Siemens SIMATIC TIWAY 1 User manual

SIMATIC TIWAY 1
Peerlink
User Manual
Order Number: PPX:TIWAY–8127–2
Manual Assembly Number: 2587871–0062
Second Edition
Copyright 1994 by Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc.
All Rights Reserved — Printed in USA
Reproduction, transmission or use of this document or
contents is not permitted without express consent of
Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc. All rights, including rights
created by patent grant or registration of a utility model or
design, are reserved.
Since Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc. does not possess
full access to data concerning all of the uses and applications
of customer’s products, we do not assume responsibility either
for customer product design or for any infringements of patents
or rights of others which may result from our assistance.
Technical data is subject to change.
We check the contents of every manual for accuracy at the
time it is approved for printing; however, there may be
undetected errors. Any errors found will be corrected in
subsequent editions. Any suggestions for improvement are
welcomed.
MANUAL PUBLICATION HISTORY
SIMATIC TIWAY I Peerlink User’s Manual
Order Manual Number: 2587871–0062
Refer to this history in all correspondence and/or discussion about this manual.
Event
Date
Description
Original Issue
Second Issue
09/89
04/94
Original Issue (2601462–0001)
Second issue (2601462–0002)
LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Pages
Cover/Copyright
History/Effective Pages
iii — vii
1-1 — 1-6
2-1 — 2-11
3-1 — 3-21
4-1 — 4-8
5-1 — 5-9
6-1 — 6-2
A-1 — A-3
B-1 — B-7
C-1 — C-13
D-1 — D-8
E-1 — E-4
Index-1 — Index-3
Registration
Description
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Second
Pages
Description
Contents
Chapter 1 Overview of the Module
1.1
General Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
1.2
PPX:500-5053—Single Communication Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5
1.3
PPX:500-5054 & PPX:505-7354—Dual Communication Channels . . .
1-6
Chapter 2 Network Operation
2.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
2.2
Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Peerlink to Peerlink Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.2 Peerlink to P/C Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.3 P/C to P/C Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
2-4
2-6
2-6
2.3
Set-Up Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-8
2.4
Using the Network Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Chapter 3 Installing and Initializing the Peerlink Module
3.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
3.2
Setting the Dipswitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
3.3
Inserting the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-8
3.4
Powering Up the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
3.5
Network Cable Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2 Peerlink Network Hardware Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.3 Important Planning Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.4 Tap Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.5 Cable Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6
Connecting the Network Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
3.7
Checking that the Module Is Logged In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7.1 Updating the I/O Configuration Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7.2 Selecting the I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7.3 Viewing the I/O Configuration Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-20
3-20
3-20
3-21
Contents
iii
3-12
3-12
3-12
3-14
3-15
3-17
Chapter 4 Normal I/O
4.1
Beginning Network Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.1 Output Word WY4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.2 Output Word WY5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
4-3
4-3
4.2
Network Status Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1 Input Word 1 (WX1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.2 Input Word 2 (WX2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.3 Input Word 3 (WX3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.4 Error Code: Bits 15 and 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.5 Single/Redundant Media: Bit 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.6 Communication Channel Active: Bit 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.7 Passive Monitor Address: Bits 9-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.8 Active Monitor Address: Bits 5-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.9 Station’s Own Address: Bits 1-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-8
Chapter 5 Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5.1
Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.1 Power-Up Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.2 Operational Diagnostic Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3 User-Initiated Diagnostic Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-3
5.2
Peerlink Troubleshooting Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
Chapter 6 Technical Assistance
Technical Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Other Relevant Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Appendix A Systems Configuration Forms for TIWAY
Peerlink Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Appendix B Network Set-Up Example
iv
B.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-2
B.2
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.1 Inserting the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.2 Setting the Configuration Dipswitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.3 Connecting Network Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.4 Powering-Up the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.5 Checking that the Module Is Logged In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-3
B-3
B-3
B-4
B-4
B-4
Contents
B.2.6 Setting the Output Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.7 Checking Network Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-5
B-6
Appendix C Programming Examples with Dual
or Single Communication Channels
C.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-2
C.2
Example #1: Dual Communication Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.1 Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.2 Program Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.3 Sample Program 1: Checking Configuration with
Dual Channel Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-4
C-4
C-4
C.3
C-7
Example #2: Single Communication Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
C.3.1 Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
C.3.2 Program Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-10
C.3.3 Sample Program 2: Checking Configuration with
Single Channel Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-12
Appendix D System Performance Examples
D.1
Determining Worst Case Total Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-2
D.2
P/C Interlocking Between P/Cs with Different Scan Times . . . . . . . . .
D.2.1 Scenario 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.2 Scenario 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-4
D-4
D-6
Appendix E
Peerlink Specifications
E.1
Operating Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-2
E.2
PPX:500–5053 and PPX:500–5054 Environmental Specifications . . .
E-3
E.3
PPX:505–7354 Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-4
Contents
v
Index
List of Figures
1-1
1-2
1-3
Peerlink Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagram of PPX:500-5053 or PPX:505-7354 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dual Channel Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-3
1-5
1-6
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
TIWAY Peerlink Multidrop Bus Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Single Media Network Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Redundant Media Network Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
P/C V Memory Tables Allocated for Peerlink Network Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
Series 500 Peerlink Module (with Access Cover Removed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Series 505 Peerlink Module Dipswitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keying the Peerlink Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting the Peerlink Module (Series 500) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting the Peerlink Module (Series 505) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TIWAY I Tap Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tap Spacing Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Location and Pin Connections for TIWAY Peerlink Network Ports . . . . . . . . .
Sample I/O Definition Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Configuration Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-13
3-16
3-19
3-20
3-21
4-1
4-2
WX1 Bit Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Word 3 (WX3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
4-6
5-1
Peerlink Diagnostic Test Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
B-1
Logging the Peerlink Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-4
C-1
C-2
C-3
Input Word 1 (WX1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Word 2 (WX2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Word 3 (WX3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-2
C-3
C-3
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-4
Simple Transfer Line Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Media Network Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P/C Interlocking—Scenario 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Handshaking Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-2
D-3
D-5
D-8
vi
Contents
List of Tables
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
P/C Models with Peerlink Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Dipswitch Settings for Number of Words to be Sent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Dipswitch Settings for Network Address Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Pin Assignments for Network Cable Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
5-1
Peerlink Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
A-1
A-2
System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V Memory Table Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-2
A-3
C-1
C-2
Variables List for Example #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-6
Variables List for Example #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-11
D-1
Variables List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-6
Contents
vii
Chapter 1
Overview of the Module
1.1
General Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
1.2
PPX:500-5053—Single Communication Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5
1.3
PPX:500-5054 & PPX:505-7354—Dual Communication Channels . . . . . .
1-6
Overview
1.1
General Description
The Peerlink module is a member of the family of intelligent input/output
(I/O) modules. It is also in a special category of intelligent modules which
are part of the SIMATIC TIWAY network family. You may wish to refer
to the TIWAY I Systems Manual (Manual No. TIWAY-8101) for more
information on TIWAY networking products.
Peerlink modules are an integral part of the Peerlink network, which is a
local area network designed to achieve peer-to-peer communication. The
module provides high-speed dissemination of data from any Programmable
Controller (P/C) station on the network to all other stations on the
network.
The double-wide Series 500 module fits into the I/O base (two adjacent
slots) of the Series 500 P/Cs and allows them to be connected to a Peerlink
network. There are two Series 500 options for users with different
industrial needs: PPX:500-5053, which uses a single communication
channel, and PPX:500-5054, which has two communication channels. The
Series 505 module, PPX:505-7354, is a single-wide module and has two
communication channels.
All models of the Peerlink module have a dipswitch bank by which you may
configure the module, a RUN/TEST mode toggle switch, a RESET button,
and indicator lights. Their functions and configurations are described in
greater detail in the Installation section. Figure 1-1 illustrates the models
of the Peerlink module.
Peerlink is an intelligent I/O module which controls its own initialization
process, network and P/C interfaces, error detection, and fault recovery.
There is no need for a host computer, complex network design, or protocol.
The only P/C programming required is that a V Memory starting address
must be specified in order to tell the module where to log in its data in each
P/C. Peerlink operates by using a broadcast method of data transmission,
where one module is designated as the “active monitor.” This means that
this module is responsible for initiating all network communications. The
active monitor polls each station on the network and each station responds
by broadcasting its message on the network. Appendix B contains an
example of how to set up a simple Peerlink network.
1-2
Overview
TIWAY I Network Port
Channel B
Status
Indicators
Access Hatch
Release Tab
Not shown:
TIWAY I Network Port
Channel A
PPX:500–5053
Not shown:
TIWAY I Network Port
Channel A
PPX:500–5054
PPX:505–7354
Figure 1-1 Peerlink Modules
Overview
1Ć3
General Description (continued)
The term “station” refers to a P/C with a Peerlink module that is assigned a
specific network address. Each station on a Peerlink network is capable of
transmitting up to 16 words of data (16-bit words) to every other station on
the network. This means that each station can receive up to 240 words of
data if a system with a maximum load of 16 stations (each transmitting 16
words) is used.
Peerlink is compatible with SIMATIC TI560 Class controllers which
include SIMATIC TI560, SIMATIC TI565, and SIMATIC TI560T,
and with SIMATIC TI530 Class controllers which include SIMATIC
TI520, SIMATIC TI520C,
SIMATIC TI530, SIMATIC TI530C, SIMATIC TI530T,
SIMATIC TI525, and SIMATIC TI535.
1-4
Overview
1.2
PPX:500-5053—Single Communication Channel
Peerlink PPX:500-5053, which uses one communication channel, provides
an active monitor and a backup, or “passive monitor”, selected by the active
monitor. This model might be preferred in applications where media loss is
not a problem but where continuous operation in necessary in the event
that the active monitor fails. Figure 1-2 illustrates a typical single-channel
Peerlink network with both active and passive monitors assigned.
The active monitor (station #1 in this drawing) automatically assigns the
station with the next higher network address as the passive monitor. If
station #1 fails, the passive monitor (station #2) assumes the role of active
monitor, designates a new passive monitor, and network operation
continues.
PASSIVE
MONITOR
ACTIVE
MONITOR
Network
Address
#1
PEERLINK
MODULE
SERIES
500
P/C
N.A.
#2
N.A.
#5
N.A.
#4
N.A.
#3
PEERLINK
MODULE
PEERLINK
MODULE
PEERLINK
MODULE
PEERLINK
MODULE
SERIES
500
P/C
SERIES
505
P/C
SERIES
500
P/C
SERIES
505
P/C
N.A. = network address
Figure 1-2 Diagram of PPX:500-5053 or PPX:505-7354 Network
Overview
1Ć5
1.3
PPX:500-5054 & PPX:505-7354–Dual Communication Channels
Peerlink models PPX:500-5054 and PPX:505-7354 can operate like the
PPX:500-5053, but also offer a dual communication channel option. By
setting a switch on the module, you may use a single communication
channel with both active and passive monitors.
In the dual communication channel option, if one network cable becomes
disabled, communication automatically switches to the other network
cable, allowing network communication to be maintained without
interruption. Communication will always occur on the channel which
detects the most active stations on the network. This model might be
preferable in applications where the Peerlink cables could be easily
damaged.
Figure 1-3 illustrates a typical network using the dual communication
channel option. The passive monitor option is not available when dual
communication channels are used.
ACTIVE
MONITOR
CHANNEL A
CHANNEL B
N.A.
#2
N.A.
#3
PEERLINK
MODULE
PEERLINK
MODULE
PEERLINK
MODULE
PEERLINK
MODULE
SERIES
505
P/C
SERIES
500
P/C
SERIES
505
P/C
SERIES
500
P/C
Network
Address
#1
N.A. = network address
Figure 1-3 Dual Channel Network
1-6
Overview
Network
Address
#16
Chapter 2
Network Operation
2.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
2.2
Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
Peerlink to Peerlink Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peerlink to P/C Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P/C to P/C Data Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
2-6
2-6
2.3
Set-Up Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-8
2.4
Using the Network Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Network Operation
2-1
2.1
Overview
TIWAY Peerlink modules can be used to create peer-to-peer applications
requiring rapid communications between P/Cs. Peerlink modules can also
act as a complement to the TIWAY I network by off-loading high speed
message transfers between P/Cs from
TIWAY I. This enables TIWAY I to better perform its functions of overall
data acquisition and supervisory control.
