Large Optical Disk Library Service Manual Part Number: EK–SS100–SV.B01 Revision/Update Information:

Large Optical Disk Library
Service Manual
Part Number: EK–SS100–SV.B01
Revision/Update Information:
Digital Equipment Corporation
Maynard, Massachusetts
This manual supersedes Part
Number EK–SS100–SV.A01.
First printing, May 1993
Revision, October 1993
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed
as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation. Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no
responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied
only in accordance with the terms of such license.
Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its software on
equipment that is not supplied by Digital or its affiliated companies.
© Digital Equipment Corporation 1993.
Reproduced with Permission of the Hewlett-Packard Company
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: DEC, Digital, VAX,
VAX DOCUMENT, VMS, and the DIGITAL logo.
Torx is a registered trademark of the Camcar Division of Textron.
All other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
U.S.A.
This equipment generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency energy. The equipment has been
type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device pursuant to Subpart
J of Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such radio
frequency interference. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause interference
in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be
required to correct the interference.
This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT, Version 2.1.
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xi
1 Introduction
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.4
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.5
1.6
1.7
The RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Disk Library
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Capacity Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Optical Drive Mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Magneto-Optical Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Interface Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single-ended SCSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differential-ended SCSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–1
1–1
1–2
1–5
1–5
1–6
1–7
1–7
1–7
1–8
1–9
1–15
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2–1
2–1
2–2
2–2
2–2
2–3
2–3
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2–4
2–6
2–8
2–9
2–9
2 Environmental/Installation/PM
2.1
2.1.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.3
2.4
2.4.1
2.4.2
2.4.3
2.5
2.6
2.6.1
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Temperature/Clearance Requirements . . . .
Location Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weight Bearing Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Primary Power/External Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents of Shipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uncrating the Large (RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536)
Optical Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Optical Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Optical Disk Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Optical Disk Library a Short Distance . .
iii
2.6.2
2.7
2.8
Moving the Optical Disk Library a Long Distance . . . .
Preventative Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–10
2–15
2–15
3 Product Configuration and Operation
3.1
3.1.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.5
3.6
Front Panel and Control Panel Operations .
Control Panel Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the SCSI Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting a Configuration (CONF) . . . . . . . . . .
Securing the Optical Disk Library . . . . . . . .
Setting a Security Code . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restricting Disk Insertion and Removal
Controlling Mailslot Rotation . . . . . . . . .
Host Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger Configuration Choices . . . . . . .
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3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–7
3–8
3–9
3–9
Operation/Installation Error Information . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-on Self-test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optical Disk Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning Tools Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Eject Tool to Remove a Disk from the Drive
Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel and
Observation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Autochanger Lists the First "Possibles" . . . . .
How to Use the Results of the Internal Tests . . . . . . . .
The FRU Isolation Test Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovery from Hardware Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures . .
Additional Explanation of Some Hardware Error
Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Information Through SCSI Commands . . . . . . .
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Offline Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Test Command Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sequence Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Core Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The FIND HOME Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4–2
4–5
4–7
4–8
4–8
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4–9
4–10
4–12
4–13
4–14
4–14
4–15
4–16
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4–27
4–29
4–30
4–30
4–30
4–32
4–32
4–36
4–39
4 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.3.1
4.4
4.5
4.5.1
4.6
4.6.1
4.7
4.7.1
4.8
4.8.1
4.8.2
4.9
4.10
4.10.1
4.10.2
4.11
4.11.1
4.11.2
4.12
iv
4.13
4.14
Micro-Move Reference Table for Viewing FIND HOME
Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–46
4–49
5 Removal and Replacement
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.4.1
5.4.1.1
5.4.1.2
5.4.1.3
5.4.1.4
5.4.1.5
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5.4.5
5.4.6
5.4.7
5.4.8
5.4.9
5.4.10
5.4.11
5.4.12
5.4.13
5.4.14
5.4.15
5.5
5.5.1
5.5.2
5.6
5.6.1
5.6.2
Field-Replaceable Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ESD Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tools Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assembly/Disassembly Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Rear Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Rear Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Front Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Front Panel PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Lower Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the SCSI Repeater PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Leadscrew Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Leadscrew/Leadscrew Motor Drive
Belt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Picker Motor and/or Picker Motor Drive
Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Carriage/Picker Assembly . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Sensor Transmitter PCA . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Sensor Receiver PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Autochanger Controller PCA . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Cooling Fan Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Optical Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Optical Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Mailslot Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Interconnect PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Re-initializing the Autochanger Controller PCA RAM after
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Variables Cleared by Configuration 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Variables Cleared by Configuration 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replaceable Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommended Service Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–1
5–1
5–2
5–2
5–3
5–3
5–6
5–7
5–8
5–9
5–11
5–12
5–14
5–15
5–17
5–20
5–20
5–21
5–23
5–28
5–29
5–31
5–32
5–33
5–34
5–35
5–36
5–37
5–37
5–37
v
6 Theory of Operation
The Autochanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Movements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Autochanger Mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Controller PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Power Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The AC PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The DC PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Multifunction Magneto-Optical Drives . . .
Controller PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Buffer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatter/Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Servo PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DSP Microprocessor and Support/Servo
Loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2.2
Read and Write Channel Electronics . .
6.5.3
Mechanism Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.1
Loader Mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.2
Optical Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6
Optical Disk Layout and Error Correction . . . .
6.6.1
Optical Disk Layout—650-Mbyte Capacity .
6.6.2
User Zone Layout—650-Mbyte Capacity . .
6.6.3
Optical Disk Layout—1.3-Gbyte Capacity .
6.6.4
User Zone Layout—1.3-Gbyte Capacity . . .
6.6.5
Drive Defect Management . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6.6
Slip Sparing Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6.7
Replacement Sparing Algorithm . . . . . . . .
6.6.8
Error Thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7
Error Detection and Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.1
Error Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.2
Error Recovery Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.3
SCSI Detected Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.4
Move Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.5
Hardware Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.6
Real Time Event Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8
The SCSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8.1
SCSI Command Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1
6.1.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.4.1
6.4.2
6.4.3
6.5
6.5.1
6.5.1.1
6.5.1.2
6.5.1.3
6.5.2
6.5.2.1
vi
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6–1
6–1
6–4
6–4
6–7
6–7
6–9
6–11
6–11
6–11
6–11
6–12
6–12
6–12
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6–12
6–12
6–13
6–13
6–13
6–13
6–14
6–15
6–17
6–17
6–22
6–24
6–24
6–25
6–26
6–27
6–28
6–28
6–29
6–30
6–30
6–31
6–32
A Offline Diagnostic Information
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
System Error Report . . . .
Autochanger Error Codes .
Drive SCSI-2 Reference . .
Offline Diagnostics . . . . . .
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A–1
A–3
A–13
A–27
Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–1
B Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts
B.1
C Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
C.1
C.2
C.3
C.3.1
C.3.2
C.4
C.5
C.5.1
C.5.2
C.6
C.7
C.8
C.9
RW516/RW536-UA Upgrade Kit Parts . . . . . . . .
Tools Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Power from the Optical Disk Library
Opening the Rear Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Lower Rear Panel . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Controller PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Additional Magazines . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Front Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting the Additional Magazines . . . . . .
Reassembling the Optical Disk Library . . . . . . .
Adding Product Change Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initializing NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing Optical Disk Library Operation . . . . . . .
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C–1
C–1
C–2
C–2
C–4
C–6
C–10
C–10
C–11
C–13
C–14
C–14
C–14
Index
Figures
1–1
2–1
2–2
2–3
2–4
2–5
3–1
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library
Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Shipping Bracket into Operation Mode
(Large Unit RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536) . . . . . . . . .
Attaching the SCSI Cable and Power Cord (Large Unit
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Positioning the Shipping Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipping Bracket Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Shipping Bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optical Disk Library Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–3
2–5
2–7
2–12
2–13
2–14
3–1
vii
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
5–1
5–2
5–3
5–4
5–5
5–6
5–7
5–8
5–9
5–10
5–11
5–12
5–13
5–14
5–15
5–16
5–17
5–18
5–19
5–20
5–21
5–22
5–23
5–24
5–25
5–26
5–27
5–28
5–29
viii
Information and Tests Through the Control Panel . . .
The Autochanger Returns Suspect FRUs . . . . . . . . . .
How Service Views the Suspect FRUs . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information and Tests Through the SCSI Bus . . . . . .
The ‘‘FIND HOME’’ Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rear Panel Keyholes and Locking Bracket . . . . . . . . .
Door Interlock Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front Door Latch Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front Panel PCA Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lower Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lower Rear Panel and SCSI Repeater PCA . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Mounting Screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leadscrew Motor Mounting and Leadscrew Belt . . . .
Leadscrew Top Bracket Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leadscrew Lower Bearing Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Pressure to Detension the Long Picker
Belt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Picker Motor Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Picker Belt Transfer Assembly and Mounting
Screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sensor Receiver PCA Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connections to the Sensor Receiver PCA . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger Controller PCA Mounting . . . . . . . . . . .
Dip Switch Locations on the Autochanger Controller
PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger PCA Connectors/Components . . . . . . . .
Cooling Fan Panel Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Cabling and Mounting on the Drive Tray . . . . .
Optical Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interconnect PCA and Cable Assignments . . . . . . . . .
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)—Diagram 1 . . . . . . .
Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)—Diagram 2 . . . . . . .
Cable Routing—Diagram 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Routing—Diagram 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Routing—Diagram 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Routing—Diagram 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4–10
4–11
4–12
4–29
4–40
5–4
5–5
5–7
5–8
5–10
5–11
5–12
5–13
5–14
5–15
5–16
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5–17
5–18
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5–19
5–22
5–23
5–24
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5–25
5–27
5–29
5–30
5–32
5–34
5–41
5–42
5–43
5–44
5–45
5–46
6–1
6–2
6–3
6–4
6–5
6–6
6–7
6–8
6–9
6–10
A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
C–1
C–2
C–3
C–4
C–5
C–6
C–7
C–8
C–9
SCSI Command Translation for Autochanger
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger Controller PCA Block Diagram . . .
Overall Diagram of the Power Supply . . . . . . . .
The AC PCA in the Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . .
The DC PCA in the Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . .
Optical Disk Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Zone Layout for 650-Mbyte Media . . . . . . .
User Zone Layout for 1.3-Gbyte Media, g=1 . . . .
User Zone Layout for 1.3-Gbyte,g=16 . . . . . . . . .
Error Detection and Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Error Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jukebox Request Sense Data Parameter Block
Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jukebox Request Sense—Additional Sense Data
Drive Request Sense Data Parameter Format . .
Rear Panel Keyholes and Locking Bracket . . . . .
Electronics Shield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lower Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger Controller PCA Mounting . . . . . . .
Autochanger PCA Connectors/Components . . . .
Front Door Latch Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailslot Cover Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Magazine Spacer and Mounting Screws . . . . . . .
Installing the Additional Magazines . . . . . . . . .
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6–2
6–5
6–7
6–8
6–10
6–14
6–16
6–19
6–20
6–26
A–2
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A–3
A–5
A–14
C–3
C–5
C–6
C–7
C–8
C–10
C–11
C–12
C–13
......
......
......
xii
1–8
1–9
......
1–12
......
1–13
......
1–14
Tables
1
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
1–5
Conventions Used in This Guide . . . . . . . . . . .
Optical Disk Library Product Matrix . . . . . . . .
Optical Disk Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Environmental
Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Physical
Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Service
Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ix
1–6
1–7
1–8
2–1
3–1
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–6
5–1
5–2
5–3
5–4
6–1
6–2
6–3
6–4
6–5
6–6
6–7
A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–5
x
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Product
Certifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pass Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acceptable Voltage/Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger Configuration Choices . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures . .
Sequence Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exerciser Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Core Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Micro-Move ID
Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information Logs (INFO Logs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S1 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S2 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exchange Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-exchange Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Values for n and m for 1.3-Gbyte with g=16 (1024
media) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Revolution to Logical Track Layout . . . . .
Error Thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Group 0 Commands (6-byte command) . . . . . . . . .
Group 1 and 2 Commands (10-byte command) . . . .
Group 5 Commands (12-byte command) . . . . . . . . .
Sense Key and Additional Sense Length Values . .
Autochanger Move Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Autochanger Micro-Move Error Codes . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Request Sense - Additional Sense Code
Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HP-Specific Drive Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–14
1–15
1–16
2–2
3–9
4–17
4–32
4–34
4–36
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4–46
4–50
5–25
5–26
5–37
5–38
6–11
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6–21
6–21
6–26
6–32
6–33
6–35
A–4
A–9
A–11
...
...
A–16
A–19
Preface
This manual assumes you are familiar with computer terms. It is divided into six
chapters and three appendixes and is organized to allow you to quickly find the
information that you need.
Here’s what you’ll find in this manual:
•
Chapter 1 provides an introduction that lists the features and components,
product configurations, and the characteristics of the drive mechanism and
the disks for the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library.
•
Chapter 2 provides environmental, installation and preventive maintenance
information on the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library.
•
Chapter 3 provides configuration and operating information on the RW514
/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library.
•
Chapter 4 provides troubleshooting and diagnostics information on the RW514
/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library.
•
Chapter 5 provides removal and replacement procedures for the fieldreplaceable assemblies in the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library.
•
Chapter 6 provides theory of operation information on the RW514/RW516
/RW534/RW536 Optical Library.
•
Appendix A provides a typical VAX system error report, SCSI-2 reference, and
offline diagnostic information.
•
Appendix B provides a list of parts and supplies.
•
Appendix C provides instructions for installing the RW516-UA/RW536-UA
capacity upgrade kit.
xi
Conventions Used in This Guide
Table 1 Conventions Used in This Guide
Convention
Use
Italics
Italic text is used for titles of manuals and other publications.
Monospace type
Anything that is displayed on the control panel of the
Optical Library is set in monospace type like this.
Boldface type
Anything that you are asked to type is set in boldface type
like this.
Keys
Keys indicate the key to press on the control panel of the Optical
Library.
Note
A note calls attention to information which is helpful in
understanding the operation of the product.
CAUTION
Caution notes provide information that protects your Optical
Library from being damaged.
WARNING
Warning notes provide information that protects you from being
harmed.
xii
1
Introduction
1.1 The RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Disk
Library Overview
The RW514, 57.2 Gbytes and RW516, 93.6 Gbytes are large-capacity optical
storage libraries.
The RW514 and RW516 both come with four 5.25-inch, 650 Mbyte multifunction
optical drive mechanisms. Multifunction disk drives sense whether a rewritable
or write-once disk was inserted and changes modes as appropriate. These
libraries support both rewritable and write-once 512 bytes/sector optical disk
cartridges.
The RW534/RW536 has approximately twice the storage capacity of the RW514
/516. This added capacity is due to a difference in the optical drives contained in
the libraries. The RW534/RW536 contains a 1.3 Gbyte drive, an enhanced version
of the 650 Mbyte drive that is used in the RW514/RW516 version libraries. The
1.3 Gbyte drive supports the use of 1.2 Gbyte disks as well as the 594 Mbyte
disks that are supported for use with 650 Mbyte drives. Other than the added
support of 1.2 Gbyte disks, the RW534/RW536 libraries are mechanically,
electrically, and operationally the same as the RW514/RW516 libraries, and both
versions support the SCSI-2 command set.
1.2 Product Features
These optical disk libraries, regardless of the capacity, have the following features
and meet the following specifications:
•
direct online access to data
•
greater security through the ability to "lock" the autochanger (prevent disk
removal)
•
high autochanger reliability through a design that eliminates the motors,
cables, and sensors from the delivery mechanism
Introduction 1–1
•
autochanger reliability of:
100,000 hours MTBF
1,200,000 MSBF (Mean Swaps Between Failure)
•
8-second average disk exchange time (excluding the drive load/unload
sequence)
•
multifunction capability (write-once and rewritable technologies)
•
high reliability and data security when using Digital-supplied rewritable and
write-once 5.25-inch optical disks
•
DEC rewritable optical disks meet ANSI and ISO standards for
Continuous-Composite (CC) format. They conform to ISO/IEC DIS 10089A;
ANSI X3.212-199x and the 1.2-Gbyte optical disk meets ECMA 184 standard
for CC format.
•
DEC write-once disks meet ISO and ANSI standards for ContinuousComposite - Write-Once format (CCW). They conform to ISO/IEC DIS 11560;
ANSI X3.220-199x and the 1.2-Gbyte optical disk meets ECMA 184 standard
for CCW format.
1.3 Product Components
Refer to Figure 1–1 for an illustration of the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536
Optical Library Components .
1–2 Introduction
Figure 1–1 RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Library Components
7 Picker
6 Carriage and Rails
4
Front
Panel
3
Mailslot
5 Rear Panel
1 Drives
2 Storage Slots
ZS-0661-MH
Introduction 1–3
1. Disk drives
The optical disk library contains four optical disk drives for
read/write data transfer. Each drive requires a unique SCSI
address.
2. Magazines
The optical disk library contains either 11 or 18 magazines.
Each magazine has 8 storage slots for a total of either 88 or
144 optical disk storage slots.
3. Mailslot
The mailslot is used to insert and remove optical disks from
the optical disk library.
4. Front panel
The front panel includes a control panel used to manage and
display autochanger functions, and a slot to insert and remove
disks.
5. Rear panel
The rear panel includes SCSI, UPS and power cord
connections. (Information on connecting the optical disk
library to the host computer is given in the Optical Library
User’s Guide, EK-STSOP-UG.)
6. Carriage and rails
The carriage and rails support the picker for its movement
within the optical disk library.
7. Picker
The picker rotates, flips, and transports disks to and from
storage slots, drives, and the mailslot.
1–4 Introduction
1.3.1 Capacity Configurations
The RW514 has a maximum storage capacity of 57.2 Gbytes. This capacity
is achieved through 11 magazines that each hold 8 disk cartridges which
gives a total of 88 cartridges. The RW514 holds a 594-Mbyte cartridge
(512bytes/sector) or, 297 Mbytes/side. The RW534 supports a maximum capacity
of 114.4 Gbytes, whereby each cartridge holds 1.2 Gbytes.
