Alpha Microsystems AM-647 Specifications

RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
Roadrunner 030 & 040
RIGHT. FROM THE START
AM-1000/AM-1200 Upgrade
Installation Instructions
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
RIGHT. FROM THE START
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
 1995 Alpha Microsystems
REVISIONS INCORPORATED
REVISION
A00
A01
A02
A03
DATE
Dec.
Feb.
Dec.
Mar.
1993
1994
1994
1995
Roadrunner 030 and 040 AM-1000/1200 Upgrade Installation Instructions
To re-order this document, request part number PDI-00172-50.
The information contained in this manual is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, no
responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or use of this information is assumed by Alpha
Microsystems.
This document may contain references to products covered under U.S. Patent Number 4,530,048.
The following are registered trademarks of Alpha Microsystems, Santa Ana, CA 92799:
AMIGOS
AlphaBASIC
AlphaLAN
AlphaNET
CASELODE
AMOS
AlphaCALC
AlphaLEDGER
AlphaPASCAL
OmniBASIC
Alpha Micro
AlphaCOBOL
AlphaMAIL
AlphaRJE
VER-A-TEL
AlphaACCOUNTING
AlphaFORTRAN 77
AlphaMATE
AlphaWRITE
VIDEOTRAX
The following are trademarks of Alpha Microsystems, Santa Ana, CA 92799:
AlphaBASIC PLUS
DART
inFront/am
AlphaVUE
ESP
AM-PC
MULTI
AMTEC
inSight/am
All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
ALPHA MICROSYSTEMS
3511 Sunflower
P.O. Box 25059
Santa Ana, CA 92799
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2.0
GENERAL PRODUCT DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2
Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3
Power Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.0
MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
4.0
COMPATIBILITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1
Software Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2
Hardware Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3
Unsupported Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
6
6
7
5.0
ROADRUNNER SCSI TAPE AND HARD DISK DRIVE REQUIREMENTS .
5.1
Tandberg 1/4" Streaming Tape Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2
AM-645 8mm Magnetic Tape Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3
AM-647 DAT Magnetic Tape Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4
SCSI Hard Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
7
9
9
10
6.0
AM-1000/1200 BOOT CONFIGURATION SWITCHES AND JUMPERS . . . 11
7.0
SCSI DISPATCHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
8.0
UPGRADING ROADRUNNER ON-BOARD MEMORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
8.1
Installing Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
9.0
CONFIGURING THE ROADRUNNER AND AM-985 BOARDS . . . . . . . . . .
9.1
Roadrunner AM-172 Board Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2
Roadrunner AM-174 Board Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3
Boot PROM Removal and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4
AM-985 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.0
INSTALLING THE AM-985 BOARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
11.0
INSTALLING THE AM-172 BOARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1 Mounting the AM-172 Above 3-1/2" SCSI Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2 AM-172 Center Position Mount (No Peripheral) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3 AM-172 Mount Over Center Peripheral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
2
2
4
4
15
15
16
17
18
22
22
25
26
Page ii
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
12.0
34-Pin X-Bus Cabling Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.1 AM-172 to AM-985 X-bus Cabling Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 AM-174 to AM-985 X-bus Cabling Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3 Connecting the 50-Pin SCSI Interface Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4 Connect DC Power Cable to Roadrunner Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
29
31
31
34
13.0
BOOTING THE NEW ROADRUNNER HARDWARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
14.0
INITIAL SYSTEM TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
15.0
OPERATIONAL NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
16.0
ROADRUNNER LOGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
17.0
ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
APPENDIX A - SCSI TERMINATION
A.1
SCSI TERMINATION USING EXTERNAL TERMINATOR OPTION . A-1
A.1.1 Termination Procedure (W/O) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.2
TERMINATOR POWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
APPENDIX B - READ-AHEAD AND WRITE BUFFERING
B.1
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2
READ AHEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.1 Controlling Read-Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3
WRITE BUFFERING FOR SCSI-1 AND SCSI-2 DISK DRIVES . . . .
B.3.1 Potential Pitfalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.2 Setting Up Write Buffering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.4
FINAL NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APPENDIX C - ROADRUNNER SOFTWARE CONFIGURATION
C.1
PREPARING FOR A ROADRUNNER UPGRADE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.1 Protecting Your Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.2 Warm Boot Ability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.3 Booting from a Floppy Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.4 Upgrading Your AMOS Operating Software . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.5 Preparing the Software to Boot from
the Roadrunner Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.1.6 Roadrunner Installation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APPENDIX D - ROADRUNNER AM-174 PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
D.1
ROADRUNNER AM-174 PROGRAMMING INFORMATION . . . . . .
D.1.1 The Problem and Why It’s a Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.2 What You Must Do.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.3 One More Caution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.1.4 New Cache Control Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
B-2
B-2
B-3
B-3
B-4
B-5
C-1
C-1
C-2
C-2
C-2
C-4
C-6
D-1
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-3
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page iii
APPENDIX E - FCC CLASS A EMISSION CONTROL REQUIREMENTS
E.1
FERRITE CLAMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
E.2
SIGNAL AND CHASSIS GROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 1
1.0INTRODUCTION
The Roadrunner product kit described in this document is designed for upgrading Alpha
Micro’s AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers. The product kit consists of two printed circuit
boards (AM-172 or AM-174 and AM-985), two 34-pin cables, and all necessary
mounting hardware. The Roadrunner hardware package is engineered to fit completely
inside the AM-1000/1200 chassis.
With a Motorola 32-bit MC68EC030 or MC68040 CPU, integral high performance SCSI
interface, and memory expansion up to 32 megabytes, Roadrunner provides incredible
power and easy installation. Simply update your operating system, install the
Roadrunner hardware into your computer, and you’re ready to take advantage of a
whole new level of performance.
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MAC923
AM-1000 / AM-1200 Computer Enclosure
If your AM-1000 or AM-1200 computer contains a full-height 5-1/4" floppy or streaming
tape drive, you must do one of the following:
Remove the floppy or streamer drive and transfer it into an external
subsystem enclosure.
Replace the full-height floppy or streamer drive with a half-height
peripheral.
Upgrade your computer with a 3-1/2" Roadrunner compatible SCSI disk
drive.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 2
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
The performance achieved by a Roadrunner upgrade depends largely on the type of
hard disk drive you are using. With the Roadrunner hardware installed, an AM-1000 or
AM-1200 computer booting from a SCSI-1 hard disk drive connected to the Roadrunner
SCSI port will see a significant improvement in overall system performance. However,
maximum performance is achieved when a SCSI-2 hard disk drive is used in
conjunction with Roadrunner hardware.
The Roadrunner hardware does not support an ST-506/Xebec controlled drive as a boot
device. However, Section 5.4 describes how you can access your ST-506 drive as a
subsystem device connected to the SASI port, for the purpose of transferring software
to a SCSI drive attached to the Roadrunner board’s high performance SCSI port.
A typical Roadrunner upgrade will include the installation of an AM-172 or AM-174
board, an AM-985 board, and a new 3-1/2" SCSI disk drive. SCSI disk drives ordered as
part of a Roadrunner upgrade may be factory loaded with a bootable copy of
Roadrunner compatible AMOS software. If you choose to use your existing drive, you
will need to download and configure a Roadrunner compatible AMOS operating system
using the instructions found in Appendix C at the end of this document.
2.0GENERAL PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
This section outlines Roadrunner’s basic features and specifications.
2.1Features
The features list is divided into four categories: features unique to the AM-172
MC68EC030 Roadrunner board; features unique to the AM-174 66MHz MC68040
Roadrunner board; features unique to the AM-174 80MHz MC68040 Roadrunner board;
and general features applicable to all three boards.
1.AM-172 Specific features:
a.MC68EC030 CPU.
b.40MHz clock rate.
c.256-byte internal cache memory.
d.One on-board (SIMM) single inline memory module expansion slot,
which supports 4, 8, 16, and 32 megabyte 70ns DRAMs.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 3
2.AM-174 66MHz Specific features:
a.MC68040 CPU.
b.33MHz bus clock rate.
c.66MHz CPU clock rate.
d.4KB internal instruction cache
e.32KB external cache.
f.One on-board (SIMM) single inline memory module expansion slot,
which supports 4, 8, 16, and 32 megabyte 70ns DRAMs.
3.AM-174 80MHz Specific features:
a.MC68040 CPU.
b.40MHz bus clock rate.
c.80MHz CPU clock rate.
d.4KB internal instruction cache
e.32KB external cache.
f.One on-board (SIMM) single inline memory module expansion slot,
which supports 4, 8, 16, and 32 megabyte 60ns DRAMs.
4.Features applicable all Roadrunner boards:
a.32-bit bidirectional data path.
b.32-bit address path.
c.Seven interrupt levels with vector capability.
d.DMA channel capability.
e.On-board bootstrap PROM containing several boot routines that
enable you to change the I/O device the computer boots from. Also
contains full power-up self-test of various system features.
f.On-board high performance SCSI expansion interface, which
supports both SCSI-1 and SCSI-2 peripherals.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 4
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
2.2Environmental Specifications
Computer operating
temperature external
60 to 80 degrees F (16 to 27
degrees C)
Humidity
10% to 90% (non-condensing)
2.3Power Specifications
DC power requirements (maximum):
Board
Current Draw
AM-172
AM-174
AM-985
1.6 A
2.9 A
200 ma
3.0MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS
The Roadrunner product kit included with this document is mechanically compatible with
both AM-167 based AM-1000 and AM-177 based AM-1200 computers. However, there
are some minimum revision requirements for both AM-167 and AM-177 boards that
must be met in order to be Roadrunner compatible. The minimum acceptable revision
levels for AM-167 and AM-177 boards (along with the minimum acceptable revision
levels for other AM-1000 and AM-1200 related hardware) are documented in the next
section.
Some AM-1000 and all AM-1200 computers contain a 68000 or 68010 CPU chip which
is soldered to the main electronics board. If this is the case with your computer, you
must make arrangements to have the CPU chip un-soldered from the board. Also, a
64-pin socket (included in the product installation kit), compatible with the AM-985
board, must be soldered in the location where the CPU chip was removed. The process
of removing the CPU chip and installing the 64-pin socket is a delicate procedure, which
if done incorrectly could result in a damaged AM-167 or AM-177 board. This procedure
should only be done by an authorized service technician.
Some AM-167 or AM-177 boards may have an old style side-contact 64-pin socket.
When installed in this type of socket, you will notice the AM-985 board will easily move
from side to side, even though it is seated into the socket. If you encounter this situation,
have your old 64-pin socket removed and install one of the full-contact 64-pin sockets
included with the Roadrunner hardware kit.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 5
The power supply in AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers will support one hard disk drive
and one diskette drive or one streaming tape drive; there is not sufficient power to
support more than two internally mounted peripherals. For the Roadrunner hardware to
function properly in your computer, your power supplies +5v DC voltage output must be
a minimum of 4.90 volts. The voltage output should be measured at the J3, J4, J5, or J6
peripheral power distribution connectors. Make the measurement at the AM-167 or
AM-177 board, not at the peripheral end of the DC power cables.
AM-177 BOARD
AM-167 BOARD
+12V
J6
J3
GND
GND
+5V
+5V
+5V
+12V
J3
J4
+5V
+12V
J4
J5
+5V
+12V
J5
J6
+5V
AM-167 and AM-177 Board DC Power Connectors
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 6
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
4.0COMPATIBILITY
The next two sections on Roadrunner hardware and software compatibility are important
and should be carefully read before proceeding with your installation.