Peerlink modules use a bit-oriented protocol similar to High-Level Data
Link Control (HDLC) for network control. This protocol provides high
throughput efficiency and very high data integrity. You may wish to refer
to the TIWAY I Systems Manual (PPX:TIWAY-8101) for more information
about TIWAY I protocol.
Peerlink operates by using a broadcast method of data transmission, where
one module is designated as the “active monitor.” This means that this
module is responsible for initiating all network communications. The active
monitor polls each station on the network and each station responds by
broadcasting its message on the network.
The active monitor is responsible for network initialization and
maintenance. When the Peerlink module is turned on, the active monitor
builds a list of active stations, assigns a passive monitor if the single media
option is being used, and gives each station a time slot when it should
broadcast its data. During normal operation, the active monitor continues
to assign time slots to active stations. It also performs a network
maintenance function which consists of adding or deleting stations to or
from the network.
In single channel communications, the active monitor designates one
Peerlink module as a passive monitor. If the active monitor fails, the
passive monitor will function like an active monitor. In dual channel
communications, there is not passive monitor.
The basic network operation is the granting of a time slot to a station
followed by a broadcast of data by the station. The information frame sent
by a network station contains a message field consisting of up to 16 words
of data that is broadcast to all stations connected to the network.
2-2
Network Operation
For each Peerlink station on the network, there must be 16 words of V
Memory allocated in each P/C. For example, if you have two Peerlink
stations, each P/C must have 32 words of contiguous V Memory space
reserved. If you have 16 Peerlink stations, each P/C must have 256 words
reserved. You specify the location of this V Memory space by using normal
I/O output words 4 and 5 which specify the starting address of the Peerlink
data table.
NOTE: Since output word 4 is used only with TI560 Class P/Cs, if you are
using a TI530 Class P/C, output word 4 should always be set to all zeroes.
Modules on a Peerlink network are interconnected on a serial bus
“multidrop” line (Local Line) consisting of a shielded twisted pair cable.
The total cable length cannot exceed 10,000 feet using premium cable such
as Belden 9860. Figure 2-1 illustrates a typical multidrop bus
configuration.
TIWAY Peerlink
PEERLINK
TI525
PEERLINK
TI535
PEERLINK
TI530T
PEERLINK
TI560
PEERLINK
TI565
Figure 2-1 TIWAY Peerlink Multidrop Bus Configuration
Network Operation
2-3
2.2
Data Transmission
2.2.1
Peerlink to
Peerlink
Data Transmission
The Peerlink network uses the TIWAY I Local Line, which is a
physical signaling technique (baseband, differential current
drive). All Peerlink modules transmit data on the Peerlink network at
115.2K bits per second.
The Peerlink network update time or network scan is defined as the time it
takes every Peerlink module on the network to update every other Peerlink
module on the network with its data. The Peerlink network update time is
dependent upon the number of stations on a network and on the number of
words transmitted. For this reason, the number of words being transmitted
is dipswitch-selectable, to allow you to keep network update time to a
minimum.
Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 illustrate the network scan times as a result of
the number of stations on the network and the number of words sent. For
example, if the network configuration consisted of 8 stations with each
transmitting 10 words, you could read from the chart that the network
scan would be 31 milliseconds. Likewise, the scan for redundant
communication channels would be 36 milliseconds.
These are typical scan times, depending on the data sent, and only when
sending the same number of words from each P/C. In any case, the network
scan time will not vary more or less than 5% from the times given in the
charts.
2-4
Network Operation
Number of Words
per Station
Scan Time (ms)
90
80
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
12
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 9 10 11
Number of Stations
12 13 14 15
16
Figure 2-2 Single Media Network Scan Time
Number of Words
per Station
Scan Time (ms)
90
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
12
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 9 10 11
Number of Stations
12 13 14 15
16
Figure 2-3 Redundant Media Network Scan Time
Network Operation
2-5
Data Transmission (continued)
2.2.2
Peerlink to P/C
Data Transmission
2.2.3
P/C to P/C
Data Transmission
2-6
Peerlink modules use a high speed block transfer method to
transfer data from the module to the P/C. This method was chosen to
achieve the performance requirements of a peer-to-peer network. There are
several installation and performance requirements to be considered
because of this. They follow:
S
The module can be located in any base in a TI560 Class P/C. In all
other P/Cs, a Peerlink module can be used only in the local I/O base.
S
While you may select (by dipswitch) less than 16 words of data to be
transmitted on the Peerlink network, a Peerlink module always
transfers 16-word blocks to its P/C. If you have set less than 16 words
by dipswitch on a Peerlink module, the module will write zeroes to the
other locations. Therefore, for each station on the network, 16 words of
V Memory must be allocated in each P/C whether they are used or not.
S
It is also important that network addresses be assigned in sequential
order beginning with network address #1. For example, if there were
two stations on your network labeled addresses 1 and 2, Peerlink would
write only to the first 32-word locations allocated in V Memory.
However, if you labeled them addresses 1 and 16, Peerlink would use
all 256 V Memory locations despite the fact that there are only two
stations on the network.
To understand how long it will take to update a network
considering the entire cycle of P/C-to-Peerlink data transfer,
Peerlink-to-Peerlink transfers, and the final Peerlink-to-P/C transfer, you
should keep in mind certain worst-case conditions. The P/C scan runs
asynchronously from the Peerlink network scan. The different P/Cs on the
network may also be scanning at different rates. Therefore, the total cycle
from data in one P/C being transmitted to the data table in other P/Cs
varies.
Network Operation
Typically, a transfer from the V Memory table in one P/C to the V Memory
table in another P/C would take:
1 P/C scan of
P/C
transmitting
data
Worst case could be:
+
1 network
scan
+
1 P/C scan of
P/C receiving data
1 network
1 P/C scan of
2 P/C scans of
+
+
scan
P/C
transmitting
P/C receiving data
data
It is also possible for a slower P/C to “miss” an update cycle from a P/C
which has a faster scan time.
To avoid the potential problem of missing data where one P/C runs faster
than another, you may wish to implement some type of hand-shaking. An
example of this is shown in the application example in Appendix D.
Network Operation
2-7
2.3
Set-up Considerations
S
Generally, any station on a Peerlink network can be designated as the
active monitor.
S
You should always assign network addresses consecutively, beginning
with network address 1. Since you must allocate 16 words of V Memory
for each station on a Peerlink network, the higher the number of the
last network address, the more memory space you will need to reserve
in each P/C’s V Memory. If you have 4 Peerlink stations in a network,
and you number them 1, 2, 3, and 4, you will need to reserve only 64
(16 x 4) words of V Memory. If you skip numbers, for instance,
numbering them 1, 6, 12, and 16, you will need to reserve 256 (16 x 16)
words of V Memory.
S
The passive monitor (in single communication channel mode only) is
usually the next-highest network address from the active monitor.
There are some exceptions to this:
1. If one Peerlink station powers-up before another, the active
monitor recognizes the first powered-up module with the
next-highest network address as the passive monitor.
2. When a Peerlink module which has been designated as the
passive monitor fails or is reset, the active monitor will log
it off the network temporarily and will designate the first
module in the active list as the passive monitor. Reset
occurs under three different conditions: (1) when the
RESET button is pressed; (2) upon power-up; and (3)
when the network is recovering from a fault condition
(such as when a cable is re-connected).
2-8
Network Operation
S
With Peerlink operating in single channel mode, the manner in which
the passive monitor is assigned may be used to protect your operation if
a cable breaks. If network addresses (N.A.) are assigned so that the
active monitor is at one end of the physical network, and the passive
monitor is at the other end, then in the event of a cable break on the
trunk, both halves of the network can continue operating as shown
below:
N.A. #1
N.A. #3
N.A. #4
Cable Break
N.A. #5
Active
Monitor
N.A.
#2
Passive
Monitor
In the example above, the active monitor would assign a new passive
monitor (station 3, since it is the next highest network address that the
active monitor can hear). The station 2 passive monitor would take
over the communications bus on that side of the cable break, and
assign station 5 as the passive monitor. Since the two halves could not
talk to each other, they would operate as two separate networks. The
new network configuration would look like this:
N.A. #1
Active
Monitor
N.A. #3
Passive
Monitor
N.A. #4
N.A. #5
Passive
Monitor
N.A.
#2
Active
Monitor
When the cable break is repaired, the network will automatically
reconfigure. (Note that after the cable break is repaired, the location of
the passive monitor might still be station 2, but might also be one of the
other stations if station 2 were not the first to respond after the cable
break is repaired.)
S
Using normal I/O, you can obtain complete network status information
and check the operation of the network using the Network Status
Words WX1, WX2, and WX3.
Network Operation
2-9
2.4
Using the Network Data
Once the network is connected, and the dipswitches set, the V Memory
table in the P/C at which you wish the network data to appear must be
specified. It should be a sequential block of V Memory which is not used for
anything else.
The number of words allocated should equal 16 times the highest
addressed station number on the network. The only thing that Peerlink
requires is that you specify the starting address of this table through
normal I/O. When you have done this, Peerlink will automatically begin
logging in data. The first 16 words are designated for network address #1,
the next 16 words for network address #2, and so on. The station
designated as network address #1 would transmit in the first block of 16
words. It would receive data from the rest of the network in the remaining
blocks. The station designated as network address #2 would transmit data
in the second block of 16 words, and so on. A block diagram of this is shown
in Figure 2-4.
The system configuration forms provided in Appendix A may make
documenting your system easier.
NOTE: When you are doing a PROGRAM to RUN or a single scan in a P/C,
the Peerlink station may momentarily go off-line. If it is the active or
passive monitor, the network configuration may change (i.e., another
station may take over as active or passive monitor). If it is an active
monitor in a dual-channel network, the network operation may stop
momentarily.
2-10
Network Operation
P/C
Station #2
(Network
Address 2)
P/C
Station #1
(Network
Address 1)
vaaa
Network
Address
#1
vbbb
Network
Address
#1
P/C
Station #3
(Network
Address 3)
vccc
Network
Address
#1
P/C
Station #4
(Network
Address 4)
vddd
Network
Address
#1
P/C
Station #5
(Network
Address 5)
veee
Network
Address
#1
vaaa
Network
+
Address
offset
#2
vbbb
Network
+
Address
offset
#2
vccc
Network
+
Address
offset
#2
vddd
Network
+
Address
offset
#2
veee
Network
+
Address
offset
#2
Network
Address
#3
Network
Address
#3
Network
Address
#3
Network
Address
#3
Network
Address
#3
Network
Address
#4
Network
Address
#4
Network
Address
#4
Network
Address
#4
Network
Address
#4
Network
Address
#5
Network
Address
#5
Network
Address
#5
Network
Address
#5
Network
Address
#5
vaaa
Network
+
offset Address
#16
vbbb
Network
+
offset Address
#16
vccc
Network
+
offset Address
#16
vddd
Network
+
offset Address
#16
veee
Network
+
offset Address
#16
vaaa, vbbb, vccc, vddd, veee = V Memory starting address (V100, V200...)
Offset = (Network Address –1) x 16
data transmitted to
all other stations
V Memory starting address (Vaaa, Vbbb, etc.) + offset for a particular network
address is equal to the starting address of that particular network address’ data.
data received from
station with appropriate
network address
Figure 2-4 P/C V Memory Tables Allocated for Peerlink Network Data
Network Operation
2-11
Chapter 3
Installing and Initializing the Peerlink
Module
3.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
3.2
Setting the Dipswitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
3.3
Inserting the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-8
3.4
Powering Up the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
3.5
Network Cable Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
3.5.1
3.5.2
3.5.3
3.5.4
3.5.5
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peerlink Network Hardware Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Important Planning Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tap Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-12
3-12
3-14
3-15
3-17
3.6
Connecting the Network Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
3.7
Checking that the Module Is Logged In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
3.7.1
3.7.2
3.7.3
Updating the I/O Configuration Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the I/O Configuration Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-20
3-20
3-21
3-1
3.1
Overview
This section describes how to mount the Peerlink module in the Series 500
and Series 505 I/O base, connect the communication cables to the Peerlink
module, and initialize the system for operation. The Programmable
Controller (P/C) and the programming device (such as a VPU200) are
assumed to be in place before you install a Peerlink module.