RW516 has a maximum storage capacity of 93.6 Gbytes. This capacity is achieved
through 18 magazines that each hold 8 disk cartridges of 594 Mbytes each (a total
of 144 cartridges). The RW536 supports a maximum capacity of 187.2 Gbytes,
whereby each cartridge holds 1.2 Gbytes.
The RW514/RW534 has the top seven magazines removed and a filler panel
installed in their place. The Controller PCA for the RW514/RW534 works only
with this 88-slot library.
Capacity differences in the above libraries are determined by the number of disks
the library is capable of storing and the type of drives used in the library. The
RW534/RW536 libraries contain ‘‘2x’’ drives, which are an enhanced version of the
RW514/RW516 libraries. The drives in RW534/RW536 support the use of higher
capacity (1.3-Gbyte) disks and have twice the buffer RAM (512 Kbytes) of the
RW514/RW516 drives.
A RW514/RW534 may be converted into a RW516/RW536 through the
RW516-UA/RW536-UA upgrade product kit (Appendix C). In the upgrade,
the Controller PCA is changed to a new controller for a 144-slot version (RW516
/RW536) and the filler panel is replaced with seven magazines.
Note
The firmware is the same for RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536. The
firmware reads the type of controller it is installed into and configures
itself accordingly.
1.3.2 The Optical Drive Mechanism
The optical drive mechanism is a multifunction drive and, therefore, operates
in both rewritable and write-once modes. The drive uses both rewritable and
write-once 5.25-inch magneto-optical disks that comply with ANSI and ISO
standards for Continuous Composite format. The drive senses the disk type and
automatically operates in either rewritable or write-once mode.
Introduction 1–5
The drive has a 3600 rpm rotational speed and can achieve a maximum sustained
write transfer rate of 0.5 to 0.8 Mbytes per second and a maximum sustained
read transfer rate of 1 to 1.6 Mbyte per second. The error rate is less than one
block in error per 14 bytes, depending on the media and drive capacity.
Immediate response mode and write caching are used by the drive mechanism
to achieve its high write performance. However, if a power failure occurs while
write data is in the buffer, the drive may not have enough power to complete
the write operation and empty the buffer. Therefore we recommend that an
uninterruptable power supply (UPS) be used with battery backup to ensure that
no data is lost if a power failure occurs.
1.3.3 Magneto-Optical Disks
Magneto-Optical (MO) disks are more durable, more reliable, removable, and cost
far less per megabyte than magnetic disks. MO disks are made of the same kind
of plastic used in bullet-proof windows. Data can be read through fingerprints
and minor scratches. MO disks can withstand x-rays, magnetic interference, and
can be dropped from desk height without damage.
Magneto-Optical disks store data on a magnetic layer in the form of magnetic
flux reversals rather than on a pitted surface used in other optical technologies.
Because surfaces of the MO disk are not physically changed, they can be written
to and erased repeatedly with no measurable data degradation. Optical disks
have an archival life of thirty years based on accelerated life tests for data
retention.
The disk is mounted in a rigid plastic case with a metal shutter, similar to a
3.5-inch magnetic flexible disk. Each optical disk holds 594 Mbytes of data, or 1.2
Gbytes of data, when 512 bytes per sector disks are used. (Check the host system
documentation to determine which disk format is supported.) The MO disk has
two recording sides. To access the second side, the cartridge must be ejected,
turned over, and re-inserted into the drive.
There are two types of magneto-optical disks: rewritable optical disks and writeonce optical disks. (Check the host system documentation to determine which
disk type(s) are supported.) The two disk types can be differentiated by the words
"rewritable" or "write-once" printed on the disk’s metal shutter.
For data safety, you can independently write-protect each side of the disk by
setting the write-protect tab on the corner of the cartridge.
1–6 Introduction
1.4 SCSI Interface Options
The optical disk library connects to the host system through a Small Computer
Systems Interface (SCSI). This interface conforms to SCSI standards ANSI
X3.131-SCSI-2.
Usually each SCSI-connect peripheral requires one SCSI address. With the disk
library, however, there are five unique SCSI interface addresses— one SCSI
address for the autochanger controller and one for each drive contained in the
disk library.
The autochanger controller and the host operating system manage communication
through the SCSI bus to each drive’s unique SCSI address.
The model RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 is available with either a single-ended
or differential SCSI interface. Initially only single-ended optical disk libraries
will be available from Digital.
Note
The interface type must be specified when ordering the library.
Regardless of the type of external SCSI interface option chosen, the
optical disk library internally uses SCSI single-ended signals and
termination.
1.4.1 Single-ended SCSI Interface
This option specifies a single-ended SCSI repeater PCA. This PCA enables the
optical disk library to be connected to an external single-ended SCSI bus and
also provides one other function; bus buffering. Bus buffering makes the library’s
internal SCSI bus length effectively zero and allows the use of the maximum
single-ended SCSI external bus length of 6 meters for connection to the host
system. (Actual library-to-host distance depends on whether there are any other
SCSI devices on this bus).
1.4.2 Differential-ended SCSI Interface
This option specifies a differential SCSI repeater PCA. This PCA enables the
library to be connected to an external differential SCSI bus. The differential
SCSI repeater PCA uses the equivalent of 10 meters of SCSI cable internally,
so the allowable external cable length is limited to 15 meters, instead of the 5
meters usually allowed on a differential SCSI bus.
Introduction 1–7
1.5 Product Matrix
Table 1–1 Optical Disk Library Product Matrix
Product No.
/Options
Description
HP Designation
RW514-ZF
A 57 gigabyte Optical Jukebox with a 88 disk
slot capacity, one mail slot, four 650 Mbyte
multifunction drives, one auto changer
mechanism. Plus packaging, skid, ESD bag,
and accessory kit. Single ended SCSI.
Model 60
(C1714C)
RW534-ZF
A 114 gigabyte Optical Jukebox with a 88 disk
slot capacity, one mail slot, four 1.3 Gbyte
multifunction drives, one auto changer
mechanism. Plus packaging, skid, ESD bag,
and accessory kit. Single ended SCSI.
Model 120T
(C1714T)
RW516-ZF
A 94 gigabyte Optical Jukebox with a 144 disk
slot capacity, one mail slot, four 650 Mbyte
multifunction drives, one auto changer
mechanism. Plus packaging, skid, ESD bag,
and accessory kit. Single ended SCSI.
Model 100
(C1715C)
RW536-ZF
A 188 gigabyte Optical Jukebox with a 144
disk slot capacity, one mail slot, four 1.3 Gbyte
multifunction drives, one auto changer
mechanism. Plus packaging, skid, ESD bag,
and accessory kit. Single ended SCSI.
Model 200T
(C1715T)
RW516-UA
Slot upgrade kit only for RW514 to RW516.
Consists of 56 slots, controller and hardware.
Plus packaging, and ESD bag.
RW536-UA
Slot upgrade kit only for RW534 to RW536.
Consists of 56 slots, controller and hardware.
Plus packaging, and ESD bag.
RW536-UB
Converts 650 Mbyte multifunction drives to
1.3 Gbyte multifunction drives, to be used with
either RW514 or RW516 jukeboxes. Consists of
four 1.3 Gbyte drives, one RFI shield and cable
kit, and the Installation Guide.
1–8 Introduction
1.6 Specifications
This section provides:
•
Performance Specifications
•
Physical Characteristics
•
Environmental Specifications
•
Power Requirements
•
Service Characteristics
•
Product Certification
Table 1–2 Optical Disk Library System
Optical Disk Library
Capacity
88 disks, 57.2 Gbytes (RW514)
88 disks, 114.4 Gbytes (RW534)
144 disks, 93.6 Gbytes (RW516)
144 disks, 187.2 Gbytes (RW536)
Drives
4 standard, 5.25-inch multifunction 650-Mbyte (RW514/RW516)
or 1.3-Gbyte (RW534/RW536)
optical drives
Average disk exchange
time (excluding drive
load/unload sequences)
9 seconds
Interface
Single-ended asynchronous SCSI
Multifunction Optical
Drives
650 Mbytes (1x)
1.3 Gbytes (2x)
Short stroke (across 2.2
Mbytes)
8 ms
4 ms
Average
25 ms
23.5 ms
Full stroke
50 ms
45 ms
Average latency
8.33 ms
8.33 ms
Seek times
Media load/unload
time
(continued on next page)
Introduction 1–9
Table 1–2 (Cont.) Optical Disk Library System
Multifunction Optical
Drives
650 Mbytes (1x)
1.3 Gbytes (2x)
Load time (including
spin up)
2.5 seconds (average)
2.3 seconds (average)
Unload time (including
spin down)
2.0 seconds
1.4 seconds
Reads (maximum
sustained)
1.0 Mbytes/second
.8-1.6 Mbytes/second
Writes (maximum
sustained)
.5 Mbytes/second
.4-.8 Mbytes/second
Burst
5 Mbytes/second synchronous
5 Mbytes/second
synchronous
3 Mbytes/second asynchronous
3 Mbytes/second
asynchronous
RW514/RW516/
RW534/RW536
Physical Characteristics
Rewritable
Write-once
Disk
5.25 in. diameter (130 mm)
5.25 in. diameter (130
mm)
Capacity (512-byte
sectors) (1x)
594 Mbytes (297 Mbytes/side)
(formatted)
594 Mbytes (297 Mbytes/side)
(formatted)
Capacity (512-byte
sectors) (2x)
1.2 Gbytes (formatted)
1.2 Gbytes (formatted)
Format (1x)
Continuous Composite (CC)
(ISO 10089)
CCW ISO 11560
Format (2x)
Continuous Composite (CC) (ISO
10089), ECMA 184 standard for
CC format
CCW ISO 11560,
ECMA 184 standard for
CCW format
Data transfer rate *
(512 bytes/sector)
* System and application software dependent
(continued on next page)
1–10 Introduction
Table 1–2 (Cont.) Optical Disk Library System
RW514/RW516/
RW534/RW536
Physical Characteristics
Rewritable
Write-once
Bytes per sector (1x)
512 (medium dependent)
512 (medium dependent)
Bytes per sector (2x)
512 (medium dependent)
512 (medium dependent)
Sectors per track (1x)
31 (medium dependent)
31 (medium dependent)
Sectors per track (2x)
31 (medium dependent)
31 (medium dependent)
Physical tracks per side
(1x)
18751
18751
Physical tracks per side
(2x)
21600
21600
Physical tracks per inch
(1x)
15875
15875
Physical tracks per inch
(2x)
18273
18273
Error Rate (1x)
Less
than 1 block in error per
14
bytes
Less than 1 block in error
per 14 bytes
Error Rate (2x)
Less
than 1 block in error per
14
bytes
Less than 1 block in error
per 14 bytes
Security
Write protect tab (1 per side)
Write protect tab (1 per
side)
Medium archival life
30 years
30 years
RW514/RW516/
RW534/RW536
Power Requirements
Line Voltage
100-127 VAC
200-240 VAC
Line Frequency
50-60 Hz
Power Consumption
(per library)
Maximum
475 Watts
Typical
200 Watts
Introduction 1–11
Table 1–3 RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Environmental Conditions
Autochanger
Drives
Media
Operating
10°C to 40°C
5°C to 50°C
10°C to 60°C
Non-operating
-40°C to 60°C
-40°C to 70°C
-10°C to 50°C
Temperature gradient
10°C per hour
10°C per hour
10°C per hour
Transportation (greater
than 14 consecutive
days)
-30°C to 60°C
-30°C to 60°C
Operating
10 to 90%
5 to 90%
10 to 80%
Non-operating
5 to 95%
5 to 95%
10 to 90%
Maximum wet bulb
29°C
29°C
29°C
Temperature
Humidity (noncondensing)
Shock (non-operating)
End-use, handling
10.2 cm tilt drop
test, 4 edges
Transportation (30 g
trapezoidal)
427 cm/s
Operating, no data loss
760 mm drop (to 2 mm
vinyl-covered concrete)
742 cm/s
10 g
Vibration (5-500 Hz
range)
Operating (max. accel)
0.21 g rms
0.5 g rms
Random
2.09 g rms
3 g rms
Swept Sine
0.5 g 0-peak
1 g 0-peak
>0.21 g rms
Non-operating
Altitude
Operating
4,572 m (15,000
ft)
(continued on next page)
1–12 Introduction
Table 1–3 (Cont.) RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Environmental Conditions
Autochanger
Non-operating
Drives
Media
15,240 m
(50,000 ft)
Acoustic Emissions
(A-weighted sound
power)
Power-on, standby
6.0 bels
Operating
6.5 bels
Table 1–4 RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Physical Characteristics
Library System
Ground
Packaging
Height
1847 mm (72.7
in.)
1854.2 mm (73.0
in.)
2082.8 mm (82.0 in.)
Width
651.2 mm (25.6
in.)
658.8 mm (27.0
in.)
914.4 mm (36.0 in.)
Depth
971.4 mm (38.2
in.)
1041.4 mm (41.0
in.)
1219.2 mm (48.0 in.)
w/o disks
360.0 kg (792
lbs)
375.5 kg (826
lbs)
409.0 kg (900 lbs)
with disks
392.0 kg (864
lbs)
407.5 kg (898
lbs)
441.0 kg (972 lbs)
Air Packaging
Dimensions:
Weight:
Introduction 1–13
Table 1–5 RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Service Characteristics
Parameter
Description
Mean time between failure
100,000 power-on hours
Mean swaps between failure
1,200,000
Mean time to repair
1 hour
Preventive maintenance
none required
Table 1–6 RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Product Certifications
Parameter
Description
Safety
UL 1950 listed and recognized
CSA C22.2 No. 950-M89
IEC 950
TUV approved to VDE 0805 (EN 60950)
Electromagnetic
Emissions
FCC 47 CFR Part 15 Subpart J - Level "A"
FTZ 1046/84 - Level "B"
EN 55022/CISPR 22 Level A-SABS
Laser
CDRH 21 CFR Chapter 1, Subpart J, Registered
TUV approved to VBG 93, VDE 0837
TSH Approved to Decision 472 (C1705A only)
BS 4803 Part 2 (complies)
IEC 825
United Kingdom
The HP C1704C, C1705C, C1714C, C1715C are approved under
Approval Number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect connection to Public
Telecommunication Systems within the United Kingdom.
1–14 Introduction
1.7 Related Documents
Table 1–7 Related Documents
Document Title
Part Number
Optical Library Conversion Kit Installation Guide
EK-OLCON-IG
Optical Library User’s Guide (shipped with each
unit)
EK-STSOP-UG
Optical Storage Desktop Software Installation
Guide
AA-PXYKA-TE
Optical Storage Desktop Software User’s Guide
AA-PXYLA-TE
Optical Storage Management Software
Installation Guide
AA-PXYPA-TE
Optical Storage Management Software
Installation Guide
AA-PXYQA-TE
Storage Server 100 Installation Guide
EK-D59SS-IN
Small Optical Disk Library Service Manual
EK-SOL10-SV
Medium Optical Disk Library Service Manual
EK-MOL20-SV
Storage Server 100 Optical Disk Service Manual
EK-STSOP-SV‡
Optical Disk Library System Technical Reference
Manual †
5959-3559 (GSD)
Technical Guide, Optical Drives and Libraries †
5960-7605
Optical Drive and Library SCSI-2 Command
Reference†
5960-7606
Offline Diagnostics for HP Optical Products†
5960-7626
†These documents can be ordered directly from Hewlett-Packard
‡Only for older model 10/20 Jukebox shipped with (Ninja) storage server systems
Introduction 1–15
Table 1–8 Pass Documents
Pass
Entry Number
RW5xx Hardware Pass
7174
Ninja Hardware Pass
6060
Optical Storage Management Software Pass
3731
Optical Storage Desktop Software Pass
3750
1–16 Introduction
2
Environmental/Installation/PM
This chapter provides the procedures for optical library installation.
2.1 Environmental Requirements
The following environmental requirements should be met at each site before
installation.
Note
The environmental specifications listed here apply when the disk library
is not connected to a system. When this device is connected to host
systems, the more stringent environmental specifications listed for any
single device within the host system are applicable and supersede these
specifications.
2.1.1 Operating Temperature/Clearance Requirements
The disk library is designed to operate with an ambient air temperature range of
10° to 40°C (50 to 104°F) with a rate of temperature change not to exceed 10°C
(50°F) per hour.
The area does not have to be air-conditioned but maintaining an operating room
temperature between 18°C to 24°C (65°F to 75°F) is recommended.
A minimum of 2-3 inches (70-80 mm) should be maintained behind the rear cover
of the cabinet to allow air circulation.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–1
2.2 Location Requirements
Position the drive away from sources of particulate contamination such as
frequently-used doors and walkways, stacks of supplies that collect dust, and
smoke-filled rooms. If possible, allow enough room behind the drive for access to
the rear panel and for service.
Required Site Survey/Verification site survey is required because of the weight of
this product.
This product includes one hour of site preparation and one-half hour for site
verification.
See the next section for an explanation of the weight-bearing requirements.
2.2.1 Weight Bearing Requirements
The weight-bearing rating on computer room raised floors may be as low as
100 pounds per square foot. The RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 could reach a
maximum of 130 pounds/square foot when fully loaded with disks. Therefore, to
install this product, the floor rating must meet or exceed 130 pounds per square
foot.
The unit should be located as close to a tile corner post as possible. The tiles
beneath and surrounding the unit should be solid. Special air-conditioning tiles
are not needed near the unit.
2.3 Primary Power/External Ground
The female power outlet to be used to supply AC power to the autochanger must
be checked to ensure that the proper voltage is available for the autochanger.
Table 2–1 Acceptable Voltage/Frequency
Voltage
(Nominal)
Frequency
(Nominal)
Voltage Range
Frequency Range
100 ±10%
50 ±10%
90-110
47-53
230 ±10%
50 ±10%
207-253
47-53
120 ±10%
60 ±10%
108-132
57-63
220 ±10%
60 ±5%
198-242
57-63
Also check the earth (safety) ground in the power outlet.
