EPSON
®
User’s Guide
a
EPA POLLUTION PREVENTER
a!3
Printed on recycled paper with at least 10% post consumer content
IMPORTANT NOTICE
DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY
Epson America makes no representations or warranties, either express or implied, by or
with respect to anything in this manual, and shall not be liable for any implied warranties
ofmerchantability and fitness for a particular purpose or for any indirect, special, or
consequential damages. Some states do not allow the exclusion of incidental or
consequential damages, so this exclusion may not apply to you.
COPYRIGHT NOTICE
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Epson
America, Inc. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of information
contained herein. Nor is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the
information contained herein. Further, this publication and features described herein are
subject to change without notice.
TRADEMARKS
EPSON is a registered trademark of Seiko Epson Corporation
EPSON Connection is a service mark of Epson America, Inc.
General notice: Other product names used herein are for identification purposes only and
may be trademarks of their respective owners. EPSON disclaims any and all rights in
those marks.
Copyright 0 1995 by Epson America, Inc.
Torrance, California, USA
ii
400434500-1
9/95
Important Safety Instructions
Read all of these instructions and save them for later reference. Follow
all warnings and instructions marked on the computer.
. Unplug the computer before cleaning. Clean with a damp cloth only.
Do not spill liquid on the computer.
. Do not place the computer on an unstable surface or near a radiator
or heat register.
. Do not block or cover the openings in the computer’s cabinet. Do not
insert objects through the slots.
. Use only the type of power source indicated on the computer’s label.
. Connect all equipment to properly grounded power outlets. Avoid
using outlets on the same circuit as photocopiers or air control
systems that regularly switch on and off.
. Do not let the computer’s power cord become damaged or frayed.
. If you use an extension cord
ampere rating of the devices
not exceed the cord’s ampere
devices plugged into the wall
with the computer, make sure the total
plugged into the extension cord does
rating. Also, make sure the total of all
outlet does not exceed 15 amperes.
. Except as specifically explained in this User's Guide, do not attempt to
service the computer yourself.
. Unplug the computer and refer servicing to qualified service
personnel under the following conditions:
If the power cord or plug is damaged; if liquid has entered the
computer; if the computer has been dropped or the cabinet damaged;
if the computer does not operate normally or exhibits a distinct
change in performance. Adjust only those controls that are covered
by the operating instructions.
. If you plan to use the computer in Germany, observe the following:
To provide adequate short-circuit protection and over-current
protection for this computer, the building installation must be
protected by a 16 Amp circuit breaker.
iii
Importantes instructions de sbcuritb
Lire attentivement les instructions suivantes et les conserver pour les
consulter en cas de besoin. Observer soigneusement tous les
avertissements et directives marques sur l’ordinateur.
. Debrancher l’ordinateur avant de le nettoyer. N’utiliser qu’un chiffon
humide. Veiller a ne pas renverser de liquides sur l’appareil.
. Ne pas placer l’ordinateur sur une surface instable ni pres dune
source de chaleur.
. Ne pas bloquer ni couvrir les orifices d’aeration de l’appareil. Ne pas
introduire d’objets dans les ouvertures.
. Utiliser seulement le type de source d’alimentation Clectrique indique
sur l’etiquette.
. Tout l’equipement doit Ctre branche sur des prises de courant avec
contact de terre. Ne jamais utiliser une prise sur le meme circuit
qu’un appareil a photocopies ou un systeme de controle de
ventilation avec commutation marche-arret automatique.
. S’assurer que le cordon d’alimentation de l’ordinateur n’est pas
abime ni effiloche.
. Dans le cas ou on utilise un cordon de rallonge avec l’ordinateur,
s’assurer que l’intensite en amperes requise pour tous les appareils
branches sur ce cordon ne soit pas superieure a la capacite du cordon.
S’assurer aussi que cette intensite ne depasse jamais la somme de 15
amperes pour l’ensemble des appareils.
. Sauf dans les cas specifiques expliques dans ce manuel de l’usager,
ne pas essayer d’entretenir ou de reparer l’ordinateur soi-meme.
. Debrancher l’ordinateur et contacter un technicien qualifie dans les
circonstances suivantes:
Si le cordon ou la prise sont abimes; si un liquide a pen&C a
l’interieur de l’appareil; si on a laisse tomber l’appareil ou si le bonier
est endommage; si l’ordinateur ne fonctionne pas normalement ou
fonctionne dune man&e tres differente de l’ordinaire. N’ajuster que
les commandes d&rites dans les directives.
. Pour utiliser l’ordinateur en Allemagne, il est necessaire que le
batiment soit muni d’un disjoncteur de 16 amperes pour proteger
l’ordinateur contre les courts-circuits et le survoltage.
iv
l
Ziehen Sie den Computer heraus, und rufen Sie qualifiziertes
Wartungspersonal, wenn eine der folgenden Bedingungen auftritt:
Das Netzkabel oder der Netzstecker ist beschadigt; Fltissigkeit ist in
den Computer eingetreten; der Computer wurde fallengelassen oder
das Gehause ist beschadigt; der Computer funktioniert nicht
ordnungsgemain oder die Leistung hat sich merklich geandert. Stellen
Sie nur die Bedienelemente ein, die in der Gebrauchsanweisung
beschrieben sind.
l
l
Nehmen Sie den Computer bei Flugreisen als Handgepack mit in den
Fluggastraum, damit er nicht in einem drucklosen Frachtraum
verstaut wird.
Beachten Sie den folgenden Hinweis, wenn Sie den Computer in
Deutschland in Betrieb nehmen:
Beim Anschluh des Computers an die Netzversorgung muh
sichergestellt werden, dab die Gebaudeinstallation mit einem 16 A
ijberstromschutzschalter abgesichert ist.
vi
Introduction
Your new EPSON® computer is a full powered, full featured
system that gives you complete access for all your business and
home computer needs. And because your computer is plug and
play compliant and designed to take advantage of Microsoft@
Windows® 95, you’ll be able to use all the latest technology.
With the computer’s 586-class processor and a generous 8MB of
standard memory you can run a vast array of the latest
programs, utilities, and games designed for productivity and
fun.
The system’s state-of-the-art PCI (Peripheral Component
Interconnect) bus architecture enables faster and more efficient
response from your VGA monitor and any PCI devices you
may install, such as PCI option cards and IDE (Integrated Drive
Electronics) devices.
When you’re ready for even more capability, you can expand
your system, video, and cache memory, install option cards
and additional drives, and upgrade your processor.
Computer Features
Your computer offers the following features:
0 586-class processor
0
At least 8MB of RAM (Random Access Memory),
expandable to 128MB
0
PCI components on the main system board provide a direct
line for caching, memory, and device control for all PCI
devices
Introduction 1
High-speed, PCI VGA controller with an integrated 24-bit
RAMDAC and 64-bit DRAM interface
Two PCI, ATA-2 compatible, enhanced IDE interfaces
supporting up to four IDE devices, such as hard disk drives
and CD-ROM drives (two on each interface)
16KB of internal cache in the processor and up to 1MB of
external cache on the main system board
1MB of video memory, expandable to 2MB
Three Energy Star compliant power-saving modes for the
CPU, video, and hard disk drives in standard
configurations
Three 16-bit, ISA (Industry Standard Architecture) option
slots and two PCI option slots supporting up to two PCI
bus m aster cards
On the slim line computer, space for up to four mass storage
devices-three externally accessible and one internal; on
the tower computer, space for up to seven mass storage
devices-four externally accessible and three internal.
Power-saving Features
In standard configurations, this computer complies with the
United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star
Program, which promotes the manufacture of energy-efficient
printers, computers, and monitors. Your computer’s “deep
green” features place the CPU, video, and hard disk drives in
power-saving modes when the mouse and keyboard have been
inactive for a specified period of time. You can customize the
deep green features in the SETUP program.
2 Introduction
ISA and PCI Expansion Buses
Your computer includes two expansion buses for two types of
option cards: ISA and PCI. The ISA bus transfers data at
8.33 MHz for up to three 16-bit ISA option cards. This bus is
especially suitable for fax/ modem cards, sound cards, and
SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) cards for scanners.
The PCI bus provides extremely fast data transfer (33 MHz) for
up to two high-performance PCI cards, such as network
adapters and high-speed video cards. The computer supports
plug and play technology that automatically configures the
resources used by PCI cards, such as interrupt requests and
memory addresses.
System and video BIOS
The computer’s system and video BIOS are contained in a flash
ROM device on the main system board. The BIOS includes the
following:
0
ISA and PCI compatibility
0 Power-on diagnostics tests
0 SETUP program
0 PCI auto-configuration utility
0
BIOS upgrade and recovery code
Your computer supports shadowing of the system and video
BIOS to allow the BIOS routines to run from fast, 64-bit RAM
instead of from the slower, 8-bit flash ROM device.
Introduction 3
PCI Auto-configuration
The PCI auto-configuration utility works with the SETUP
program to support PCI option cards. When you turn on the
computer after installing a PCI option card, the BIOS
automatically configures interrupts, DMA channels, I/O
addresses, and other settings. You can also customize these
resources in SETUP.
BIOS Upgrades
Because the BIOS is stored in a flash ROM device, you can
easily upgrade the BIOS information without replacing the
chip. You can upgrade the BIOS by running a utility from a
diskette, hard disk, or network server.
How to Use This Manual
This manual contains the information you need to get the best
results from your computer. You don’t have to read everything
it contains.
If you are reading this manual online, select the highlighted
text in the summaries below to skip to the chapter you want to
read. You can also print out chapters you use frequently. If you
are reading a printed version of this manual, see the following
chapter summaries to find the sections you need.
Chapter 1 provides instructions for setting up your system and
connecting peripheral devices such as the monitor and printer.
Chapter 2 describes how to run the SETUP program to define
your computer’s configuration and how to install the PCI IDE
and video drivers.
4 Introduction
Chapter 3 covers general operating procedures, such as
resetting the computer and using passwords.
Chapter 4 describes how to remove and replace the computer’s
cover, change jumper settings, and install optional equipment
such as option cards, memory modules, and video memory.
Chapter 5 explains how to install and remove mass storage
devices on the slimline computer.
Chapter 6 explains how to install and remove mass storage
devices on the tower computer.
Chapter 7 contains troubleshooting tips.
The Appendix lists the specifications of your computer,
including DMA and IRQ assignments.
Where to Get Help
If you purchased your computer in the United States or
Canada, EPSON provides customer support and service
through a network of Authorized EPSON Customer Care
Centers. EPSON also provides the following services when you
dial (800) 922-8911:
Technical assistance with the installation, configuration,
and operation of EPSON products
Assistance in locating your nearest Authorized EPSON
Reseller or Customer Care Center
Customer relations
EPSON technical information library fax service
Product literature on current and new products.
Introduction 5
You can purchase printed manuals, accessories, or parts for
EPSON products from EPSON Accessories at (800) 873-7766
(U.S. sales only). In Canada, call (800) BUY-EPSON.
If you purchased your computer outside the United States or
Canada, contact your EPSON dealer or the marketing location
nearest you for customer support and service.
If you need help with a software program that you installed,
see that program’s documentation for technical support
information. If the software was installed on your computer,
see the User's Digest for technical support information.
Electronic Support Services
If you have a modem, the fastest way to access helpful tips,
specifications, drivers, application notes, DIP switch or jumper
settings, and bulletins for EPSON products is through the
online services below.
EPSON Bulletin Board Service
You can call the EPSON Bulletin Board Service (BBS) at
(310) 782-4531. No membership is required. Make sure your
communications software is set to 8 data bits with 1 stop bit,
no parity bit, and a modem speed up to 28.8 Kbps. See the
documentation that came with your communications software
for more information.
CompuServe online support
CompuServe® members can call the Epson America Forum on
CompuServe. If you are already a member, simply type
GO EPSON at the menu prompt to reach the Forum.
6 Introduction
If you are not currently a member, you are eligible for a free
introductory membership as an owner of an EPSON product.
This membership entitles you to:
0
An introductory credit on CompuServe
0
Your own user ID and password
0
A complimentary subscription to CompuServe Magazine,
CompuServe’s monthly publication.
To take advantage of this offer, call (800) 848-8199 in the United
States and Canada and ask for representative #529. In other
countries, call the following U.S. telephone number:
(614) 529-1611, or your local CompuServe access number.
Introduction 7
Contents
Introduction
Computer Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-saving Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA and PCI Expansion Buses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System and Video BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Auto-configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BIOS Upgrades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Use This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Get Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
2
3
3
4
4
4
5
6
Chapter 1 Setting Up Your System
Choosing a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Voltage Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Keyboard or Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Parallel or Serial Device . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Power Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turning On the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turning Off the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-11
vii
Chapter 2 Running SETUP and Ins falling Drivers
Running SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
Starting the SETUP Program .
.
.
Using the System Setup Option .
Using the Fixed Disk Setup Option .
Using the Advanced System Setup Options
Setting the Boot Options . . . . . .
Selecting the Security Setup Options .
.
.
Setting the Green PC Features .
Exiting SETUP . . . . . . . . . .
.
Running the Installation Program .
Installing Video Drivers . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . 2-2
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. 2-2
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. 2-3
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. 2-5
2-8
. . . . . 2-12
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. 2-13
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. 2-17
. . . . . . 2-19
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.2-22
. . . . . . 2-22
Chapter 3 Using Your Computer
Working Comfortably . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Right Furniture . . . . . . . . . .
Positioning Your Monitor . . . . . . . . . .
Lighting Your Workspace . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Keyboard and Mouse . . . . . . .
Maintaining Good Posture and Work Habits
Using Energy Wisely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Your Green PC Features . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting and Removing Diskettes . . . . . . . .
Stopping a Command or Program . . . . . . . .
Resetting the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
viii
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-4
3-5
. 3-6
. 3-6
. 3-8
. 3-9
. 3-10
. 3-11
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.
.
Chapter 4 Installing and Removing Options
Removing the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locating the Internal Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locating the System Board Components . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory Modules (SIMMs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting SIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing SIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing an Option Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Card in the Slimline Computer (3-slot Side)
Installing a Card in the Slimline Computer (2-slot Side)
Installing a Card in the Tower Computer . . . . . . . . . .
Removing an Option Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Video Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing External Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading the Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post-installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
4-5
4-6
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-12
4-13
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-19
4-20
4-22
4-22
4-24
4-27
4-30
Chapter 5 Installing and Removing Dives in the Slimline Computer
Setting the IDE Device Jumpers and Locating Pin 1 .
.
Removing the Drive Mounting Bracket
Installing a Hard Disk Drive in the Mounting
Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Hard Disk Drive
.
Replacing the Bracket in the Computer .
Connecting the Hard Disk Drive Cables .
Reconnecting the Diskette Drive Cables .
Removing a Hard Disk Drive From the Mounting
Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Drive in an External Drive Bay ...................... .
Attaching Mounting Frames to the Drive ...................... .
I n s t a l l i n g t h e D r i v e...................... .
Connecting the Drive and Power Cables .
Removing a Drive from an External Bay .
. . . . .
. . . . .
5-2
5-4
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5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-11
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5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
5-17
5-20
ix
Chapter 6 Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
Setting the IDE Device Jumpers and Locating Pin 1 . . . . . . .
Installing a Drive in the Front Internal Drive Bay . . . . . . . .
Installing the Internal Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Cables to the Front Internal Drive . . . . .
Removing a Drive From the Front Internal Drive Bay . . . . . .
Installing a Drive in an External Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Drive From an External Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Drive in the Rear Internal Bracket . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Drive From the Rear Internal Bracket . . . . . . . .
6-3
6-5
6-5
6-6
6-8
6-10
6-14
6-16
6-19
Chapter 7 Troubleshoofing
Identifying Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Computer Will Not Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Computer Does Not Respond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mouse Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitor Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Disk Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CD-ROM Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer or Scanner Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Card Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Cache Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X
7-2
7-3
7-5
7-6
7-6
7-7
7-9
7-10
7-10
7-12
7-13
7-13
7-15
7-16
7-17
7-17
7-18
Appendix
Specifications
Computer Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
CPU and Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Mass Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
SETUP Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
Option Slot Power Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . A-8
System Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Video Resolutions and Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Hard Disk Drive Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
DMA Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11
Hardware Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
System I/O Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Connector Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-14
Options Available From EPSON . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
Tested Operating Environments . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
Glossary
Index
xi
Chapter- 1
Setting Up Your System
This chapter describes how to set up your computer, if you
have not already done so.
Note
If you are reading this manual online, you have already set
up your computer using the instructions in your User's
Digest.
This chapter describes the following procedures:
0 Choosing a location
0
Setting the voltage selector switch
0 Connecting system components
0 Turning the computer on
0 Turning the computer off.
Choosing a Location
Before you set up your system, choose a convenient location
that provides a flat, hard surface. Do not place your system too
close to any electrical device, such as a radio or television,
which generates an electromagnetic field. Protect your
computer from extremes in temperature, humidity, dust, and
smoke, and avoid direct sunlight or other sources of heat.
Setting Up Your System
1-1
Read the “Important Safety Instructions” at the beginning of
this manual for more information about choosing a suitable
environment for your system.
Also read “Working Comfortably” in Chapter 3 for guidelines
on creating a comfortable and safe working environment.
Setting the Voltage Selector- Switch
Your system is powered by a 200 watt power supply. The
power supply input voltage is controlled by a switch on the
computer’s back panel that may be set to 110 VAC or 220 VAC.
(The switch on your computer may read 115 VAC or 230 VAC;
these settings are equivalent to 110 VAC and 220 VAC.)
The computer is shipped with the voltage selector switch set to
110 VAC, which is appropriate for line source voltages between
100 and 120 VAC. This is generally the correct setting if you use
the computer in North America, South America, or Japan.
If you plan to operate the computer in the United Kingdom,
Europe, or some South American countries, you will almost
certainly need to reset the voltage selector switch to 220 VAC.
Line source voltages between 200 and 240 VAC are acceptable
with the switch set to 220 VAC.
Caution
Before you turn on the power to your system, make sure the
voltage selector switch is set appropriately for the electrical
power source in your location or you will seriously damage
your system.
1-2
Setting Up Your System
To change the voltage selector switch setting, slide the switch
to the left to select 110 VAC or to the right to select 220 VAC.
Connecting System Components
Use these illustrations to locate the ports on the back of your
system as you connect the keyboard, monitor, and other
devices. The icons next to the ports identify their function.
keyboard
mouse
serial 1
serial 2
printer (parallel
device)
VGA
monitor
Setting Up Your System
1-3
Tower
computer
VGA
monitor
printer (parallel
device)
serial 2
Serial1
mouse
keyboard
power inlet
voltage selector
switch
‘AC outlet
Connecting a Keyboard or Mouse
Refer to the illustration under “Connecting System
Components” as you connect your keyboard and mouse.
m
6
1-4
To connect a keyboard, hold the cable connector so the
arrow on the connector faces the icon on the computer
case. Insert it into the keyboard port.
If you have a PS/2™ compatible mouse, hold the cable
connector so the arrow on the connector faces the icon
on the computer case. Insert it into the built-in mouse
port.
Setting Up Your System
Caution
Although the connectors and ports for the mouse and
keyboard are physically identical, they cannot be used
interchangeably. Be sure to plug the connectors into the
correct ports or you may dam age your system.
Connecting a Monitor
Refer to the illustration under “Connecting System
Components” as you connect your monitor. Follow these steps
to connect a VGA or SVGA monitor to the computer’s built-in
VGA port:
1.
Place your monitor near the computer. Turn the monitor and
computer around so the backs are facing you.
2.
There should be two cables provided with your monitor: the
monitor cable (to connect it to the computer) and the power
cable (to connect it to a power source). On most monitors,
the monitor cable is permanently attached to it. If your
monitor cable is not attached, connect it now.
3.
Align the connector on the monitor cable with the SVGA
monitor port on the computer. Then insert the connector
into the port.
Iu
This icon identifies the computer’s SVGA monitor port.
Caution
To avoid damaging the connector, be careful not to bend
the pins when you insert it.
Setting Up Your System
1-5
4.
If the connector has retaining screws, tighten them.
caution
Before you plug the monitor’s power cord into the back
of your computer, make sure the monitor’s power
requirements do not exceed 2 Amps (for 110 volt
operation) or 1 Amp (for 220 volt operation).
5. Plug the monitor’s power cord into the power inlet on the
back of the monitor.
6. Plug the other end of the power cord into a grounded
electrical outlet or the computer’s AC outlet.
power inlet
AC outlet
Note
The position of the power inlet and AC outlet on your
computer may be reversed.
