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Contents
Purpose of this document ...........................................................................4
Product overview ...................................................................................................6
Key functions and features ..........................................................................6
More in-phone functions .............................................................................7
Multimedia in the T68i ............................................................................................9
MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service) ................................................................10
MMS objects .............................................................................................10
Benefits ......................................................................................................11
MMS technical features .............................................................................12
EMS (Enhanced Messaging Service) ...................................................................13
EMS – more than just words .....................................................................13
New possibilities with messaging ..............................................................13
Bluetooth™ wireless technology .........................................................................16
Using Bluetooth wireless technology in the T68i .......................................16
Synchronize calendar and phone book ...............................................................17
SyncML, an open standard for remote synchronization in the T68i ..........17
Local synchronization ................................................................................19
WAP services .......................................................................................................21
Using WAP in the T68i ...............................................................................21
Bearer type characteristics ........................................................................22
Gateway characteristics ............................................................................22
Security using WAP ...................................................................................22
Configuration of WAP settings ..................................................................23
Push services .............................................................................................23
Mobile Internet .....................................................................................................24
Data connections .......................................................................................24
Mobile positioning ................................................................................................25
General Packet Radio Services ...........................................................................25
Using GPRS in the T68i .............................................................................26
Modem and AT commands .................................................................................28
GSM data communication .........................................................................28
AT commands support ..............................................................................28
Infrared transceiver ..............................................................................................30
Connection via infrared ..............................................................................30
In-phone functions and features ..........................................................................31
Network-dependent features .....................................................................36
SIM application toolkit .........................................................................................37
SIM AT services supported by the T68i ....................................................37
User interaction with SIM AT .....................................................................40
Security and M-commerce technical data ................................................41
Terminology and abbreviations ...........................................................................42
Related information ..............................................................................................46
Documents ................................................................................................46
Software ....................................................................................................46
Links ..........................................................................................................46
Trademarks and acknowledgements ........................................................46
Technical specifications .......................................................................................47
General technical data ...............................................................................47
Exterior description ....................................................................................47
Ambient temperatures ...............................................................................48
Supported Man-Machine Interface (MMI) languages ................................48
Current consumption, talk and standby times ..........................................48
Speech coding ...........................................................................................49
Cell broadcast service ...............................................................................50
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Multimedia message service .....................................................................54
Bluetooth technical data ............................................................................56
Performance and technical characteristics ...............................................57
WAP browser technical data .....................................................................58
WAP Operator technical data ....................................................................59
GPRS technical data ..................................................................................62
Built-in GSM data modem technical data .................................................65
E-mail client technical data ........................................................................65
USSD technical data ..................................................................................66
Image format technical data ......................................................................66
Images – downloading to phone ...............................................................67
SyncML technical data ..............................................................................68
Infrared transceiver technical data ............................................................68
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Preface
Purpose of this document
The Ericsson T68i/T68ie White Paper is designed to give the reader a deeper technical understanding of
how the T68i/T68ie is designed, and of how it interacts with other media. This document will make it easier to integrate the T68i/T68ie with the IT and communications solutions of a company or organization.
People who can benefit from this document include:
• Corporate buyers
• IT Professionals
• Software developers
• Support engineers
• Business decision-makers
More information, useful for product, service and application developers, is published at http://www.Ericsson.com/mobilityworld/, which contains up-to-date information about technologies, products and tools.
This White Paper is published by:
Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications AB
SE-221 88 Lund, Sweden
Phone:+46 46 19 40 00
Fax: +46 46 19 41 00
www.SonyEricssonMobile.com
First edition (February 2002)
Publication number: EN/LZT 108 5416 R2A
This document is published by Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications AB, without any warranty. Improvements and
changes to this text necessitated by typographical errors, inaccuracies of
current information or improvements to
programs and/or equipment, may be
made by Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications AB at any time and without
notice. Such changes will, however, be
incorporated into new editions of this document. Any hard copies of this document
are to be regarded as temporary reference
copies only.
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Product overview
The T68i comes in two versions, T68i and T68ie.
The only difference between the two versions is
the languages they support. In this document, the
name T68i stands for both versions.
The T68i is small, sleek and impressively
designed. The most innovative of its features is a
large 256 colour display allowing high-quality
colour imaging and a host of new interfaceenhancing functions.
With a GPRS (General Packet Radio Services)
modem built in, the T68i offers a fast and
satisfying mobile Internet experience. And with
Bluetooth wireless technology, connecting the
T68i to other devices is smooth and simple. The
T68i is a triple band 900/1800/1900 premium
product which is planned to be available Q1,
2002.
Key functions and features
Multimedia Messaging - Digital
greetings
Reacting to the enormous popularity of mobile
phone messaging, Sony Ericsson has
incorporated the latest messaging standard into
the T68i, along with a colour display for an
enhanced imaging experience.
Say it in words, say it with pictures, animate it,
add sound. Multimedia birthday and holiday
greetings are great fun to put together using the
T68i. On vacation, use your mobile phone and
accessories to send a digital postcard with
stylized text, digital pictures of where you are,
and authentic sound clips to friends and family
back home. If, when shopping, you find
something a friend might like, you can instantly
send a digital picture of the item and ask if they
like it.
With MMS, the subscription applications get
more interesting, for example stock information,
movie trailers and weather reports
images from the Web is another alternative.
Thousands of online image collections already
exist on the Web and many sites are already
gearing up to include images for use in mobile
phones.
There are various ways to incorporate images and
other multimedia into your communication. You
can attach pictures to people listed in your phone
book and have pictures or icons of the caller
identifying them in your display.
The pictures are stored in the picture browser in
the phone. From here, the user can select view,
thumbnail or full view, as well as keep track of the
number and size of the pictures stored in the
phone.
WAP 2.0 supporting XHTML™
The WAP browser supports the markup
languages of WAP 2.0 – XHTML Mobile and
XHTML Basic. These two subsets of the Web
standard XHTML are supported by all major Web
browsers. An XHTML page can be viewed in both
the WAP browser and in any standard Web
browser. All of the basic XHTML features are
supported, including text, images, links,
checkboxes, radio buttons, text areas, headings,
horizontal rules and lists.
In addition to XHTML, the WAP browser supports
WML. The user can navigate between WML and
XHTML pages.
WAP 2.0 in the T68i also supports cookies, often
used by Web sites to store site-specific
information in the browser between visits to the
site. Cookies are often used by e-commerce sites
(shopping carts and wish lists), and to save the
user from entering the same information more
than once.
Full graphic 256 colour display
The large colour display of the T68i enhances
viewing, facilitating high-quality multimedia
messaging and personalized imaging. The
standby display looks like the desktop in a
computer, with the menus presented as icons.
Imaging
With a digital camera attached to your T68i, you
can take, view, store and send high-quality
pictures over the air to another mobile phone, as
MMS messages, or you can send them to an email address or Web photo album. Downloading
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Joystick navigation
The T68i has an easy-to-use 5-directional
joystick function. Using finger or thumb, you can
easily navigate the new T68i menu system. When
you arrive at the required function in a menu,
instead of pressing Yes, just gently press the
joystick and the feature is activated. The T68i
MMI is adapted for easy joystick navigation.
Bluetooth wireless technology
The T68i is among the first mobile phones on the
market with built-in Bluetooth wireless
technology. Using this reliable and secure
connection, the T68i can communicate with your
Bluetooth headset or mobile computer via a
radio link instead of a cable, when the two
devices are within 10 metres of each other.
Unlike infrared, Bluetooth wireless technology is
not dependent on line-of-sight communication.
With a Bluetooth headset, wherever your phone
is when it rings, you can answer it. The phone
can be in your briefcase, your coat pocket or
even in another room.
Two or more mobile phones with Bluetooth
wireless technology can exchange data such as
images, business e-cards, ring signals, contacts,
notes and calendar data. It is also possible to
play interactive games between phones. You
could be at a meeting with your laptop open in
front of you and a new e-mail message is
displayed on the screen. In this case, your T68i,
which could be in your briefcase under the table,
has received an e-mail message and passed it
on to your laptop by way of a Bluetooth
connection.
GPRS
GPRS uses Internet-style packet based
technology. It lets you be permanently
connected to the mobile Internet, but only uses
the radio link for the duration of time that it
transfers data. GPRS offers the user the speed
needed for satisfactory mobile Internet usability.
The T68i supports GPRS 3+1.
More in-phone functions
E-mail
The T68i is one of the first mobile phones on the
market with a built-in fully functional e-mail
client. With inbox, outbox, save draft and reply
options, you have all the functions you need for
effective e-mail communication in a small and
powerful mobile phone. Constantly connected to
a POP3, SMPT or IMAP4 e-mail server anywhere
on the Internet, your T68i stores messages
(without attachments) dynamically, depending on
available memory, and updates your inbox
automatically and over the air. Check your e-mail
anywhere. Reply to e-mail on the move. Friends,
family and business contacts know that when
they send you e-mail, you receive it and can read
it and act on it immediately. You can include
pictures in outgoing e-mails, but not receive
attachments. Hyperlinks in e-mails are
supported.
Enhanced voice control
Lets you dial, answer, reject, change profiles and
use a “magic word” to activate voice control.
Instead of having to press a sequence of keys to
activate voice control, you simply say a userdefined word or phrase and the voice control
function is automatically activated. You can also
redial a number by simply saying “redial”.
EMS (Enhanced Messaging Service)
You can send text, pictures and sounds in easyto-create and fun messages. EMS has been
adopted by several leading mobile phone
manufacturers, making it possible for T68i users
to send enhanced text messages to users of
other makes of mobile phones. EMS makes it
possible for the user to use text formatting (style,
size, alignment and paragraphs) in a text
message. At purchase there are several predefined images and animations in the T68i.
Predictive Text Input Software
Text messaging with your T68i is made easier
than ever with the introduction of predictive text
input software. Instead of having to press keys
several times for a letter, software in your T68i
chooses from a dictionary of words and phrases
and anticipates what word or phrase you are
writing, giving your mobile phone keyboard ease
of use comparable to that of a full-size keyboard.
Screen saver and sleep mode
The screen saver is activated when the phone
has been idle for 26 seconds. There is a pre-
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defined screen saver at the purchase of the
phone, but the user can choose his/her own
image/animation as a screen saver. After a short
period of time the screen saver changes to sleep
mode, to save power.
Memory management
All applications in the T68i share the same
memory, allowing for efficient memory usage.
When the memory runs low, the user gets
information about the current memory situation,
where each application’s usage is displayed. In
the memory manager menu, the user can delete
items from any application, in order to set
memory free. The memory available for the user is
approximately 800 kBytes.
technology, infrared or MMS.
SyncML - for remote synchronization
SyncML is an open standard that allows you to
synchronize calendars, files and phone books
with any mobile device irrespective of model and
make. In the T68i, SyncML is used for remote
synchronization. This means that e-mails read on
the mobile phone, for example, automatically
show up as read e-mail messages on the desktop
computer. When the time for a meeting is being
changed at the office, the user gets the correct
update in the mobile, after having performed a
synchronization over WAP.
iMelody and Melody Composer
With the Notes function, the user can make quick
notes that can be stored in the phone or sent to
others. One note can be displayed in standby as
a reminder. vNote can be sent via Bluetooth
wireless technology, infrared or MMS.
The audio iMelody format enhances the sound
quality in the T68i. With this format, the user can
play, compose, edit and send melodies within the
improved Melody Composer. The new composer
has an improved graphical user interface to
simplify melody handling. All new and edited
melodies are stored in the iMelody format.
Mobile chat
Sound browser
Mobile chat makes text messaging easier, since a
chat-session opens up immediately when a text
message is received from a phone. Because the
user stays connected during the session, the
messages open up automatically. All previous
messages from both persons are visible on
screen, each writer being distinguished by a
nickname.
From the Sound browser function, the user can
handle all sounds (for example eMelodies,
iMelodies and sound recordings) stored in the
phone. The user can play, edit, send and view
information on the sounds. Ring signals (eMelody,
iMelody, vMel) can be downloaded via WAP or
exchanged via SMS (iMelodies), infrared,
Bluetooth wireless technology and MMS
(iMelodies). Sound recordings can be exchanged
via infrared, Bluetooth and MMS. The maximum
number of sounds is limited only by the amount
of free memory.
Notes (vNote)
Picture phone book
The phone book in the T68i lets the user assign a
picture, a personal ring signal or a voice
command to a certain phone number. When the
user gets a call from this person, the picture
(instead of the number) is shown in the display. If
a personal ring signal or a voice command is
assigned to the phone number, that particular
sound is heard instead.
Camera application
The camera application in the T68i supports the
Communicam MCA-20. The user can browse,
view, send and store pictures in the phone. It is
also possible to set different picture sizes.
Calendar (vCalendar)
Themes
The T68i calendar supports week numbering and
lets you create, edit and delete both
appointments and tasks. It is a versatile mini
organizer. It stores appointment details, offers
day, week and month views and effectively
reminds you when something is due. Using the
advanced data capabilities built into the T68i, you
can also synchronize calendar, tasks and
contacts between your mobile or stationary PC or
other device and your mobile phone. vCalendar
entries can be sent via Bluetooth wireless
With themes, the user can change the
appearance of the display, for example, the text,
the background colours and the background
picture. The phone comes with three pre-defined
pictures. It is possible to download and exchange
additional themes. The maximum number of
themes is limited only by the amount of free
memory.
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Multimedia in the
T68i
Image formats
For information on Image formats and
downloading of images, see “Image format
technical data” on page 67 and “Images –
downloading to phone” on page 67.
The T68i is a multimedia phone. The colour
display together with the audio functionality
gives the user several multimedia possibilities.
Sounds can be recorded and pictures can be
created and edited. By using themes, it is easy to
change the appearance of the display. Pictures,
audio, animations and themes can be
transmitted via MMS.
Graphics
Graphics (tables, charts, diagrams and layouts)
has a major impact on the way we work. The
T68i supports JPG (max 640x480), GIF (max
160x120), WBMP (max 320x320) and animated
GIFs. With MMS, the user can personalize the
appearance of the display – for example the text,
the background colours and the background
picture.
Audio
The user of the T68i can use the mobile phone as
a sound recorder. With the sound recorder
function, it is easy to make a voice recording, for
example a personal rendition of “Happy
Birthday”. The audio function in the T68i also
allows downloading of sounds and melodies.
Pictures
With a digital camera attached to your T68i, you
can take, view and store pictures. It is also
possible to download colour pictures to your
T68i. The pictures are stored in the picture
browser in the phone. From here, the user can
select view, thumbnail or full view, as well as
keep track of the number and size of the pictures
stored in the phone.
The pictures stored in your T68i can be used for
creating your own digital postcards. This is easily
done by adding text to the pictures and sending
them via MMS.
Themes
With themes, the user can change the
appearance of the display, for example the text,
the background colours and the background
picture. The phone comes with a number of predefined pictures, and it is possible to download
additional themes. The maximum number of
themes is limited only by the amount of memory.