4.1Software Compatibility
In order to be Roadrunner 030 compatible, your AMOS operating system can be no
earlier than AMOS PR5/94 1.4C or AMOS PR5/94 2.2C. The Roadrunner 040 board
has the same operating system requirements as the 030 board; however, for the
PR5/94 AMOS releases, you must also download the Product Support Software Kit
designed to support the Roadrunner 040 board. PR11/94 and later AMOS releases will
include Roadrunner 040 support as part of the main release.
If you are installing an AM-174 Roadrunner 040 board, Appendix D contains some
important programming information related to the use of self-modifying code and the
Roadrunner 040’s large 4KB instruction cache. All Roadrunner 040 users should
carefully read the information in Appendix D before running third party application
programs.
4.2Hardware Compatibility
To be compatible with the Roadrunner hardware, other circuit boards in your computer
need to be at certain minimum revision levels. The following is a list of all boards
compatible with the Roadrunner, along with their minimum acceptable revision levels:
BOARD
MINIMUM REVISION
COMMENTS
DWB-00167-XX
D06, B12
Revision D15 boards with gold pins are desirable.
Revision A boards are not supported.
DWB-00177-XX
C00, B00, A13
DWB-00213-00
B03, A03
A09 boards are acceptable if you are not
using the SASI port.
DWB-00213-01
B04
DWB-00220-00
A07
DWB-00220-01
A01
DWB-00334-00
A01
DWB-00336-00
A01
DWB-00337-XX
A01
Note that this information does not supersede existing minimum level requirements for
AM-1000 and AM-1200 functionality. For instance, SCSI support for disk and streaming
tape drives connected to the on-board SASI port require revision level A16, B17, or D24
for the AM-1000 main logic board.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 7
4.3Unsupported Hardware
The following products are not supported for use with Alpha Micro’s Roadrunner
hardware:
1.ST-506 drives and Xebec controllers are not supported as a boot devices.
2.AM-706 memory expansion boards.
3.AM-708 memory expansion boards.
4.All third party memory expansion boards designed to plug onto AM-177 or
AM-167 boards.
5.Other types of third party boards (i.e., I/O and communications boards) may not
work with the Roadrunner product. Contact the original manufacturer of the
equipment for assistance. Also, see the Roadrunner SIG on AMTEC+ for more
information on third party hardware compatibility.
5.0ROADRUNNER SCSI TAPE AND HARD DISK DRIVE REQUIREMENTS
Roadrunner has an on-board high performance SCSI interface incorporated into its
design. To insure a successful installation, you should carefully read the next few
sections dealing with SCSI peripherals and Roadrunner compatibility.
The Roadrunner’s on-board high performance SCSI interface supports both SCSI-1 and
SCSI-2 hard disk and magnetic tape devices. However, because of the potential
increase in performance, we highly recommend the use of SCSI peripherals that
support SCSI-2.
5.1Tandberg 1/4" Streaming Tape Drives
In order to warm boot from a Tandberg tape drive, it must be set to a higher numerical
SCSI ID (1 through 6) than any other tape device connected to the bus.
1.In order to be Roadrunner compatible, the AM-625 Tandberg 150MB tape drive
must have firmware at revision -06:00 or later. You can use the SCSI.LIT
program (included in AMOS 2.2C and 1.4C operating system releases) to
determine the firmware revision of your tape drive. Simply type in the command
SCSI at the AMOS prompt and the program will display a string of numbers which
includes the firmware revision. The AM-625 is a SCSI-1 device; it cannot be
upgraded to SCSI-2. AM-625 backups are not able to span tapes.
2.AM-626 525MB Tandberg SCSI tape drives can be upgraded to SCSI-2 by
installing updated firmware (part number PDB-00626-90), which can be ordered
from Alpha Micro. If you do not upgrade the firmware, the drive can still be used
with Roadrunner hardware as a SCSI-1 device, but only if it has firmware at
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 8
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
revision -04:08 or later. You can use the SCSI.LIT program (included in AMOS
2.2C and 1.4C operating system releases) to determine the firmware revision of
your tape drive. Simply type in the command SCSI at the AMOS prompt and the
program will display a string of numbers which includes the firmware revision.
To install the firmware PROM, you simply remove the two TORX screws holding
the drive’s top cover in place; lift off the top cover; gently pry out the old PROM;
and install the new PROM, as shown.
TORX SCREWS
Make sure the notch
in the chip (indicating
pin-1) points toward
the rear of the drive.
FIRMWARE PROM
LOCATION
MAC860
AM-626 PROM Installation
3.AM-627 and AM-628 Tandberg SCSI tape drives also require a firmware update
to be SCSI-2 compatible. However, these drives use a flash ROM for their
firmware, which can be updated without removing the drive from the computer.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 9
Once the computer has completed booting, enter the following commands to
update the tape drive firmware for SCSI-2 operation:
LOG OPR: RETURN
FWUPD DVR:TSCZ2 RETURN
The program will prompt you for the name of the device, enter:
STR0: RETURN
The firmware on the tape drive will automatically be updated for SCSI-2 operation;
it takes about one minute and the AMOS prompt will re-appear. In order for the
firmware update to take affect, you must power the computer down and then turn
the power on again. With the computer up and running, your AM-627 or AM-628
tape drive will now be SCSI-2 compatible.
Once the firmware has been updated, the drive is only compatible with the
Roadrunner hardware, AM-540 enhanced AM-3000M computers, or an AM-4000
CPU board. If the drive is ever used in a configuration with an earlier style CPU
board, the firmware must be converted back. To convert back to SCSI-1, follow
the same procedure outlined above, but enter the command:
FWUPD DVR:TSCZ1 RETURN
5.2AM-645 8mm Magnetic Tape Subsystem
In order for the Exabyte tape drive to work with the Roadrunner hardware, new firmware
must be installed in the drive. The updated firmware is available from Alpha Micro under
part number PDB-00645-90. Once the new firmware is installed, the Exabyte tape drive
will operate in SCSI-1 mode only. The ability to span tapes is not supported on the
Exabyte tape drive.
5.3AM-647 DAT Magnetic Tape Subsystem
The DAT tape drive is SCSI-2 ready and does not require any firmware updates to be
compatible with Roadrunner hardware. However, on the back of the DAT drive a change
needs to be made to one of the configuration switches. Switch S4 needs to be placed in
the "ON" position in order for the drive to operate in SCSI-2 mode.
After making a configuration switch change, you must turn the drive off and then power
the drive back on in order for the switch change to take affect.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 10
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
5.4SCSI Hard Disk Drives
Depending on your order, your new SCSI drive may already be loaded with a
Roadrunner compatible AMOS operating system. If this is the case, the drive will be
clearly labeled indicating how it was configured.
In most cases, you will be attaching your SCSI disk drive to the high performance port
on the Roadrunner board. The Roadrunner hardware also supports a SCSI drive
connected to the SASI port on the AM-167 or AM-177 board. However, if your
configuration includes a Tandberg tape drive, make sure the bootable hard disk and the
tape drive are attached to the same bus. The configuration will not be functional if the
tape drive is connected to the SASI port on the AM-167 or AM-177 board and the
bootable disk drive is attached to the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port.
For the temporary purpose of transferring software, you may want to attach your
existing SCSI or ST-506 drive to the SASI port so you can copy software on to your new
SCSI drive attached to the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port. Your power supply may not
have enough power to support two disk drives, in which case you may damage your
power supply if you overload it. If you plan to do a disk to disk file transfer operation, we
highly recommend that the second disk drive be powered by an external power supply.
An AM-1001 subsystem would be ideal for this operation.
If you are booting from the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port and want to copy software
from a drive connected to your computer’s SASI port, the SCSI or ST-506 drive
connected to the SASI port must be addressed to SCSI ID 1, 2, or 3. If the drive
attached to the SASI port is addressed as 0, one of two things will happen; the
computer will hang during the boot cycle; or if the SCSI drive connected to the SASI port
has a properly configured bootable copy of AMOS, the computer will boot from the SASI
port instead of the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port. (The boot PROMS on the
Roadrunner do not support booting from an ST-506 drive from the SASI port or the
SCSI port.) Also, you will need to create the appropriate driver using FIXLOG for the
drive you are accessing as a subsystem device.
Maxtor LXT, MXT, and 7200 series SCSI disk drives supplied by Alpha Micro are
supported for use on the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port. However, for use on your
computer’s SASI port, Maxtor MXT SCSI drives must have revision 1.5 firmware or
later. Some earlier SCSI disk drives sold by Alpha Micro may also be supported on the
Roadrunner board’s SCSI port, but they must be fully compatible with SCSI-1 protocol.
Some SCSI drives, like the older Micropolis full-height 5-1/4" SCSI drives, are not
compatible with SCSI-1 or SCSI-2 protocol. These drives are not supported for use on
the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port, but they can remain on the SASI port and still
function with the Roadrunner upgrade. If you are not sure what SCSI protocol your drive
supports, contact Alpha Micro’s Technical Support Group for assistance. Quantum LPS
and Empire SCSI disk drives sold by Alpha Micro are also supported on the
Roadrunner’s SCSI port.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 11
The boot PROMS on the Roadrunner board are programmed to look first at the SASI
port on the AM-167 or AM-177 board. If a SCSI drive addressed as #0 is detected on
the SASI port, it will be selected as the boot device. If no device is detected on the
SASI port, the boot PROMS will then check the Roadrunner board’s SCSI port for a
device. If a SCSI drive addressed as #0 is detected on the Roadrunner board, it will be
selected as the boot device.
The installation of Roadrunner hardware does not change the way your boot select
switch works on your AM-167 or AM-177 board. The switch settings documented in your
computer owner’s manual are still valid.
Under AMOS 2.2 (or later) operating systems, you can divide your hard disk drive into
logical devices larger than 32MB. In fact, you could take a 540MB drive and make it one
giant 540MB logical. While this is perfectly acceptable, you may get a memory allocation
error when running programs that load a copy of the bitmap into your memory
partition—e.g., DSKANA and MONTST. To use these types of programs, you will need
at least one job on your computer with enough memory allocated to allow you to load
the large bitmap. Depending on the size of the logical device, you may need a memory
partition between 100 and 800KB.
6.0AM-1000/1200 BOOT CONFIGURATION SWITCHES AND JUMPERS
The two tables on the following page show how the AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers
are configured to boot from various primary (hard disk drive) and secondary (VCR,
floppy, and SCSI streamer) devices. Note that in order to configure the boot jumpers on
the AM-1000, you need to remove the computer’s top cover. The AM-1200 computer
has a dip-switch for boot device selection, which can be accessed via the computer’s
rear panel.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 12
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
AM-1200 BOOT SWITCH CONFIGURATION
SWITCH
1
2
3
DIAGRAM
4
(AS VIEWED FROM
REAR PANEL)
BOOT SELECTION
SCHEME
ON OFF OFF ON
VCR/HARD DISK
ON
ON OFF ON OFF
FLOPPY ONLY
ON
OFF ON OFF ON
HARD DISK ONLY
ON
ON
ON OFF ON
SCSI STREAMER/HARD DISK
ON
AM-1000 BOOT CONFIGURATION JUMPERS
U100
U101
W14
W8
W15
W9
W14
W8
W15
W9
W14
W8
W15
W9
W14
W8
W15
W9
= VCR/HARD DISK
= FLOPPY ONLY
= HARD DISK ONLY
= SCSI STREAMER/HARD DISK
MAC939
An AM-1000 computer can only warm boot from a Tandberg tape drive with the
Roadrunner hardware installed; standard AM-1000 computers don’t support SCSI
streamer warm boot.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 13
7.0SCSI DISPATCHER
In order to use the Roadrunner’s on-board high performance SCSI controller, you must
define the "SCSI Dispatcher" in your system initialization command file. AMOS uses the
dispatcher to communicate with the SCSI controller chip. All communications with the
SCSI controller chip are handled by the dispatcher.
