Mitsubishi PK-10 Owner`s manual

Using The Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector
with the Ubuntu Linux Operating System
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Introduction
These instructions will teach you how to use a Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with
Ubuntu Linux, using a video graphics array (VGA) connector cable. The majority of
Linux users have some technical skills and this tutorial is specifically designed for those
users, although it will include enough detail for novice users to get up and running as
well. It also assumes that you will be using the pocket projector for presentations that
require you to project your computer screen onto a pull-down screen or a white or
pastel-colored wall, and that you will be demonstrating technical work or presenting a
PowerPoint-style slide show. Finally, the computer or laptop that you use must have the
option to hook up a separate monitor to it with a VGA connector cable. To find out this
information, consult the owner’s manual for your computer in order to check if this
option is available.
The instructions will show you how to adjust the settings in Ubuntu Linux so that the
projector will display exactly what is on the screen, in real time. For more general
instructions and to explore all of the features of the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector go
to http://office.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/mitsubishi/pk10.html?idRes=105535 for
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
the full manufacturer’s manual in digital form.
Introduction (continued)
This tutorial will be organized as follows:
Table of Contents
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Introduction – Pages 1-3
Description of the equipment – Page 4
Materials that you will need – Page 5
Connecting the projector – Pages 6-7
Adjusting the display settings in Ubuntu Linux – Pages 8-10
Focusing the projector display – Page 11
Troubleshooting – Page 12
Works Cited/Referenced Images – Pages 13-14
Tips for getting the most out of this tutorial:
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Be sure that you have all of the necessary materials
Follow each step in order
In each row of the step by step instructions, the images in the left column of
correspond to the numbers in the center column and the text in the right column
for each step
Keep this tutorial handy for future reference
Optional tools needed for this tutorial:


Flat/Standard screwdriver (the VGA cable has slots for a screwdriver, but it is not
necessary – it is easily tightened by hand)
Screen to project image (a light-colored or pastel-colored wall will also work)
Warnings:


The projector and computer you will use in this tutorial are both electric
devices that will be plugged into a wall outlet. Exercise caution to avoid
electric shock!
The projector uses an LED bulb that is fragile and expensive to replace. Be
careful when handling the projector and avoid dropping it or handling it
roughly so that you do not damage the bulb.
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Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Introduction (continued)
Why are these instructions necessary?
In order for you to properly connect and use your Mitsubishi pocket projector on Ubuntu
Linux, without damaging the projector or mistakenly adjusting the display settings in a
way that could cause errors on your operating system, you should use this tutorial
instead of risking your hardware or software.
These instructions will save you time and they will get you ready for presentations faster
and without hassle by taking the guesswork out of using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket
Projector with Ubuntu Linux.
This tutorial is also excellent for professionals who work in a Linux environment. With so
many servers now using Linux and more and more Web Developers using Linux, this
tutorial will help users to avoid having to track down a computer with Mac OSX or
Windows to do demonstrations and presentations to clients and coworkers alike.
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Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Description of the Mitsubishi PK10
Fig. 1
Power Indicator Light
Focus Dial
Lamp Indicator Light
Charge Indicator Light
Auto Position Button
Computer Button
Video Button
Down Direction Button
Menu Button
Power Button
Enter Button
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector Top [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
4
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Fig. 2
S-Video Terminal
Video Terminal
VGA In Terminal
A/C Adapter Power Supply Port
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector Side [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Materials You Will Need
5
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector Unit
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Computer or Laptop Computer with a VGA port
and Ubuntu Linux operating system
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Linux Laptop
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
VGA connector cable
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA Cable
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
A/C Adaptor Cable (Included with projector)
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). A/C Adapter
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Connecting the Projector
6
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
1
Be sure your computer is turned off.
2
Plug the A/C adapter power supply
for the projector unit into a wall
outlet.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Linux Laptop
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). A/C Adapter
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). A/C Adapter in
Projector [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
3
4
Plug the A/C adapter power supply
into the projector unit in the A/C
Adapter Power Supply Port.
See Fig. 2 on page 4 for extra reference.
Plug the VGA connector cable into
the projector unit in the VGA In
Terminal.
See Fig. 2 on page 4 for extra reference.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA in Projector
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Connecting the Projector (continued)
7
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
5
Use your fingers or a screwdriver to
tighten the plastic-coated screws that
are on each side of the VGA
connector plug.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA in Projector
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
6
Plug the other end of the VGA
connector cable into the computer’s
VGA In Terminal.
Make sure the computer is still turned off.
The location of VGA In Terminal will vary
based on the particular computer.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA in Laptop
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
7
Use your fingers or a screwdriver to
tighten the plastic-coated screws that
are on each side of the VGA
connector plug.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA in Laptop
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Adjusting the Display In Ubuntu Linux
8
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
1
Turn on the computer.
The projector should be fully connected to
the computer before turning the computer
on.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Linux Laptop
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Turn on the projector by pressing the
Power Button.
2
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector
Top [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
See Fig. 1 on page 4 for extra reference.
The projector should project its default bluecolored screen onto the wall or movie
screen and the power indicator light should
be green.
On the desktop of the computer, click
the Settings icon.
3
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Desktop 1
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
This icon is on the left navigation bar and it
has a wrench and a gear on it.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Settings Icon [Photograph],
Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Adjusting the Display In Ubuntu Linux (continued)
9
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Click the Displays icon to access the
display settings.
4
This icon has a computer monitor and a
measuring device on it.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Displays Icon [Photograph],
Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Desktop 2
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Take a moment to look over the
display settings screen.
5
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Desktop 3
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Mirror Display
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
6
The default display settings treat the
projector as a second screen and allow you
to move windows and applications over to
the projector, but for most Information
Technology (IT) presentations (and for the
scope of this tutorial), we want the projector
screen to show exactly what you are doing
on the desktop in real-time.
Click the Mirror displays checkbox.
This will enable the feature that allows a
real-time desktop display on your projector
screen.
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Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Adjusting the Display In Ubuntu Linux (continued)
Click the Apply button to apply the
display settings.
7
Now the projector will display a mirror
image of the desktop and you can use your
Ubuntu Linux laptop for presentations and
demonstrations of your work, techniques or
for PowerPoint-style slide show
presentations.
8
9
Click the small “x” in the upper left
corner of the display settings window
to exit the display settings.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Apply Button
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Exit Button 1
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Exit Button 2
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Click the small “x” in the upper left
corner of the system settings window
to exit the system settings.
11
Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Focusing the projector display
1
Turn out the lights before trying to
view the projected image of your
desktop screen on a wall or projector
screen.
2
Check the projector display to see if it
is crisp and clear or if it is blurry or
fuzzy.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Laptop Projecting
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Projected Image
[Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
3
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector
Top [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
If the display is fuzzy, adjust the
Focus Dial until the picture on the
projector is clear.
See Fig. 1 on page 4 for extra reference.
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Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Troubleshooting
Problems
Solutions