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MMS (Multimedia
Messaging
Service)
One of the key features in the T68i is the
Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS), expected
to become the preferred messaging method of
mobile terminal users, since there are virtually no
limits to the content of an MMS transmission. An
MMS message from the T68i can contain text,
graphics, animations, images, audio clips and
ring melodies. For more detailed information, see
“Multimedia message service” on page 54. For
third-part developers’ information, please visit
www.ericsson.com/mobilityworld/ and look for
the MMS Developers’ guidelines.
Defined and specified by 3GPP as a standard for
third generation implementation, MMS completes
the potential of messaging. Sending digital
postcards and PowerPoint-style presentations is
expected to be among the most popular user
applications of MMS. Eagerly awaited by young
users in particular, MMS is projected to fuel the
growth of related market segments by as much
as forty percent.
Using the Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) as
bearer technology and powered by the highspeed transmission technologies EDGE, GPRS
and UMTS (W-CDMA), Multimedia Messaging
allows users to send and receive messages that
look like PowerPoint-style presentations. The
messages may include any combination of text,
graphics, photographic images, speech and
music clips . MMS will serve as the default mode
of messaging on all terminals, making total
content exchange second nature. From utility to
sheer fun, it offers benefits at every level and to
every kind of user.
Figure 1. An MMS message can contain images,
music, audio and graphics.
MMS objects
Although MMS is a direct descendant of SMS,
the difference in content is dramatic. The size of
an average SMS message is about 140 bytes,
while the maximum size of an MMS message is
limited only by the memory. That is why the key
word to describe MMS content is rich. Complete
with words, sounds and images, MMS content is
endowed with the user’s ideas, feelings and
personality. An MMS message can contain one or
more of the following:
Text
As with SMS and EMS, an MMS message can
consist of normal text. The length of the text is
unlimited, and it is possible to format the text.
The main difference between an EMS and MMS
message is that in an MMS message, text can be
accompanied not only by simple pixel images or
melodies but by photographic images, graphics,
audio clips and in the future, video sequences.
Templates
The T68i comes with a number of MMS predefined templates, for example templates for
birthday cards, meeting requests etc.
Audio
MMS provides the ability to send and receive full
sound (iMelody and AMR) messages. Not only
can users share a favourite song ot ring signal
with a friend, they can also use the mobile phone
to record sound and send it along with a
message. Because sound includes speech as
well as music, this extra dimension of an MMS
message makes for enhanced immediacy of
expression and communication. Rather than
sending a downloaded birthday jingle in EMS, for
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example, a user can send a clip of his or her own
personal rendition of “Happy Birthday”.
Pictures and themes
By using either a digital camera attached to the
T68i with a cable, or a snap-on camera
accessory, users can take a snapshot and
immediately send it to a recipient. The ability to
send pictures is one of the most exciting
attributes of MMS, as it allows users to share
meaningful moments with friends, family and
colleagues.
MMS.
Notes
The T68i supports vNote. Notes can be sent via
MMS.
.
Mobile picture transmission also offers
inestimable utility in business applications, from
sending on-site pictures of a construction project
to capturing and storing an interesting design
concept for later review. Editing a picture by
adding text allows users to create their own
electronic postcards, an application that is
expected to substantially cut into the traditional
postcard-sending market.
Themes (downloaded or pre-defined) can be
exchanged via MMS.
SMIL presentations
SMIL stands for Synchronized Multimedia
Integration Language and is pronounced “smile”.
SMIL in the T68i allows the user to the create and
transmit PowerPoint-style presentations on the
mobile device. SMIL is an advanced XML-based
protocol, and Sony Ericsson MMS supports a
subset of this protocol. Using a simple media
editor, users can incorporate audio and animated
GIFs along with still images, animations and text
to assemble full multimedia presentations.
The idea of SMIL is to allow the user to
customize the page timing in Powerpoint-style
presentations. The user can decide in which
order the image and text will be displayed, as
well as for how long the images and text lines are
to be shown in the display
PIM communication with MMS
With MMS in the T68i, it is easy to send and
receive business cards, calendar entries and
notes.
Business card (vCard)
With MMS in the T68i, the user can send his/her
business card.
Calendar entry (vCal)
With the vCal function the user can enclose a
vCal entry when sending a meeting request via
Figure 2. Example of the creation of an MMS
message.
Benefits
Essentially enabling the mobile terminal to serve
as image processor and conveyor, Multimedia
Messaging accommodates the exchange of
important visual information as readily as it
facilitates fun. Business and leisure usage of
MMS will be dynamically merged, resulting in
enhanced personal efficiency for users and
increased network activity for operators. In short,
MMS affords total usage for total communication
Because MMS uses WAP as its bearer
technology and is being standardized by 3GPP, it
has wide industry support and offers full
interoperability, which is a major benefit to
service providers and end users. Ease-of-use
resulting from both the gradual steps of the
messaging evolution and the continuity of user
experience gained from interoperability is
assured.
The MMS server, through which MMS messages
are sent, supports flexible addressing (to both
normal phone numbers (MSISDN) and e-mail
accounts), which makes user interface more
friendly and allows greater control for operators.
The MMS server, moreover, is responsible for the
instant delivery feature of MMS.
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MMS technical features
Architecture
The MMS standard, just like SMS, offers storeand-forward transmission (instant delivery) of
messages, rather than a mailbox-type model.
MMS is a person-to-person communications
solution, meaning that the user gets the message
directly into the mobile. He or she doesn’t have to
call the server to get the message downloaded to
the mobile. Unlike SMS, the MMS standard uses
WAP as its bearer protocol. MMS will take
advantage of the high speed data transport
technologies EDGE and GPRS and support a
variety of image, video and audio formats to
facilitate a complete communication experience.
The MMS Centre (MMS-C) is comprised of the
MMS Server, the MMS Proxy-Relay and the MMS
Store. The MMS Centre is the central element of
the MMS network architecture, providing storage
and operational support, enabling instant delivery
of multimedia messages from terminal-toterminal and terminal-to-e-mail, and supporting
flexible addressing. The centre’s MMS ProxyRelay interacts with the application being run on
the MMS-enabled terminal to provide various
messaging services. WAP is used as bearer of an
MMS message between the MMS-C and the
MMS client (application). The WAP Gateway is
used for delivery and retrieval of messages
Figure 3. The architecture of MMS
Message conversion
OTA configuration
The MMS-C is able to perform limited message
conversion - for example, from MMS to SMS - so
that processing and air time is not wasted in
sending messages to mobile terminals that do
not have adequate capability to receive them. It
also handles service aspects such as store and
forward, guaranteed delivery, subscriber
preferences, operator constraints, and billing
information. The MMS-C also vouches for high
quality messaging, e.g. by format conversion.
This means that the MMS-C recognizes which
formats are supported in the mobile phone, and
adapts the MMS messages to these formats.
Users can easily get MMS into their phone. MMS
supports OTA, meaning that the user does not
have to configure the settings manually. The
configuration is done by the operator.
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EMS (Enhanced
Messaging
Service)
Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) adds new
powerful functionality to the well-known SMS
standard. With it, mobile phone users can add
life to SMS text messaging in the form of
pictures, animations,sound and formatted
text.This gives the users new ways to express
feelings, moods and personality in SMS
messages. As well as messaging,users will enjoy
collecting and swapping pictures and ring
signals and other melodies, downloading them
from the Internet or editing them directly on the
phone.
EMS uses existing SMS infrastructure and
industry standards, keeping investments to a
minimum for operators and providing a familiar
user interface and compatibility with existing
phones and with other manufacturers.
EMS – more than just words
Sounds and melodies
EMS gives the user the ability to send and
receive sounds. These can be pre-defined
sounds, such as “Chime high” and “Notify ”, or
melodies (ring signals in the phone), downloaded
from the Internet, received in SMS messages or
composed by the user on the phone keypad or a
PC.
Several sounds and melodies can be inserted in
one message, and they can be combined with
pictures.
Pictures, animations and formatted
text
Phones supporting EMS include a set of predefined pictures for inserting in SMS messages.
New pictures and animations are downloaded
from the Internet or received in SMS messages.
Pictures can be created and edited in the phone
using a built-in Picture Editor. Several pictures
can be inserted in one message,and they can be
combined with sounds and melodies. The users
can format text in messages with different styles
and sizes.
Concatenated messages
A part of the EMS standard is the support for
concatenated messages, which means that the
phone is able to automatically combine several
messages both when creating and receiving
EMS. This is useful to be able to build,and
display,messages with rich content,since the
amount of information in each SMS is limited by
the SMS standards.
New possibilities with
messaging
The EMS standard is now a part of the SMS
standard and supported by the major network
operators and mobile phone manufacturers. This
universal approach enables a fast penetration
and development of new services and
applications within messaging.
Creativity explosion
Users will be inspired to create and swap their
own melodies and pictures. But more
importantly, professional content creators and
providers are already preparing to offer
imaginative and creative contents for use with
EMS. Based on subscriptions, fees or ads,
network operators will be able to provide wide
ranges of ring signals, operator logos and
corporate icons, as well as personal and moodrelated pictures and melodies. Movie, music and
game companies can promote new products and
events with designer melodies, animations and
pictures.
Huge business potential
Network operators can now enhance their
services and attract more customers by offering
pictures, animations, ring signals and melodies
for download at their portals. Operators can
charge more per EMS message since it contains
more data. Thereby EMS adds more value to the
operators and to the end users.
Increase SMS revenue
EMS uses the same basic network support as
ordinary SMS, and with the same familiar user
interface. From an operator's point of view, SMS
is low tech because minimal investment is
needed to provide an effective SMS service to
subscribers and little maintenance is required.
EMS will create additional revenue for service
providers and network operators by increasing
SMS traffic.
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Compatible with SMS standards
Users will find EMS as easy to use as SMS. At the
moment 15 billion SMS messages, are sent every
month worldwide. Roughly 80% of this traffic is
user-to-user i.e. mobile phone users sending
short messages to each other using the keypad
of the phone to enter text. The remaining 20 % is
shared by downloads and notifications of
different kinds.
The Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) was first
submitted to the standards committees by
Ericsson. Ericsson presented the outline structure
of EMS to the relevant ETSI/ 3GPP committees.
The major mobile phone manufacturers and most
operators are actively contributing to the 3GPP
standards. Hence the EMS standards have
evolved and are now stable and complete as part
of the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP)
technical specification.
An EMS message can be sent to a mobile phone
that does not support EMS, or only supports part
of EMS. All the EMS elements i.e. text formatting,
pictures, animations and sounds are located in
the message header. The EMS contents will be
ignored by a receiving phone that does not
support the standard. Only the text message will
be displayed to the receiver. This is true
consumer-friendly standardization. EMS is
compatible to SMS across most of the range of
mobile phones from the oldest to the newest.
Some companies in the mobile phone industry
have developed their own messaging
technologies, which only work with their own
phone models. Network operators are in favour of
EMS because it is universal – many of the major
mobile phone manufacturers are constructively
improving and developing the EMS standards
even further for implementation in their products.
Examples of EMS contents and
applications
A wide range of contents, applications and
services may be developed. Below is a list of
examples and areas where messaging can be
enhanced with EMS.
User-to-user message
Messages usually originating from the keypad of
a mobile phone can include pictures, melodies,
formatted text with EMS.
Voice and e-mail notifications
Notifying mobile phone users that they have new
voice or fax mail messages waiting - including
icons or melodies with EMS.
Unified messaging
The user typically receives a short message
notifying them that they have a new message in
their unified messaging box, with icons or
formatted text further enhancing the message.
Internet e-mail alerts
An Internet e-mail alert is provided in the form of
a short message that typically details the sender
of the email, the subject field and first few words
of the email message, and in this case formatted
text is excellent to identify mesage elements.
Ring signals
Downloading ring signals from the Internet
News & commercials
World news illustrated, sports scores and news
headlines, finance and stock market news with
diagrams and tickers, commercial product
promotions, weather reports with maps, tunes
from TV commercials as ring signals.
Info & entertainment
Ring signals, e-greetings, football club logo, jokeof-the-day illustrated by pictures or sound,
horoscopes, movie related animation or theme
song, TV show promotions, music artist
promotions, lottery results, food and drinks
pictures and recepies, mood-related pictures.
Corporate
Flight schedules, preinstalled corporate logos,
map snippets and travel info, company branded
icons and ring signals, corporate e-mail
notifications, affinity programmes where
companies notify customers of product updates
etc, banks notifying customers about new
services and interest rates, call centres providing
answers to questions about a product, vehicle
positioning combining EMS with Global
Positioning System (GPS) position information,
job dispatch with delivery addresses for sales or
courier package delivery, using EMS in a retail
environment for credit card authorization, remote
monitoring of machines for service and
maintenance purposes.
Using Web, WAP And SMS for download
Already today services exist on the Internet where
users can create melodies, and view icons and
pictures, subscribe to entertainment and
informations services. These may develop further
in the future to support access via PC over the
Internet, from the phone using WAP and even
14
T68i
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with an SMS request interface.
The diagram shows a model over the possibilities with Enhanced Messaging Service:
- When the Operator/Service provider enables EMS in the network, users will enjoy adding life to
messages with sounds, melodies, pictures and formatted text.
- New ranges of Content/Application aggregators on the operator network or the Internet can provide
EMS contents and services to the users over SMS.
- Content Creators/providers can see a new demand for creative contents. Also, promotional activities
from movie companies, record labels etc can provide ring signals, movie snapshots etc.
The added value in SMS messaging will create new revenue which can be shared between the network
operators, the application aggregators and the content providers.
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T68i
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Bluetooth™
wireless
technology
The T68i features built-in Bluetooth wireless
technology. Its short-range radio link operates in
the globally available 2.4 GHz radio frequency
band, ensuring fast and secure communications
up to a range of 10 metres. Please note that in
countries where the use of Bluetooth wireless
technology is not allowed, the Bluetooth function
should be switched off. Contact a Sony Ericsson
representative to check if the use of Bluetooth
wireless technology is restricted in your country.
Bluetooth wireless technology is designed to be
fully functional, providing high transmission
speeds, even in noisy radio frequency
environments. All data transfer is protected by
advanced error-correction methods, ensuring a
high level of data security. For more information,
see “Bluetooth technical data” on page 56.
Bluetooth wireless technology facilitates instant
connections, which are maintained even when
the devices are not within line of sight. Highquality voice transmission is provided under
adverse conditions, making it possible to use a
headset connection to the T68i at all times. A blue
LED (Light Emitting Diode) is used for the
indication of Bluetooth activity.
•
devices
Access points in hotel lobbies and airports
for connecting to computer networks and
the Internet
Using Bluetooth wireless
technology in the T68i
Key benefits include:
•
True wireless connection
Cable replacement for connecting to headsets, computers, networks, printers and
other devices.
•
Several devices
The T68i identifies and maintains several
devices in a pairing list.
•
High speed
High transmission speed, faster than infrared or cable.
•
Radio link
No line of sight required; the phone can
remain in a briefcase or in a pocket, as long
as no solid objects are in between
(whereas infrared requires line of sight).
•
Secure and fast
Data connection with a Bluetooth PC/laptop turns the phone into a modem for connecting to the Internet and for data transfer
(faster than infrared or cable).