1-6
Setting Up Your System
Connecting a Parallel or Serial Device
Refer to the illustration under “Connecting System
Components” as you connect your parallel or serial device.
Your computer has one multi-mode parallel port and two serial
ports. To connect a printer or other peripheral device, follow
the appropriate instructions in this section.
Using the printer (parallel device) port
You can connect any parallel device into the computer’s
parallel port, but the most common device is a printer. Follow
these steps to connect a parallel device:
1.
Position the parallel device and the computer so that the
backs are facing you.
2.
Align the connector end of the parallel cable with the printer
port and plug it in.
rm
This icon identifies the computer’s printer port.
If the connector has retaining screws, tighten them.
3.
Connect the other end of the cable to the parallel device. To
secure the cable, squeeze the clips at each side of the device
port and push them into place.
4.
Plug the parallel device’s power cord into a grounded
electrical outlet.
You may need to set the multi-mode parallel port to the correct
mode for the device you connected by changing the setting of
the LPT Mode option in the SETUP program, as described in
Chapter 2. Check your parallel device documentation for the
parallel port mode you should select.
Setting Up Your System
1-7
You may also need to change the setting of the LPT Port
option in SETUP if you need a different address and /or
interrupt assignment for the port.
Node
If you use ECP (Extended Capabilities Port) mode, you may
also need to change jumpers JP8 and JP9 to the correct DMA
channel; check your parallel device documentation for the
DMA channel you should use. Then see “Changing the
Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for instructions on setting
jumpers.
If you have a printer, a modem, or other device with a serial
interface, you can connect it to one of the serial (RS-232C) ports.
Make sure you have a cable compatible with a DB-9P connector.
IdI
m3
To connect a serial device, insert the connector into
either the serial 1 or serial 2 port. If you are connecting
onl y one serial device, use the serial 1 port.
Connecting the Power Cord
Follow these steps to connect the computer’s power cord:
1. Plug the power cord into the power inlet on the back of the
computer.
power inlet
AC
voltage hector witch
1-8
Setting Up Your System
outlet
Note
The position of the power inlet and AC outlet on your
computer may be reversed.
2.
Plug the other end of the cord into an electrical outlet.
WARNING
To avoid an electric shock, be sure to plug the cord into the
computer before plugging it into the wall outlet.
Turning On the Computer
Once you set up your system, you’re ready to turn on the
power.
Caution
Before you turn on your system, be sure to read the
“Important Safety Instructions” at the beginning of this
manual to ensure that you have created a safe working
environment.
1.
Turn on the monitor, printer, and any other devices
connected to the computer.
2.
Turn on the computer by pressing the POWER button on the
front panel. Refer to the illustrations below to locate the
power button and other features on the front panel.
Setting Up Your System
1-9
SPEED light
hard disk
access light
POWER light (HDD)
drive bays
RESET
I
button
Slimline
computer
I
diskette drive
Tower
computer
POWER
button
POWER light
SPEED light
hard disk
access light
(HDD)
RESET
button
drive bays
1-10
Setting Up Your System
The power indicator lights up; then the computer performs
its power-on diagnostics, which are a series of checks to
make sure everything is working correctly. During
diagnostics, you see a message telling you to press Del to
run the SETUP program. Then the computer loads the
operating system.
You may want to run the SETUP program to adjust power
saving features or set a password.
See “Running SETUP” in Chapter 2 for instructions.
Turning Off the Computer
Whenever you turn off your system, follow these steps:
1.
Save your data, exit any application programs, and exit or
shut down Windows. If you see a message, wait until it
says you can safely turn off your computer.
2.
Check the hard disk and the diskette drive lights to make
sure they are not on. Don’t turn off the computer if these
lights are on; you could damage the drive or lose data.
3.
Remove any diskette(s) from the diskette drive(s).
4.
Press the POWER button to turn off the computer.
5.
Turn off the monitor, printer, and any other peripheral
devices.
Setting Up Your System
1-11
Chapter 2
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Your computer has a configuration program, called SETUP,
contained within the BIOS ROM (basic input/ output system
read-only memory) chip on the system board. The BIOS ROM
also contains default configuration settings for your hardware
configuration, security options, and power-saving features that
SETUP allows you to change. Any configuration information
you set is backed up by a battery, so it is not erased when you
turn off or reset the computer.
You may also want to install drivers and utilities for the built-in
IDE interfaces and the built-in SVGA video interface. You only
need to install these drivers if you’re using an operating system
other than Windows.
This chapter describes the following procedures:
Starting the SETUP program
Using the System Setup options
Using the Fixed Disk Setup option
Using the Advanced System Setup options
Setting the Boot options
Selecting the Security Setup options
Setting the Green PC features
Installing PCI IDE drivers
Installing video drivers.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-1
Running SETUP
You may want to run the SETUP program the first time you use
your computer to customize the settings. You also may need to
run SETUP again later if you add options or change your
configuration.
Starting the SETUP Program
When you start your computer, it performs some power-on
diagnostics. During these diagnostics, you may see the
following message:
Press <DEL>
to enter SETUP
Press Del. This message is only on the screen for a few seconds.
If you missed it, restart your computer and try again.
If, during power-on diagnostics, the system detects an error in
your system configuration, you hear two beeps and see an
error message followed by this message:
Press <F1> to resume, <DEL> to run SETUP
Press Del to run SETUP and correct the problem
SETUP displays the Main Menu, which allows you to select
various options to identify your system’s configuration and
then save your new values. You can also cancel any changes
you have made and restore the default values stored in ROM
or load the previously stored values.
2-2
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
The table below lists some of the keys you can use to perform
SETUP operations.
SETUP function keys
Press
To
I‘lt f
Move the cursor to the next or previous modifiable option
Home or End
Move the cursor to the top or bottom of the menu or
screen
F1 or Alt H
Display a help screen for the option currently selected
PgUp or -
Select the previous value
PgDn or +
Select the next value
F5
Supply the previously saved values in the CMOS for the
SETUP options on the current screen
F6
Supply the factory default values for the SETUP options on
the current screen
F10
Ignore any changes you have made on the current
screen and exit the screen: at the Main Menu, save the
configuration and exit
Enter
Select the current option or value
Esc
Return to the previous screen: at the Main Menu, exit
without saving
L
L
c
c
c
While you are in SETUP, the bottom of the screen lists the keys
you can press to perform specific functions.
Using the System Setup Option
When you select the System Setup option, you see the
System Setup screen. From this screen, you can set the system
time and date, define your video display type, check system
memory, define the diskette drives, and control keyboard
testing during system startup.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-3
The System Setup options are described in the table below.
System Setup options
2-4
Option
Settings
Description
System Time
System Date
hh:mm:ss
mmm dd, yyyy
Sets the time and date for
the computer’s real-time
clock: once set, you do not
need to change the
settings except to adjust
the time for daylight
savings or a different time
zone (the computer
automatically changes the
date for leap years)
Video System
EGA/VGA *
Monochrome
CGA 80X25
Defines the type of display
you are using: if you
connected a VGA or
SVGA monitor to the
built-in VGA port, the
computer automatically
sets this option to
EGA/VGA(l)
System Memory
Extended Memory
system memory size
extended memory size
Detects and displays the
size of the system and
extended memory: you
cannot change these
values (2)
Diskette Drive A
and B
3.5 inch, 1.44MB * (A)
3.5 inch, 720KB
5.25 inch, 1.2MB
5.25 inch, 360KB
3.5 inch, 2.88MB
Not installed * (B)
Defines the type of diskette
drive installed as drives A
and B (if installed)
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
System Setup options (continued)
Option
Keyboard
T
Settings
Installed *
Not Installed
T
Description
Enables or disables testing
of the keyboard during
power-on diagnostics:
select Not Installed if
you plan to use your system
without a keyboard (as a
network server, for
instance) so you do not
receive keyboard errors
* Default setting
(1) If you installed a video adapter card, make sure you disable the
on-board SVGA controller by setting jumper JP2 to position 2-3; see
“Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for instructions.
(2) If the System memory and Extended memory values are not correct,
check that the SlMMs are installed correctly, as described in “Installing
Memory Modules (SIMMs)” in Chapter 4.
Using the Fixed Disk Setup Option
The Fixed Disk Setup option defines the types of hard
disk drives connected to the primary and secondary IDE
interfaces in your system. When you select this option, you see
the Fixed Disk Setup screen.
Note
These options do not configure other IDE devices, such as
CD-ROM drives, connected to the secondary IDE interface.
Fixed Disk Setup screen options
Make sure the Large Disk Access Mode option is set to
DOS (the default setting). Set this option to Other if you are
using UNIX® an operating system other than MS-DOS@ or
Windows.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-5
From this screen, you can configure each of the installed drives
using these options:
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
0
0
1
1
Master
Slave
Master
Slave
The IDE Adapter 0 drives are the master and slave drives
connected to your primary IDE interface. The IDE Adapter 1
drives are connected to the secondary IDE interface. (The
computer detects the master and slave status of the drives
based on the drive’s jumper settings, described in Chapters 5
and 6.)
Individual drive options
Your computer comes with a hard disk auto-sensing feature.
To use it, select one of the drives you have installed from the
Fixed Disk Setup screen. On the screen that appears for that
drive, press Enter to select the Autotype Fixed Disk
option. The system detects the type of hard disk drive, fills in
the drive’s parameters, and sets the remaining options on the
screen.
Some older drives may not support the auto-sensing feature.
If the drive parameters displayed on the screen do not match
your drive, you need to define your own drive parameters (see
the next section for instructions). You may also need to set the
remaining options on the screen, as described below.
The Multi-Sector Transfer option sets the number of
sectors per block that the hard disk uses in multiple sector
transfers. The more sector transfers per block, the faster your
hard drive performs. If this option is not automatically
detected, you can select 2, 4, 8, or 16 sectors.
2-6
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
The Transfer mode option selects the method for
transferring data between the hard disk and system memory. If
this option is not automatically set, you can select Standard
(thedefault), Fast P1O1, Fast P102, or Fast P103.
The LBA Mode Control option enables or disables ISA
logical block address (LBA) mode control for each drive. If this
option is not detected automatically, and your drive supports
LBA mode control, select Enabled. Many drives larger than
528MB support LBA mode control, but some older drives do
not; check the drive documentation.
The 32 Bit I/O option sets the I/O transfer rate for data
read from the disk. If your drive supports 32-bit I/O transfers,
select Enabled; the default setting is Disabled (16-bit
transfers).
Defining your own drive parameters
If the parameters for your hard disk do not match the
parameters detected by the auto-sensing feature, you must
define your own drive parameters. Follow these steps:
1. Move the cursor to Type and select User.
2.
Type the values in each field that are appropriate for your
hard disk drive.
3.
When you leave SETUP, make sure you save your changes.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-7
Using the Advanced System Setup Options
When you select the Advanced System Setup option, you
see the Advanced System Setup screen, from which you can
configure the computer’s integrated peripheral devices (such as
the parallel and serial ports), cache memory, shadow memory,
the advanced chipset, and PCI devices. Your system can
automatically configure many of these options for you to avoid
configuration problems.
The Plug & Play O/S option is set to Yes at the factory.
The Reset Configuration Data option is set to Yes at
the factory. The system resets this option to No after you run
Windows 95 for the first time. If you are using Windows 95,
reset this option to Yes whenever you upgrade your
computer or install a new component.
Configuring integrated peripherals
Select Integrated Peripherals from the Advanced
System Setup menu to configure your serial port addresses,
parallel port address, diskette drive controller, and parallel port
mode.
2-8
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
The Integrated
the table below.
Peripherals
optionsaredescribedin
Integrated peripherals options
Option
Settings
Description
COM 1
COM 2
3F8, IRQ 4 * (COM1)
2F8, IRQ 3 * (COM2)
338, IRQ 4
238, IRQ 3
3E8, IRQ 4
2E8, IRQ 3
2E8, IRQ 4
2E0, IRQ 3
220, IRQ 4
228, IRQ 3
Auto
Disabled
Assign the address for the built-in
primary and secondary serial
ports: the Auto setting detects
any optional ports you may have
installed and sets the built-in ports
automatically based on the
optional port settings to avoid
conflicts (if no optional ports are
installed, Auto sets the built-in
ports to their default settings): the
Disabled setting disables the
port(s)
LPT port
378, IRQ 7 *
278, IRQ 7
3BC, IRQ 5
378, IRQ 5
278, IRQ 5
3BC, IRQ 7
Auto
Disabled
Assigns the address for the built-in
parallel port: the Auto setting
detects any optional ports you
may have installed and sets the
built-in port automatically based
on the optional port settings to
avoid conflicts (if no optional
ports are installed, Auto sets the
built-in port to the default setting):
select Disabled to disable the
port
L
t
c
LPT Mode
Sets the parallel port mode to:
Standard
Bi-Directional*
ECP
c
L
Unidirectional AT mode
Bidirectional
PS/2 mode
Extended Capabilities Port
mode
Diskette
controller
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables the built-in
diskette drive controller
CMD
Enhance
Mode 3
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables the CMD
driver that automatically checks
your drive’s IDE modes
* Default setting
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-9
Configuring cache memory
Enabling external cache memory improves system
performance, especially in large data retrieval and processing
environments. It’s a good idea to use the default settings for all
your Memory Cache options unless you have a specific
reason for changing them. The table below lists the memory
cache options.
Memory cache options
Option
Settings
Description
External cache
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables the system’s
external (secondary) caching
L1 cache write back
Enabled *
Sets the internal (primary)
cache to Write-back mode
Disabled
Sets the internal (primary)
cache to Write-through mode
Enabled *
Sets the external (secondary)
cache to Write-back mode
Disabled
Sets the external (secondary)
cache to Write-through mode
Cache system BIOS
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables caching of
the system BIOS memory area
Cache video BIOS
Enabled
Disabled *
Enables or disables caching of
the video BIOS memory area
Non-cacheable area
#1 and #2
Enabled
Disabled *
Define the location (local
DRAM or AT bus), starting
address, and block size of two
non-cacheable memory
blocks: you may want to create
these areas to provide noncacheable memory for 16.bit
AT cards, such as video capture
boards: see your card
documentation to see if noncacheable memory is necessary
L2 cache write back
* Default setting
2-10
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Configuring shadow memory
You can enable video BIOS shadowing or configure specific
option ROM shadow blocks by selecting the Memory
Shadow option.
Note
Shadowing for the system BIOS is always enabled. For the
best system performance, always set the Video BIOS
shadow option to Enabled (the default setting).
Your computer can access RAM faster than ROM. The options
on this screen allow your system to copy the contents of its
video ROM and any optional ROMs into RAM. When you use
shadowing, your system can perform certain operations faster,
providing a significant increase in performance.
Note
Some option ROMs cannot be shadowed using the Shadow
Option ROMS options; see the documentation that came
with your optional equipment for information on
shadowing the option’s BIOS ROM.
Configuring the advanced chipset
Most of the Advanced Chipset Control options are for
test purposes only, and you should not change them. However,
you will need to set the PC1 clock frequency option if
you upgrade your processor. The default setting is
CPUCLK/ 1.5 (for 75 Mhz processors); change it to CPUCLK/ 2
if you install a 90 or 100 Mhz processor.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-11
Configuring PCI devices
Select PCI Devices from the Advanced System Setup
screen to configure the devices connected to the PCI option
slots in your computer. These options need to be set only if you
installed older PCI devices that do not follow PCI version 2.0
specifications.
Note
If you installed PCI option cards in the computer before
running SETUP, the computer configures the PCI
Devices options automatically by detecting the
information returned from the PCI option cards.
The Slot #1 and Slot #2 options allow you to specify
whether the device is a master or not, and select the timer
values for devices in slots 1 and 2.
Setting the Boot Options
When you select Boot Options from the Main Menu, you
see the Boot Options screen, which allows you to define the
drive boot sequence and determine which power-on diagnostic
tests the computer performs when you start your system.
The SETUP prompt option allows you to enable or disable
display of the message press DEL to run SETUP that
appears when you turn on or reset your computer. If you
disable the message, you can still press Del to start SETUP. The
default setting is Enabled.
The Boot sequence option determines the order in which
the computer checks the drives for an operating system when
you turn it on or reset it.
2-12
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
The table below describes the available options
Boot sequence option settings
Option
+
Description
A: then C: *
Loads operating system from drive A; if it isn’t
there, loads it from drive C (recommended
setting)
C: then A:
Loads operating system from drive C; if it isn’t
there, loads it from drive A
C: only
+
Loads operating system from drive C
* Default setting
Note
If you set Boot sequence to C: only, you will not be
able to start your system when there is a problem with your
hard disk drive.
If you set the Boot sequence option to C: only, you
should disable the Floppy check option so the system
doesn’t access the diskette drive during the startup procedure.
Disabling this option decreases the time needed to start the
system; the default setting is Enabled.
Selecting the Security Setup Options
When you select Security Setup from the Main Menu,
you see the Security Setup screen, which contains options that
allow you to set passwords and other security and anti-virus
options, as described below.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-13
Selecting password types
You can define both User and Supervisor password levels for
this system. If this system will be used by more than one
person, you may want to set a Supervisor password for
yourself and a User password for others you don’t want to
have complete access to the system. This allows you to restrict
access to the computer’s diskette drives or the virus protection
features.
See the next sections for instructions on selecting the type of
password prompting you want, and on entering, changing, or
deleting passwords.
Note
If both a Supervisor password and a User password are
enabled, SETUP displays options for setting the User
password only to users who logged on with a User
password.
Selecting pass word prompting
If you enable the Password on boot option, you must
enter the Supervisor or User password each time you turn on
the system. If you disable this option, but you’ve defined
passwords, you must enter the password each time you start
SETUP.
Entering or changing passwords
To specify a User password, you must first specify a Supervisor
password. Follow these steps to enter or change a password:
1. Select Set Supervisor Password and press Enter.
2.
2-14
You see a Set Supervisor Password window. Type a
password of up to seven characters and press Enter.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
3.
Type the same password a second time and press Enter. You
see a message that your change has been saved.
4. Press the spacebar. The Supervisor
now displays Enabled.
Password option
To set a User password, select the Set User Password
option as you follow the steps above.
Deleting passwords
To delete your passwords, follow these steps:
1. Set the Password on boot option to Disabled.
2.
Delete the User password by pressing Enter for both the
password field and the confirmation field. Don’t type any
characters in these fields.
3.
Then delete the Supervisor password the same way.
If you forget your password, see “Password Problems” in
Chapter 7.
Using the virus protection features
The Diskette access option lets you restrict access to
your diskette drives based on the password levels you have
defined. This prevents unauthorized users from accessing the
drives and possibly introducing a virus to your system. You
can restrict diskette access only if passwords are enabled and
you have enabled the Password on boot option.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-15
If you select Supervisor for this option (the default setting),
you can access the diskette drives only if you enter the
Supervisor password when you start your system. If you start
the system with a User password, you see an error message
when you try to access the diskette drive. If you select User
for the Diskette access option, you can access the
diskette drives whether you enter the Supervisor or User
password when you start the system.
Note
To use passwords for diskette drive access, you must enable
the Password on boot option. If you select a password
level for Diskette access, but leave the Password
on boot option disabled, you see an error message
whenever you try to access your diskette drive.
You can also protect your system by selecting Write
protect for the Fixed disk boot sector option.
When this option is enabled, the system displays an error
message when a program tries to write to the boot sector of
your hard disk drive. The boot sector is where computer
viruses typically cause damage. To use a program designed to
write to the boot sector (such as the Format command), you
must select Normal (the default setting) for the Fixed
disk boot sector option.
2-16
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Setting the Green PC Features
Select Green PC Features from the Main Menu to view
the Green PC Features screen. The options on this screen allow
you to control the computer’s Energy Star compliant,
power-saving features described in the table below. (For more
information on the Green PC features, see “Using Your Green
PC Features” in Chapter 3.)