2–2 Environmental/Installation/PM
2.4 Installation Procedures
This section provides information on:
•
Contents of shipment
•
Uncrating and installing the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Optical Libraries
Setting up the optical disk library is the customer’s responsibility; however this
service may be contracted for on a time-and-materials basis. Setup instructions
for the disk library are in the Optical Library User’s Guide, part number
EK-STSOP-UG, which is shipped with the product.
The installation and configuration instructions are provided for situations where
the customer has arranged for this service.
Note
Before you connect the optical disk library to the host, verify that it is
supported by the host. Refer to the Product Support Plan for the most
current list of host systems which support RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536.
2.4.1 Contents of Shipment
The contents will vary depending on which unit you receive but you should
receive a crate containing the optical library, and a box, shipped separately,
labeled OPEN FIRST. Inside this box are several additional packages containing
the following:
•
READ ME FIRST instructions
•
The Optical Library User’s Guide
•
SCSI cable
•
SCSI terminator
•
Power cord
In addition to these items, to complete the installation you may need two
wrenches—a 1/2 inch wrench and a 9/16 inch wrench—and a TORX T10, T15,
T20, and T25 screwdriver (the blade is star-shaped) as well as wire cutters or a
knife.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–3
2.4.2 Uncrating the Large (RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536) Optical
Library
CAUTION
Two people are required to move the Optical Library Unit.
1. Remove packaging Materials
2. Roll the unit into position.
3. Move the shipping bracket into "operation mode" position to allow free
movement of the picker as follows: (Refer to Figure 2–1 for clarification of
these steps.)
2–4 Environmental/Installation/PM
Figure 2–1 Moving the Shipping Bracket into Operation Mode (Large Unit
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536)
ZS-0665-MH
a. Unlock and open the rear cabinet door.
b. Find the picker and the bright orange shipping bracket that secures it,
located halfway up the rail on the right side of the Autochanger.
c.
Remove the screw that secures the shipping bracket using a Torx T-15
driver.
d. Remove the shipping bracket from the picker by first pushing the bracket
back to free the end of the picker farthest away from you. Swing the
other end of the bracket to the right to free the end of the picker closest
to you.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–5
Note
Once released, the picker will glide slowly downward inside the
Autochanger until the fingers are extended to a point where they catch on
the magazines.
e.
Push the shipping bracket as far as possible into the slot in the rail
farthest away from you.
f.
Slide the bracket to the right and then pull it toward you so that the
finger on the bracket protrudes out of the hole just to the left of the slot.
(See Figure 2–1.)
g. Insert the peg on the other end of the bracket into the center hole in the
rail closest to you.
h. Insert the screw (removed earlier) into the right-most hole in the rail and
tighten.
The picker is now secured into the right-most position. This allows the picker
to move freely along the rails and carriage.
4. Shut and lock the rear cabinet door.
2.4.3 Installing the Optical Library
Attaching the SCSI Cable, SCSI Terminator, and Power Cord
To attach the SCSI cable, SCSI terminator, and the power cord. See Figure 2–2
and follow these steps:
1. Locate the SCSI cable and SCSI terminator.
2. Locate the two SCSI ports on the rear of the machine. Plug the 50-pin Champ
connector end of the SCSI cable into either port. The 50-pin Champ end is
the one housed in plastic. (The other end is a metal connector with 50 pins
and is labeled Honda.) The 50-pin Champ connector is keyed so that it only
attaches one way. Lock the wire brackets into the grooves on the sides of the
connector.
2–6 Environmental/Installation/PM
Figure 2–2 Attaching the SCSI Cable and Power Cord (Large Unit RW514
/RW516/RW534/RW536)
Power
Connector
SCSI
Connectors
68-Pin Connector
ZS-0668-MH
3. Plug the SCSI terminator into the other SCSI port.
Note
The terminator must remain plugged into the second SCSI port on the
back of the optical library.
4. Leave the 50-pin Honda end of the SCSI cable disconnected for now.
Instructions for connecting this end to your host computer may be found
in the host system documentation.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–7
5. Locate the power cord. Locate the yellow safety sticker covering the power
plug on the rear of the optical library. Pull the sticker away and plug in the
power cord.
6. Remove the clamp from the rear panel using a Torx T-10 driver. Attach the
clamp to the power cord approximately 4 to 5 inches from the end of the
power cord plugged into the optical library. Reattach the clamp.
7. Plug the other end of the power cord into an electrical outlet.
Enable Operation
To enable operation of the optical library follow these steps:
1. Close the rear cover of the optical library.
2. Position the optical library.
3. Press the white operation switch on the front of the optical library to enable
operation of the optical library system.
4. The message TESTING is displayed, and the Drive 1, Drive 2, Drive 3 and
Drive 4 lights are illuminated briefly, indicating the start of self-test. After
about a minute, all the lights on the front panel are illuminated briefly for
a lamp check, the current Rev # is displayed, and finally the READY message
is displayed, indicating successful completion of the self-test. If the self-test
fails, call your service representative.
Your optical library is now installed.
2.5 Hardware Verification
The Customer Engineer needs to verify that the optical disk library is fully
functional. To do this, the CE powers up the unit, which will invoke the poweron
diagnostic. After completion of the poweron diagnostic, the CE should run
internal diagnostics and test the autochanger mechanism and drive(s) to verify
that all functions of the optical library unit (moves, flips, reads, writes, etc.)
are operating correctly. Execute Tests 2 and 11 through 17 to accomplish final
verification (refer to Section 4.11). Verify the library and drive IDs before
connecting the other end of the SCSI cable to the host system to avoid bus
conflicts (refer to Section 3.2). Refer to the host configuration guide to complete
the installation.
2–8 Environmental/Installation/PM
2.6 Moving the Optical Disk Library
If you want to move the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 short distance, such as
to another office or to another floor in your building, see Section 2.6.1. If you
want to move the library a long distance or ship the optical disk library, see
Section 2.6.2.
2.6.1 Moving the Optical Disk Library a Short Distance
For short moves, follow these steps:
1. Unmount (unreserve) any disk surfaces from the host system, if necessary.
2. Eject all disks from the optical disk library and, if the disks were not labeled
with a storage slot location prior to inserting them into the optical disk
library, do it now.
CAUTION
Failure to eject the disks from the optical disk library prior to transport
could result in damage to the library mechanism.
CAUTION
See Section 2.2.1 before relocating the optical disk library.
CAUTION
Do not press the optical disk library operation switch to standby or unplug
the AC power cord until you are sure that the SCSI bus is inactive. Either
selecting standby mode on the operation switch or unplugging the power
cord when the SCSI bus is active can cause data loss and/or indeterminate
bus states. (Check the host system reference manuals for information on
checking the status of the SCSI bus.)
Opening the rear cabinet door automatically removes power to the optical
disk library motors. When the rear cabinet door is open, disks that are
already in a drive can be read; however, if the host issues an autochanger
command to access disks not currently in a drive, an error condition, or
host "hang" results.
3. Switch off the optical disk library.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–9
4. Remove the power cord and SCSI cable connections from the optical disk
library
5. Raise the leveler feet using a 1/2-inch open-end wrench.
6. Carefully roll the optical disk library to its new destination.
7. Connect the optical disk library to the host.
8. Re-connect the power cord.
9. Lower the leveler feet using a 1/2-inch open-end wrench.
2.6.2 Moving the Optical Disk Library a Long Distance
To move the optical disk library a significant distance, or if it must be shipped,
follow these steps.
1. Unmount (unreserve) any disk surfaces from the host system, if necessary.
2. Eject all disks from the optical disk library and, if the disks were not labeled
with a storage slot location prior to inserting them into the optical disk
library, do it now.
CAUTION
Failure to eject all disks from the optical disk library prior to transport
could result in damage to the library.
3. Run TEST 23 to position the picker for shipping.
a. Press
OPTION
b. Press
NEXT
until TEST * appears, and then press
c.
NEXT
until TEST 23 appears, and then press
Press
.
ENTER
.
ENTER
.
4. Position the optical disk library so that the rear panel is accessible and the
rear cabinet door can be opened.
5. Unlock and open the rear cabinet door.
6. Locate the bright orange shipping bracket located halfway up the rail on the
right side of the optical disk library.
7. Move the shipping bracket from its "operation mode" position ("A" in
Figure 2–3) to its shipping position ("B" in Figure 2–3) by following these
steps.
a. Remove the screw that secures the shipping latch using a Torx® T-15
driver.
2–10 Environmental/Installation/PM
b. Move the end of the shipping bracket labeled "C" in Figure 2–3, from
position "A" to position "B." (Detail "C" in Figure 2–3 is shown in
Figure 2–4.)
c.
Attach the slot in the shipping bracket to the end of the picker that is
farthest away from you.
d. Insert the peg on the other end of the shipping bracket into the left-most
hole in the rail and pull the bracket tight against the rail.
e.
Verify that the circular cut-out in the shipping bracket fits around the
protrusion on the carriage-end of the picker (adjust if necessary).
f.
Insert the screw that was removed earlier into the hole indicated in
Figure 2–3.
8. Shut and lock the cabinet rear door.
9. Remove the power cable and SCSI cable connections from the optical disk
library.
10. Have the unit repackaged and shipped in the same manner in which it was
received.
CAUTION
See Section 2.2.1 in this section before relocating this optical disk library.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–11
Figure 2–3 Positioning the Shipping Bracket
C
A
B
ZS-0663-MH
2–12 Environmental/Installation/PM
Figure 2–4 Shipping Bracket Detail
A
B
ZS-0664-MH
Before powering on the optical disk library once it has reached its destination,
move the shipping bracket back to the "operation mode" position to allow free
movement of the picker. To move the shipping bracket to the operation mode
position follow these steps:
(Refer to Figure 2–5 for clarification of these steps.)
1. Unlock and open the rear cabinet door.
2. Find the picker and the bright orange shipping bracket that secures it,
located halfway up the rail on the right side of the autochanger.
3. Remove the screw that secures the shipping bracket using a Torx T-15 driver.
4. Remove the shipping bracket from the picker by first pushing the bracket
back to free the end of the picker farthest away from you. Swing the other
end of the bracket to the right to free the end of the picker closest to you.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–13
Figure 2–5 Installing the Shipping Bracket
ZS-0665-MH
Note
Once released, the picker glides slowly downward inside the autochanger
and the fingers extend. The fingers extend to a point where they catch on
the magazine stack.
5. Secure the shipping bracket in its right-most position, which allows the picker
to move freely along the rails and carriage.
a. Push the shipping bracket as far as possible into the slot in the rail
farthest away from you.
b. Slide the bracket to the right and then pull it toward you so that the
finger on the bracket protrudes out of the hole just to the left of the slot.
(See Figure 2–4.)
2–14 Environmental/Installation/PM
c.
Insert the peg on the other end of the bracket into the center hole in the
rail closest to you.
d. Insert the screw (removed earlier) into the right-most hole in the rail and
tighten.
6. Shut and lock the rear cabinet door.
7. Connect the power cable to the optical disk library. Connect one end of a
SCSI cable to the optical disk library, and connect the other end to the host
system.
2.7 Preventative Maintenance
There is no preventive maintenance for the optical disk library, however the
optical disks may require cleaning.
Cleaning an optical disk is needed more commonly on standalone drives than
with autochangers because of the differences in their environments and usage.
Although an autochanger may be used in such a way as to make disk cleaning
necessary, it is not recommended.
To determine whether or not disk cleaning is appropriate for your customer’s
situation, see "Optical Disk Cleaning" in Chapter 4.
CAUTION
Do not attempt to clean the optical drive objective lens! Although disk
drive cleaning kits are available, they are not approved for use with the
Model RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536. Using these kits to clean the drive
in these libraries will damage the optical drive mechanism.
2.8 Service Recommendations
Since distributor system connects and operating systems are different from
site to site, it is recommended that Digital Services personnel disconnect the
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 from the host system and run internal self-tests
from the front panel.
Internal self-tests are described in Section 4.10.2. There are also offline PC-based
diagnostics (see Appendix A) which can be ordered.
Environmental/Installation/PM 2–15
Note
Once the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 is disconnected from the host,
and passes all internal selftests, the functionality of the RW514/RW516
/RW534/RW536 may be considered verified.
Refer to the RW5xx Hardware Pass Entry 7174 for further details on
support strategy.
2–16 Environmental/Installation/PM
3
Product Configuration and Operation
3.1 Front Panel and Control Panel Operations
Refer to Figure 3–1 for a view of the Optical Disk Library front panel.
Figure 3–1 Optical Disk Library Front Panel
2 Mailslot
1 Power
6
9-Character
Display
5 Status Indicators
4 Modes
3 Selection Controls
ZS-0666-MH
Product Configuration and Operation 3–1
1.
Operation
Switch
Pushed to enable or disable operation of the optical disk library.
This is not a power switch. Power is applied by inserting the
AC power cord.
2.
Mailslot
Used to insert or remove disks.
3.
Status
Indicators
Lit when the indicated activity is taking place.
4.
Selection
Control
Pressed to perform these operations:
CANCEL cancels the current operation or choice.
PREV scrolls the display choice backward by one.
NEXT scrolls the display choice forward by one.
ENTER chooses the displayed selection.
5.
Mode Buttons
Pressed to perform the desired operation.
LOAD is pressed after you place the disk in the mailslot. Once
LOAD is pressed, the display prompts you for the desired
destination inside the unit. Once you choose the location, press
ENTER . The disk loads to that location.
EJECT is pressed to remove a disk from storage in the library.
Once EJECT is pressed, the display prompts you for which disk
location to eject. Once you choose the location, press ENTER .
The disk is then brought from that location to the mailslot.
OPTION is pressed to display the current operation options
available such as TEST, INFOrmation, CONFiguration, and SCSI
ID.
6.
9-Character
Display Window
Displays information about the current operation. Generally
you press NEXT or PREV to control the selections. Once
your selection is displayed, you press ENTER . You may press
CANCEL to cancel your selection.
3.1.1 Control Panel Tips
•
Pressing OPTION a second time returns the optical disk library display to the
READY state. The OPTION key acts like a toggle.
•
Pressing
•
When selecting a number on the display, you can usually get to your selection
three different ways:
Press
CANCEL
NEXT
or
takes you back one step each time it is pressed.
PREV
to increment/decrement by one.
Hold NEXT or PREV down to increment/decrement by one at an
accelerated speed.
3–2 Product Configuration and Operation
Press
EJECT
or
LOAD
to increment/decrement respectively by tens.
For example, if one of the numbers in your password is 167, you could press NEXT
to get to that number. You could press PREV to work backwards to that number.
Or you could press EJECT or LOAD to work forward or backward to the nearest
ten (160 or 170) of that number and then press NEXT or PREV to get the exact
number.
Note
Using the LOAD and EJECT buttons to increment the display numbers by
tens won’t work if you are loading or ejecting disks.
3.2 Setting the SCSI Address
The optical disk library uses five SCSI addresses: one for each of the drives, and
one for the autochanger. All of these addresses are set through the control panel.
The default address settings are as follows:
Autochanger Controller - Address 5
Optical Disk Drive #1 - Address 1
Optical Disk Drive #2 - Address 2
Optical Disk Drive #3 - Address 3
Optical Disk Drive #4 - Address 4
If you want to change one or all of the addresses, follow these steps
1. Switch on the optical disk library if it is not already on.
2. With READY displayed, press OPTION . TEST * displays. If TEST * does not
display, press NEXT until it does.
3. Press
NEXT .
CONF * displays.
4. Press
NEXT .
INFO * displays.
5. Press
NEXT .
SCSI IDs * displays.
6. Press ENTER . AC ID with a blinking ## displays. The ## is the autochanger
controller address. If you want to change this address, press ENTER ,
otherwise continue to press NEXT until the drive number address that you
want to change is displayed, (DRV1 ID 1, DRV2 ID 2, etc.)
7. Press
NEXT
or
8. Press
ENTER
PREV
until the address you want displays.
. The address you chose is now set.
Product Configuration and Operation 3–3
9. If you want to change additional drive addresses, press NEXT until that drive
number is displayed, press ENTER , and repeat steps 7 through 9 to set the
new address.
10. Press
NEXT
until UPDATE or CONFLICT displays.
11. If CONFLICT displays, two or more drives and/or the controller have been set
to the same address and must be reset.
12. If UPDATE displays and you are satisfied with the addresses you have selected,
press ENTER .
13. Record the new address setting(s) for future reference.
CAUTION
Do not remove power to the optical disk library until you are sure that
the SCSI bus is inactive. Removing power from a SCSI peripheral when
the bus is active can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus states.
(Check the host system reference manuals for information on checking
the status of the SCSI bus.)
Opening the rear cabinet door automatically removes power to the optical
optical disk library motors. When the rear cabinet door is open, disks
that are already in a drive can be read; however, if the host issues an
autochanger command to access a disks not currently in a drive, an error
condition, or host "hang" will result.
14. Power cycle the optical disk library so the new address setting(s) will be
recognized by the host system.
Note
Power may have to be cycled on some host systems for the new address
settings to be recognized.
3.3 Setting a Configuration (CONF)
There are several ways the operations of the optical disk library can be
customized. This customization can be done by setting configurations. A list
of configurations that can be changed is given in Section 3.6.
More specific information on setting security configurations (CONF #15, 17, 20, 31
and 32) is given in Section 3.4.
3–4 Product Configuration and Operation
Follow these steps to change a configuration:
1. With READY displayed, press
OPTION
2. Press
NEXT .
CONF * displays.
3. Press
ENTER
. CONF 0 displays.
. TEST * displays.
4. Press NEXT or PREV until CONF ## displays (where ## is the configuration
number you want to change.)
5. Press
ENTER
.