•
Synchronization
Fast synchronization, even without line of
sight, of calendar and phone book with PC/
laptop and PDA, and quick exchange of
business cards, calendar events and melodies with other phones and devices.
•
Low power consumption.
Ericsson is a founding partner of the Bluetooth
Special Interest Group (SIG). Bluetooth wireless
technology devices that are expected to be
available in the near future, include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Headsets for wireless voice transmission
and remote call control
PCs, laptops, PDAs, palmpads for data
transfer, synchronization etc.
PC cards for Bluetooth wireless technology
in laptops and PDAs
MP3 music player
Other phones for exchanging business
cards, ring signals, playing games etc.
Digital still and motion video cameras
Printers, hard disks and other storage
devices
Handheld scanners for text, barcodes and
images
Household appliances with built-in logic,
as well as games and entertainment
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T68i
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Synchronize
calendar and
phone book
In everyday life, access to an updated calendar
and addresses of friends and business
colleagues is greatly appreciated. To be truly
mobile, users must be able to carry their
important information with them. Equipping
mobile phones with Personal Information
Manager (PIM) programs such as calendars, todo lists and address books gives users access to
their most important data anywhere and anytime.
The information is kept updated by
synchronizing with the information at the office or
at home.
Hierarchical phone book with contacts
The T68i features a hierarchical phone book. For
every contact, details such as name, home, work
and mobile numbers, pager number, e-mail
address and other information can be stored.
The hierarchical phone book in the T68i is
compatible with most groupware and agenda
programs, such as Microsoft Outlook, enabling
smooth local synchronization of contact
information between the phone and a PC, via
cable, Bluetooth wireless technology or IR. For
remote synchronization of Contacts and
Calendar over WAP, the T68i supports SyncML.
SyncML, an open standard
for remote synchronization
in the T68i
and immediate update of data. The benefit for
the end user is that SyncML can be used almost
anywhere and in a wide variety of devices,
regardless of application or operating system.
For more detailed information, see “SyncML
technical data” on page 68, or go to
www.syncml.org.
What is SyncML?
SyncML is the common language for
synchronizing all devices and applications over
any network. SyncML leverages Extensible
Markup Language (XML), making SyncML a truly
future-proof platform. With SyncML any personal
information, such as e-mail, calendars, to-do
lists, contact information and other relevant data,
will be consistent, accessible and up to date, no
matter where the information is stored. For
example, a calendar entry made to a mobile
device on a business trip is equally available to a
secretary in a network calendar. SyncML is the
ultimate choice for remote synchronization.
In the T68i, SyncML supports remote
synchronization of the calendar and phone
bookDesigned for the requirements of the
wireless world
SyncML is designed specifically with the wireless
world’s tight requirements in mind. SyncML
minimizes the use of bandwith and can deal with
the special challenges of wireless
synchronization, such as relatively low
connection reliability and high network latency.
SyncML supports synchronization over WAP,
fixed networks, infrared, cable or Bluetooth
wireless technology.
In the T68i, SyncML enables synchronization
over WAP – an ultimate solution for travellers.
SyncML – background
The SyncML Initiative Ltd. was founded by
Ericsson, IBM, Lotus, Motorola, Matsushita,
Nokia, Palm Inc., Psion and Starfish Software in
February 2000. Supported by more than 600
software and hardware developers, the SyncML
Initiative Ltd. seeks to develop and promote a
globally open standard for remote
synchronization, called SyncML. Unlike many
other synchronization platforms, SyncML is an
open industry specification that offers universal
interoperability. Because it uses a common
language, called XML, for specifying the
messages that synchronize devices and
applications, SyncML has been called the only
truly future-proof platform for enabling reliable
17
T68i
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Figure 4 SyncML architecture
Benefits of a common synchronization
protocol
•
End users
Today’s user of mobile devices probably
uses a different synchronization product
with every device. Each technology can
synchronize only a few applications, or is
limited to a particular type of network connection. This arrangement is expensive to
install, confusing to configure and operate,
and costly to administer. With SyncML,
users will be able to buy devices that synchronize with a broader range of data.
•
Device manufacturers
Device manufacturers will benefit from a
common protocol that will make the device
interoperable with a broader range of applications, services, and network and transmission technologies.
•
Service providers
Service providers moving into the growth
arena of application hosting are particularly
concerned that a proliferation of synchronization technologies will make it impossible
to deploy and support their customers in a
cost-effective manner. To support the
range of data types and devices in use
today, service providers must install and
configure multiple server infrastructures,
maintain and support that infrastructure,
and maintain compatibility and performance. The alternative now available, to
use a single solution for data connectivity,
involves the risk of a tight coupling to a
propriety solution. With SyncML, they will
be able to provide connectivity to a wider
selection of applications.
•
Application developers
Choosing to support multiple synchronization technologies enables an application to
support more types of devices and networked data, but that choice comes at a
cost. With SyncML, application developers
will be able to develop an application that
can connect to a more diverse set of
devices and network data.
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T68i
White Paper, April 2002
•
Network operators
As multiple applications that need remote
synchronization over WAP are developed,
there will be an automatic growth of revenue for network operators.
Local synchronization
Open standard
Synchronization is possible with almost any
groupware or office program, since the
synchronization method complies with the open
standard IrMC 1.1, as specified by the Infrared
Data Association – reference http://
www.irda.org. IrMC 1.1 brings together the
following standards:
•
•
•
vCard 2.1 for address book information
vCalendar 1.0 for appointment and to-do
information
ObEx (Object Exchange) for data
exchange
Bluetooth wireless technology or infrared
The T68i synchronizes using the same protocol,
regardless of connection type. It connects via
Bluetooth wireless technology, infrared or cable.
The cable is connected either directly to the
phone or to the desktop charger.
Automatic synchronization
When infrared or Bluetooth wireless technology
is switched on in the phone, the synchronization
process starts automatically, as soon as the
phone is within range of a compatible port on a
PC or handheld device (a suitable
synchronization program must be running on the
device).
Intelligent process
A synchronization engine performs the task of
synchronizing. For local synchronization, the
synchronization engine is an application that
runs on the desktop computer. The
synchronization engine compares, updates and
resolves conflicts to ensure that the information
in the phone is the same as that in the computer.
Local synchronization software and
the T68i
PCs equipped with XTNDConnect PC For
Ericsson will perform synchronization with
Microsoft Outlook. For other groupware
environments (Lotus Notes, etc.), the full version
of XTNDConnect PC is required. By using
Bluetooth wireless technology, infrared or the RS
232 Cable, you can easily perform a fast, local
synchronization.
Integration between XTNDConnect PC For
Ericsson and Microsoft Outlook provides an
embedded menu for one-key synchronization.
To enhance functionality and compatibility
further, the synchronization software can easily
be upgraded.
The number of units that can talk to each other is
unlimited. One phone can be partner with several
PCs. This ensures that information from both the
work PC and the home PC can be synchronized
with the phone. For users that have both a
desktop PC and a laptop (free version
XTNDConnect PC) or a PDA (free version
XTNDConnect PC), it is an efficient way to
synchronize data with the phone. This way, data
can also be transferred between PCs to keep
them in sync.
If the synchronization software is upgraded to a
full version of XTNDConnect PC, one PC can be
partnered with several different phones. This is
vital if, for example, each member in a work
group has his/her own T68i, and needs to
synchronize with a PC. It makes it easy, for
example, to download a common company
phone directory to the phone book in each
company mobile phone. With the full version of
the synchronization software, other phone types
and handheld devices, such as PDAs and
Windows CE computers, can also be
synchronized.
XTNDConnect PC For Ericsson
This synchronization software can be
downloaded from
www.SonyEricssonMobile.com and provides a
powerful set of functions:
•
•
•
•
T68i phone book and calendar synchronization with Microsoft Outlook.
An embedded synchronization in
Microsoft Outlook, providing one-key synchronization and allowing the user to control the synchronization process with easyto-use settings.
PC applications supported by XTNDConnect PC For Ericsson:
Microsoft Outlook 97, 98,
2000
Platforms for using XTNDConnect PC For
Ericsson:
Windows 98, Me (Millennium
Edition), Windows NT 4.0 and
2000.
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T68i
White Paper, April 2002
•
•
Pentium II recommended
64 MB RAM recommended
(minimum 32 MB)
Other requirements:
20 MB free hard disk space
Bluetooth wireless technology,
infrared, or cable connection
Support is handled by Sony Ericsson.
XTNDConnect PC
All users of the T68i can easily upgrade to the full
version of the synchronization software. A
number of features and supported applications
will then be added, including XTNDConnect
Phone Viewer.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Phone book and calendar synchronization
for the T68i.
XTNDConnect Phone Viewer for easy data
entry. All data can be created, viewed and
edited on a PC.
PC applications supported by XTNDConnect PC (full upgraded version):
Microsoft Outlook 97, 98,
2000
Lotus Notes 4.5, 4.6, R5
Lotus Organizer 4.1, 5.0, 97,
97 GS, 6.0
Symantec ACT! 3.05, 4.0,
2000
NetManage Ecco Pro 4.0
GoldMine 3.0, 4.0 (StandardEdition)
Platforms for using XTNDConnect PC:
Windows 98, Me (Millennium
Edition), Windows NT 4.0 and
2000.
Pentium II recommended
64 MB RAM recommended
(minimum 32 MB)
Other requirements:
20 MB free hard disk space
Bluetooth wireless technology,
infrared, or cable connection
An embedded synchronization in Microsoft
Outlook, providing one-key synchronization and allowing the user to control the
synchronization process with easy-to-use
settings.
Handheld devices supported include the
T68i, palm-sized and handheld devices
using Windows CE and PalmOS/ Casio
Personal Organizers.
All support for the full version is handled by
Extended Systems Inc.
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T68i
White Paper, April 2002
WAP services
The T68i has a WAP browser, supporting WAP
2.0 (WML 1.3). WAP 2.0 optimizes usage of
higher bandwidths and packet-based
connections of wireless networks.
The typical WAP client is a small, portable device
connected to a wireless network. This includes
mobile phones, pagers, smart phones, PDAs and
other small devices. Of course, compared to
desktop and laptop computers, these devices
are limited by user interface, low memory and
low computing power.
The WAP browser in the T68i is compliant with
WAP 2.0 and includes WTLS class 3 as well as
mechanisms for digital signatures. It supports
WML and XHTML. The WAP browser in the T68i
is also designed to access information such as
timetables, share prices, exchange rates,
Internet banking and other interactive services.
For more details, see “WAP browser technical
data” on page 58.
Using WAP in the T68i
The built-in WAP browser in the T68i gives the
user portable, fast and secure access to a wide
variety of services, including personalized
services, with new opportunities for business,
individuals and service providers:
Push services
Businesses and service providers can “push”
content or service indications to work groups
and/or customers. Examples of pushed content
would be mail alerts, messaging, news, stock
quotes, contacts, meeting requests, etc.
Support of XHTML
The WAP browser supports the markup
languages of WAP 2.0 – XHTML Mobile and
XHTML Basic. These two subsets of the Web
standard XHTML are supported by all major Web
browsers. An XHTML page can be viewed in
both the WAP browser and in any standard Web
browser. All of the basic XHTML features are
supported, including text, images, links,
checkboxes, radio buttons, text areas, headings,
horizontal rules and lists.
Support for cookies
This version of WAP has support for cookies
(client based), an application used by Web sites
to store site-specific information in the browser
between visits to the site. Cookies give the site
owner a possibility to see when a person has
visited their site. They also save the user from
having to enter the same information (e.g. the
password or user ID) more than once. Cookies
are often used by e-commerce sites (shopping
carts and wish lists).
Sending bookmarks
WAP 2.0 enables the sending of bookmarks via
infrared and Bluetooth wireless technology (in
the vBookmark format) as well as via SMS.
Provide settings
Using SMS messages, configuration settings can
be sent over the air, OTA, so that the user does
not need to configure the WAP access settings
manually. WAP settings may also be customized
by the operator. For more information, see “WAP
Operator technical data” on page 59.
Adapt to phone type
The User Agent Profile function allows WAP
content to be automatically optimized for the
T68i, ensuring the intended user experience.
Several bearer types
The T68i accesses WAP over a standard GSM
Data connection as well as over a GPRS
connection (network-dependent services.)
Bandwidth efficiency
Unlike traditional Internet services, WAP services
are relayed to wireless devices as binary
encoded data, maximizing bandwidth efficiency.
A GPRS connection further increases efficiency.
Easy create for WAP
Creating a WAP service is no harder than
creating an Internet/intranet service, as WML and
WMLScript are based on well-known Internet
languages such as HTML and JavaScript.
Using standard tools
Service creators can use standard tools such as
ASP (Active Server Page) or CGI (Common
Gateway Interface) to generate content
dynamically. Services can be created once and
then made accessible on a broad range of
wireless networks.
Maintain customer base
Existing services can be adapted to WAP. The
necessary binary encoding is handled by a WAP
Gateway, allowing HTML-based services to be
21
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
viewed on the WAP browser of the T68i. An
XHTML page can be viewed in both the WAP
browser and in any standard Web browser.
Improve productivity
A business can use a WAP gateway to provide a
secure connection to its corporate network,
improving internal communication flow by making
information available to mobile as well as office
users.
tiations.
GSM data access
•
•
•
•
The WAP profiles
A WAP profile holds network settings and user
identification, allowing the user to switch easily
between corporate services and WAP services on
the Internet, simply by switching WAP profile.
•
Circuit connection of data calls, which
means that the phone is connected during
the entire WAP session.
Higher transmission speed than with SMS
access.
Pricing is comparable to that of data calls
in the network.
Suitable for complex pull services, browsing and data transfer.
Not suitable for provisioning, pager services.
Gateway characteristics
The T68i has dynamic WAP profile handling,
which means that the user can add, edit and
delete WAP profiles. The T68i has a maximum of
5 WAP profiles.
A WAP Gateway provides Internet/intranet as well
as WAP services to the mobile browser. A
Gateway is identified by an IP number, depending
on access type.
During WAP browsing, the options button on the
T68i gives the user immediate access to a
dynamic option menu for WAP services, similar to
a mouse right-click in PC programs.
End-to-end gateway navigation
The WAP 2.0 supports E2E (End-toEnd) Gateway
navigation, making it possible for example for a
bank to redirect its clients from the Internet
gateway to its own gateway.
Bearer type characteristics
The T68i accesses WAP services over IP. IP can
be provided either over GSM Data or GPRS,
depending on network services.
Typical differences which distinguish the bearer
types are listed below.
GPRS access
•
•
•
•
•
The connection is maintained “constantly”,
with data transmitted in packets, and
transmission capacity being used by the
application in use on an as-needed basis.
Higher transmission speed than with GSM
Data or SMS access.
Pricing of GPRS can be dependent on the
actual use of bandwidth, which means the
user is charged for the volume of data
transmitted, rather than the duration of the
connection.
When transmitting large amounts of data,
bandwidth can be increased automatically
to allow faster transmission speed.