Green PC options
c
Option
Settings
Description
Power Saving Mode
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables all of the
computer’s power-saving
features: you must enable this
option to set the rest of the
features described in this table
System Doze Timer
20 seconds
40 seconds
90 seconds
1 minute
3 minutes
Disabled *
Sets the time period of system
inactivity after which the system
enters Doze mode or allows you
to disable entry into Doze mode
System Standby
Timer
20 seconds
1 minute
5 minutes
10 minutes
15 minutes
20 minutes
30 minutes
Disabled *
Sets the time period of system
inactivity (following any Doze
period that is set) after which the
system enters Standby mode or
allows you to disable entry into
Standby mode
System Suspend
Timer
20 seconds
1 minute
5 minutes *
10 minutes
15 minutes
20 minutes
30 minutes
Disabled
Sets the time period of system
inactivity (following any Doze
and Standby periods that are
set) after which the system enters
Suspend mode or allows you to
disable entry into Suspend mode
c
c
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-17
Green PC options (continued)
2-18
Option
Settings
Description
Hard Disk Standby
Timer (1)
Disabled
1 to 15 minutes
15 min*
Sets the time period of hard disk
drive inactivity after which the
hard disk enters Standby mode
or allows you to disable the hard
disk standby timer
VGA with Power
Down feature
VESA DPMS *
Standard
None
Selects the method used to
determine video activity when
the system attempts to enter a
power-saving mode: Standard
monitors activity of the vertical
and horizontal sync signals and
VESA DPMS monitors any VESA
DPMS activity
APM SMI Function
Support (2)
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables the APM
(Advanced Power
Management) interface which
handles system activity
detection from Windows
VGA Access
Detection (3)
Enabled
Disabled *
Enables or disables checking of
video activity to determine
whether the system enters a
power-saving mode
Hard Disk Port
Activity
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables checking of
hard disk drive activity to
determine whether the system
enters a power-saving mode
Serial Port Activity
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables checking of
serial port activity (modem
access, for example) to
determine whether the system
enters a power-saving mode
Parallel Port Activity
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables checking of
parallel port activity (signals from
a scanner, for example) to
determine whether the system
enters a power-saving mode
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Green PC options (continued)
Option
Settings
Description
ISA or PCI Master
Activity
Enabled *
Disabled
Enables or disables checking of
activity from the devices listed
below: leave this option enabled
PM monitor
IRQ1 -IRQ15 Activity
On*
Off
Allow you to enable or disable
checking of activity from devices
using IRQs 1 through 15 to
determine whether the system
enters a power-saving mode: the
device using each IRQ is listed on
the screen and varies depending
on your configuration
cause errors in some applications. If you have problems, you may want to
disablethe Hard Disk Standby Timer option (Disabled is the
default setting).
(2) APM enhances your system’s power-saving abilities by providing
increased inactivity detection and lower CPU power states without
degrading performance. Windows may provide a Power icon in the
Control Panel that lets you select the type of APM you want to use: see
the Windows on-line help information about the Power functions.
(3) If you enabled VGA Access Detection and your system’s video is
active, the system does not enter any power-saving modes. If you disable
VGA Access Detection, the system ignores video activity (such as a
blinking cursor) and enters these modes as necessary.
Exiting SETUP
When you leave SETUP, you can save your settings or exit
SETUP without saving your settings. You can also return all
values to the factory defaults.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-19
To leave SETUP, press ESC from any SETUP screen. From the
SETUP Main Menu, you can perform the following functions in
the table below.
Exiting SETUP options
Option
Description
Load ROM Default
Values
Loads the factory default settings stored in ROM
back into CMOS: if you change your configuration
using SETUP and then have problems, you can
load ROM values to boot the system and start over
Load Values from
CMOS
Loads the current values stored in CMOS for all
SETUP options: ignores any changes you have
made through SETUP
Save Values to
CMOS
Saves the changes you have made to your
configuration to CMOS
Press ESC to exit SETUP without saving your settings and
restart your computer.
All the files and drivers you need for maximum performance
with the operating system on your computer are already
installed. If you switch to another operating system, such as
NetWare® you may want to install PCI IDE drivers, which let
you take full advantage of the high-speed performance
available through your system’s IDE interfaces for hard disk
drives and other IDE devices.
2-20
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
In order to install the drivers, you need to create install
diskettes using the utility program on your computer. See the
User's Digest for instructions. Once you create the diskettes, you
can install drivers for these programs:
0 MS-DOS
0 Microsoft Windows
0 Microsoft Windows NT
0
IBM® OS/2® versions 2.0 and higher (2.X)
0
SCO® UNIX versions 3.2.4 and higher (3.2.4.X)
0
Novell® NetWare versions 3.1 and higher (3.1X)
0
Novell NetWare versions 4.0 and higher (4.0X).
Before you install the PCI IDE drivers, make sure you back up
your hard disk drive. Then use the installation program on the
PCI IDE Drivers diskette to install the drivers.
Note
Make sure you use the installation program to install the PCI
IDE drivers; if you simply copy the driver files, they won’t
work correctly.
The driver files for each of the programs listed above are in
their own directory on the PCI IDE Drivers diskette. Log onto
the directory for each driver you want to install and print out
the README file. Refer to the information in these files for
additional instructions on installing and using the PCI IDE
drivers.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-21
Running the Installation Program
Follow these steps to install the PCI IDE drivers:
1.
Insert the PCI IDE Drivers diskette in drive A.
2.
Access the DOS prompt, if you are not there already
3 . T y p e A : and press Enter to log onto drive A.
4. Type
5.
INSTALL
and press Enter.
Follow the instructions on the screen to install the PCI IDE
drivers on your hard disk.
Note
Not all hard disk drives can take full advantage of the IDE
interface; your hard disk drive must be compatible with
ATA-2 specifications. To find out whether your drive
supports ATA-2, see the drive documentation or contact the
drive manufacturer to request a product specification.
Installing Video Drivers
Your system already includes Windows video drivers that let
you get the best performance from your computer’s built-in
SVGA controller.
If you are using Windows 3.1, you also have the Galileo and
S3REFRSH utility programs, which let you control the
resolutions, colors, and refresh rates your Windows driver
uses.
2-22
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Using the diskette creation utility on your system, you can
create an install diskette containing drivers for these programs:
0
AutoDesk® AutoCAD® versions 11 and 12, AutoShade®
version 2.1, and 3D Studio versions 1.0 and 2.0
0
MicroStation PC protected mode versions 4.0 and 5.0.
Note
See the User's Digest for instructions on using the diskette
creation utility included with your computer.
For instructions on installing and configuring the video drivers,
see the README file in the root directory on the video drivers
install diskette.
To obtain drivers for additional applications or new drivers as
they become available, contact the EPSON Connection or
access one of EPSON’s electronic support services. See “Where
to Get Help” in the Introduction for more information.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-23
Chapter- 3
Using Your Computer
This chapter describes the following operations:
0 Working comfortably
0 Using energy wisely
0
Using your Green PC features
0 Inserting and removing diskettes
0
Stopping a command or program
0 Resetting the computer
0 Using a password.
Working Comfortably
If you spend a lot of time at your computer, you may
experience occasional fatigue or discomfort caused by
repetitive motions or too much time spent in one position. If
you follow the guidelines in this section, you may avoid these
problems and actually increase your productivity.
Take a few minutes to read this section for suggestions about:
0
Using the right furniture
0 Positioning your monitor
0 Lighting your workspace
Using Your Computer
3-1
0 Using a keyboard and mouse
0
Maintaining good posture and work habits.
Using the Right Furniture
electing a good desk and using the right type
f chair can make a big difference in your level
f comfort. When you set up your furniture,
onsider these suggestions:
An L- or U-shaped desk configuration works well because it
provides ample space to hold your computer equipment and
work materials while keeping everything within easy reach. A
split-level desk or one with a pull-out keyboard drawer lets
you place the keyboard in a comfortable typing position.
Since you’ll usually be sitting when you use your computer, it’s
important to have a good chair. An adjustable chair allows you
to support your body in the correct position. Make sure the
chair supports your lower back; the backrest should fit the
curvature of your spine. To reduce fatigue, try to use a chair
with adjustable, padded armrests so you can occasionally rest
your arms while you work.
Make sure the seat and backrest are wide enough so you can sit
in a variety of positions throughout the day. Also leave enough
room under the work surface to vary the position of your legs.
Adjust the height of your chair so when you are using the
keyboard or mouse your upper arms are vertical and your
forearms and wrists are horizontal. For good circulation, your
feet should rest flat on the floor with your lower legs vertical
and your knees level with your hips. You may need to use a
footrest to maintain the correct alignment for your legs.
3-2
Using Your Computer
Positioning Your Monitor
ace the monitor so it is directly in front of you
ith the top of the screen slightly below eye level
when you are sitting at the computer. You may want to place it
on top of the computer or on a stand.
Your line of sight to the screen should be about 10 to 20 degrees
below the horizontal. If the monitor has a tilt and swivel base,
you can adjust the position of the screen for the best viewing
angle.
Sit about an arm’s length or more away from the monitor. The
most comfortable viewing distance depends on the size of the
screen characters and your ability to focus on the display.
Adjust the monitor’s brightness and contrast controls to
maximize image clarity, and keep the screen clean.
Try placing any source documents you are using on a copy
stand and position the stand next to the screen at the same eye
level. This reduces neck strain and makes it easier for your eyes
to move back and forth between the document and the screen.
Lighting Your Workspace
Appropriate lighting increases your comfort and
productivity, and it’s good for your eyes.
Arrange your computer and light sources to minimize glare
and bright reflections.
Position the monitor so that any windows in the room face the
sides of the monitor, not the front or back. This will help reduce
glare.
Using Your Computer
3-3
For working at the computer, indirect or shielded lighting is
best, and it should light your entire office equally. Make sure
the lighting is not too bright, because this can make your eyes
tired from continually readjusting between the relative dimness
of the screen and the bright surroundings. You can use window
blinds, shades, or drapes to control the amount of daylight in
the room or reduce overhead lighting by turning off or
dimming the lights.
Here is a simple way you can test your lighting. While looking
at the screen, use your hand to shield your eyes from the
brightest light source in the room (such as a window or
overhead light). If you feel a sense of relief, no matter how
small, your current lighting is too bright.
Using the Keyboard and Mouse
Constant use of a keyboard, mouse, or any
pointing device can lead to a variety of aches and
strains. To prevent injury, keep your hands
relaxed and rest them frequently
Try to keep your fingers parallel with your forearms to prevent
straining your wrists. Adjust the angle of the keyboard so the
slope is no more than 25 degrees. (The keyboard has legs on the
bottom which allow you to adjust the angle.)
Keep your hands and fingers relaxed when you are typing and
try not to press the keys too hard; using too much force creates
tension in your hands. Remove your hands from the keyboard
when you are not using it and take frequent breaks to stretch
your hands and fingers.
When
go of
Leave
move
3-4
using a mouse, keep your wrist and fingers relaxed. Let
the mouse frequently and stretch or relax your hand.
enough space on your work surface so you can freely
the mouse.
Using Your Computer
T Maintaining Good Posture and Work
, Habits
1Here are suggestions to help you stay fit while
using your computer. If you form good work
habits, you shouldn’t have to spend too much time thinking
about it!
Work in a relaxed, natural, upright position and let the
chair support you. Your back and neck should be straight
with your shoulders down and relaxed. Keep the elbows
and hips bent at about a 90 degree angle and your forearms
and thighs parallel to the floor.
Try to keep your arms in an easy, natural position with
your elbows near your body and level with or slightly
lower than the keyboard. Your wrists should be straight,
not bent, and your hands should rest lightly on the keys or
the mouse.
Rest your eyes occasionally by closing them or focusing on
a fixed spot in the distance.
Change your sitting position frequently throughout the day
to avoid muscle fatigue. Take periodic breaks; stand up,
stretch, and move around.
Using Your Computer
3-5
Using Energy Wisely
By purchasing this low-power, Energy Star
compliant computer, you join a growing number
of users concerned about conserving energy. Here are a few
additional tips you can use to be even more energy-wise:
EPA POLLUTION PREVENTER
0
If your printer and monitor are not Energy Star compliant,
turn them off when you’re not using them.
0
Use the print preview option on your software before you
print something. You’ll be able to catch formatting errors
before you commit them to paper.
0
If you have an electronic mail system available to you, send
E-mail rather than memos. Not only is this faster, but you’ll
save paper and storage space too.
0
Use recycled paper whenever you can and, if possible,
reuse or recycle used paper instead ofthrowing it away
Using Your Green PC Features
Your computer places the CPU, the hard disk drive, an Energy
Star compliant monitor, or all of these components into
Suspend mode when the keyboard or mouse has been inactive
for 5 minutes. Using the SETUP program, you can customize
this timer and set up additional energy saving features. (See
“Setting the Green PC Features” in Chapter 2 for instructions
on setting these features.)
Three power-saving modes are available: Doze, Standby, and
Suspend. Each mode provides progressively increased power
conservation and affects progressively more components in
your system. The power-saving operations performed by your
computer in each of these modes are summarized in the table
below.
3-6
Using Your Computer
Power-saving modes
Mode
Doze
(disabled by
default)
L
Power-saving operations
Slows down the processor
c
Standby
(disabled by
default)
Lowers the processor speed further and the monitor
screen goes blank (the monitor is placed in a low power
consumption mode only if it is Energy Star compliant)
Suspend
Stops the processor clock, powers down the hard disk
drive(s), and the monitor screen goes blank (the monitor
is placed in a low power consumption mode only if it is
Energy Star compliant)
To resume activity when your system is in a power-saving
mode, press a keyboard key or move the mouse.
If your system was in Suspend mode, it takes a few moments
for the monitor to display and for the hard disk drive to return
to active mode. You’ll hear it start again. It takes a few seconds
for the drive to reach its full operating speed and read or write
to the disk.
Note
Some hard disk drives do not support power-saving modes.
Also, the delay caused by the hard disk drive returning to
active mode may cause errors in some applications. If you
have problems, you may want to disable any power-saving
features for the hard disk drive; see “Setting the Green PC
Features” in Chapter 2.
Using YOUR Computer
3-7
Inserting and Removing Diskettes
To insert a diskette into a 3.5-inch drive, hold the diskette with
the label facing up and the shutter leading into the drive as
shown in the following illustrations. Slide the diskette into the
drive until it clicks into place.
3-8
Using Your Computer
When you want to remove the diskette, make sure the drive
light is off; then press the release button. Remove the diskette
and store it properly.
Caution
Never remove a diskette, reset the computer, or turn it off
while a diskette drive light is on. You could lose data. Also,
remove all diskettes before you turn off the computer.
Stopping a Command or Program
You may sometimes need to stop a command or program while
it is running. If you want to stop a DOS command or a DOS
application program command, try one of the following from
the DOS prompt:
0 Press Pause
0 Press Ctrl C
0 Press Ctrl Break.
If you are using Windows, press Ctrl Alt Del and follow the
instructions on the screen.
If these methods do not work, you may need to reset the
computer as described below. Do not turn off the computer to
exit a program or stop a command unless you have to, because
the computer erases any data you did not save.
Using Your Computer
3-9
Resetting the Computer
Occasionally, you may want to clear the computer’s memory
without turning it off. You can do this by resetting the
computer.
For example, if an error occurs and the computer does not
respond to your keyboard entries, you can reset it to reload
your operating system and try again. However, resetting erases
any data in memory that you have not saved; so reset only if
necessary.
Caution
Do not reset the computer to exit a program. Some programs
store data when you exit them. If you reset the computer
without properly exiting a program, you may lose the data.
To reset your computer, press Ctrl Alt Del and then follow the
instructions on the screen. You can also press the RESET button
located on the front of your computer. The screen displays
nothing for a moment and then the computer reloads the
operating system.
If resetting the computer does not correct the problem, you
probably need to turn it off and on again. Remove any
diskette(s) from the diskette drive(s). Turn off the computer
and wait 20 seconds. Then turn on the computer.
3-10
Using Your Computer
Using a Password
Using SETUP, you can define both a Supervisor level password
and a User level password. You can also specify whether a
password is required when you start the system. In addition,
the password can control who has access to the diskette drives.
If you enabled the Password on boot option in SETUP,
you must enter the Supervisor or User password every time
you turn on or reset the computer. If you enter a password but
disable the Password on boot option, you must enter the
password when you start SETUP.
If you set the Diskette access option to Supervisor, you
can access a diskette drive only if you entered the Supervisor
password when you started your system. If you entered a User
password when you started the system but the Diskette
access option is set to Supervisor, you see an error message
when you access the diskette drive.
When you need to enter your password, you’ll see the Security
Check window containing this prompt:
Enter password:
As you type your password, you see a rectangle for each
character you type. When you press Enter, the computer loads
the operating system (or starts SETUP).
If you don’t enter the correct password the first time you type
it, you can try two more times. If you haven’t entered the
correct password on the third try, the computer locks up to
prevent unauthorized access. You see the message:
SYSTEM DISABLED
Using Your Computer
3-11
You must either turn off the computer or press the RESET
button to start over. In this situation, you cannot reset the
computer by pressing Ctrl Alt Del.
Note
If you want to delete your password, you must run the
SETUP program and follow the instructions for deleting a
password under “Selecting the Security Setup Options” in
Chapter 2. If you do not remember your password, see
“Password Problems” in Chapter 7.
3-12
Using Your Computer
Chapter- 4
Installing and Removing Options
You can enhance the performance of your computer by adding
optional equipment such as option cards, and system, video, or
cache memory modules, or by upgrading the processor.
If you are reading this manual online, be sure to print out
this chapter before performing any of the steps it describes.
This chapter describes the following procedures:
0 Removing the computer’s cover
0 Replacing the computer’s cover
0 Locating the internal components
0
Changing the jumper settings
0
Installing and removing SIMMs (single in line memory
modules)
0 Installing and removing option cards
0 Adding video memory
0
Installing external cache (slimline computers only)
0 Upgrading the processor
0 Post-installation procedures.
Installing and Removing Options
4-1
Caution
Never install options or change jumper settings when the
computer is turned on or the power cable is connected to the
computer.
Removing the Cover
You need to remove the computer’s cover to install any of the
options described here or to install or remove a disk drive (as
described in Chapters 5 and 6). Follow these steps:
4-2
1.
Turn off the computer and then any peripheral devices.
2.
Disconnect the computer’s power cable from the electrical
outlet and from the back panel. Also disconnect any other
cables that are connected to the computer.
3.
If the monitor is on top of the computer, lift it off and set it to
one side.
4.
Turn the computer around so the back panel is facing you.
Installing and Removing Options
5. Remove the screws securing the cover to the back panel, as
shown below. (Save the screws to reinstall later.) The
slimline computer has three cover screws and the tower
computer has six cover screws.
Installing and Removing Options
4-3
6. Grasp the sides of the cover and lift it off as shown below.
On the slim line computer, lift the cover up at an angle and
then pull it off. For the tower computer, pull the cover
straight back; then lift it up and off the computer.
Slimline
Tower
computer
front bezel
4-4
Iip
Installing and Removing Options
7.
Set the cover aside
8.
Ground yourself to the computer by touching the metal
surface of the back panel.
WARNING
Be sure to ground yourself by touching the back panel of the
computer every time you remove the cover. If you are not
properly grounded, you could generate an electric shock
that could damage a component when you touch it.
Replacing the Cover
When you are ready to replace the computer’s cover, refer to
the illustrations above and follow these steps:
1.
Make sure all the internal components are installed properly.
2.
Check all cable connections, especially those that might have
been loosened during your work.
3.
Make sure all cables are out of the way so they do not catch
on the cover.
4.
For the slimline computer, insert the lip at the front of the
cover between the front bezel and the computer case; then
guide the cover straight down.
For the tower computer, squeeze the sides in and slide the
cover forward until the lip at the front of the cover slides
between the front bezel and the computer case.
5.
Replace the retaining screws.
Installing and Removing Options
4-5
6.
Reconnect the computer to the monitor, printer, keyboard,
mouse, and any other peripheral devices you have. Then
reconnect the power cable to the back of the computer and
to an electrical outlet.
Locating the Internal Components
As you follow the instructions in this chapter, refer to the
illustrations below to locate the major components inside your
computer.
option card connector board
power supply
Slimline
computer
S
I
sockets
M
M
I
processor
4-6
drive mounting
bracket
Installing and Removing Options
drive bays
Tower
computer
SIMM sockets
\
processor
/
option card
connector
/ board
rear internal
1 drive mounting
bracket
/
drive bays
power supply
Installing and Removing Options
4-7
Locating the System Board Components
This illustration shows the system-board inside your computer.
