Possibilities
The accuracy of position fixes is influenced by a number of issues such as sky view, reasonable satellite geometry and so on. The standard position accuracy is 2.5 m CEP and 5.0 m SEP.
As explained below, the GPS receiver provides two possibilities to improve the accuracy of position fixes. With
DGPS/SBAS the accuracy improves to 2.0 m CEP and 3.0 m SEP.
4.1.4.1
Differential GPS (DGPS)
The correction data from a terrestrial reference station may be transmitted to the GPS receiver via RTCM protocol:
•
•
via GSM network provider (internet server) or
via broadcast service (LW, SW, FM).
Additional hardware is required to receive this data.
DGPS lost significance when the Selective Availability (SA) of the GPS satellite system was discontinued in May
2000. These days, the applications of DGPS are typically limited to surveying, and DGPS is replaced by SBAS
wherever possible.
4.1.4.2
Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS)
SBAS (Satellite Based Augmentation System) augments GPS. It is a technology that calculates GPS integrity
and correction data with RIMS (Ranging and Integrity Monitoring Stations) on the ground and uses geostationary
satellites (GEOs) to broadcast GPS integrity and correction data to GPS users. The correction data is transmitted
on the GPS L1 frequency (1575.42 MHz). Therefore, no additional receiver is required to make use of the correction and integrity data.
There are several compatible SBAS systems available or in development all around the world:
•
•
•
WAAS (Wide Area Augmentation System) for Northern America is in operation since 2003.
EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service) is in test mode ESTB (EGNOS satellite test
bed). Full operation of EGNOS is planned for 2006.
MSAS (Multi-Functional Satellite Augmentation System) for Asia is in development stage. This system is not
yet available, not even in test mode.
Other systems are planned for Canada (CSAS), India (GAGAN), Africa (EGNOS) and South America. SBAS is
primarily used to meet the requirements of onboard aircraft navigation.
The GPS receiver is capable to receive multiple SBAS satellites in parallel, even from different SBAS systems
(WAAS, EGNOS, etc.). The satellites can be tracked and used for navigation simultaneously. Up to three SBAS
satellites can be searched in parallel and every SBAS satellite tracked utilizes one vacant GPS receiver channel.
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4.2 GPS-GSM Interface
4.2
s
GPS-GSM Interface
The GPS receiver is an integral part of the module and as such controlled over an internal GPS-GSM interface.
It communicates over the interface at a fixed bit rate of 57600bps and with the character framing set to 8N1 (8
data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit). These settings should not be altered, even though this option is usually available
by means of the NMEA/UBX application (UBX-CFG-PRT) accessing the GPS receiver. Apart from that, you can
change the bit rate of the interface used as transparent channel for the NMEA/UBX application. When doing so,
be sure that the AT+IPR command and the COM port of the NMEA/UBX application are set to the same value.
Otherwise, the NMEA/UBX application will not work.
4.3
Software Control
The GPS receiver can be software controlled using two different operating modes:
•
•
In AT command mode, the GPS receiver is controlled by means of AT commands as described in more detail
in [1]. Also, the entire set of AT commands supported by XT75 is available.
In Transparent mode, the GPS receiver is driven by an application based on the NMEA/UBX/RTCM protocols
(see Section 4.1.3). In this mode, the AT command interface is not available on this channel, except that the
escape sequence "+++" can be used to quit the Transparent mode and enter the Suspended mode. In Suspended mode, all AT commands supported by XT65/XT75 are usable. However, there are only two GPS
options available that can be selected with AT^SGPSS: either restoring the Transparent mode or closing the
GPS driver. Having closed the GPS driver, it is possible to reopen it and enter either the AT command mode
or the Transparent mode.
4.4
Power Saving
Power saving can be enabled on the GSM part (set with AT+CFUN) and on the GPS receiver (in AT command
mode set with AT^SGPSS, parameter <action>, in Transparent mode depending on the used UBX application).
The GPS receiver can be set to SLEEP mode while the GSM part operates at full level. But bear in mind that
even though the SLEEP mode AT+CFUN=0 or 7 or 9 was already set on the GSM part, power saving does not
take effect when the GPS receiver is still active. In Transparent mode, a module set to SLEEP mode with
AT+CFUN=9 will wake up on any GPS activity. For more details on power saving see [12]. For more information
on the AT commands AT+CFUN and AT^SGPSS see [1].
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5 GSM Antenna Interface
5
GSM Antenna Interface
The GSM interface has an impedance of 50Ω. XT65/XT75 is capable of sustaining a total mismatch at the
antenna connector without any damage, even when transmitting at maximum RF power. DC electric strength is
given (see Table 22).
The external antenna must be matched properly to achieve best performance regarding radiated power, DCpower consumption, modulation accuracy and harmonic suppression. Antenna matching networks are not
included on the XT65/XT75 PCB and should be placed in the host application.
Regarding the return loss XT65/XT75 provides the following values in the active band:
Table 16: Return loss in the active band
State of module
Return loss of module
Recommended return loss of application
Receive
> 8dB
> 12dB
Transmit
not applicable
> 12dB
Idle
< 5dB
not applicable
5.1
Antenna Installation
To suit the physical design of individual applications XT65/XT75 offers two alternative approaches to connecting
the antenna:
•
Recommended approach: U.FL-R-SMT antenna connector from Hirose assembled on the component side of
the PCB.
Figure 39: GSM antenna connector placement
See Section 5.3 for connector details.
•
Antenna pad and grounding plane placed on the bottom side. See Section 5.2.
The U.FL-R-SMT connector has been chosen as antenna reference point (ARP) for the Siemens reference
equipment submitted to type approve XT65/XT75. All RF data specified throughout this manual is related to the
ARP. For compliance with the test results of the Siemens type approval you are advised to give priority to the
connector, rather than using the antenna pad.
IMPORTANT: Both solutions can only be applied alternatively. This means, whenever an antenna is plugged to
the Hirose connector, the pad must not be used. Vice versa, if the antenna is connected to the pad, then the
Hirose connector must be left empty.
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5.2 Antenna Pad
Antenna connected to Hirose connector:
Antenna connected to pad:
Figure 40: Never use antenna connector and antenna pad at the same time
5.2
Antenna Pad
The antenna can be soldered to the pad, or attached via contact springs. For proper grounding connect the
antenna to the ground plane on the bottom of XT65/XT75 which must be connected to the ground plane of the
application.
If you decide to use the antenna pad take into account that the pad has not been intended as antenna reference
point (ARP) for the Siemens XT65/XT75 type approval. The antenna pad is provided only as an alternative option
which can be used, for example, if the recommended Hirose connection does not fit into your antenna design.
Please ensure that the antenna pad does not come into contact with the holding device or any other components
of the host application. It needs to be surrounded by a restricted area filled with air, which must also be reserved
0.8mm in height.
Figure 40: Restricted area around antenna pad
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Also, consider that according to the GSM recommendations TS 45.005 and TS 51.010-01 a 50Ω connector is
mandatory for type approval measurements. This requires GSM devices with an integral antenna to be temporarily equipped with a suitable connector or a low loss RF cable with adapter.
Figure 41: GSM antenna pad placement
Notes on soldering:
•
•
To prevent damage to the module and to obtain long-term solder joint properties you are advised to maintain
the standards of good engineering practice for soldering.
Be sure to solder the antenna core to the pad and the shielding of the coax cable to the ground plane of the
module next to the antenna pad. The direction of the cable is not relevant from the electrical point of view.
XT65/XT75 material properties:
XT65/XT75 PCB:
FR4
Antenna pad:
Gold plated pad
5.2.1
Suitable Cable Types
For direct solder attachment, we suggest to use the following cable types:
•
•
RG316/U 50Ohm coaxial cable
1671A 50Ohm coaxial cable
Suitable cables are offered, for example, by IMS Connector Systems. For further details and other cable types
please contact http://www.imscs.com.
Please note that the GSM antenna must be isolated for ESD (to withstand a voltage resistance up to 8kV air
discharge).
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5.3 Antenna Connector
5.3
Antenna Connector
For GSM and GPS, XT65/XT75 uses an ultra-miniature SMT antenna connector supplied from Hirose Ltd. The
product name is:
•
U.FL-R-SMT
The position of the antenna connector on the XT65/XT75 board can be seen in Section 5.1.
Figure 42: Mechanical dimensions of U.FL-R-SMT connector
Table 17: Product specifications of U.FL-R-SMT connector
Item
Specification
Conditions
Nominal impedance
50Ω
Operating temp:-40°C to + 90°C
Operating humidity: max. 90%
Rated frequency
DC to 3GHz
Ratings
Mechanical characteristics
Female contact holding force 0.15N min
Measured with a Ø 0.475 pin
gauge
Repetitive operation
Contact resistance:
Center 25mΩ
Outside 15mΩ
30 cycles of insertion and disengagement
Vibration
No momentary disconnections of
1µs;
No damage, cracks and looseness
of parts
Frequency of 10 to 100Hz, single
amplitude of 1.5mm, acceleration
of 59m/s2, for 5 cycles in the
direction of each of the 3 axes
Shock
No momentary disconnections of
1µs.
No damage, cracks and looseness
of parts.
Acceleration of 735m/s2, 11ms
duration for 6 cycles in the direction of each of the 3 axes
No damage, cracks and looseness
of parts.
Insulation resistance:
100MΩ min. at high humidity
500MΩ min. when dry
Exposure to 40°C, humidity of
95% for a total of 96 hours
Environmental characteristics
Humidity resistance
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5.3 Antenna Connector
Table 17: Product specifications of U.FL-R-SMT connector
Item
Specification
Conditions
Temperature cycle
No damage, cracks and looseness
of parts.