Ideal for complex pull services, browsing,
data transfer, provisioning, pager services,
messaging services, info services, push ini-
Security using WAP
For certain WAP services, such as banking
services, a secure connection between the phone
and WAP gateway is necessary. An icon in the
display of the T68i indicates when a secure
connection is in use.
The T68i is based on the WAP 2.0 (WML 1.3)
specification suite, in which security functionality
is specified by a technology called Wireless
Transport Layer Security (WTLS). The WAP
protocols for handling connection, transport and
security are structured in layers, with security
handled by the WTLS layer, operating above the
transport protocol layer. WTLS classes define the
levels of security for a WTLS connection:
•
•
•
WTLS class 1 – encryption with no authentication.
WTLS class 2 – encryption with server
authentication.
WTLS class 3 – encryption with both server
and client authentication.
Server authentication requires a server certificate
stored at the server side and a trusted certificate
stored at the client side.
Client authentication requires a client certificate
22
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
stored at the client side and a trusted certificate
stored at the server side.
A Wireless Identity Module (WIM) can contain
both trusted and client certificates, private keys
and algorithms needed for WTLS handshaking,
encryption/decryption and signature generation.
The WIM module can be placed on a SIM card
and is then referred to as a SWIM card.
Certificates
To use secure connections, the user needs to
have certificates stored in the phone. There are
two types of certificates:
•
•
Trusted certificate
A certificate that guarantees that a WAP
site is genuine. If the phone has a stored
certificate of a certain type, it means that
the user can trust all WAP gateways that
use the certificate. Trusted certificates can
be pre-installed in the phone, in the SWIM
or they can be downloaded from the
trusted supplier’s WAP page.
Client certificate
A personal certificate that verifies the
user’s identity. A bank that the user has a
contract with may issue this kind of certificate. Client certificates can be preinstalled in the SWIM card.
Configuration of WAP
settings
An easy way to perform WAP configuration in the
T68i is to use the step-by-step WAP configurator
available on http://
www.SonyEricssonMobile.com. The configurator
utilizes OTA provisioning.
Manual configuration is done using the menu
system in the phone. This is described in the
User’s Guide.
Over-the-air provisioning of WAP
settings
To simplify the configuration of WAP settings in
the T68i, all settings can be sent to the phone as
an SMS message. This makes it easy for an
operator, a service provider or a company to
distribute settings for Internet/intranet, and WAP,
without the user having to configure the phone
manually. This also makes it easy to upgrade
services, as no manual configuration is required.
•
•
WIM locks (PIN codes)
There are two types of WAP security locks (PIN
codes) for a SWIM, which protect the
subscription from unauthorized use. The PIN
codes should typically be provided by the
supplier of the SWIM.
•
•
•
•
Access lock
An access lock protects the data in the
WIM. The user is asked to enter the PIN
code the first time the SWIM card is
accessed when establishing a connection.
Signature lock
A signature lock is used for confirming
transactions, much like a digital signature.
In the T68i, the user can check which
transactions have been made with the phone
when browsing. Each time the user confirms a
transaction with a signature lock code, a
contract is stored in the phone. The contract
contains details about the transaction.
•
The OTA configuration message is distributed via SMS point-to-point.
The setup information is a binary encoded
XML message (WBXML). To receive information about OTA specifications, please
contact your local Sony Ericsson representative for consumer products. A configurator that utilizes OTA provisioning can be
tested on www.SonyEricssonMobile.com.
The user is alerted about new settings
when the ongoing browsing session ends.
Settings are not changed during an ongoing browsing session.
User interaction is limited to receiving and
accepting/rejecting the configuration message, and selecting which WAP profile to
allocate the settings to.
Security can be handled using a keyword
identifier displayed on the screen as a
shared secret between the SMS sender
and recipient. It is important that the user
can verify that the configuration message
is authentic.
Push services
Examples of WAP services that can be pushed
include:
•
•
Notification of new e-mail, voice mail, etc.
News, sports results, weather forecasts,
23
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
•
•
•
financial information (stock quotes etc.).
Personal Information Manager (PIM) delivery of contacts, meeting requests etc.
Smart card e-cash.
Interactive games.
In the T68i, the user selects whether to allow
push messages or not. There are two different
forms of Push services:
Service Indication (SI)
An SI service sends to the browser a text
message with a URL of a WAP page. If the user
decides to load the URL, normal WAP browsing
commences. When an SI is received by the T68i,
the user can load it immediately, postpone it or
delete it. Received SIs are stored in the Push
Inbox and can be viewed and loaded at a later
time. The Push Inbox displays a list containing
the first part of each received message. The list is
sorted by action attribute (high/medium/low) or
reception time of the message.
Service Loading (SL)
An SL service sends and displays a WAP page if
accepted by the user. If the SL is not accepted, it
is loaded and stored in the cache for later use.
The user can start the browser and load the page
from the cache manually.
Mobile Internet
The mobile Internet offers much more than
mobile access to the Internet. It opens up a whole
new range of situation-based services that give
the user access to personalized communications,
information and entertainment, anytime,
anywhere.
Data connections
In order to browse via WAP or use an Internet
connection, the user must have a data
communication connection configured in the
phone. This connection contains specific settings
and parameters to connect to an appropriate
server. Several data connections can be saved in
the T68i. To make it easier for the user, data
connections can be provided by the operator via
OTA provisioning.
Advantages of data connections include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Once the data connections are defined and
named, the user does not have to enter the
settings for the connection again.
Data connections can be re-used at any
time.
Individual data settings for working with
WAP, e-mail or the Internet can be stored
and activated as needed.
Data connections can be used for both
GSM Data and GPRS connection settings.
Bearer type for WAP and corresponding
bearer-specific parameters may be
selected.
Data connections contain all the necessary
settings for the Internet access point,
including modem pool phone number or IP
address, user ID and password.
24
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Mobile positioning
The geographic location of mobile subscribers
can be used to provide them with related
information and a variety of services. Sony
Ericsson’s Mobile Positioning System (MPS)
gives operators a fast and cost-effective way to
establish and roll out location-based services.
For users of the T68i, the integration of mobile
positioning with WAP services means that a
complete range of service and information tools
is available.
More information regarding possibilities with and
technologies for mobile positioning is available at
http://www.SonyEricssonMobile.com/mps.
General Packet
Radio Services
The introduction of GPRS (General Packet Radio
Services) is one of the key steps in the evolution
of today’s GSM networks for enhancing the
capabilities of data communication. Data traffic
is increasing enormously (over both wired and
wireless networks), with the growth in demand
for Internet access and services paralleling that
for mobile communications. Users want access
to the Internet while they are away from their
offices and homes, and surveys have found that
the vast majority of business professionals want
the ability to send and receive e-mail, browse the
Web and transmit text and graphics on a
portable device. That is why the main
applications driving Mobile Internet development
are e-mail clients and Web browsers.
The demand for high-speed Internet access will
be the key driver for coming generations of
wireless services, and GPRS can deliver the
necessary speed. GPRS allows innovative
services to be created, enabling new and
previously inaccessible market segments to be
addressed and increasing customer loyalty.
GPRS applications can be developed as both
horizontal and vertical. Vertical applications are
specific, including those for operations such as
reaching police and emergency, taxi, delivery or
automated services (vending machines,
supervision, vehicle tracking). Horizontal
applications are more generic and include those
for Internet access, e-mail, messaging, ecommerce and entertainment.
GPRS is able to take advantage of the global
coverage of existing GSM networks.
Applications developed for GPRS can be
deployed on a large scale and can reap the
associated benefits. GPRS also provides a
secure medium for connections to private
networks, banking and financial services.
With GPRS, the T68i sends data in “packets” at a
very high speed. The T68i remains connected to
the network at all times, using transmission
capacity only when data are sent or received. For
details, see “GPRS technical data” on page 63.
25
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
1 GSM
9,600/14,400
9,600 bps
14,400, 19,200 or 28,800 bps (HSCSD)
9,600/14,400
9,600/14,400
9,050/13,400/
15,600/21,400
9,050/13,400/
15,600/21,400
9,050/13,400/
15,600/21,400
2 GPRS
9,050, 13,400,
15,600, 18,100,
21,400, 26,800,
27,150, 31,200
40,200, 42,800,
46,800 or 64,200 bps
9,050/13,400/
15,600/21,400
Figure 5 A comparison between GSM and GPRS
A normal GSM call uses only one of eight
work dependent).
repeating time slots in the GSM channel, giving a
data speed of 9,600 bps. The T68i supports a
more efficient coding scheme, giving data
speeds of up to 14,400 bps (with necessary network support). Furthermore, High Speed Circuit
Switched Data (HSCSD) adds the possibility of
using two time slots for receiving data, increasing
the data speed to as much as 28,800 bps (net-
In GPRS, data is sent in packets, with up to
Using GPRS in the T68i
Instead of occupying an entire voice channel for
the duration of a data session, the T68i sends/
receives data in small packets, as needed, much
like IP on the Internet. Because of this, the T68i
maintains a constant online connection, its data
transmission abilities summoned by the
application in use on an as-needed basis.
The GPRS specification includes four coding
schemes – CS1, CS2, CS3 and CS4 – that allow
data speeds of 9,050 bps, 13,400 bps, 15,600
bps and 21,400 bps respectively. The T68i works
with all four coding schemes, but data speed will
naturally vary according to network configuration.
At the moment, CS-3 and CS-4 are not supported
in any live network, i.e present speed is limited to
40,200 bps.
three time slots being combined to provide the
necessary bandwidth. The T68i is prepared to
support 3+1 time slots, giving speeds of up to
64,200 bps for receiving data, depending on coding scheme.
The GSM system limits the ability to use all eight
time slots, so the T68i uses up to three time slots
for receiving data, and one slot for transmitting.
This means the speed for receiving data is up to
64,200 bps and up to 21,400 bps for sending
data.
Information about the identity of the phone and
the characteristics of the connection are
described in the PDP (Packet Data Protocol)
context. This information is stored both in the
phone and in the mobile network, so that each
phone is identified and “visible” to the system.
26
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Using with the T68i has several advantages, for
example:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Constant connection
Keep an open connection to an e-mail
system or the company network, staying
online to receive and send messages at all
times. All connection settings can be managed by using the data connections feature.
High speed
Gain access automatically to increased
bandwidth when downloading large files,
images etc.
Cost efficient
Use transmission capacity only when
needed, thus reducing costs.
WAP over GPRS
Access the Internet via WAP at high speed
and with a constant connection.
E-mail over GPRS
Remain connected to an e-mail system
while reading and preparing messages,
(which are sent at a high speed).
Data communication
Transfer data and access the Internet or an
intranet with a PC, PDA or handheld
device connected via Bluetooth wireless
technology, infrared or cable.
Data and voice
Maintain a data connection, for example, a
constant connection to an e-mail system
when conducting a voice call.
Provide settings
Receive GPRS configuration settings from
the provider over the air, OTA, making
manual configuration unnecessary.
User controlled settings
Take advantage of full user control in the
data connections menu, establishing multiple descriptions and accessing advanced
settings for GPRS.
27
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Modem and AT
commands
The T68i contains a complete GSM/GPRS
modem. This provides data and e-mail
communication, as well as Internet/intranet
access, for a connected PC, PDA or handheld
device. Once the PC/PDA is connected to the
phone using a cable, Bluetooth wireless
technology or infrared, and the appropriate
software is installed, the modem in the phone
works in a similar way to a PC Card modem, or an
external modem.
In the T68i, AT commands are used for:
•
•
controlling the data communication
between the PC and the remote service
configuring and requesting settings and
behaviours in the phone, from a connected
PC or PDA
GSM data communication
The built-in data capability turns the phone into a
modem when connected to a PC/PDA. The T68i
offers the user data connection anytime,
anywhere, unmatched by fixed telephone
networks. Each GSM channel is divided into eight
repeating time slots. A normal GSM voice or data
call is circuit switched, and only one time slot is
used for each call. The data speed is therefore
limited to 9,600 bps. For more information, see
“Built-in GSM data modem technical data” on
page 65.
High Speed Data gives a faster speed
High Speed Data (HSCSD) increases speeds for
circuit switched data by allowing the phone to
use a coding scheme with a high capacity, and to
use two time slots for receiving data. The
download speed is increased to up to 28,800
bps. The speed for sending data is limited to
14,400 bps. The data rate can be increased
several times by the use of rate adaption,
interworking with ISDN. This also provides
additional features, such as quick call set-up
capability.
Pricing of GPRS can be dependent on the actual
use of bandwidth, which means very low cost
when no data is sent or received, while the phone
remains connected. When transmitting large
amounts of data, bandwidth can be increased
automatically to allow faster transmission speed,
up to 64,200 bps download speed.
AT commands support
This section outlines the AT commands
supported by the T68i. The information here can
be of use for advanced users, to indicate the
possibilities they have to:
•
•
•
develop new communications software
add the T68i to an application’s list of compatible modems
adjust the settings of their mobile telephone and modem
The modem in the T68i supports the V.25ter
command set, which is the standard
communication set used by modems.
The T68i is compatible with industry de facto
extensions, ETSI 07.05, 07.07 and 07.10.
Overview of AT command functions
AT commands are used to configure the mobile
telephone, to request information about the
current configuration or operational status of the
mobile phone, and to test availability and request
the range of valid parameters, when applicable,
for an AT command.
The built-in modem can be set to any one of three
modes of operation. These are:
Off-line command mode
The command mode for entry of AT commands,
when the device is first turned on.
On-line data mode
Allows “normal” operation of the built-in modem,
for exchanging data or facsimiles with a remote
modem.
On-line command mode
For sending AT commands to the built-in modem
while remaining connected to a remote modem.
GPRS enables constant connection
and high speed
With GPRS, the connection is maintained
“constantly”, and data is transmitted in packets.
28
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
The AT commands in the T68i are grouped as
follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Control and Identification
Call Control
Interface Commands
Data Compression
Mode Management
Audio Control
Accessory Menus
Accessory Authentication
Voice Call Control
Accessory Identification
GSM DTE-DCE Interface Commands
GSM Call Control
GSM Data
GSM High Speed Circuit Switched Data
GSM Network Services
GSM USSD
GSM Facility Lock
GSM Mobile Equipment, Control and Status
GSM Mobile Equipment Error Control
GSM SMS and PDU Mode
GSM GPRS
GSM Phonebook
GSM Clock, Date and Alarm Handling
GSM Subscriber Identification
Ericsson Specific AT Commands for GSM
MMI Settings
Voice Control
OBEX
WAP Browser
29
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Infrared
transceiver
•
•
Exchange of ring signals between compatible phones
Ability to attach a photo from a digital camera in outgoing e-mail
Connection via infrared
Infrared communication creates a data link
between two communications devices through an
infrared beam of light. On the T68i, this link is
used to connect with desktop computers, PDAs,
Sony Ericsson handheld computers, laptop PCs,
other phones (for example, the T39), and other
hardware supporting the standard. The Infrared
Data Association (IrDA) has set the hardware and
software standards that form the infrared
communication links. The T68i complies with the
IrMC 1.1 specification, which defines how mobile
telephony and communication devices can
exchange information. In the T68i, the IrMC 1.1
specification is also used for communication via a
cable.