6. Some configurations require a password. If prompted, enter the password.
7. Press
NEXT
8. Press
ENTER
or
PREV
until the value you want appears in the display.
once your choice displays. SET ## displays followed by CONF *.
3.4 Securing the Optical Disk Library
In its default condition, the optical disk library is unsecured. Any user can insert
or remove disks or access control panel displays, configurations, or tests. In an
open environment, some precautions should be taken to secure access to the
control panel, as well as to the following:
•
sensitive data stored on optical disk surfaces
•
configuration settings
•
diagnostic log information
If the customer is concerned about security consider the following procedures:
•
Set a new optical disk library password periodically and limit the number of
people who know the password.
•
Implement security configurations 15 and 20 which restrict disk insertion and
removal.
•
Keep the rear cabinet door locked; use the circular keys provided with the
optical disk library. (These keys are the same for all libraries but limit casual
access.)
•
Use a padlock in the area provided on the lower left of the rear door.
•
Locate the optical disk library in a physically secure environment.
Product Configuration and Operation 3–5
3.4.1 Setting a Security Code
Note
This procedure is explained in the Optical Library User’s Guide
(EK-STSOP-UG). It is presented here as information to service personnel
and in case the customer prefers this level of guidance as you set up the
optical disk library.
Note
The default factory set security code is 0-0-0. When setting a new security
code you must first key in the old security code (or default one, 0-0-0, if
none has been set) and then key in the new security code.
The customer should key in the old security code and new security code
during this procedure.
1. With READY displayed, press
OPTION
2. Press
NEXT .
CONF * displays.
3. Press
ENTER
. CONF 0 displays.
4. Press
NEXT
5. Press
ENTER
. TEST * displays.
until CONF 17 displays.
. 0 displays.
6. Enter the current security code (or the default security code, 0-0-0).
a. Press NEXT or
displays.
b. Press
c.
ENTER
until first number of old (or default) security code
. 0 displays.
Press NEXT or
displays.
d. Press
e.
ENTER
PREV
PREV
until second number of old (or default) security code
. 0 displays.
Press NEXT or
displays.
PREV
until third number of old (or default) security code
3–6 Product Configuration and Operation
f.
Press
ENTER
.
Note
If the security code was keyed in successfully, the display prompts you for
the new one. If a mistake was made in keying in the security code, NO
CONFIG briefly displays and the unit returns to the CONF 17 display.
If you realize you’ve made a mistake in keying in a security code, press
CANCEL to return to the CONF 17 option.
Note
It is a good idea for the user to write down the new security code prior to
entering it into the optical disk library.
7. Enter a new security code (user)
a. Press
ENTER
b. Press
NEXT
c.
ENTER
Press
or
d. Press
NEXT
e.
Press
ENTER
f.
Press
NEXT
g. Press
. A displays.
until first number of new security code displays.
. B displays.
or
PREV
until second number of new security code displays.
. C displays.
or
ENTER
PREV
PREV
until third number of new security code displays.
. SET 17 displays.
3.4.2 Restricting Disk Insertion and Removal
Configurations 15 and 20 act together to control disks during normal and
powerfail conditions.
•
CONF 15 - when this is set to ON, you cannot insert or remove disks without
a security code.
•
CONF 20 - when this is set to ON, the CONF 15 status is maintained
when a power fail occurs. Also, the reserved status on mounted surfaces
is maintained if the autochanger power fails.
When setting CONF 15 or CONF 20, the display prompts you for a security code.
This security code is 0-0-0 (default) or the one set by the customer using CONF 17.
Product Configuration and Operation 3–7
Follow these steps to set CONF 15 or CONF 20.
or
until CONF 15 or CONF 20 displays.
1. Press
NEXT
2. Press
ENTER
3. Press
NEXT
4. Press
ENTER
5. Press
NEXT
6. Press
ENTER
. 0 displays.
7. Press
NEXT ,
or
8. Press
ENTER
.
9. Press
NEXT
10. Press
ENTER
PREV
. 0 displays.
or
PREV
until the first security code number displays.
. 0 displays.
or
or
PREV
PREV
PREV
until the second security code number displays.
until the third security code number displays.
to select ON or OFF.
. SET 15 or SET 20 displays.
3.4.3 Controlling Mailslot Rotation
Configurations 31 and 32 allow control of mailslot rotation as described below.
(See Section 3.3.)
Note
In its default state, the optical disk library’s mailslot stays open, ready to
accept an optical disk
•
CONF 31 - when this is set to ON and CONF 15 is also set to ON, the mailslot’s
default position is closed. The mailslot cannot be opened and disks cannot
be inserted or removed until CONF 15, (requires a security code be set), is set
to OFF. Setting this configuration to ON makes it visible to the user that the
mailslot cannot be used until security configuration 15 is switched OFF.
If the optical disk library is full, the mailslot opens only for an eject command.
•
CONF 32 - when this is set to ON, the mailslot can be rotated open or closed
from the control panel or it allows the host to control mailslot rotation using a
SCSI rotate mailslot command. Pressing OPTION on the optical disk library’s
control panel displays an OPEN MS or CLOSE MS message. When the open or
close message displays, press ENTER to toggle the mailslot open or closed.
If the optical disk library is full, the OPEN/CLOSE MS is not displayed and the
mailslot opens only for an eject command.
3–8 Product Configuration and Operation
3.5 Host Configuration
Once the disk library is connected to the host system and the device address is
set, you are ready to prepare the host system to access the library. To determine
if the host you are connecting to supports the optical disk library and for further
installation information, check the following documents:
•
product support plan (available from your local Sales Support Office)
•
host system documentation
3.6 Autochanger Configuration Choices
The following table lists the available configurations choices. An explanation of
how to access and set these configurations is found in Section 3.3.
Table 3–1 Autochanger Configuration Choices
No.
Function
Default
Options
0
Clear/Save Error Log
(Information Log 0)
Save
Clear - clears the error log
immediately.
Save - saves the error log until
Clear is con figured.
8
No Break on Failure
Off
Off - if a test encounters a failure,
the test stops.
On - if a test encounters a failure,
the test continues.
10
Clear/Save Move Log
(Information Log 10)
Save
Clear - clears the move log
immediately.
Save - saves the move log until
Clear is configured.
11
Clear/Save Runtime Log
(Information Log 11)
Save
Clear - clears the runtime log
immediately.
Save - saves the runtime log until
clear is configured.
Off
On = No mailslot I/O
Off = Normal mailslot I/O
Configurations 15 - 20 require
a security code.
15
Prevent Media Removal
(security code required)
(continued on next page)
Product Configuration and Operation 3–9
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Autochanger Configuration Choices
No.
Function
Default
Options
16
Set Default Configurations
(security code required)
Save
Clear - restores default configurations immediately.
Save - maintains all set configurations.
17
Set New Security Code
(security code required)
0-0-0
18
Clear/Save Logs
(security code required)
Save
Clear - clears/zeros the specified
logs.
Save - maintains the specified logs
until clear is configured.
Clears/zeros these logs:
#4 - Drive Load Count
#5 - Poweron Hours
#9 - Move
#12 - Flip
#13 - Translate
#14 - Mailslot Rotation
Sets the number of attempts to
retry moves before giving up.
19
Set Autochanger Retries
A - Max. attempts to find home
B - Max. attempts to do move
C - Max. attempts to restore
move after failure.
20
Poweron Cartridge Security
(security code required)
Off
On - maintains the status of
configuration 15 upon power cycle
or power failure.
Off - Configuration 15 is not
maintained through a power cycle
or power failure.
21
Enable Autochanger Retries
On
On - Autochanger attempts to
correct itself when it encounters
difficulty.
Off - Autochanger does not attempt
to correct itself when it encounters
difficulty.
22
Clear Drive 1 Load Count Log
(Information Log 4)
Save
Clear - clears the Drive 1 Load
Count Log immediately.
Save - saves the Drive 1 Load
Count Log until clear is configured.
23
Same as config. 22 for Drive 2.
4
2
1
(continued on next page)
3–10 Product Configuration and Operation
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Autochanger Configuration Choices
No.
Function
Default
Options
27
Report Recovered Error
Off
On - reports the SCSI-level error to
the host.
Off - no reports of SCSI-level errors
to the host.
31
Secured Mailslot Rotation
(security code required)
Off
Off - Normal mailslot operation.
On - The mailslot rotates in when
configuration 15 is set to ON or a
Prevent Media Removal command
is received. The mailslot remains
closed until configuration 15 is
set to OFF or an Allow Media
Removal command is received.
If the autochanger is full, the
mailslot will open only for an
EJECT command.
32
Mailslot Rotation Command
(security code required)
Off
Off - Normal mailslot operation. If
the host sends a Rotate mailslot
command and config. 32 is set to
off, the host will receive a Check
Condition followed by a Sense Key
of Illegal Request.
On - When a Rotate Mailslot
command is received (either from
the host or via the control panel),
the mailslot is toggled open or
closed.
40
DEC/OEM Mode
Off
Off - Changes inquiry mode to DEC
mode. Required when connected
to a DEC computer to ensure
integrity. This changes default of
Autocontroller PCA.
On - For use with OEM computers
(HP).
41
DEC/OEM Mode
Off
Off - Changes inquiry mode to DEC
mode. Required when connected to
a DEC computer to ensure integrity.
This changes default of 1.3 Gbyte
multifunction drive only.
On - For use with OEM computers
(HP).
(continued on next page)
Product Configuration and Operation 3–11
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Autochanger Configuration Choices
No.
Function
Default
Options
50
Emulate Model 60C or 120T
Must be a Model 100C or 200T.
Security code required
Off
Off - Normal Model 100C or 200T
mode. (All 144 storage slots are
available.)
On - Emulates a Model 60C or
120T.
Reduces the number of available
storage slots from 144 to 88.
This is only used for system
integration, and should not
normally be used.
66
Zero all RAM
Save
Save - RAM remains unchanged.
Clear - Zeros all RAM locations and
reboots.
Caution - When this configuration
is set to ’’Clear,’’ the product
ID and the vendor ID are
cleared. This procedure is NOT
RECOMMENDED.
3–12 Product Configuration and Operation
4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
This chapter is divided into the following sections:
•
Operation/Installation Error Information
Lists common problems encountered during operation and installation of the
optical disk library, and gives suggestions for solving these problems (top-level
troubleshooting).
•
Control Panel Error Information
Provides error messages and log information which are available through
the front panel display. This level of troubleshooting is used when hard or
repeatable errors are encountered (intermediate-level troubleshooting).
•
Error Information through SCSI Commands
Error messages and log information available by issuing SCSI commands
via a PC-based external host computer. This level of troubleshooting is used
when soft or intermittent errors are encountered (in-depth troubleshooting).
•
Internal Diagnostic Utilities
Information about the available internal diagnostics used to aid in the
troubleshooting process.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–1
4.1 Operation/Installation Error Information
The following table lists problems that may occur during operation of the optical
disk library. If you cannot find a solution to a problem in this section, go to the
next section for more in-depth troubleshooting.
CAUTION
DO NOT CYCLE POWER during any troubleshooting until you are sure
the system SCSI bus is INACTIVE and will REMAIN INACTIVE.
Removing power while the bus is active can cause data loss and/or
indeterminate bus states. Check the host system reference manuals for
information on checking the status of the SCSI bus.
Task
Problem/Symptom
What to Do
Communicating to host
library
Can’t get host to
recognize the optical
disk library
Check to make sure the optical
disk library was installed and
configured as described in the
Chapter 2 and the appropriate host
configuration guide.
Check the SCSI connections.
Check the SCSI interface address
as it relates to the device files.
Make sure SCSI IDs of Jukebox
and MF drives do not conflict with
other SCSI devices on the bus.
Make sure software license was
correctly installed.
Make sure CONFIG 40 is set to
DEC mode. Reference Section 3.3
and Section 3.6
Changing drive
addresses
Changed drive addresses
but new address is not
recognized
4–2 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
After changing an address, the
optical disk library power must
be cycled for the address to be
recognized. The host system may
also have to be cycled for the
address to be recognized.
Task
Problem/Symptom
What to Do
Inputting security code
Security Code forgotten
or misplaced for the
optical disk library
First, try the default security code
(0-0-0). If the default security code
is not accepted, locate the four
dip switches in the center of the
controller PCA. Set switch 1 to
’’ON.’’ Power on the optical disk
library. Set switch 1 back to ’’OFF.’’
Set a new security code.
Loading disks
Disk inserted in
mailslot, but the
display reads EMPTY
or MISLOAD.
Press CANCEL and try inserting
the disk in the mailslot again.
Push the disk all the way in.
Powering On
Optical disk library
won’t power on.
Check to make sure the power cord
connections are tight.
Check to make sure the power
outlet is operating.
Replace the fuse with a new one.
Replace the power cord.
Replace the power supply module.
Power fail
Power-on self-test fails
Turn the unit off, then turn it on
again. Observe the power-on test
result. If the unit continues to
fail, use the error code to begin
troubleshooting.
Does not boot correctly.
Make sure the boot disk is ON,
spun up, and ready before applying
power to the host computer. The
autochanger and the host may then
be powered on in any order.
Just the optical disk
library power fails.
When power returns, unmount and
remount all disk surfaces. Do not
eject any disks until the surfaces
are unmounted/unreserved.
Host computer power
fails and the optical disk
library stays on.
After the host reboots, file system
check any write-mounted surfaces.
Both the host system
and optical disk library
power fail.
After the host reboots, file system
check any write-mounted surfaces.
See the previous CAUTION note.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–3
Task
Problem/Symptom
What to Do
Reading the front panel
No display messages
appear.
Check power cord connected.
Check AC input.
Check control panel cable
connections.
Replace control panel PCA.
Replace AC controller PCA.
Replace power supply module.
Reading/writing optical
disks
Can’t write to the disk.
Check the host file system access
permissions.
Check the write-protect tab on each
disk side to assure write-enabled
status.
Check to make sure the disk was
initialized.
Check that the disk file system was
mounted correctly.
Check your application software.
CAUTION
Do not eject disks from the autochanger until all mounted surfaces are
unmounted.
To prevent disks from being removed after a power failure, set
Configuration 20 (Poweron Cartridge Security) to "ON." See Chapter 3 for
an explanation of Configuration 20 and how it is set.
CAUTION
DO NOT CYCLE POWER during any troubleshooting until you are sure
the system SCSI bus is INACTIVE and will REMAIN INACTIVE.
Removing power while the bus is active can cause data loss and/or
indeterminate bus states. Check the host system reference manuals for
information on checking the status of the SCSI bus.
4–4 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Task
Problem/Symptom
What to Do
Removing Disks
Disk removal attempted,
but the storage slot
or drive location won’t
display the option.
Make sure the optical disk surface’s
file systems have been unmounted.
Disk removal attempted,
but a FULL, MISLOAD,
or RESERVE message
displays.
Remove the disk from the mailslot
and try to remove the desired disk
again. If MISLOAD still displays, it
could indicate a drive failure.
In the case of RESERVE, a
security code was set to prevent
disk removal. See Table 3–1,
Autochanger Configuration
Choices, number 15.
The unit’s power failed
while a disk was in the
drive.
Try powering on the unit. If
successful, use the file system
check command.
If power-on is unsuccessful, power
the unit off. !!Do not move the
unit.!! Moving the unit with a disk
in the drive risks damaging the
magneto-optical mechanism in the
MO drive. Refer to "Powering On"
earlier in this table.
4.2 Power-on Self-test
CAUTION
When the optical disk library is powered on and the self test is run,
the SCSI interface and the terminator must both be either connected or
disconnected.
If the controller senses that the optical drive is not connected to a host
system via the SCSI interface, additional selftests are run on the SCSI
circuitry. If these tests run while a terminator is attached, voltage levels
at the SCSI bus connector are different than expected and a self test
failure results.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–5
CAUTION
Do not switch off any peripheral on the SCSI bus without first checking
that the bus is not active.
Switching off can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus states.
To run the power-on self test, perform the following steps:
1. Insert a formatted disk into the drive either from a storage slot location or
through the mailslot/control panel.
2. Remove power from the optical disk library. Press both the power switch on
the back panel and the operation switch on the front panel.
3. Remove the disk library top cover and side panels so that you can observe the
LEDs on the front of the optical drive mechanism.
Follow the steps in Section 5.4.1, Service Access.
4. Switch on both the rear panel power switch and the front panel operation
switch, and wait for the power-on self test to complete.
Note
A failure will occur under the following circumstances:
•
if an UNFORMATTED disk is used during the test
•
if the host is not powered up and properly terminated
•
if the host is not connected and the drive is not correctly terminated.
The power-on self test will have one of the following results:
Indication
Description
The busy and the
fault LEDs turn off.
No failure has
occurred.
The fault LED
remains lit.
A failure had
occurred.
Connect the offline diagnostic tool to
determine failure.
The LEDs do not
light at all, and the
disk does not load.
There are possible
loose power
connections.
Check all power connections for the
drives.
4–6 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Further Diagnosis
4.3 Optical Disk Cleaning
Note
Cleaning an optical disk is needed more commonly on standalone drives
than with autochangers because of the differences in their environments
and usage. While the following information is therefore more applicable
to standalone drives, an autochanger may be used in such a way as to
make the following cleaning information apply. Disk cleaning for libraries
in general, however, is NOT RECOMMENDED as a normal user task.
Disk cleaning should only be done after a read/write failure or if a customer
notices a loss of autochanger performance. In addition, it must be determined
that the failure or loss of performance was not caused by a definite hardware
failure.
A failure to read a disk may result from:
•
hardware failure
•
contamination of the disk surface
•
contamination of the drive objective lens
On an otherwise working drive, check to see that the most current firmware code
level is being used and/or that all applicable service notes have been done. If so,
contamination could be a cause and cleaning may be necessary.
In the case of a read failure, cleaning might be the only way to get the customer’s
data back. In the case of performance loss, a few minutes spent cleaning may
prevent unnecessary replacement of service parts and present an opportunity to
"fix the site" and help the customer prevent contamination in the future.