The Projector is not projecting a
display.

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
The Projector is projecting a blue
screen and not the desktop of
the computer.

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The projector display is fuzzy and
not clear.


The projector will not turn on
and the indicator lights are not
lighting up.


Check to make sure that the projector is plugged in
Make sure that the VGA cable is connected to the
computer and the projector both
Make sure that the computer is turned on
Make sure the projector is turned on by checking the
power indicator light to see if it is green
The projector’s LED bulb may be burned out
 use the original owner’s manual for information
about ordering a replacement bulb
Make sure that the VGA cable is connected to the
computer and the projector both
Make sure that the computer is turned on
Make sure that Mirror Mode is selected in the display
settings for the computer (see pages 7 and 8 for
details)
The lens of the projector may be dirty, try cleaning it
with a soft tissue and warm water
Adjust the Focus Dial until the projection is clear
Make sure the surface that you are projecting on is a
smooth, light colored surface to ensure a clear
projection
Check to make sure that the projector is plugged in
Check the A/C adapter to see if the cord is damaged
 use the original owner’s manual for information
about ordering a replacement cord
*For any other problems that are beyond the scope of this tutorial, consult your owner’s manual or the
online resources that the manufacturer has made available.
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Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Works Cited – Referenced Images
The images used for this tutorial were photographed by Scott Fillman and were retrieved
from the hard drive of Mr. Fillman’s computer. The labels and arrows used to label the
instructions are used for educational purposes and are from Microsoft Corporation’s
Microsoft Office Word 2010. The following is an alphabetical list of the images used for these
instructions:
Photos:
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). A/C Adapter [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). A/C Adapter in Projector [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Apply Button [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Desktop 1 [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Desktop 2 [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector Top [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Digital LED Projector Side [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Displays Icon [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Exit Button 1 [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Exit Button 2 [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Laptop Projecting [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Linux Laptop [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Mirror Display [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Projected Image [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). Settings Icon [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA Cable [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA in Laptop [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
Fillman, S. (Photographer). (2012). VGA in Projector [Photograph], Retrieved July 1, 2012.
*All images and screenshots were captured by and are the sole property of Scott Fillman, Copyright 2012.
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Using the Mitsubishi PK10 Pocket Projector with Ubuntu Linux
Labels - Vector Art:
Microsoft Corporation (Creator). (2010). Text Box [Shape/Vector Art], Retrieved July 1, 2012 from
Microsoft Office Word 2010.
Microsoft Corporation (Creator). (2010). “No” Sign [Shape/Vector Art], Retrieved July 1, 2012 from
Microsoft Office Word 2010.
Microsoft Corporation (Creator). (2010). Arrow Shape [Shape/Vector Art], Retrieved July 1, 2012 from
Microsoft Office Word 2010.
*All shapes and vector art were used for educational purposes with permission from Microsoft and are the sole property
of Microsoft Corporation: http://www.microsoft.com, Copyright 2012.
The shapes were used via Microsoft’s Requirements for Allowed Uses and for educational purposes
(http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/en/us/IntellectualProperty/Permissions/Default.aspx).
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