Key benefits of using the T68i with its built-in
infrared transceiver:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
True wireless communication
Low power consumption
Secure data transmission with the IrDA
DATA standard
Ability to send and receive e-mail and data
on the connected PC/PDA
Ability to connect to the Internet or intranet/LAN from the connected PC/PDA
Ability to manage the phone book from a
PC
Exchange of business cards and calendar
events with vCard/vCalendar compatible
devices
IrDA is a point-to-point communication link
between two infrared ports. The infrared beam
has to be directed towards the target infrared port
and as long as the two infrared ports are within
sight and range, the devices exchange data. For
optimal performance, place the T68i within a
metre and at an angle of 30 degrees to the
infrared port on the PC/PDA, or other phone. An
advantage of the necessary proximity of devices
is reduced risk of transmitting data to other
nearby devices. An infrared link is a serial
connection, which means that data bits are sent
one after another in a long stream. The IrDA–SIR
Data Link Standard is a protocol that makes
transmission of data faultless. The standard
provides a high level of noise immunity, which
means that the connection is not affected by
fluorescent light, sunlight and electromagnetic
fields – making it suitable for the modern office
environment.
Connection via cable
The infrared connection is not always the best
solution when connecting to a PC/PDA. Indeed, it
is not always even possible. The DRS-11 cable
provides the same connectivity between the
phone and another unit.
The DRS-11 cable supports a subset of the
signals in the RS-232 standard, as detailed in
“Infrared transceiver technical data” on page 69.
30
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
In-phone functions and features
*Subscription and/or network-dependent
A
Antenna connector, external for HF kits
No
B
Background light
Yes
Background pictures, pre-defined
Yes
Background pictures, downloadable
Yes, only limited by memory
Bluetooth wireless technology support
Yes, built-in
Bookmarks (URL memory)
Yes, (25)
Built-in antenna
Yes
Business card exchange
Yes
C
Call functions
Call counter
Yes, outgoing and total (not incoming)
Call barring*
Yes
Call divert*
Yes
Call hold*
Yes
Call list (last dialled, answered and missed
calls)
Yes, 30 entries
Call screening*
Yes
Call time/call cost (a.k.a Advice of Charge,
Information/Charging)*
Yes
Call transfer*
Yes
Calling card service
Yes
Calling Line Identification (CLI)
Yes. Either as the number of the caller, or
as a picture, icon or personal ring signal
assigned to the number of the caller.
Conference calls*
Yes
Camera application
Yes. The application supports the
Communicam MCA-20. The user can
browse, view, send and store pictures. It
is also possible to set different picture
sizes.
Chat application
Yes, SMS as radio bearer, developped inhouse.
Clock
Yes, with automatic Time Zone*
Closed User Groups (CUG)*
Yes
31
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Colour display
Yes, 256 colour, 101x80 pixels
Connected Line Identity Presentation (COLP)
Yes
Contacts
Yes
Converter
No
Copyright protection
Yes, possible with copyright protection
via EMS and MMS.
CSD, Circuit Switched Data*
Yes
Date
Yes
Display light
Yes
EDGE (enhanced Data rates for Global
Evolution)*
No
E-mail address storage
Yes
E-mail client
Yes, supporting IMAP4, POP3, SMTP.
EMS (Enhanced Messaging Service)*
Yes, with 30 pre-defined pictures, 15 predefined animations and 4 melodies.
External antenna connector
No
File system
Yes. At the purchase of the T68i phone,
there is 1.0 Mb of memory space for own
objects such as pictures, sounds and
themes.
Fixed Dialling Numbers (FDN)*
Yes
Games
Yes
GPRS (General Packet Radio Services)*
Yes, up to 64,2 kbps (multislot class 4,
3+1 time slots)
H
High Speed Data (HSCSD)*
Yes, multislot class 2
I
Image browser
Yes. Gives access to pictures stored in
the phone.
Imaging support
Yes
Infrared port
Yes
Input methods
T9 Text Input, multitap alphabetic (GSM
standard), eZi Text Input, Bopomofo,
Pinyin and Stroke
J
Joystick
Yes, five-way
K
Keypad lock
Yes
L
Languages
40
M
Melody composer
Yes
Memory check
Yes, dynamic memory allocation: 1.0 Mb
MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service)
Yes
D
E
F
G
32
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Mobile chat
Yes
Modem (data)
Yes, built-in (maximum data rate 108,800
bit/s.)
N
Notes
Yes, up to 10 – depending on size.
O
Option key
Yes, gives the most common options for
the function currently in use. The option
key also provides a help menu for certain
functions.
P
Personal management
Calculator
Yes
Calendar
Yes
Alarm clock with snooze function
Yes
Stopwatch
Yes
Timer
Yes
Currency converter
No
Code memo
Yes
Organizer
Yes
Phone book
Capacity
510 numbers in phone + SIM
Maximum number of ADN read from the SIM
255
Maximum number of FDN read from the SIM
55
Phone book user groups
Yes, 6
Phone lock
Yes
Pictures
Total storage capacity
Limited by the memory
Number of pre-existing pictures
26
Possibility to download
Yes, storage capacity limited by memory
Possibility to create
Yes, storage capacity limited by memory
Picture editor
Yes, stand-alone picture editor facility.
Here the user can create new and edit
existing pictures (WBMP).
Picture phone book
Yes
Pictures, exchange
Yes, via EMS, MMS, infrared and
Bluetooth wireless technology
Predictive text input
Yes
Profiles
Yes, 7
33
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
R
Re-dialling, automatic
Yes
Ring signals
S
Total storage capacity
Limited by the memory
Number of pre-existing ring signals
14
Possibility to download
Yes, storage capacity only limited by the
memory
Possibility to compose
Yes, storage capacity only limited by the
memory
Ring signal exchange
Yes, via EMS, MMS, infrared and
Bluetooth wireless technology
Screen saver
Yes
Shortcuts
Yes
SIM relative features
SIM voltage
3V and 5V
Number of networks that the handset can
mangage on the SIM card
60
SDN support
Yes, 15. Located in Phonebook menu/
Special numbers/ Service numbers
SIM Application Toolkit*
Yes
SIM card copy
Yes
SIM card lock
Yes (support of GID 1 and GID 2)
Sleep mode
Yes
SMS (Short Message Service)*
Yes
SMS, long messages (a.k.a. concatenated
SMS)*
Yes, up to 10 messages of 160
characters each.
SMS Cell Broadcast*
Yes
SMS counter
Yes
SMS templates
Yes, up to 10 templates of 30 characters
each
Sound browser
Yes. Gives the user access to sounds
stored in the phone.
Sound handling
Yes (iMelody and AMR)
Speaker phone
No
Speech coding
Enhanced, Full and Half Rate
Speed dialling
Yes
Start-up/Shutdown shows
Yes
Status menu
Yes
34
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
T
U
V
W
Swatch Internet Time
No
Synchronization with PC
Yes, via RS232 cable, infrared and
Bluetooth wireless technology
SyncML
Yes
Themes, pre-defined
Yes, 5
Themes, downloadable
Yes, only limited only by memory
Themes, exchange
Yes, via MMS, infrared and Bluetooth
wireless technology
Two Line Service (a.k.a Alternate Line Service,
ALS)
Yes
USB protocol support
No, but through the DCU-10 accessory
(USB to System Connector cable +
drivers) you can get the USB
functionality, though not charging
USB physical interface support
No, only with accessory
Connection to a PC USB port
No, only with accessory
Battery recharging through USB port
No
Maximum data rate through USB port (bit/s)
46080
Vibrator
Yes
Vibrator mode: vibrating only
Yes
Vibrator mode: vibrating then ringing
No
Vibrating mode: vibrating + ringing
Yes
Vibrator: activation
Option key or long press on “c”.
Voice recognition
Yes, dialling, answering and rejecting
with HF, redial, switch profile, record/play
memos and “magic word”. Maximum
number of contacts: 34.
Voice command
Yes, maximum number of functions: 6
Voice coding
Yes
Voice memo
Yes, the total time is only limited by the
memory. The maximum number of voice
memos is 20. Voice memos cannot be
used as ring signals.
WAP browser
Yes, WAP 2.0 browser with support for
XHTML Basic
WTLS for added WAP security*
Yes, WTLS class 1, 2, 3 and signText
35
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Network-dependent features
SMS and EMS messaging
The T68i is capable of sending and receiving SMS
and EMS messages, and linked messages.
•
•
With the Short Message Service, a user
can send text messages containing up to
160 characters to and from GSM mobile
stations
With the linked SMS, the user can link up
to 10 SMS messages together to create a
longer message (network-dependent service)
A Service Centre (SC) acts as a a storage and
forwarding centre. The T68i also supports using
SMS as a bearer type for connecting to WAP.
SMS consists of two basic services:
•
•
Mobile Originated SMS
Mobile Terminated SMS
For Mobile Originated SMS, an SMS message is
sent from a Mobile Station to the SMS-C where it
is forwarded to its destination. This can be
another Mobile Station, or a terminal in the fixed
network.
A Mobile Terminated SMS is when an SMS
message is forwarded from the SMS-C to a
Mobile Station. When the Mobile Station receives
the message, it returns a delivery report saying
the transfer was successful.
Fixed dialling and Restricted calls
For a company or an organization, it can be useful
to restrict phone calls. Fixed Dialling allows the
user to preset a number of digits, for example
area codes. This restricts the user to making calls
only to numbers which use the preset digits as
leading digits. Fixed Dialling makes use of the
PIN2, and it requires fixed dial fields on the SIM
card.
The Restrict Calls service allows the user to block
outgoing or incoming calls in certain situations,
for example international calls.
36
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
SIM application
toolkit
programs that also have an HTML version for
desktop use. Work is currently under way on
building interfaces between the two
technologies.
The SIM Application Toolkit (SIM AT) is a smart
card-centric method of deploying programs that
apply only to GSM and to SMS and USSD
transports. Programs must be distributed on
smart cards. WAP is an Internet-centric method
of deploying programs that is independent of
network technology. Programs and content are
kept centrally on web servers and downloaded
as required. While there is some overlap, WAP is
a particularly good choice when deploying
For an operator, a company or service provider,
SIM AT offers a powerful way to deploy
programs and services to users, without the
need for new or upgraded equipment. All
necessary setup and programming is distributed
to users over the air, directly to their phones. In
the T68i, a separate menu is available for
functions residing on the SIM card. These can
include submenus for controlling functions, and
also functions which allow the phone to initiate
calls, send data, and display information to the
user.
SIM AT services supported by the T68i
Service
Mode
Support
in T68i
CALL CONTROL
Yes
CELL BROADCAST
DOWNLOAD
Yes
DISPLAY TEXT
bit 1:
bit 8:
GET INKEY
bit 1:
bit 2:
bit 3:
Text of up to 240 characters (120 ucs2 coded).
Yes
0 = normal priority
Yes
1 = high priority
Yes
0 = clear message after a delay
Yes
1 = wait for user to clear message
Yes
General: The GET_INKEY requires that the user
press Yes to confirm his/her choice
Yes
0 = digits (0-9, *, # and +) only
Yes
1 = alphabet set
Yes
0 = SMS default alphabet
Yes
1 = UCS2 alphabet
Yes
0 = character sets defined by bit 1 and bit 2 are
enabled
Yes
Yes
1 = character sets defined by bit 1 and bit 2 are
disabled and the Yes/No response is requested
37
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Service
Mode
GET INPUT
General: No. of hidden input characters
bit 1:
bit 2:
bit 3:
bit 4:
bit 8:
Support
in T68i
20
0 = digits (0-9, *, # and +) only
Yes
1 = alphabet set
Yes
0 = SMS default alphabet
Yes
1 = UCS2 alphabet
Yes
0 = ME may echo user input on the display
Yes
1 = user input not to be revealed in any way (see
note)
Yes
0 = user input to be in unpacked format
Yes
1 = user input to be in SMS packed format
Yes
0 = no help information available
Yes
1 = help information available
No
MORE TIME
Yes
PLAY TONE
Yes
POLLING OFF
Yes
POLL INTERVAL
Yes
PROVIDE LOCAL
INFORMATION
REFRESH
'00' = Location Information (MCC, MNC, LAC
and Cell Identity)
Yes
'01' = IMEI of the ME
Yes
'02' = Network Measurement results
Yes
'03' = Date, time and time zone (DTTinPLI)
Yes
'04' - Language setting
Yes
'05' - Timing setting
Yes
General: The reset option requests the user to
wait while the phone restarts
Yes
'00' =SIM Initialization and Full File Change
Notification
Yes
'01' = File Change Notification
Yes
'02' = SIM Initialization and File Change
Notification
Yes
'03' = SIM Initialization
Yes
'04' = SIM Reset
Yes
SELECT ITEM
Yes
SEND DTMF
Yes
38
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
Service
SEND SHORT MESSAGE
bit 1:
Mode
Support
in T68i
0 = packing not required
Yes
1 = SMS packing by the ME required
Yes
SEND SS
Yes
SEND USSD
Yes
SET UP CALL
SET UP EVENT LIST
General: Capability configuration
Yes
Set-up speech call CallParty
Subaddress DTMF support
No
'00' = set up call, but only if not currently busy
on another call
Yes
'01' = set up call, but only if not currently busy
on another call, with re-dial
Yes
'02' = set up call, putting all other calls (if any)
on hold
Yes
'03' = set up call, putting all other calls (if any)
on hold, with re-dial
Yes
'04' = set up call, disconnecting all other calls (if
any)
Yes
'05' = set up call, disconnecting all other calls (if
any), with re-dial
Yes
'00' = MT call
No
'01' = Call connected
No
'02' = Call disconnected
No
'03' = Location status
Yes
'04' = User activity
No
'05' = Idle screen available
Yes
'06' = Cad reader status
No
'07' = Language selection
Yes
'08' = Browser termination
No
'09' = Data available
No
'OA' = Channel status
No
Yes
SET UP IDLE MODE TEXT
Yes, 1
row of
text is
supporte
d
SET UP MENU
Yes
SMS PP DOWNLOAD
Yes
39
T68i
White Paper, April 2002
User interaction with SIM AT
then restarts.
DISPLAY TEXT
SELECT ITEM
Text of up to 240 characters (80 UCS coded) is
supported.
Scroll to highlight item for selection. The
maximum number of items supported by the
phone within one Select Item command is 30.
Text clearing times
•
10-20 seconds. 60-second time-out limit
for the user to clear the text.
‘Key’ responses
•
‘Long NO’ – Proactive session terminated
by user.
•
‘NO’ – Backward move in proactive session.
Any other key clears display if the command is performed successfully.
GET INKEY
Prompt for a one-character input. Pressing ‘YES’
without entering a character gives warning
message “Minimum 1 character”.
‘Key’ responses
•
‘CLR’ clears current character.
•
‘Long NO’ terminates the proactive session.
•
‘NO’ – Backward move in proactive session.
•
‘YES’ – Command performed successfully.