There are two versions of the SCSI dispatcher. SCZRR.SYS is a high performance SSD
protected version of the SCSI dispatcher, which supports command queueing,
synchronous transfers, multi-threaded, and scatter-gather operations. SIMRR.SYS is a
simplified version of the SCSI dispatcher, which is not SSD protected and does not
support the high performance features supported in SCZRR.SYS. SIMRR.SYS is used
when making warm boot tapes and for temporary situations with computers which do
not have an SSD chip; it is not intended for normal operation. While both of these
dispatchers support SCSI devices, there is a tremendous performance increase using
the SCZRR.SYS dispatcher.
The PIC code for the SCSI dispatcher must be purchased separately from Alpha Micro.
See Appendix C for information on how to install the SCSI dispatcher and enter its SSD
PIC code.
If you have any SCSI peripherals attached to the Roadrunner’s SCSI port, you must
define the dispatcher, regardless of whether you are using SCSI-1 or SCSI-2 peripheral
devices.
8.0UPGRADING ROADRUNNER ON-BOARD MEMORY
Roadrunner AM-172 and AM-174 boards have one on-board 72-pin SIMM (single inline
memory module) expansion slot. SIMM memory is available in four sizes: 4, 8, 16, and
32 megabytes. The 80MHz AM-174 board requires a 60ns SIMM; all AM-172 and
AM-174 66MHz boards require a 70ns SIMM. The next section describes how a SIMM
module is installed in AM-172 and AM-174 Roadrunner boards.
8.1Installing Memory
Special care must be taken when installing a SIMM module. The figure on the following
page shows how the curve in the SIMM module must align with pin-1 on the
Roadrunner’s SIMM connector.
The SIMM must be inserted into the connector at a slight angle and after you feel the
SIMM module settle into the connector, you rotate the SIMM into an upright position, as
shown in the illustration. When the SIMM is properly positioned, the metal retainer clips
at each end of the connector will click into position, locking the SIMM in place.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 14
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Very little force is required to install a SIMM module. If you’re having problems getting
the SIMM module installed in the connector, stop and take a moment to examine both
the SIMM module and the connector. Make sure you are installing the SIMM as shown
in the illustration.
Once the memory is installed, you must set the memory configuration jumpers based on
the capacity of the SIMM module. A table showing how these jumpers are configured is
shown in the AM-172 and AM-174 Roadrunner board illustrations.
MAKE SURE THIS CURVE
IN THE SIMM CARD ALIGNS
WITH PIN-1 IN THE
SIMM CONNECTOR.
SIMM (SINGLE INLINE
MEMORY MODULE)
METAL RETAINER
CLIP
MC1059
METAL RETAINER
CLIP
SIMM
CONNECTOR
PIN-1 INDICATOR
Roadrunner SIMM Module Installation
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 15
9.0CONFIGURING ROADRUNNER AND AM-985 BOARDS
The next four sections supply jumper configuration information for the Roadrunner
AM-172 and AM-174 boards, as well as the AM-985 board. The illustrations show the
configuration jumpers for each printed circuit board set in their factory default positions.
9.1Roadrunner AM-172 Board Configuration
The illustration below shows the AM-172 board configured as shipped by Alpha Micro.
The only user configurable jumpers on this board are the JP5 and JP6 memory
configuration jumpers. These jumpers only need to be reconfigured if you change the
amount of memory installed in your computer. All other jumpers on the board should be
left in their factory configured positions. All possible configurations for the memory
jumpers are shown in the illustration.
1
2
3
JP1
JP1 SET TO PINS 1 AND 2 = TERMPOWER DISABLED
JP1 SET TO PINS 2 AND 3 = TERMPOWER ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
1 2 3
JP2 SET TO PINS 1 AND 2 = SCSI BUS ACTIVE TERMINATION ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
JP2
JP2 SET TO PINS 2 AND 3 = SCSI BUS ACTIVE TERMINATION DISABLED
OSCILLATOR JUMPER (DO NOT REMOVE)
ALPHA
MICROSYSTEMS
JP2
JP1
J3
J1
J2
MEMORY SIMM CONNECTOR
JP3
N C R
50-PIN SCSI
CONNECTOR
JP4
BOOT PROM
X-BUS
CONNECTORS
J5
JP6
J6
PIN-1 INDICATOR
JP5
030
JP19
JP15
JP18
JP17
JP16
DWB-00172-00 REV. XXX
MEMORY CONFIGURATION
JUMPERS
OSCILLATOR JUMPERS
(DO NOT REMOVE)
TEST JUMPER
(DO NOT INSTALL)
4MB
8MB
16MB
32MB
JP6
JP6
JP6
JP6
MAC924
JP5
JP5
JP5
JP5
X-BUS ACTIVE TERMINATION
TEST JUMPER (DO NOT INSTALL)
IN = ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
OUT = DISABLED
CACHE ENABLE / DISABLE JUMPER
IN = DISABLED
OUT = ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
INDICATES PIN-1
FOR ALL CONNECTORS
AM-172 Board Configuration
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 16
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
9.2Roadrunner AM-174 Board Configuration
The illustration below shows the AM-174 board configured as shipped by Alpha Micro.
The only user configurable jumpers on this board are the JP11, JP12, and JP13
memory configuration jumpers. These jumpers only need to be reconfigured if you
change the amount of memory installed in your computer. All other jumpers on the
board should be left in their factory configured positions. All possible configurations for
the memory jumpers are shown in the illustration.
1
2
3
JP2
1
2
3
JP1
JP2 SET TO PINS 1 AND 2 = TERMPOWER DISABLED
JP2 SET TO PINS 2 AND 3 = TERMPOWER ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
JP1 SET TO PINS 1 AND 2 = SCSI BUS ACTIVE TERMINATION ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
JP1 SET TO PINS 2 AND 3 = SCSI BUS ACTIVE TERMINATION DISABLED
OSCILLATOR JUMPER (DO NOT REMOVE)
MEMORY SIMM CONNECTOR
JP2
J1
JP1
JP7
ALPHA
MICROSYSTEMS
J4
N C R
PIN-1 INDICATOR
JP6
50-PIN SCSI
CONNECTOR
X-BUS
CONNECTORS
JP13
JP12 JP11
BOOT PROM
JP10
JP15
JP14
JP9
ALPHA MICROSYSTEMS AM-174
MC1057
FACTORY USE ONLY, NO JUMPERS INSTALLED
JP13
JP13
JP13
JP13
JP12 JP11
JP12 JP11
JP12 JP11
JP12 JP11
X-BUS ACTIVE TERMINATION
IN = ENABLED (FACTORY DEFAULT)
OUT = DISABLED
MEMORY CONFIGURATION JUMPERS
8MB
16MB 32MB 64MB
4MB
JP13
OSCILLATOR JUMPERS
(DO NOT REMOVE OR RECONFIGURE)
JP12 JP11
JP17
J3
040
JP16
J2
INDICATES PIN-1
FOR ALL CONNECTORS
AM-174 Board Configuration
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 17
9.3Boot PROM Removal and Installation
The type of socket used for the boot PROM on your Roadrunner board requires a
special IC removal tool. See the illustration below for more information:
WARNING!
The boot PROM IC used on
Roadrunner boards requires
a specialized tool for its
removal. If you attempt to
remove the boot PROM
using a screwdriver or
pocketknife, you could
easily damage both
the chip and the
socket. Use a chip
extraction tool like this,
which is available at retail
stores that specialize in
electronic components.
MC1107
Roadrunner Boot PROM Removal
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 18
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
9.4AM-985 Configuration
The AM-985 board, which attaches to either an AM-167 or AM-177 CPU board, only has
one jumper. The jumper is factory installed at location JP1 and should not be removed.
DWB-00985-00
ALPHA
MICROSYSTEMS
AM-985
MADE IN USA
This rubber button protects the
AM-985 board, preventing it from
coming into contact with the metal
frame on the AM-177 board.
PIN-1
P2
P1
JP1
MAC925
TERMPOWER DISCONNECT
JUMPER (DO NOT REMOVE)
AM-985 Board
10.0INSTALLING THE AM-985 BOARD
Prior to handling any computer hardware, GROUND YOURSELF. The best ground is
the chassis cabinet that houses the boards. Touch the cabinet prior to picking up,
installing, or removing any board. Do not unplug the AC power cord from the cabinet,
but make sure the power switch is turned OFF. Unplugging the computer cabinet
isolates it from the common earth ground, leaving it vulnerable to static discharge.
If you did not include a new SCSI disk drive with your Roadrunner upgrade, you need to
load a new Roadrunner compatible AMOS operating system on your existing drive. The
software download and configuration procedure, located in Appendix C, must be
completed before the Roadrunner hardware is installed in your computer.
The AM-985 board plugs into the 64-pin socket used by the 68000 or 68010 CPU chip
in your AM-167 or AM-177 board. Use the following instruction for installing the AM-985:
1.Remove all the screws holding the computer’s top cover in place. Once the
screws have been removed, set the top cover out of the way.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 19
The illustrations on the following pages use the AM-177 CPU board as an
example of how to install the AM-985 board. The procedure used for the AM-167
board is exactly the same; the only difference is that none of the screws holding
the metal frame around the AM-167 board need to be removed to install the
AM-985 board.
2.If you are upgrading an AM-1200 computer, you must remove some of the screws
holding the AM-177 board’s metal frame in place in order to install the AM-985
board. Use a #2 phillips-head screw driver to remove the screws as indicated in
the following figure. Once the screws have been removed, you will be able to lift
the frame high enough to allow you to install the AM-985 board.
3.Carefully remove your 68000 or 68010 CPU chip from its socket on the CPU
board. It is not necessary to remove the boot PROMs from the AM-167 or AM-177
board. If your CPU board has a 68000 or 68010 CPU chip that is soldered into
position, you must make arrangements to have the chip un-soldered. See the
section on mechanical compatibility (appearing earlier in this document) for more
information on un-soldering the CPU chip.
4.On the bottom of the AM-985 board, an addtional 64-pin socket has been
installed. This socket protects the pins on the bottom of the AM-985 board during
shipment and during installation.
5.In some computers, there may be two configuration jumpers (shorting blocks) that
stick up high enough above the AM-167 or AM-177 board as to interfere with the
installation of the AM-985 board. If you run into this problem, you will find two "low
profile" configuration jumpers in the product installation kit. Replace the two long
jumpers with the two low profile jumpers if necessary.