Contact resistance:
Center 25mΩ
Outside 15mΩ
Temperature: +40°C → 5 to 35°C
→ +90°C → 5 to 35°C
Time: 30min → within 5min →
30min within 5min
Salt spray test
No excessive corrosion
48 hours continuous exposure to
5% salt water
Table 18: Material and finish of U.FL-R-SMT connector and recommended plugs
Part
Material
Finish
Shell
Phosphor bronze
Silver plating
Male center contact
Brass
Gold plating
Female center contact
Phosphor bronze
Gold plating
Insulator
Plug: PBT
Receptacle: LCP
Black
Beige
Mating plugs and cables can be chosen from the Hirose U.FL Series. Examples are shown below and listed in
Table 19. For latest product information please contact your Hirose dealer or visit the Hirose home page, for
example http://www.hirose.com.
Figure 43: U.FL-R-SMT connector with U.FL-LP-040 plug
Figure 44: U.FL-R-SMT connector with U.FL-LP-066 plug
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In addition to the connectors illustrated above, the U.FL-LP-(V)-040(01) version is offered as an extremely space
saving solution. This plug is intended for use with extra fine cable (up to Ø 0.81mm) and minimizes the mating
height to 2mm. See Figure 46 which shows the Hirose datasheet.
Figure 45: Specifications of U.FL-LP-(V)-040(01) plug
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5.3 Antenna Connector
Table 19: Ordering information for Hirose U.FL Series
Item
Part number
HRS number
Connector on XT65/XT75
U.FL-R-SMT
CL331-0471-0-10
Right-angle plug shell for
Ø 0.81mm cable
U.FL-LP-040
CL331-0451-2
Right-angle plug for
Ø 0.81mm cable
U.FL-LP(V)-040 (01)
CL331-053-8-01
Right-angle plug for
Ø 1.13mm cable
U.FL-LP-068
CL331-0452-5
Right-angle plug for
Ø 1.32mm cable
U.FL-LP-066
CL331-0452-5
Extraction jig
E.FL-LP-N
CL331-04441-9
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6 GPS Antenna Interface
6
s
GPS Antenna Interface
In order to receive satellite signals an additional GPS antenna must be connected to the GPS part of the XT65/
XT75 module.
6.1
Antenna Installation
To suit the physical design of individual applications XT65/XT75 offers two alternative approaches to connecting
the antenna:
•
Recommended approach: U.FL-R-SMT antenna connector from Hirose assembled on the component side of
the PCB. The GPS antenna connector is the same as for the GSM antenna connector. For details see Section
5.3.
Figure 46: GPS antenna connector placement
•
Antenna pad and grounding plane placed on the bottom side of the PCB. For some notes on soldering the
antenna to the pad see Section 5.2.
Figure 47: GPS antenna pad placement
Note that it is not possible to employ both alternatives at the same time.
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6.2 GPS Antenna
6.2
s
GPS Antenna
It is possible to connect active or passive GPS antennas. In either case they must have 50 Ohm impedance. The
simultaneous operation of GSM and GPS has been implemented.
A slight degradation of sensitivity may occur for the GPS receiver, if the GSM transmitter operates during GPS
reception. The degradation depends on GSM-GPS antenna coupling, the current GSM transmit power and the
GSM transmitter duty cycle (The GPS receiver remains fully functional as long as the defined limits are not
exceeded - see Table 22).
If the GSM and GPS antennas are located close to each other and the GSM Tx output power is maximal, the
sensitivity degradation is caused mainly by the broadband noise of the GSM transmitter (at the GPS reception
frequency).
Table 20: Sensitivity degradation
GSM Tx duty cycle1
GPS Rx degradation
12.5%
max. -0.6dB
25%
max. -1.3dB
37.5%
max. -2.0dB
50%
max. -3.0dB
1.
The listed duty cycles correspond to the following transfer modes:
12.5% = GSM call, 25% = GPRS Class 10, 37.5% = GPRS Class 11, 50% = GPRS Class 12
Note: The GPS antenna must be isolated for ESD protection (to withstand a voltage resistance up to 8kV air discharge). For details on power supply for active GPS antennas see Section 7.6.
Active versus Passive Antennas
Passive antennas contain only the radiating element, e.g. the ceramic patch or the quadrifilar dipole structure.
Sometimes they also contain a passive matching network to match the electrical connection to 50 Ohms impedance.
Note: A passive antenna inner conductor must not have a DC connection to ground.
Active antennas have an integrated low-noise amplifier (LNA) and usually an additional GPS band pass filter.
This is beneficial in two respects: First, the losses of the cable do no longer influence the overall noise figure of
the GPS receiver system. Secondly, the acquisition and tracking sensitivity is up to 2dB higher (see Section 2.1).
Active antennas need a power supply that will contribute to GPS system power consumption, typically 5 to 20
mA. The supply voltage is fed to the antenna through the coaxial RF cable.
Inside the antenna, the DC current on the inner conductor will be separated from the RF signal and routed to the
supply pin of the LNA.
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The use of an active antenna is always advisable, if the RF-cable length between receiver and antenna exceeds
about 10 cm.
Table 21: GPS antenna: Active versus Passive
Active Antenna
Passive Antenna
Active antenna connected to the GPS module.
Passive patch antennas or quadrifilar dipole antennas connected with a microcoax to the GPS module.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A wide range of active patch or quadrifilar
dipole antennas is available in the market.
They differ in size, gain, selectivity and
power consumption.
Less sensitive to jamming than a passive
antenna, if the placement of the active
antenna is some distance away of other
noise or signal radiating devices.
Needs DC current.
Easier to handle.
More freedom to place the antenna1
Some low noise amplifier (LNA) circuits in an
active antenna may be sensitiv to GSM Tx
interference. GPS reception can therefore be
distorted or the LNA may be damaged.
1.
•
•
•
•
•
Passive patch antennas or helical antennas are available in different form factors and sensitivity.
Antenna must be connected with a low insertion loss
line to the GPS module to ensure a good GPS sensitivity.
The PCB design with a passive antenna must consider
the sensitivity of the GPS antenna to other radiating circuits or general signal jamming.
Due to the proximity of the GPS antenna to other electronic circuits, in-band jamming may become a critical
issue.
Requires more experience in RF design.
Requires more effort to optimise the circuit design to
minimize jamming into the antenna and the antenna
signal routing.
Some cars for instance have a metallic coating on the windshield. GPS reception may be degraded in such a
car. There is usually a small section, typically behind the rear view mirror without the coating for mobile phone
and GPS antennas. The antenna has to be placed with optimal sky visibility. An external antenna (e.g. with a
magnetic base) is easier to use and usually allows a better positioning.
For more information on GPS antenna design see [13].
Note: If you are not an expert in RF designs, it is recommended to implement an active antenna setup and place
the antenna away from any emitting circuits.
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7 Electrical, Reliability and Radio Characteristics
7
Electrical, Reliability and Radio Characteristics
7.1
Absolute Maximum Ratings
The absolute maximum ratings stated in Table 22 are stress ratings under any conditions. Stresses beyond any
of these limits will cause permanent damage to XT65/XT75.
The power supply connected to the XT65/XT75 module shall be compliant with the SELV requirements defined
in EN60950. Above all, the peak current of the power supply shall be limited according to Table 22.
Table 22: Absolute maximum ratings
Parameter
Min
Peak current of power supply
Max
Unit
3.2
A
Supply voltage BATT+
-0.3
5.5
V
Voltage at digital pins in POWER DOWN mode
-0.3
0.3
V
Voltage at digital pins in normal operation
-0.3
3.05
or VEXT+0.3
V
Voltage at analog pins in POWER DOWN mode
-0.3
0.3
V
1
Voltage at analog pins, VMIC on
-0.3
2.75
V
Voltage at analog pins, VMIC off1
-0.3
0.3
V
Voltage at VCHARGE pin
-0.3
5.5
V
Voltage at CHARGEGATE pin
-0.3
5.5
V
VUSB_IN
-0.3
5.5
V
USB_DP, USB_DN
-0.3
3.5
V
VSENSE
5.5
V
ISENSE
5.5
V
PWR_IND
-0.3
510
V
VDDLP
-0.3
5.5
V
Voltage @ GSM antenna connector
-36
36
V
-0.3
VBATT++0.3
V
+25
-13
+25
dBm
dBm
dBm
Voltage @ GPS antenna connector
2
RF power @ GPS antenna connector :
50MHz...1460MHz
1460MHz...1710MHz
1710MHz...4000MHz
1.
2.
For normal operation the voltage at analog pins with VMIC on should be within the range of 0V to 2.4V
and with VMIC off within the range of -0.25V to 0.25V.
Source impedance 50Ω continuous wave signal.
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7.2 Operating Temperatures
7.2
Operating Temperatures
The values listed in Table 23 to Table 25 are applicable at maximum power control level.
Table 23: Board temperature
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Temperature measured on XT65/XT75 board
-30
---
>+80
°C
Temperature measured at battery NTC
-20
---
+60
Automatic shutdown1
1.
Due to temperature measurement uncertainty, a tolerance on the stated shutdown thresholds may occur.
The possible deviation is in the range of ± 3°C at the overtemperature limit and ± 5°C at the undertemperature limit.