GET INPUT
Prompt for character input. Pressing ‘YES’
without entering a character gives warning
message “Minimum ‘no.’ characters”. The phone
will refuse to accept further input when maximum
response length is exceeded.
MMI Maximum Response lengths
•
Digits Only – 160 characters
•
SMS default alphabet characters – 160
characters
•
Hidden Characters (digits only) – 40 characters
‘Key’ responses‘
•
‘CLR’ clears current character/characters.
•
‘Long NO’ terminates the proactive session.
•
‘NO’ – Backward move in proactive session.
•
‘YES’ – Command performed successfully.
REFRESH
When a refresh command is executed by the
phone, it displays the message “Please wait” and
‘Key’ responses
•
Down arrow – Scroll down list.
•
Up arrow – Scroll up list.
•
Long ‘NO’ terminates proactive session.
•
‘NO’ – Backward move in proactive session.
•
‘YES’ – Command performed successfully.
SEND SHORT MESSAGE
Default message “Sending message, please wait”
can be replaced for the Alpha Identifier text, or
suppressed completely if a null text is provided.
Responses are “MESSAGE FAILED” or
“MESSAGE SENT”.
‘Key’ responses
•
Long ‘NO’ or ‘NO’ terminates the proactive
session.
SET UP CALL
If the ME is on a call when the command 'Set up
Call, putting all other calls on hold' is sent, the
user will see the text 'Setting up a call current call
will be held'. If the 'YES' key is pressed the
current call will be put on hold and the new call
set up. If the ME is on a call when the command
‘Set Up Call, disconnecting all other calls’ is sent,
the user will see the text ‘Setting up a call current
call will be disconnected’. If the ‘YES’ key is
pressed the current call will be disconnected and
the new call set up.
SET UP MENU
Incorporates a SIM Application Toolkit Menu Item
into the ME’s main menu structure. From the
standby display the right or left arrow buttons can
be pressed to select the Menu Items. (Note: The
SIM AT menu option is found in the ‘Connect’
menu.)
If an Alpha Identifier is supplied in the Set Up
Menu command, this is used as the SIM AT entry
in the ME’s main menu. If no alpha identifier is
supplied and only one item provided, then this
item is used as header. If no alpha identifier is
supplied and several items are found in the menu,
a default title is used. If the SIM AT Menu Item is
selected using the ‘YES’ key all the items sent in
the Set Up Menu command will be available for
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selection, in the same way as the Select Item
command. A limit of 30 menu items has been set
within this command.
‘Key’ responses
•
Down arrow – Scroll down list.
•
Up arrow – Scroll up list.
•
Side key: Scrolls the menu.
•
‘YES’ – Envelope (Menu Selection).
Security and M-commerce technical data
Feature
Support in the T68i for m-commerce
Dual-slot
No
Associated with a STK card,
allowing ISO B0' bank card
payments
If separate card, no
Associated with a STK card,
allowing EMV bank card
payments
If separate card, no
Certified by the "GIE Carte
Bancaire"
If separate card, no
WIM supportance
If separate card, no
Ability to use a WIM
application embedded on a
SIM/USIM card
Yes
WIM application embedded
on a SIM/USIM card the
default WIM application
Yes
Number of smart card
readers in the handset
1
Provisioning of the following
SATK commands : Perform
Card APDU, Power Off Card,
Power On Card, Get Reader
Status
No
Release of SIM Application
Toolkit supported
R99 with exceptions (missing AT commands, for example “Launch
browser” and “Show icon” – still under investigation)
Information to the user while
in secured mode (WTLS)
Yes, via icon
Is an incoming class 2 SMS
transferred to the SIM even
when another application (a
browser) is running?
Yes
Access to the WIM
WIM can only be accessed by native applications, e.g. the browser
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Terminology and
abbreviations
3GPP
3rd Generation Partnership Project.
AMR
Adaptive Multi Rate. Audio format for speech
sounds.
API
Application Programming Interface.
ASP
Active Server Page. Server technology that
generates web pages dynamically.
Bearer
The method for accessing WAP from the phone,
for example GSM Data (CSD) and SMS.
bFTP
binary File Transfer Protocol.
Bluetooth
Bluetooth wireless technology is a secure, fast,
point-to-multipoint radio connection technology.
It is a specification for a small-form factor, lowcost radio solution providing links between
mobile computers, mobile phones and other
portable handheld devices, and connection to the
Internet. For more information, http://
www.bluetooth.com.
Bookmark
A URL and header/title stored in the phone.
Browsing session
The period from the first access of content until
the termination of the connection.
Calling Line Identification (CLI)
Shows the number of the caller, or a picture
assigned to the number of the caller in the mobile
phone display. Not all numbers can be displayed.
Network-dependent service.
Card
A single WML unit of navigation and user
interface. May contain information to present to
the user, instructions for gathering user input, etc.
CDMA
Code division Multiple Access. CGI
Common Gateway Interface. Server technology
that generates web pages dynamically.
CS
Circuit Switched.
CSD
Circuit Switched Data.
Deck
A collection of WML cards.
DTMF or Touch Tone
Dual Tone Multi-Frequency signal – codes sent as
tone signals. Used for telephone banking,
accessing an answering machine, etc.
Dual band
GSM 900/1800.
e-GSM
Extended GSM. New frequencies specified by the
European Radio Communications Committee
(ERC) for GSM use when additional spectrum is
needed (Network-dependent). It allows operators
to transmit and receive just outside GSM’s core
900 frequency band. This extension gives
increased network capability.
EDGE
Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution. !
"#
EFR
Enhanced Full Rate, speech coding.
EMS
Enhanced Message Service. Allows the user to
add simple pixel pictures and animations, sounds
and melodies to a text message. The EMS 3GPP
standard also includes text formatting.
ETSI
European Telecommunications Standards
Institute.
FR
Full Rate, speech coding.
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Gateway
A WAP Gateway typically includes the following
functions:
•
•
A Protocol Gateway – the protocol gateway translates requests from the WAP
protocol stack to the WWW protocol stack
(HTTP and TCP/IP).
Content Encoders and Decoders – the
content encoders translate Web content
into compact encoded formats to reduce
the size and number of packets travelling
over the wireless data network.
GIF
Graphics Interchange Format.
GPRS
General Packet Radio Services.
GSM
Global System for Mobile Communications.
GSM is the world’s most widely-used digital
mobile phone system, now operating in over 100
countries around the world, particularly in Europe
and Asia-Pacific.
GSM 900
The GSM system family includes GSM 900, GSM
1800 and GSM 1900. There are different phases
of roll-out for the GSM system and GSM phones
are either phase 1 or phase 2 compliant.
GSM 1800
Also known as DCS 1800 or PCN, this is a digital
network working on a frequency of 1800 MHz. It
is used in Europe and Asia-Pacific.
HDML
Handheld Device Markup Language.
Image
WBMP or GIF image contained in a Card.
IrMC
Infrared Mobile Communications standard.
IrDA
Infrared Data Association.
ISP
Internet Service Provider.
ITTP
Intelligent Terminal Transfer Protocol.
LED
Light Emitting Diode.
LAN
Local Area Network.
ME
Mobile Equipment.
Micro browser
Accesses and displays Internet content in a
mobile phone, using small file sizes and the
bandwidth of the wireless-handheld network.
MMI
Man-Machine Interface.
MS
Mobile Station.
MT
Mobile Termination.
HR
Half Rate, speech coding.
OTA
Over-the Air Configuration. To provide settings
for the phone by way of sending an SMS
message over the network to the phone. This
reduces the need for the user to configure the
phone manually.
HSCSD
High Speed Circuit Switched Data.
PDA
Personal Digital Assistant.
HTML
HyperText Markup Language.
PDP
Packet Data Protocol.
HTTP
HyperText Transfer Protocol.
Phone book
A memory in the mobile phone or SIM card
where phone numbers can be stored and
accessed by name or position.
HDTP
Handheld Device Transport Protocol.
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PIM
Personal Information Management.
VAS
Value Added Service.
SC
Service Centre (for SMS).
vCalendar
vCalendar defines a transport and platformindependent format for exchanging calendar and
scheduling information for use in PIMs/PDAs and
group schedulers. vCalendar is specified by IETF.
Service provider
A company that provides services and
subscriptions to mobile phone users.
SI
Service Indication.
SL
Service Loading.
SIM card
Subscriber Identity Module card – a card that
must be inserted in any GSM-based mobile
phone. It contains subscriber details, security
information and memory for a personal directory
of numbers. The card can be a small plug-in type
or credit card-sized, but both types have the
same functions. The T68i uses the small plug-in
card.
SMS
Short Message Service. Allows messages of up
to 160 characters to be sent and received via the
network operator's message centre to a mobile
phone.
SS
Supplementary Services.
SyncML
An open standard for synchronization of all
devices and applications over any network.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
UMTS
Universal Mobile Telecommunications System.
The telecommunications system, incorporating
mobile cellular and other functionality, that is the
subject of standards produced by 3GPP.
URL
Uniform Resource Locator.
USSD
Unstructured Supplementary Services Data.
vCard
vCard automates the exchange of personal
information typically found on a traditional
business card, for use in applications such as
Internet mail, voice mail, Web browsers,
telephony applications, call centres, video
conferences, PIMs /PDAs, pagers, fax, office
equipment, and smart cards. vCard is specified
by IETF.
WAE
Wireless Application Environment.
WAP
Wireless Application Protocol. Handheld devices,
low bandwidth, binary coded, a deck/card
metaphor to specify a service. A card is typically
a unit of interaction with the user, that is, either
presentation of information or request for
information from the user. A collection of cards is
called a deck, which usually constitutes a service.
WAP Application
A collection of WML cards, with the new context
attribute set in the entry card.
WAP service
A WML application residing on a web site.
WBMP
WAP Bitmap.
WBXML
Wireless Binary Extensible Markup Language.
WDP
Wireless Datagram Protocol.
WML
Wireless Markup Language. A markup language
used for authoring services, fulfilling the same
purpose as HyperText Markup Language (HTML)
does on the World Wide Web (WWW). In contrast
to HTML, WML is designed to fit small handheld
devices.
VAD
Voice Activated Dialling.
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WMLScript
WMLScript can be used to enhance the
functionality of a service, just as, for example,
JavaScript may be utilized in HTML. It makes it
possible to add procedural logic and
computational functions to WAP-based services.
WSP
Wireless Session Protocol.
WTLS
Wireless Transport Layer Security.
WWW
World Wide Web.
XML
Extensible Markup Language.
XHTML
Extensible HyperText Markup Language.
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Related
information
•
•
Communications.
XTNDConnect is a trademark of Extended
Systems Inc.
XHTML™ is a registered trademark of the
W3C.
Documents
•
•
•
•
The T68i User’s Guide
Sony Ericsson T68i FAQ
AT Command Reference Manual
WAP June2000 (WAP 2.0) Specification
Software
•
•
XTNDConnect PC For Ericsson can be
downloaded from http://www.SonyEricssonMobile.com.
XTNDConnect PC, upgraded version from
Extended Systems Inc.
Links
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
http://www.SonyEricssonmobile.com/
http://wap.SonyEricssonmobile.com/
http://www.ericsson.com/mobilityworld
http://www.gprsworld.com/
http://www.extendedsystems.com/
http://www.bluetooth.com/
http://www.imc.org/
http://www.3gpp.org/
http://www.irda.org/
http://www.etsi.fr/
http://www.wapforum.org/
http://www.imc.org/pdi/
http://www.syncml.org/
http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-basic/
Trademarks and
acknowledgements
•
•
•
•
•
BLUETOOTH is a trademark owned by the
Bluetooth SIG, Inc. The IrDA Feature Trademark is owned by the Infrared Data Association and is used under licence there from.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows CE and
Windows NT are registered trademarks or
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Pentium is a registered trademark or trademark of Intel.
Palm, PalmPilot and Palm OS are trademarks or registered trademarks of Palm
Inc. or its
subsidiaries.
T9 is a registered trademark of Tegic
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Technical
specifications
•
•
•
ware
User’s guide, including Battery Information
Accessory leaflet
Service and Support Leaflet
The consumer pack includes
•
•
•
•
•
Mobile Phone T68i
Standard Battery BST-14 (700 mAh)
Travel Charger, CST-12
Sony Ericsson PC Programs
XTND Connect PC Synchronization soft-
General technical data
Product name
T68i
SAR measurements: figures
0,54 SAR 1g
SAR measurements:
laboratory
Electromagnetic Near Field and Radio Frequency Dosimetry, Sony
Ericsson Mobile Communications
System
Tri-band. GSM phase 2 recommendations. GSM 900 (3GPP TS 51.0101), GSM 1800 (3GPP TS 51.010-1) and GSM 1900 (NATWG 03), e-GSM
supported
Speech coding
HR, FR, EFR supported where available, for high speech quality
SIM card
Small plug-in card, 3V or 5V type
Type number
1130202-BV, 1130202-CN
Exterior description
Size
100x48x20 mm (with battery)
Weight
84 grams with battery, 60 grams without battery
Graphic display
Full graphical display 80 x 101 pixels
256 colours, 34 x 28 mm (30.3 x 24 mm used)
Display
Type: graphical
Resolution: 101 pixels wide, 80 pixels high
Size: 30.3 x 24 centimeters, 101 x 80 pixels
Technology: LCD, 256 colours
Colours displayed together: 256 colours
Size (lines): 8
Refresh rate: 70 Hz
Backlight colour: 1
Fonts: 4
Possibility to display the Euro symbol: yes
Zooming availability: yes, 3 levels
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Antenna
Built-in
Text size
A selection of text sizes
Text rows
Varies depending on text size used
Colours
2, Lunar Grey and Gold
Battery
Li-Polymer Battery BST-14 (700 mAh)
Network LED
1 colour – green
Keypad
Hard silver-painted plastic, 5-way joystick and select
16 keys + joystick + side key (four different keypads: Latin, Arabic,
Hebrew, Chinese)
Keypad lock: option key or long press on “c”.
Use of several keys simultaneously (e.g. for games) is possible
Ambient temperatures
Operating
Max: +55°C, Min -10°C
Storage
Max: +70°C, Min -40°C
Charging
Max: +35°C, Min 0°C
Supported Man-Machine Interface (MMI) languages
Depending on software in the phone, these languages are supported:
Albanian (SQ), Arabic (AR), Brazilian Portuguese (PB), Bulgarian (BG), Canadian French (CF), Czech (CS),
Chinese traditional (ZC), Chinese simplified (ZS), Croatian (HR), Danish (DA), Dutch (NL), English (EN),
Estonian (ET), Farsi (FA), Finnish (FI), French (FR), German (DE), Greek (EL), Hebrew (IW), Hungarian (HU),
Indonesian-Bahasar (IN), Italian (IT), Latin American Spanish (XL), Latvian (LV), Lithuanian (LT), Malay (MS),
Norwegian (NO), Philippine-Tagalog (TL), Polish (PL), Portuguese (PT), Romanian (RO), Russian (RU),
Serbian (SR), Slovakian (SK), Slovenian (SL), Spanish (ES), Swedish (SV), Thai (TH), Turkish (TR), US
English (AE), Vietnamese (VI).
