Retrieving Internet Media

Retrieving Internet Media
Since all of the information on the Internet is essentially just computer data files, it makes
sense that students and staff should be able to bring the files locally to use in their
multimedia writing projects. Following are the steps involved in retrieving the Internet
information back to your local computer that you so diligently searched for.
Gathering Internet Addresses for Later Reference
As students and staff come across sites that they would like to reference as part of their
multimedia writing project, encourage them to keep track of those sites by setting a
"bookmark" in Netscape or by copying and pasting the addresses from their Internet
browser application into a word processing document, like Word. This is fairly
straightforward and also will give them practice is using common computer skills such as
switching between open applications as well as copying and pasting.
1. Highlight the address of the site in the location area on your browser.
2. Use the Copy command in the Edit Menu or Control-C.
3. Use the task bar to switch from your browser application to your word
processing file.
4. Use the Paste command in the Edit Menu or Control-V to place the address in
your word processing file.
Multimedia Fair Use at a Glance
Probably the most used resource from the Internet for multimedia-writing projects are the
graphic images. More and more sites are making their image collections available for
educational use. In addition, more sites are using images as part of their HTML pages to
enhance their readability and these images can be used as part of projects as well. Please
respect an author's copyright on these Internet resources. In every case, it's important that
students and staff cite these resources appropriately. Taking things off of the Web and using
them in classroom projects is OK, but posting them back on to the Internet is generally not.
Even if there is no copyright notice on someone else's page, images, etc., ask the author
(copyright owner) for written permission before you copy the text or pictures to place on
other pages that are going to placed on the Internet. To find out more about "Copyright and
Fair Use" visit http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/image.htm or
http://www.indiana.edu/~ccumc/copyright/ccguides.html#intro
Authoring for curriculum-based projects may include materials from CDs, books, the
Internet, and other sources. The resulting projects cannot be distributed outside the
"classroom community", although they can be shared with family members since students'
homes are considered to be part of the learning community.
Retrieving Graphic Images
1. Have the Internet page containing the graphic image you wish to use visible in your
browser application.
2. While "hovering" or "floating" the cursor on the graphic you want, click the right
mouse button to see the built-in menu from the browser.
3. Choose Save Picture As...and you'll be able to save the image file into the directory
(folder) that you choose.
4. Before you hit the "Save" button, you may want to rename the file with a different
name so it gives an indication of what the file represents when you use it later on.
Gathering Text from the Internet
Retrieving text from the Internet can be accomplished in two ways. You can use the
"highlight" method to save only portions of the text on a page or save the entire page as a
text file. Make sure to open both your browser and your word processing application before
following these steps.
1. Highlight the text on the page using the standard "click and drag" method.
2. Use the Copy command in the Edit Menu or use the buttons Control-C.
3. Use the task bar to switch from your browser application to your word processing
file.
4. Use the Paste command in the Edit Menu or Control-V to place the text in your word
processing file.
OR
1. Have the page with the desired text showing in your browser.
2. Use the Save As command in the File Menu.
3. Make certain you choose Text as the format.
In both cases, the text will contain some extra spaces that will take some editing to clean
up and make the text truly usable in your multimedia writing project.
Gathering Other Resources from the Internet
Other resources, such as sounds, movies, and animations can also be retrieved for local use
with a similar process.
1. Have the Internet page containing the resource you wish to retrieve visible in your
browser application.
2. While "hovering" or "floating" the cursor on the file you want, click the right mouse
button to see the built-in menu from the browser.
3. Choose Save Target As, and you'll be able to save the file into the directory (folder)
that you choose.
4. Before you hit the "Save" button, you may want to rename the file with a different
name other than the default so it gives an indication of what the file represents when
you use it later on.
The techniques described above will enable students and staff to retrieve all forms of
Internet resources and use them as needed in their multimedia writing projects. With all of
the data available on the Internet, it will be a task not to "fill up" these projects too quickly
without truly evaluating the information for appropriateness. Use these elements selectively
and sparingly to keep them effective at enhancing your presentation.