6.Using the following two figures as a reference, use one hand to carefully press the
AM-985 board into the 64-pin socket on the CPU board, while using the other
hand to support the opposite side of the AM-167 or AM-177 board. You want to
avoid flexing the main CPU board!
7.After the AM-985 board has been installed, you will need to re-install the screws
removed from the metal frame on the AM-177 board. A small rubber button on the
AM-985 board prevents the AM-985 board from coming into contact with the metal
frame. Make sure the rubber button is properly in place between the AM-985
board and the metal frame before you tighten the metal frame screws.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 20
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Carefully pry the
CPU chip from
its socket.
BATTERY
MC68000
LOW
BYTE
HIGH
BYTE
MAC926
AM-177 Board and Mounting Frame
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Make sure the rubber button
that isolates the AM-985 board
from the metal frame is in place.
Install the AM-985 board
exactly as shown. Note how
the AM-985's two 34-pin
connectors are oriented
in relation to the AM-177
board.
BATTERY
P2
P1
JP1
AM-985 BOARD
AM-985 Board Installation
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
MAC927
Page 21
Page 22
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
11.0INSTALLING THE ROADRUNNER BOARD
There are several different methods of installing the Roadrunner board. In a typical
installation that includes a new SCSI drive, the Roadrunner board will be mounted
above the SCSI disk drive using the PDB-00172-10 mounting kit. If you choose to use
your existing disk drive, the Roadrunner can be mounted in the center position between
the power supply and the hard disk drive. It can be also be mounted in the center
position on top of a half-height floppy or Tandberg streaming tape drive, using special
brackets included in your PDB-00172-11 mounting kit.
11.1Mounting the AM-172 Above 3-1/2" SCSI Drive
If you included a new 3-1/2" SCSI drive with your Roadrunner upgrade, a special
bracket (DWF-20741-00) is included for mounting both the disk drive and the
Roadrunner board. The following instructions describe how to build the bracket, drive,
and Roadrunner board assembly:
1.Unplug any interface or power cables attached to your old disk drive assembly.
2.The two mounting brackets holding your old disk drive in place set on top of four
nylon standoffs. The brackets are attached to the standoffs with four phillips-head
screws. Remove the screws, but leave the nylon standoffs in place.
3.After the screws have been removed, your old disk drive assembly can be
removed from the chassis.
4.The new mounting bracket, the new SCSI drive, and the Roadrunner board must
be assembled together, before being installed in the chassis.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
DISK DRIVE/AM-17X
MOUNTING BRACKET
DWF-20741-00
AM-17X MOUNTING
HOLES
3-1/2" DRIVE
MOUNTING
HOLES
AM-17X MOUNTING
HOLES
The drive's 50-pin SCSI
connector must be positioned
at this end of the bracket.
3-1/2" SCSI DISK DRIVE
MAC931
DWF-20741-00
MOUNTING BRACKET
3-1/2" SCSI Drive and Roadrunner Mounting Bracket
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 23
Page 24
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
5.The previous figure shows the new mounting bracket (DWF-20741-00). Install
your new drive on the bracket as shown in the illustration. Make sure the 50-pin
connector on the drive is oriented as shown.
6.To install the Roadrunner board, attach one 2" long standoff to the mounting holes
located at each corner of the Roadrunner board. The standoffs and nuts attaching
the Roadrunner board to the mounting bracket are shown below; the screws that
attach the Roadrunner board to the standoffs are standard 6-32 phillips head
screws. Make sure you install the nylon washer at the location indicated in the
following figure. After all the standoffs are attached to the board, mount the
Roadrunner board on the bracket as shown. Make sure the SIMM connector on
the Roadrunner board is located at the same end of the bracket as the 50-pin
SCSI connector on the drive.
#6 NYLON
WASHER
6-32
PHILLIPS-HEAD
SCREW
SIMM CONNECTOR
2" STANDOFF
#6-32 NUT
MAC932
Mounting the Roadrunner Board
7.The completed bracket, drive, and Roadrunner board assembly can now be
placed in the chassis. The assembly must be positioned with the 50-pin connector
on the drive and the SIMM connector on the Roadrunner board pointing toward
the computer’s rear panel.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 25
8.Once the bracket is aligned with the nylon standoffs on the bottom of the chassis,
install the phillips-head screws that hold the assembly in place.
11.2Roadrunner Center Position Mount (No Peripheral)
To install the Roadrunner board between the power supply and the hard disk drive in a
configuration where no tape or diskette drive is being used, the Roadrunner board
mounts on four two inch long standoffs. The Roadrunner board and the standoffs are
assembled as shown in the following figure. The standoffs, as well as the nuts holding
the standoffs in place are shown below. The screws that attach the Roadrunner board
to the standoffs are standard 6-32 phillips head screws. The standoffs, screws, nuts,
and washers are included in the PDB-00172-10 installation kit.
TOWARD REAR
PANEL
SIMM CONNECTOR
TOWARD FRONT
PANEL
#6-32 NUT
2" STANDOFFS
MAC928
6-32 PHILLIPS-HEAD
SCREW
AM-1000/1200
CHASSIS BOTTOM
Roadrunner Board Center Position Mounting Assembly
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 26
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Once the standoffs are attached to the Roadrunner board, the assembly can be placed
inside the chassis between the power supply and the hard disk drive. Make sure the
Roadrunner board is oriented as shown in the prior figure; the SIMM connector on the
Roadrunner board needs to be closest to the computer’s rear panel. There are four
screw holes in the bottom of the AM-1000/1200 chassis that will align with the standoffs
on the Roadrunner board. Position the standoffs over the screw holes and secure the
assembly in place.
11.3Roadrunner Mounting Over Center Peripheral
If your computer has a half-height floppy drive or Tandberg streaming tape drive, the
PDB-00172-11 installation kit includes the necessary hardware for mounting the
Roadrunner board above the diskette or tape drive.
In order to mount the Roadrunner board above a center mounted half-height diskette or
tape drive, the drive must be mounted close enough to the chassis bottom to allow
adequate clearance for the Roadrunner board. Over the years, the length of the
standoffs used to mount a diskette or tape drive in AM-1000/1200 chassis varied. If your
diskette or tape drive is mounted on standoffs that are no longer than one inch, you can
install the Roadrunner board and its mounting brackets as shown on the following page.
If the standoffs are longer than one inch, you will need to mount the diskette or tape
drive on shorter standoffs, which are included in the installation kit. Also, you will need
to install a new front panel (included in the installation kit) as shown below.
Install the new front panel
DWF-20492-02.
SY
ST
EM
RE
SE
T
ST
AT
U
Remove the old front panel.
S
RU
N
LIG
HT
PO
WE
R
PA
R
ITY
al
ER
RO
ph
R
a
m
ic
ro
The installation kit
includes a new front panel
that positions the peripheral
closer to the chassis bottom.
10
00
MAC929
New Front Panel Installation
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 27
To install the new panel, the AM-1000/1200 front bezel must be removed:
1.The bezel is held in place with seven phillips-head screws. Four of the screws are
inside the chassis (these are the screws that secure the bezel to the doublers on
each side of the chassis). The other three screws holding the bezel in place are
located on the bottom of the chassis.
2.Once the screws have been removed, the bezel can be pulled off and the old front
panel can be removed.
3.Install the new front panel and re-install the bezel on the computer.
To install the Roadrunner board on top of the half-height diskette drive or Tandberg tape
drive:
1.Remove the four screws from the bottom of the chassis that hold your half-height
floppy or streaming tape drive in its mounting position.
2.Attach two 1" long standoffs to the front of the drive and two "shorter" 7/8" long
standoffs on the rear of the drive. By using shorter standoffs on the rear of the
drive, the Roadrunner board will be positioned low enough so the SIMM memory
card clears the AM-167 or AM-177 board. Note that the Tandberg tape drive uses
metric standoffs and screws. Diskette drives use standard standoffs and screws.
Be careful not to damage the threads in the mounting holes on the tape or diskette
drive by attempting to install the incorrect standoff (metric or standard). When the
proper standoff is used, it will screw easily into the drive.
3.The installation kit includes two DWF-20349-01 brackets, as shown. One on these
brackets attaches to each side of the drive. Each bracket is held in place with two
screws; diskette drives use standard screws; Tandberg tape drives use metric
screws.
4.Once the brackets have been attached to the drive, the Roadrunner board can be
installed. The Roadrunner board is held in place with four 6-32 phillips-head
screws. One of the screws must use a nylon washer to protect a resistor on the
Roadrunner board, as shown. Make sure the Roadrunner board is positioned with
the SIMM connector located nearest the computer’s rear panel.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 28
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
By installing shorter standoffs on the
rear of the tape or diskette drive, it will
lower the AM-17X board, allowing the
SIMM memory card to clear the bottom
of the AM-177 or AM-167 board.
TOWARD REAR
PANEL
TOWARD FRONT
PANEL
#6 NYLON
WASHER
6-32 PHILLIPS-HEAD
SCREW
MAC930
7/8" STANDOFFS INSTALL
AT THE REAR OF THE DRIVE
AM-17X MOUNTING
BRACKET
(DWF20349-01)
1" STANDOFFS INSTALL
AT THE FRONT OF THE
DRIVE
Roadrunner Board Mounting
5.With the completed assembly properly positioned inside the chassis, install the
four screws through the bottom of the chassis that hold the assembly in place.
Before you power-up your computer, make sure the top edge of the
Roadrunner board’s SIMM card is no higher than 4-1/8" above the chassis
bottom; this will prevent the SIMM card from making contact with the AM-167 or
AM-177 board.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 29
12.034-PIN X-BUS CABLING PRECAUTIONS
Up to this point, the installation instructions for AM-172 and AM-174 Roadrunner boards
have been exactly the same. However, the installation of the 34-pin X-bus cables is
not the same. This difference becomes important in configurations where an AM-172
(030 based) Roadrunner board is being replaced with an AM-174 (040 based) board. If
you remove your Roadrunner 030 board and replace it with an 040 board and then plug
the X-bus cables into the 040 board exactly as they were in the 030 board, your
computer will not boot. If you are performing an 030 to 040 upgrade, completely
remove both 34-pin X-bus cables from your computer and reinstall them using the the
X-bus cabling instructions for the Roadrunner (AM-174) 040 board.
The next figure shows how the two 34-pin cables are routed over the top of your
AM-177 or AM-167 board. In order that the cables not interfere with the fit of the
computer’s top cover, the cables must be routed under the metal frame that stiffens the
AM-167 or AM-177 board as shown. Connect both 34-pin cables to the AM-985 board
now. Make sure the embossed arrow (indicating pin 1) on the cable connectors aligns
with pin-1 on the AM-985 connectors.
12.1AM-172 to AM-985 X-bus Cabling Instructions
The AM-985 and AM-172 boards are linked together with two 34-pin cables, which you
were instructed to connect to the AM-985 board previously. One of the cables connects
the P2 connector on the AM-985 board to the J5 connector on the AM-172 board; the
other cable connects the P1 connector on the AM-985 board to the J6 connector on the
AM-172 board. Since you have already connected the two 34-pin cables to the AM-985
board, it is now simply a matter of routing the cables as shown on the following figure
and connecting them to the AM-172 board.
When plugging in the two cables, make sure the embossed arrow (which indicates
pin-1) on the connectors align with the pin-1 indicators on both the AM-172 and AM-985
boards. The section dealing with circuit board configuration contains illustrations
indicating pin-1 locations for AM-985, AM-172, and AM-174 boards.