Use this illustration to locate jumpers, SIMM sockets, external
cache sockets, and video memory sockets.
s e r i a l 1 mport
keyboard
port
port
JP6
diskette drive
interface
JP2
JP8
JP9
video
RAM I
sockets
U13, U14
JP10
JP11
tr
LJNIO
qIl,I
I
primary IDE
interface
secondary IDE
interface
I II I
JP12
JP14
JP13
I
cache
tag
socket
U20
external
cache
sockets
U33,34,35,36
U40,41,42,43
\
SIMM sockets
SlM1, SIM2, SIM3, SIM4
4-8
Installing and Removing Options
I
cache ALT bit
socket U44
Changing the Jumper Settings
The jumpers on the system board are preset to factory default
positions, indicated by an asterisk (*) in the tables below. (See
the illustration under “Locating the System Board
Components” to locate jumpers.) Use the information in this
section to change jumper settings, if necessary.
Note
Any jumpers not listed in the following tables are for service
purposes only. Do not change their settings.
CPU clock jumper settings
*
CPU clock speed *
JP16
pins 1-2
JP16
pins 3-4
50 MHz (for 75 MHz CPU)
Off
Off
60 MHz (for 90 MHz CPU)
Off
On
66 MHz (for 100 MHz CPU)
On
On
Default setting depends on speed of CPU
Parallel port ECP mode DMA channel (DRQ) settings
1 Jumper number
1DRQ1 DMA channel
DRQ3 DMA channel
JP8
On pins 1-2 *
On pins 2-3
JP9
On pins 1-2 *
On pins 2-3
External cache size jumper settings
7
Installing and Removing Options
4-9
Miscellaneous jumper settings
Jumper
number
Jumper
setting
Function
JP2
1-2 *
2-3
Enable VGA controller
Disable VGA controller
JP6
On
Off *
Clears the CMOS SETUP values
Normal CMOS operation
JP12
1-2 *
Disable DRAM parity checking if you installed
32-bit SlMMs
Enable DRAM parity checking if you installed
36-bit SlMMs
L
L
c
2-3
JP13
Off *
On
Enable IDE controller
Disable IDE controller
JP14
1-2,3-4
2-3 *
Double- and single-sided SlMMs
Single-sided SlMMs only
t
* Default setting
Setting the Jumpers
To change a jumper setting, follow these steps:
4-10
1.
Refer to the illustration under “Locating the System Board
Components” to locate the jumper(s).
2.
If any option cards are installed in your computer, you may
need to remove them to access the jumpers; see “Removing
an Option Card” for instructions.
Installing and Removing Options
3.
A jumper’s setting is determined by where the jumper is
placed on the pins. Use the table below to identify the pin
settings for 2-, 3-, and 4-pin jumpers. To identify the pin
numbers, look at the system board near the jumper.
Jumper positions
Type
Position
2-pin
On
Off
3-pin
2-3
4-pin
2-3
To move a jumper from one position to another, use
needle-nose pliers or tweezers to pull it off its pins and
gently move it to the desired position.
Caution
Be careful not to bend the jumper pins or damage any
components on the main system board.
4.
Replace any option cards you removed, if necessary; see
“Installing an Option Card” for instructions.
Installing and Removing Options
4-11
Installing Memory Modules (SlMMs)
The computer comes with 8MB of RAM standard on two 4MB
SIMMs. You can increase the memory up to 128MB using 1MB,
2MB, 4MB, 8MB, 16MB, 32MB, or 64MB SIMMs. The SIMMs
must be tin-plated, 72-pin, single- or double-sided, fast-page
mode, parity or no-parity type with an access speed of 70ns or
faster. Be sure all the SIMMs operate at the same speed.
The table below lists all the possible SIMM configurations; do
not install SIMMs in any other configuration.
SIMM configurations
4-12
32MB
32MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
Installing and Removing Options
32MB
128MB
128MB
Your SIMM sockets may not look exactly like the ones in the
illustrations. If you’re not sure how to install SIMMs, contact
your Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON Connection
and ask for assistance.
Inserting SlMMs
Make sure the computer is turned off and the cover is off. Then
follow these steps to install SIMMs:
1. Refer to the illustration under "Locating the System Board
Components” to locate the SIMM sockets on the left side of
the main system board, next to the processor.
2. Remove any option cards that may be blocking your access
to the SIMM sockets; see “Removing an Option Card” for
instructions.
3. Position the SIMM at an angle over the empty SIMM socket
with the notch in the comer of the SIMM facing the back of
the computer.
notch
Installing and Removing Options
4-13
4-14
4.
Push the SIMM into the socket until it is seated firmly in the
slot. Then tilt it upright, as shown below, guiding the hole
at each end of the SIMM over the retaining post at each end
of the SIMM socket. If it does not go in smoothly, do not
force it; pull it all the way out and try again.
5.
Check the settings ofjumpers JP12 (indicating 36-bit SIMMs
with parity or 32-bit SIMMs without parity) and JP14
(indicating double- and single-sided SIMMs or single-sided
SIMMs only) and change them if necessary. See “Changing
the Jumper Settings” for instructions.
6.
Replace any option cards you removed; see “Installing an
Option Card” for instructions.
7.
Replace the computer’s cover as described under “Replacing
the Cover. “Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for
instructions on configuring your computer with your new
memory size.
Installing and Removing Options
Removing SlMMs
If you need to remove SIMMs from your computer (to install
different ones, for example), follow the steps below:
1.
Use the illustration under “Locating the System Board
Components” to locate the SIMM sockets on the left side of
the main system board, next to the processor.
2.
Remove any option cards that may be blocking your access
to the SIMM sockets; see “Removing an Option Card” for
instructions.
3.
Use your fingers or a small screwdriver to carefully pull
away the tabs that secure the SIMM at each end. The SIMM
falls to the side: remove it from the socket.
4.
Follow the same procedure to remove any other SIMMs.
5.
If you are inserting different SIMMs, follow the instructions
under “Inserting SIMMs” to install them.
Installing and Removing Options
4-15
6.
Replace any option cards you removed; see “Installing an
Option Card” for instructions.
7.
Replace the computer’s cover as described under “Replacing
the Cover. “Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for
instructions on configuring your computer with your new
memory size.
Installing an Option Card
This section explains how to install option cards in your
computer. Your computer has five slots; the three large slots
are ISA compatible and the two smaller slots are PCI
compatible.
Note
The two PCI slots are labelled PC11 and PC12 on the option
slot connector card. The SETUP program uses the PCI slot
number as it configures the PCI cards, so make a note of the
slot number you use for each card.
The slot nearest the main system board accommodates only a
half-length card. In the slimline computer, the two slots facing
the power supply can contain only half-length cards.
Caution
Before you install any option cards in your system, make
sure that each card does not draw more current than the
limits listed in the Appendix.
4-16
Installing and Removing Options
As you install option cards, keep these guidelines in mind:
If you have an S-bit ISA card, you can install it in a 16-bit
ISA slot, as long as it fits.
Install PCI cards only in PCI slots. Note the slot number
printed on the option card connector board beside the slots
you use.
Check the components on your card and the system board
before deciding which slot to use. Make sure that no
component touches or obstructs other cards or cables.
When you unpack the option card, do not touch the
components on the circuit board or the gold-edged
connectors. Place the card gently on top of its original
packing material with the component side facing up. Keep
the packing materials in case you remove it later.
Adjust any switches or jumpers on the card, if necessary,
before you install it. (See the option card instructions.)
If you install a video adapter on an option card you need to
change the setting of jumper JP2 on the system board to
disable the built-in VGA controller; see “Changing the
Jumper Settings” for instructions.
Installing a Card in the Slimline Computer (3-slot Side)
The option card connector board in the slim line computer has
two slots on one side and three slots on the other. Although the
illustration shows an ISA card, you can use the same
instructions to install a PCI card.
Installing and Removing Options
4-17
Follow these steps to install an option card on the three-slot
side:
1.
Remove the retaining screw securing the option slot cover
to the computer. (Keep the screw to secure the option card
in step 4.)
2.
Slide out the slot cover and set it aside. (Store it in a safe
place in case you remove the option card later.)
3.
Hold the card along the top corners and guide it into the slot,
as shown below. (If you are installing a full-length card
insert the front edge of the card into the corresponding
guide inside the computer’s front panel.)
Once the connectors reach the slot, push the card in firmly
(but carefully) to insert it fully. You should feel the card fit
into place. If it does not go in smoothly, do not force it; pull
the card all the way out and try again.
4.
4-18
Secure the end of the card to the computer with the retaining
screw.
Installing and Removing Options
5. Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for instructions on
configuring your computer with your new option card.
Installing a Card in the Slim line Computer (2-slot Sick)
The option card connector board in the slimline computer has
two slots on one side and three slots on the other. Although the
illustration shows an ISA card, you can use the same
instructions to install a PCI card. Follow these steps to install an
option card on the two-slot side:
1. Remove the retaining screw securing the slot cover bracket.
Remove the bracket by lifting it straight up and out of the
small metal holder that secures it.
slot cover bracket
2. Remove the slot cover for the slot you are going to use.
3. Hold the card by the top corners and guide it into the slot.
Then push the card in firmly (but carefully); you should
f&l it fit into place. If it does not go in smoothly, do not
force it; pull the card out and try again.
Installing and Removing Options
4-19
4.
Replace the slot cover bracket by inserting it into the small
metal holder below the option slots; then replace its
retaining screw.
5.
Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for instructions on
configuring your computer with your new option card.
Installing a Card in the Tower Computer
Follow the steps below to install an option card in the tower
computer. Although the illustration shows a PCI card, you can
use the same instructions for an ISA card.
4-20
1.
Remove the retaining screw securing the option slot cover to
the computer, as shown below. (Keep the screw to secure
the option card in step 4.)
2.
Slide out the slot cover and set it aside. (Store it in a safe
place in case you remove the option card later.)
Installing and Removing Options
3.
Hold the card along the top corners and guide it into the slot.
(If you are installing a full-length card insert the front edge
of the card into the corresponding guide inside the
computer’s front panel.)
Once the connectors reach the slot, push the card in firmly
(but carefully). You should feel the card fit into place. If it
does not go in smoothly, do not force it; pull the card all the
way out and try again.
4.
Secure the end of the card to the computer with the retaining
screw.
5.
Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for instructions on
configuring your computer with your new option card.
Installing and Removing Options
4-21
Removing an Option Card
You may need to remove an option card to access components
on the main system board or if you no longer need it. Refer to
the illustrations for your computer and slot type under
“Installing an Option Card” as you follow these steps:
1.
If you are removing a card from one of the half-length slots
in the slimline computer, first remove the slot cover
bracket. Then pull the card straight out of the slot.
2.
If you are removing a card from the tower computer or from
one of the full-length slots in the slimline computer, remove
the retaining screw securing the option card to the
computer. Then pull the card straight out of the slot.
3.
If you are not installing another option card, replace the
option slot cover, the slot cover bracket (if necessary), and
retaining screw(s).
4.
Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for instructions on
configuring your computer without your option card.
Adding Video Memory
Your computer comes with 1MB of video memory. You can
increase your video memory to 2MB by installing two 512KB,
40-pin, SOJ flat pack video DRAM chips. Additional video
memory is useful for running graphics-intensive applications
or for supporting high resolutions with many colors.
Note that your video memory sockets may not look exactly like
the ones in the illustration. If you’re not sure how to install
video memory, contact your Authorized EPSON Servicer or the
EPSON Connection and ask for assistance.
4-22
Installing and Removing Options
Follow these steps to install video memory:
1.
Locate the video memory sockets on the left side of the main
system board, as shown in the illustration under “Locating
the System Board Components." The sockets are labeled
U13 and U14.
2.
If there are any option cards in your way, remove them; see
“Removing an Option Card” for instructions.
Caution
To avoid generating static electricity and damaging the
memory chips, ground yourself by touching the metal
surface on the inside of the computer’s back panel. Then
remain as stationary as possible while you install them.
3.
Position the chip over the socket and align the notch in the
chip’s corner with the notch in the corner of the socket, as
shown below.
notches
/--c--Y
4.
Gently press the chip into the socket; then push down firmly
on both ends to make sure it is well-seated.
Installing and Removing Options
4-23
5.
Repeat steps 3 and 4 to install the other chip.
6.
Replace any option cards you removed; see “Installing an
Option Card” for instructions.
7.
Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for instructions on
configuring your new video memory.
Installing External Cache
Your computer has 256KB of external cache installed. You can
expand your external cache to 512KB or 1MB with 64K x 8 or
128K x 8, 3.3 volt, 15ns SRAM DIP chips.
Caution
The only cache memory chips approved for use in your
computer are 3.3 volt cache SRAM chips made by Alliance
Semiconductor®, do not install any other type of cache chip.
Your cache sockets may not look exactly like the ones in the
illustrations. If you’re not sure how to install cache memory:
contact your Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON
Connection and ask for assistance.
Note
If you have a tower computer, contact your Authorized
EPSON Servicer to have them install external cache for you;
do not install it yourself.
4-24
Installing and Removing Options
You must install chips in one of the configurations in the table
below (each bank contains four cache memory sockets).
Cache memory configurations
T
BANK 0
U33, 34,35, 36
BANK 1
U40,41,42,43
32K x 8,
28-pin (3.3 V)
32K x 8,
28-pin (3.3 V)
64K x 8,
28-pin (3.3 V)
64K x 8,
28-pin (3.3 V)
128Kx8,
32-pin (3.3 V)
128Kx8,
32-pin (3.3 V)
+
c
L
T
Total
external
cache
Tag SRAM
U20
ALT bit
U44
32K x 8,
28-pin (5 V)
32K x 8,
28-pin (5 V)
256KB
32K x 8,
28-pin (5 V)
32K x 8,
28-pin (5 V)
512KB
32K x 8,
28-pin (5 V)
32K x 8,
28-pin (5 V)
1MB
Follow these steps to install external cache on the slimline
computer:
First remove the internal drive mounting bracket in your
computer; see “Removing the Drive Mounting Bracket” in
Chapter 5 for instructions.
Locate the external cache memory sockets as shown in the
illustration under “Locating the System Board
Components.”
Remove any option cards that are blocking access to the
sockets; see “Removing an Option Card” for instructions.
Caution
To avoid generating static electricity and damaging the
cache chips, ground yourself by touching the metal
surface on the inside of the computer’s back panel. Then
remain as stationary as possible while you install them.
Installing and Removing Options
4-25
4.
Remove the cache memory chips in sockets U33-U36 and
U40-U43. Use a chip remover or wedge a small screwdriver
between the sockets and the chips until you can remove the
chips.
5.
Inspect each cache memory chip you are going to install; the
pins should point inward at slightly less than a 90° angle. If
any of the pins are bent or crooked, straighten them gently
with your fingers or with small tweezers to align them with
the other pins. Be careful when you do this; the pins are
fragile and can break off easily.
6.
Position one of the cache chips over the first socket as shown
below, aligning the pins on the chip with the holes in the
socket. Align the small notch on the end of the chip with
the corresponding notch on the socket.
U44
U40
U41
U42
U43
Gently press the chip halfway into the socket (to make sure
it is correctly aligned). If the chip goes in at an angle,
remove it and try again.
When the chip is properly positioned, push down firmly on
both ends of the chip to make sure it is well-seated.
Repeat steps 5 through 7 for each of the remaining chips.
4-26
Installing and Removing Options
10. Change jumpers JP10 and JP11 to match to the amount of
cache you installed; see “Changing the Jumper Settings.”
11. Replace any option cards you removed; see “Installing an
Option Card” for instructions.
12. Replace the internal drive mounting bracket; see “Replacing
the Bracket in the Computer” in Chapter 5 for instructions.
13. Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then see “Post-installation Procedures” for instructions on
configuring your computer with your new cache size.
Upgrading the Processor
You can upgrade your processor with a faster one to improve
system performance. If you upgrade the processor in the tower
computer, you may want to lay the computer on its side to
make the process easier.
Caution
If you are upgrading to a 100 MHz processor, make sure you
use a standard 3.3 V processor.
If you’re not sure how to install a processor, contact your
Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON Connection to ask
for assistance.
Follow these steps to replace the processor:
1.
Use the illustration under “Locating the System Board
Components” to locate the processor on the main system
board. The processor is inserted in a ZIF (Zero Insertion
Force) socket.
Installing and Removing Options
4-27
Caution
Make sure you ground yourself by touching the metal
surface on the inside of the computer’s back panel before
you touch the processor. Then remain as stationary as
possible while you install it. Do not touch the pins on the
processor; handle it only by the edges.
4-28
2.
If there are any option cards in your way, remove them; see
“Removing an Option Card” for instructions.
3.
To open the socket, locate the handle at the base of the
socket. (The handle rests under a plastic tab.) Press the
handle down and away from the tab; then lift it up to
release the processor from the socket. The illustration in
step 6 shows this handle in the released position.
4.
Gently lift the processor straight up and set it aside.
5.
Remove the new processor from its package and inspect the
pins. If they are bent, do not install the processor; contact
your vendor for a new one. (Store the old processor in the
packaging included with your new processor, in case you
need to reinstall it later.)
Installing and Removing Options
6. Position the processor over the socket, aligning the comer of
the chip that is missing a pin with the comer of the socket
that is missing a hole, as shown below.
caution
If you install the processor in the wrong orientation, you
may damage it and void your warranty.
7. Make sure the pins in the processor are directly over the
holes in the socket. Then gently push the processor straight
into the socket, pressing evenly on all sides.
8. Secure the processor by pressing the ZIF handle back to the
closed position.
9. Change the setting of jumper JPl6 to the correct setting for
the speed of your new processor; see “Changing the
Jumper Settings” for instructions.
10. Replace any option cards you removed; see “Installing an
Option Card” for instructions.
Installing and Removing Options
4-29
11. Replace the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover.”
Then run SETUP and change the PCI clock
frequency option if necessary. See “Configuring the
advanced chipset” in Chapter 2 for more information.
Post-installation Procedures
After you install or remove options such as SIMMs, video
memory, cache memory, processor, or option cards, you
must run SETUP so it can automatically update the
computer’s configuration. You may also want to customize
any options associated with these components. If you are
using Windows 95, you need to turn on the Reset
Configuration Data option. See “Running SETUP” and
“Using the Advanced System Setup Options” in Chapter 2 for
instructions.
Additionally, you may need to add some commands to your
configuration files. See your operating system manual and the
manual that came with your optional equipment.
4-30
Installing and Removing Options
Chapter- 5
Installing and Removing Drives in the
Slimline Computer
This chapter describes
drives in your slimline
instructions to install a
drives, diskette drives,
how to install and remove optional
computer. You can use these
variety of devices, such as hard disk
CD-ROM drives, or other devices.
Note
This chapter describes installing and removing drives in the
slimline computer; if you have a tower computer, see
Chapter 6.
Although your drive may look different from the ones
illustrated here, you should be able to install it the same way.
If you are reading this manual online, be sure to print out
this chapter before performing any of the steps it describes.
Follow the instructions in this chapter to do the following:
0
Set the IDE device jumpers
0
Remove the drive mounting bracket
0
Install a hard disk drive in the mounting bracket
0
Remove a hard disk drive from the mounting bracket
0
Install a drive in an externally accessible drive bay
0
Remove a drive from an externally accessible drive bay.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-1
Some of the steps in this chapter may not apply for the drive
you are installing. See the documentation that came with your
drive for more information.
Your computer can hold up to four mass storage devices,
including the diskette drive (and possibly other drives) that
came with your system. You can replace the existing hard disk
drive in the internal mounting bracket. In the externally
accessible bays, you can install a CD-ROM drive or another
type of drive.
To install or remove a drive, first remove the computer’s cover
as described under “Removing the Cover” in Chapter 4. Then
remove any option cards that may be in your way. Once you
have installed the drive, replace any option cards you removed.
See “Installing an Option Card” in Chapter 4 for instructions.
Setting the IDE Device Jumpers and Locating Pin 1
Before you install any IDE devices, be sure to check the device’s
jumper settings. The jumpers indicate the master and slave
configuration of devices connected to both of the IDE
interfaces.
A table in the “Hard Disk Drive Information” section of the
Appendix lists the master and slave jumper settings for the IDE
hard disk drives that are qualified for use in your computer. If
your drive is not listed or you need more information, see the
documentation that came with your drive or contact the
manufacturer.
If you are installing another type of IDE device, such as an IDE
CD-ROM drive, check the documentation that came with the
device for the master and slave jumper settings.
5-2
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
Note
Use the primary IDE interface to connected only IDE hard disk
drives. You must connect any other type of IDE devices to
the secondary IDE interface. Never connect an IDE CD-ROM
drive to the same interface used by an IDE hard disk drive.