Current consumption, talk and standby times
Dimension
Value in GSM 900
Transmission current
55 mA (min)
210 mA (max)
Standby current
1.75 mA (min), (paging rate 9, 1 neighbour present)
3.55 mA (max), (paging rate 2, 16 neighbours present)
Standard Battery (LiPolymer)
BST-14 (700 mAh)
Talk time
up to 12 hours
Standby time
up to 390 hours
Charging time
2 hours 15 minutes
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Games
Name
Type of game
Interactive
Vibration
Arizona
Card game
Contrary
Strategic
Yes, via IR and Bluetooth.
Erix
Level based
Yes, highscore can be sent
via WAP.
Yes
Four piles
Card game
Naval fleet
Strategic
Yes, via IR and Bluetooth.
Yes
North territory
Card game
Q
Strategic
Yukon struggle
Card game
Wuziqi
(Chinese market only)
Strategic
Yes, via IR and Bluetooth.
* All games will stop and be saved in the memory if interrupted by an incoming call.
You can resume the games after the call.
* All games in the T68 are owned by Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications.
Technical platform information
AVR micro-controller
12 Mhz frequency
Video management memory
Yes, 8 Kb
API (Application Program Interface)
Yes
Speech coding
Dimension
Full rate
Enhanced full rate
Type
RPE/LPC with LTP
ACELP
Bit rate
13.0 Kbp/s
12.2 Kbp/s
Frame duration
20 ms
20 ms
Block length
260 bits
244 bits
Class 1 bits
182 bits
Class 2 bits
78 bits
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Cell broadcast service
Feature
Support in the T68i
User notification of the reception of a CB
message
Message displayed on screen
Handling of reception of several unread
messages
The last message overwrites the previous one
Support of all CMBI from 0 to 65535
Yes
File support
CBMI and CBMID
Support CB SIM data download
Yes
Support of all applicable Data Coding
Scheme values as defined in 3G TS 23.038
V3.3.0
Yes
Ability to display in a understandable way a
message with a DCS “language unspecified”
whatever language is set in the SIM card
Yes
Ability to extract a phone number or short
number of a CB message to re-use it (to send
an SMS or call the sender)
Yes
Support of multi-page CB-messages
Yes
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Short message service
Feature
Support in the T68i
SMS Center Number
It is possible to pre-record the SMS Center Number.
Pictures
It is possible to insert a picture/an icon into the text
message. EMS compliant mobile handsets will be able
to see the picture correctly.
Input methods
Predictive text input
Reply to messages
It is possible to reply to received messages by SMS,
phone call, ...
Message creation methods support
Predictive writing
Enhanced predictive writing method by:
predictive keyboard which replaces the
PDA keypad, alphabet keypad,
keyboards for numbers, punctuation and
symbols
Yes, the Chatboard accessory
copy, cut and paste words
No
teaching of predictive words that are not
in the predictive dictionary
Yes
Possibilities when creating a message:
save a sent message in a “sent items”
folder
Yes
insert a line in the message
Yes
assign a validity period to the message
Yes
print via IrDA
No
use predefined messages
Yes
Possibilities when receiving a message:
reply to the sender
Yes (only to the sender, not to all or part of the message
recipients)
forward the message
Yes
save the message in the inbox
Yes
get delivery time and date
Yes
print via IrDA
No
Possibilities of the previously sent message:
delivery report of the message
Yes
forward the message
Yes
save the message in the Inbox
Yes
know the remaining capacity storage
Yes
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Feature
print via IrDA
Support in the T68i
No
Possibilities of the previously received
message:
reply to the sender
Yes (only to the sender, not to all or part of the message
recipients)
save the message in the Inbox
Yes
forward the message
Yes
know the remining capacity storage
Yes
Supported ways for replying to a received
SMS:
via SMS
Yes
via phone call (set up a call to the number
contained in the message body)
Yes
via WAP call (go to the WAP address
contained in the message body)
Yes
via USSD session
No
Possibility to offer the user the ability of
sending an SMS to a list of recipients
Yes, using Phone Book groups
Possibility to write an e-mail address as a
recipient adress
Yes, if SMS type=e-mail
SMS storage
In the SIM and in the handset.
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Enhanced message service
Feature
Support in the T68i
Level of compliance supported by the
handset regarding the specifications
described in release 99.
Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) according to the
standard 3GPP TS 23.040 v4.3.0, with the addition of
the ODI feature from 3GPP TS 23.040 v5.0.0.
Number of messages that the handset is
able to handle to generate a concatenated
message
10
Capacity storage
100 messages
Outgoing messages
It is possible to...
•
•
Incoming messages
•
•
see how many short messages an EMS message
consists of before sending it.
choose whether to send the message or not after
writing it.
A pre-defined signal is heard once all parts of the
message have been received or when a timeout
occurs.
It is possible to re-use the content of an EMS message. Sounds, pictures, animations, text formatting,
can be inserted in a new message, if the object is
not protected using ODI.
Concatenated messages
A receipt is received in the handset when all parts of a
concatenated message have been delivered.
Attachments
It is possible to attach pictures, animations and sounds
to an EMS message.
Text formatting
•
•
•
Sounds
Chimes high, chimes low, ding, tada, notify, drum, claps,
fanfare, chords high, chords low.
I-melody
Yes, version 1.2.
Melodies
It is possible to...
•
•
•
•
Centred, left and right aligned text.
Small, normal and large font size.
Bold, italic, underlined and strikethrough style.
edit and create melodies by using the phone keypad.
send and receive melodies via EMS.
download melodies and commercial tunes from
Web/WAP portals.
create melodies on Web/WAP portals.
WBMP
Yes
Picture sizes
16x16 mm, 32x32 mm, variable size receipts in black
and white.
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Feature
Support in the T68i
Pictures
It is possible to...
•
•
•
•
•
Animations
edit and create pictures by using the phone keypad.
send and receive pictures via EMS.
create pictures on Web/WAP portals.
download pictures from Web/WAP portals.
receive pictures in enhanced messages originated
by service providers.
The handset supports the following animations: I am
ironic, I am glad, I am sceptic, I am sad, WOW!, I am crying. Plus the other 9 defined in 23.040 v4.3.0.
It is possible to...
•
•
TP-PID field value given by the handset
before sending an EMS message
send and receive animations.
download animations from Web/WAP portals.
0x00
Multimedia message service
Feature
Support in the T68i/ie
MMS/CSD parameters and MMS/GPRS
parameters placement
MMS is bound to a WAP profile. A WAP profile is
bound to a Data Account. A Data Account contains
either CSD parameters or GPRS parameters.
Possibility to pre-configure the MMS
parameters in factory
•
•
MMS/CSD: Yes
MMS/GPRS: Yes
Possibility to configure the MMS parameters
by OTA provisioning
•
•
MMS/CSD: Yes
MMS/GPRS: Yes
Possibility for all the parameters from the
parameters set to be OTA provisioned at the
same time
•
•
MMS/CSD: Yes
MMS/GPRS: Yes
Possibility for only one parameter from the
parameters set to be OTA provisioned
•
•
MMS/CSD: No
MMS/GPRS: No
OTA provisioning solution
OTA specified by Ericsson and Nokia
MMS User Agent functional entity will be a
separate entity from WAP browser:
Yes
MMS User Agent support
WAP WTA, WAP UAProf and WTA Public.
Supplier indication of realized interoperability
tests between its MMS User Agent and MMS
Relay/Server from other suppliers
Yes
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T68i
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Feature
Support in the T68i/ie
Support of a standard or a proprietary procedure for OTA provisioning of MMS parameters
Proprietary
Functionalities that the user is able to set
during message composition:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
message subject
MSISDN recipient address
e-mail recipient address
message Cc recipient(s) address(es)
delivery report request
read-reply report request
message priority
From where can the user insert multimedia
elements into multimedia messages:
•
•
terminal memory
directly from camera
Supplier indication if MMS User Agent will be
able to handle a network-based address
book
No
Possibility for sent messages to be memorized into a folder in handset memory
Yes
Actions that the user can perform after message notification:
•
•
•
retrieve the message immediately
defer message retrieval
reject message
Actions that the user can perform after message retrieval:
•
•
•
•
•
reply to the sender of the message
reply to the sender and to Cc people
forward the message
delete the message
save message into terminal
Multimedia codecs/formats supported for
audio
AMR, AAC
Multimedia codecs/formats supported for
video
None
Multimedia codecs/formats supported for
image
Baseline JPG, GIF 89a
MMS User Agent provides:
•
•
•
Supported formats for message presentation:
•
•
text formatting facilities (only textsize)
coloured text/background (Viewer/player supports coloured text and background. Not editable
in composer)
predictive writing
message body + attachments (e-mail presentation)
SMIL version as described in “Nokia/Ericsson
MMS Conformance document
(not WML and SMIL 2.0 Boston)
Storage capacity dedicated to multimedia
messages (Kb)
~800kb available for user data (images, sounds,
mms,...)
Maximum message size that can be handled
by the handset for message
30 kb for sending, 50 kb for receiving
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Feature
Support in the T68i/ie
Possibility to configure unconditional message modification (such as media modification in messages)
Yes
MMS User Agent will report problems to user
in case of:
•
•
•
message not sent causes no user subscription to
service, if included in ResponseText (please see
WAP209)
message not sent causes required functionality
not supported by MMS Relay/Server, if included
in ResponeText (please see WAP209)
message not sent causes insufficient credit (in
case of prepaid charging), if included in ResponeText (please see WAP209)
Instant messaging/ Chat
Feature
Support in the T68i/ie
Support of instant messaging
No
Chat application
Yes, SMS as the radio bearer.
Bluetooth technical data
Dimension
Support in the T68i
Bluetooth capability
statement
This product is manufactured to meet Bluetooth Specification 1.0b.
Bluetooth enabled through
accessory
Yes
Bluetooth functions
Dial-up Networking Profile
Fax Profile
Generic Access Profile
Generic Object Exchange Profile
Headset Profile
Object Push Profile
Serial Port Profile
Synchronization Profile
Connectable devices
All products supporting Bluetooth spec. 1,0b.
Coverage area
Up to 10 metres (33 feet)
Transmission power
1mW (0dBm)
Frequency band
2.4 GHz - the unlicensed ISM band
Power consumption
Standby current: < 0.3 mA
Voice mode: 8-30 mA
Data mode average: 5 mA [0.3-30 mA, 20 kbps, 25%]
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Data transmission rate
up to 108,800 bps with one time slot
Specific commands working
with the SIM card
No
Support of multipoint
connections
No
Performance and technical characteristics
Dimension
GSM 900/E-GSM
900
GSM 1800
GSM 1900
Frequency range
TX: 880 – 914 MHz
RX: 925 – 959 MHz
TX: 1710 – 1785
RX: 1805 – 1880
TX: 1850 – 1910
RX: 1930 – 1990
Channel spacing
200 kHz
200 kHz
200 kHz
Number of channels
174 Carriers *8
(TDMA)
374 Carriers *8
(TDMA)
299 Carriers *8
(TDMA)
Modulation
GMSK
GMSK
GMSK
TX Phase Accuracy
< 5º RMS Phase
error (burst)
< 5º RMS Phase error
(burst)
< 5º RMS Phase
error (burst)
Duplex spacing
45 MHz
95 MHz
80 MHz
Frequency stability
+/- 0.1
+/- 0.1
+/- 0.1
Voltage operation (nominal)
3.6 Volts
3.6 Volts
3.6 Volts
Transmitter RF power output
33 dBm Class 4 (2W
peak)
30 dBm Class 1 (1W
peak)
30 dBm Class 1 (1W
peak)
Transmitter Output
impedance
50 Ω
50 Ω
50 Ω
Transmitter Spurious
emission
< -36 dBm up to 1
GHz
< -30 dBm over 1
GHz
(according to GSM
spec.)
< - 30 dBm
(according to GSM
spec.)
< - 30 dBm
(according to GSM
spec.)
Receiver RF level
Better than – 102
dBm
– 102 dBm
– 102 dBm
Receiver RX Bit error rate
< 2.4%
< 2.4%
< 2.4%
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WAP browser technical data
Feature
Support in the T68i WAP browser
Back to previous page
Yes
Bearer type GPRS (IP)
Yes
Bearer type GSM Data (IP)
Yes, HSCSD, ISDN and analog
Bookmarks
Yes, up to 25 named bookmarks for easy access to frequently visited
pages
Bookmark Export/Import
Yes, can be sent and received as link using SMS and vBookmark
format via IR and BT
Cache
Yes (size 6 kbyte)
Character sets *
UTF8 (Default), USASCII, Latin1, UCS2
Clear cache
Yes
Colour
Colour display
Home page
Yes, up to 5 different, one for each WAP profile
HTML version for WAP
browser
xHTML, mobile profile
Hyperlinks in Text
Yes, highlighted by inverse video
Hyperlinks in Images
Yes, indicated by a frame
Image Animation
No
Image Formats
GIF (interlaced and non-interlaced), WBMP, no transparent layers,
JPG
Network Settings
Up to 5 different settings available by selecting WAP profile (Intranet,
Internet, Banking, Gateway etc.)
OTA Support
Yes
PPP Authentication
PAP, CHAP supported
Reload page
Yes
Tables
Yes
User Agent Profiles
Yes, list of client characteristics - e.g. display size
WAP/WML WAP
WAP 2.0/ WML 1.3
*) When creating WML applications, it is recommended that you
always save the page contents as UTF8, and that this is clearly
indicated in the pages before publishing. This ensures that the
contents of the application can be viewed, regardless of character
sets used in gateways and the phone. All characters are not
supported in all phones. The software version depends on which
market the phone is associated to. Also, please note that the phone
may not support input on a WAP Service which uses certain
characters (languages), even if those characters are supported for
browsing in the phone.
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Feature
Support in the T68i WAP browser
WAP browser
WAP 1.2.1 baseline
WAP profiles
Dynamic - up to 5 WAP profiles, each with its own settings
WTLS (security)
Yes,
WTLS Class 1 - Encoding
WTLS Class 2 - Encoding + Server Authentication. Root Certificates
needed in phone
WTLS Class 3 - Encoding + Server Authentication + Client
Certification. Root Certificates needed in phone + special SIM cards
Sign text
WAP Operator technical data
Feature
Support in the T68i for WAP
WAP Browser
Version
1.2.1 baseline
HTML
xHTML, mobile profile
WAP Provisioning
Total Parameter sets
5
Parameter set list
Name
Startpage
IP settings:
CSD phoneno., CSD Data rate, CSD dial type
GPRS APN, password request, allow calls, authentication,
data compression, header compression, quality of services
IP address, datamode (conn.less or oriented)
UserId and password
Security on/off
Show images on/off
Response timer
Manual selection
Yes, between Analog (V32) and Digital (V110)
Parameter sets include
WAP/CSD, WAP/GPRS (different sets)
Factory pre-configuration
WAP/CSD (possibility to lock a setting), WAP/GPRS
OTA
WAP/CSD, WAP/GPRS configuration possible
Simultaneous OTA
WAP/CSD, WAP/GPRS configuration possible
Single OTA
WAP/CSD, WAP/GPRS is not possible
Bookmarks
Not empty by default
URL format
Underlined
Security mechanism
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Feature
Support in the T68i for WAP
OTA provisioning (if empty)
Operator verification through a code, included in the OTA data.