Table 24: Ambient temperature according to IEC 60068-2 (without forced air circulation)
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Operating temperature range
-30
+25
+65
°C
+70
°C
+70 to
°C
Restricted operation (with VBATT+ < 3,8V)
1
Restricted operation
---
+85
1.
Restricted operation allows normal mode speech calls or data transmission for limited time until automatic
thermal shutdown takes effect. For operating the XT75/65 above an expected ambient temperatures of
70°C please contact Siemens Application Engineering. The duration of emergency calls is unlimited because automatic thermal shutdown is deferred until hang up.
Table 25: Ambient temperature with forced air circulation (air speed 0.9m/s)
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Operating temperature range
-30
+25
+70
°C
+75
°C
+75 to
°C
Restricted operation (with VBATT+ < 3,8V)
Restricted operation1
---
+85
1.
Restricted operation allows normal mode speech calls or data transmission for limited time until automatic
thermal shutdown takes effect. For operating the XT75/65 above an expected ambient temperatures of
75°C please contact Siemens Application Engineering. The duration of emergency calls is unlimited because automatic thermal shutdown is deferred until hang up.
Table 26: Charging temperature
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Battery temperature for software controlled fast charging
(measured at battery NTC)
0
---
+45
°C
Note:
•
•
See Section 3.3.4 for further information about the NTCs for on-board and battery temperature measurement,
automatic thermal shutdown and alert messages.
When data is transmitted over EGPRS or GPRS the XT65/XT75 automatically reverts to a lower Multislot
Class if the temperature increases to the limit specified for normal operation and, vice versa, returns to the
higher Multislot Class if the temperature is back to normal. For details see Section 3.4.
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7.3 Storage Conditions
7.3
Storage Conditions
The conditions stated below are only valid for modules in their original packed state in weather protected, nontemperature-controlled storage locations. Normal storage time under these conditions is 12 months maximum.
Table 27: Storage conditions
Type
Condition
Unit
Reference
Air temperature: Low
-40
°C
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 68-2-1 Ab
High
+85
Humidity relative: Low
Air pressure:
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 68-2-2 Bb
10
%
---
High
90 at 30°C
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 68-2-56 Cb
Condens.
90-100 at 30°C
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 68-2-30 Db
Low
70
High
106
kPa
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1K4
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1K4
Movement of surrounding air
1.0
m/s
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1K4
Water: rain, dripping, icing and
frosting
Not allowed
---
---
Radiation:
Solar
1120
W/m2
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 68-2-2 Bb
Heat
600
ETS 300 019-2-1: T1.2, IEC 68-2-2 Bb
Chemically active substances
Not recommended
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1C1L
Mechanically active substances
Not recommended
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1S1
IEC TR 60271-3-1: 1M2
Vibration sinusoidal:
Displacement
1.5
mm
Acceleration
5
m/s2
Frequency range
2-9 9-200
Hz
Shocks:
IEC 68-2-27 Ea
Shock spectrum
semi-sinusoidal
Duration
1
ms
Acceleration
50
m/s2
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7.4 Reliability Characteristics
7.4
Reliability Characteristics
The test conditions stated below are an extract of the complete test specifications.
Table 28: Summary of reliability test conditions
Type of test
Conditions
Standard
Vibration
Frequency range: 10-20Hz; acceleration: 3.1mm
amplitude
DIN IEC 68-2-6
Frequency range: 20-500Hz; acceleration: 5g
Duration: 2h per axis = 10 cycles; 3 axes
Shock half-sinus
DIN IEC 68-2-27
Acceleration: 500g
Shock duration: 1msec
1 shock per axis
6 positions (± x, y and z)
Dry heat
EN 60068-2-2 Bb
ETS 300 019-2-7
Temperature: +70 ±2×C
Test duration: 16h
Humidity in the test chamber: < 50%
Temperature
change (shock)
Low temperature: -40×C ±2×C
DIN IEC 68-2-14 Na
High temperature: +85×C ±2×C
Changeover time: < 30s (dual chamber system)
ETS 300 019-2-7
Test duration: 1h
Number of repetitions: 100
Damp heat cyclic
High temperature: +55×C ±2×C
DIN IEC 68-2-30 Db
Low temperature: +25×C ±2×C
Humidity: 93% ±3%
ETS 300 019-2-5
Number of repetitions: 6
Test duration: 12h + 12h
Cold (constant
exposure)
Temperature: -40 ±2×C
DIN IEC 68-2-1
Test duration: 16h
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
7.5
Pin Assignment and Signal Description
The Molex board-to-board connector on XT65/XT75 is an 80-pin double-row receptacle. The position of the
board-to-board connector can be seen in Figure 50 that shows the top view of XT65/XT75.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
GND
ADC1_IN
ADC2_IN
GND
GPIO10
GPIO8
SPIDI
GPIO7
GPIO6
GPIO5
I2CCLK_SPICLK
VUSB_IN
DAI5
ISENSE
DAI6
CCCLK
CCVCC
CCIO
CCRST
CCIN
CCGND
DAI4
DAI3
DAI2
DAI1
DAI0
BATT_TEMP
SYNC
not connected
RXD0
Pull up
TXD0
VDDLP
VCHARGE
CHARGEGATE
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
DAC_OUT
PWR_IND
Do not use
GPIO9
SPICS
GPIO4
GPIO3
GPIO2
GPIO1
I2CDAT_SPIDO
USB_DP
USB_DN
VSENSE
VMIC
EPN2
EPP2
EPP1
EPN1
MICN2
MICP2
MICP1
MICN1
AGND
IGT
EMERG_RST
DCD0
not connected
CTS0
Pull up
DTR0
RTS0
DSR0
RING0
VEXT
BATT+
BATT+
BATT+
BATT+
BATT+
80
79
78
77
76
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
Figure 48: Pin assignment (component side of XT65/XT75)
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7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Please note that the reference voltages listed in Table 29 are the values measured directly on the XT65/XT75
module. They do not apply to the accessories connected.
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
Power
supply
BATT+
I
VI = 3.3V to 4.5V
Five pins of BATT+ and GND must
be connected in parallel for supply
purposes because higher peak
currents may occur.
VItyp = 3.8V
I ≈ 2A, during Tx burst
See power consumption Table 32.
n Tx = n x 577µs peak current every
4.616ms
Power
supply
GND
Charge
Interface
VCHARGE
I
Ground
Application Ground
VImin = 3.1 V
This line signalizes to the processor that the charger is connected.
VImax = 5.25V
BATT_TEMP
I
Connect NTC with RNTC ≈ 10kΩ @
25°C to ground. See Section 3.5.3
for B value of NTC.
If unused keep pin open.
Battery temperature measurement
via NTC resistance.
NTC should be installed inside or
near battery pack to enable proper
charging and deliver temperature
values.
If unused keep pin open.
ISENSE
I
VImax = 4.65V
ΔVImax to VBATT+ = +0.3V at normal
condition
Connect ISENSE directly at the
shunt for current measurement.
If unused connect pin to VSENSE.
VSENSE
I
VImax = 4.5V
VSENSE must be directly connected to BATT+ at battery connector or external power supply.
CHARGEGATE
O
VImax = 5.5V
IImax = 0.6mA (for fast charging)
Control line to the gate of charge
FET
If unused keep pin open.
External
supply
voltage
VEXT
O
Normal mode:
VOmin = 2.75V
VOtyp = 2.93V
VOmax = 3.05V
IOmax = -50mA
Cload,max,extern = 1µF
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VEXT may be used for application
circuits, for example to supply
power for an I2C.
If unused keep pin open.
Not available in Power-down
mode. The external digital logic
must not cause any spikes or
glitches on voltage VEXT.
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
Power
indicator
PWR_IND
O
VIHmax = 10V
PWR_IND (Power Indicator) notifies the module’s on/off state.
VOLmax = 0.4V at Imax = 2mA
PWR_IND is an open collector
that needs to be connected to an
external pull-up resistor. Low state
of the open collector indicates that
the module is on. Vice versa, high
level notifies the Power-down
mode.
Therefore, the pin may be used to
enable external voltage regulators
which supply an external logic for
communication with the module,
e.g. level converters.
Ignition
IGT
I
Internal pull-up: RI ≈ 30kΩ,
CI ≈ 10nF
VILmax = 0.8V at Imax = -150µA
VOHmax = VBATT+
ON ~~~|____|~~~
Emergency
reset
EMERG_RST
I
This line must be driven low by an
open drain or open collector
Active Low > 300ms driver.
Internal pull-up: RI ≈ 5kΩ
VILmax = 0.2V at Imax = -0.5mA
VOHmin = 1.75V
VOHmax = 3.05V
Signal
10ms
This signal switches the mobile
on.
~~~
|______|~~~ Pull down >
Reset or shut down in case of
emergency: Pull down and release
EMERG_RST. Then, activating
IGT for 400ms will reset XT65/
XT75. If IGT is not activated for
400ms, XT65/XT75 switches off.
Data stored in the volatile memory
will be lost. For orderly software
controlled reset rather use the
AT+CFUN command (e.g.
AT+CFUN=x,1).
This line must be driven by open
drain or open collector.
If unused keep pin open.
Power-on
reset
O
Internal pull-up: RI ≈ 5kΩ
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 1.75V
VOHmax = 3.05V
Reset signal driven by the module:
Reset signal driven by the module
which can be used to reset any
application or device connected to
the module. Only effective for
120ms during the assertion of IGT
when the module is about to
start(see also Section 3.3.1.6).