Table 3-1 lists the software release levels required for using the Peerlink
modules with the P/Cs listed.
Table 3-1 P/C Models with Peerlink Part Numbers
P/C Model
TI520 Rel. 2.0
TI530 Rel. 2.0
TI520C Rel 1.0
TI530C Rel 1.0
TI530T Rel 1.5
TI560 Rel 1.0
TI565 Rel 1.0
TI525 Rel 2.2
TI535 Rel 1.0
Part No.
2461446-0003
2460607-0004
2491824–0001
2491816–0001
2491895–0006
2493498–0001
2493498–0001
2586279–0004
2591717–0001
Before you insert the Peerlink module, you should consider the power
budget of the I/O base which you are planning to use. The power
consumption for Peerlink modules is given in the specifications section at
the back of this manual.
Before inserting the Peerlink module into a Series 505 I/O base, determine
which slot the Peerlink module will occupy in the I/O base. In the Series
500 I/O base, determine which 2 adjacent slots the Peerlink module will
occupy on the I/O base. Then clear output words (WYs) or force them to
zeroes, and power–down the I/O base of the P/C. This is done to prevent
erroneous network operation prior to actual initialization.
WARNING
3-2
To minimize the risk of potential electrical shock hazard, power to the
P/C must be disconnected before you insert or remove Peerlink modules
from the I/O base.
Installing and Intializing the Module
Installation Steps
Summary
The following steps are required to install the Peerlink module
for models PPX:500–5053, PPX:500–5054, and PPX:505–7354.
1.
Disconnect power to the P/C system (I/O base, power supply, etc.).
2.
Set the configuration dipswitches on the Peerlink module.
3.
Insert the module into the base and secure it.
4.
Power up the P/C system.
5.
Connect the network cables.
6.
Log the module into the P/C I/O map.
7.
Use the Peerlink diagnostics and LED status indicators to be sure
the module is operating correctly.
Each step will be discussed in the following sections.
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-3
3.2
Setting the Dipswitches
As Figure 3-1 and Figure 3-2 illustrates, there are two blocks of
dipswitches on the Peerlink module. However, only the 10–switch block is
used for configuring the module.
WARNING
3-4
All Peerlink modules on the same network should be configured for the
same media mode (single or redundant channels). Mixing modes may
result in erratic network behavior, causing potential for personal injury or
property damage.
1.
Switch 10. If you are working with Peerlink model PPX:500-5053,
set dipswitch #10 to 0, indicating that you are using a single
communications channel. For Peerlink models PPX:500–5054 and
PPX:505–7354, set the dipswitch to 1 for redundant media, or to 0 for
single media.
2.
Switch 9. Set dipswitch #9 to 1 if the Peerlink module will be an
active monitor; otherwise set it to 0. Only one module in the network
may be selected as the active monitor.
3.
Switches 8 through 5. Select the number of 16-bit words to be sent
in each transmission. You may select a different number of words to
be transmitted for each module. Remember that you should select
only the number of words actually needed in order to increase
network throughput time. Table 3-2 illustrates dipswitch settings for
the number of words to be transmitted.
4.
Switches 4 through 1. Select the network address of the Peerlink
module. You should assign network addresses in sequential order,
beginning with 1. Since you must allocate 16 words of V memory for
each P/C on a Peerlink network, the higher the number of the last
network address, the more memory space you will need to reserve in
each P/C’s V memory. Table 3-3 shows the dipswitch settings for
network addresses.
Installing and Intializing the Module
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
MODULE GOOD
P/C COMM GOOD
ONLINE
RECEIVE
TRANSMIT
TEST MODE
1
Redundant (1)/Single (0)
Communication Channel(s)
Active Monitor (1)/
Non–Monitor (0)
Number of Words
to Transmit = 10
(See Table 3-2)
Network Address = 2
(See Table 3-3)
0
0=
Slide right
1=
Peerlink
Configuration
Dipswitches
(See Chart at
Right)
Slide left
Not Used
(Set to Zero)
1–0
Figure 3-1 Series 500 Peerlink Module (with Access Cover
Removed)
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-5
Setting the Dipswitches (continued)
Table 3-2 Dipswitch Settings
for Number of Words to be Sent
No. of Words
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
6
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
7
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
8
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
3
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
4
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
Table 3-3 Dipswitch Settings
for Network Address Selection
Network Address
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
3-6
Installing and Intializing the Module
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
Network Configuration Parameters
0=
Press left
1=
Press right
Figure 3-2 Series 505 Peerlink Module Dipswitches
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-7
3.3
Inserting the Module
NOTE: The Peerlink module may be placed in any I/O base of the 560
Class P/Cs. In all other Series 500 and Series 505 P/Cs, the Peerlink
module must be placed only in the local I/O base (bases 0 or 1).
Before inserting the Series 500 module, you should decide whether you
want to protect it by “keying” the module’s position in the I/O base. As
shown in Figure 3-3, keying is accomplished by placing the three keys
provided in the right-hand slot of the two slots occupied by the module so
that they fit into the notches on the module edge card. This prevents
another I/O module from being mistakenly inserted into the slots reserved
for the Peerlink module.
Key
Key
Key
Figure 3-3 Keying the Peerlink Module
3-8
Installing and Intializing the Module
Once the keys are in place (if you wish to key the module), you should
orient the module so that the indicators are on the top half of the module
and carefully push the module into the I/O base as shown in Figure 3-4.
When the module is fully seated in the I/O base, tabs will hold the module
in place. To take the module out, pull the tabs away from the module and
take it out of the I/O base, being careful not to damage the edge card.
Figure 3-4 Mounting the Peerlink Module (Series 500)
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-9
Inserting the Module (continued)
For the Series 505 Peerlink module, insert it into the I/O base as shown in
Figure 3-5. Then secure it with the bezel screws.
3cm x kg f (2.6in x lb) max torque
Figure 3-5 Mounting the Peerlink Module (Series 505)
WARNING
3-10
Do not insert or remove Peerlink modules while power is applied to the
P/C, since doing this may alter the P/C memory or cause a P/C fatal error
resulting in possible personal injury or property damage.
Installing and Intializing the Module
3.4
Powering-up the Module
When the Peerlink module has been inserted into the I/O base, apply
power to the Peerlink module by powering–up the P/C.
WARNING
Do not insert or remove Peerlink modules while power is applied to the
P/C. Doing so can cause the P/C to alter memory, or may cause erratic
network behavior, causing potential for personal injury or property
damage.
As soon as power is applied to the module, it will go through a power-up
diagnostics routine (See the “Diagnostics” section for a more detailed
description of power-up diagnostics.) When the diagnostics routine is
complete, only the MODULE GOOD indicator will light (P/C COMM
GOOD may light if a valid V Memory starting address has been set). If this
is not the case, please refer to the sections on “Troubleshooting” and
“Technical Assistance.”
In some installations when both Peerlink and PPX:505–49XX series of
relay modules are used, noise errors may be induced when switching high
voltage in the relay module, (voltage > 40 V rms). This is the result of
internal arcing of the relay contacts.
If you encounter this problem, place a snubber consisting of a 47 ohm 1/4
watt resistor and a 0.022 F capacitor across the relay contact terminals on
the terminal block. Snubbers were not included in the relay modules in
order to meet the need for lower current leakage in many applications.
NOTE: Snubber components must be UL component recognized and/or CSA
Certified for use across the rated voltage being switched by the relay
module.
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-11
3.5
Network Cable Installation
3.5.1
Overview
After you have set the dipswitches on the Peerlink modules and inserted
the modules into the I/O base, you need to connect the network cables to
each Peerlink module on the network. This section discusses some general
considerations for planning and installing a network cable system.
The network cable is designed to operate with shielded twisted-pair cable
which has a characteristic impedance of
124 ohms. The interface is a
male, 9-pin D-type receptacle with pin assignments as shown in Table 3-4
below. The connecting cable consists of a main cable or spine with droplines
or taps for each Peerlink station.
Table 3-4 Pin Assignments for Network Cable Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Name
Shield
LLM+
LLM–
Description
No connection
No connection
Cable shield and signal common
No connection
No connection
Positive biased signal line
No connection
No connection
Negative biased signal line
For consistency in installation, always connect the LLM+ (Pin 6 of the
Local Line Connector) to the white strand of the twisted pair and to the
terminal marked “W” in the tap housing. Connect the blue strand to the
LLM– (Pin 9 of the Local Line Connector) and to the terminal marked “B”
in the tap housing. The Cable Shield and Signal Common should be
connected to Pin 3 of the Local Line Connector and to terminal “G” inside
the tap housing.
3.5.2
Peerlink Network
Hardware
Components
3-12
The hardware components of a Peerlink network are explained
in the sections below and consist of the following:
D
TIWAY I Tap Housing (PPX:500-5606)
D
Twisted-pair cabling (customer-supplied)
Installing and Intializing the Module
Tap Housing: The tap housing, shown in Figure 3-6, is made by Siemens
Industrial Automation, Inc. specifically for the TIWAY I network. The tap
housing can be mounted rigidly to a NEMA panel or other enclosure. It can
also be used to splice cables in a cable tray without being rigidly mounted.
The tap housing not only provides an orderly connection to the TIWAY I
network, but also contains terminating resistors, resists moisture, relieves
strain, and provides noise isolation for attached cabling. One tap housing is
provided with Peerlink model PPX:500-5053; two are provided with
Peerlink model PPX:500-5054 and PPX:505–5374. Additional tap housings
may be ordered from your Applications Engineering Distributor or from
Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc. under part number PPX:500-5606.
The terminating resistors mentioned in the last paragraph are very
important. They must be used to ensure that the main line cable is
properly terminated and biased. Each tap housing is supplied with
terminating resistors which should only be installed at each end of the
main (trunk) cable. At each end, a terminating resistor must be connected
between LLM+ and the cable shield and also between LLM– and the cable
shield inside the tap housing.
G
W
B
B W G
G
W
B
Top cover removed for clarity.
Figure 3-6 TIWAY I Tap Housing
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-13
Network Cable Installation (continued)
Twisted Pair Cabling: Siemens recommends Belden 9860 twisted pair
cabling or its equivalent for use as the Peerlink network spine. For
distances less than 3000 feet, Belden 9271 or its equivalent is acceptable
for the trunk line. Belden 9271 or the equivalent should be used for the
dropline. Brands other than those listed here will be specified by Siemens
upon request.
3.5.3
Important Planning
Considerations:
Some major points to consider during the planning phase of a
Peerlink network are:
D
Always make the network flexible enough to allow for re-arrangement
of plant equipment.
D
Since network system noise is usually picked up by its interconnecting
wiring, steps should be taken at the outset to by pass or eliminate noise
sources.
D
If cable redundancy is desired, the two cables should never be routed
along the same path, since the environmental and other factors which
disable one cable will very likely disable the second cable.
Aside from physical obstructions such as posts, walls, and partitions,
electrical interference should also be avoided. Some sources of such
interference:
3-14
D
Power distribution mains
D
Arcing motors
D
Fluorescent lighting
D
Undesired signal transfer (cross-talk) between adjacent circuits
D
Poor cable-to-equipment impedance matching
Installing and Intializing the Module
In general, network cabling should never come into direct contact with any
electrical conductor, and if cabling is installed inside a conduit, the conduit
should be grounded in accordance with applicable electrical codes. A
minimum of three feet of distance should be kept between all network
cabling and the following.
D
Power lines
D
Generators
D
Electric motors
D
Electric welders
D
Transformers
D
Induction furnaces and heaters
D
Rectifiers
D
All sources of microwave radiation
3.5.4
Tap Spacing
Local Line signal characteristics require that the minimum distance
between tap nodes be calculated using the length of the droplines at the
last tap node. A tap node consists of either a single tap on the Peerlink
trunk cable or a pair of taps separated by less than the minimum tap node
separation distance. The minimum distance between a given tap node and
the next tap node on the network is equal to one-half the length of the
longest drop line at the given node.