No power is conducted over either of the two 34-pin cables, so no damage will occur if
you accidentally reverse these cables. However, if the cables are not plugged in
correctly, the system will not boot or run self-test. If your computer does not boot after
doing the upgrade, double check your cable connections.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 30
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
If the AM-17X board is
mounted above the disk
drive, both 34-pin cables
route across the end of
the board.
If the AM-17X board is
mounted in the center
position, both 34-pin
cables are routed
across the middle of
the board.
RED STRIPE
RED STRIPE
BATTERY
The P2 connector
on the AM-985
board connects to:
AM-172 board - J5
AM-174 board - J3
The P1 connector
on the AM-985
board connects to:
AM-172 board - J6
AM-174 board - J2
P2
P1
JP1
MAC933
Roadrunner Cable Routing
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 31
12.2AM-174 to AM-985 X-bus Cabling Instructions
The AM-985 and AM-174 boards are linked together with two 34-pin cables, which you
were instructed to connect to the AM-985 board previously. One of the cables connects
the P2 connector on the AM-985 board to the J3 connector on the AM-174 board; the
other cable connects the P1 connector on the AM-985 board to the J2 connector on the
AM-174 board. Since you have already connected the two 34-pin cables to the AM-985
board, it is now simply a matter of routing the cables as shown on the previous figure
and connecting them to the AM-174 board.
When plugging in the two cables, make sure the embossed arrow (which indicates
pin-1) on the connectors align with the pin-1 indicators on both the AM-174 and AM-985
boards. The section dealing with circuit board configuration contains illustrations
indicating pin-1 locations for AM-985, AM-172, and AM-174 boards.
No power is conducted over either of the two 34-pin cables, so no damage will occur if
you accidentally reverse these cables. However, if the cables are not plugged in
correctly, the system will not boot or run self-test. If your computer does not boot after
doing the upgrade, double check your cable connections.
12.3Connecting the 50-Pin SCSI Interface Cable
If your AM-1000/1200 computer is currently using a SCSI disk drive, your existing 50-pin
SCSI interface cable does not have to be replaced. If you intend on using the
Roadrunner board’s SCSI port, simply take the 50-pin connector that would normally be
plugged into the SASI port on the AM-167 or AM-177 board and plug it into the J3
connector on the AM-172 board or the J1 connector on the AM-174 board. Make sure
the connection is made pin-1 to pin-1.
If as part of the Roadrunner upgrade you are replacing an ST-506 type disk drive with a
new SCSI disk drive, you will need to install a new SCSI interface cable. The
Roadrunner product installation kit includes a 50-pin SCSI interface (DWB-10201-00).
The cable has an extra 50-pin connector that will allow you to install an optional
magnetic tape SCSI peripheral, like the Tandberg SCSI tape drive shown in the next
figure.
You may already be using the same cable (DWB-10201-00) included in the Roadrunner
installation kit, if at some point in the past you installed a Tandberg 1/4" streaming tape
drive. However, in order to work with the Roadrunner hardware, this cable may need to
be re-routed as shown.
The following figure shows how the new cable is routed in configurations where the
Roadrunner board is mounted on top of the SCSI disk drive. First, connect the external
SCSI cable to the computer’s rear panel. The first 50-pin connector, located closest to
the rear panel connector, attaches to the SCSI disk drive; the second connector
attaches to an optional magnetic tape peripheral; the connector at the far end of the
cable attaches to the Roadrunner board. Note how the cable is routed so that the red
stripe aligns with pin-1 on the disk drive, tape drive, and Roadrunner board.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 32
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
TANDBERG SCSI
1/4" TAPE DRIVE
DWB-10201-00 50-PIN
SCSI INTERFACE CABLE
RED
STRIPE
AM-17X
BOARD
PIN-1
RED STRIPE
3-1/2" SCSI
DISK DRIVE
REAR PANEL EXTERNAL
SCSI CONNECTOR
MAC942
RED STRIPE
SCSI Interface Cable Routing
If you have your Roadrunner board mounted in the center position between the power
supply and the hard disk drive, the 50-pin connector at the far end of the cable still
connects to the Roadrunner board. The cable routes as shown in the next figure. Any
extra cable length can be neatly folded beneath the Roadrunner board.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 33
AM-17X
BOARD
PIN-1
DWB-10201-00 SCSI
INTERFACE CABLE
RED
STRIPE
REAR PANEL EXTERNAL
SCSI CONNECTOR
SCSI HARD
DISK DRIVE
MAC943
RED STRIPE
Center Position Cable Routing
In some cases, the Roadrunner board may be mounted in the center position above a
streaming tape drive. In this configuration, route the cable straight over the top of the
disk drive, and then over to the Roadrunner board. Do not route the cable over the
top of the Roadrunner’s memory SIMM.
When it comes to cable routing, make sure all connections are made pin-1 to pin-1,
using the red stripe on the cable as a reference. Make sure the cables are positioned so
they will not get damaged by other equipment in the chassis, like the pins extending
from the solder side of the AM-167 or AM-177 board. The goal is to route cables so they
are safe and protected, as well as neat and clean. Also, you want to avoid routing
cables in such a way as to block the air flow from the computer’s cooling fan.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 34
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
12.4Connect DC Power Cable to Roadrunner Board
The Roadrunner installation kit includes a special DC power harness that has three DC
power connectors. One of the connectors plugs into the Roadrunner board; one
connector plugs into the SCSI disk drive; and the third connector plugs into the DC
power cable previously connected to the disk drive in your non-Roadrunner
configuration. Although these connectors are keyed, with extra force they can be
installed incorrectly, so be careful.
13.0BOOTING THE NEW ROADRUNNER HARDWARE
In order to perform the steps outlined in this section, your disk drive must be properly
configured with a bootable Roadrunner compatible AMOS operating system. If you are
using your existing drive, the instructions in this section assume that you have already
configured your software, based on the instructions in Appendix C, prior to installing the
Roadrunner hardware.
If you installed a new SCSI disk drive that was pre-loaded with a bootable Roadrunner
compatible copy of AMOS, your computer is ready to boot.
SCSI drives factory loaded with a bootable Roadrunner compatible AMOS operating
system are configured with the simple dispatcher, SIMRR.SYS. The simple dispatcher is
intended for temporary use only. To configure the high performance SCSI dispatcher,
you must purchase the PIC for the dispatcher from Alpha Micro and configure it as
described in Appendix C.
Turn the computer’s power switch to the on position and your Roadrunner hardware will
start the boot process just as your old CPU board did. If the SCSI dispatcher was not
defined in your system initialization command file prior to turning off the computer and
removing your old CPU board, an error message similiar to this:
?The SCSI dispatcher must be defined in order to use this driver
will be displayed on your terminal. This error will be displayed each time a DEVTBL
statement for a SCSI magnetic tape drive is encountered in your system initialization
command file. While this error will not prevent the computer from booting, none of your
magnetic tape devices will work until the dispatcher is defined.
14.0INITIAL SYSTEM TESTING
After installation is complete, run the Roadrunner Self Test program to make sure each
subsystem is functional. The self test diagnostics are incorporated into the boot PROMs
on the Roadrunner. Refer to the Alpha Micro Self Test User’s Guide for instructions.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 35
Once you have completed self test, press the reset button and wait for the computer to
boot. At the AMOS prompt, type:
SYSTAT RETURN
Check the system status information displayed by the SYSTAT program and insure all
jobs applicable to your computer are up and running—e.g., terminal, printer, task
manager, etc.
15.0OPERATIONAL NOTES
Under normal operating conditions, the RUN light on AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers
(without Roadrunner hardware installed) will remain lit at all times. With the Roadrunner
hardware installed and the system booted, you’ll notice the RUN light on your
computer’s front panel may not be lit. This is because the Roadrunner hardware uses
the RUN light as an activity light and during periods of no activity the RUN light will go
out. Also, on AM-1000 computers, the RUN light will be barely visible during periods of
low activity and will get progressively brighter as activity increases. With AM-1200
computers, the RUN light will be fully lit whenever there is any CPU activity.
When your computer boots, a number of status codes are displayed on the computer’s
front panel. The following tables show the codes generated by the AMOS monitor, as
well as the codes generated by the boot PROMS.
For the tables on the following pages, the first digit of many status codes is shown as
"x". This digit is either 2 or 3, and identifies the device the computer is attempting to
boot from:
2 = The alternate boot device.
3 = The primary boot device.
If you have an alternate boot device selected, the first few status codes will always
begin with 2 since the computer checks the alternate device first. If there is a bootable
tape or floppy diskette in the alternate boot device, the first digit of the status codes
remains 2. If there is no bootable medium in the alternate device, the computer boots
from the primary device and the first digit of the status codes changes to 3.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page 36
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Table 1. Front Panel Status Codes Generated by the Monitor
CODE
MEANING
4
System is out of QUEUE blocks.
8
A/C power dropped below an acceptable level.
9
Memory parity error.
10
An interface driver (.IDV) defined in a TRMDEF statement in the
system initialization command file was not found in account [1,6]
on the boot device.
11
A terminal driver (.IDV) defined in a TRMDEF statement in the
system initialization command file was not found in account [1,6]
on the boot device.
12
System Initialization Command file was not found.
Table 2. Front Panel Status Codes Generated by the Boot PROMS
CODE
MEANING
F
System is now clearing and sizing memory.
10
Roadrunner has determined the computer booting in an AM-1000
or AM-1200 computer.
20
The system is beginning to execute the boot PROM. An error at
this point indicates your computer has a faulty PROM. Contact
your dealer.
21
The system is transferring the instructions from the PROM into its
Random Access Memory (RAM). If an error occurs here, your
computer might have a bad PROM or bad memory.
22
The system is generating a checksum of the instructions in
Random Access Memory. If this calculated checksum doesn’t
match the checksum coded into the instructions themselves, you
see a "2E" error code.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 37
Table 2 (Continued)
CODE
MEANING
x3
The system is initializing the boot device. If the boot stops at this
point, it may indicate a hardware problem with the boot device.
For disk devices, when turning power on, this code might remain
on the display for a short time while the disk drive spins up to
operating speed.
x4
The system is reading the Master File Directory (MFD) from disk.
An error at this point indicates disk problems.
x5
Searching for the User File Directory (UFD) account [1,2] on the
boot device.
x6
Searching for BADBLK.SYS. Valid only on disk drives that use a
BADBLK.SYS file.
x7
Loading BADBLK.SYS.
BADBLK.SYS file.
x8
The system is searching for account DSK0:[1,4]. An error at this
point may indicate disk problems. Try reloading the latest
version of the system software.
x9
The system is looking for the system monitor file, AMOSL.MON,
in DSK0:[1,4]. If this file is missing, reload the latest version of
the system software.
x9
If your computer is trying to boot from a tape device, this code
indicates the system is searching for a label block on the tape.
xA
The system is loading the AMOS monitor from the boot device.
This code might indicate a disk problem.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Valid only on disk drives that use a
Page 38
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Table 2 (continued)
CODE
MEANING
xb
The system is beginning to execute the AMOS monitor program.
If an error occurs at this point, try reloading the latest version of
the system software.
xd
System bootup failed because of a time-out error. This code may
indicate faulty memory or an addressing problem.