(see also Figure 5 and Figure 6)
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7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
Synchronization
SYNC
O
VOLmax = 0.3V at I = 0.1mA
There are two alternative options
for using the SYNC pin:
VOHmin = 2.3V at I = -0.1mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
n Tx = n x 577µs impulse each
4.616ms, with 180µs forward time.
a) Indicating increased current
consumption during uplink transmission burst. Note that the timing
of the signal is different during
handover.
b) Driving a status LED to indicate
different operating modes of
XT65/XT75. The LED must be
installed in the host application.
To select a) or b) use the
AT^SSYNC command.
If unused keep pin open.
RTC
backup
VDDLP
I/O
RI ≈ 1kΩ
VOmax = 4.5V
If unused keep pin open.
VBATT+ = 4.2V:
VO = 3.3V at IO = -500µA
VBATT+ = 0V:
VI = 2.4V…4.5V at Imax = 25µA
ASC0
RXD0
O
Serial
interface
TXD0
I
CTS0
O
RTS0
I
DTR0
I
DCD0
O
DSR0
O
RING0
O
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VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.55V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
Serial interface for AT commands
or data stream.
If lines are unused keep pins open.
VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.15V
VIHmax = VEXTmin + 0.3V = 3.05V
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
SIM
interface
specified
for use
with 3V
SIM card
CCIN
I
RI ≈ 100kΩ
VILmax = 0.6V at I = -25µA
VIHmin = 2.1V at I = -10µA
VOmax = 3.05V
CCIN = Low, SIM card holder
closed
CCRST
O
RO ≈ 47Ω
VOLmax = 0.25V at I = +1mA
VOHmin = 2.5V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 2.95V
Maximum cable length or copper
track 100mm to SIM card holder.
CCIO
I/O
RI ≈ 4.7kΩ
VILmax = 0.75V
VILmin = -0.3V
VIHmin = 2.1V
VIHmax = CCVCCmin + 0.3V =
3.05V
All signals of SIM interface are
protected against ESD with a special diode array.
Usage of CCGND is mandatory.
RO ≈ 100Ω
VOLmax = 0.3V at I = +1mA
VOHmin = 2.5V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 2.95V
CCCLK
O
RO ≈ 100Ω
VOLmax = 0.3V at I = +1mA
VOHmin = 2.5V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 2.95V
CCVCC
O
VOmin = 2.75V
VOtyp = 2.85V
VOmax = 2.95V
IOmax = -20mA
CCGND
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7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
SIM
interface
specified
for use
with 1.8V
SIM card
CCIN
I
RI ≈ 100kΩ
VILmax = 0.6V at I = -25µA
VIHmin = 2.1V at I = -10µA
VOmax = 3.05V
CCIN = Low, SIM card holder
closed
CCRST
O
RO ≈ 47Ω
VOLmax = 0.25V at I = +1mA
VOHmin = 1.45V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
Maximum cable length or copper
track 100mm to SIM card holder.
CCIO
I/O
RI ≈ 4.7kΩ
VILmax = 0.45V
VIHmin = 1.35V
VIHmax = CCVCCmin + 0.3V =
2.00V
All signals of SIM interface are
protected against ESD with a special diode array.
Usage of CCGND is mandatory.
RO ≈ 100Ω
VOLmax = 0.3V at I = +1mA
VOHmin = 1.45V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
CCCLK
O
RO ≈ 100Ω
VOLmax = 0.3V at I = +1mA
VOHmin = 1.45V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 1.90V
CCVCC
O
VOmin = 1.70V,
VOtyp = 1.80V
VOmax = 1.90V
IOmax = -20mA
CCGND
I2C interface
Ground
I2CCLK
_SPICLK
O
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.55V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
I2C interface is only available if the
two pins are not used as SPI interface.
I2CDAT_SPIDO
I/O
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.15V
I2CDAT is configured as Open
Drain and needs a pull-up resistor
in the host application.
VIHmax = VEXTmin + 0.3V = 3.05V
According to the I2C Bus Specification Version 2.1 for the fast
mode a rise time of max. 300ns is
permitted. There is also a maximum VOL=0.4V at 3mA specified.
The value of the pull-up depends
on the capacitive load of the whole
system (I2C Slave + lines). The
maximum sink current of I2CDAT
and I2CCLK is 4mA.
If lines are unused keep pins open.
SPI
SPIDI
I
Serial
Peripheral Interface
I2CDAT_SPIDO
O
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.55V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
If the Serial Peripheral Interface is
active the I2C interface is not available.
I2CCLK_SPICLK O
SPICS
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VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.15V,
VIHmax = VEXTmin + 0.3V = 3.05V
Page 98 of 133
If lines are unused keep pins open.
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
USB
VUSB_IN
I
VINmin = 4.0V
VINmax = 5.25V
USB_DN
I/O
USB_DP
I/O
Differential Output Crossover voltage Range
VCRSmin = 1.5V, VCRSmax = 2.0V
All electrical characteristics
according to USB Implementers’
Forum, USB 2.0 Full Speed Specification.
Driver Output Resistance
ZDRVtyp = 32Ohm
Digital
Audio
interface
DAI0 (USC0)
I/O
DAI1 (USC1)
I/O
DAI2 (USC2)
I/O
DAI3 (USC3)
I/O
DAI4 (USC4)
I/O
DAI5 (USC5)
I/O
DAI6 (USC6)
I/O
GPIO1
General
Purpose
Input/Out- GPIO2
put
GPIO3
I/O
I/O
I/O
GPIO5
I/O
GPIO6
I/O
GPIO7
I/O
GPIO8
I/O
GPIO9
I/O
GPIO10
I/O
I
I
Under Java: Debug interface for
development purposes.
If lines are unused keep pins open.
DAI0…DAI6 are configurable as
PCM interface
VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.15V
VIHmax = VEXTmin + 0.3V = 3.05V
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.55V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
I/O
GPIO4
Analog
ADC1_IN
Digital
Converter ADC2_IN
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.55V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
Without Java: USB port
VILmax = 0.8V
VIHmin = 2.15V,
VIHmax = VEXTmin + 0.3V = 3.05V
Input voltage: VImin = 0V, VImax =
2.4V
All pins which are configured as
input must be connected to a pullup or pull-down resistor.
If lines are unused (not configured) keep pins open.
Alternatively, the GPIO10 pin can
be configured as a pulse counter
for pulse rates from 0 to 1000
pulses per second.
Inputs used for measuring external voltages. In the range of 0mV
to 2400mV.
Ri ≈ 750kOhms Measurement interUse the command AT^SRADC to
val: 100ms - 30s selectable by AT
select analog inputs ADC1_IN or
command
ADC2_IN, to set the measurement
Sensitivity, accuracy: 2400 steps
mode and read out the results.
(1step = 1mv)
The values are indicated in mV.
Cut-off frequency: 30 Hz
ADC1_IN and ADC2_IN are internally multiplexed through analog
Underflow: > -25mV
switch.
Overflow: > +2425 mV
For restrictions during SLEEP
Accuracy: ± 0.5mV
mode see Section 3.15.
Linear error: ± 0.5mV
Temperature error: ± 0.5mV
Burst error: ± 0.5mV
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7.5 Pin Assignment and Signal Description
Table 29: Signal description
Function
Signal name
IO
Signal form and level
Comment
O
VOLmax = 0.2V at I = 2mA
VOHmin = 2.55V at I = -0.5mA
VOHmax = 3.05V
PWM signal which can be
smoothed by an external filter.
Use the AT^SWDAC command to
open and configure the DAC_OUT
output.
VMIC
O
VOmin = 2.4V
VOtyp = 2.5V
VOmax = 2.6V
Imax = 2mA
Microphone supply for customer
feeding circuits
EPP2
O
EPN2
O
3.0Vpp differential typical @ 0dBm0 The audio output can directly
operate a 32-Ohm-loudspeaker.
4.2Vpp differential maximal @
If unused keep pins open.
3.14dBm0
Digital
DAC_OUT
Analog
Converter
Analog
Audio
interface
Measurement conditions:
Audio mode: 6
Outstep 3
No load
Minimum differential resp. single
ended load 27Ohms
EPP1
O
EPN1
O
4.2Vpp (differential) typical @
0dBm0
The audio output can directly
operate an 8-Ohm-loudspeaker.
6.0Vpp differential maximal @
3.14dBm0
If unused keep pins open.
Measurement conditions:
Audio mode: 5
Outstep 4
No load
Minimum differential resp. single
ended load 7.5Ohms
MICP1
I
MICN1
I
Differential Line Input Configuration.
Apply external bias of 1.5V at
MICN1
Full Scale Input Voltage: 1.6 Vpp
0dBm0 Input Voltage: 1.1 Vpp
Balanced or single ended microphone or line input with external
feeding circuit (using VMIC and
AGND).
If unused keep pins open.
Measurement conditions:
Audio mode: 5
^SNFI: 0,32767 => PGA = 0dB
Ri = 100 kOhm (typical)
MICP2
I
MICN2
I
Differential Line Input Configuration.
Apply external bias of 1.5V at
MICN2
Full Scale Input Voltage1.6 Vpp
0dBm0 Input Voltage1.1 Vpp
Balanced or single ended microphone or line input with external
feeding circuit (using VMIC and
AGND) and accessory detection
circuit.
If unused keep pins open.
Measurement conditions:
Audio mode: 6
^SNFI: 0,32767 => PGA = 0dB
Ri = 100 kOhm (typical)
AGND
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GND level for external audio circuits
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.6 Power Supply for Active GPS Antenna
7.6
Power Supply for Active GPS Antenna
The following table describes the electrical characteristics at the GPS antenna connector.