Before you install a drive, identify pin 1 on the drive connector
so you know where it is when you connect the drive cable. On
a hard disk drive, turn it over so you can see the circuit board,
as shown below. Locate the side of the drive connector
containing pin 1, indicated by a “1” printed on the connector or
the board (a “2” may be printed beside the opposite row of pins
to indicate the side of the connector containing pin 1). On a
CD-ROM drive, check for a label identifying pin 1.
For hard disk drives, you may also want to make a note of the
drive parameters (such as cylinders, heads, etc.), in case the
SETUP auto-sensing feature cannot detect them when you
configure the drive. The parameters may be listed on a drive
label or in the drive documentation.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-3
Removing the Drive Mounting Bracket
Your computer has a 3.5-inch diskette drive and a hard disk
drive installed in a mounting bracket. In order to install or
remove any drives, you must first remove the drive mounting
bracket. Follow these steps:
5-4
1.
Remove the two cables from the diskette drive, as shown
below. Grasp the connectors and pull them straight out so
you do not bend the pins; do not pull on the cables.
2.
Remove the two cables from the hard disk drive.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
3.
Remove the screws securing the bracket to the drive bay and
brace. (Save the screws for later use.)
brace
4.
Slide the bracket away from the front of the computer and
lift it out.
Installing a Hard Disk Drive in the Mounting
Bracket
You can install a new hard disk drive below the diskette drive
in the mounting bracket, once you have removed the bracket
from the computer. To fit into this space, your hard disk drive
must be 1 inch high by 3.5 inches wide. If you have a larger
hard disk drive, you can install it in one of the external drive
bays; see “Installing a Drive in an External Drive Bay” for
instructions.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-5
This section includes steps for the following procedures:
0
Installing a hard disk drive in the mounting bracket
0
Replacing the mounting bracket in the computer
0
Connecting the drive cables.
Installing the Hard Disk Drive
Follow these steps to install a hard disk drive in the mounting
bracket:
5-6
1.
With the drive components facing down, slide the drive into
the bracket until the front of the drive is nearly flush with
the edge of the bracket.
2.
Align the holes in the drive with the oval-shaped holes in
the bracket.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
3.
Secure the drive with the screws that came with it; you can
use two or four screws, depending on the location of the
holes in your drive.
Replacing the Bracket in the Computer
Follow these steps to replace the bracket in your computer:
1.
Lower the bracket into the mounting area and slide it
forward, inserting the front of the diskette drive through
the drive slot in the front panel of the computer.
2.
Make sure the holes in the bracket are aligned with the holes
in the drive bay and brace. Then secure the bracket with the
screws you removed previously.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-7
Connecting the Hard Disk Drive Cables
After you replace the bracket, you need to connect the cables to
the hard disk drive. Follow these steps:
1.
Locate one of the IDE device cables that are connected to
the IDE interfaces on the system board. They are flat cables
with a connector at one end and two IDE device connectors
at the other end. A red wire is on one side of the cable. (See
“Locating the System Board Components” in Chapter 4 to
find the primary and secondary IDE interfaces on the
system board.)
system board
connector
IDE device
connectors
\
red wire
Use the primary IDE interface for your boot drive and your
second hard disk drive; use the secondary IDE interface to
connect IDE CD-ROM drives, other IDE devices, or your
third and fourth hard disk drives. You cannot connect a
CD-ROM drive and hard disk drive to the same interface.
5-8
2.
Identify the IDE device connector you will use on the IDE
device cable.
3.
Locate pin 1 on the drive connector. If you do not see it on
the connector casing and you did not locate it before you
replaced the drive bracket, you may have to remove the
drive and turn it over to check the circuit board.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
4. Position the connector on the cable so that the red wire
aligns with pin 1 on the drive.
ire
5.
Make sure the holes in the cable connector fit over all the
pins; then push in the connector.
6. Now locate one of the power supply cables that lead from
the power supply. (They have multi-colored wires and a
plastic connector on the end.)
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
I
5-9
7. Position the power supply cable connector so that its
notched corners line up with the notched corners of the
power supply connector on the hard disk drive.
notched
corners
8. Make sure the holes fit over all the pins and then push in the
connector.
5-10
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
Reconnecting the Diskette Drive Cables
Refer to the illustration below while you follow the steps in this
section to reconnect cables to the diskette drive.
red wire
red wire
1. Locate the connector you will use on the diskette drive cable.
2.
Identify pin 1 on the drive and align the connector so that
the red wire is at pin 1. Push in the connector.
3.
Locate the power supply cable with the small connector.
4. Position the power supply cable connector so that the holes
fit over all the pins and the red wire aligns with pin 1 on
the drive’s connector. Then push in the connector.
5.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in Chapter
4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in Chapter 2
for instructions on defining your new drive configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-11
Removing a Hard Disk Drive From the Mounting
Bracket
You may need to remove a hard disk drive for service or for
replacement.
Caution
Before you remove a hard disk drive, make sure you have
backup copies of all your files and programs. You can use
backup software or the backup utility in your operating
system. Refer to your online help files or your software
documentation for instructions.
Follow these steps to remove a hard disk drive from the bracket:
5-12
1.
Disconnect the cables from the back of the hard disk drive
and diskette drive in the bracket. Grasp the connectors and
pull them straight out; do not pull on the cables.
2.
Remove the screws securing the mounting bracket to the
computer; then slide back the bracket and lift it out.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
3.
Remove the screws securing the hard disk drive to the
bracket and slide the drive out of the bracket.
4.
If you removed the only IDE device connected to the
interface the device used, you may want to disconnect the
device cable from its interface on the system board and
remove it from the computer.
5.
Replace the bracket following the instructions under
“Replacing the Bracket in the Computer.”
6.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in
Chapter 4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in
Chapter 2 for instructions on defining your new drive
configuration.
Installing a Drive in an External Drive Bay
Your system includes two externally accessible drive bays.
Using these bays, you can install any type of drive, including
internal hard disk drives.
If you are installing a hard disk drive or another IDE device,
be sure its jumper(s) are set correctly for your configuration;
see “Setting the IDE Device Jumpers and Locating Pin 1” in
Chapters 5 and 6 for instructions.
Before you can install a drive in one of the external bays, you
must remove the mounting bracket containing the diskette
drive (and possibly a hard disk drive). Follow the instructions
under “Removing the Drive Mounting Bracket.” (You can
remove the bracket and drives without disconnecting the drive
cables.)
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-13
This section includes steps for the following procedures:
0
Attaching mounting frames to the drive (if necessary)
0
Installing the drive in the bay
0
Connecting the drive cables.
Attaching Mounting Frames to the Drive
If you are installing a 3.5-inch wide drive, you need to attach
mounting frames to it so that the drive fits in a 5.25-inch wide
bay. These frames usually come with your drive.
Follow these steps to attach mounting frames to a drive:
5-14
1.
Locate the two mounting frames and four screws that came
with the drive.
2.
As shown below, place a mounting frame on one side of the
drive and align it so that the oval holes in the frame are
positioned over the holes in the drive. Then secure the
mounting frame to the drive with the two screws.
3.
Repeat step 2 to attach a mounting frame to the other side of
the drive.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
Installing the Drive
Follow these steps to install a drive in the upper or lower
external drive bay:
1.
Using a screwdriver, reach inside the back of the drive bay
and insert the screwdriver into one of the holes in the metal
plate covering the drive bay slot. Use the screwdriver to
bend the plate up and down until it loosens; then grasp the
plate with your hands and pull it out of the back of the
drive bay. Discard the plate; you do not need to reinstall it.
2.
Remove the plastic faceplate from the bay by pushing it out
from the inside of the computer.
You need to reinstall the faceplate in later steps if you are
installing a hard disk drive. If you are installing an
externally accessible drive, keep the faceplate in a safe place
in case you remove a drive later.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-15
3. Slide the drive through the slot into the bay until it is flush
with the front of the computer.
4. Align the slots at the side of the drive bay with the mounting
holes in the drive or mounting frames. Then secure both
sides of the drive to the bay using the retaining screws that
came with the drive.
5-16
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
Connecting the Drive and Power Cables
Follow these steps to connect the drive and power cables:
1. Locate the connector you will use on the drive cable.
2. Locate pin 1 on the drive connector next to the power
connector.
3. Position the connector on the cable so that the red wire
aligns with pin 1 on the drive.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-17
4.
Make sure the holes in the cable connector fit over all the
pins; then push in the connector.
5.
Locate one of the power supply cables that lead from the
power supply. (They have multi-colored wires and a plastic
connector on the end.)
6.
Align the notched corners of the power supply cable
connector with the notched corners of the drive’s power
connector (such as the one shown below). Make sure the
holes fit over all the pins and then push in the connector.
notched corners
5-18
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
7. If you are installing a CD-ROM drive, you may need to
connect an audio cable to a sound card. Follow the
instructions in your sound card documentation to connect
the audio cable to the card. (If you need to install a sound
card, see “Installing an Option Card” in Chapter 4.)
8. Position the audio cable connector so that the tab faces up
and aligns with the notch in the CD-ROM drive’s audio
connector. Then push in the connector.
audio
conne
9. If you installed a hard disk drive in one of the external bays,
you may want to replace the plastic faceplate. Insert one
side of the plate, then gently press on the other side until it
snaps into place.
10. Replace the internal mounting bracket; see ‘Replacing the
Bracket in the Computer” for instructions.
11. If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in Chapter
4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in Chapter 2
for instructions on defining your new drive configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-19
Removing a Drive from an External Bay
You may need to remove a drive for service or replacement.
Caution
Before you remove a hard disk drive, make sure you have
backup copies of all your files and programs. You can use
backup software or the backup utility in your operating
system. Refer to your online help files or your software
documentation for instructions.
To remove a drive from an external drive bay, follow these
steps:
5-20
1.
Remove the drive mounting bracket, following the
instructions under “Removing the Drive Mounting
Bracket.” (You can remove the bracket and drives without
disconnecting the drive cables.)
2.
Disconnect all cables from the drive you are removing.
3.
Remove the screws securing the drive on both sides.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
4.
Reach behind the drive and gently push it out through the
front of the bay; then pull it out of the slot.
5.
Once you have removed the drive, you may want to replace
the plastic faceplate by inserting one side of the plate, then
gently pressing on the other side until it snaps into place.
6.
If you removed the only IDE device connected to the
interface the device used, you can disconnect the device
cable from the main system board and remove it from the
computer.
7.
Replace the drive mounting bracket; see “Replacing the
Bracket in the Computer” for instructions.
8.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in
Chapter 4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in
Chapter 2 for instructions on defining your new drive
configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Slimline Computer
5-21
Chapter- 6
Installing and Removing Drives in the
Tower Computer
This chapter describes how to install and remove optional
drives in your tower computer. You can use these instructions
to install a variety of devices, including hard disk drives,
diskette drives, tape drives, CD-ROM drives, or other devices.
This chapter describes installing and removing drives in the
Although your drive may look different from the ones
illustrated here, you should be able to install it the same way.
If you are reading this manual online, be sure to print out
this chapter before performing any of the steps it describes.
Follow the appropriate instructions in this chapter to do the
following:
0
Set the IDE device jumpers
0
Install a drive in the front internal drive bay
0
Remove a drive from the front internal drive bay
0
Install a drive in an externally accessible drive bay
0
Remove a drive from an externally accessible drive bay
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-1
0
Install a drive in the rear internal drive bracket
0
Remove a drive from the rear internal drive bracket.
Some of the steps in this chapter may not apply for the drive
you are installing. See the documentation that came with your
drive for more information.
Your computer can hold up to seven mass storage devices, as
described in the table below.
1Drive bay
1Drive type and size
Four externally accessible
bays
Two 5.25-inch, half-height drives or
one 5.25-inch, full-height drive
and two 3.5-inch, half-height drives
One front internal bay
One 3.5-inch, half-height or third-height drive
Two rear internal bays
Two 3.5-inch, half-height or third-height
drives or one 3.5-inch, full-height drive
To install or remove a drive, first remove the computer’s cover
as described under “Removing the Cover” in Chapter 4. Then
remove any option cards that may be in your way. Once you
finish installing or removing drives, replace any option cards
you removed; see “Installing an Option Card” in Chapter 4 for
instructions.
6-2
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
Setting the IDE Device Jumpers and Locating Pin 1
Before you install any IDE devices, you need to check or
change the settings of the device’s jumpers to be sure they are
set correctly. The jumpers indicate the master and slave
configuration of devices connected to both of the IDE
interfaces.
A table in the “Hard Disk Drive Information” section of the
Appendix lists the master and slave jumper settings for the IDE
hard disk drives that are qualified for use in your computer. If
your hard disk drive is not listed in that table, check the
documentation that came with it or call the manufacturer for
the jumper settings.
If you are installing another type of IDE device, such as an IDE
CD-ROM drive, check the documentation that came with the
device for the master and slave jumper settings.
Note
Use the primary IDE interface to connect only IDE hard disk
drives. You must connect any other type of IDE devices to
the secondary IDE interface. Never connect an IDE CD-ROM
drive to the same interface used by an IDE hard disk drive.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-3
Before you install a drive, identify pin 1 on the drive connector
so you know where it is when you connect the drive cable. On
a hard disk drive, turn it over so you can see the circuit board,
as shown in the next illustration. Locate the side of the drive
connector containing pin 1, indicated by a “1” printed on the
connector or the board (a “2” may be printed beside the
opposite row of pins to indicate the side of the connector
containing pin 1). On a CD-ROM drive, pin 1 is next to the
power connector.
For hard disk drives, you may also want to make a note of the
drive parameters (such as cylinders, heads, etc.), in case the
SETUP auto-sensing feature cannot detect these parameters
when you configure the drive. The parameters may be listed on
a drive label or in the drive documentation.
6-4
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
I
Installing a Drive in the Front Internal Drive Bay
You can install a half-height, 3.5-inch drive in the front internal
drive bay.
Installing the Internal Drive
Follow these steps to install a drive in the front internal drive
bay:
1.
Position the drive so its drive and power connectors face the
back of the computer and its circuit board is on the bottom.
2.
Slide the drive into the front internal drive bay as shown
below. Align the holes in both sides of the drive with the
slots in the drive bay. Then secure the drive to the bay with
the four screws that came with it.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-5
Connecting the Cables to the Front Internal Drive
Follow these steps to connect the IDE device and power cables
to the front internal drive:
1.
Locate one of the IDE device cables that are connected to the
IDE interfaces on the system board. They are flat cables
with a system board connector at one end, and two IDE
device connectors at the other end. A red wire is on one
side of the cable. (See “Locating the System Board
Components” in Chapter 4 to find the primary and
secondary IDE interfaces on the system board.)
system board
connector
\
IDE device
connectors
red wire
Use the primary IDE interface for your boot drive and your
second hard disk drive; use the secondary IDE interface to
connect IDE CD-ROM drives, other IDE devices, or your
third and fourth hard disk drives. You cannot connect a
CD-ROM drive and hard disk drive to the same interface.
6-6
2.
Identify the IDE device connector you will use on the IDE
device cable.
3.
Locate pin 1 on the drive connector. The number 1 or 2 may
be printed on the drive’s connector or circuit board to
identify the side of the connector containing pin 1.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
4. Position the IDE device cable so the side with the red wire
aligns with pin 1 on the drive. Make sure the holes in the
connector fit over all the pins; then push in the connector.
5. Locate one of the power supply cables that lead from the
power supply. (They have multi-colored wires and a plastic
connector on the end.) Align the notched comers of the
power supply connector and the drive’s power connector;
then push in the connector, as shown above.
Note
Your system has five power supply cables; three with
large connectors and two with small connectors. If you
need more than five cables, you can purchase Y-adapters
at most computer accessory stores. Y-adapters let you
use one power supply cable for two devices.
6. If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in Chapter
4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in Chapter 2
for instructions on defining your new drive configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-7
Removing a Drive From the Front Internal Drive Bay
You may need to remove a hard disk drive for service or for
replacement.
Caution
Before you remove a hard disk drive, make sure you have
backup copies of all your files and programs. You can use
backup software or the backup utility in your operating
system. Refer to your online help files or your software
documentation for instructions.
Follow these steps to remove a drive from the front internal
drive bay:
1.
6-8
Remove the drive and power cables from the back of the
drive
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
Remove the four screws securing the drive to the drive bay.
There are two screws on each side of the drive.
Slide the drive out the back of the bay
If you removed the only IDE device connected to the
interface the device used, you may want to disconnect the
device cable from the interface on the system board and
remove it from the computer.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in Chapter
4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in Chapter 2
for instructions on defining your new drive configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-9
Installing a Drive in an External Bay
Follow these steps to install an internal or externally accessible
drive in an externally accessible drive bay:
1.
Using a screwdriver, reach inside the back of the drive bay
you are going to use and insert the screwdriver into one of
the holes in the metal plate covering the drive bay slot. Use
the screwdriver to bend the plate up and down until it
loosens; then grasp the plate with your hands and pull it
out of the drive bay. Discard the plate; you do not need to
reinstall it.
2.
Remove the plastic faceplate from the bay by pushing it out
from the inside of the computer.
plastic faceplate
You need to reinstall the faceplate in later steps if you are
installing a hard disk drive. If you are installing an
externally accessible drive, keep the faceplate in a safe place
in case you remove a drive later.
3.
6-10
Position the drive so its drive and power connectors face the
back of the computer.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
4.
Slide the drive into the front of the bay and secure it to the
bay using the four screws that came with the drive.
5.
Connect the appropriate cable to the drive.
If you are installing an IDE device, see “Connecting the
Cables to the Front Internal Drive” for instructions on
connecting the drive cable to the drive.
If you are installing a diskette or tape drive, use the
appropriate connector on the diskette drive cable. If your
drive has a connector containing pins (a header connector),
be sure to align pin 1 of the drive connector with the side of
the cable containing the red wire. If your drive has a
card-edge connector (with gold contacts on each side of a
flat plastic connector), align the key-way in the cable
connector with the gap in the drive connector.
If you are installing another type of drive, see the
documentation that came with it for instructions on
connecting its drive cable.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-11
6.
Now locate one of the power supply cables that lead from
the power supply. (They have multi-colored wires and a
plastic connector on the end.) Align the notched corners of
the cable’s connector and the drive’s power connector; then
push in the connector.
Note
Your system has five power supply cables; three with
large connectors and two with small connectors. If you
need more than five cables, you can purchase Y-adapters
at most computer accessory stores. Y-adapters let you
use one power supply cable for two devices.
7.
6-12
If you are installing a CD-ROM drive, you may need to
connect an audio cable to a sound card. Follow the
instructions in your sound card documentation to connect
the audio cable to the card. If you need to install a sound
card, follow the instructions under “Installing an Option
Card” in Chapter 4.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
8.
Position the audio cable connector so that the tab faces up
and aligns with the notch in the CD-ROM drive’s audio
connector. Then push in the connector.
notch
9.
/-------/
tab
If you installed a drive that is not externally accessible, you
may want to replace the plastic faceplate for the bay you
used. Insert one side of the plate, then gently press on the
other side until it snaps into place.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-13
10. If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in
Chapter 4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in
Chapter 2 for instructions on defining your new drive
configuration.
Removing a Drive From an External Bay
Follow these steps to remove a drive from an externally
accessible drive bay:
1.
6-14
Disconnect the drive and power cables from the back of the
drive you are removing.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
2.
Remove the four screws (two on each side) securing the
drive to the drive bay. Then slide the drive out through the
front of the bay.
3.
If you are not installing another externally accessible drive in
the open drive bay, you may want to install a plastic drive
slot cover for that bay. Push the slot cover into the open bay
until the tabs on the cover click into place.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-15
4.
If you removed the only IDE device connected to the
interface the device used, you may want to disconnect the
device cable from the interface on the system board and
remove it from the computer.
5.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in
Chapter 4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in
Chapter 2 for instructions on defining your new drive
configuration.
Installing a Drive in the Rear Internal Bracket
Your computer has a hard disk drive installed in the rear
internal drive bracket.
Follow these steps to install a second drive in this drive bay:
6-16
1.
Remove the drive and power cables from the back of the
drive already installed in the rear internal drive bracket.
2.
Remove the four screws securing the rear internal drive
bracket to the computer’s back panel and slide it out of the
computer. Make sure you save the screws.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
3.
Place the rear internal drive bracket on your work surface as
shown in the illustration below.
4.
Position the drive so that its drive and power connectors
face the end of the bracket shown below. Then slide the
drive into the appropriate bay in the bracket and secure it
with the four screws that came with the drive.
5.
Replace the bracket as shown below and secure it to the back
panel with the four screws you removed earlier.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-17
6-18
6.