Example 1 of Figure 3-7 illustrates how this calculation is performed. For
the 100i taps, the next tap node cannot be closer than 50i or one-half the
tap length. Likewise, the next tap to the 60i tap node cannot be closer than
30i (60 2).
No limit is placed upon the number of Peerlink modules that can be
daisy-chained to form a drop line off the main trunk as long as the
resulting drop length is no greater than 100 feet. Figure 3-7 illustrates
three typical examples of tap spacing.
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-15
Network Cable Installation (continued)
Example One:
100‘
100‘
Not Less
Than 50‘
100‘
Example Two:
100‘
Each Not
Less
Than 50‘
25‘
60‘
This is considered as a double drop from the closest
tap. The next nearest tap must then be greater than 50i
away.
25‘
100‘
Not Less
Than 30‘
25‘
Min 50‘
Example Three:
Overall Dropline length
can be up to 100 feet.
100‘
50‘
100‘
No limit on
number of Peerlink Modules Daisy-Chained on
one Dropline
Tap Droplines less than 3 feet in
length are not considered in calculating distance to next tap.
100‘
Figure 3-7 Tap Spacing Examples
3-16
Installing and Intializing the Module
3.5.5
Cable Routing
Cable routing should be planned as if the path between all stations on the
network were free of obstructions. The next step is to modify the first
routing to account for obstructions, then calculate the amount of cable
needed.
CAUTION
Observe all local and national electrical and fire codes when installing
wiring.
In general, there are three routes network cabling may take.
D
Under-floor routing
D
In-ceiling routing
D
Surface duct routing
Any combination of these three routes may be used on a single network.
The choice is often determined by whether the building (or buildings) in
which the network is being installed is new construction, or is an existing
building. The following paragraphs describe some of the advantages and
disadvantages of each type of cable routing.
Under-floor Routing: For under-floor routing, the cable can be enclosed
within ducts or, with raised flooring, in the “open air.” Under-floor systems
enclosed in ducts are usually expensive, and while they are better
protected against unauthorized taps than are “open air” systems, they often
make future expansion of the network more difficult and expensive.
“Open air” under-floor cabling systems usually provide good access, and
allow maximum network expansion and flexibility.
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-17
Network Cable Installation (continued)
In-ceiling Routing: For in-ceiling routing, network cables are usually
supported in troughs or hooks and clamps every 10 or 15 feet. Some
advantages of in-ceiling installation are that:
D
It provides flexibility.
D
Installation can be made at low cost.
D
It ensures accessibility to cabling.
Some disadvantages are
D
It is impractical for buildings without drop ceilings.
D
Working in high ceilings can be hazardous.
D
Ceilings often collect dust and other debris.
Surface Duct Routing: Surface ducting for network cabling is usually
installed along the baseboards or is attached to walls at desktop height.
While surface ducting ordinarily protects cables from both physical and
EMI effects, it may also require that Peerlink station devices be positioned
near a wall.
3-18
Installing and Intializing the Module
3.6
Connecting the Network Cable
Figure 3-8 illustrates the Peerlink module and the location of the network
ports. To connect the network cable, first remove the plastic dust cover(s)
on the TIWAY Peerlink network port connectors. Next, carefully insert the
cable connector into the port. Be sure to secure the cable by tightening the
screws on either side of the connector.
Figure 3-8 provides a pin diagram for the Peerlink interface on the module.
Ch. B
Ch. A
Ch. B
Ch. A
Ch. A
PPX:500–5053
6
1
9
3
5
Tiway I Peerlink
Network Port
PPX:500–5054 PPX:505–7354
PIN
ASSIGNMENT
NO.
Cable shield and signal common
3
6
Positive–biased signal line (LLM+)
Negitave–biased signal line (LLM–)
9
Figure 3-8 Location and Pin Connections for TIWAY Peerlink
Network Ports
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-19
3.7
Checking That the Module is Logged In
3.7.1
Updating the I/O
Configuration
Definition
After inserting the module into the base, update the I/O
configuration in the controller. If any module is statically logged
in on a TI530 Class P/C, the Peerlink module will not automatically be
logged in. A VPU or other programming device must be connected to the
controller to register and verify controller module communication.
3.7.2
Selecting the I/O
Configuration
With your VPU or other programming device, select the I/O
Configuration option. For example, if you have the module inserted into
the first slot of the first I/O base, configure it as displayed in Figure 3-9.
Refer to the manual that came with the programming device for
instructions.
I/O Address
The Peerlink module is logged in
as three input words (WX) and five
output words (WY).
Base Number
Displays number of
the current base.
I/O MODULE DEFINITION FOR : CHANNEL 1 BASE 00
I/O
Address
Slot
Number of Bit and Word I/O
X
Y
WX
WY
00
00
00
00
00
00
1
2
3
4
5
6
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
0001
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
7
8
.....
.....
0000
0000
..... 00
..... 00
Slot Number
Install the Peerlink into any
available I/O slot.
..
..
..
..
..
..
00
00
00
00
00
00
.. 00
.. 00
..
..
..
..
..
..
03
00
00
00
00
00
.. 00
.. 00
..
..
..
..
..
..
05
00
00
00
00
00
.. 00
.. 00
Installing and Intializing the Module
....... Yes
....... No
....... No
....... No
....... No
....... No
.......
.......
No
No
SF Module
The Peerlink is a SF
Module. The default for this
definition is NO.
Figure 3-9 Sample I/O Definition Chart
3-20
Special
Function
3.7.3
Viewing the I/O
Configuration
Chart
Use SHOW to view the I/O Configuration Chart. If the Peerlink
module is installed in slot 1, for channel 1, base 00, the I/O
chart will appear as displayed in Figure 3-10.
I/O CONFIGURATION CHART FOR : CHANNEL 1, BASE 00
I/O POINTS
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Slot 4
Slot 5
Slot 6
WX001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
WX002 WX003 WY004 WY005 WY006
00000 00000 00000 00000 00000
00000 00000 00000 00000 00000
00000 00000 00000 00000 00000
00000 00000 00000 00000 00000
00000 00000 00000 00000 00000
WY007
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
WY008
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
Figure 3-10 I/O Configuration Chart
Installing and Initializing the Module
3-21
Chapter 4
Normal I/O
4.1
4.2
Beginning Network Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
4.1.1
4.1.2
Output Word WY4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Word WY5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
4-3
Network Status Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.2.4
4.2.5
4.2.6
4.2.7
4.2.8
4.2.9
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-8
Input Word 1 (WX1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Word 2 (WX2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Word 3 (WX3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Code: Bits 15 and 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single/Redundant Media: Bit 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication Channel Active: Bit 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Passive Monitor Address: Bits 9-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Monitor Address: Bits 5-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station’s Own Address: Bits 1-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Normal I/O
4-1
Once you have plugged in the Peerlink module and connected the cables,
you will need to use a SIMATIC VPU200 or other programming device to
allocate V Memory and to set up any necessary network diagnostics.
WARNING
Be sure there is enough V Memory space allocated for the Peerlink data
table in each P/C. Otherwise, Peerlink data in V Memory will write over
existing data.
Peerlink logs into normal I/O as three input words (WXs) and five output
words (WYs). The three input words contain network status information.
The first two output words describe the starting address of the V Memory
table containing the network data. The last three output words are not
used.
4-2
Normal I/O
4.1
Beginning Network Operation
The two output words which are used in Peerlink modules are described
here first because after the output words are set, the network will begin
transmitting data. You can then use the input words (WX1, WX2, and
WX3) to check network operating status.
4.1.1
Output Word WY4
4.1.2
Output Word WY5
This 16-bit word is for use with the 560 Class P/Cs only. There is no WY4 in
the 525 and 535 P/Cs. In all other P/Cs it must be set to zero.
Output word 5 is the starting address of the V Memory table allocated to
the Peerlink network in each P/C. Data written to V Memory are read
during each network scan and P/Cs on the network update their data
tables accordingly.
Output words WY4 and WY5 comprise a 32-bit address for V Memory
starting address. Model 560 Class P/Cs require all 32 bits (the
double-precision display format) to address all of their V Memory. 530 Class
P/Cs only require 16-bit V Memory address, so on these models, WY4 must
be set to zeroes. To understand the double-precision method of representing
a 32-bit address, you should refer to the 565 Program Design Guide
(Manual No. 565-8102).
The starting address for the V Memory table must be chosen based on the
smallest memory capacity CPU on the Peerlink network. You should not
use address V4095 when the P/C has only 4,096 memory locations.
After you have inserted the Peerlink module, set the dipswitches, installed
the network cables, applied power, and set the output word values, the
Peerlink network should automatically begin working. For example, if you
put integer value 100 in WY5, data would start logging in at V100 and you
would see network operation begin. When this occurs, the MODULE
GOOD, P/C COMM GOOD, and ONLINE indicators should light, and the
RECEIVE and TRANSMIT indicators should both light. The only indicator
which should not be lit is TEST MODE. If this is not the case, you should
refer to the Troubleshooting section of this manual.
Normal I/O
4-3
4.2
Network Status Words
To check the operation of all the Peerlink modules on the network, you
should use input words WX1, WX2, and WX3 (network status words) as
described in the following sections and in the application examples in
Appendices B and C.
4.2.1
Input Word 1
(WX1)
Input word 1 defines which stations are active on network
communication channel A. Bit 1 corresponds to network address 1, bit 2 to
network address 2, and so on.
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
0
13 12 11
0
0
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
Figure 4-1 WX1 Bit Addresses
By looking at this input word, you would be able to tell the network
addresses 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 are active on the network.
Each of these bits represents a corresponding network address which is
operating on the network. Suppose that you have a network with 16
Peerlink modules installed and connected. All 16 bits in WX1 should be set
to “1.” If there are any zeroes, you should check to see which network
addresses the zeroes correspond to, and make sure that those modules are
correctly inserted and that the Peerlink network cables are connected
securely. Then look at WX1 again to see if all 16 bits are set to “1.”
4-4
Normal I/O
4.2.2
Input Word 2
(WX2)
Input word 2 defines which units are active on network
communication channel B. The only time you should see any “1”s for bits in
WX2 is if you are using a Peerlink model PPX:500-5054 and PPX:505–7354
with dipswitch #10 set to “1” (for redundant media).
If you have a four-station network operating normally with redundant
media (Model PPX:500-5054 and PPX:505–7354), input words 1 and 2 will
look the same:
Channel A
Input Words 1 and 2:
0000000000001111
1
2
3
4
Channel B
If a cable break were to occur between stations 2 and 3 on Channel A, only
stations 1 and 2 would appear on Channel A; stations 3 and 4 would have
dropped off that channel. All stations would communicate on Channel B.
By checking bit 13 of input word 3, you could tell which channel is active.
Channel A
Input Word 1:
1
A.M.
0000000000000011
2
3
4
Input Word 2:
0000000000001111
Channel B
Note that with a redundant-media network, if operation is normal,
communication will be on Channel A. If there is a cable break or a media
failure on one of the channels, stations will run on the channel having the
largest number of active stations.
Normal I/O
4-5
Network Status Words (continued)
4.2.3
Input Word 3
(WX3)
Input word 3 shows several pieces of information as shown in
Figure 4-2.
MSB
LSB
16
15
14
13
Error
Code
12
11 10
Passive
Monitor Station Address
9
8
7
6
5
Active Monitor Station
Address
4
3
2
1
Module’s
Station Address
Single (0) or Redundant (1) Media
Comm. Channel
Currently Active
(A=0; B=1)
Figure 4-2 Input Word 3 (WX3)
NOTE: The passive monitor may not always appear to be the next highest
network address from the active monitor. The active monitor will designate
as passive monitor the next ACTIVE station which has the next highest
network address at the time of the assignment.
4-6
Normal I/O
The following sections describe what each of the 16 bits of WX3 signifies
and how to interpret the bit values.
4.2.4
Error Code:
Bits 15 and 16
This is an indication from the Peerlink module to the P/C of an
incorrect V Memory table starting address. The error codes are defined
below:
Bit 16
Bit 15
Meaning
0
0
No error
0
1
V Memory table starting address out of range*
1
0
Unused
1
1
Unused
*NOTE: Error 01 (V Memory table starting address out of range) may occur temporarily (for a few
P/C scans) under the following conditions: (1) when the module is powered-up, (2) when RESET is
pressed, or (3) when the module is recovering from a fault. Under these conditions, the error message
should change to 00 (no error) within the next few P/C scans.