Table 30: Power Supply for active GPS Antenna
Function
Signal name
IO
GPS
Antenna
Antenna connector IO
Signal form and level
Comment
VOmin = 3.0V
VOtyp = 3.3V
VOmax = 3.4V
Imax = 20mA
Power supply for external
active GPS antenna.
The output power for GPS
antenna has a short circuit
protection.
Short circuit detection Ityp ≈ 50mA
Short circuit current Imax ≈ 400mA for 2ms
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.7 Power Supply Ratings
7.7
Power Supply Ratings
Table 31: Power supply ratings
Parameter
Description
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
BATT+
Supply voltage
Directly measured at module.
3.3
3.8
4.5
V
400
mV
@ f<200kHz
50
mV
@ f>200kHz
2
mV
Voltage must stay within the min/max
values, including voltage drop, ripple,
spikes.
IVDDLP
IBATT+
Voltage drop during
transmit burst
Normal condition, power control level
for Pout max
Voltage ripple
Normal condition, power control level
for Pout max
OFF State supply
current
RTC Backup @ BATT+ = 0V
40
POWER DOWN mode1
60
Average standby
supply current for
GSM unit2
SLEEP mode @ Airplane mode
3.7
mA
SLEEP mode @ DRX = 9
3.7
mA
(GPS off)
SLEEP mode @ DRX = 5
4.6
mA
SLEEP mode @ DRX = 2
7.0
mA
IDLE mode @ Airplane mode
26
mA
IDLE mode @ DRX = 2
28
mA
Satellite acquisition (no position found)
68
mA
Tracking mode3
70
mA
Sleep state
GSM in SLEEP mode @ DRX=9
8.9
mA
Sleep state
GSM in SLEEP mode @ Airplane mode
8.9
mA
Average supply
current for GSM
unit and GPS
receiver
(w/o active GPS
antenna)
1.
2.
3.
µA
120
µA
Measured after module INIT. For more details see Section 3.3.3.2.
Additional conditions:
- Measurements started 3minutes after switch on or state transition from the module
- Averaging times: SLEEP mode - 3 minutes; IDLE mode - 1.5 minutes
- Communication tester settings: no neighbor cells, no cell reselection
- USB interface disabled
1 fix/s, tracking on 6 channels, depends on FXN configuration settings
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.7 Power Supply Ratings
Table 32: Current consumption during Tx burst for GSM 850MHz and GSM 900MHz (w/o GPS)
Mode
GSM call
GPRS
Class 8
GPRS Class10
GPRS Class 12
EGPRS
Class 8
EGPRS Class 10
Timeslot configuration
1Tx / 1Rx
1Tx / 4Rx
2Tx / 3Rx
4Tx / 1Rx
1Tx / 4Rx
2Tx / 3Rx
RF power nominal
2W
(33dBm)
2W
(33dBm)
2W
(33dBm)
0.5W
(27dBm)
0.5W
(27dBm)
Radio output power
reduction with
AT^SCFG, parameter
<ropr>
<ropr> = 1 ... 3 <ropr> = 1 ... 3 <ropr> = 1
<ropr> = 2 or 3 <ropr> = 1
<ropr> = 2 or 3 <ropr> = 1 ... 3 <ropr> = 1 or 2 <ropr> = 3
Burst current
@ 50Ω antenna (typ.)
1.75A
1.48A
1.1A
Burst current
@ total mismatch
3.2A
Average current
@ 50Ω antenna (typ.)
360mA
360mA
540mA
475mA
680mA
Average current
@ total mismatch
540mA
540mA
905mA
780mA
1200mA
1W
(30dBm)
1W
(30dBm)
0.5W
(27dBm)
0.25W
(24dBm)
Current characteristics
1.75A
3.2A
1.75A
3.2A
2.7A
1.26A
2.3A
1.4A peak
1.4A peak
1.1A peak
1.2A plateau
1.2A plateau
1.0A plateau
1.8A peak
1.8A peak
1.4A peak
1.5A plateau
1.5A plateau
1.2A plateau
600mA
370mA
450mA
400mA
1000mA
395mA
525mA
450mA
1.9A
AT parameters are given in brackets <..> and marked italic. Statements on EGPRS apply to XT75 only.
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
7.7 Power Supply Ratings
Table 33: Current consumption during Tx burst for GSM 1800MHz and GSM 1900MHz (w/o GPS)
Mode
GSM call
GPRS
Class 8
GPRS Class10
GPRS Class 12
EGPRS
Class 8
EGPRS Class 10
Timeslot configuration 1Tx / 1Rx
1Tx / 4Rx
2Tx / 3Rx
4Tx / 1Rx
1Tx / 4Rx
2Tx / 3Rx
RF power nominal
1W
(30dBm)
1W
(30dBm)
1W
(30dBm)
0.5W
(27dBm)
0.5W
(27dBm)
0.25W
(24dBm)
0.4W
(26dBm)
0.4W
(26dBm)
Radio output power
reduction with
AT^SCFG, parameter
<ropr>
<ropr> = 1 ...
3
<ropr> = 1 ...
3
<ropr> = 1
<ropr> = 2 or
3
<ropr> = 1
<ropr> = 2 or 3 <ropr> = 1 ... 3
<ropr> = 1 or 2 <ropr> = 3
Burst current
@ 50Ω antenna (typ.)
1.3A
1.3A
1.3A
1.1A
0.95A
0.85A
1.0A peak
1.0A peak
0.9A peak
0.9A plateau
0.9A plateau
0.75A plateau
Burst current
@ total mismatch
2.2A
1.3A peak
1.3A peak
1.1A peak
1.0A plateau
1.0A plateau
0.95A plateau
Average current
@ 50Ω antenna (typ.)
325mA
330mA
505mA
450mA
645mA
545mA
360mA
445mA
420mA
Average current
@ total mismatch
390mA
395mA
630mA
540mA
920mA
795mA
410mA
545mA
470mA
0.2W
(23dBm)
Current characteristics
2.2A
2.2A
1.75A
1.5A
1.25A
AT parameters are given in brackets <..> and marked italic. Statements on EGPRS apply to XT75 only.
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7.8 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
7.8
Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
7.8.1
Setting Audio Parameters by AT Commands
The audio modes 2 to 6 can be adjusted according to the parameters listed below. Each audio mode is assigned
a separate set of parameters.
Table 34: Audio parameters adjustable by AT commands
Parameter
Influence to
Range
Gain range
Calculation
inBbcGain
MICP/MICN analogue amplifier
gain of baseband controller before
ADC
0...7
0...42dB
6dB steps
inCalibrate
Digital attenuation of input signal
after ADC
0...32767 -∞...0dB
20 * log (inCalibrate/
32768)
outBbcGain
EPP/EPN analogue output gain of
baseband controller after DAC
0...3
6dB steps
outCalibrate[n] Digital attenuation of output signal
n = 0...4
after speech decoder, before summation of sidetone and DAC
0...-18dB
0...32767 -∞...+6dB
20 * log (2 * outCalibrate[n]/
32768)
0...32767 -∞...0dB
20 * log (sideTone/
32768)
Present for each volume step[n]
sideTone
Digital attenuation of sidetone
Is corrected internally by outBbcGain to obtain a constant sidetone
independent of output volume
Note: The parameters outCalibrate and sideTone accept also values from 32768 to 65535. These values are
internally truncated to 32767.
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7.8 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
7.8.2
s
Audio Programming Mode
The audio programming model shows how the signal path can be influenced by varying the AT command parameters. The parameters inBbcGain and inCalibrate can be set with AT^SNFI. All the other parameters are adjusted
with AT^SNFO.
Figure 49: Audio programming model
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7.8 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
7.8.3
Characteristics of Audio Modes
The electrical characteristics of the voiceband part depend on the current audio mode set with the AT^SNFS
command. All values are noted for default gains e.g. all parameters of AT^SNFI and AT^SNFO are left
unchanged.
Table 35: Voiceband characteristics (typical)
Audio mode no.
AT^SNFS=
1 (Default
settings, not
adjustable)
2
3
4
5
6
Name
Default
Handset
Basic
Handsfree
Headset
User
Handset
Plain
Codec 1
Plain
Codec 2
Purpose
DSB with
Votronic
handset
Siemens
Car Kit Portable
Siemens
Headset
DSB with
individual
handset
Direct
access to
speech
coder
Direct access
to speech
coder
Gain setting via AT
command. Defaults:
inBbcGain
outBbcGain
Fix
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
5 (30dB)
1 (-6dB)
2 (12dB)
2 (-12dB)
5 (30dB)
1 (-6dB)
5 (30dB)
1 (-6dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
0 (0dB)
Default audio interface
1
2
2
1
1
2
Power supply VMIC
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
Sidetone
Fix
---
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Volume control
Fix
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Adjustable
Echo canceller
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
Noise reduction
6dB
12dB
12dB
6dB
OFF
OFF
MIC input signal for
0dBm0 1
-10dBm0
f=1024 Hz
16mV
5mV
---2
90mV
18mV
16mV
16mV
5mV
400mV
126mV
400mV
126mV
EP output signal in
mV rms. @ 0dBm0,
1024 Hz, no load
(default gain) /
@ 3.14 dBm0
660mV
240mV
740mV
660mV
default @
default @
default @
max volume max volume max volume
1.47V
1.47V
Vpp = 6.2V
Vpp = 4.2V3
Sidetone gain at
default settings
21dB
-∞ dB
-∞ dB
1.
2.
3.