To connect the drive cables to the drives in the rear internal
bracket, first locate pin 1 on each drive’s connector. The
number 1 or 2 may be printed on the drive’s connector or
circuit board to identify the side containing pin 1.
7.
Hold the connector on the IDE device cable so the red wire
aligns with pin 1 on the drive. Make sure the holes in the
connector fit over all the pins; then push in the connector.
8.
Locate a power supply cable for each drive installed in the
rear internal bracket. These cables lead from the power
supply and have multi-colored wires with a plastic
connector on the end. Align the notched corners of the
power supply connector with the drive’s power connector;
then push in the connector.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
Note
Your system has five power supply cables; three with
large connectors and two with small connectors. If you
need more than five cables, you can purchase Y-adapters
at most computer accessory stores. Y-adapters let you
use one power supply cable for two devices.
9.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in
Chapter 4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in
Chapter 2 for instructions on defining your new drive
configuration.
Removing a Drive From the Rear Internal Bracket
You may need to remove a hard disk drive for service or for
replacement.
Caution
Before you remove a hard disk drive, make sure you have
backup copies of all your files and programs. You can use
backup software or the backup utility in your operating
system. Refer to your online help files or your software
documentation for instructions.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-19
Follow these steps to remove a drive from the rear internal
bracket:
6-20
1.
Remove the IDE device and power cables from the back of
each drive in the rear internal bracket.
2.
Remove the four screws securing the rear internal drive
bracket to the computer’s back panel and slide it out of the
computer.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
3.
If you removed the only IDE device connected to the
interface the device used, you may want to disconnect the
device cable from its interface on the system board and
remove it from the computer.
4.
Remove the four screws securing the drive to the bracket and
slide the drive out of the bracket.
5.
Replace the bracket as shown below and secure it to the back
panel with the four screws you removed earlier.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
6-21
6-22
6.
If there is a drive installed in the rear internal bracket, follow
steps 6 through 8 under “Installing a Drive in the Rear
Internal Bracket” to reconnect the drive and power cables
to the drive.
7.
If you have finished installing or removing drives, replace
the computer’s cover; see “Replacing the Cover” in
Chapter 4 for instructions. Then see “Running SETUP” in
Chapter 2 for instructions on defining your new drive
configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives in the Tower Computer
Troubleshooting
If you have any problems with your computer, refer to this
chapter. You can correct most problems by adjusting a cable
connection, repeating a software procedure, or resetting the
computer.
If you are reading this manual online, be sure to print out
this chapter before performing any of the steps it describes.
The troubleshooting suggestions in this chapter are organized
in general categories, as listed below. Within each category, a
more specific problem is described with possible solutions.
The following issues are included:
q
Identifying your system
0
Computer will not start
q
Computer does not respond
0 Keyboard problems
0 Mouse problems
0 Monitor problems
0 Diskette problems
0 Diskette drive problems
0 Hard disk drive problems
0 CD-ROM drive problems
Troubleshooting
7-1
q
Password problems
q
Software problems
q
Printer or scanner problems
q
Option card problems
q
Memory module problems
q
External cache problems
q
Controller problems.
If the suggestions here do not solve the problem, contact your
Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON Connection for
help; see “Where to Get Help” in the Introduction of this
manual for instructions.
Identifying Your System
When you request technical assistance, be ready to provide
the serial number and “A” code or model number of your
computer, its system BIOS version number, its configuration
(including the type of disk drives, monitor, and option cards),
and the names and version numbers of any software programs
you are using.
Use these guidelines to locate information about your system.
Record the information in your User's Digest so you’ll have it
available if your system is not working.
Serial number:
7-2
Troubleshooting
Look on the back or side panel of
the computer to find the serial
number; also note the number
beginning with A (the “A” code).
System BIOS version:
Restart your system. You’ll see the
system BIOS version number
displayed on the screen during
power-on diagnostics.
System
configuration:
Start SETUP and make a note of all
your configuration option settings.
Operating system
version:
At the MS-DOS prompt, type VER
and press Enter. Or watch the
screen when your system starts up.
Software versions:
In Windows applications, select
About from the Help menu. As
your software application starts, it
usually displays a version number
on the banner screen. Also, you can
check your software manual.
CONFIG.SYS:
At the MS-DOS prompt, type
TYPE C : \ CONFIG . SYS and press
Enter to see a listing of your
CONFIG.SYS file, which contains
system configuration commands.
AUTOEXEC.BAT:
At the MS-DOS prompt, type
TYPE
C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT
and
press Enter to see a listing of your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file, which
contains system startup commands.
The Computer Will Not Start
The power light is on, but the computer does not start.
Place a boot or startup diskette in drive A and turn on the
computer again.
Troubleshooting 7-3
Caution
If you turn off the computer, always wait at least 20 seconds
before turning it back on to prevent damage to its circuitry.
If your computer is set to boot from drive C, make sure that the
IDE hard drive is formatted. Also make sure that the primary
IDE controller is enabled by checking the setting of jumper JP13
on the system board; see “Changing the Jumper Settings” in
Chapter 4.
The computer does not start and the power light is not lit.
Make sure the power cord is securely connected to both the
AC inlet on the back panel and an electrical outlet.
The power cord is securely connected but the computer
still does not start.
Check the electrical outlet for power. Turn off your computer
and unplug the power cord. Plug a lamp into the outlet and
turn it on.
You installed or removed system components, and now
your computer does not start.
Check to make sure you have reconnected all the internal and
external cables correctly.
You may have installed a SIMM incorrectly. If the system
doesn’t detect memory, it won’t start. Check that your SIMMs
are securely installed in the correct sockets.
7-4
Troubleshooting
If you replace the processor, make sure the new processor is
installed correctly, and that the processor is aligned correctly
on the system board. If you did not align it correctly, the
system won’t start. Also make sure the jumpers are set
correctly for your processor speed. For more information, see
“Installing Memory Modules (SIMMs),” “Upgrading the
Processor,” and “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4
You may have installed option cards that exceed the system’s
power limits. Check “Option Slot Power Limits” in the
Appendix to see if they exceed the option slot power limits of
your computer.
The Computer Does Not Respond
The computer locks up.
Wait a few moments; if your computer does not respond after a
reasonable length of time, press Ctrl Alt Del and follow the
instructions on the screen. If that doesn’t work, press the RESET
button.
You may have installed memory using SIMMs that work at the
wrong speed. Install the correct SIMMs; see “Installing
Memory Modules (SIMMs)” in Chapter 4.
Your system may have overheated. If you upgraded the
processor yourself, make sure you have an adequate heat sink
installed.
You reset the computer, but it still does not respond.
Try turning the computer off, wait 20 seconds, and turn it on
again.
Troubleshooting
7-5
Your system suddenly stops operating.
You may have overloaded the power supply. See your option
card manuals for the power requirements of your cards. Then
check “Option Slot Power Limits” in the Appendix to see if
they exceed the option slot power limits of your computer.
Keyboard Problems
The screen displays a keyboard error message when you
turn on or reset the computer.
Make sure the keyboard is securely connected to the keyboard
port and not the mouse port. Although these ports look alike,
they cannot be used interchangeably.
The cursor keys on the numeric keypad do not work
properly.
If the Num Lock light in the upper right corner of the keyboard
is lit, press Num Lock to turn off the function.
Mouse Problems
Your mouse isn't working properly.
Make sure the mouse cable is securely connected to the mouse
port and not the keyboard port. Clean the mouse ball if
necessary. Also make sure you installed the mouse driver
correctly for DOS programs. See your mouse documentation
and “Connecting a Keyboard or Mouse” in Chapter 1 for
instructions.
7-6
Troubleshooting
Monitor Problems
There is no display on the screen.
Check that the monitor’s power switch is on and that its power
light is on.
Also, the computer may be in a power-saving mode. When you
press a mouse button or a key on the keyboard, see if the
monitor displays an image.
The power light is on, but you still do not see anything on
the screen.
Press a mouse button or a key on the keyboard to see if the
monitor or computer is in a power-saving mode. Also, check
the brightness and contrast controls.
If you still do not see anything on the screen, make sure the
monitor is securely connected to the computer.
If you installed a display adapter card, make sure your monitor
type matches the card type. Also make sure you disabled the
built-in VGA controller by changing the setting of jumper JP2;
see “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for
instructions. In addition, check that you set the correct display
type for the Video System option in SETUP; see “Using the
System Setup Option” in Chapter 2.
If you are running an application program, see if you need to
set up the program for the type of monitor and display adapter
you have. Also make sure you are using the appropriate
monitor and display adapter for your software.
Troubleshooting
7-7
The power switch is on but the power light is not on.
If the monitor is Energy Star compliant, it may be in a
power-saving mode. Press a mouse button or a key on the
keyboard to activate the monitor.
Turn off the monitor’s power, wait five seconds, and turn it
back on.
If the light still does not come on, check the electrical outlet for
power. Turn off your monitor and unplug it from the outlet.
Then plug a lamp into the wall outlet and turn it on. If the light
turns on, your monitor may be faulty.
An illustration in one of your software applications displays
incorrectly.
For the best display performance, your system has been set to
run Windows with the High Color palette (64 thousand colors).
Some application programs you may install work better with
the 256 color palette. If you want to change your color palette,
you can use the Display utility in the Windows 95 Control
Panel or the Galileo program in Windows 3.1. See your
Windows documentation or online help for more information
about changing your Display settings.
You used the Galileo utility in Windows 3.1 to change your
video refresh rate, but the rate you set is not saved after you
turn off your computer.
You need to set the refresh rate using the S3REFRSH program,
located in the C:\ S3INSTALL\ UTIL subdirectory. When you
are ready to exit the S3REFRSH program, make sure you select
the exit option that saves the refresh rate values in your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
7-8
Troubleshooting
Diskette Problems
You see a diskette error message.
Reinsert the diskette, making sure you insert it all the way. If
the drive has a latch, turn it down to secure the diskette.
Also, check to see that you have inserted the right type of
diskette in the drive. For example, make sure you are not
inserting a high-density diskette in a double-density drive.
If reinserting the diskette does not solve the problem, insert the
diskette in another diskette drive of the same type. If you can
read the diskette in a different drive, your drive may be faulty.
Contact the dealer from whom you purchased the drive; if the
diskette drive came with your computer, contact your
Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON Connection for
assistance.
The diskette is the right type, but you still see an error.
Check that the diskette is not write-protected, preventing the
drive from writing to the diskette.
Make sure the diskette is formatted. See your operating system
documentation for instructions on formatting diskettes.
The system may have the Diskette access security option
in SETUP enabled. If you entered a User level password when
you started the system, but this option is set to a Supervisor
level, you see an error when you access the drive. See “Using
the virus protection features” in Chapter 2 for more
information.
You may have a defective diskette. Try copying the files from
the bad diskette to a new diskette.
Troubleshooting
7-9
Something is wrong with the data in the files.
Run ScanDisk to repair the files. You may also be able to use
special utilities or diagnostics to solve this problem.
Diskette Drive Problems
A newly installed diskette drive is not working properly.
Make sure you have installed the drive correctly and check all
the cable connections.
You see a diskette drive error when you start your computer.
Run the SETUP program and configure your system for the
correct type of diskette drive. Make sure the Diskette
controller option in SETUP is enabled. See “Configuring
integrated peripherals” in Chapter 2 for more information.
The diskette drive is making loud or unusual noises.
Contact your Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON
Connection.
Hard Disk Drive Problems
A newly installed hard disk drive is not working properly or
ifs performance is not what you expect.
Make sure you have installed the drive correctly and check all
cable connections. Also, check the jumper settings on your
drive.
7-10
Troubleshooting
If this is your only hard disk drive, make sure it is connected to
the primary IDE interface on the system board. If you have a
CD-ROM drive, make sure it is connected to the secondary IDE
interface and is not connected to the same interface as any hard
disk drive.
If you are using MS-DOS and Windows 3.1, make sure the PCI
IDE driver is installed and loaded; see “Installing the PCI IDE
Drivers” in Chapter 2. To take advantage of the driver, your
hard disk drive must be compatible with the ATA-2
specification; check your hard disk drive documentation for
this information.
Some hard disk drives may not support the power
management features on your system. You may need to disable
these features in SETUP; see “Setting the Green PC Features” in
Chapter 2 for more information.
You see a hard disk drive error when you start your system.
Run SETUP and check that your system is auto-sensing the
correct drive type. If SETUP cannot automatically detect the
hard disk drive type or displays information that does not
match your drive, you need to define your own drive type. See
“Defining your own drive parameters” in Chapter 2.
Check to make sure you did not disable the IDE controller by
changing the setting of jumper JP13 on the main system board;
see “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for more
information.
Make sure the jumpers on the hard disk drive are set correctly.
See the documentation that came with the drive for more
information.
Troubleshooting
7-11
You are unable to store data on the hard disk drive.
Make sure your hard disk drive has space available for storing
data. If the hard disk drive has been in a power-saving mode,
make sure the drive has had time to achieve its full operating
speed before you try to write data to it.
You have been using your hard disk drive successfully for
some time but notice a reduction in performance.
The data on the disk may have become fragmented. Back up all
your data and use a disk optimization utility to reorganize the
files on your disk.
If you’re using MS-DOS and Windows 3.1, check that your PCI
IDE driver is installed and loaded; see “Installing the PCI IDE
Drivers” in Chapter 2.
If you cannot access data on your hard disk or you are seeing
read/ write errors, the disk may have a physical problem.
Contact your Authorized EPSON Servicer or the EPSON
Connection.
CD-ROM Drive Problems
Make sure the drive contains the correct CD-ROM disc. Make
sure the disc is rightside up and inserted correctly in the drive.
If you installed your CD-ROM drive, make sure you followed
all the instructions in Chapter 5 (for slimline computers) or
Chapter 6 (for tower computers). The drive should be
connected to the secondary IDE interface cable, and that cable
should not have an IDE hard disk drive connected to it.
Make sure that you set the master/ slave jumpers on the drive
correctly for your configuration; see the documentation that
may have come with the drive for more information.
7-12
Troubleshooting
If your drive came with documentation, check there for other
possible solutions to the problem you are having.
Password Problems
You have forgotten your pass word
You must discharge your CMOS memory. To do this, you
need to change the setting of jumper JP6 to the On position. See
“Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for details.
After you have changed JP6, restart your system, leave it on for
a few seconds, then turn it off again. This resets the SETUP
values to their factory defaults. Both the Supervisor and the
User passwords are disabled.
Set jumper JP6 back to the Off position. Then turn on the
computer again. If you want to set a new password, use SETUP
as described under “Selecting the Security Setup Options” in
Chapter 2.
Software Problems
Your operating system won't start after you installed the PCI
IDE drivers.
If you installed PCI IDE drivers for another operating system,
such as UNIX, make sure you followed the instructions in the
README file for the drivers. See “Installing the PCI IDE
Drivers” in Chapter 2 for instructions.
Troubleshooting
7-13
The application program does not start.
Check that you are following the correct procedure for starting
the program and that it is installed correctly. If you need help
on software that came with your configured computer, see the
User's Digest for technical support information. If you
purchased the software separately, contact your software
manufacturer.
The application program cannot read from or write to the
hard disk drive.
If you have enabled the Hard Disk Standby Timer
option in SETUP, your application may be timing out during
the few seconds when the hard disk drive returns to its full
speed. Disable this option in SETUP as described under
“Setting the Green PC Features” in Chapter 2.
Your application has locked the computer, making if
unresponsive to keyboard commands.
Reset the computer and try again. If resetting the computer
does not help, turn it off, wait 20 seconds, then turn it on again.
Some software, like OS/ 2, UNIX, or NetWare, needs at least
8MB to 16MB of RAM to work correctly. Check your software
documentation for the minimum memory requirements. If
necessary, add more memory as described under “Installing
Memory Modules (SIMMs)” in Chapter 4.
7-14 Troubleshooting
Printer or Scanner Problems
The printer or scanner does not work at all.
Check that the printer or scanner has power and is properly
connected to the computer. Also make sure your printer has
paper in it. If you are using more than one serial port, check the
primary and secondary port settings (COM1 and COM2) in
your application program and in the SETUP program. See
“Configuring integrated peripherals” in Chapter 2 for
information about serial port settings in SETUP.
If you connected a scanner to the parallel port, make sure the
port is set for bidirectional operation (ECP mode). See
“Configuring integrated peripherals” in Chapter 2 for more
information. If you use ECP mode, check your parallel device
software documentation for the correct DMA channel (DRQ)
setting; then set jumpers JP8 and JP9 to match the setting, if
necessary; see “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for
more information.
The printer prints garbled information.
Check the printer manual for the printer’s correct DIP switch or
control panel settings. Also, make sure you have the proper
drivers installed for your printer and make sure you’ve
selected the correct printer within your software application.
Troubleshooting
7-15
Option Card Problems
A newly installed option card is not working correctly.
Make sure the option card is installed correctly and is
well-seated in its slot. Run SETUP to update your configuration
after you install the card. If you are using Windows 95, turn on
the Reset Configuration Data option. See “Starting the
Setup Program” and “Using the Advanced System Setup
Options” in Chapter 2 for instructions. Perform setup
procedures for any software you are using with the card.
See the documentation that came with the option card to set
any necessary DIP switches or jumpers on the card. If you
installed a video adapter on an option card, make sure you
disabled the built-in VGA controller by changing the setting of
jumper JP2; see “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4
for more information.
Make sure you install option cards that do not exceed the
system’s power supply limits; see “Option Slot Power Limits”
in the Appendix for more information.
Make sure the option card is not touching any other card or
component on your main system board.
If you installed a PCI card, check to see that the PCI options in
SETUP are set correctly for your card. For more information,
see “Configuring PCI devices” in Chapter 2.
An external device connected to the option card is not
working correctly.
Make sure you are using the proper cable to securely connect
the device to the card.
7-16
Troubleshooting
Memory Module Problems
The memory count displayed by power-on diagnostics or
the SETUP program is incorrect.
You may have installed the SIMMs incorrectly. They may be
the wrong type or speed, or they may not be inserted all the
way or in the correct sockets. See “Installing Memory Modules
(SIMMs)” in Chapter 4 for more information. Also make sure
you set jumpers JP12 and JP14 for the correct type of SIMMs;
see “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for
instructions.
If you have installed a gold-plated SIMM in the sockets, the
socket may have corroded slightly. Remove the SIMM and
clean the gold-plated connector with a pencil eraser; then
reinstall the SIMM.
External Cache Problems
The amount of external cache displayed by the power- on
diagnostics program is incorrect.
You may have installed the external cache chips incorrectly.
They may be the wrong type, or they may not be inserted all
the way.
Also, you may not have changed the SETUP program or the
jumpers to recognize the new cache. Make sure you have set
the External cache option to Enabled.
See “Installing External Cache” in Chapter 4 for more
information. See “Configuring cache memory” in Chapter 2 for
instructions on setting the cache options in SETUP.
Troubleshooting
7-17
Controller Problems
You see a controller error for the drive controllers or the I/O
port controllers when you start your system.
If the error message refers to your IDE controller, make sure
jumper JP13 is set to enable the controller; see “Changing the
Jumper Settings” in Chapter 4 for more information.
If the error message refers to your diskette drive controller,
make sure the controller is enabled in SETUP; see “Configuring
integrated peripherals” in Chapter 2 for more information.
The indicated controller on your system board may be faulty.
If you have an option card with a controller that will work with
your device, you can install it and change the jumper settings
on the system board to disable the built-in controller. You can
then continue to use your system until it is convenient for you
to have it serviced.