This code is shown to the user who can choose installation or
not.
Interface (if empty)
An Install question is asked with the code, if available.
The user has to choose if a new WAP profile shall be created or
an existing profile shall be replaced.
Re-provisioning (Set 1 filled)
As above
Interface (Set 1 filled)
As above
Carrier reset/provisioning
Yes, but not if the set is pre-configured in the factory and locked.
SWIM
Not used for provisioning.
The SWIM is only used for WAP security, both WTLS connections
and digital signatures.
SWIM certificate
Both client and trusted certificates can be used for WTLS
connections and digital signatures.
No new certificates can be stored and no old ones can be
removed by the terminal.
Applicative provisioning
Preferred bearer customization
Yes
Email customization
No
Other applications/features
Yes. MMS, SyncML
Technologies
WAP Forum OTA provisioning
No
Openwave OTA
No
Other
Yes. The Ericsson-Nokia solution.
Provisioning bearer
SMS
Parameter sets available
5
Parameter sets for OTA
modification
5
PUSH
Content types
Service Indication (SI)
Yes
Service Loading (SL)
Yes
Cache Operation (CO) content
type
Yes
Session Initiation Application (SIA)
Yes
Man Machine Interface
SI/content retrieval postponing
Yes
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Feature
Support in the T68i for WAP
SI menu structure accessability
WAP services, Push inbox
SL reception warning
The user can make a choice if a dialog is wanted or not before
loading the SL.
WAP services/options/common/Push access/prompt
SIA reception warning
Yes
Cache size limitations
If the inbox is full and a new push is received, the oldest push in
the inbox will be discarded.
Number of push messages
Depending on the size of the push messages. Around 20 push
messages with a size of 500 bytes can be stored.
Push de-activate
Yes. WAP services/options/common/Push access/Off
Dynamic push menu changes
No. There are no changes in the menus when activating/
deactivating push
Security
Mechanisms for push
None
Trust with PPG
Sending a SIA is the most trustful.
WSP push sessions
1
Denial of service/spoofing
User agent profile
UA profile content sent at
beginning of WSP session
No
OA profile content size
URL sent pointing to the UA profile
at the beginning of WSP session
Yes
URL location
On the manufacturer web site.
WTAI
WTA Make Call
Yes
WTA Send DTMF
Yes
WTA Add Phone Book
Yes
Other WTA/WTAI
No
DOWNLOAD
WAP solutions
SAR/WSP/HTTP GET solution to
download content over WAP
Yes
Download Fun from Openwave
No
Other download content over WAP
Yes. Content limited to 3kB is downloaded without using SAR
Features
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Feature
Support in the T68i for WAP
Download application/product
memory check
Yes
Downloaded object solution
Yes. The user is asked if the content is to be saved.
UAP indication for downloading
Yes
Other features
Yes. Store, delete, forward, use, manage.
Object formats
Ringing tones
audio/iMelody, other/eMelody, vMel.
Wallpapers
Image/WBMP, GIF, JPG.
Pictures
Image/WBMP, GIF, JPG, PNG.
Games
JAVA applications
application/JAR not used, JAD not used
Screen savers
Image/GIF, JPG
Audio files
audio/MPEG4 not used,MP3 not used, WAV not used
Skins
Application /skin
Video
Video/MPEG4 not used
GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE
Man Machine Interface
Soft keys
None
Separate/dedicated back or erase
keys
No
Screen backlight on when
browsing?
Yes
Predictive writing for WAP
sessions?
Yes
“http://” string displayed
automatically when entering URLs
Not displayed but the "http://" is added automatically to the URL.
Elements
Number of display lines for a WAP
connection
4 to 7 plus Title, depending on the selected font size.
Pop-up menus
Yes. Single select list to conserve space.
Radio buttons
Yes. Single select list to conserve space.
Check boxes
Yes. Boolean selection.
Push buttons
No
Horizontal rules
Yes. Separate sections of WML card.
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GPRS technical data
Dimension
Support in the T68i
Compatible GPRS and
SMG specifications
ETSI R97 SMG 31 bis
Data rates
Multislot class 4 supported (3+1)
CS-1, CS-2, CS-3, CS-4
9,050 bps, 13,400 bps, 15,600 bps, 21,400 bps supported (networkdependent)
Indicator of attachment to
the GPRS service
Yes, an icon in the bottom left corner, a filled triangle if attached
Indicator of PDP context
activation
Yes, an icon on the right side. Animated globe
Data volume counter
•
•
The Data volume counter details the volume of data exchanged in
bytes for the up/down link for last call for each PDP context.
The Total data counter details the sum of all GPRS sessions (i.e. not
the sum of total data received + sent during the last GPRS session.
The total data counter can be reset by the user.
Medium Access Modes
Fixed and dynamic allocation
Support of Packet
Control Channels
(PBCCH/PCCCH)
Yes. Available at launch.
Network operation mode
NOM I, II, III
Support of GPRS/CS
combined procedures
Yes
Network control mode
NC0
Support of access in 2
phases
Yes
Support of PRACH on 11
bits
Yes
Support of GPRS reselection C31/C32
Yes
Support of static and
dynamic addressing
Yes
Support of power control
Uplink and Downlink
Uplink = yes, Downlink is a network feature
Support of ciphering
algorithms
GEA1
Support of compression
algorithms
Yes, V42bis and IP header
compression
Support of the QoS
modification procedure
Yes, when initiated by the network
(not by the handset)
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Dimension
Support in the T68i
Interfaces to external
devices supported by the
handset and available for
a GPRS link
IrDA, RS-232, AT commands. IrDA,
Datarate=SIR & MIR RS232,
autobaud, max 460kbit/s
Bluetooth, v1.0B+Critical errata,
Certified and listed Supported
Bluetooth profiles: DUN, FAX,
Headset, Synch, Object push
Downlink data rate
Up to 64,200 bps for packet data communication, using 3 time slots in
coding scheme CS-4
Uplink data rate
Up to 21,400 bps for packet data communication, using 1 time slot in
coding scheme CS-4
Mode of operation
Class B and Class C modes of operation supported. It is possible for the
user to choose if the Circuit Switched services should be favoured.
R Reference point
Physical layer: Support of RS232
PPP is supported as L2 layer in the R reference point
Authentication algorithms PAP, CHAP supported
IP connectivity
PDP type IP is supported
IP termination in mobile or TE (laptop, PDA) supported
Application
WAP over GPRS supported (UDP/IP and GPRS-SMS)
SMS over GPRS (SMS-MT, SMS-MO) supported
QoS
QoS negotiation supported. Default requested QoS sent by the handset at
PDP context activation is reliability Class 3. Peak/Mean/Delay/Precedence
Class: subscribed (1,2,3).
•
•
•
•
Precedence class supported (1,2,3)
Reliability class 1-5 supported
Delay classes supported (1,2,3,4)
Mean and peak throughput rate limited by multislot class 4 and CS4
PDP context
10 PDP context descriptions stored in mobile
PDP context description is edited via application in mobile, AT-command
or via OTA
Simultaneous PDP contexts not supported
Network requested PDP context not supported
SIM
GPRS aware, as well as non GPRS aware SIMs are supported
AT commands supported
•
•
•
•
AT+CGDCONT - DEFINE
PDP CONTEXT
AT+CGQREQ - Quality of
Service Profile
(REQUESTED)
AT+CGQMIN - Quality of
Service Profile (Minimum
Acceptable)
AT+CGATT - PACKET
DOMAIN SERVICE ATTACH
OR DETACH
•
•
AT+CGACT - PDP CONTEXT
ACTIVATE OR DEACTIVATE
AT+CGDATA - ENT
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Built-in GSM data modem technical data
Dimension
Support in the T68i
Standards
AT commands industry standard, ETSI 07.05 and 07.07 and 07.10, V.25ter
command set supported
Data rates, Circuit
Switched (CSD)
Download data rate
Up to 19,200 or 28,800 bps (depending on base
rate) no compression,
with V.42bis compression up to four times higher
transmission rates depending on the data type
Upload data rate
Up to 9,600 or 14,400 bps (depending on base
rate) for GSM Data communication, no
compression
with V.42bis compression up to four times higher
transmission rates depending on the data type
Data rates, GPRS
See GPRS Technical data
E-mail client technical data
Feature
Support in the T68i e-mail client
Attachment
Yes (outgoing,
images only)
Bearer type GPRS (IP)
Yes
Bearer type GSM Data (IP)
Yes, HSCSD, ISDN and analog
Character sets *
US ASCII (All variants)
ISO8859-1 (All variants)
ISO8859-2 (All variants except China, Taiwan & HongKong) )
ISO8859-5 (All variants except China, Taiwan & HongKong) )
ISO8859-10 (All variants except China, Taiwan & HongKong) )
KOI8-R (All variants except China, Taiwan & HongKong) )
WIN1251 (All variants except China, Taiwan & HongKong) )
WIN1252 (All variants except China, Taiwan & HongKong) )
UTF7 (All variants)
UTF8 (All variants)
GB2312 (Chinese Simplified, only in China variant)
BIG5 (Chinese Traditional, only in Taiwan/HongKong variant)
GB18030 (Chinese Simplified, only in China variant)
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Feature
Support in the T68i e-mail client
OTA Support
Yes
Supported protocols
POP3, IMAP4, SMTP
USSD technical data
Feature
Support in the T68i/ie
USSD support
GSM Phase 1/ 2 (Cross-phase compatibility). GPRS
behaviour according to class B
Mode support -mode
MMI-mode supported.
No application mode support (not needed for any
application).
MMI-mode details
•
•
USSD messages displayed until removed by user
It is possible to scroll up and down the text in
USSD messages
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Image format technical data
Format
Visible
Max
Animation
Colours
Visible
colours
GIF
101x80
pics
160x120
pixels
50 frames (1
frame/
100ms)
256
256
(3:3:2=RGB;
less blue
colours)
JPEG
101x80
pics
640x480
pixels
No
16.8 mil.
256
WBMB
101x80
pics
320x320
pixels
No
Black/
White
2
Transparency
support
Images – downloading to phone
Feature
File type
Max. size
PC/
Cable
PC/
IrDA
PC/
BT
Phon
e-tophon
e
WAP
MMS
EMS icons
WBMP
WxH<=1024
pixels
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MMS
GIF, WBMP,
JPG
Limited by
the memory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Background
GIF,
WBMP;
JPG
Limited by
the memory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Send 30k,
Receive 50k
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
MMS
template
Animations
Animated
GIF
Limited by
the memory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes, 1)
Yes
Themes
GIF
(propriety,
THM)
Limited by
the memory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Screensaver
Animated
GIF
Limited by
the memory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Exceptions:
MMS: GIF, WBMP, JPG, 160x120 pics
EMS icons: WBMP max WidthxHeight<=1024 pixels (eg 32x32=1024)
Themes: GIF max, 160x120 pixels
WAP: Can not show animations in the WAP Browser. You can download maximum 3kb. The animation
will be shown in the Image Browser if it’s saved in the phone.
GIF: Animations used as background images or user greetings displays first frame only.
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SyncML technical data
Feature
Support for Sync ML in the T68i
SyncML compliance
The handset is fully SyncML compliant (it passed both
SyncML Conformance and Interoperability testing [SyncFest])
Basic data formats
Contacts: vCard 2.1, Calendar: vCalendar 1.0, Tasks: vTodo
1.0.
Possibility for operators to extend
SyncML functionlity
No
Possibility to synchronize other
handsets using SyncML
No
Transport method for SyncML
messages
WSP (i.e. using a WAP connection)
Synchronization application
placement
Inside the handset
Possibility for the user to configure
login parameters (e.g. username and
password) to access the remote
database
Yes
Configuration parameters that can be
entered/modified by the user
Server URL, Server UserID, Server PWD, Paths to databases
(Calendar, Contacts, Tasks) UserID and PWD for Databases,
Databases to be synced (on/off), WAP Account, Sync Sound
Mechanisms used by the handset to
capture changes made by the end
user (i.e. how does the SyncML client
in your handset know which changes
ware made to the address book)
It uses a changelog where it marks the contact as updated
Ability to deal with multiple servers
No
Ability to perform conflict resolution
actions
No
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Infrared transceiver technical data
Signal in RS-232
Support in DRS-11
CD (Carrier
Detect)
No. Set
statically
CTS (Clear To
Send)
Yes
DSR (Data Service
Ready)
Statically connected with DTR
DTR (Data
Terminal Ready)
Statically connected with DSR
GND (Signal
Ground)
Yes
RI (Ring
Indication)
No. Set
statically
RTS (Request To
Send)
Yes
Rx (Received
Data)
Yes
Tx (Transmitted
Data)
Yes
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Index
A
Abbreviations42
Acknowledgement46
Ambient temperatures48
Architecture12
MMS Centre12
AT Command Functions28
Audio10
B
Bluetooth devices16
Bluetooth technical data56
Built-in GSM data modem technical data65
C
Calendar8
Cell broadcast service50
Compatibility14
Compatible with old phones14
Connection via desktop charger19
Current consumption, talk and standby times48
D
Desktop charger19
Documents46
E
E-mail7
E-mail client technical data65
EMS7
EMS functional model15
Enhanced message service53
Exterior description47
F
Fixed Dialling36
G
Games49
General Packet Radio Service25
GPRS25
GPRS access characteristics22
GPRS technical data62
Graphics9
GSM Data access characteristics22
GSM system support47
I
Image format technical data66
Images, downloading to phone67
Info & entertainment14
In-phone functions and features31
L
Languages, MMI48
Links46
M
Memory management8
MMS Centre12
MMS content
audio10
graphics9
SMIL presentations11
text10
video11
MMS Technical features
architecture12
MMSC12
Mobile chat8
Mobile Internet24
Modem and AT Commands28
Multimedia message service54
N
News & commercials14
Notes8
O
Online Services37
OTA configuration1223
Overview of AT command functions28
P
Performance and technical characteristics57
Picture phone book8
Preface6
Product description6
Promotion, music13
Promotions, movie13
Push inbox24
Push services23
R
Related information46
Restricted Calls36
Ring signals14
S
Screen saver7
Short message service51
SIM Application Toolkit37
SIM AT Services37
SIM card type47
SMIL presentations11
SMS access characteristics22
SMS request15
SMS standard14
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Software46
Speech coding49
Supported MMI languages48
Synchronization software19
Synchronization, local19
SyncML17
SyncML architecture18
SyncML technical data68
T
Technical Specifications47
Terminology and abbreviations42
Text10
Themes8
Trademarks and acknowledgements46
U
Unified messaging14
User-to-user14
USSD technical data66
V
Vehicle positioning14
Video11
Voice control7
W
WAP browser technical data58
WAP Operator technical data59
WAP services21
WAP, security22
Weight47
X
XTNDConnect PC20
71