-∞ dB
10dB
21dB
All values measured before the noise reduction attenuates the sine wave after a few seconds.
0dBm0 cannot be achieved at 1024Hz due to attenuation of the frequency correction filter for the headset at this
frequency.
Output voltage is limited to 4.2V.
NOTE: With regard to acoustic shock, the cellular application must be designed to avoid sending false AT commands that might increase amplification, e.g. for a highly sensitive earpiece. A protection circuit should be implemented in the cellular application.
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7.8 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
7.8.4
Voiceband Receive Path
Test conditions:
•
•
The values specified below were tested to 1kHz with default audio mode settings, unless otherwise stated.
Default audio mode settings are: mode=5 for EPP1 to EPN1 and mode=6 for EPP2 to EPN2, inBbcGain=0,
inCalibrate=32767, outBbcGain=0, OutCalibrate=16384 (volume=4) or OutCalibrate=11585 (volume=3),
sideTone=0.
Table 36: Voiceband receive path
Parameter
Min
Unit
Test condition / remark
6.0
6.2
V
V
8Ω ,
no load,
Audio Mode 5, Volume 4
@ 3.14 dBm0 (Full Scale)
Batt+ = 3.6V
4.0
4.2
V
V
32Ω,
no load
Audio Mode 6, Volume 31
@ 3.14 dBm0 (Full Scale)
4.2
4.3
V
V
8Ω,
no load,
Audio Mode 5, Volume 4
@ 0 dBm0 (Nominal level)
2.8
2.9
V
V
32Ω,
no load
Audio Mode 6, Volume 31
@ 0 dBm0 (Nominal level)
Output bias voltage
Batt+/2
V
from EPP1 or EPN1 to AGND
Output bias voltage
1.2
V
from EPP2 or EPN2 to AGND
Maximum differential
output voltage (peak to
peak)
Typ
Max
EPP1 to EPN1
Maximum differential
output voltage (peak to
peak)
EPP2 to EPN2
Nominal differential output voltage (peak to
peak)
EPP1 to EPN1
Nominal differential output voltage (peak to
peak)
EPP2 to EPN2
Differential output gain
settings (gs) at 6dB
stages (outBbcGain)
-18
0
dB
Set with AT^SNFO
Fine scaling by DSP
(outCalibrate)
-∞
0
dB
Set with AT^SNFO
Differential output load
resistance
7.5
8
Ω
From EPP1 to EPN1
Differential output load
resistance
27
32
Ω
From EPP2 to EPN2
Single ended output load 7.5
resistance
8
Ω
From EPP1 or EPN1 to AGND
Single ended output load 27
resistance
32
Ω
From EPP2 or EPN2 to AGND
0.1
dB
outBbcGain=2
-75
dBm0p
outBbcGain=2
dB
outBbcGain=2
Absolute gain error
-0.1
2
-83
Idle channel noise
Signal to noise and distortion3
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7.8 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
Table 36: Voiceband receive path
Parameter
Frequency Response
Min
0Hz - 100Hz
200Hz
300Hz - 3350Hz
3400Hz
4000Hz
>4400Hz
1.
2.
3.
4.
Typ
Max
Unit
-34
dB
Test condition / remark
4
-1.1
0.1
-0.2
-0.7
-39
-75
Full scale of EPP2/EPN2 is lower than full scale of EPP1/EPN1 but the default gain is the same. 3.14dBm0
will lead to clipping if the default gain is used.
The idle channel noise was measured with digital zero signal fed to decoder. This can be realized by setting outCalibrate and sideTone to 0 during a call.
The test signal is a 1 kHz, 0 dbm0 sine wave.
This is the frequency response from a highpass and lowpass filter combination in the DAC of the baseband
chip set. If the PCM interface is used, this filter is not involved in the audio path. Audio mode 1 to 4 incorporate additional frequency response correction filters in the digital signal processing unit and are adjusted
to their dedicated audio devices (see Table 35).
gs = gain setting
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7.8 Electrical Characteristics of the Voiceband Part
7.8.5
Voiceband Transmit Path
Test conditions:
•
•
The values specified below were tested to 1kHz and default settings of audio modes, unless otherwise stated.
Parameter setup: Audio mode=5 for MICP1 to MICN1 and 6 for MICP2 to MICN2, inBbcGain=0, inCalibrate=32767, outBbcGain=0, OutCalibrate=16384, sideTone=0
Table 37: Voiceband transmit path
Parameter
Min
Full scale input voltage (peak to
peak) for 3.14dBm0
Typ
Max
Unit
Test condition / Remark
1.6
V
MICPx must be biased with
1.25V (VMIC/2)
1.1
V
MICPx must be biased with
1.25V (VMIC/2)
MICP1 to MICN1 or AGND, MICP2
to MICN2 or AGND
Nominal input voltage (peak to
peak) for 0dBm0
MICP1 to MICN1 or AGND, MICP2
to MICN2 or AGND
Input amplifier gain in 6dB steps
(inBbcGain)
0
42
dB
Set with AT^SNFI
Fine scaling by DSP (inCalibrate)
-∞
0
dB
Set with AT^SNFI
Microphone supply voltage VMIC
2.4
2.6
V
2
mA
-76
dBm0p
2.5
VMIC current
Idle channel noise
Signal to noise and distortion
-82
70
77
dB
Frequency response1
0Hz - 100Hz
200Hz
300Hz - 3350Hz
3400Hz
4000Hz
>4400Hz
1.
-34
dB
-1.1
0.1
-0.2
-0.7
-39
-75
This is the frequency response from a highpass and lowpass filter combination in the DAC of the baseband
chip set. If the PCM interface is used, this filter is not involved in the audio path. Audio mode 1 to 4 incorporate additional frequency response correction filters in the digital signal processing unit and are adjusted
to their dedicated audio devices (see Table 35).
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7.9 Air Interface
7.9
Air Interface
Test conditions: All measurements have been performed at Tamb= 25×C, VBATT+ nom = 4.0V. The reference points
used on XT65/XT75 are the BATT+ and GND contacts (test points are shown in Figure 4).
Table 38: Air interface
Parameter
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Frequency range
GSM 850
824
849
MHz
Uplink (MS → BTS)
E-GSM 900
880
915
MHz
GSM 1800
1710
1785
MHz
GSM 1900
1850
1910
MHz
Frequency range
GSM 850
869
894
MHz
Downlink (BTS → MS)
E-GSM 900
925
960
MHz
GSM 1800
1805
1880
MHz
GSM 1900
1930
1990
MHz
RF power @ ARP with 50Ω load
GSM 850
31
33
35
dBm
E-GSM 900
31
33
35
dBm
GSM 18002
28
30
32
dBm
GSM 1900
28
30
32
dBm
1
Number of carriers
Duplex spacing
GSM 850
124
E-GSM 900
174
GSM 1800
374
GSM 1900
299
GSM 850
45
MHz
E-GSM 900
45
MHz
GSM 1800
95
MHz
GSM 1900
80
MHz
200
kHz
Carrier spacing
Multiplex, Duplex
TDMA / FDMA, FDD
Time slots per TDMA frame
8
Frame duration
4.615
ms
Time slot duration
577
µs
Modulation
GMSK
Receiver input sensitivity @ ARP
GSM 850
-102
-108
dBm
BER Class II < 2.4% (static input level)
E-GSM 900
-102
-108
dBm
GSM 1800
-102
-107
dBm
GSM 1900
-102
-107
dBm
1.
2.
Power control level PCL 5
Power control level PCL 0
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7.10 Electrostatic Discharge
7.10
Electrostatic Discharge
The GSM engine is not protected against Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) in general. Consequently, it is subject
to ESD handling precautions that typically apply to ESD sensitive components. Proper ESD handling and packaging procedures must be applied throughout the processing, handling and operation of any application that
incorporates a XT65/XT75 module.
Special ESD protection provided on XT65/XT75:
•
•
•
GSM Antenna interface: RF choke decoupled 100nF capacitor
GPS Antenna interface: RF choke decoupled 100nF capacitor
SIM interface: clamp diodes for protection against overvoltage.
The remaining ports of XT65/XT75 are not accessible to the user of the final product (since they are installed
within the device) and therefore, are only protected according to the "Human Body Model" requirements.
XT65/XT75 has been tested according to the EN 61000-4-2 standard. The measured values can be gathered
from the following table.
Table 39: Measured electrostatic values
Specification / Requirements
Contact discharge
Air discharge
± 4kV
± 8kV
ETSI EN 301 489-7
ESD at SIM port (w/o SIM card)
Human Body Model (Test conditions: 1.5kOhm, 100pF)
ESD at GSM antenna port
± 1kV
± 1kV
ESD at GPS antenna port
± 1kV
± 1kV
± 1kV
± 1kV
± 1kV
± 1kV
ESD at USB Interface
ESD at all other interfaces
Note: Please note that the values may vary with the individual application design. For example, it matters whether
or not the application platform is grounded over external devices like a computer or other equipment, such as the
Siemens reference application described in Chapter 10.
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8 Mechanics
8
Mechanics
8.1
Mechanical Dimensions of XT65/XT75
s
Figure 50 shows the top view of XT65/XT75 and provides an overview of the board's mechanical dimensions.
For further details see Figure 51.
Length: 59.00mm
Width: 34mm
Height: 3.5mm
Pin1
Pin80
Figure 50: XT65/XT75– top view
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8.1 Mechanical Dimensions of XT65/XT75
Figure 51: Dimensions of XT65/XT75 (all dimensions in mm)
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8.2 Mounting XT65/XT75 to the Application Platform
8.2
s
Mounting XT65/XT75 to the Application Platform
There are many ways to properly install XT65/XT75 in the host device. An efficient approach is to mount the
XT65/XT75 PCB to a frame, plate, rack or chassis.