The following are recommendations for preventing contamination of disks and the
disk drive:
•
Place the library away from high traffic areas.
•
Do not leave a disk in the drive for extended periods of time if possible.
•
Do not use the library in "dirty" environments such as coal mines, railroad
maintenance yards, etc.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–7
4.3.1 Cleaning Tools Available
Disks may be cleaned with the Optical Disk Cleaning Kit (C1700-88800). This kit
contains swabs and alcohol, cleaning instructions, and a special cartridge holder
that keeps the sliding sleeve open. The Optical Disk Cleaning Kit is not a Digital
stocked item. Refer to Appendix B for a list of supplies and ordering information.
Note
If the problem appeared as loss of performance and cleaning a disk solved
the problem, another couple of steps must be done to regain performance
using that disk.
As performance was declining because of read/write problems, the disk
was probably becoming fragmented through excessive "sparing." To regain
performance, the data on each side of the disk should be stored, each
side of the disk reformatted, and the data restored back on the disk.
Use either the online diagnostic DASDIAG or the offline diagnostic
DOSDASS2 to rebuild the spares table. Refer to Appendix B for a list of
parts and supplies, and ordering information.
CAUTION
Do not attempt to clean the optical drive objective lens! Although disk
drive cleaning kits are available, they are not approved for use with the
RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536. Using these kits to clean the drive in
these libraries will damage the optical drive mechanism.
4.4 Using the Eject Tool to Remove a Disk from the
Drive
The optical drive mechanism does not automatically eject a disk from the drive if
a power failure occurs. If you need to manually remove a disk from a drive with
no power, you must use the eject tool.
If you do not have an eject tool for the optical drive, you may order one of these:
•
Hewlett-Packard part number - C1701-88803
•
Marshall Industries part number - R3322
Refer to Appendix B for a list of parts and supplies.
4–8 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
You may also use a small flat-head screwdriver with the following dimensions:
Length - 50 mm
Width - 2.45 mm
Thickness - .5 mm
A disk can be removed from the drive while the drive is still secured in the
autochanger. Follow the service access procedures in Chapter 5 to access the
front of the drive mechanism, and then follow these steps to remove a disk from
the drive:
1. Disconnect all power to the drive if you have not done so already.
2. Insert the eject tool into the small round hole in the front panel of the drive.
3. Turn the eject tool in a clockwise direction (approximately 20 complete
rotations) until the disk is ejected through the front of the drive.
CAUTION
Do not reach into the drive to get the disk. Wait until the disk is ejected
through the front of the drive before removing it. Premature removal of
the disk could damage the drive.
4.5 Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel and
Observation
When there are errors in autochanger movements, two main approaches are
available to obtain information and to run execiser tests. The approach usually
depends on whether the error encountered was a hard error or whether it was a
soft or intermittent error.
•
Troubleshooting Using the Control Panel and Observation - This method is
usually used in situations where you have a hard error.
•
Troubleshooting Through the SCSI Bus - This method is used in situations
where you have a soft or intermittent error.
Error information and logs accessed through the control panel are summarized.
By knowing how the autochanger operates and using the summarized information
from the control panel display, there is enough information to troubleshoot many
problems that result in a hard error.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–9
Figure 4–1 Information and Tests Through the Control Panel
4.5.1 The Autochanger Lists the First "Possibles"
At power-on, and after every failed move, the autochanger automatically runs
an initialization sequence that comprehensively tests the autochanger. If a hard
failure occurs, a list of possible FRUs that may have been at fault is returned.
Keep in mind that these FRUs are not listed in any prioritized manner. The
Customer Engineer should visually verify the failure in progress to determine the
most likely candidate.
4–10 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Figure 4–2 The Autochanger Returns Suspect FRUs
Note
This test sequence returns possible failed FRUs only if there has been
a HARD FAILURE. The test sequence will NOT find an intermittent
failure. This test sequence, called the "FRU Isolation Test" (test 60), can
also be run from the control panel. Similarly to its automatic operation,
this test sequence only points out ("isolates") FRUs if there has been a
hard failure.
What the Autochanger Assumes
The FRU isolation test assumes the following:
•
There was a failure.
•
The cause of the failure was physical (either mechanical or in the electronics).
•
There is only one failed component. Simultaneous failures of unrelated items
are not considered possible for purposes of this test.
•
Service will be done, if necessary, if a problem is found (i.e., the unit does not
have to be left in a "clean" state).
The test takes advantage of this and does whatever is necessary to determine
the cause of the failure. Disks are not intentionally rearranged, but if the
picker starts this test with a disk in it, the position and orientation of that
disk is unknown.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–11
When an error occurs, the cause may be the power supply, cables, drive
electronics, motors, encoders, belts, gears, sensors, or picker. No assumption
is made about the integrity of any of these components. To isolate the actual
cause of the failure, a process of elimination is used.
The components are tested in a sequence that starts with the most basic functions
and builds to the more complex, and interrelating components (i.e., the motors
cannot be tested if the power supply is dead).
Whenever the initialization sequence is run, FIND HOME is attempted.If the
"home" position cannot be found, the FRU isolation test is run automatically.
When the FRU isolation test is run from the control panel, the FIND HOME
sequence is run.
4.6 How to Use the Results of the Internal Tests
Similar to treating symptoms rather than the real problem, the suspect FRUs
given by the FRU isolation test may actually mask the root cause of the problem.
The hard move error that caused the autochanger to run the FRU isolation test
may have only been a PRODUCT of the actual problem. Blindly and repeatedly
replacing the suspect FRU(s) will not solve the problem.
Figure 4–3 How Service Views the Suspect FRUs
If you consider the suspect FRU as a POINTER to the problem area rather than
the problem itself, an educated visual inspection, with perhaps some cable and
connector wiggling, should reveal the real problem.
4–12 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
A good visual inspection requires an understanding of how the autochanger acts
under normal operation. This understanding can be achieved by completing the
self-paced training for the autochanger and getting as much hands-on experience
as possible. If you are familiar with the moves of the carriage/picker assembly
during the FIND HOME sequence and you are familiar with the behavior of the
drive, you will be able to more easily detect the real problem pointed to by a
suspect FRU.
Note
The specific steps of the FIND HOME sequence and the possible errors
which may result are listed in Section 4.12.
An example:
The autochanger fails with an error code of 4D (hexadecimal), "MOTION ERROR
CHECKING FOR CARTRIDGE IN THE PICKER," and lists the picker (FRU 27)
as the most likely failure. However, when you observe the unit while running the
Wellness Test (test 2), you see that the picker is having trouble flipping. As you
manually move the carriage/picker assembly around and touch the components
that are involved, you notice that the picker belt is abnormally tight. The belt is
tight because the carriage motor is skewed.
The error (4D) and suspect FRU gave an AREA to look at when troubleshooting.
Visual inspection (concurrent with physical checks) helps to link the suspect FRU
with the root cause by providing an area to examine. In the preceding example,
the components that INTERACT with, and DRIVE the picker are examined.
The section in this chapter entitled, "Recovery Procedures for Specific Hardware
Errors," lists each error code and procedure for finding the cause of the error,
using the autochanger’s suspect FRUs as a guide. Error codes and recovery
procedures are grouped by functional area in the autochanger.
At the BEGINNING of the list of errors for each functional group, you will find
general HINTS about what areas should be checked when errors appear in that
group. Be sure to check out those hints.
4.6.1 The FRU Isolation Test Sequence
The following list traces the execution of the FRU isolation test. A failure
requires additional tests at that point to determine the actual cause. The original
sequence is not continued if a test fails.
1. Look at the error code generated by the FIND HOME sequence, some codes
may have obvious, implied FRUs. (eliminates optical sensors and their cables)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–13
2. Run autochanger controller PCA tests that do not cause host communication
(eliminates power supply, power supply cables, ROMs, RAM, motor control
IC, and microprocessor)
3. Check that the motors are capable of moving by attempting to move them
very small distances in both directions. (eliminates motor assemblies (except
belts), motor cables, PCA drivers)
4. Pull picker fingers back. They should come to a hard stop. (eliminates all
picker belts, picker belt tensioner)
5. Move carriage/picker assembly toward the drive. It should come to a hard
stop. (eliminates the carriage belt)
6. Move carriage/picker assembly away from the drive. The move has to be
far enough to be certain that the leadscrew can move, but not so far that
a jammed cartridge will cause the test to fail. (eliminates the carriage
leadscrew assembly)
If the FRU isolation test has been run from the front panel, the FIND HOME
sequence will automatically be executed at this point.
7. At this point, there is some level of confidence that the system is capable of
moving the carriage/picker assembly. Using the new information learned by
running these tests, look at the error codes, the move ID that failed, and how
the recovery system failed.
4.7 Information Logs
The optical disk library control panel diagnostic tests have two major purposes.
The first is to provide diagnostic information that can lead to early detection of
an autochanger problem. The second is to provide fault isolation tests.
All the logs are maintained within non-volatile RAM, and so are not affected by
cycling autochanger power. These logs are accessible from the control panel by
using the INFO option. For a list of information log selections, see Table 4–6.
4.7.1 Procedure
To display information about the autochanger (e.g., the error log or move success
log), follow these steps.
1. With the Autochanger power on and in the READY state, press
displays.
2. Press
NEXT
until INFO * displays.
3. Press
ENTER
.
4–14 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
OPTION
. TEST *
4. Press
NEXT
or
5. Press
ENTER
PREV
until the desired log number is displayed.
. The log information will be displayed.
Note
Some logs will display more information when
NEXT
Press
log.
ENTER
CANCEL
to stop the INFO display. Press
or
PREV
is pressed.
to choose another
4.8 Recovery from Hardware Errors
When a hardware failure occurs, a message is displayed on the control panel.
If the failure occurs during the power-on sequence, FAIL 1 is displayed. If the
failure occurs at some other time, MISLOAD or FAIL 0 is displayed. If a failure
occurs while you are running a test, FAIL # is displayed, where # is the number of
the test that failed.
When you press ENTER , the autochanger displays information about the
hardware failure.
The autochanger firmware can detect broken components such as a dead motor,
a missing belt, etc., but if failures are due to marginal or random problems, the
failing component may induce errors in other components. For example, if any
portion of the electronics becomes intermittent or if friction increases on a part,
different components of the autochanger may appear to fail at varied points as
the autochanger runs its code. This results in many different error codes.
Additional explanation of some hardware error codes follows the table of
hardware error codes and recovery procedures.
Note
Instructions for running internal diagnostic tests are given in
Section 4.10. A list of the available test choices and their descriptions are
given in Section 4.11.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–15
4.8.1 Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Table 4–1 shows the hardware error codes possible and recovery procedures for
specific hardware errors. In all cases, if you run a test, and no error occurs,
monitor for reoccurrence. If the error repeats, use the list of suspect FRUs logged
by the FRU isolation test as a guide to determine the problem. Replace the
FRU(s) as necessary.
Some error codes require further explanation; see the section immediately
following Table 4–1.
4–16 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–1 Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
Error
Recovery Procedures
00
No error
No action.
AUTOCHANGER CONTROLLER PCA ERRORS
The first step is to make sure
autochanger pca cables are seated
in their connectors.
01
ROM Checksum Error
Run test 31—ROM Checksum Test – verify
failure.
03
RAM Test Error
Run test 33—RAM Test—verify failure.
04
Microprocessor Test
Error
Run test 30 – Microprocessor Operation
Test—verify failure.
05
Controlled Area of RAM
Checksum Error
Recycle Power—verify failure.
06
Illegal interrupt seen by
microprocessor
Same as for error code 05
07
Illegal CPU exception
seen by microprocessor
Same as for error code 05
09
Firmware Error
Run test 3—Controller Test—(may not be
able to duplicate).
If error repeats –
Run configuration 16—resets default
values. Recycle power.
If error repeats – run Configuration 66
- Zeros all RAM locations and reboots.
CAUTION - When this configuration is set
to "Clear," the product ID and vendor ID
are cleared and the code must be reloaded
from the host.
If error repeats –
Replace autochanger controller PCA (FRU
01). Power-on—check fix.
SCSI INTERFACE-SPECIFIC ERRORS
Visual inspection is not possible for
errors 0B to 13.
0B
SCSI Controller Register
Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–17
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
Error
Recovery Procedures
0C
SCSI Controller IC’s
RAM Failed
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
0D
SCSI Controller
Message Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
0E
SCSI Controller
Command Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
0F
SCSI Controller Kill
Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
10
SCSI Controller FIFO
Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
11
SCSI Controller Target
Sequence Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
12
SCSI Controller
Command Sequence
Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
13
SCSI Controller Status
Sequence Error
Run test 34—SCSI Interface Controller
Chip Test—verify failure.
LOOPBACK ERRORS
CAUTION: SCSI Loopback Test 41 will
always fail when the SCSI repeater PCA
is installed. All RW514/RW516/RW534
/RW536 libraries are shipped with the SCSI
repeater PCA.
18
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DBO
or I/O
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
19
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB1
or C/D
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
1A
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB2
or MSG
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
1B
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB3
or REQ
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
(continued on next page)
4–18 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
Error
Recovery Procedures
1C
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB4
or ACK
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
1D
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB5
or ATN
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
1E
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB6
or SEL
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
1F
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DB7
or BSY
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
20
SCSI Connector
Loopback Error in DBP
or RST
Run test 41—SCSI Connector Loopback
Test (using loopback connector 8878060095)—verify failure.
MOTOR CONTROL IC ERRORS
Visual inspection is not possible for
errors 2C to 2E.
2C
Failed read/write test to
motor control IC
Run test 36 – Motor Control Chip Test—
verify failure.
2D
Motor Control Loopback
Test failed
Run test 36 – Motor Control Chip Test—
verify failure.
2E
Motor Control IC RAM
Test failed
Run test 36—Motor Control Chip Test—
verify failure.
POWER SUPPLY ERRORS
Visually check the power cables and
connections.
33
Low Voltage Power
Supply failed
Run test 40—Power Supply Test—verify
failure.
If error repeates - measure 12 V (see
Figure 5–13, (2)) - measure at 4-prong
Molex® that connects to J81 on mother
PCA.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–19
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
34
Error
Recovery Procedures
High Voltage Power
Supply failed
Run test 40—Power Supply Test—verify
failure.
If error repeates - measure 24 V (see
Figure 5–13, (4)) - measure at 4-prong
Molex® that connects to J81 on mother
PCA.
DRIVE CONNECT ERRORS
On error codes 38 and 39 be sure to check:
•
drive cabling
good contacts
no cut or exposed wires
•
drive tray not skewed
38
Drive 1 not connected
Run test 37—Drive Connector Test—verify
failure.
39
Drive 2 not connected
Run test 37—Drive Connector Test—verify
failure.
3A
Drive 3 not connected
Run test 37—Drive Connector Test—verify
failure.
3B
Drive 4 not connected
Run test 37—Drive Connector Test—verify
failure.
MECHANISM ERRORS
Check carriage/picker for free motion.
The carriage should travel easily
along the rails; you should be able
to smoothly translate the picker along
the carriage. The picker should also
flip easily by pulling the picker belt.
3C
Unspecified failure
Run test 11—Autochanger Mechanism
Exercise Test. On error—go to error code in
this table.
3E
Unspecified servo failure
Run test 11—Autochanger Mechanism
Exercise Test—verify failure.
(continued on next page)
4–20 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
40
Error
Recovery Procedures
Unable to free picker
fingers for carriage
motion
Check the picker, mailslot, and
magazine for loose labels or other
obstructions.
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence.
41
Unable to verify picker
is at home position
(non-leadscrew side)
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
42
Unable to find home
position; Path-Clear
sensors blocked
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
43
Unable to clear PathClear sensors by moving
picker fingers back
Check drive and magazine for loose lables
or other obstructions.
44
Carriage motion failure
during Find Home
sequence
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
45
Unable to free picker
fingers for translate
motion
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
46
Carriage motion failed
while initializing Home
position (during Find
Home)
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence – verify
failure.
47
Translate failed while
moving toward nonleadscrew side during
Find Home sequence
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence – verify
failure.
48
Carriage motion failed
during carriage/picker
assembly calibration
(leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
49
Carriage motion failed
during carriage/picker
assembly calibration
(non-leadscrew side)
Run test 51 – Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–21
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
Error
Recovery Procedures
4A
Motion error while
determining orientation
of the picker
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
4B
No sensor found
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence – verify
failure.
4C
Failed flip motion during
Find Home sequence
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
4D
Motion error checking
for cartridge in the
picker
Run test 50—Find Home Sequence—verify
failure.
4E
Unable to measure
height of sensor on the
leadscrew side
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
4F
Unable to measure
height of sensor on
non-leadscrew side
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
50
Excessive tilt of the
carriage/picker assembly
(away from the drives)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration – verify failure.
Check the optical sensors, if necessary.
51
Excessive tilt of the
carriage/picker assembly
(toward drives)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
52
Excessive cone angle on
picker
Run test 51 – Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
53
Excessive stack tilt
Run test 51 – Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
54
Unable to complete an
interrupted move (at
power-up)
Check the optical sensors, if necessary.
Check the optical sensors, if necessary.
55
Unable to find top of
unit
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure.
If test 60 shows an error code, look up the
hardware error code in this table and follow
the recovery procedures for that error.
Run test 51 – Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
(continued on next page)
4–22 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
Error
Recovery Procedures
EXERCISER TEST ERRORS
56
Need to issue Initialize
Status command
No FRUs failed. Run test 10 to initialize
the element status.
57
Invalid test configuration
No FRUs failed. Check cartridge
configuration. Check that the cartridge
configuration (number and location) are
correct for the test you are doing.
59
Exerciser unrecovered
error
No FRUs failed. Exerciser had an
unrecovered error. Rerun exerciser. If
exerciser fails again, access the recovery
log. Recovery log is available only through
the SCSI interface. Use the DOSDASS2
utility available through Hewlett-packard.