7-18
Troubleshooting
Appendix
Specifications
This appendix describes the following specifications:
0 Computer specifications
0 System memory map
0 Video resolutions and colors
0 Hard disk drive information
0 DMA assignments
0 Hardware interrupts
0
System I/O address map
0 Connector pin assignments
0 Options available from EPSON
0 Tested operating environments.
Specifications A-l
Computer Specifications
CPU and Memory
64-bit CPU
586-class processor
Green PC
energy saver
Energy Star compliant, low-power, doze,
standby, and suspend modes for the CPU,
hard disk drive, and VGA display; select
time-out periods, power-saving rates, and
other options in SETUP
Memory
64-bit DRAM interface supporting 8MB
RAM standard on two 4MB SIMMs;
expandable to 128MB using 1MB, 2MB,
4MB, 8MB, 16MB, 32MB, and 64MB
SIMMs; SIMMs must be tin-plated, 72-pin,
32-bit or 36-bit, fast-page mode type with
access speed of 70ns or faster
ROM
128KB Phoenix® system BIOS, video BIOS,
and SETUP code in Flash ROM on main
system board
video RAM
1MB video DRAM on main system board;
expandable to 2MB using two 512KB,
40-pin, SOJ flat pack video DRAM chips
Shadow RAM
Supports shadowing of system and video
BIOS ROM into RAM; video and option
ROM shadowing selectable in SETUP
A-2 Specifications
Cache
Internal cache in the 586-class processor;
256KB, 512KB, or 1MB of external cache
installed on 32K x 8, 64K x 8, or 128K x 8,
3.3 volt, 15ns cache SRAM DIP chips and
two 32K x 8,28-pin, 5 volt, 15ns tag chips
(one for the tag and one for the ALT bit);
internal and external cache controllable
through SETUP
Math
coprocessor
Math coprocessor built into the 586-class
processor
Clock/
calendar
Real-time clock, calendar, and CMOS
RAM socketed on main system board with
integrated backup battery
Controllers
PCI chipset
Provides PCI caching, memory, and
control for the PCI bus and the
two-channel PCI IDE interface (described
under “Hard disk and other IDE devices”
below); integrated PCI bridge translates
CPU bus cycles to PCI bus cycles and
CPU-to-PCI memory write cycles to PCI
burst cycles
Video
S3™ Trio64™ PCI VGA controller with
integrated 24-bit RAMDAC, 64-bit DRAM
interface; includes power-saving and
multimedia features; supports resolutions
up to 1280 x 1024 in 16 colors with 1MB of
video RAM, increasing to 256 colors with
2MB of video RAM; True Color support in
the 640 x 480 resolution
Specifications A-3
Diskette
Controller on main system board supports
up to two diskette drives, or one
diskette/ combo diskette and one tape
drive
Hard disk and
other IDE
devices
Two PCI, ATA-2 compatible, IDE
interfaces on main system board support
up to four IDE devices (two on each
interface); IDE CD-ROM drives cannot be
connected to the primary IDE interface or
to the same interface as IDE hard disk
drives; BIOS provides hard disk
auto-sensing and enhanced IDE functions
Interfaces
Monitor
Energy Star compliant video interface for
fixed or multi-frequency monitor built into
system board; 15-pin, D-shell connector
Parallel
One standard, multimode parallel
interface built into main system board;
supports S-bit unidirectional, 16-bit
bidirectional and ECP (Extended
Capability Port) modes; 25-pin, D-shell
connector; operation controllable by
SETUP program and jumpers
Serial
Two high-speed RS-232C, programmable,
asynchronous interfaces built into main
system board; 16C550 compatible; 9-pin,
D-shell connectors; operation controllable
through SETUP
A-4 Specifications
Keyboard
PSI 2 compatible keyboard interface built
into main system board; 6-pin, mini DIN
connector
Mouse
PSI 2 compatible mouse interface built into
main system board; 6-pin, mini DIN
connector
Option slots
Connector card with five I/O expansion
slots; three ISA compatible (8.33 MHz bus
speed) and two PCI compatible (33 MHz
bus speed); PCI slots support up to two
PCI bus masters
Speaker
Internal
Mass Storage
Slimline computer
Internal bays:
One 3.5-inch wide, one-inch high drive
Externally accessible bays:
One 3.5-inch wide, one-inch high drive
and two 5.25-inch wide, half-height drives
Tower computer
Front internal bay:
One 3.5-inch wide, half-height drive
Rear internal bracket:
Two 3.5-inch wide, one-inch high drives
or one 3.5-inch wide, full-height drive
Externally accessible bays:
Two 3.5-inch wide, one-inch high drives
and two 5.25-inch wide, half-height drives
Specifications A-5
Diskette drive
types
3.5-inch diskette drive, 720KB or 1.44MB
storage capacity; 5.25-inch diskette drive,
360KB or 1.2MB storage capacity; or a
combination 3.5-inch/ 5.25-inch diskette
drive
Hard disk
drive types
5.25-inch or 3.5-inch form factor hard disk
drive(s), up to half-height size; maximum
of four drives
Other de vices
Half-height tape drives, CD-ROM drives,
optical drives, PCMCIA card readers, or
other devices; 5.25-inch, or 3.5-inch with
mounting frames
Keyboard
Mouse
Detachable, two-position height; 101, 102:
or 104 sculpted keys; country-dependent
main typewriter keyboard; numeric/
cursor control keypad; four-key cursor
control keypad; 12 function keys
Detachable, two-button, PS/ 2 compatible
SETUP Program
Stored in ROM; accessible by pressing Del
during boot
System
security
User and Supervisor level passwords
available for system boot or diskette access
Virus
protection
Write protection feature for the hard disk
drive boot sector
A-6
Specifications
Power Supply
Type
200 Watt, UL/ TUV/ CSA listed, fan-cooled
Input ranges
90-130 VAC or 180-270 VAC; switchselectable
Maximum
output
+5 VDC at 20 Amps, -5 VDC at 0.5 Amp
+12 VDC at 8 Amps, -12 VDC at 0.5 Amp
Frequency
47 to 63 Hz
Cables
Two to
storage
devices,
existing
main system board, five to mass
devices; for more than five
Y cables can be installed on the
cables
Option Slot Power Limits
Output voltage
(VDC)
+5 Volts
-5 Volts
+12 Volts
-12 Volts
For all slots
12 Amps
0.4 Amp
4.0 Amps
0.4 Amp
Physical Characteristics
Dimension
Slimline computer
Tower computer
Width
16.8 inches (427 mm)
7.125 inches (181 mm)
Depth
15.8 inches (401 mm)
16.25 inches (413 mm)
Height
4.4 inches (112 mm)
13.25 inches (337 mm)
Weight
18.2 lb (8.3 kg) with one
diskette drive, but
without keyboard
20.6 lb (9.3 kg) with one
diskette drive, but
without keyboard
Specifications A-7
Environmental Requirements
Condition
Operating range
Storage range
Temperature
41° to 90° F
(5° to 32° C)
-4° to 140° F
(-20° to 60° C)
-330 to 9,900 ft
(-100 to 3,000 m)
-330 to 39,600 ft
(-100 to 12,000 m)
Humidity
(non-condensing)
Altitude
System Memory Map
Address range
Function
FE0000h-FFFFFFh
128KB duplication of ROM BIOS stored at
OEOOOOh-OFFFFFh
100000h-FDFFFFh
System extended memory (128MB maximum)
0E0000h-0FFFFFh
128KB ROM BIOS
0C8000h-0DFFFFh
Adapter ROM BIOS
0C0000h-0C7FFFh
Video ROM BIOS
0A0000h-0BFFFFh
128KB video memory
OOOOOOh-09FFFFh
A-S Specifications
I
640KB base memory
Video Resolutions and Colors
Resolution
I
1640 x 480
1800 x 600
11024x768
11280x 1024
c
+
t
I
1600 x 1200
Memory
requirements
Color
Refresh
rates (Hz)
Remarks
1MB
256
60/72/75
8 bits/pixel
1MB
32K/64K
60/72/75
16 bits/pixel
2MB
16.8M (True Color) 60/72/75
24 bits/pixel
1MB
256
56/60/72/75
8 bits/pixel
1MB
32K/64K
60/72/75
16 bits/pixel
2MB
16.8M (True Color) 60/72/75
24 bits/pixel
1MB
256
43.5/60/70/75
8 bits/pixel*
2MB
64K
43.5/60/70/75
16 bits/pixel**
1MB
16
43.5/60/72/75
4 bit planes’
2MB
256
43.5/60/72/75
8 bits/pixel**
2MB
256
43.5
8 bits/pixel**
* Non-interlaced and interlaced
** Interlaced
Specifications A-9
Hard Disk Drive Information
The IDE hard disk drives listed in the tables below are qualified
for use in your computer.
IDE hard disk drive parameters
Precomp zone 0
Landing zone 2479
sectors
63
*
0
1652
63
0
1050
63
0
826
63
0
826
63
0
525
63
1048
1048
63
989
989
56
1011
1011
55
1011
1011
55
Select 1 or none for the precomp value. If neither of these options are
available, select the maximum available precomp value.
A-10 Specifications
IDE hard disk drive jumper settings
*
Model number
Single drive
Master drive
Conner CFS 1275A
C/D jumpered
C/D jumpered
1 No jumpers
Slave drive
Conner CFS850A
C/D jumpered
C/D jumpered
1 No jumpers
Conner CFS540A
C/D jumpered
C/D jumpered
1 No jumpers
Conner CFS425A
C/D jumpered
C/D jumpered
1 No jumpers
Conner CFS420A
C/D jumpered
C/D jumpered
1 No jumpers
1 No jumpers
Conner CFS270A
C/D jumpered
C/D jumpered
Western Digital
AC2540
No jumpers
MA jumpered
SL jumpered
Western Digital
AC2420
No jumpers
MA jumpered
SL jumpered
Western Digital
AC2340
No jumpers
MA jumpered
SL jumpered
Western Digital
AC2250
No jumpers
MA jumpered
SL jumpered
CS (cable selection) can be jumpered for any configuration. When CS is
used, the drive is a master if pin 28 is grounded, and a slave if pin 28 is not
grounded.
DMA Assignments
1Level
1Assigned device
1DMA0
1Reserved
1DMA1
1 Available
1DMA2
1 Diskette drive controller
1DMA3
1 Available
1DMA4
1 Cascade from DMA1 to DMA2
1DMA5
I S pare
1DMA6
Spare
DMA7
Spare
Specifications
A-11
Hardware Interrupts
IRQ no.
1IRQ0
Function
Internal timer, PIT A counter 0 output
1lRQ1
I
1IRQ2
I Cascade for IRQ9
1IRQ3
I Serial port 2
1IRQ4
1Serial port 1
1IRQ5
1 Available
I IRQ6
1 Diskette drive controller
1IRQ7
1Parallel port 1
1IRQ8
1 Real-time clock
1IRQ9
1 Available
1IRQ10
1Reserved
1IRQ11
1Reserved
1IRQ12
1PS/2 mouse
Keyboard
IRQ13
Math coprocessor
IRQ14
Primary IDE controller
IRQ15
Secondary IDE controller
System I/O Address Map
Hex address
Assigned device
000-01F
DMA controller 1, 8237
020-03F
Interrupt controller 1, 8259
022-024
Reserved
040-05F
Timer, 8254
060-06F
Keyboard controller, 8242PE
070-07F
Real-time clock NMI (non-maskable interrupt)
080-09F
DMA page register, 74LS612
0A0-0BF
Interrupt controller 2, 8259
0C0-0DF
DMA controller 2, 8237
0F0
Clear math coprocessor
OF1
Reset math coprocessor
A-12 Specifications
System I/O address map (continued)
Hex address
Assigned device
0F8 - OFF
Math coprocessor
1F0-1F8
Primary hard disk interface
1E0-1E7
Secondary hard disk interface
200-207
Game I/O
278-27F
Parallel printer port 2
2B0-2DF
Alternate enhanced graphics adapter
2E1
GPIB (adapter 0)
2E2, 2E3
Data acquisition (adapter 0)
2F8-2FF
Serial port 2
300-31F
Prototype card
360-363
Available
368-36B
Available
378-37A
Parallel printer port 1
380-38F
Available
390-393
Available
3A0-3AF
Available
3B0-3BF
Available
3C0-3CF
VGA adapter
3D0-3DF
VGA adapter
3F0-3F5
Diskette drive controller
3F8-3FF
Serial port 1
6E2, 6E3
Available
790-793
Available
AE2, AE3
Available
B90, 893
Available
EE2, EE3
Available
1390-1393
Available
22E1
Available
2390-2393
Available
42E1
Available
63E1
Available
82E1
Available
Specifications
A-13
System I/O address map (continued)
Hex address
Assigned device
A2E1
Available
C2E1
Available
E2E1
Available
Connector Pin Assignments
Parallel port connector pin assignments (J1)
T
Pin 1 Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
1
1 Strobe’
10
ACK *
19
2 1D a t a 0
11
Busy
20
3
1Data 1
12
PE
21
4
1 Data2
13
Select
22
5
1 Data3
14
AFD *
23
6
1 Data4
15
Error *
24
7
1 Data5
16
lnit *
25
8
1Data 6
17
Selectin *
Data 7
18
9
I
I
Signal
Signal ground
Signal ground
Signal ground
* Active LOW logic
Serial port connector pin assignments (J2 and J3)
A-14 Specifications
Options Available From EPSON
Many options for enhancing and supplementing this product
are available from EPSON. Call your nearest marketing
location or EPSON Accessories for more information about
specific options.
Tested Operating Environments
Although your system will run most software applications,
the following operating environments have been tested for
compatibility with your system.
Microsoft MS-DOS 3.3 and later
NovellNetWare*3.12 and 4.1
Novell Personal NetWare
IBM® OS/ 2; including version 3.0 (Warp)
SCO® UNIX
SCO Open Desktop
Microsoft Windows 3.1 and later
Microsoft Windows 95
Microsoft Windows for WorkGroups
Microsoft Windows NT™ including version 3.5
*
Certified as workstation and file server in certain configurations
As new environments become available, these also will be
tested.
Specifications
A-15
Glossary
586- class processor
A sophisticated CPU including the Intel Pentium™ processor
that incorporates the latest in processor technology, including a
64-bit data path, 16KB of internal cache, and the ability to
execute instructions in parallel. See also CPU and Processor.
Address
The location where information is stored in a computer’s
memory.
ATA-2
AT Attachment. A drive interface that provides high-speed,
high-capacity data transfers.
BIOS
Basic Input/ Output System. Routines in ROM (Read Only
Memory) that handle the transfer of information in your
operating system.
Boot
The process a computer performs to check its components and
then load the operating system into memory.
Cache
A high-speed memory buffer that stores frequently used data
where your processor can access it faster. Your computer
includes 16KB of internal cache built into the 586-class
processor and external cache installed on the main system
board. The external cache can be expanded to 1MB by installing
cache SRAM chips.
Glossary 1
CMOS
Complimentary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor. A low-power
silicon chip used for RAM and switching operations. CMOS is
backed up by a battery.
Controller
A processor, interface, port, or adapter that translates data
between the CPU and a peripheral device, such as a hard disk,
diskette drive, keyboard, or video monitor. Controllers convert
data from one format to another, match speeds between
devices that operate at different speeds, and perform other
functions.
CPU
Central Processing Unit. The primary device that interprets
instructions, performs tasks, keeps track of stored data, and
controls input and output operations. See also Processor.
Device
A piece of computer equipment that performs a specific task,
such as a disk drive, a monitor, a printer, or a scanner. Also
called a peripheral.
Device driver
A file containing instructions that allow your computer to
recognize and communicate with a device. The device may be a
printer, monitor, or other type of device.
DIP
Dual Inline Package. A type of chip that has two rows of
downward-pointing pins.
2
Glossary
DMA channel
Direct Memory Access channel. A channel for transferring data
from your computer to its peripherals without involving CPU
resources.
DRAM
Dynamic Random Access Memory. A type of memory that
stores large amounts of information.
ECP
Extended Capabilities Port. The parallel port mode in your
computer that provides bidirectional signals for the parallel
port and includes other enhanced functions.
Expansion bus
An internal bus that provides high-speed connections for
option cards and built-in components that enhance the
performance of your computer.
Extended memory
Memory above 1MB that is accessed by 386-, 486-, and 586-class
processors operating in protected or virtual mode.
Flash ROM
Non-volatile, read/ write ROM that can be erased and
reprogrammed using the normal voltages inside your
computer. This capability provides the computer and its
peripheral devices with a means of storing data without
needing a constant supply of electricity.
Glossary 3
IDE
Integrated Drive Electronics. A type of interface in which the
controller is on the drive instead of on a controller card.
Interface
A physical or software connection that transmits data between
equipment or programs so they can work with each other.
Interlaced
A method of scanning a video screen which appears to double
the refresh rate of the image on the screen.
Interrupt
A signal that a device uses when it is ready to accept or send
information.
I/O base address
The location within the input/ output space of your computer
that a peripheral device uses to communicate with software.
IRQ
Interrupt Request. A hardware channel over which devices can
send interrupts. Each peripheral device uses a separate IRQ.
ISA
Industry Standard Architecture. The 8- or 16-bit standard
developed for IBM compatible computers.
Jumper
A small movable plug that connects two pins on a device’s
circuit board to alter the operation of a particular function.
4 Glossary
LBA mode
Logical Block Address mode. A method of accessing
large-capacity hard disk drives.
Math coprocessor
A device that enables the computer to process mathematical
calculations faster by using floating point numbers instead of
whole numbers for calculations.
Memory module
A small circuit board that contains surface-mounted memory
chips. You can add memory modules to the main system board
to expand your computer’s memory. See also SIMM.
Modem
Modulator/ DEModulator. A device that allows a computer to
transfer data to and from another computer by transmitting
signals over telephone lines.
Option card
A circuit board you can install in the computer to provide
additional capabilities, such as a modem or an I/O port.
Parallel
An interface that transmits data simultaneously over separate
wires in a cable. See also Serial.
PCI
Peripheral Component Interconnect. A type of expansion
design standard that allows high-speed data transfer. Although
it was designed for current processors, PCI circuitry is not tied
to the requirements of a specific processor or family.
Glossary 5
PCMCIA card
Personal Computer Memory Card International Association
card. A credit-card-sized device used for data storage, memory
expansion, or other purposes. PCMCIA cards are often used in
notebook computers and PCMCIA card readers.
Port
A physical socket on a computer to which you can connect a
peripheral device.
Power- on diagnostics
Tests stored in ROM that the computer runs to check its
internal circuitry, peripheral device configuration, and
operating status each time you turn it on or reset it.
Processor
A small CPU on one semiconductor chip. See also CPU.
RAM
Random Access Memory. The area of the computer’s memory
used to run programs and store data while you work. All data
in RAM is erased when you turn off or reset the computer.
Real- time clock
A battery-powered clock inside the computer that tracks the
time and date, even when the computer is turned off.
Refresh rate
The frequency with which a monitor can redraw a screen
image. The faster the refresh rate, the less the screen will flicker.
6 Glossary
Reset
To restart a computer without turning it off. You can reset your
computer by pressing Ctrl Alt Del or by pressing the RESET
button. Resetting erases all data stored in RAM and reloads the
computer’s operating system.
ROM
Read Only Memory. Memory that can only be read and cannot
be modified. ROM retains its contents even when you turn off
the computer by using power from a backup battery.
Serial
The type of communication that transmits data from a serial
interface to a serial device over a single wire. See also Parallel.
Shadow RAM
The system’s ability to copy the contents of the system, video,
and external BIOS ROMs into RAM to speed up processing.
SIMM
Single Inline Memory Module. A small circuit board that
contains surface-mounted memory chips. You can add SIMMs
to the main system board to expand your computer’s memory.
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory. A type of fast memory used in
caches.
Glossary 7
SVGA
Super VGA (Video Graphics Array). In addition to supporting
standard VGA modes, your computer’s built-in SVGA
controller supports resolutions up to 1280 x 1024 in 256 colors
with 2MB of video memory and a compatible monitor.
True Color
A VGA feature that supports 24-bits-per-pixel color, which
enables your VGA interface to display 16.8 million colors. The
screen image looks more like a photograph than a traditional
computer image.
VGA
Video Graphics Array. A high-resolution display adapter that
provides a variety of video modes.
Video adapter card
A circuit board that can be installed in one of the computer’s
option slots to control the way a monitor displays text and
graphics.
Write-protect
To protect the data on a diskette from being changed by setting
the write-protect switch on a 3.5-inch diskette or by placing a
write-protect tab over the notch on a 5.25-inch diskette. You
cannot change data on a write-protected diskette.
ZIF socket
Zero Insertion Force. The type of socket on your computer’s
system board that holds the processor. With this type of socket,
it’s easy to remove and install processor chips.