4.2.5
Single/Redundant
Media: Bit 14
This bit reflects the setting of dipswitch 10 on the Peerlink
module. If the setting for redundant media is selected, this bit will be a “1”;
if a single communication channel is used, the bit will be set to “0”. For
Model PPX:500-5053 the bit should always be set to “0”. Model
PPX:500-5054 and Model PPX:505-7354, however, can act with either
single or dual communication channels, and bit 14 could be set to either “1”
or “0”.
NOTE: You cannot mix single and redundant media Peerlink modules on
the same network.
4.2.6
Communication
Channel Active:
Bit 13
This bit shows which channel is currently being used for
communication. The bit will be set to “0” if Channel A is being
used, and it will be set to “1” if Channel B is being used. If bit 14
(single/redundant media) is “0”, then bit 13 will also be “0”.
Normal I/O
4-7
Network Status Words (continued)
4.2.7
Passive Monitor
Address: Bits 9–12
These 4 bits define the station address of the Peerlink module
that is the passive monitor.
NOTE: When using redundant communication channels, since there is no
passive monitor option, these 4 bits will show the same address as the
active monitor.
4.2.8
Active Monitor
Address: Bits 5–8
4.2.9
Station’s Own
Address: Bits 1–4
These 4 bits define the station address of the Peerlink module
that is the active monitor.
These 4 bits define the station’s own network address.
You should check all of the bits in input words 1, 2, and 3 to verify that
they reflect the dipswitch settings you have selected for each Peerlink
module.
4-8
Normal I/O
Chapter 5
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5.1
5.2
Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
Power-Up Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operational Diagnostic Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-Initiated Diagnostic Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
5-2
5-3
Peerlink Troubleshooting Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5-1
5.1
Diagnostic Tests
There are several test modes built into the Peerlink module software.
D
Power-up/reset
D
Continuous (run-time)
D
User-selected.
The following sections describe each test mode.
5.1.1
Power-Up Test
This test executes the initialization routine following a reset. Whenever the
module is powered-up to reset, it will run through this test routine to make
sure that the module hardware is operating properly. While the tests are
executing, all of the front panel indicators light. If the tests are all passed
successfully, the MODULE GOOD indicator lights, and the TEST indicator
goes out. The P/C COMM GOOD indicator will be on only if the V Memory
starting address is valid and the P/C has logged the module into its base.
The diagnostic tests include a RAM data and address verification test, a
ROM test using an error-checking routine, a P/C to Peerlink
communications test, and a communications controller test. The
communications controller test is internal and does not send any signals
out to the network; therefore, it will not disrupt communication between
other modules on the network.
If the Peerlink module cannot pass one of these tests, the TEST indicator
will light and the module will go into an idle state until RESET is pressed.
When you press RESET, the module will repeat the power-up diagnostic
routine.
5.1.2
Operational
Diagnostic Test
This test executes during all normal modes of the Peerlink
module’s operation, off-line or on-line. This diagnostic does not disturb
normal operation of the network.
If a problem is detected during the operational diagnostics, the module will
restart itself and run power-up diagnostics.
An operational diagnostics failure is treated in the same way as a power-up
test failure.
5-2
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5.1.3
User-Initiated
Diagnostic Test
CAUTION
You may wish to run the user-initiated test, which is a more
extensive diagnostic routine than the other two tests described earlier, as
part of a preventive maintenance program. You should only run the test
when the Peerlink module is off-line, since the test will disrupt the system
operation.
Remember to physically disconnect the Peerlink module from the
network before starting the user-initiated diagnostic test. Failure to do
this will cause a temporary communication error on the network.
To run the user-initiated test, disconnect all of the network connections
from the module. Open the front access door and place the RUN/TEST
mode switch in the position for TEST mode. Press RESET. The test will
begin executing. See Figure 5-1.
This test will perform both internal and external loopback, jabberstop, and
baud rate sub-tests to each channel. If a media card in the Peerlink module
communications is faulty, the test will fail.
While the user-initiated diagnostic test is running, the TEST indicator will
be lit and all other indicators will be off. If the test has been completed
successfully, all the indicators will flash in unison three times. Then, if all
indicators except for ONLINE stay lit while TEST flashes, the Peerlink
module has passed the diagnostic routines. The module will not resume
operation, however, until you re-connect the network cables, place the
RUN/TEST switch in the RUN mode, and press the RESET button on the
module. After RESET is pressed, Peerlink will go through the power-on
diagnostic routine described earlier in this section.
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5-3
Diagnostic Tests (continued)
MODULE GOOD
P/C COMM GOOD
ONLINE
RECEIVE
TRANSMIT
TEST MODE
Run/Test
Reset
Run/Test
Reset
PPX:500–5053 and PPX:500–5054
PPX:505–7354
Figure 5-1 Peerlink Diagnostic Test Switches
5-4
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
If the Peerlink module fails one of the user-initiated diagnostic tests
routines, the front panel indicators will light as described in the following.
LED
Description
MODULE GOOD
Lights when the module passes the ROM and RAM
integrity tests.
P/C COMM GOOD
Lights when the module passes the communications
integrity tests.
TRANSMIT
Lights (with the RECEIVE LED) when Channel A
passes the integrity tests.
RECEIVE
Lights when Channel B passes the integrity tests.
When the TEST indicator begins flashing, the user-initiated diagnostic
routing is complete. If the Peerlink module fails more than one test, more
than one indicator will be off.
In the power-up diagnostic routine, the user-initiated test, and the
operational test, the outcome of the P/C COMM test depends upon the
status of the P/C. If the P/C is in a fatal error mode, the Peerlink module
interprets this as a P/C COMM test failure. If the P/C COMM indicator is
off at the end of the test, before assuming that there is really a P/C COMM
error, you should make sure that:
D
V Memory starting address is valid
D
P/C is not in a fatal error mode
D
Connection between the module and the P/C is secure (Check that any
keys used are in the proper slot in the base, and that the module is
firmly seated and latched in place)
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5-5
5.2
Peerlink Troubleshooting Guide
The tools used in troubleshooting with the Peerlink module are the six
indicator lights, the three normal I/O input words (WXs) sent to the P/C,
and P/C auxiliary functions. By checking the network status bits (WXs)
when you first set up the Peerlink network, you may be able to detect and
solve configuration problems quickly.
Before attempting to use a Peerlink network, you should check that the
following things have been done:
D
All Peerlink modules should match in their settings for either single or
redundant communication channels; all stations should be set up the
same way.
D
Communication cables should be set up so that all Channel A ports are
connected only to other Peerlink Channel A ports; Channel B ports to
Channel B ports. Do not crosswire the channels.
D
Each module should have a unique network address.
D
There should be only one active monitor on any Peerlink network.
Table 5-1 below lists some problems which you might encounter, with
possible remedies.
Table 5-1 Peerlink Troubleshooting Chart
5-6
Symptom
Possible Problem
Solution
Module passes
power-up test;
MODULE
GOOD light
is on, but P/C
COMM GOOD
is off.
V Memory offset words
(WYs to the module)
have not been
initialized or are
set to an invalid
value (zeroes, for
example).
Determine the
block of V Memory
where the Peerlink
module should write,
and set the output
words (WYs) so that
they reflect the
starting address of
the data table. See
page 4-3 of this manual.
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
Table 5-1 Peerlink Troubleshooting Chart (Continued)
Symptom
Possible Problem
Solution
Module passes
power-up test;
MODULE
GOOD light
is on, but P/C
COMM GOOD
does not come
on for several
seconds.
If you have pressed
RESET, it may take
the module several
scans to log itself
back in.
This is normal. It
may take the P/C COMM
GOOD indicator a few
seconds to light.
P/C COMM
GOOD
indicator stays
off.
The Peerlink module
may be in a distributed
base. It should
be in the local I/O
base.
Move Peerlink to
the local base.
Set the appropriate
V Memory output
words (WYs) for the
new slot location.
or
or
Module not logged
into I/O configuration
table.
Log in the Peerlink
module.
MODULE
GOOD,
RECEIVE, and
P/C COMM
GOOD light,
but
TRANSMIT
stays off.
Peerlink station has
the same address as
the active monitor.
Check dipswitch
settings for network
address; change as
necessary.
TRANSMIT or
RECEIVE
indicators
flash.
Excessive communication
errors are occurring
because of an
improperly terminated
line.
Check that terminating
resistors are installed
properly. See page 3-13
of this manual
Module
GOOD and
P/C COMM
indicators are
on; all others
are off.
No network
Check to see that
communication is taking all modules are
place.
connected correctly,
that station numbers
are unique, and that
exactly one module is
selected as the
active monitor.
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5-7
Peerlink Troubleshooting Guide (continued)
Table 5-1 Peerlink Troubleshooting Chart (Continued)
5-8
Symptom
Possible Problem
Solution
RECEIVE or
TRANSMIT
indicators are
not lit after
user-initiated
diagnostic
test.
User-initiated
diagnostic test may
have been run while
the module is
connected to the
network.
Disconnect module
from network; re-run
diagnostic test.
Module stays
in a loop:
resetting,
running
diagnostics,
resetting.
Switch-selected
active monitor on
single channel is
alone on the network.
This is normal operation.
The active monitor
will continue
to reset until some
other station responds
to its communications.
Module fails
the power-up
test. Pressing
RESET takes
10 seconds to
be recognized
No communication
with P/C
Check P/C GOOD light
on the P/C. If light is
off, re-check the
connection between the
Peerlink module and the
base.
P/C GOOD
light goes out
or a memory
scramble condition occurs
in the P/C.
Peerlink module
was inserted or
removed with the
power on.
Power the P/C down;
disconnect P/C battery;
insert Peerlink module
with the power off.
Reload the P/C program.
Bits 5-8 of
input word 3
(active monitor
address) appear
as 0000.
No active monitor
has been selected;
bits 5-8 will
default to zeroes.
Set dipswitch on the
active monitor station
designating it as the
active monitor.
Bits 15 and 16
of input word
3 show error
code 01
(V Memory table
starting address
out of range);
active/passive
monitor
addresses are
invalid.
If V Memory starting
address is invalid
the active/passive
monitor addresses may
also be invalid.
A Peerlink station
with an invalid V
memory starting
address does not take
part in the network
scan.
Correct the V Memory
starting address.
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
Table 5-1 Peerlink Troubleshooting Chart (Continued)
Symptom
Possible Problem
Solution
All indicators
and normal I/O
words appear
normal, but no
data appears to
be transmitted.
You may be trying
to write data to
an address
which is “receive”
only.
Check your data table
and transmit data
only in the 16-word
block associated
with your module.
or
You may have two
Verify the address
stations set to the same
address.
on each Peerlink.
settings
or
You may have the
dipswitches set
incorrectly.
Verify the dipswitch
settings.
Diagnostic Tests and Troubleshooting
5-9
Chapter 6
Technical Assistance
Technical Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Other Relevant Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Technical Assistance
6-1
Technical
Assistance
If you need additional help, or information, contact your Siemens
Industrial Automation, Inc. distributor or sales agent. If you need
assistance in contacting your distributor or sales office in the United
States, call 800–964–4114. If additional technical assistance is needed, call
the SIA Technical Services Group in Johnson City, Tennessee at
615–461–2522.
Other Relevant
Documents
Other manuals which you may find helpful to
refer to are listed below, with manual numbers.