Refer to Appendix B for order information.
5A
Invalid test configuration (elements reserved)
No FRUs failed. Can’t do the selected test
on a reserved cartridge. Check cartridge
reservations. Rerun the test.
5B
Initialize Element
Status command failed
No FRUs failed. The initialization of an
element status failed. Rerun initialization.
If initialization fails again, access the
recovery log. Recovery log is available
only through the SCSI interface. Use
the DOSDASS2 utility available through
Hewlett-packard. Refer to Appendix B for
order information.
5C
Shipping diagnostic
run with cartridges in
autochanger mechanism
No FRUs failed. Shipping warning. Take
all disks out of the optical drives.
CALIBRATION SENSOR SYSTEM ERRORS
60
Optical sensor failed
(leadscrew side)
Run test 51 – Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
61
Optical sensor failed
(non-leadscrew side)
Run test 51 – Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
62
Optical sensor failed
(leadscrew side near
mailslot)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–23
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
63
Error
Recovery Procedures
Optical sensor failed
(non-leadscrew side near
mailslot)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
PATH-CLEAR SENSOR SYSTEM ERRORS
64
Intermittent path-clear
sensor beam (leadscrew
side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
65
Intermittent pathclear sensor beam (nonleadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
66
Path physically blocked
(leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
67
Path physically blocked
(non-leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
6B
Path-clear LED failed
(leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
6C
Path-clear LED failed
(non-leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
6D
Path-clear sensor failed
(leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
6E
Path-clear sensor failed
(non-leadscrew side)
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
6F
Path-clear sensor system
failed
Run test 51—Carriage/Picker Assy
Calibration—verify failure.
MAILSLOT/STORAGE SLOT ERRORS
Check for loose labels or other
obstructions in errors that involve
the mailslot (B0-B2).
B0
Mailslot will not rotate
Run test 17—Mailslot I/O Test—verify
failure.
B1
Inside mailslot sensor
failed
Run test 17—Mailslot I/O Test—verify
failure.
B2
Mailslot will not accept
or release cartridge
Run test 17—Mailslot I/O Test—verify
failure.
(continued on next page)
4–24 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Error Code
(hex.)
Error
Recovery Procedures
Check for loose labels or other
obstructions in errors B3 and B4.
Also, make sure that the magazines are
not skewed.
B3
Storage slot will not
accept or release
cartridge
Run test 15—Storage Slot Test—verify
failure.
B4
Outside mailslot sensor
failed
Run test 17 – Mailslot I/O Test—verify
failure.
DRIVE ERRORS
The autochanger only checks for
the PRESENCE of a drive. To run
complete drive tests requires an
external diagnostic.
On drive error codes, check all cabling
to/from the drive
no broken wires
no worn cables
no loose connections
Check the drive tray.
B8
Drive 1 access error
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
B9
Drive 2 access error
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
BA
Drive 3 access error
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
BB
Drive 4 access error
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
DRIVE EJECT ERRORS
BC
Drive 1 access failure
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
BD
Drive 2 access failure
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
BE
Drive 3 access failure
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
BF
Drive 4 access failure
Run test 16—Drive I/O Test – verify failure.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–25
Table 4–1 (Cont.) Hardware Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
FRU DETECTION TEST ERRORS
Check carriage/picker for free motion.
The carriage should travel easily
along the rails; you should be able
to smoothly translate the picker across
the carriage.
You should be able to easily flip the
picker using the picker belt.
C8
Unable to gain proper
servo control of motors
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
C9
Unable to move picker
motor
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
CA
Unable to move carriage
motor
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
CB
Unable to move either
motor
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
CC
Unable to find a hard
stop while turning the
picker motor
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
CD
Unable to find a hard
stop while turning the
carriage motor
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
CE
Excessive force needed
to move the carriage
leadscrew
Run test 60—FRU Isolation Test—verify
failure. Replace the FRUs if necessary.
MISCELLANEOUS ERROR Codes
FA
Invalid switch
configuration
FB
Door interlock open
FC
The test can not be run
from the SCSI interface
FD
The test can only be run
from the SCSI interface
FE
The test did not run
FF
Invalid test number
4–26 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Probably a configuration error
4.8.2 Additional Explanation of Some Hardware Error Codes
Error Code
Explanation
05
Controlled area of RAM checksum error.
All of the RAM on the autochanger controller board has battery backup, but not all of it needs to be retained upon power loss. The portion
of the RAM which needs to be valid at poweron is referred to as
"controlled RAM." The stored checksum is re-calculated on this area
every time the "controlled RAM" is modified. The checksum is verified
by Test #32. Error 05H is returned any time the calculated checksum
does not match the stored checksum. To reset the checksum, clear
Configuration 16 using the control panel and switch the autochanger
off and on again.
This error is deemed to be so unacceptable that all autochanger
function is halted. The motors are turned off and the SCSI bus is
not accessed.
09
Firmware error
There are three conditions where this code is used, case statement
which falls through, stack overflow, divide by zero
In case 1, the error code is returned over SCSI to the host. In cases 2
and 3, the motors shut down, the processor halts.
43-4C
See "The FIND HOME sequence" in Section 4.12 for a thorough
explanation of the Find Home test.
50
Excess upward droop on picker.
51
Excess downward droop on picker.
"Droop" is the distance between where the end of a perfectly
perpendicular picker (in relationship to the carriage) would be, and
where the end of this picker is MEASURED to be. If the picker droops
down too far, it will not be able to engage the mailslot correctly. It will
first engage the translate pin and move across, rather than out.
52
Excessive cone angle on picker.
If the sum of the upward droop on one side of the picker plus the
downward droop on the other side of the picker is too great for proper
operation, this error is returned.
53
Excessive stack tilt.
The height of each side of the autochanger, or "stack", is the height
of each of the two sensors. Tilt is the measure of the difference of the
heights of the sides. If the tilt is too great for proper operation, this
error is returned.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–27
Error Code
Explanation
54
At power up, unable to complete an interrupted move.
If a move was interrupted by a power failure, at the next poweron
the autochanger will attempt to return the library to the state it
was in before that command was issued. This error is returned if
all the poweron tests pass, but the autochanger is unable to put the
cartridge(s) back.
B8-BF
Drive Errors.
Errors B8 through BB appear when a drive cannot come to a READY
state.
Errors BC through BF appear if there is a problem either inserting or
ejecting a cartridge. These errors also occur when either the drive eject
mechanism has failed or the drive eject-control solenoid will not allow
the cartridge to come out and be grabbed by the picker.
C8
Unable to close the loops on the motors.
When this error occurs, the FRU Isolation code has already confirmed
that the motors and encoders appear functional. But, for some reason,
the servo system is unable to initiate proper control. This condition is
rare.
CC
Unable to find a hard stop while turning the picker motor.
CD
Unable to find a hard stop while turning the carriage leadscrew motor.
The FRU Isolation code checks for the presence of the belts by turning
the motors until the mechanical system hits something. These errors
are returned if the motors continue to spin longer than the maximum
expected distances.
4–28 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4.9 Error Information Through SCSI Commands
Troubleshooting through the SCSI bus is used in situations where you encounter
a soft or intermittent error. Using data on the SCSI bus, you can determine
exactly what the autochanger was doing when a failure occurred; all the way
down to the macro-move and micro-moves. Also, through the Log Sense and
Request Sense commands, you can gather information on the optical drives;
which cannot be done through the control panel.
Figure 4–4 Information and Tests Through the SCSI Bus
Refer to the following information when troubleshooting through the SCSI bus:
•
Request Sense Command Tables - located in Appendix A.
These tables show error information and information about the state of the
autochanger after an error has occurred, which is returned when a Request
Sense command is issued through the SCSI bus.
•
Log Sense Command Tables - located in Appendix A.
These tables show the error and move information which is stored in various
logs during autochanger operation and when running internal diagnostics.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–29
4.10 Diagnostics
Several diagnostic programs and tests are available for the optical disk library.
This section provides information on how to run these tests/programs or where to
find this information.
The main types of diagnostics available for the disk library are internal
diagnostics. These tests are run from the control panel and are divided into
four groups: sequence tests, exerciser tests, electronic core tests, and mechanism
core tests. These tests are fully explained in Section 4.11.
4.10.1 Offline Diagnostics
A diagnostic utility called DOSDASS2 is available from Hewlett-Packard for
accessing the optical disk library through the SCSI bus.
DOSDASS2 fully exercises either standalone multifunction optical drives or
optical disk libraries that contain multifunction optical drives. Information for
obtaining DOSDASS2 is found in Appendix B of this manual.
4.10.2 Internal Diagnostic Tests
An extensive set of diagnostic tests are available for the optical disk library.
Except for the poweron sequence test, the running of tests is not automatic. The
operator may initiate each test from the control panel.
A test is actually a sequence of separate tests that are called and run in series.
Each test exercises a specific portion of the autochanger. Each test is identified
by a test number that is requested when the test is to be run. Tests return either
PASS or FAIL.
All the tests are combined into groups of similar functions.
Sequence Tests (1 - 9) execute sequences of individual tests within the range of
Test 10 through Test 69. Sequences may be used to either test many portions of
the autochanger or as an autochanger exerciser. When a sequence test is selected,
the autochanger executes the tests in sequence until an error occurs or until the
sequence successfully completes.
Exerciser Tests (10 - 29) do simple autochanger mechanism moves to check out
elementary functions.
Electronics Core Tests (30 - 49) run basic tests of the controller PCA.
Autochanger Mechanism Core Tests (50 - 70) run basic tests of the autochanger
mechanism. These tests make combinations of moves that can help to detect the
source of failures.
4–30 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Section 4.11 contains a complete listing and description of these diagnostic tests.
Instructions for running these tests are provided in the following paragraphs.
Procedure for Running Tests
To display test information and to choose tests to execute, access the TEST option
by follow ing these steps:
1. With the optical disk library power on and in the READY state, press
TEST * displays.
2. Press
ENTER
3. Press
NEXT
OPTION
.
. TEST 0 displays.
or
PREV
until the test number you want shows in the display.
4. Press ENTER to choose the test. ONCE displays. You may accept ONCE by
pressing ENTER or press NEXT or PREV to choose 10, 100, 1000, or LOOP
times. LOOP runs the test continuously until CANCEL is pressed or the unit is
powered off.
Note
Any test may be stopped, at any time, by pressing
stop the test after it completes its current activity.
5. Once you have pressed
RUN nn displays.
ENTER
CANCEL
. The unit will
for the number of times the test will repeat,
6. At this point the test runs. If no problems are encountered, the message PASS
nn displays. You may press OPTION to get back to the READY state; or, you
may press ENTER or CANCEL to run another test.
7. If a problem occurs during the test, the message FAIL nn displays. Press
ENTER to gain information about the failure. An ERROR nn displays. The error
log stores the FRU information, TEST nn information, and a time stamp.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–31
4.11 Diagnostic Test Command Descriptions
The following is a description of the diagnostic test commands. Sequences may
combine both exercisers and tests.
4.11.1 Sequence Tests
Table 4–2 Sequence Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
1
Poweron
Checks all digital data paths and normal machine
operation. This test runs the same sequence of TESTS
as when initiated by an actual power on, but does NOT do
all operations (see below).
Sequence Order:
3 - Controller Test
40 - Power Supply Test
– Motor Connection Test (no number)
5 - Initialize Mechanism
46 - Board Configuration
– Restore (if needed). If power failed in the middle
of a move, the autochanger tries a "restore" of the
last move. The autochanger tries to put the cartridge
back to where it came from. This attempt could fail
(Poweron sequence would fail). POWERON ONLY.
10 - Initialize Element Status (if needed).
38 - "Light Show" in the indicators of the control
panel.
– Mailslot rotation (if not secured). This rotation
could fail(Poweron sequence would fail). POWERON
ONLY.
2
Wellness Test
Checks out the general capability of the autochanger.
Needs one loaded cartridge; drives and mailslot empty.
(continued on next page)
4–32 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–2 (Cont.) Sequence Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
3
Controller Test
This sequence is run by the autochanger controller at
poweron to check out all paths, and operation of the servo
motor and autochanger circuitry.
Sequence Order:
30
31
33
32
34
36
35
31
33
32
34
36
35
31
33
32
34
36
35
37
5
Initialize
Mechanism
-
Processor Test
ROM Checksum Test
Non-Destructive RAM Test
RAM Checksum Test
SCSI Interface Controller IC Test
Motor Control IC Test
Multi-Function Peripheral IC Test
ROM Checksum Test
Non-Destructive RAM Test
RAM Checksum Test
SCSI Interface Controller IC Test
Motor Control IC Test
Multi-Function Peripheral IC Test
ROM Checksum Test
Non-Destructive RAM Test
RAM Checksum Test
SCSI Interface Controller IC Test
Motor Control IC Test
Multi-Function Peripheral IC Test
Drive Connect Test
Prepares the unit for movement.
Sequence Order:
Initialize RAM variables to defaults
50 - Find Home
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–33
Table 4–3 Exerciser Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
10
Initialize Element
Status
Does the same function as the SCSI Initialize Element
Status command. It physically scans the entire unit to
determine which storage slots and drives have disks.
11
Mechanism
Exercise Test
Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL result.
This exerciser is a sequence of other exerciser tests—12,
13, 14, 15, 16, and 17. This exerciser returns an error code
#57H Invalid Configuration if there are no cartridges
loaded into the unit, or if any drive is full. Needs one
loaded cartridge.
12
Carriage/Picker
Move Test
Moves the carriage/picker assembly the full length of the
rails with the picker on first one side, then the other.
Returns PASS/FAIL. No cartridges are required.
13
Translate Test
Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL
result. It does several translations from various starting
positions. No cartridges are required.
14
Flip Test
Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL result.
It does several flips at various locations. No cartridges are
required.
15
Storage Slot Test
Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL result.
It moves a cartridge from a randomly-chosen full to a
randomly-chosen empty slot, with a random flip. It then
moves the cartridge back to its original storage slot with
its original orientation. This exerciser returns an error
code 57H, Invalid Configuration, if there are no
cartridges loaded into the unit or if all storage slots are
full. Needs one loaded cartridge.
16
Drive I/O Test
Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL result.
It moves a cartridge from a randomly-chosen full slot to
a drive, with a random flip. It then moves the cartridge
back to its original slot with its original orientation. It
does this once for each optical drive. Returns an error
code 57H, Invalid Configuration, if there are no
cartridges loaded into the unit or if any drive is loaded.
Needs one loaded cartridge; drives must be empty.
(continued on next page)
4–34 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–3 (Cont.) Exerciser Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
17
Mailslot I/O
Makes a combination of moves with a PASS/FAIL
result. It moves a cartridge from the lowest-numbered
full slot to the mailslot with a random flip. It then
moves the cartridge back to its original slot with its
original orientation. Returns error code 57H, Invalid
Configuration if there are no cartridges loaded into the
unit or if the mailslot is full. Needs one loaded cartridge;
mailslot must be empty.
18
Speed Factor
Setting Utility
Allows the setting of the speed factor as the first
parameter given. The speed factor determines how fast
the system moves the mechanics. The number provides
1/Parameter speed (e.g., Parameter=3 runs the motors at
1/3 of full speed). This test can only be run from the
SCSI Interface.
19
Zero Maximum
Force Log
The maximum force log is initialized to all zeros.
20
Set Speed Factor to
Full Speed
Allows the mechanics to be run at full speed.
21
Set Speed Factor to
Half Speed
Allows the mechanics to be run at half speed.
22
Set Speed Factor to
Quarter Speed
Allows the mechanics to be run at quarter speed.
23
Shipping
Moves the picker to the appropriate position for
preparation for shipping.
24
Fill Picker
Moves a cartridge into the picker from the first storage
slot.
25
Empty Picker
Moves a cartridge from the picker to the first empty
storage slot.
26
Zero Runtime Log
The entire runtime log is initialized to all zeros.
27
Set Minimum
Retries
This sets the number of retries to 1. This may be set to
see if the chosen test is doing what you want it to do.
After you are satisfied that the test is what you want,
run test 28 which resets the number of retries to default
values.
28
Set to Default
Number of Retries
Resets the number of retries to powerup default values.
Used after setting retries to 1 by test 27.
29
Zero Error Log
Zeroes the Error Log.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–35
4.11.2 Electronic Core Tests
Table 4–4 Electronic Core Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
30
Microprocessor
Operation Test
Does a functional check of the microprocessor. This test
must shut down the servo system; a Initialize Mechanism
Test is run when this test finishes.
31
ROM Checksum
Test
Does a checksum verification of the ROM.
32
RAM Checksum
Test
A checksum of the "Controlled" area of RAM is kept on a
continuous basis. This test verifies that the checksum is
still valid.
33
Non-Destructive
RAM Test
Tests all the controller’s RAM, checking for data
acceptance and retention. The test is non-destructive
to RAM unless interrupted by power failure. To run
correctly, this test must shut down the servo system; as
a result, a Initialize Mechanism Test runs when this test
finishes.
34
SCSI Interface
Controller Chip
Test
Checks out operations of the SCSI interface controller
chip. This test will not be run if initiated via SCSI, it
reports PASS.
35
Multi-Function
Peripheral Chip
Test
Tests the functionality of the Multi-Function Peripheral
chip. It verifies the timer by comparing it to he CPU clock
and tests RS-232 capabilities with an on-chip loopback.
36
Motor Control Chip
Test
Exercises the registers of the motor control IC. To run
correctly, this test shuts down the servo system.
37
Drive Connect Test
Checks for expected drive configuration. This is done by
polling the drive connect signal on each of the possible
drives. This line is grounded at the drive end if a drive is
connected. If the drives physically connected do not match
the expected configuration, then an error is reported.
38
Control Panel Light
Show
Lights each portion of the display individually and then
together. No feedback; always passes.
39
Control Panel
Button Check
Displays the name of the button pressed. Press CANCEL
twice to exit.