Fasteners can be M2 screws plus suitable washers, circuit board spacers, or customized screws, clamps, or
brackets. In addition, the board-to-board connection can also be utilized to achieve better support. To help you
find appropriate spacers a list of selected screws and distance sleeves for 3mm stacking height can be found in
Section 11.2.
When using the two small holes take care that the screws are inserted with the screw head on the bottom of the
XT65/XT75 PCB. Screws for the large holes can be inserted from top or bottom.
For proper grounding it is strongly recommended to use large ground plane on the bottom of board in addition to
the five GND pins of the board-to-board connector. The ground plane may also be used to attach cooling elements, e.g. a heat sink or thermally conductive tape. Please take care that attached cooling elements do not
touch the antenna pads on the module’s bottom side, as this may lead a short-circuit.
To prevent mechanical damage, be careful not to force, bend or twist the module. Be sure it is positioned flat
against the host device (see also Section 11.4 with mounting advice sheet).
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8.3 Board-to-Board Application Connector
8.3
s
Board-to-Board Application Connector
This section provides the specifications of the 80-pin board-to-board connector used to connect XT65/XT75 to
the external application.
Connector mounted on the XT65/XT75 module:
Type:
52991-0808 SlimStack Receptacle 80 pins, 0.50mm pitch, for stacking heights from 3.0 to 4.0mm,
see Figure 52 for details.
Supplier:
Molex, http//www.molex.com
Table 40: Technical specifications of Molex board-to-board connector
Parameter
Specification (80-pin B2B connector)
Electrical
Number of Contacts
80
Contact spacing
0.5mm (.020")
Voltage
50V
Rated current
0.5A max per contact
Contact resistance
50mΩ max per contact
Insulation resistance
> 100MΩ
Dielectric Withstanding Voltage
500V AC (for 1 minute)
Physical
Insulator material (housing)
White glass-filled LCP plastic, flammability UL 94V 0
Contact material
Plating: Gold over nickel
Insertion force 1st
th
< 74.4N
Insertion force 30
< 65.6N
Withdrawal force 1st
> 10.8N
Maximum connection cycles
30 (@ 70mΩ max per contact)
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8.3 Board-to-Board Application Connector
s
Mating connector types for the customer's application offered by Molex:
•
•
53748-0808 SlimStack Plug, 3mm stacking height,
see Figure 53 for details.
53916-0808 SlimStack Plug, 4mm stacking height
Note: There is no inverse polarity protection for the board-to-board connector. It is therefore very important that
the board-to-board connector is connected correctly to the host application, i.e., pin1 must be connected to pin1,
pin2 to pin 2, etc. Pin assignments are listed in Section 7.5, pin locations are shown in Figure 50.
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8.3 Board-to-Board Application Connector
s
Figure 52: Molex board-to-board connector 52991-0808 on XT65/XT75
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8.3 Board-to-Board Application Connector
s
Figure 53: Mating board-to-board connector 53748-0808 on application
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9 Sample Application
9
s
Sample Application
Figure 54 shows a typical example of how to integrate a XT65/XT75 module with an application. Usage of the
various host interfaces depends on the desired features of the application.
Audio interface 1 demonstrates the balanced connection of microphone and earpiece. This solution is particularly
well suited for internal transducers. Audio interface 2 uses an unbalanced microphone and earpiece connection
typically found in headset applications.
The charging circuit is optimized for the charging stages (trickle charging and software controlled charging) as
well as the battery and charger specifications described in Section 3.5.
The PWR_IND line is an open collector that needs an external pull-up resistor which connects to the voltage supply VCC µC of the microcontroller. Low state of the open collector pulls the PWR_IND signal low and indicates
that the XT65/XT75 module is active, high level notifies the Power-down mode.
If the module is in Power-down mode avoid current flowing from any other source into the module circuit, for
example reverse current from high state external control lines. Therefore, the controlling application must be
designed to prevent reverse flow.
If the I2C bus is active the two lines I2CCLK and I2DAT are locked for use as SPI lines. Vice versa, the activation
of the SPI locks both lines for I2C. Settings for either interface are made by using the AT^SSPI command.
The internal pull-up resistors (Rp) of the I2C interface can be connected to an external power supply or to the
VEXT line of XT65/XT75. The advantage of using VEXT is that when the module enters the Power-down mode,
the I2C interface is shut down as well. If you prefer to connect the resistors to an external power supply, take care
that the interface is shut down when the PWR_IND signal goes high in Power-down mode.
The interfaces ASC0 and USB have different functions depending on whether or not Java is running. Without
Java, all of them are used as AT interfaces. When a Java application is started, ASC0 can be used for CommConnection or/and System.out, and the USB lines can be used for debugging or System.out. If Java is running,
only the following four signals are supported over the ASC0 interface: TXD0, RXD0, RTS0 and CTS0 (see also
Section 3.10).
The EMC measures are best practice recommendations. In fact, an adequate EMC strategy for an individual
application is very much determined by the overall layout and, especially, the position of components. For example, mounting the internal acoustic transducers directly on the PCB eliminates the need to use the ferrite beads
shown in the sample schematic. However, when connecting cables to the module’s interfaces it is strongly recommended to add appropriate ferrite beads for reducing RF radiation.
Disclaimer
No warranty, either stated or implied, is provided on the sample schematic diagram shown in Figure 54 and the
information detailed in this section. As functionality and compliance with national regulations depend to a great
amount on the used electronic components and the individual application layout manufacturers are required to
ensure adequate design and operating safeguards for their products using XT65/XT75 modules.
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Figure 54: XT65/XT75 sample application
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10 Reference Approval
10
Reference Approval
10.1
Reference Equipment for Type Approval
s
The Siemens reference setup submitted to type approve XT65/XT75 consists of the following components:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Siemens XT65/XT75 cellular engine
Development Support Box DSB75
SIM card reader integrated on DSB75
U.FL-R-SMT antenna connector and U.FL-LP antenna cable
Handset type Votronic HH-SI-30.3/V1.1/0
Li-Ion battery (capacity: 1200mAh)
PC as MMI
Figure 55: Reference equipment for Type Approval
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10.2 Compliance with FCC Rules and Regulations
10.2
s
Compliance with FCC Rules and Regulations
The Equipment Authorization Certification for the Siemens reference application described in Section 10.1 will
be registered under the following identifiers:
FCC Identifier: QIPXT65
Industry Canada Certification Number: 267W-XT65
Granted to Siemens AG
FCC Identifier QIPXT75
Industry Canada Certification Number: 267W-XT75
Granted to Siemens AG
Manufacturers of mobile or fixed devices incorporating XT65/XT75 modules are authorized to use the FCC
Grants and Industry Canada Certificates of the XT65/XT75 modules for their own final products according to the
conditions referenced in these documents. In this case, the FCC label of the module shall be visible from the
outside, or the host device shall bear a second label stating "Contains FCC ID QIP XT65" resp. "Contains FCC
ID QIP XT75".
IMPORTANT:
Manufacturers of portable applications incorporating XT65/XT75 modules are required to have their final product
certified and apply for their own FCC Grant and Industry Canada Certificate related to the specific portable
mobile. This is mandatory to meet the SAR requirements for portable mobiles (see Section 1.3.2 for detail).
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user's
authority to operate the equipment.
If the final product is not approved for use in U.S. territories the application manufacturer shall take care that the
850 MHz and 1900 MHz frequency bands be deactivated and that band settings be inaccessible to end users. If
these demands are not met (e.g. if the AT interface is accessible to end users), it is the responsibility of the application manufacturer to always ensure that the application be FCC approved regardless of the country it is marketed in. The frequency bands can be set using the command
AT^SCFG="Radio/Band"[,<rbp>][, <rba>].
A detailed command description can be found in [1].
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11.1 List of Parts and Accessories
11
Appendix
11.1
List of Parts and Accessories
s
Table 41: List of parts and accessories
Description
Supplier
Ordering information
XT65
Siemens
Standard module (Siemens IMEI)
Siemens ordering number: L36880-N8835-A100
Customer IMEI mode:
Siemens Ordering number: L36880-N8836-A100
XT75
Siemens
Standard module (Siemens IMEI)
Siemens ordering number: L36880-N8830-A100
Customer IMEI mode:
Siemens Ordering number: L36880-N8831-A100
Siemens Car Kit Portable
Siemens
Siemens ordering number: L36880-N3015-A117
DSB75 Support Box
Siemens
Siemens ordering number: L36880-N8811-A100
Votronic Handset
VOTRONIC
Votronic HH-SI-30.3/V1.1/0
VOTRONIC
Entwicklungs- und Produktionsgesellschaft für elektronische Geräte mbH
Saarbrücker Str. 8
66386 St. Ingbert
Germany
Phone: +49-(0)6 89 4 / 92 55-0
Fax: +49-(0)6 89 4 / 92 55-88
e-mail: contact@votronic.com
SIM card holder incl. push
button ejector and slide-in
tray
Molex
Board-to-board connector
Molex
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Ordering numbers: 91228
91236
Sales contacts are listed in Table 42.
Sales contacts are listed in Table 42.