SIMATIC TIWAY I Systems Manual
6-2
PPX:TIWAY-8101
SIMATIC TI520 User’s Manual
1
PPX:520-810
SIMATIC TI530 User’s Manual
1
PPX:530-810
SIMATIC TI560/TI565 User’s Manuals
8105
PPX:560/565-
SIMATIC TI520C/TI530C/TI530T Manual Set
6
2462158–002
VPU200/TI520/TI530C/TI525 Programming Manual
6
PPX:530–811
SIMATIC TISOFT2 TI560/TI565 User’s Manual
2–8102
PPX:TISOFT
SIMATIC TI520/TI530/TI530C TISOFT3 User’s Manual
3–8102
PPX:TISOFT
SIMATIC TI560/TI565 TISOFT3 User’s Manual
3–8104
PPX:TISOFT
TISOFT1 & 2 Rel. 2.0 User’s Manual
8101
PPX:TS1&2–
VPU200 User’s Manual
–8102
PPX:VPU200
Technical Assistance
Appendix A
Systems Configuration Forms
for TIWAY Peerlink Network
Systems Configuration Forms
A-1
It is important to keep complete, up-to-date records on system
configuration. Below are some sample record-keeping forms for use with a
TIWAY Peerlink Network. These may be photocopied.
Type of Peerlink Used
(Redundant or Non-redundant Media):________________________
Table A-1
P/C Type or
Reference
A-2
Systems Configuration Forms
Peerlink Base/
Slot No.
System Configuration
Network
Address
# of Words
Transmitted
Active/
Non-Monitor
Table A-2
V Memory Table Allocation
Network Address: __________________________________________________
V-memory Table Starting Address:_________________________________
V Memory Locations
Comments
Network
Address
Network
Address
Network
Address
Systems Configuration Forms
A-3
Appendix B
Network Set-Up Example
B.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-2
B.2
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-3
B.2.1
B.2.2
B.2.3
B.2.4
B.2.5
B.2.6
B.2.7
Inserting the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Configuration Dipswitches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Network Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Powering-Up the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking that the Module Is Logged In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Output Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Network Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Set-up Example
B-3
B-3
B-4
B-4
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-1
B.1
Introduction
This section contains a simple example of how to set up a two-station
Peerlink network. The example will take you through all of the
initialization steps outlined in this manual.
You may wish to refer to the TI520C/TI530C/TI530T Manual Set (Manual
No. 2462158–0026) and the VPU200/TI520/TI530C/TI525 Programming
Guide (Manual No. PPX:530-8116) if you need specific information about
the TI530T P/C or about the VPU200.
For this example, the following assumptions are being made:
D
The single communication channel option is being used on both
Peerlink modules.
D
You need to transmit 4 words of data.
D
Peerlink station #1 is assigned network address 1 and Peerlink station
#2 is assigned network address 2. Station #2 should be the
switch-selected active monitor.
D
Each Peerlink module is placed in slots 1 and 2 of the local I/O bases
for two TI530T P/Cs.
You should designate in the space provided on the front label of each
Peerlink module the network address assigned to that module.
Before you insert a Peerlink module into the I/O base, first determine
which 2 adjacent slots the Peerlink module will occupy on the I/O base,
clear output words (WYs) or force them to zeroes, and power-down the I/O
base of the P/C. This is performed to prevent erroneous network operation
prior to actual initialization.
WARNING
B-2
To minimize the risk of potential electrical shock hazard, disconnect
power to the P/C before you insert or remove Peerlink modules from the
I/O base.
Network Set-up Example
B.2
Installation
B.2.1
Inserting the
Module
Place each Peerlink module into slots 1 and 2 of the I/O bases
for both TI530T P/Cs as described in the Installation section of this
manual.
Peerlink Station 1
Peerlink Station 2
TI530T P/C
TI530T P/C
Network Address 1
B.2.2
Setting the
Configuration
Dipswitches
Network Address 2
(Active Monitor)
Since this network is using the single communication channel
option, and network address #2 has been designated as the
active monitor, you would set the configuration dipswitches as shown
below:
Station 1
Station 2
10
9
Set for single channel (0)
For network address 1, set for non-monitor (0). For network address 2, set for active monitor (1).
8
7
6
To transmit 4 words on each station, set
switch 8 to 0, switch 7 to 0, switch 6 to 1, and
switch 5 to 0.
5
4
3
2
For network address 1, set switch 4 to 1, and
switches 3, 2, and 1 to 0. For network address 2,
set switch 4 to 0, switch 3 to 1, and switches 2 and
1 to 0.
1
0=
1—0
1—0
1=
Network Set-up Example
B-3
Installation (continued)
B.2.3
Connecting
Network Cables
B.2.4
Powering-Up
the Module
B.2.5
Checking That
The Module
Is Logged In
Once the dipswitches on each module have been set, connect the
modules on the Peerlink network by plugging in the 9-pin cable connectors
to each Peerlink module. Since you are only using one communication
channel, you will only need to connect one 9-pin connector (into Channel A,
which is located on the bottom of the module).
After the network cables have been connected, apply power to
the P/C. The module will go through its power-up diagnostics. When the
diagnostics are complete, the TEST indicator light will go out and
MODULE GOOD will be lit.
Using TISOFT or a VPU200, perform a “read base” to see if the
Peerlink module is logged into the memory of the P/C. If you
inserted a Peerlink module in slots 1 and 2 of each 530T I/O base, you
would see a display on the VPU similar to Figure B-1.
I/O MODULE DEFINITION FOR : CHANNEL 1 BASE 00
I/O
Address
Slot
Number of Bit and Word I/O
X
Y
WX
WY
1
2
3
4
5
6
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
0001
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
00
00
00
00
00
00
7
8
.....
.....
0000
0000
..... 00
..... 00
..
..
..
..
..
..
00
00
00
00
00
00
.. 00
.. 00
..
..
..
..
..
..
03
00
00
00
00
00
.. 00
.. 00
..
..
..
..
..
..
05
00
00
00
00
00
.. 00
.. 00
Special
Function
....... Yes
....... No
....... No
....... No
....... No
....... No
.......
.......
No
No
Figure B-1 Logging the Peerlink Module
Peerlink modules log into normal I/O as three input words (WXs) and five
output words (WYs). You can access the WXs to obtain network status
information. Before you read the WXs, however, you should set up WY4
and WY5 (the output words) and the V memory data table.
B-4
Network Set-up Example
B.2.6
Setting the
Output Words
The output words WY4 and WY5 are used to define the starting
address of the V memory table allocated to the Peerlink network in each
P/C. For TI530Ts, only WY5 is used; WY4 should be set to zeroes. For each
P/C on the network, you need to specify a sequential block of V memory
words equal to 16 times the highest network address. For this example, in
which the highest network address is 2, you need to allocate 32 words of V
memory in each TI530T. If you defined the V memory table starting
address for station 1 as V150 by forcing WY5 to 150 in P/C #1, and for
station 2 as V250 by forcing WY5 to 250 in P/C #2, the chart below would
illustrate the organization of the V memory tables. For example, if you
wrote the value 333 to V150 in P/C #1, you would see 333 appear in V250
in P/C #2. If you wrote the value 777 to V266 in P/C #2, you would see 777
appear in V166 in P/C #1.
P/C #1
(Network Address 1)
V150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
V166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
“333”
Data
transmitted
from network
address 1 to all other
stations
“777”
Data
transmitted
from network
address 2 to all other
stations
P/C #2
(Network Address 2)
V250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
V266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
“333”
Data
transmitted
from network
address 1 to all other
stations
“777”
Data
transmitted
from network
address 2 to all other
stations
As soon as the output words are set, Peerlink modules begin transmitting
data on the network. You should see all indicators except for TEST MODE
illuminated.
Network Set-up Example
B-5
Installation (continued)
B.2.7
Checking
Network Status
You should now be able to use the three input words to check
the status of the network and the module. Input words 1 and 2 (WX1,
WX2) show which units are active on network communication channels A
and B, respectively. WX3 gives all address information (for the active and
passive monitors, and for the Peerlink module itself), identifies which
communication channel is currently being used by a particular Peerlink
module, shows whether the single or redundant media option is being used,
and shows any error codes.
For example, for the two-station network described earlier, WX1 would look
like this (only the values of the bits will appear on the VPU screen):
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
0
13
0
12 11
0
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
Since stations 1 and 2 are both active on Channel A, and the single
communications channel option is being used, the only 1s which would
appear on the screen would be for bits 1 and 2. WX2 would be all zeroes,
since there is no communication on Channel B.
For station 1, WX3 would look like this:
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
No
Errors
0
13
0
Network Set-up Example
0
Channel
A
Single Channel
B-6
12 11
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
Passive
Monitor
Address
Active
Monitor
Address
Module
Network
Address
For station 2, WX3 would look like this:
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
No
Errors
0
13 12 11
0
0
Channel
A
0
10
0
Passive
Monitor
Address
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1 0
0
1 0
0
0
1 0
Active
Monitor
Address
1
Module
Network
Address
Single Channel
In this example, since station 2 was designated as the active monitor,
station 1 then became the passive monitor. If station 2 were to fail for any
reason, station 1 would take over the role of active monitor until station 2
recovered.
Network Set-up Example
B-7
Appendix C
Programming Examples with Dual
or Single Communication Channels
C.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-2
C.2
Example #1: Dual Communication Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-4
C.2.1
C.2.2
C.2.3
C.3
Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Program 1: Checking Configuration with Dual Channel Usage . . . . . . . .
C-4
C-4
C-7
Example #2: Single Communication Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-9
C.3.1
C.3.2
C.3.3
C-9
C-10
C-12
Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Program 2: Checking Configuration with Single Channel Usage . . . . . .
C-1
C.1
Introduction
This section contains two programming examples which illustrate how to
use Peerlink network diagnostics using the three normal I/O status words.
The first programming example is designed for a Peerlink system with dual
communication channels; the second is designed for a system using a single
communication channel.
Status Words
There are three words of module and network status information reported
to the P/C from the Peerlink module. These are normal I/O words 1, 2, and
3 which are described in this manual beginning on page 4-4. You can use
these status words as valuable diagnostic tools. For instance, you can use
them when debugging your system (to locate such things as configuration
or cable problems). You can also use them during normal operation to
ensure that all stations are active and working properly. They can indicate
a station which is down or help pinpoint a cable break, and allow your
system to act on this information accordingly.
Once the Peerlink network has been installed and is running, it will
continue to run with little intervention from either the ladder logic or the
operator. In many applications no checking need be done by the ladder
program. In some applications, the program designer may wish to
incorporate checks in the ladder logic program to give an indication of the
network status. The following sample programs illustrate how these status
words might be used to verify the operation of the module, the status of the
network, and the status of each Peerlink module on the network.
The format of the three normal I/O words is repeated here for reference:
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
0
13 12 11
0
0
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Figure C-1 Input Word 1 (WX1)
C-2
Programming Examples
Each of these bits represents a corresponding network address which is
active on the network on Channel A. This example shows network
addresses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 active on the network on Channel A.
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
0
13 12 11
0
0
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Figure C-2 Input Word 2 (WX2)
Each of these bits represents a corresponding network address which is
active on the network on Channel B. If you are using single media, then all
zeroes should appear in this word. If everything is operating normally and
you are using redundant media, Input Word 1 should look exactly like
Input Word 2. A difference in these two words would indicate a cable break
or a station which is down.
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
No
Errors
1
13 12 11
0
0
Channel
A
0
10
0
Passive
Monitor
Address
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1 0
0
0 1
0
0
1 0
Active
Monitor
Address
1
Module
Network
Address
Dual Channel
Figure C-3 Input Word 3 (WX3)
C-3
C.2
Example #1: Dual Communication Channels
This program performs two functions:
C.2.1
Network
Configuration
D
It verifies that the module is set up correctly by checking the network
address, V Memory starting address, and redundant media setting.
D
It verifies that each station which should be active on the network is
logged in on the active channel lists (status words 1 and 2). If the
correct bit is not set, indicating that the module being read is not active
on the network, then the data for that module will not be valid.
This program is designed for 8 stations with network addresses 1,
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Status words 1 and 2 should look the same as those
shown above if everything is operating correctly.
For simplicity, this program will run in the P/C at network address 2
(station 2), although you may want to modify this to run in every P/C on
your network. In addition, the following assumptions have been made in
this program:
C.2.2
Program
Operation
C-4
D
The active monitor will be selected as network address 1.
D
Dual communication channels are connected to all modules.
D
Station 2 will be located in Base 0, slots 1 and 2, with its I/O address
starting at WX1.
D
The starting address of the V Memory table in station 2 will be V1.