40
Power Supply Test
Looks at both the 12-Volt and the 24-Volt pow that they
are within limits. The limits for the 12V supply are 11V
and 13V and the 24V supply limits are 23.5V and 25.5V.
(continued on next page)
4–36 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–4 (Cont.) Electronic Core Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
41
SCSI Connector
Loopback Test
(interactive)
Runs a loopback through SCSI connectors, checking
proper operation of the SCSI drivers, receivers, and cables.
Requires an external loopback hood with terminator
power. Will not run if initiated via SCSI; if so, it reports
error FCH Test Did Not Run.
42
Optical Sensor Test
(and Mailslot)
(interactive)
Checks the status of the two optical sensors. Also checks
the Mailslot sensor (see test 43). Three "0"s are placed on
the control panel display; one at the left position in the
display, one in the middle of the display, and one at the
right position in the display. The mark is an open zero
if the sensor is not blocked, and a zero filled in with lit
segments if a sensor is blocked. No FRU is returned.
43
Mailslot Sensor
Test (and Optical
Sensor)
(interactive)
See description for test 42.
50
Find Home
Sequence
Moves the picker to a known "home" spot. This test
assumes nothing about the state of the mechanics. The
"home" location is at the lower left position of the box. The
servo system is initialized to the "home" location. It then
automatically runs test 51.
51
Carriage /Picker
Assembly
Calibration Test
Runs the portion of the mechanism recalibration related
to the optical sensors. It measures sensor offsets and
calculates picker tilt and droop. This test assumes that
the mechanics and servo system are functional.
60
FRU Isolation Test
Assumes that something has physically failed, either
electronic or mechanical. A series of special low level tests
are run to select the three (or fewer) FRUs that are most
likely to be at fault. Tests 30, 31, 33, 35, 36, 40, and 50
are executed as a part of the isolation process. Returns an
error code, three suspect FRUs in decreasing order of fault
probability, and a time stamp.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–37
Table 4–4 (Cont.) Electronic Core Tests
No.
Test Name
Description
65
Calibrate
Magazines
Calculates a min/max clearance for a magazine. (The
selected magazine should be empty.) The autochanger
requires a disk in the mailslot. The test passes if
clearance is 85 encoder counts (1 mm) up and down.
(See info 23 for actual values.)
If this test is run by SCSI command, set Byte 1 to the
magazine number. (Model 60C contains 11 magazines;
Model 100C contains 18 magazines.) The test returns:
PASS or FAIL.
66
Clear Magazine
Offset
Clears the value calculated in test 65.
67
Calibrate Mailslot
Calculates an offset for the Mailslot. The Autochanger
requires a disk in the Mailslot.
68
Clear Mailslot
Offset
Clears the value calculated in test 67.
70 74
Reserved
For design/production use only.
75
UPS Test
Tests whether or not the UPS is connected properly.
The test returns PASS if connected properly, FAIL if
the UPS is not connected properly or if there is no UPS
connected.
76 80
Reserved
For design/production use only.
4–38 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4.12 The FIND HOME Sequence
The following FIND HOME sequence executes all the motions used in normal
autochanger operation. Understanding the motions explained here, and the likely
errors during these motions, should help you diagnose problems that may be
occurring in the unit you are working on.
Each large movement in the FIND HOME sequence is called out, along with
the micro-moves that formed this movement (given by Micro-move ID Numbers,
MMID# n..n). If there is a problem during a movement, the most likely hardware
error is listed.
Figure 4–5 shows the sequence graphically. The numbers of the following steps
correspond to the numbers on the diagram.
Note
When running the FIND HOME sequence, you will be able to see what
the mechanism was attempting when an error occurred by setting
RETRIES to 1 (Test 27). When limited to a single execution, the
autochanger is prevented from entering any error recovery sequences.
Note
If you want to examine movements more closely, set the speed to half or
quarter speed (Test 21 or Test 22).
Error numbers are in hexadecimal notation.
1. Lock loops. (MMID# 82)
a. Possible error:
C8–Unable to gain proper servo control of the motors
2. Clear the picker of any obstructions that would prevent carriage/picker
movement. (MMID# 62 to 67)
a. Possible error:
40–Unable to free the picker fingers in preparation for carriage motion.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–39
Figure 4–5 The ‘‘FIND HOME’’ Sequence
Sensor
26
20 21 22
23 24 25
Sensor
27 28 29
30
31
32
Leadscrew
19
1 2 3 4
5
6 7 8
Home
Position
9
10 11 12
13 14
16 17 18
Sensor
15
Rear View
4–40 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Sensor
Note
These steps are repeated, in order, until all pass or until any four failures
accumulate. If four failures occur, the errors are diagnosed to three FRUs
and a hardware error code is reported.
3. Clear an area large enough to enable a flip to take place. (MMID# 4B to 4F)
a. Possible error #1:
44–Carriage motion failure during the Find Home sequence.
b. Possible error #2:
66–Path physically blocked (leadscrew side)
c.
Possible error #3:
67–Path physically blocked (non-leadscrew side)
4. Initialize the picker fingers by pulling the fingers back to a hard stop.
(MMID# 4F, 50, 60, 2)
a. Possible error:
45–Unable to free the picker fingers in preparation for translate motion.
5. Initialize the carriage/picker position by moving it toward the drive-end of the
unit until it hits a hard stop. (MMID# 2, 49, 4A)
a. Possible error:
46–Carriage motion failed while initializing Home position during Find
Home sequence.
6. Find the non-leadscrew side of unit. (MMID# 47, 48)
a. Possible error:
47–Translate failed while moving toward the non-leadscrew side during
the Find Home sequence.
7. Verify the non-leadscrew side of the unit. (MMID# 5D, 1)
a. Possible error #1:
61–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near drives)
b. Possible error #2:
66–Path physically blocked (leadscrew side)
c.
Possible error #3:
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–41
67–Path physically blocked (non-leadscrew side)
d. Possible error #4:
41–Unable to verify that the picker is at the home position during Find
Home sequence (non-leadscrew side)
8. Initialize the picker fingers by pulling the fingers back to a hard stop.
(MMID# 4F, 50, 60, 2)
a. Possible error:
45–Unable to free the picker fingers in preparation for translate motion.
9. Translate to the leadscrew side. (MMID# 2, 4, E, 10)
a. Possible error:
4A–Motion error while determining the orientation of the picker.
10. Find the picker side. (MMID# 1, 56, 2)
a. Possible error #1:
4A–Motion error while determining the orientation of the picker.
b. Possible error #2:
60–Optical Sensor failed (leadscrew side - near drives).
11. Calibrate the downward-facing picker tab against lower leadscrew-side sensor.
(MMID# 5D, 5E, 1)
a. Possible error #1:
48–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(leadscrew side).
b. Possible error #2:
60–Optical sensor failed (leadscrew side - near drives)
12. Flip the picker. (MMID# 2, 8, C, 3, A, 9)
a. Possible error:
4C–Failed flip motion during Find Home sequence.
13. Calibrate the downward-facing picker tab against the lower leadscrew - side
sensor.
a. Possible error:
48–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(leadscrew side).
4–42 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
14. Verify the picker side. ( MMID# 1, 2, 56)
a. Possible error #1:
60–Optical sensor failed (leadscrew side - near drives)
b. Possible error #2:
4A–Motion error while determining the orientation of the picker
15. Translate to the non-leadscrew side. (MMID# 1, 4, E, 11)
a. Possible error:
49–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(non-leadscrew side)
16. Calibrate the downward-facing picker tab against lower non-leadscrew - side
sensor. (MMID# 5D, 5E, 1)
a. Possible error #1:
61–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near drives
b. Possible error #2:
49–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(non-leadscrew side)
17. Flip the picker. (MMID# 2, 8, C, 3, A, 9)
a. Possible error:
4C–Failed flip motion during Find Home sequence.
18. Calibrate the downward-facing picker tab against lower non-leadscrew - side
sensor. (MMID# 5D, 5E, 1)
a. Possible error #1:
61–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near drives
b. Possible error #2:
49–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(non-leadscrew side)
19. Go to the top of the unit. (MMID# 1)
a. Possible error:
4A–Motion error while determining the orientation of the picker
20. Verify the picker side. (MMID# 2, 56, 5C, 15, 13)
a. Possible error #1:
4A–Motion error while determining the orientation of the picker
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–43
b. Possible error #2:
63–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near mailslot)
21. Find the top hard stop. (MMID# 5C, 15, 13)
a. Possible error:
55–Unable to find top of unit
22. Calibrate the upward-facing picker tab against upper non-leadscrew - side
sensor. (MMID# 5D, 5E, 3)
a. Possible error #1:
63–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near mailslot)
b. Possible error #2:
49–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(non-leadscrew side)
23. Flip the picker. (MMID# 2, 8, C, 3, A, 9, 1)
a. Possible error:
4C–Failed flip motion during Find Home sequence.
24. Calibrate the upward-facing picker tab against upper non-leadscrew - side
sensor. (MMID# 5D, 5E, 3)
a. Possible error #1:
63–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near mailslot)
b. Possible error #2:
49–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(non-leadscrew side)
25. Verify the picker side. (MMID# 56, 2, 3)
a. Possible error #1:
4A–Motion error while determining the orientation of the picker
b. Possible error #2:
63–Optical sensor failed (non-leadscrew side - near mailslot)
26. Translate to the leadscrew side. (MMID# 2, 5, 12, 14)
a. Possible error:
48–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(leadscrew side).
4–44 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
27. Calibrate the upward-facing picker tab against upper leadscrew-side sensor.
(MMID# 5D, 5E, 3)
a. Possible error #1:
62–Optical sensor failed (leadscrew side - near mailslot)
b. Possible error #2:
48–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(leadscrew side).
28. Flip the picker. (MMID# 2, 8, C, 3, A, 9, 1)
a. Possible error:
4C–Failed flip motion during Find Home sequence.
29. Calibrate the upward-facing picker tab against upper leadscrew-side sensor.
(MMID# 5D, 5E, 3)
a. Possible error #1: 62–Optical sensor failed (leadscrew side - near mailslot)
b. Possible error #2:
48–Carriage motion failed during carriage/picker assembly calibration
(leadscrew side).
30. Translate to the non-leadscrew side. (MMID# 1, 5, 12, 15, 6)
a. Possible error:
4D–Motion error while checking for a cartridge in the picker
31. Test for a cartridge in the picker. (MMID# 2, 44)
a. Possible error:
4D–Motion error while checking for cartridge in the picker.
32. Initialize the mailslot. (MMID# 2, 3F, 3 B, 3D, 3E)
a. Possible error:
B0–Mailslot will not rotate
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–45
4.13 Micro-Move Reference Table for Viewing FIND
HOME Sequence
Table 4–5 RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Micro-Move ID Table
Move ID
(hex)
Description
0
No motion; no commands pending
1
Carriage motion; full speed (away from drives)
2
Full speed finger motion
3
Carriage motion ; full speed (toward the drives)
4
Carriage motion; to seat the translate pin (toward the drives)
5
Carriage motion; to seat translate pin (away from drives)
6
Push fingers toward end of picker; during full speed carriage motion (away
from drives)
7
Push fingers toward end of picker; during full speed carriage motion (toward
drives)
8
First move in flip sequence (picker leadscrew up)
9
First move in flip sequence (picker leadscrew down)
A
Verify flip complete
C
Flip during carriage motion (away from drives)
D
Flip during carriage motion (toward drives)
E
Translate (at bottom)
10
Prepare for carriage motion after translate (leadscrew side; bottom)
11
Prepare for carriage motion after translate (non-leadscrew side; bottom)
12
Translate (at top)
13
Slow motion at top to verify hard stop during translate
14
Prepare for carriage motion after translate (leadscrew side; top)
15
Prepare for carriage motion after translate (non-leadscrew side; top)
16
Move fingers toward storage slot with intent to grab cartridge
17
Detect disk in storage slot before grab and during Initialize Element Status
18
Take up the slack in the fingers before grabbing the cartridge
(continued on next page)
4–46 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–5 (Cont.) RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Micro-Move ID Table
Move ID
(hex)
Description
19
Pull cartridge back from storage slot
1A
Push cartridge forward into storage slot
1B
Detect cartridge in storage slot after insert
1C
Pull fingers back from storage slot after releasing cartridge
21
Move fingers toward drive; prepare to grab cartridge
22
Carriage shake; to assist cartridge ejected from the drive to slide into the
picker.
23
Move fingers toward drive with intent to grab cartridge
24
Pull cartridge back from drive
25
Insert cartridge into drive until slider engages
26
Move cartridge toward the drive using short steps; look for the drive to accept
the cartridge
27
Drive failed to accept the cartridge; pull cartridge back
28
Drive accepted cartridge; release cartridge and pull fingers back
29
Detect a cartridge in the drive with cartridge in the picker
2A
Move cartridge in and out of the picker during test for cartridge in the drive
2B
No motion; waiting for drive to eject the cartridge
2C
Move fingers toward mailslot; with intent to grab the cartridge
2D
Detect cartridge in the mailslot before grab
2E
Take up the slack in the fingers before grabbing the cartridge
2F
Pull cartridge back from the mailslot
30
Carriage motion during mailslot insert
31
Push cartridge forward into the mailslot
32
Carriage motion; during mailslot insert
33
Detect cartridge in the mailslot after insert
34
Pull fingers back from mailslot after releasing cartridge
35
Carriage motion toward actuator arm before pulling mailslot in
36
Rotate the mailslot inward
37
Rotate the mailslot when rotational position unknown
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–47
Table 4–5 (Cont.) RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Micro-Move ID Table
Move ID
(hex)
Description
38
Verify that rotation of the mailslot inward is complete
39
Release tension on the mailslot rotate arm
3A
Move leadscrew tab toward mailslot actuator arm before pulling mailslot in
3B
Carriage motion toward actuator arm where mailslot is engaged before
pushing mailslot out
3C
Rotate the mailslot outward
3D
Verify that the rotation of the mailslot outward is complete
3E
Release tension on the mailslot rotate arm
3F
Move leadscrew tab to mailslot actuator arm before pushing mailslot out
41
Move cartridge in or out during test for a cartridge in storage slot
42
Move fingers in or out during test for a cartridge in storage slot
44
Check for a cartridge in the picker; same motion is used to check for a
cartridge in mailslot or storage slot when picker contains a cartridge
45
Insert cartridge into the drive, after slider has engaged
47
Slowly translate at bottom to the non-leadscrew side in the FIND HOME
sequence
48
Short carriage motion after finding non-leadscrew side of machine (away from
drives)
49
Carriage motion toward drives; looking for hard stop in the FIND HOME
sequence
4A
Short carriage motion away from drives after hard stop
4B
Slow carriage motion toward drives; finding room to flip in FIND HOME
sequence
4C
Carriage motion away from drives when room to flip is found
4D
Slow carriage motion away from drives; finding room to flip in FIND HOME
sequence
4E
Carriage motion toward drives when room to flip is found
4F
Slow flips during FIND HOME sequence
50
Push fingers slowly out of picker after flips in FIND HOME sequence
51
Check for picker short belt in FRU isolation tests
(continued on next page)
4–48 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–5 (Cont.) RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536 Micro-Move ID Table
Move ID
(hex)
Description
56
Carriage motion away from drives to determine which side of picker faces the
top
5C
Slow carriage motion away from drives; measuring distance to the top
5D
Long carriage motion during height sensor measurements
5E
Short carriage motion during height sensor measurements
60
Short carriage motion toward drives after finding picker finger position during
FIND HOME sequence
62
Slow carriage motion away from drives during error recovery
63
Slow carriage motion toward drives during error recovery
64
Slow carriage motion away from drives during error recovery
65
Slow carriage motion toward drives during error recovery
66
Slow finger or cartridge motion out of picker; used during error recovery
67
Slow finger or cartridge motion into picker; used during error recovery
81
Check for long picker belt in FRU isolation tests
82
No motion; servo-locking the motors
4.14 Information Logs
The logs listed in Table 4–6 are accessible from the control panel by using the
INFO option.
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–49
Table 4–6 Information Logs (INFO Logs)
No.
Log Name
Description
0
Autochanger Error
Log
The autochanger maintains a time-stamped history of
past diagnostic test errors that have occurred within the
autochanger. The error message maintained for each error
indicates the failure and the possible Field Replaceable
Units (FRUs) that may have caused the failure.
Displays as follows:
Err n y - nth error; actual error code
FRU A - suspect FRU #1
FRU B - suspect FRU #2
FRU C - suspect FRU #3
Test n - test that failed
abcdefgh - time stamp
1
Firmware Version
Number
Displays the current autochanger firmware version
number.
2
Element Status
Displays the status (empty or
autochanger element.
full) of the selected
Displays three numbers:
First Number = Element number
0 = picker
1 = drive 1
2 = drive 2
3 = drive 3
4 = drive 4
10 = mailslot
11 - 98 = storage slots (RW514)
11 - 154 =storage slots (RW516)
Second Number = Element type
1
2
3
4
=
=
=
=
picker
storage slot
mailslot
drive
Third Number = Data mask
00 = empty
01 = full
(continued on next page)
4–50 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–6 (Cont.) Information Logs (INFO Logs)
No.
Log Name
Description
3
Software Clock
Displays the current "count" in seconds of the software
clock. (hexadecimal)
4
Drive Load Count
Displays the number of cartridge loads for drive 1, 2, 3 or
4.
5
Poweron Hours
Displays the number of hours the unit has been powered
on.
The term Move
used in Logs 6 - 10
means SCSI-level
moves by the picker
mechanism.
6
Current Move
Success Count
Displays the number of successful moves since the most
recent autochanger failure.
7
Move Success
Average
Displays the average of the values in Log 10 - Move
Success Log.
8
Current Move
Retry Count
Displays the number of move retries done since the most
recent autochanger failure.
9
Total Move Count
Displays the total number of moves and move attempts.