2E
System bootup failed because of a bootstrap loader program
checksum error. This code may indicate a bad PROM or bad
memory.
xF
System bootup failed because of an invalid boot device selection.
Check the boot ID switches on the back panel of your computer.
See Chapter 2 for the proper settings.
Other status codes can appear during self test; these codes are discussed in the Alpha
Micro Self Test User’s Guide.
16.0ROADRUNNER LOGO
Your product installation kit includes a special Roadrunner logo. This logo, which is
shown below, should be affixed to your computer’s front panel after the Roadrunner
hardware has been installed.
030
The illustration above shows the 030 logo. If you ordered an AM-174 Roadrunner 040,
your product installation kit will include an 040 Roadrunner logo.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Installation Instructions: Roadrunner 030 & 040 AM-1000 / AM-1200 Upgrade
Page 39
17.0ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION
For additional HARDWARE information, refer to the following:
1. AM-1000 (or AM-1200) Owner’s Manual
2.Alpha Micro Self Test User’s Guide
3.Alpha Micro Installation and Planning Guide
For additional SOFTWARE information, refer to the following:
1. AMOS System Operator’s Guide
2.AMOS System Commands Reference Manual
3.The Release Notes for your version of AMOS and the corresponding hardware
support release
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
APPENDIX A
SCSI TERMINATION
A.1SCSI TERMINATION USING EXTERNAL TERMINATOR OPTION
The preferred method of terminating the SCSI bus in an AMOS based computer is the
installation of an external terminator. In Early April of 1993, the external SCSI bus
terminator became standard on all AMOS based computer configurations. Using an
external terminator makes the task of installing an add-on subsystem (like a portable
CD-ROM drive) easier, eliminating the necessity of removing terminators from a SCSI
device located in the host computer.
The Roadrunner hardware is sensitive in regards to SCSI bus termination. If you are
using the external terminator and one of the SCSI devices inside your computer also
has its terminators installed, you may experience problems.
The SCSI bus must be terminated at each end of the cable. The Roadrunner terminates
the SCSI bus at one end of the 50-pin interface cable. Termination at or close to the
other end of the SCSI bus is required, either via an external terminator or via a
terminator installed on the SCSI peripheral nearest the end of the bus.
External terminators are available from Alpha Micro under part number PRA-00222-00.
To use the external terminator, you need to insure none of your SCSI peripherals inside
the computer are terminated. You will also need to follow the guidelines in the section
on providing termination power for the SCSI bus.
The external terminator is shown in Figure A-1:
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page A-2
Appendix A
BAIL LOCKS
CONFIGURATION A
SI
SC
(PRA-00222-00)
EXTERNAL SCSI BUS
TERMINATOR
CONFIGURATION B
SI
SC
MAC821
#4 SCREW
AND WASHER
Figure A-1. External Terminator Installation
Figure A-1 shows two different types of external SCSI connectors.
1.Configuration"A" shows an extended external SCSI connector and bail locks for
holding the terminator in place. This configuration is used on almost all of Alpha
Micro’s currently available product. The terminator is installed by sliding it over the
connector and then latching the bail locks into the notches in the terminator.
2.Configuration"B" shows a flush mounted external SCSI connector. This is the
configuration used on AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers, as well as AM-1001
subsystems. In this configuration, the terminator inserts into a cutout in the sheet
metal and over the SCSI connector. The terminator is held in place with two
#4screws and washers.
A.1.1Termination Procedure (Without External Terminator)
1.For all AM-1000 and AM-1200 AMOS based computers, the last SCSI device
attached to the connector farthest down the cable away from the CPU board must
have its terminators installed. If only one SCSI device is installed, that device must
be terminated.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
SCSI Termination
Page A-3
2.For AM-1001 subsystem installations, the last SCSI device attached to the
connector farthest down the cable away from the host computer must have its
terminators installed. All SCSI devices inside the host computer must have their
terminators removed. If you are mixing SCSI-1 and SCSI-2 disk drives, do not
terminate the last SCSI device in the subsystem; instead, plug an external
terminator (PRA-00222-00) into the open rear panel SCSI connector on the rear
panel of the AM-1001 subsystem. This will properly terminate all SCSI-1 and
SCSI-2 devices in both the host computer and the subsystem.
A.2TERMINATION POWER
In order to properly control SCSI bus termination, a termination power source must be
provided; this is especially important when using an external terminator.
Why is Termination Power so important when using an external terminator?
In order for terminators to do their job, they must have a power source. In most (but not
all) cases, a SCSI peripheral will supply termination power to its own on-board
terminators, even if the SCSI host controller or no other SCSI peripheral is supplying
termination power to the SCSI bus. However, for an external terminator to be effective
there has to be termination power supplied to the SCSI bus. If no termination power is
available, the external terminator is not going to do its job, which means your SCSI bus
is not terminated. This may result in a computer that either won’t boot or once booted
may tend to hang frequently. Because SCSI-2 devices transfer data at a higher rate,
they are more prone to display problems when improperly terminated.
SCSI-2 Bus Termination Power Guidelines
Use these guidelines for supplying termination power for your Roadrunner enhanced
computers:
1.AMOS based computers with SCSI-2 implementation will be configured with the
Roadrunner board supplying termination power to the SCSI bus.
2.When the SCSI host controller is supplying termination power, you want your
internally mounted SCSI peripherals to be configured so they do not supply
termination power.
3.If a computer with one or more SCSI peripherals is cabled to a subsystem with
additional SCSI devices, the SCSI devices in the subsystem should be configured
so they do not supply termination power. Ideally, you want the SCSI host
controller in the main system to be the sole source of termination power.
The termination power guidelines described above are valid even when you are using
SCSI peripherals that do not support SCSI-2 protocol.
For information on how to configure terminator power on SCSI hard disk and magnetic
tape peripherals, see the following documents:
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page A-4
Appendix A
Each SCSI disk drive shipped by Alpha Micro has a one page notice with jumper
configuration information, including instructions on how to configure termination
power.
AM-62X SCSI 1/4" Streaming Tape Drive Installation Instructions, PDI-00625-00,
revision A07 or later.
AM-647 DAT Tape Drive Installation Instructions, PDI-00647-00, revision A05 or
later.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
APPENDIX B
READ-AHEAD AND WRITE
BUFFERING
B.1INTRODUCTION
In the past, AMOS systems achieved high levels of performance by using a "Herbie"
style disk controller (such as the AM-520) to offload a large portion of the overhead
associated with disk access. One additional benefit of this offloading, is that extra cycles
are available on the Herbie controller to perform functions such as read-ahead and write
buffering. Both of these schemes are used by the current AM-520 firmware, but cannot
be used on other non-intelligent interfaces such as the Alpha Micro SASI interface
because the main processor running AMOS has to handle control of the SASI interface,
stealing CPU cycles away from other resources, such as the terminal service system
and user jobs.
In the case of the Roadrunner board, a "hybrid" Herbie style controller has been
implemented. A programmable RISC controller is used for SCSI bus communications
and for data transfer to and from the Roadrunner’s SCSI bus. The 68030 CPU is only
involved with setup before and cleanup after a SCSI command is sent to a device—the
rest of the command, including data transfer, is handled by the RISC processor.
Having the RISC processor take care of these details, allows us to implement both
read-ahead and write buffering without the need for a separate Herbie controller. Also,
higher levels of performance will be seen when using a fast SCSI-2 disk drive than with
an AM-520 using ESDI drives for the following reasons:
Physically, SCSI-2 drives are faster than most ESDI drives. They spin the platters
twice as fast (reducing latency) and have significantly faster seek times.
Data transfer rates are higher with fast SCSI-2 drives. ESDI drives have a
maximum transfer rate of 18Mbits/s, whereas fast SCSI-2 drives transfer data at
80Mbits/s (or around 4 times faster).
The data transfer path is much faster with the RISC SCSI-2 controller. It is able to
read from or write to system memory 32 bits at a time, taking 150ns per read or
write. The AM-520 transfers data 16 bits at a time, taking 210ns per 16 bit transfer.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page B-2
Appendix B
B.2READ AHEAD
The Roadrunner’s SCSI disk driver, SCZRR.DVR, is able to perform read-ahead directly
into AMOS disk cache. When any program attempts to read a physical block from a
disk, the SCZRR driver will also read up to an additional seven sequential blocks from
the disk drive and store these read-ahead blocks in the cache.
This read-ahead scheme works very well when jobs on the system are doing a large
number of sequential reads. For example, data base searches and programs like
REDALL execute much faster because the data they require is already in memory and
only has to be transferred from the cache into the user partition.
Programs that do significant random disk access (such as RNDRED) tend to slow down
with this read ahead scheme. Most of the slow down is caused by "thrashing" of the
cache, where cache entries that will be used again are removed from the cache due to
the allocation requirements of the read-ahead blocks (which typically are never used).
The actual data transfer overhead is very little, as most SCSI disk drives (especially fast
SCSI-2 drives) have a track cache built into the drive allowing both the target and read
ahead blocks to be transferred over the SCSI cable without delay.
B.2.1Controlling Read-Ahead
In order for read-ahead to occur on the Roadrunner, the AMOS disk cache,
DCACHE.SYS, must be installed as normal and additionally, the full SCSI dispatcher
(SCZRR.SYS) must also be installed. The number of read-ahead blocks to be
transferred into cache on every physical disk access is controlled by the FIXLOG
program.
When you use FIXLOG to create a driver for the Roadrunner hardware, a new option
will appear, which is the number of read-ahead blocks. For example, type:
FIXLOG RETURN
FIXLOG.LIT Version x.x(xxx)
1. Change the number of logicals
2. Create a sub-system driver
Enter choice: 2 RETURN
Enter name of generic driver to be used: SCZRR RETURN
Enter number of logical units per physical unit: 10 RETURN
Enter SCSI id (0-6): 0 RETURN
Enter number of read-ahead blocks (0-7): 5 RETURN
Enter new driver name: MAX RETURN
New driver is now in memory.
To save the driver you have created, type:
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Read-Ahead and Write Buffering
Page B-3
SAVE MAX.DVR RETURN
If you wish to disable or change the number of read-ahead blocks, simply use the
FIXLOG program to generate a new disk driver and if the disk driver is for the DSK:
device, don’t forget to use MONGEN and embed the new driver into the system monitor.
The generic driver Roadrunner SCSI disk driver (SCZRR.DVR) is setup for seven
read-ahead blocks.
B.3WRITE BUFFERING FOR SCSI-1 AND SCSI-2 DISK DRIVES
AMOS (and therefore every application written for AMOS) understands only 512 byte
disk blocks. Therefore, when a disk write request is made by a program, a single block
transfer is made to the disk drive. If the program then writes the next sequential block,
the system must wait the latency time of the drive (i.e., the time it takes the drive to
complete one revolution) before the next block can be written. Latency even on fast
SCSI-2 drives is around 7ms.
In order to speed up the write process, when write buffering is enabled, all writes to the
SCSI disk are first transferred into a buffer. If the write buffer becomes at least half full,
or around three quarters of a second passes with no reads, or if a preset "guaranteed
flush" timeout occurs, the SCZRR.DVR disk driver will begin scanning through the write
buffer, finding blocks that need to be written out to the drive. The algorithm used to flush
blocks out to the drive is able to find up to eight consecutive blocks and write them to
the disk drive as a single write command, therefore dramatically improving system
performance.