This program is designed to first load the value of the V Memory
starting address (V1) into WY4 and WY5. With 8 active stations this will
allocate a block of 128 V Memory locations in station 2 (V1-V128).
Programming Examples
The next step will be to ensure that the module (station 2) has been set up
correctly by checking for proper network address, V Memory starting
address and redundant media setting. The way to do this is by using status
word 3 (WX3), and by masking off the bits which are not important for
information at the moment – bits 5-13. The result of WX3 after the unused
bits are cleared is then compared with the expected WX3 value. C1 is
turned on if the module configuration is correct; therefore, it can be used as
an indicator that the module has not been configured correctly.
If the module configuration is correct, WX1 (network active list for Channel
A) is compared against the expected active list (V304). If this is correct, C3
is turned on. If C3 is off, this indicates that at least one Peerlink module
has logged off Channel A.
In using redundant media, WX2 should also be checked, therefore the next
step is to compare the expected active list against WX2. C4 will turn on if
this is correct. If C4 is off, this indicates that at least one Peerlink module
has logged off Channel B.
While C3 and C4 can be indicators that a station has dropped off the
network, it is necessary to determine exactly which station has logged-off
or if a faulty or broken connection is causing communication to switch from
Channel A to B. The following steps demonstrate this.
Since the network will be running on the channel with the most active
stations, it is necessary to check WX3 for operation on Channel A or B. If
Channel A is active, the value of WX1 will be loaded into V303 for later
comparison. If Channel B is active, the value of WX2 will be loaded into
V303. C2 will be turned on if Channel B is active. Since redundant media
will normally operate on Channel A this probably indicates a cable problem
or partial module failure on Channel A. C2 can therefore be used to
indicate a problem on Channel A. A counter may also be included here to
record the number of times the network is active on Channel B.
C-5
Example #1: Dual Communication Channels (continued)
The last step may be skipped (using a JMP statement) if C3 and C4 are on.
These last steps are implemented in order to determine exactly which
stations are down. They also provide the P/C with the knowledge that it
should not use data from the particular station being checked if it is
determined not to be active. After determining which channel is active,
each station is checked by making sure that the appropriate bit is set in the
network active list (BITP instruction).
NOTE: The manner in which the TI530 Class P/C reads data is the reverse
from Peerlink. For example, in Peerlink, status word 1 looks like this:
MSB
BIT
LSB
16 15 14 13 12 11
VALUE
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
In using the BITP instruction, bit 1 in Peerlink would be bit 16 for the
TI530 Class P/C.
Table C-1 Variables List for Example #1
Data Areas
Used
C-6
Description
V1-128
V300
V301
V302
V303
V304
Peerlink data table
Mask value for WX3 bits 1110 0000 0000 1111
WX3 after unused bits are cleared
Expected WX3 value 0010 0000 0000 0010
Active station list for active channel
Expected value of active list
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
Turns on if module configuration is correct
Turns on if Channel B is being used
Turns on if Channel A active list is correct
Turns on if Channel B active list is correct
Turns on if configuration is OK to proceed
C7
C8
Station 1 data valid
Station 3 data valid
Programming Examples
C.2.3
Sample Program 1:
Checking
Configuration with
Dual Channel Usage
C51
C50
LDC
A:
LDC
WY4
A:
N=0
WY5
Set V Memory starting
address to V1
N=1
C50
C51
LDC
A:
BITS
V300
A:
N = 24591
300
N=1
WAND
A:
B:
C:
WX3
V300
V301
Read WX3 and mask off unused bits for comparision.
1110 0000 0000 1111
Error Code
Module Address
Single/Redundant
C51
C1
LDC
A:
V302
CMP
A:
B:
V301
V302
N = 8194
Compare status word to expected value.
001X XXXX XXXX 0010
C1
C3
LDC
A:
V304
N = 255
CMP
A:
B:
WX1
V304
Compare WX1 against
expected active list.
0000 0000 1111 1111
C1
C4
CMP
A:
B:
WX2
V304
Compare WX2 (channel B) against
same expected active list.
C-7
Example #1: Dual Communication Channels (continued)
C1
C2
BITP
A:
WY3
Check the active channel indicator.
Turn on C2 if B is being used.
N=4
C1
C2
C50
MOVW
A:
B:
WX1
V303
Channel A is being used so
read WX1 (channel A active
list) into V303 for future use.
N=1
C1
C2
C50
MOVW
A:
B:
WX2
V303
Channel B is being used so
read WX2 (channel B active
list) into V303 for future use.
N=1
C1
C7
BITP
A:
V303
If bit set in active list for active channel,
then okay to use the data.
N = 16
C7
Use the data for station #1
C1
C8
BITP
A:
V303
If bit set in active list for active channel,
then okay to use the data.
N = 14
C8
Use the data for station #3
Repeat for each station used.
C-8
Programming Examples
C.3
Example #2: Single Communication Channel
This program performs the following functions:
C.3.1
Network
Configuration
D
It verifies that the module is set up correctly by checking the network
address, V Memory starting address, and single media setting.
D
It checks the active channel bit, since single media should always be
running on Channel A.
D
It verifies that each station which should be active on the network is
logged in on the active channel list (status word 1). If the correct bit for
a particular station is not set, then the data for that module will not be
valid. This indicates that a station is down or that there is a cable
break.
This program is designed for 4 stations with network addresses
1, 2, 3, and 4. Status word 1 should read:
MSB
LSB
16 15 14
BIT
VALUE
0
0
0
13 12 11
0
0
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
For simplicity, this program will run in the P/C at network address 4
(station 4), although you may want to modify this to run in every P/C on
your network. In addition, the following assumptions have been made in
this program:
D
The active monitor will be selected as network address 1.
D
Single communication channels are connected to all modules.
D
Station 4 will be located in Base 1, slots 7 and 8 with its I/O address
starting at WX113.
D
The starting address of the V Memory table in station 4 will be V500.
C-9
Example #2: Single Communication Channel (continued)
C.3.2
Program
Operation
This program is designed to first load the value of the V Memory
starting address (V500) into WY116 and WY117. With 4 active stations this
will allocate a block of 64 V Memory locations in station 4 (V500-V563).
The next step will be to ensure that the module (network address 4) has
been set up correctly by checking for proper network address, V Memory
starting address, single media setting and Channel A active bit. The way to
do this is by using status word 3 (WX115), and by masking off the bits
which are not important for information at the moment—bits 5-12. The
result of WX115 after the unused bits are cleared is then compared with
the expected WX115 value. C1 is turned on if the module configuration is
correct; therefore, it can be used as an indicator that the module has not
been configured correctly.
If the module configuration is correct, WX113 (network active list for
Channel A) is compared against the expected active list (V304.) If this is
correct, C3 is turned on. If C3 is off, this indicates that at least one
Peerlink module has logged off Channel A.
This last step may be skipped (using a JMP statement), if C3 is on. These
last steps are implemented in order to determine exactly which stations are
down. They also provide this station with the knowledge that it should not
use data from the particular station being checked if it is determined to be
inactive. Each station on the network is checked by making sure that the
appropriate bit is set in the network active list (BITP instruction).
C-10
Programming Examples
NOTE: The manner in which the TI530 Class P/C reads data is the reverse
from Peerlink. For example, in Peerlink, status word 1 looks like this:
MSB
BIT
VALUE
LSB
16 15 14
0
0
0
13 12 11 10
0
0
0
0
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
In using the BITP instruction, bit 1 in Peerlink would be bit 16 for the
TI530 Class P/C.
Table C-2 Variables List for Example #2
Data Areas
Used
Description
V500-V563
Peerlink data table
V300
V301
V302
V304
Mask value for WX115 bits 1111 0000 0000 1111
WX115 after unused bits are cleared
Expected WX115 value 0000 0000 0000 0100
Expected value of active list
C1
C3
Turns on if module configuration is correct
Turns on if Channel A active list is correct
C7
C8
Station 1 data valid
Station 3 data valid
WY116, WY117
V Memory starting address
C-11
Example #2: Single Communication Channel (continued)
C.3.3
Sample Program 2:
Checking
Configuration
With Single
Channel Usage
C51
C50
LDC
A:
WY116
N=0
LDC
A:
WY117
Set V Memory starting
address to V500
N = 500
C51
C50
LDC
A:
V300
N = 28687
BITS
A:
V300
N=1
WAND
A:
B:
C:
Read WY115 and mask off unused bits for comparision.
1111 0000 0000 1111
Error Code
Single/Redundant
Active Channel
C-12
Programming Examples
Module Address
WX115
V300
V301
C51
C1
CMP
LDC
A:
V302
A:
B:
V301
V302
Compare status word to expected value
0000 XXXX XXXX 0100
N=4
C3
C1
CMP
LDC
A:
V304
A:
B:
WX113
V304
Compare WX113 against expected active list.
0000 0000 0000 1111
N = 15
C1
C7
BITP
A:
WX113
If bit set in active list for active channel,
then okay to use the data.
N = 16
C7
Use the data for station #1
C1
C8
BITP
A:
WX113
If bit set in active list for active channel,
then okay to use the data.
N = 14
C8
Use the data for station #3
Repeat for each station used.
C-13
Appendix D
System Performance Examples
D.1
Determining Worst Case Total Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-2
D.2
P/C Interlocking Between P/Cs with Different Scan Times . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-4
D.2.1
D.2.2
Scenario 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Performance Examples
D-4
D-6
D-1
D.1
Determining Worst Case Total Scan Time
In the simple transfer line application shown in Figure D-1, data is
continuously being sent from P/C 1 down the line to other P/Cs. Data is
also being sent up the line as feedback information.
Peerlink
Peerlink
Peerlink
Peerlink
P/C 1
P/C 2
P/C 3
P/C 4
Figure D-1 Simple Transfer Line Application
Assume that this application requires that no more than 150 milliseconds
pass from the time that P/C 4 receives some status condition information to
the time that information must arrive at all of the other P/Cs. The reason
for this is that each P/C may need to act on that information immediately
to allow the line to run more efficiently, or to prevent unnecessary waste in
case of a fault condition.
The Peerlink network will use 4 stations with 4 words being transmitted
from each station. A single communications channel is being used.
The scan time for P/C 4 is 25 milliseconds. The scan time for each of the
other P/Cs is 40 milliseconds or less. Referring to the scan time chart in
Figure D-2, you can see that 4 stations sending 4 words each yields a
network scan of 13 milliseconds.
D-2
System Performance Examples
Number of Words
per Station
Scan Time (ms)
90
80
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
12
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 9 10 11
Number of Stations
12 13 14 15
16
Figure D-2 Single Media Network Scan Time
Total P/C to P/C scan is the time it takes data to be transmitted from P/C to
P/C using the Peerlink network as the medium. The formula for calculating
this is
Total Scan =
1 P/C scan of P/C
transmitting data
+
1 network
scan
+
2 P/C scans of P/C
receiving data
Therefore, for this application, total P/C to P/C scan is:
Total Scan = (25 ms) + (13 ms) + (2x40 ms) = 118 ms
This would give you a 21% margin over the worst case timing requirement.
System Performance Examples
D-3
D.2
P/C Interlocking Between P/Cs with Different Scan Times
Peerlink distributes data from each P/C to every other P/C, assuring that
the V Memory tables for each are updated with the latest data once per
network scan. Since the P/Cs on the network are operating asynchronously
and possibly at different rates, some data transmitted may never be seen
by another P/C. For example, data being sent from a Peerlink on a fast P/C
can be changing so fast that a slower P/C may “miss” some of the values.
In many applications, the data is not changing so quickly and this effect is
unimportant. However, in some applications, certain precautions must be
taken. Following are two scenarios illustrating two different means of
assuring that each P/C is using current data.
D.2.1
Scenario 1
This first scenario simply keeps the data in V Memory constant for several
scans, allowing the receiving station time to get the data. The exact time
required will depend on the difference between the P/C scans involved.
The ladder logic shown below is for a P/C sending data to a slower P/C. The
data to be transmitted has been calculated and placed into locations
V300-V315 previously. This data is not moved into the allocated Peerlink V
Memory table until a timer has counted down. This timer’s preset must be
at least equal to the worst case total scan time (1 P/C scan of transmitting
P/C + 1 network scan + 2 P/C scans of the receiving P/C). In the example
shown below, the transmitting P/C will prevent the slower P/C from
missing data by only allowing the data to change once every 200
milliseconds.