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11.1 List of Parts and Accessories
s
Table 42: Molex sales contacts (subject to change)
Molex
Molex Deutschland GmbH
American Headquarters
For further information please click:
Felix-Wankel-Str. 11
4078 Heilbronn-Biberach
Germany
Lisle, Illinois 60532
U.S.A.
http://www.molex.com
Phone: +49-7066-9555 0
Fax: +49-7066-9555 29
Email: mxgermany@molex.com
Molex China Distributors
Beijing,
Room 1319, Tower B, COFCO Plaza
No. 8, Jian Guo Men Nei Street, 100005
Beijing
P.R. China
Phone: +1-800-78MOLEX
Fax: +1-630-969-1352
Molex Singapore Pte. Ltd.
Molex Japan Co. Ltd.
Jurong, Singapore
Yamato, Kanagawa, Japan
Phone: +65-268-6868
Fax: +65-265-6044
Phone: +81-462-65-2324
Fax: +81-462-65-2366
Phone: +86-10-6526-9628
Phone: +86-10-6526-9728
Phone: +86-10-6526-9731
Fax: +86-10-6526-9730
Table 43: Hirose sales contacts (subject to change)
Hirose Ltd.
Hirose Electric (U.S.A.) Inc
Hirose Electric GmbH
For further information please click:
2688 Westhills Court
Simi Valley, CA 93065
U.S.A.
Herzog-Carl-Strasse 4
73760 Ostfildern
Germany
Phone: +1-805-522-7958
Fax: +1-805-522-3217
Phone: +49-711-456002-1
Fax: +49-711-456002-299
Email: info@hirose.de
Hirose Electric UK, Ltd
Hirose Electric Co., Ltd.
Hirose Electric Co., Ltd.
Crownhill Business Centre
22 Vincent Avenue, Crownhill
Milton Keynes, MK8 OAB
Great Britain
5-23, Osaki 5 Chome,
Shinagawa-Ku
Tokyo 141
Japan
Phone: +44-1908-305400
Fax: +44-1908-305401
Phone: +81-03-3491-9741
Fax: +81-03-3493-2933
European Branch
First class Building 4F
Beechavenue 46
1119PV Schiphol-Rijk
Netherlands
http://www.hirose.com
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Phone: +31-20-6557-460
Fax: +31-20-6557-469
2007-1-8
XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
11.2 Fasteners and Fixings for Electronic Equipment
11.2
s
Fasteners and Fixings for Electronic Equipment
This section provides a list of suppliers and manufacturers offering fasteners and fixings for electronic equipment
and PCB mounting. The content of this section is designed to offer basic guidance to various mounting solutions
with no warranty on the accuracy and sufficiency of the information supplied. Please note that the list remains
preliminary although it is going to be updated in later versions of this document.
11.2.1
Fasteners from German Supplier ETTINGER GmbH
Sales contact:
ETTINGER GmbH
http://www.ettinger.de/main.cfm
Phone: +49-81-046623-0
Fax: +49-81-046623-99
The following tables contain only article numbers and basic parameters of the listed components. For further
detail and ordering information please contact Ettinger GmbH.
Please note that some of the listed screws, spacers and nuts are delivered with the DSB75 Support Board. See
comments below.
Article number: 05.71.038
Spacer - Aluminum /
Wall thickness = 0.8mm
Length
3.0mm
Material
AlMgSi-0,5
For internal diameter
M2=2.0-2.3
Internal diameter
d = 2.4mm
External diameter
4.0mm
Vogt AG No.
x40030080.10
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11.2 Fasteners and Fixings for Electronic Equipment
Article number: 07.51.403
s
Insulating Spacer for M2
Self-gripping1
Length
3.0mm
Material
Polyamide 6.6
Surface
Black
Internal diameter
2.2mm
External diameter
4.0mm
Flammability rating
UL94-HB
1.
2 spacers are delivered with DSB75 Support Board
Article number: 05.11.209
Threaded Stud M2.5 - M2 Type E /
External thread at both ends
Length
3.0mm
Material
Stainless steel X12CrMoS17
Thread 1 / Length
M2.5 / 6.0mm
Thread 2 / Length
M2 / 8.0mm
Width across flats
5
Recess
yes
Type
External / External
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11.2 Fasteners and Fixings for Electronic Equipment
Article number: 01.14.131
s
Screw M21
DIN 84 - ISO 1207
Length
8.0mm
Material
Steel 4.8
Surface
Zinced A2K
Thread
M2
Head diameter
D = 3.8mm
Head height
1.30mm
Type
Slotted cheese head screw
1.
2 screws are delivered with DSB75 Support Board
Article number: 01.14.141
Screw M2
DIN 84 - ISO 1207
Length
10.0mm
Material
Steel 4.8
Surface
Zinced A2K
Thread
M2
Head diameter
D = 3.8mm
Head height
1.30mm
Type
Slotted cheese head screw
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XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
11.3 Data Sheets of Tested Batteries
Article number: 02.10.011
s
Hexagon Nut1
DIN 934 - ISO 4032
Material
Steel 4.8
Surface
Zinced A2K
Thread
M2
Wrench size / Ø
4
Thickness / L
1.6mm
Type
Nut DIN/UNC, DIN934
1.
11.3
2 nuts are delivered with DSB75 Support Board
Data Sheets of Tested Batteries
The following two data sheets have been provided by VARTA Microbattery GmbH.
Click here for sales contacts and further information: http://www.varta-microbattery.com
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11.3 Data Sheets of Tested Batteries
Figure 56: Lithium Ion
battery from VARTA
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11.3 Data Sheets of Tested Batteries
8
F
7
6
4
3
40
d/s adhesive tape Nomex
0.18x8x32
50
d/s adhesive tape Nomex
0.18x5x32
90
tag
0.1x3x25
60
d/s adhesive tape Nomex
30
0.18x4x27
Ni-tag
(0.07x4x15mm)
80
PCM
D
A
20
adhesive tape Kapton
0.055x8x18
130
wire black(-)
AWG 24
150
sumitube (2x)
140
wire white(NTC)
AWG24
+0
37 - 0,5
110
adhesive tape Kapton
0.055x6x28 (2x)
120
wire red(+)
AWG24
0,2
58,5 +- 0,3
5 +- 0,1
0,2
C
B
1
1.General:
Battery with safety circuit and wires
Cell: PLF 503759C
PCM: PLFE+NTC
NTC: 10 kOhm
ID: None
Configuration: 1S
Weight: approx. 22.5g
2.Electrical Specification:
Rated Capacity: 1210 mAh min, 1250mAh typical
Nominal Voltage: 3.7V
Charging Method: Constant Current + Constant Voltage
Max. Charge Voltage [V]: 4.20 (C50mV)
Max. Continuous Charge Current: 1210mA
Rec. Charge cut off: 24mA
Max. Continouos Discharge Current: 2A (limited by PCM)
Rec. Discharge cut off: 3V
Internal Impedance: 130mOhm
Exp. Cycle Life: >500 cycles (0.5C/0.5C) >70% of initial cap.
Cell protection
Overcharge Detection: 4.275 C0.025V
(0.7 to 1.3 sec. delay, resume 4.275 C0.025V)
Overdischarge Detection: 2.30 C0.058V
(14 to 26 msec. delay, resume 2.30 C0.058V)
Overcurrent Detection: 2.0A to 4.0 A (8 to 16 msec. delay)
3. Ambient Conditions
Tempratur Range
- Charge:
0 to 45°C
- Discharge: -20 to +60°C
- Charge Retention/Storage [%]: 1 year at -20 to 20°C >80%
3 month at -20 to 45°C >80%
1 month at -20 to 60°C >80%
Humidity: 65 C20%RH
4.Environmental and Safety
Please follow VARTA Handling and Safety Precautions for LiIon & LiPolymer
Ansicht ohne Kapton Tapes
100
thermofuse
EYP2ML098US
2
Specification
10
PLF 503759C
70
adhesive tape Kapton
0.055x6x10
E
5
circuit diagramm
PCM
F
Figure 57: VARTA
PoLiFlex® Lithium Polymer battery
E
D
C
B
In Arbeit
+
NTC
-
Thermofuse
Änderung / Alteration
Index
Projection:
tbd
PLF503759C
A
Freimaßtoleranzen
Diese Maße werden
Generaltolerances
besonders geprüft
Maße in mm
All dimensions in mm
up to 6
C0,1
Als Betriebsgeheimnis
anvertraut, alle
Rechte vorbehalten.
over 6
up to 30
C0,2
Proprietary data,
company confidential,
all rights reserved.
This dimensions are
C0,3
over 100
C0,5
Bearb./Desig.
Gepr./Check.
Name
19.10.2006 nbarenthin
19.10.2006 nbarenthin
20.10.2006 R.Keppeler
VARTA Microbattery
Ansicht ohne Kapton tape (pos. 110)
mobility for you
XT65_XT75_HD_v01.001
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7
6
5
4
Page 131 of 133
3
66661 111 099
Benennung /
Designation
PLF 503759C.PCM
Zchng. / Dwg.Nr.
Origin:
8
A
Index
2 KE_1684_00
repl.f.:
2
Name
1:1
considered inspectable
Date
Erst./Orig.
over 30
up to 100
Date
Maßstab / Scale
Material
repl.by:
00
Alloc.:
1
2007-1-8
XT65/XT75 Hardware Interface Description
11.4 Mounting Advice Sheet
11.4
s
Mounting Advice Sheet
To prevent mechanical damage, be careful not to force, bend or twist the module. Be sure it is positioned flat
against the host device. The advice sheet on the next page shows a number of examples for the kind of bending
that may lead to mechanical damage of the module.
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11.4 Mounting Advice Sheet
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