Another benefit of write buffering is it tends to eliminate duplicate disk writes, such as
bitmap updates during operations such as copying files and tape restores and prevents
head thrashing when reading through random access data files and writing a sequential
file out to the disk (as most report generation programs do).
B.3.1Potential Pitfalls
Obviously, there can be problems with write buffering, especially if either the system
crashes or is powered off while writes are pending in the write buffer. If either of these
two cases occur, all pending writes will be lost. Though this sounds like a major
problem, it can also happen if write buffering is not enabled. However, write buffering
increases the number of writes at risk.
To help reduce the possibility of data loss, certain safeguards have been put in place.
Writes are not buffered indefinitely; they are performed whenever the device is not
performing reads. Even if the drive is busy with read requests, the buffer is still
periodically flushed, based on a user definable "absolute flush time." Additionally, the
MONTST command automatically flushes the write buffer.
The primary write buffering risks are an errant software operation or a hardware failure
that causes a system crash.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page B-4
Appendix B
Therefore, you must weigh the potential for data loss (which is always there) versus the
dramatic performance increase seen when using write buffering. If you are worried
about the reliability of write buffering, it may be worth keeping in mind that the AM-520
disk controller has always used write buffering on a track-by-track basis (not quite as
efficiently as the Roadrunner write buffering scheme however). The SMARTDRV
program that comes with MS-DOS 5.0 does write buffering (you may have noticed the
"Waiting for system shutdown" message when re-booting a PC with
CTRL-ALT-DELETE) and Unix based computers have always done it.
B.3.2Setting Up Write Buffering
In order to enable write buffering, you must be using the full SCSI dispatcher
(SCZRR.SYS). Write buffering is enabled by adding parameters to the SYSTEM
statement used to load the driver. All hard disk subsystem drivers for the Roadrunner
SCSI interface must be loaded into system memory. Appending "/N" followed by the
buffer-size and flush-period will enable write buffering for that device. For example:
SYSTEM DVR:devn/N buffer-size flush-period
where devn is the device you want to enable write buffering for (for example DSK and
SUB).
One SYSTEM command is required for each different SCSI disk driver present in the
system. For example, if you had two 1.2GB SCSI-2 drives named as DSK0-36 and
DSK37-73 and one 540MB SCSI-2 drive named SUB0-17, you would need one
additional SYSTEM command for the DSK device (although it’s really two physical
drives) and one additional SYSTEM command for the SUB device.
When specifying write buffering for a device, two files are loaded into system memory:
.DVR and .WRC, which are the driver and cache buffer. This is true for all SCSI disk
devices except the DSK device. For the DSK device, the file DSK.DVR does not need to
be created because it is already loaded into the system monitor. Therefore, for the DSK
device, only the file DSK.WRC will be loaded into system memory.
The buffer-size is the size of the write buffer (you specify the size in Kilobytes).
Specifying a buffer size of over 100KB is unlikely to improve performance.
The flush-period is the absolute maximum number of seconds data may be left in the
write buffer without being written to the disk. For example, if you specified 30, you would
know that after 30 seconds any pending writes would be written to the disk. This is true
even if the disk is constantly busy servicing reads.
In the three drive example mentioned earlier, the added SYSTEM commands would
look similiar to this:
SYSTEM DVR:DSK/N 100K 60
SYSTEM DVR:SUB/N 100K 60
;Driver in AMOS will create DSK.WRC
;Load SUB.DVR and create SUB.WRC
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Read-Ahead and Write Buffering
Page B-5
This would set up 100KB of write buffering for the DSK devices and 100KB of write
buffering for the SUB device. All three drives would have their write buffers flushed
every minute (or sooner if the drives are not busy with read requests).
B.4FINAL NOTES
Both read-ahead and write buffering schemes used on the Roadrunner hardware
dramatically improve system performance in our lab tests. Both schemes are fine tuned
for both the main system processor and RISC SCSI controller and do not take cycles
away from AMOS like other commercially available disk optimization software.
Although our lab tests attempt to simulate the "real world" of user applications, they
probably use the resources of the Roadrunner CPU and SCSI sub-system completely
differently than your application does, therefore we highly recommend you experiment
with both cache and write buffer sizes, read-ahead blocks and flush periods on an
installed system to find the best possible combination for that system.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
APPENDIX C
ROADRUNNER SOFTWARE
CONFIGURATION
C.1PREPARING FOR A ROADRUNNER UPGRADE
Before you can install the Roadrunner software, you must consider these questions:
Are all the boards in my computer compatible with the Roadrunner hardware?
Do any of my peripheral devices need to be upgraded for Roadrunner
compatibility?
Do I have a current and complete system backup?
Do I have a tape available to warm boot the computer?
The first two questions are covered earlier in this document in the section dealing with
compatibility. Make sure you read the compatibility section very carefully before
attempting the installation. The second two questions, discussed in the next few
sections, might be the most important if you encounter a problem during the installation.
C.1.1Protecting Your Data
When doing a major upgrade to your computer, you want to be absolutely sure you
have a recent and complete system backup. While it is very unlikely data stored on your
hard disk drive would be corrupted when upgrading your computer—you should be
prepared for anything. Before you loosen the first screw or download any new
software, make sure all your data is copied onto some form of backup media.
Make sure you are able to read the data on your backup media; you want to be
absolutely sure the data on your backup media is both readable and restorable.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page C-2
Appendix C
C.1.2Warm Boot Ability
A warm boot tape allows you to access the computer in situations where you are not
able to boot from the hard disk drive. When doing a Roadrunner upgrade, you’ll be
modifying the system initialization command file and using the MONGEN program to
embed a new driver in your AMOS monitor. Either of these two operations, if done
incorrectly, could result in a computer that won’t boot. If you have a warm boot tape, you
will be able to access your hard disk drive and correct the situation which prevented you
from booting. Without a warm boot tape, it will be much more difficult to access the
computer and correct the problem on the hard disk drive. See the Systems Commands
Reference Manual for information on how to create a warm boot monitor and a bootable
tape.
C.1.3Booting from a Floppy Drive
If your computer includes a floppy drive, it can be configured as a boot device. A floppy
drive makes an excellent alternate boot device and may prove invaluable should your
hard disk drive fail to boot.
To boot from a diskette, you must reconfigure the AM-167 or AM-177 board’s boot
switch, selecting your floppy drive as the boot device. The floppy drive can be
configured as either the main or alternate boot device. Information on how to configure
the boot switch is located earlier in this document in Section 6.0. Even though the entire
AMOS release will not fit on a single diskette, you can create a bootable diskette by
copying only files essential for booting and minimal operation onto the diskette. Once
you copy the necessary files onto the diskette, you must use the MONGEN program to
create a bootable monitor. Use the program FIX210 to create a floppy driver; once the
driver has been created, you can use MONGEN to embed this driver into the monitor.
Don’t forget that the system initialization command file on the diskette must be updated
to designate the floppy drive as the boot device.
C.1.4Upgrading Your AMOS Operating Software
The instructions in this section are based on the assumption that you are loading a
Roadrunner compatible version of AMOS on your existing disk drive. Since this
operation should be done before you install the Roadrunner hardware, the assumption
is also made that your disk drive is connected to the SASI port on your AM-1000 or
AM-1200 computer. If you ordered a new SCSI disk drive along with your Roadrunner
upgrade, the new drive has already been loaded with a Roadrunner compatible AMOS
operating system. Also the new drive will be clearly labeled with information which
includes bitmap size, AMOS version (1.4C or 2.2C), and disk structure (extended or
standard). A one page notice included with your new drive explains what software is on
the drive, as well as how to copy your existing software onto the new drive without
overwriting the new operating system. New SCSI drives ordered with a Roadrunner
upgrade will be configured to boot from the Roadrunner board’s high performance
SCSI port; the new drive will not boot from the SASI port on your AM-167 or AM-177
board.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Roadrunner Software Configuration
Page C-3
If your disk drive is not running an AMOS 1.4C or 2.2C (or later) software release, you
will need to update your operating system. It is highly recommended that you update
your operating system before you install the Roadrunner hardware. Load the
Roadrunner compatible operating system and corresponding hardware support tape
onto your computer’s hard disk drive, following the instructions in the AMOS release
notes supplied with the software. Once the software is loaded, you’ll need to:
Use the MONGEN program to load your boot device driver into the new monitor;
SCZDVR.DVR is the driver used for a SCSI drive.
If you are using a DAT drive, you must log into the DVR: account and type:
COPY DAT.DVR=647DVR.DVR RETURN
If you are using an AM-625, AM-626, AM-627, or AM-628 Tandberg tape drive,
you must log into the DVR: account and type:
COPY STR.DVR=625DVR.DVR RETURN
If you are using an AM-645 Exabyte tape drive, you must log into the DVR:
account and type:
COPY MTX.DVR=645DVR.DVR RETURN
Once you execute the above copy command, the AM-645 tape drive will not be
operational until you install the Roadrunner hardware. Also, unlike the previous
AM-645 driver, 645DVR.DVR is not SSD protected.
After the software has been configured, make sure your computer is fully functional.
Reboot the computer and do a complete check of all the hardware on your
computer—e.g., printers, magnetic tape drives, network hardware (if applicable), etc.
After you are satisfied all the hardware is working properly with the new operating
system, you must configure the AMOS monitor to be compatible with the Roadrunner
hardware as described in the next section.
Using SCZDVR.DVR as described above will allow your computer to boot using the
SASI port on your AM-167 or AM-177 board. If you are going to use the high
performance SCSI port on the Roadrunner board, you will need to follow the instructions
in the next section, which describe the use of SCZRR.DVR. This is the driver used by
MONGEN to make a bootable monitor for a SCSI drive connected to the Roadrunner
board.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page C-4
Appendix C
C.1.5Preparing the Software to Boot from the Roadrunner Hardware
Before you turn off the power to your computer and install the Roadrunner hardware,
you need to make a couple of adjustments for Roadrunner compatibility:
Instructions outlined in this section require that you directly modify your AMOS monitor,
as well as your AMOS system initialization command file. These files are being
modified directly to allow the computer to boot from the new Roadrunner hardware once
it is installed. This is why it is so important to have a bootable tape or some other means
of accessing your hard disk drive should a problem arise.
1.The high performance features incorporated into the Roadrunner hardware
require more queue blocks. You need to increase the queue block parameter in
the system initialization command file in order to support the Roadrunner
hardware.
Use this formula to determine your new queue block requirement:
NEW QUEUE BLOCK REQUIREMENT = OLD QUEUE BLOCKS + (13 x THE NUMBER OF JOBS)
For example, if the QUEUE statement in your system initialization command file is
currently set to 200 and the JOBS statement is set to 50, the resulting formula
would look like this:
NEW QUEUE BLOCK REQUIREMENT = 200 + (13 x 50)
For the example, the QUEUE statement would now be set to 850 to accommodate
the Roadrunner hardware.
2.If you are booting from a SCSI disk drive or have any SCSI peripheral connected
to the Roadrunner hardware, you need to define the SCSI dispatcher (described
in Section 7.0) in your system initialization command file. The PIC for the SCSI
dispatcher must be purchased separately from Alpha Micro.