D-4
System Performance Examples
Peerlink station #1
V Memory starting address = V1
C1
C2
TIMER 1
Generate transfer pulse
C2
P = 0.200
C2
C3
MOVW
A:
B:
V300
V1
Move data into Peerlink table.
N = 16
Figure D-3 P/C Interlocking—Scenario 1
System Performance Examples
D-5
P/C Interlocking Between P/Cs with Different Scan Times (continued)
D.2.2
Scenario 2
This next example may be used in applications where handshaking is
required between P/Cs to acknowledge data sent or received. In this case, a
transmitting P/C would send its data words with one word designated as a
“command code”. This command code or sequence number could then be
interpreted by the receiving P/C when it receives the data. The receiving
P/C would then respond by sending a “response” code to the transmitting
P/C to inform it that it may now send the next set of data and use the
received data.
The following data structures are used in this example:
P/C Transmitting Data
Network Address 1
V Memory
starting
address
V100
Data to be
transmitted from
Network Address 1
P/C Receiving Data
Network Address 2
V Memory
starting
address
V200
COMMAND CODE
V116
COMMAND CODE
V216
Data received from
Network Address 2
RESPONSE CODE
Table D-1
D-6
Data
received from
Network Address 1
Data to be
transmitted from
Network Address 2
RESPONSE CODE
Variables List
Data Areas
Used
Description
V51-V65
V100-V131
V115
V131
V1
Data to be transmitted work area
V-memory Peerlink data table
Command code
Response code
Constant to be loaded into Command Code
System Performance Examples
Figure D-4 is a ladder logic program that illustrates one method of
implementing the handshaking routine. This sample program has been
implemented in P/C Network Address 1. In this example, the data to be
transmitted is collected or calculated in V Memory from V51 to V65. This is
a temporary storage area. When the data is ready to be sent, it is moved to
V100 (the V Memory starting address) for transfer onto the network. The
16th word will contain the command code or sequence number which
serves as a unique identifier of this set of data. The data will be moved into
the Peerlink V Memory table only once by using a one-shot. This occurs
only once since you would not want to load another set of data until the
correct response sequence is received from the other P/Cs.
The program will now wait for the correct sequence number or response
code to appear in the appropriate V Memory locations allocated for each
P/C. When the response code arrives it is compared against the expected
value and if it is correct the received data is moved into a location to be
used by the P/C and new data is transmitted.
The major timing concern here corresponds to data transfer to and from
both P/Cs. This transfer represents a transmit/receive pair. The worst case
timing sequence described in the “Data Transmission” section of this
manual must be applied twice to determine the delay for the total cycle.
System Performance Examples
D-7
P/C Interlocking Between P/Cs with Different Scan Times (continued)
C51
C1
C1
C3
ONE–SHOT 1
Generate pulse to transmit data
C3
C4
ADD
A:
B:
C:
V66
V1
V66
Assign Command Code
C3
C4
MOVW
Transfer to V100–V115
A:
B:
V51
V100
N = 16
C1
C2
CMP
A:
B:
V131
V66
Check for correct response. If
correct send new data out.
C2
C4
ONE–SHOT 2
MOVW
A:
B:
V116
V20
Copy response into work
area V20.
N = 15
Figure D-4 Sample Handshaking Program
D-8
System Performance Examples
Appendix E
Peerlink Specifications
E.1
Operating Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-2
E.2
PPX:500–5053 and PPX:500–5054 Environmental Specifications . . . . . .
E-3
E.3
PPX:505–7354 Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-4
Specifications
E-1
E.1
Operating Specifications
Channels per module:
PPX:500-5053
PPX:500-5054
PPX:505-7354
1 channel
2 channels
2 channels
Network transmission media
Shielded twisted pair
Total network distance
10,000 ft (Belden 9860 cable or
equivalent)
3,250 ft (Belden 9271 cable or
equivalent)
Maximum number of
modules on network
16
Data transferred per station
1 to 16 words (16-bit words)
Network update rate
15 ms - 4 stations at 8 words/station
30 ms - 8 stations at 8 words/station
40 ms - 8 stations at 16 words/station
60 ms - 16 stations at 8 words/station
80 ms - 16 stations at 8 words/station
Data transmission rate
115.2K bits per second
Undetected bit error rate
6 x 10-!#(calculated, with premium
cable)
Power consumption:
PPX:500-5053
PPX:500-5054
PPX:505-7354
Module size
E-2
Specifications
0.62 watts, –5 VDC
6.50 watts, +5 VDC
1.25 watts, -5 VDC
6.90 watts, +5VDC
8 watts, +5 VDC
Double-wide (occupies 2 slots,
Models PPX:500–5053 and
PPX:500–5054 only)
Single-wide (Model 505–7354)
E.2
PPX:500–5053 and PPX:500–5054 Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature
0_ to 60_ C (32_ to 140_ F)
Storage Temperature
–40_ to 85_ C (–40_ to 185_ F)
Relative Humidity
5% to 95% noncondensing
Vibration
Random
Electrostatic Discharge
Electrical Noise Immunity
Conducted
Radiated
NAVMAT P–9492
Test Fdc with
0.04g@/Hz, 80–350 Hz,
and 3dB/octave rolloff, 80–20 Hz
and 350–2000 Hz at 10 min/axis
MIL–STD–883 5.5 kV/22 kV
MIL STD 461B, Part 4;
CS01, CS02, CS06
IEC 255–4, Appendix E
MIL STD 461B, Part 4; RS01,
RS02, RS03
Corrosion Protection
All parts are of corrosion resistant
material or are plated, or painted,
as corrosion protection.
Agency Approvals
UL Listed, CSA Certified
Specifications
E-3
E.3
PPX:505–7354 Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature
0_ to 60_ C (32_ to 140_ F)
Storage Temperature
–40_ to 70_ C (–40_ to 158_ F)
Relative Humidity
5% to 95% noncondensing
Pollution Degree
2, IEC 664, 664A
Vibration
Sinusoidal
Random
Impact Shock
IEC 68–2–27, Test Ea;
Half Sine, 15g, 11 ms
Electrostatic Discharge
IEC 801, Part 2, Level 4 (15 kV)
Electrical Noise Immunity
Conducted
IEC 801, Part 4, Level 3
MIL STD 461B, Part 4;
CS01, CS02, CS06
IEC 255–4, Appendix E
EEC 4517/79 Com(78) 766 Final,
Part 4
IEEE 472, 2.5 kV
Radiated
E-4
Specifications
IEC 68–2–6, Test Fc;
0.15 mm, peak-to-peak, 10-57 Hz;
1.0g 57-150 Hz
NAVMAT P–9492 or IEC 68–2–34,
Test Fdc with
0.04g@/Hz, 80–350 Hz,
and 3dB/octave rolloff, 80–20 Hz
and 350–2000 Hz at 10 min/axis
IEC 801, Part 3, Level 3
MIL STD 461B, Part 4; RS01,
RS02, RS03
Corrosion Protection
All parts are of corrosion resistant
material or are plated, or painted,
as corrosion protection.
Agency Approvals
UL Listed, CSA Certified
Index
A
channels, number of communication, 1-2
compatible controllers, 1-4
active monitor, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2, 2-8, 2-9, 2-10, 3-4,
4-6, 5-8
active monitor address, 4-6, 4-8
active stations, determining the, 4-4, 4-5
address, setting the network, 3-4, 3-6
addresses
active monitor, 4-6, 4-8, 5-8
for this module, 4-6, 4-8
passive monitor, 4-6, 4-8, 5-8
stations, 5-9
assistance, technical, 6-2
D
diagnostics, power-up, 3-11
dipswitches
Model 505–7354, 3-7
Models 500–5053 and 500–5054, 3-5
setting the, 3-4
documents, related, 6-2
drop lines, 3-15
dual channel communication, 1-6
B
base
inserting the module into the, 3-9, 3-10
installation requirements, 2-6
bases
distributed, 5-7
local, 5-7
E
Environmental specifications, E-4
error code, 4-7, 5-8
I
bias, Local Line, 3-13
block transfer, 2-6
C
Configuration
selecting, 3-20
updating, 3-20
cables
connecting to the module, 3-19
length limits, 2-3, E-2
redundant, 3-14
routing, 3-17
tap spacing, 3-15
twisted pair, 3-14
channel, determining the active, 4-7
I/O
address, 3-20
configuration chart, 3-21
definition chart, 3-20
installation
I/O configuration, 3-20
into the base, 3-9, 3-10
logging the module into the controller, 3-20
power budget, 3-2
power requirements, E-2
requirements, 2-6
setting the dipswitches, 3-4
setup considerations, 2-8
single/dual channel selection, 3-4
software release compatibility, 3-2
station addresses, 2-8
tap housing wiring, 3-12
Index-1
L
passive monitor, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2, 2-8, 2-9, 2-10,
3-4, 4-6, 5-8
Local Line, 2-4, 3-12
passive monitor address, 4-6, 4-8
Logging module into controller, 3-20
power budget, 3-2, E-2
protocol, HDLC, 2-2
M
MODULE GOOD light, 3-11, 4-3, 5-2, 5-5
manuals, related, 6-2
multidrop line, 2-3
N
network
active monitor, 2-9, 2-10, 3-4, 4-6, 5-8
addresses, 3-4, 3-6
baud rate, 2-4
cable installation, 3-12
cable pin assignments, 3-12
cables
connecting to the module, 3-19
length limits, 2-3, E-2
recommended types, 2-3, 3-14
routing, 3-17
components, 3-12
determining the active stations, 4-4, 4-5
passive monitor, 2-8, 2-9, 2-10, 3-4, 4-6
planning considerations, 3-14
ports on the module, 3-19
redundant media status, 4-7
scan time, 2-4, D-2
station addresses, 2-6, 2-8
status words, 2-9, 4-2, 4-4, B-6, C-2
tap spacing, 3-15
transfer method, 2-6
update time, 2-4
network protocol, 2-2
O
ONLINE light, 4-3, 5-3
P
P/C COMM GOOD light, 3-11, 4-3, 5-2, 5-5
Index-2
R
RECEIVE light, 4-3, 5-5
redundant media status, 4-7
resetting the module, 2-8, 5-3, 5-4
resistors, terminating, 3-13
S
Series 500, module size, 1-2, E-2
Series 505, module size, 1-2, E-2
single channel communication, 1-5, 2-9
snubber, installing a, 3-11
station, 1-4, 2-2, 2-4
station address, 4-6
stations, addresses, 5-9
status
determining redundant media, 4-7
determining the active channel, 4-7
status words, 2-9
switches
Reset, 5-3, 5-4
Test, 5-3, 5-4
T
TEST light, 4-3, 5-2, 5-3
TIWAY I, 2-4
TRANSMIT light, 4-3, 5-5
tap housing, 3-12, 3-13
technical assistance, 6-2
terminating resistors, 3-13
TI530 class controller, 1-4
TI560 class controller, 1-4
U
user manuals, related, 6-2
requirements for, 2-3
starting address, 4-2, 4-3, 5-5, 5-8
W
WX1, 2-9, 4-4, B-6, C-2
WX2, 2-9, 4-5, B-6, C-3
V
V Memory
allocation requirements, 2-10
WX3, 2-9, 4-6, B-6, B-7, C-3
WY4, 4-3, B-4, B-5, C-4
WY5, 4-3, B-4, B-5, C-4
Index-3
SIMATIC is a trademark of Siemens AG.
Peerlink, TIWAY, TISOFT1, TISOFT2, TISOFT3, VPU200, Series 500 and Series 505 are trademarks of Siemens Industrial Automation,
Inc.
TI560, TI565, TI560T, TI530, TI520, TI520C, TI530C, TI530T, TI525, TI535 are trademarks of Texas Instruments.
Belden is a registered trademark of Cooper Industries.
UL is a registered trademark of United Laboratories.
CSA is a registered trademark of Canadian Standards Association.
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SIMATIC TIWAY 1 Peerlink User’s Manual
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