8 Glossary
Index
A
AC inlet, 1-4, 1-6, 1-8, 7-4
AC outlet, 1-4, 1-6, 1-8
Advanced System Setup options,
2-8, 7-17
Integrated Peripherals, 2-8
Memory Cache, 2-10
Memory Shadow, 2-11
PCI devices, 2-8, 2-12
Shadow Option ROMs, 2-11
Altitude requirements, A-8
Application programs
compatibility, A-15
problems, 7-14
ATA-2 compatible, Intro-2, 2-22,
7-11, A-4
Auto-sensing, hard disk drive, 2-6,
7-11, A-4
AUTOEXEC.BAT file, 7-3
Autotype Fixed Disk option, 2-6
B
Back panel, 1-3 -4
Backup copies, 5-12, 5-20, 6-19
Banks
cache, 4-8, 4-25
SIMM socket, 4-8
Basic input/ output system
read-only memory,
see BIOS ROM
Battery, 2-1, A-3
BIOS, 2-1, 7-3, A-2
ROM, 2-1
system, Intro-3
upgrades, Intro-4
video, Intro-3
Boot options, 2-12 -13, 7-3
Boot sequence, 2-12
Floppy check, 2-13
Booting system, 1-9 -11, 2-2, 2-20,
7-3 -4
Bracket
drive, 4-6 -7, 5-2, 5-4 -7, 5-12 -13
option slot cover, 4-19
slot cover, 4-19
Brightness, 7-7
Buttons
diskette release, 3-8-9
POWER, 1-9 -10
RESET, 1-10, 3-10, 3-12, 7-1
C
Cable
diskette drive, 5-4, 5-11 -12,
5-17 -18, 5-20, 6-11
hard disk drive, 5-4, 5-8 -9, 5-12,
5-14, 6-6 -7 ,6-18
monitor, 1-5
power, 4-2, 4-6
power supply, 5-9, 5-11, 5-17 -18,
6-7, 6-12, 6-18
printer, 1-7
serial device, 1-8
Cache memory
banks, 4-8, 4-25
configuration, 2-10, 4-25
external, Intro-2, 2-10, 4-8,
4-24 -27, 7-17, A-3
installing, 4-24 -27
internal, Intro-2, A-3
jumpers, 4-8
problems with, 7-17
Case
removing, 4-2 -5
replacing, 4-5 -6
CD-ROM drive, Intro-2, 2-5, 5-1,
5-3, 5-19, 6-1, 6-13, 7-12, A-4, A-6
Chapter summaries, Intro-4
CHKDSK command, 7-10
Index 1
Clock, real-time, A-3
CMOS RAM, 2-20, A-3
Combo diskette, A-4
Command, stopping, 3-9
COMn port, see Serial ports
Component damage, 4-5, 4-11,
4-25, 4-29, 5-9, 5-18
CONFIG.SYS file, 2-22, 7-3
Configuration
changing, 2-2 -3, 2-7, 2-10,
2-13 -15, 2-20
files, 4-30, 7-3
PCI auto-configuration utility,
Intro-4
program, see SETUP program
Configured system, 1-11
Configuring, resources, Intro-3
Connecting
power cord, 1-8
printer, 1-7
serial device, 1-7
Connector(s), 4-8
DB-9P, 1-8
diskette drive, 4-8, 5-4, 5-11, 5-18
hard disk drive, 4-8, 5-8 -9
keyboard, 1-3 -5, A-5
monitor, 1-3 -6, A-4
mouse, 1-3 -5, A-5
option card board, 4-6, 4-8
parallel device, A-4, A-14
pin assignments, A-14
printer, 1-3, 1-7, A-4, A-14
serial device, 1-3, 1-7 -8, A-4, A-14
VGA port, 1-3 -5
Contrast, 7-7
Controller(s)
diskette drive, A-4
hard disk drive, 7-11, A-4
IDE, 4-10
problems, 7-18
SVGA, 2-5, 2-22, A-3
VGA, 4-10
2
Index
Coprocessor, math, A-3
Cover
removing, 4-2-5
replacing, 4-5-6
CPU, see Pentium
Ctrl Alt Del, 3-12
Cursor, 2-3
Customer support, Intro-5, Intro-7
D
DB-9P connector, 1-8
Deep green features, Intro-2
SETUP program, Intro-2
Default settings, SETUP, 2-3, 2-20
Depth of computer, A-7
Diagnostics, power-on, 1-11, 2-13,
7-3, 7-17
DIP chips, see Video memory
Disk optimization utility, 7-12
Diskette drive
accessing, 2-15, 3-11, 7-9, A-6
bays, 1-10, 4-6 -7, 5-2, 5-13,
5-15 -18, 5-20 -21
boot sequence, 2-13, 7-3
cable, 5-4, 5-11-12, 5-14, 5-17,
5-20, 6-11
combo, A-4
configuring, 7-10
connectors, 4-8, 5-4, 5-11, 5-18
controller, A-4
errors, 7-9-10
installing, slimline computer,
5-1 -22
installing, tower computer,
6-1 -22
interface, 4-8
light, 3-9
power supply cable, 6-12
problems, 7-10
removing, 5-4 -5, 5-20 -21
restricting access, 2-15, 3-11, 7-9,
A-6
types, A-6
Diskette(s)
defective, 7-9
drivers, 2-22
errors, 7-9
formatting, 7-9
inserting, 3-8
problems, 7-9
release button, 3-8 -9
removing, 1-11, 3-8 -9
shutter, 3-8
types, 7-9, A-6
write-protected, 7-9
Display adapters, see Video
DMA assignments, A-11
DMA channels, Intro-4, 1-8, 4-9
DOS command, stopping, 3-9
Doze mode, 3-6-7
Drive bracket, 5-2, 5-4 -7, 5-12 -13
Drivers
IDE, 2-1, 2-22, 7-12
mouse, 7-6
PCI IDE, 2-22, 7-11
printer, 7-15
SVGA, 2-l
video, 2-22
Windows, 2-23
Drives, see Diskette drive or Hard
disk drive
Dust, l-l
E
ECP (Extended Capabilities Port),
1-8, A-4
Electric shock, 1-9, 4-5
Electrical outlet, 1-6 -7, 1-9
Electrical power source, 1-2
Electromagnetic field, 1-1
Energy Star, Intro-2, 2-17, 3-6 -7,
7-7 -8, A-2, A-4
Energy, conserving, 3-6
Environmental requirements, A-8
Environments, tested operating,
A-15
EPSON, contacting, Intro-6
Ergonomic tips, 3-1 -5
Errors
controller, 7-18
diskette drive, 7-9 -10
hard disk drive, 7-11 -12
keyboard, 7-6
mouse, 7-6
power-on diagnostics, 1-11
read/ write, 7-12
Expansion buses
ISA, Intro-3
PCI, Intro-3
External cache, Intro-2, see also
Cache memory
F
Faceplate
removing, 5-15, 6-10
replacing, 5-21
Files
AUTOEXEC.BAT, 7-3
CONFIG.SYS, 2-22, 7-3
readme, 2-23
repairing, 7-10
SYSTEM.INI, 2-22
Fixed Disk Setup option, 2-5, 2-7
32 Bit I/O ,2-7
Autotype Fixed Disk, 2-6
Large Disk Access Mode, 2-5
LBA Mode Control, 2-7
Multi-Sector Transfer, 2-6
Fixed Disk Timeout option, 2-19,
7-14
Flash EEPROM, Intro-4
Floppy check option, 2-13
Formatting, diskettes, 7-9
Frames, mounting, 5-14
Function keys, SETUP, 2-3
Furniture, 3-2
Index
3
G
Game port, optional, 4-8
Green PC, Intro-2, 2-17, 2-19, 3-6 -7,
7-7 -8, 7-14, A-2
Green PC options
APM SMI Function Support, 2-18
IRQ Activity, 2-19
Power Down feature, 2-18
Power Saving Mode, 2-17
Standby Timer, 2-18
System Doze Timer, 2-18
System Standby Timer, 2-17
System Suspend Timer, 2-17
VGA Access Detection, 2-18
Grounding yourself, 4-5, 4-23,
4-25, 4-28
H
Hard disk drive
access light, 1-10
ATA-2 compatibility, Intro-2,
2-22, 7-11, A-4
auto-sensing, 2-6 -7, 7-11, A-4
bays, 1-10, 4-6 -7, 5-2, 5-15 -17,
5-19, 5-21, 6-5
boot sequence, 2-13, 7-3
cable, 5-4, 5-8-10, 5-12, 5-14,
6-6 -7, 6-11, 6-18
configuring, 2-5, 2-7, 5-13
connector, 4-8, 5-8
controller, 7-11, A-4
errors, 7-11 -12
IDE driver, 2-1, 2-22
installing, slimline computer,
5-1 -22
installing, tower computer,
6-1 -22
jumpers, 5-13, 7-10, A-11
master, 2-7, 5-13, A-11
mounting frames, 5-14
parameters, 2-5, 2-7, 5-3, A-10
4
Index
Hard disk drive (continued)
power supply cable, 6-7
problems, 7-10, 7-12
removing, 5-12, 5-20 -21
SETUP options, 2-5, 2-7
slave, 2-7, 5-13, A-11
standby mode, 2-17, 2-19, 3-6,
7-12, 7-14, A-4
suspend mode, 3-6-7
timeout options, 2-17, 2-19
types, 2-6 -7, A-6
Hardware interrupts, Intro-3 -4,
A-12
Heat, 1-1
Height of computer, A-7
Help screen, SETUP, 2-3
Help, where to get, Intro-5 -6
Humidity requirements, 1-1, A-8
I/O
address map, A-12 -14
addresses, Intro-4
expansion slots, see Option slots
problems, 7-18
Icons, 1-3 -5, 1-7 -8
IDE devices, Intro-1 -2, 2-1, 4-8,
4-10, 5-3, 6-3, A-10 -11
Indicator lights
diskette drive, 3-9
hard disk access, 1-10
POWER, 1-10 -11, 7-3 -4, 7-7
SPEED, 1-10
Industry Standard Architecture,
see ISA
Inlet, power, 1-6, 1-8, 7-4
Input ranges, power supply, 1-2,
A-7
Integrated Drive Electronics, see
IDE devices
Internal cache, Intro-2, see also
Cache memory
Internal components, 4-6, 4-8
damage, 4-5, 4-11, 4-25, 4-29, 5-9,
5-18
locating, 4-6 -8
Interrupts, hardware, Intro-3 -4,
A-12
ISA
expansion bus, Intro-3
option slots, Intro-2, 4-16 -21
J
Jumpers
cache settings, 4-9, 7-17
changing settings, 4-9 -11
hard disk drive, 5-13, 7-10, A-11
locating, 4-8
master and slave, 5-2, 6-3
K
K/ B port, 1-4, see also Keyboard
Keyboard
connecting, 1-3 -5
errors, 7-6
port, 1-3 -4, 4-8, A-5
problems, 7-6
specifications, A-6
using, 3-4
Keypad, numeric, 7-6
Keys, SETUP function, 2-3
L
Lighting workspace, 3-3 -4
Lights, see Indicator lights
Location, choosing, 1-1 -2
Lockup problems, 7-5
LPT Extended Mode, 1-7
M
Main menu, SETUP, 2-2
Mass storage, Intro-2, 5-2, 6-2,
A-5 -6
Master hard disk drive, 2-7, 5-2,
5-13, 6-3, A-11
Math coprocessor, A-3
Measurements, computer, A-7
Memory
addresses, Intro-3
banks, 4-8, 4-12
BIOS ROM, 2-1
cache, see Cache memory
clearing, 3-10
CMOS RAM, A-3
configurations, 4-12
extended, A-8
installing, 4-12 -14
location, 4-6, 4-8
map, A-8
modules, see SIMMs
problems, 7-17
RAM, Intro-1, 2-11, A-2
removing, 4-15
requirements, video, A-9
ROM, 2-11, 2-20, A-2
shadow, 2-11, A-2
SIMMs, see SIMMs
specifications, A-2 -3
video, see Video memory
Microprocessor, see Pentium
Microsoft Windows, see also
Windows
Modem, 1-8
Monitor
cables, 1-5
connecting, 1-3, 1-5 -6
connector, 1-3, 1-6
Energy Star compliant, A-4
positioning, 3-3
power cord, 1-6
power requirements, 1-6
problems, 7-7-8
standby mode, 3-7
SVGA, 1-5 -6
time-out periods, 3-6
VGA port, 1-3, 1-5
Mounting brackets, 4-6 -7
Mounting frames, 5-14
Index
5
Mouse
connecting, 1-3 -5
driver, 7-6
port, 1-3 -4, 4-8
port specifications, A-5
PSI 2 compatible, 1-4, A-5 -6
specifications, A-6
using, 3-4
Multi-mode parallel port, see
Parallel port or Ports
N
NetWare, A-15
Numeric coprocessor, A-3
Numeric keypad, 7-6
0
Operating environments, tested,
A-15
Operating system
diskette, 7-3
reloading, 3-10
version number, 7-3
Optical drive, 5-1, 6-1, A-6
Option cards
2-slot side, 4-19-20
3-slot side, 4-17-19
connector board, 4-6-7
installing, 4-16-21
power limits, 7-6, A-7
problems, 7-16
removing, 4-22
slimline computer, 4-17 -20
tower computer, 4-20 -21
Option slots
full-length, 4-22
half-length, 4-22
ISA, Intro-2, 4-16 -21
PCI, Intro-2, 4-16 -21
PCI1 and PCI2, 4-16
power limits, 7-6, A-7
specifications, A-5
using, 4-16
6
Index
Optional equipment, A-15
Outlet, electrical, 1-6-7, 1-9
P
Parallel port
configuring mode, 7-15
connecting, 1-3, 1-7
controller, A-4
jumpers, 1-8
locating on system board, 4-8
pin assignments, A-14
problems, 7-15
Password
changing, 2-14
deleting, 2-15, 3-12
entering, 2-14
options, 2-13 -15, 3-11
problems, 7-9, 7-13
prompting, 2-14
selecting type, 2-14
using, 3-11
PCI
auto-configuration utility, Intro-4
bus architecture, Intro-1 -2
expansion bus, Intro-3
IDE drivers, installing, 2-22
option slots, Intro-2, 4-16-21
VGA controller, Intro-2
PC11 and PC12 slots, 4-16
PCMCIA card reader, A-6
Pentium, Intro-1
Peripheral Component
Interconnect, see PCI
Physical characteristics, A-7
Plug and play technology, Intro-l,
Intro-3
Port
connector pin assignments, A-14
keyboard, 1-3 -5, 4-8
location, 1-3 -4
mouse, 1-3 -5, 4-8
multi-mode parallel, 1-3, 1-7, 4-8
parallel, 1-7
Port (continued)
serial, 1-3, 1-7 -8, 4-8
specifications, A-4 -5
VGA, 1-3 -5, 4-8
Post-installation procedures, 4-30
Posture, 3-5
Power
button, 1-9 -10
inlet, 1-4, 1-6, 1-8, 7-4
light, 1-10 -11, 7-3 -4, 7-7
source, 1-2
Power cable
computer, 1-6, 1-8, 4-2, 4-6
diskette drive, 5-11 -12, 5-18, 5-20
hard disk drive, 5-4, 5-9 -10, 5-12,
5-17, 5-20 -21
monitor, 1-5 -6
Power supply
cable, 5-9, 5-11, 5-17-18, 6-7, 6-12,
6-18
frequency, A-7
input ranges, A-7
limits, 7-6, A-7
location, 4-6 -7
maximum output, A-7
specifications, A-7
voltage selector switch, 1-2
Power-on diagnostics, 1-11, 2-13,
7-3, 7-17
Power-saving modes, 3-6-7
Precautions, iii-vi, 1-1 -2
Printer
available options, A-15
connecting, 1-7
connector, 1-7
connector pin assignments, A-14
drivers, 7-15
port, 1-3, A-4
problems, 7-15
turning off, 1-11
turning on, 1-9
Processor, Intro-1, A-2
locating, 4-6 -7
upgrading, 4-27 -30
Processor speed, changing, 4-9
Program, stopping, 3-9
PSI 2 compatible, 1-4, A-5 -6
R
RAM, Intro-1, 2-11, A-2
Random Access Memory, see RAM
Read/ write errors, 7-12
Real-time clock, A-3
RESET button, 1-10, 3-10, 3-12
Resetting the computer, 3-10, 7-1
Resolutions, see Video resolutions
Resources, configuring, Intro-3
Resume system activity, 3-7
ROM, 2-11, 2-20, A-2
RS-232C ports, see also Serial ports
S
Safety instructions, iii-vi, 1-1 -2,
3-1 -5, 4-2
Scanner, 7-15
SCSI cards, Intro-3
Security and anti-virus options,
2-13, 2-15, 2-17
Diskette access, 2-15 -16
Fixed disk boot sector, 2-16
Password on boot, 2-14 -16
Serial number, 7-2
Serial ports, 1-3
connecting, 1-7 -8
controller, A-4
jumpers, 4-8
locating on system board, 4-8
pin assignments, A-14
problems, 7-15
Service, Intro-5 -6
Index
7
SETUP program
advanced options, 2-8, 2-10 -12
anti-virus options, 2-13 -15
autotype fixed disk, 2-6
boot options, 2-12 -13
cache memory, 2-10
date, 2-4
deep green features, Intro-2
default settings, 2-2, 2-20
displaying default settings, 2-3
drive configuration, 2-4 ,2-7
exiting, 2-20
extended memory, 2-4
fixed disk setup, 2-5, 2-7
floppy check option, 2-13
function keys, 2-3
Green PC Features, 2-17-19, A-2
help screen, 2-3
keyboard, 2-5
Main menu, 2-2
memory shadow, 2-11
password options, 2-14-15, 3-11
restoring default values, 2-20
saving settings, 2-20
security options, 2-13 -16, A-6
starting, 2-2-3
system memory, 2-4
time, 2-4
timeout options, 2-19
user-defined hard drives, 2-7
video, 2-4
virus protection, 2-13 -16
Shadowing memory, 2-11, A-2
SIMMs
configurations, 4-12
installing, 4-12 -14
location, 4-6 -8
problems, 7-5, 7-17
removing, 4-15
specifications, A-2
8
Index
Slave hard disk drive, 2-7, 5-2,
5-13, 6-3, A-11
Slot cover bracket, 4-19
Slots, see Option slots
Small Computer System Interface,
see SCSI cards
Smoke, l-l
Software, see Application programs
SOJ flat pack video DRAM chips,
4-22, A-2
Speaker, A-5
SPEED light, 1-10
SRAM chips, see Cache memory
Standby mode, 2-17, 2-19, 3-6, 7-7,
7-12, 7-14, A-4
Static electricity, 4-23, 4-25
Stopping a command or program,
3-9
Storage devices, Intro-2, 5-2,6-2,
A-5 -6
Supervisor password, see Password
Suspend mode, 3-6 -7
SVGA
connector, 1-3, 1-5 -6
drivers, 2-1, 2-22
monitor, 1-5
on-board controller, 2-5
System
BIOS, Intro-3 -4
BIOS version, 7-3
board components, 4-6 -8
configuration, see SETUP program
date, 2-4
I/O address map, A-12 -14
identifying, 7-2 -3
memory map, A-8
resume activity, 3-7
security, A-6
time, 2-4
turning off, 1-11
turning on, 1-9 -10
System Setup options, 2-3-5
date, 2-4
diskette drives, 2-4
extended memory, 2-4
keyboard, 2-5
system memory, 2-4
time, 2-4
video, 2-4
SYSTEM.INI file, 2-22
T
Tag SRAM, see Cache memory
Tape drive, 5-1, 6-1, A-6
Technical assistance, Intro-5 -6
Temperature requirements, 1-1,
A-8
Troubleshooting, 7-1 -18
True Color support, A-9
Turning off computer, 1-11
Turning on computer, 1-9 -10
U
Upgrading processor, 4-27-30
User password, see Password
User-defined hard disk drive, 2-7
V
VGA
controller, Intro-2, 4-10, 4-17
monitor, 1-5 -6
port, 1-3 -5, 4-8, see Video
Video
BIOS, Intro-3
colors, A-3, A-9
connector, 1-3 -5, A-4
controller, A-3
DIP chips, see Video memory
drivers, 2-1, 2-22
port, 1-3 -5, A-4
problems, 7-7 -8
resolutions, A-3, A-9
SOJDRAM chips, 4-22, A-2
standby mode, 2-17, 3-6, 7-7, A-2
time-out, 2-17, 3-7
Video memory
installing, 4-22 -23
location, 4-6, 4-8
requirements, A-9
specifications, Intro-2, 4-22, A-2
Virus protection options, 2-13,
2-15, A-6
Voltage selector switch, 1-2 -3
W
Weight of computer, A-7
Width of computer, A-7
Windows
95, Intro-l
drivers, 2-23
mouse driver, 7-6
Work environment, iii-vi, 1-1 -2,
3-1 -5
Work habits, 3-5
Y
Y-adapters, 6-7, 6-12, 6-19
Z
ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket,
4-27-29
Index
9