In order to install the dispatcher, the command:
SCZDSP SCZRR
must be entered in the system initialization command file after the JOBALC
statements, but before the first DEVTBL command.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Roadrunner Software Configuration
Page C-5
For example:
:T
JOBS 1
JOBALC
;
TRMDEF
VER
SCZDSP
;
DEVTBL
JOB1
TERM1,AM1000=0:19200,AM62A,100,100,100,EDITOR=15
SCZRR.SYS
DSK1,DSK2
Once the dispatcher has been defined in your AMOSL.INI file, you must code the
SCSI dispatcher to allow it to run on your specific system.
Once you enter the product installation code (PIC), the product overlay file is
forever modified and will not accept a new PIC. This can be a problem if you
happen to enter an incorrect PIC. As a safeguard, make a copy of the dispatcher
overlay file before you do the SSD encodement. Type:
COPY SCZDSP.SAV=SCZDSP.OVR RETURN
By saving an unmodified version of the overlay file, you will be able re-enter the
PIC if necessary.
To perform the SSD encodement, enter the following commands:
LOG SYS: RETURN
SCZPIC RETURN
You will be prompted for a Product Installation Code (PIC).
This PIC is a unique identifier for your system that must be purchased and
obtained from Alpha Micro. Enter the PIC, carefully verifying you have entered it
correctly and press RETURN .
After a brief pause, you will be returned to AMOS command level and you can
proceed with the remainder of the installation. If you see the error message
?Improper SSD after you have rebooted the computer, it probably means you
have entered the PIC incorrectly.
As mentioned above, you cannot SSD encode the same overlay twice; to
re-encode the dispatcher software, do this command first:
COPY SCZDSP.OVR=SCZDSP.SAV RETURN
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page C-6
Appendix C
You will now be able to re-encode the dispatcher. If after once again rebooting the
computer you still receive the same error, check with your dealer to make sure the
correct PIC was supplied for your computer.
3.Your AM-1000 or AM-1200 computer boots from a monitor called AMOSL.MON.
In order for the Roadrunner to boot, a new monitor must be created using a driver
called SCZRR.DVR, which is compatible with the Roadrunner hardware. The
boot monitor used by the Roadrunner is also called AMOSL.MON.
The Roadrunner’s high performance SCSI port supports write buffering for SCSI
hard disk drives. If you are going to use this feature, please read the information in
Appendix B before continuing with this procedure.
Use the MONGEN program to embed the Roadrunner SCSI compatible hard disk
driver into the AMOS monitor located in account [1,4].
For Example:
LOG SYS: RETURN
MONGEN RETURN
Input monitor name: AMOS.MON RETURN
New disk driver: SCZRR.DVR RETURN
New language definition table name: ENGLSH RETURN
New monitor name: AMOSL.MON RETURN
SAVE AMOSL.MON RETURN
The monitor is now compatible with Roadrunner hardware; the computer will not
boot if you press the reset button before Roadrunner is installed.
C.1.6Roadrunner Installation Checklist
At this point in the installation, all of the following preliminary steps required to support
the Roadrunner hardware should be complete:
1.All circuit boards should be updated (if necessary) to meet the minimum revision
requirements, listed earlier in this document.
2.If you’re using an AM-645 Exabyte tape drive or a Tandberg AM-625, AM-626,
AM-627, or AM-628 tape drive, make sure you read the information on firmware
requirements located earlier in this document in Section 5.1.
3.A Roadrunner compatible operating system and corresponding hardware support
tape should have been downloaded onto your computer’s hard disk drive.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Roadrunner Software Configuration
Page C-7
4.If you are booting from a SCSI drive, your AMOS monitor should be configured
with the SCZRR.DVR file, using the MONGEN program, prior to shutting down
your computer and installing the Roadrunner hardware.
Once you have completed all the steps outlined in this appendix, you are ready to install
the Roadrunner hardware.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
APPENDIX D
ROADRUNNER AM-174
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
D.1ROADRUNNER AM-174 PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
The MC68040 processor used on the AM-174 Roadrunner board contains more internal
instruction cache (4096 bytes) than earlier MC68030-based processors. Increased
internal cache is one of the features which contributes to the improved performance of
the Roadrunner 040 board; however, if your software does not properly manage this
instruction cache, it could be adversely affected.
When the instruction cache is enabled—as it would be during normal system
operation—any memory location which is executed by the processor is loaded into the
instruction cache. This improves performance for those cases where the same location
is executed again, since the instruction will be read from cache instead of slower main
memory.
D.1.1The Problem and Why It’s A Problem
The problem arises when that same memory location, which has now been loaded into
cache, is modified. Because data operations—such as the MOV instruction—do not
update the instruction cache, when your program next executes the memory location, it
may read the old contents, which are still in the instruction cache, rather than pulling the
instruction from main memory where it was updated. This is known as self-modifying
code.
In this context, self modifying code is any code which is written to memory as data, such
as when read from disk to memory, and then executed as instructions. AMOS handles
the most common cases, such as reading data from disk or during the FETCH monitor
call, but cannot handle cases in your software where you are handling program overlays
or building instructions on the fly. Such code is often present in "trick" code like that
used to perform SSD-based software protection, although it may be present anywhere.
This issue was present on 68030 based systems, but the limited cache size on that
processor made it a much smaller problem. Tricks to flush the cache that worked on the
68030, such as forcing a context switch, will probably not work reliably on the 68040.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page D-2
Appendix D
D.1.2What You Must Do..
The only sure way to address this issue is to flush the instruction cache after loading
instructions into memory, but before executing those instructions. Because the method
by which you flush the cache is different on the various 680x0 processors, you will need
to add code specific to the 68040.
You must be certain to handle the different processors individually. Failure to do so may
result in inadvertently disabling certain processor features. For example, trying to flush
the 68040 cache using the 68030 method will result in the 68040’s instruction cache
being disabled. This will seriously degrade system performance.
To test to see if a program is executing on a 68040, use the following code fragment:
MOV
AND
BNE
SYSTEM,D7
; get the system flags
#SY$M40,D7
; is the 040 bit set?
yes we’re on a 040! ; yes - take the branch
To simply flush the cache, use the following code fragment:
SUPVR
CINVA
LSTS
#0
; enter supervisor mode
; invalidate cache
; return to user mode
To turn off the instruction cache, as is needed in some cases, use the following code:
SUPVR
SVLOK
CLR
MOVEC
LSTS
D7
D7,CACR
#0
;
;
;
;
;
;
enter supervisor mode
ensure interrupts are off
clear the CACR
flags
return to user mode and enable
interrupts again
To turn the instruction cache back on, use the following:
SUPVR
SVLOK
CINVA
MOV
MOVEC
LSTS
#^H08000,D7
D7,CACR
#0
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
enter supervisor mode
turn off interrupts
invalidate cache
set the ICACHE
enable bit
return to user mode and enable
interrupts again
Remember to turn the instruction cache back on! If you don’t, system performance will
be seriously impaired.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Roadrunner AM-174 Programming Information
Page D-3
In versions of M68 appearing in earlier AMOS releases, the instructions
MOVECD7,CACR and CINVA were not implemented. With the release of AMOS 2.2C,
which includes M682.0(181), these instructions are now supported. Examples of their
use are shown above.
D.1.3One More Caution
The 68040 also has internal registers called Transparent Translation Registers (also
present on the 68030) that you must be sure not to modify. This is far less common
than instruction cache issues, but will cause system failure if modified.
D.1.4New Cache Control Program
Some existing third party software packages making use of self modifying code, which
worked fine with the 68030, will no longer work with the 68040 based Roadrunner. This
is due to the 68040’s large (4096 byte) instruction cache.
The ideal way to handle this problem is to have the software developer either not use
self modifying code, or to properly disable and enable the instruction cache as required.
However, you may find yourself in a position where a third party software developer is
no longer available, or is unwilling to make the necessary changes in a timely fashion.
As a solution to this problem, AMOS 2.2C and 1.4C include a new program called
COMPAT.LIT. This program works in conjunction with an ASCII file, which you create
using AlphaVUE, called COMPAT.DAT. Within COMPAT.DAT, you list programs that
can only be run with the 68040’s instruction cache disabled.
For example, the COMPAT.DAT file shown below would disable caching for the three
programs listed:
SCHDLP
INIJOB
;This is a comment
FAXUIT
Since there are no Alpha Micro programs that require the instruction cache to be
disabled, the program names used in the example are fictitious.
By using COMPAT, you can disable the instruction cache for selected programs, while
allowing other users on the system to run non-selected programs with the instruction
cache enabled.
Once you have created your COMPAT.DAT file, you can run the COMPAT program one
of two ways:
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page D-4
Appendix D
From the AMOS prompt, you can type:
COMPAT COMPAT.DAT RETURN
or you can add this same command into your system initialization command file.
If you simply enter the command:
COMPAT RETURN
you will get a display showing the list of programs that have been selected for the
special cache control. Also, you will get some statistical information in the form of the
total number of CPU context switches which are non-cached, and the percentage of the
non-cached context switches that each of the selected programs caused. A display like
the one shown below, which has a very high percentage of non-cached CPU context
switches, would indicate that system performance is hindered, because very little use of
the instruction cache it taking place.
The following programs run with internal cache disabled:
STIC
FAXUIT
(active in 88.7% of total context switches, 99.6% of non-cached)
(active in 0.2% of total context switches, 0.3% of non-cached)
A total of 89.0% of context switches were non-cached
If you are having problems getting a certain software package to run on your
Roadrunner, try adding the program to the list of programs in the COMPAT.DAT file.
You may find the program will run with the instruction cache disabled.
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
APPENDIX E
FCC CLASS A EMISSION CONTROL
REQUIREMENTS
In order to insure that your Roadrunner enhanced computer complies with FCC Class A
rules and regulations, it must have the following equipment, and (or) modifications.
E.1FERRITE CLAMP
Your product installation kit includes a special ferrite clamp (IND-00010-40) that clamps
around the two 34-pin cables extending between the AM-985 board and the Roadrunner
board. The ferrite clamp is a hinged assembly that simply slips around the cables and
snaps together. In order to be effective, the clamp must be positioned on the cables as
close as possible to the Roadrunner board. The ferrite clamp assembly is shown in
Figure E-1.
FERRITE CLAMP
(IND-00010-40)
MAC944
Figure E-1. Ferrite Clamp Assembly
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03
Page E-2
Appendix E
E.2SIGNAL AND CHASSIS GROUND
The signal ground and chassis ground in your Alpha Micro computer are normally
isolated from one another and then tied together at a single point within the computer. If
your computer’s signal and chassis grounds are not tied together, they should be
connected at a single point within the computer chassis. The recommended method is
to connect these grounds together at the power supply. Figure E-2 shows the
recommended method of connecting the two grounds together in CEC power supplies,
which were supplied by Alpha Micro in many AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers.
Contact Alpha Micro’s Service Operations for information on other types of power
supplies used in AM-1000 and AM-1200 computers.
Any power supply modification should only be done by an authorized service technician.
To tie AC and DC grounds together, you
must solder a wire across the leads on the
capacitor at location C31.
C31
C32
C33
C34
CEC POWER SUPPLY
(PRF-00038-00)
DC SIDE
AC SIDE
MAC945
Figure E-2. CEC Power Supply Modification
PDI-00172-10, Rev. A03