10
Move Success Log
Contains the number of successful moves that have
occurred without a failure. Each time a failure occurs,
the number of good moves is entered into the log and a
new count is started. This INFO display shows the most
recent 10 (or less) entries in the log. This log also shows
the retry counts corresponding to each log entry.
Example (2 displays for each entity):
1
33482
3
First display: 1 = entry number and
33482 = number of moves
Second display: 3 = number of retries
11
Display Runtime
Log
Flashes to each display until CANCEL is pressed.
A - Moves done
B - Retries
C - Automatic recoveries
D - Hard errors
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–51
Table 4–6 (Cont.) Information Logs (INFO Logs)
No.
Log Name
Description
12
Display Flip Count
Displays total number of picker flips.
13
Display Translate
Count
Displays total number of picker translates.
14
Display Mailslot
Rotation Count
Displays total number of mailslot rotations.
15
Number of Drives
Displays the number of disk drives in the unit.
16
Drive #1 SCSI
Address
Displays drive #1’s SCSI address.
17
Drive #2 SCSI
Address
Displays drive #2’s SCSI address.
18
Drive #3 SCSI
Address
Displays drive #3’s SCSI address.
19
Drive #4 SCSI
Address
Displays drive #4’s SCSI address.
20
Sensor Height
Displays the measured height of the picker sensor.
(hexadecimal)
21
Picker Cone Angle
Displays the measured picker cone angle from the nominal
position. (hexadecimal)
The cone angle is the sum of the upward droop on one side
of the picker plus the downward droop on the other side of
the picker.
22
Stack Tilt
Displays the measured stack tilt of the box. (hexadecimal)
The height of each side of the autochanger, or "stack", is
the height of each of the two sensors. Tilt is the measure
of the difference of the heights of the sides.
23 41
Minimum
Clearance
Minimum clearance for cartidge insertion into a magazine
or mailslot. Up/down clearance is as calculated by Test 65
and Test 67. Up clearance/down clearance (hexadecimal)
Example:
00DC 0028 = 220, 40
FFEC 0014 = -20, 20
Note: The autochanger contains either 11 or 18
magazines, depending on the option ordered.
23
Mailslot
(continued on next page)
4–52 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Table 4–6 (Cont.) Information Logs (INFO Logs)
No.
Log Name
24
Magazine 1
25
Magazine 2
26
Magazine 3
27
Magazine 4
28
Magazine 5
29
Magazine 6
30
Magazine 7
31
Magazine 8
32
Magazine 9
33
Magazine 10
34
Magazine 11
35
Magazine 12
36
Magazine 13
37
Magazine 14
38
Magazine 15
39
Magazine 16
40
Magazine 17
41
Magazine 18
Description
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 4–53
5
Removal and Replacement
5.1 Field-Replaceable Assemblies
The optical disk library contains the following major assemblies:
•
multifunction optical drive mechanism
•
mailslot assembly
•
power supply
•
front panel assembly
•
leadscrew assembly
•
picker/carriage assembly
•
autochanger controller
5.2 ESD Precautions
The optical disk library contains very sensitive electrical components. It is
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT that you follow the proper procedures for preventing
ESD (Electrostatic Discharge). Use wrist-grounding straps, anti-static mats, and
anti-static work stations when removing and replacing the major assemblies.
CAUTION
Failure to follow proper procedures could lead to intermittent failures
and/or premature hard failures in the disk controller and mechanism.
Removal and Replacement 5–1
5.3 Tools Required
The following tools are needed to service the optical library:
#1 and #2 Pozidriv® magnetized screwdrivers
T-10, T-15, T-20 and T-25 Torx® drivers
5/32 hex wrench (ball tip, at least 4 inches long)—front door
1/8 hex wrench (ball tip, at least 6 inches long)—picker motor
diagonal cutting pliers
needle-nosed pliers
flatblade screwdriver
5.4 Assembly/Disassembly Procedures
CAUTION
Do not press the optical disk library system operation switch or unplug
the AC power cord until you are sure that the SCSI bus is inactive.
Either pressing the operation switch or unplugging the power cord when
the SCSI bus is active can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus
states. (Check the host system reference manuals for information on
checking the status of the SCSI bus.)
Opening the rear cabinet door automatically removes power to the optical
disk library system motors. When the rear cabinet door is open, disks
that are already in a drive can be read; however, if the host issues an
autochanger command to access a disk not currently in the drive, an error
condition, or host "hang" results.
CAUTION
If you will be working on or around the disk magazines, record the slot
location and orientation of each cartridge to make sure that the disks can
be restored to their original positions if moved.
Always return disks to their original slot and orientation before returning
control back to the customer. Serious loss of system integrity will result if
this practice is not followed.
5–2 Removal and Replacement
5.4.1 Service Access
WARNING
DO NOT disassemble the drive mechanisms. The magneto-optical drive
mechanisms in the library system become Class 3B laser mechanisms
when disassembled. If a drive is disassembled, exposure to the invisible
laser beam and hazardous invisible laser radiation could result in
blindness.
Note
A drive that has been disassembled will not be accepted as an exchange
assembly.
5.4.1.1 Opening the Rear Door
Requires a service key
Note
The rear door may be secured with a lock added by the customer . You
may have to contact the system administrator to remove the lock.
Removal and Replacement 5–3
Figure 5–1 Rear Panel Keyholes and Locking Bracket
1
2
1. SEE CAUTION AT BEGINING OF CHAPTER.
2. Remove power from the autochanger by switching off the operation switch
and then unplugging the optical disk library from line power.
3. Request that the customer remove the lock on the rear door (if necessary).
See Figure 5–1 (1) for the location of the lock bracket.
5–4 Removal and Replacement
4. Open the rear door using an access key. Each of the two latches have to be
turned approximately 1/2 turn counterclockwise (Figure 5–1 (2)).
Note
Opening the rear door removes power from the carriage/picker mechanism
of the library system because the door safety interlock switch is opened.
5. If you need power applied to the optical disk library while having the rear
door opened, depress the interlock button and insert a pencil or tool (C17056078) into the mechanism as shown in Figure 5–2.
Figure 5–2 Door Interlock Button
WARNING
While working inside the unit with the interlock activated, remove the
power cord.
Removal and Replacement 5–5
CAUTION
When power is removed, the carriage/picker drifts down toward the
bottom of the rails. As it drifts down, the picker fingers extend and finally
catch on either the edge of a cartridge or the edge of a storage slot.
When the picker fingers are supported this way, it is possible to damage
them if the carriage is struck during service.
You can allow the picker/carriage assembly to slide all the way to the
bottom of the rails (and out of your way) by pulling the picker leadscrew
back and then moving the carriage down. The picker flips once as you
move it down, but this is normal.
5.4.1.2 Removing the Rear Door
1. Pull the release pin on the top hinge down (you do not have to pull it all the
way out, just far enough to clear the hinge). It is held in place by a springloaded ball on the end of the pin. You may want to jiggle the pin a little as
you pull down to decrease the force necessary to pull it out.
2. Raise the door slightly and tilt it away from you until the door clears the
hinge, then lift it up and remove it.
Note
The plastic bushing on the lower hinge may become dislodged and fall out
when you remove the door.
Be sure to replace this bushing before replacing the door.
5–6 Removal and Replacement
5.4.1.3 Opening the Front Door
Requires a long, 5/32-inch hex wrench.
Loosen the front panel latches by turning them counterclockwise. It may take
several turns to release the spring-tensioned latch.
the top latch is behind the TOP hole
the bottom latch is behind the BOTTOM hole of the second panel up from the
bottom (Figure 5–3).
Figure 5–3 Front Door Latch Holes
Removal and Replacement 5–7
5.4.1.4 Removing the Front Panel PCA
Requires a T-15 driver.
1. Remove power from the optical disk library by switching off the operation
switch and then unplugging the optical disk library from line power.
2. Open the front door (see Section 5.4.1.3).
3. Disconnect the ground cable. (Figure 5–4, (1)).
4. Disconnect the RS-232 cable, the address cable, and the PCA power cable
(Figure 5–4, (3),(4),(5)).
5. Remove the two screws holding the plastic shield and remove the shield
(Figure 5–4, (2)).
6. Remove the remaining three screws that mount the PCA to the front door.
Figure 5–4 Front Panel PCA Mounting
1
5
3
2
4
5–8 Removal and Replacement
5.4.1.5 Removing the Lower Rear Panel
Requires T-15 and T-25 drivers
1. Remove power from the optical disk library by switching off the operation
switch and then unplugging the optical disk library from line power.
2. Remove the external SCSI cable(s) and the external UPS cable, if present.
3. Remove the electronics shield.
a. Loosen the two screws in the keyhole openings on the electronics shield.
b. Remove the remaining two screws.
c.
Lift off the electronics shield.
4. Remove the flat SCSI ribbon cable from the top connector on the controller
board.
5. Remove the red and black power cable from the SCSI repeater PCA and the
cable clamp. (See Figure 5–6, (2) in the next procedure).
6. Remove the internal UPS cable from the interconnect board at the front of
the autochanger. Unlatch the three cable clamps that route the cable to the
lower rear panel, and remove the UPS cable from the clamps.
7. Remove the two screws that hold the lower rear panel to the Power Supply
(Figure 5–5, (1)).
8. Loosen the five screws in the keyholes around the perimeter of the lower rear
panel (Figure 5–5, (2)).
9. Lift the panel up and away.
Removal and Replacement 5–9
Figure 5–5 Lower Rear Panel
5–10 Removal and Replacement
5.4.2 Removing the SCSI Repeater PCA
Requires a T-15 driver.
1. Remove the lower rear panel as explained in Section 5.4.1.5.
2. Remove the 4 screws that hold the PCA onto the rear panel.
Figure 5–6 Lower Rear Panel and SCSI Repeater PCA
Note
If you have to remove the internal UPS cable, use a T-10 driver to remove
the two screws.
Make sure the termination jumpers on a replacement SCSI repeater PCA
match the settings on the PCA just removed. The location of the jumpers
is shown in Figure 5–6, (1).
Removal and Replacement 5–11
5.4.3 Removing the Power Supply
Requires a T-15 driver.
1. Remove the lower rear panel. (See Section 5.4.1.5.)
2. Remove the five cables to the power supply (Figure 5–7, (1) to (5)).
Figure 5–7 Power Supply Connections
5–12 Removal and Replacement
3. Remove the two power supply mounting screws (Figure 5–8).
Figure 5–8 Power Supply Mounting Screws
4. Lift the power supply out using the handle shown in Figure 5–7.
Removal and Replacement 5–13
5.4.4 Removing the Leadscrew Motor
Requires a T-25 driver and 1/8 hex wrench.
CAUTION
DO NOT CHANGE THE POSITION OF THE FACTORY-SET SPRINGLOADED TENSION ADJUST SCREW (Figure 5–9, (1)).
1. Remove the 3 cables connected to the leadscrew motor.
2. Remove the leadscrew belt tension on the leadscrew motor.
a. Loosen the T-25 Torx screw on the leadscrew motor (Figure 5–9, (2))
b. Loosen the 1/8 hex pivot screw on the leadscrew motor (Figure 5–9, (3))
c.
While rotating the leadscrew motor against its tension spring, slip the
leadscrew belt off the pulley on the leadscrew motor.
Figure 5–9 Leadscrew Motor Mounting and Leadscrew Belt
3
2 1
3. Remove the leadscrew motor:
a. Remove the T-25 screw (with washer), on the leadscrew motor.
b. Remove the 1/8 hex screw on the leadscrew motor.
c.
Remove the leadscrew motor.
5–14 Removal and Replacement
5.4.5 Removing the Leadscrew/Leadscrew Motor Drive Belt
Requires T-15 and T-25 drivers and 1/8 hex wrench.
1. Remove the leadscrew motor (see Section 5.4.4.)
2. Remove the leadscrew:
a. Remove the two T-15 screws holding the leadscrew nut to the carriage
bracket.
b. Remove the three T-25 screws holding the top leadscrew mounting
bracket. (Figure 5–10)
3. Free the top leadscrew mounting bracket by pushing it down slightly (it
is spring-loaded) and then pulling it away from the frame. The leadscrew
assembly may then be pulled up and out of the lower bearing assembly.
Figure 5–10 Leadscrew Top Bracket Mounting
T25
Screws
Note
When you reconnect the power cables to the motor, make sure you connect
black to black and red to red.
If you are going to replace the leadscrew bearing components, refer to
Figure 5–11.
Removal and Replacement 5–15
If you are going to replace the leadscrew motor belt, install the new belt
and reassemble.
Figure 5–11 Leadscrew Lower Bearing Assembly
5–16 Removal and Replacement
5.4.6 Removing the Picker Motor and/or Picker Motor Drive Belts
Requires a T-25 driver and 1/8 hex wrench. The 1/8 hex wrench should be at
least 6 inches long.
1. Detension and remove the long picker belt (Figure 5–12).
Figure 5–12 Applying Pressure to Detension the Long Picker Belt
Insert a screwdriver UNDER the belt and press the tension release plate
down. When the screwdriver is placed under the belt, you have enough room
to remove the belt while holding the tension release plate down.
CAUTION
DO NOT CHANGE THE POSITION OF THE FACTORY-SET SPRINGLOADED TENSION ADJUST SCREW (Figure 5–13, (1)).
Removal and Replacement 5–17
Figure 5–13 Picker Motor Mounting
1
2
3
2. Remove the 3 cables connected to the leadscrew motor.
3. Loosen the T-25 Torx screw on the picker motor mount (Figure 5–13, (2)).
4. Loosen the 1/8 hex pivot screw on the picker motor mount (Figure 5–13, (3)).
Insert a long (at least 6-inch) wrench through the cutout in the frame.
5. While rotating the picker motor counterclockwise against the tension spring,
slip the picker motor drive belt off the shaft pulley.
If you are going to remove the picker motor drive belt –
6. Remove the two T-25 screws from the lower pulley assembly and remove the
assembly (Figure 5–14).
7. Remove the drive belt.
5–18 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–14 Picker Belt Transfer Assembly and Mounting Screws
Note
When you replace the dual pulley, thread the long belt underneath the
small pulley and wrap the picker drive belt around the large pulley. Be
sure the picker drive belt does not get caught under the plate when you
tighten down the plate.
Removal and Replacement 5–19
5.4.7 Removing the Carriage/Picker Assembly
Requires a T-15 and a T-25 driver, and a 7/64 hex wrench.
1. Position the carriage somewhere near the middle of the magazine stack.
2. If possible, pull out an optical cartridge a short distance to act as a temporary
rest. The picker also may be supported by a screwdriver, etc. placed in the
magazine stack.
3. Detension the long picker belt.
4. Remove the two T-15 screws holding the carriage to the leadscrew mounting
bracket. (These two screws were sealed with Loctite®.)
Note
Let the leadscrew mounting bracket assembly drift down to the bottom of
the leadscrew.
5. Remove the leadscrew. See Section 5.4.5.
6. Remove the carriage assembly from the rails.
a. Using a 7/64 hex wrench, remove the top and bottom bearing blocks on
the right side of the carriage (leadscrew side).
b. Rotate the carriage assembly horizontally and pull it through the rails.
5.4.8 Removing the Sensor Transmitter PCA
Note
Be careful not to drop parts into the bottom of the autochanger during
this procedure. The screws, plastic cover, and PCA can easily be dropped
if you are not careful.
Requires a T-25 driver.
1. Loosen the four screws on the plastic cover.
2. Remove the plastic cover.
3. Remove all connections to the PCA.
2 optical sensor cables
5–20 Removal and Replacement
1 mailslot cable
1 transmitter cable (ribbon cable)
4. Loosen the screw in the slot edge of the PCA (the edge closest to you).
5. Remove the two screws holding the PCA to the top casting and remove the
PCA.
5.4.9 Removing the Sensor Receiver PCA
Requires a T-25 driver.
1. Remove the cover.
a. Remove the two screws holding the rear of the cover (nearest the drives).
See Figure 5–15, (1).
b. Loosen the two screws holding the front of the cover in keyholes
(Figure 5–15, (2)).
c.
Slide the cover toward you and lift it away.
Removal and Replacement 5–21
Figure 5–15 Sensor Receiver PCA Cover
2. Disconnect all cables to the PCA (Figure 5–16, (1) to (3))
2 optical sensor cables (#1)
1 transmitter cable (small ribbon cable) (#2)
1 interconnect cable (larger ribbon cable) (#3)
3. Remove the four screws holding the PCA to the casting.
5–22 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–16 Connections to the Sensor Receiver PCA
5.4.10 Removing the Autochanger Controller PCA
Requires a T-25 driver.
1. Access this PCA by following the procedures in Section 5.4.1.1 and
Section 5.4.1.5.
2. Remove all cables connected to the autochanger controller PCA.
3. Remove the screw holding the metal PCA mounting plate to the frame
(Figure 5–17). Slide the PCA away from the frame.
Removal and Replacement 5–23
Figure 5–17 Autochanger Controller PCA Mounting
4. Verify that the dip switches onthe new autochanger controller PCA are set as
shown in ***new figure, new tables***.
Note
The non-volatile RAM on the autochanger controller PCA MUST BE
INITIALIZED after firmware is changed or a new PCA is installed.
•
set the default configurations—run CONF 16; ‘‘CLEAR’’ option
•
cycle power
•
initialize the status of the elements—run Test 10
See Section 5.5.1 for the values that are affected by CONF 16.
5–24 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–18 Dip Switch Locations on the Autochanger Controller PCA
Switch 2
Switch 1
M-2264-6
Table 5–1 S1 Switch Settings
Position
Description
Default
1
SCSI Address Switch 1 (LSB) must be set to the
default setting to avoid conflict with front panel
address selection.
OFF
2
SCSI Address Switch 2 must be set to the default
setting to avoid conflict with front panel address
selection.
OFF
3
SCSI Address Switch 3 (MSB) must be set to the
default setting to avoid conflict with front panel
address selection.
OFF
4
Defines RS-232 output as either front panel
control or extended error information output.
Only the default setting is supported.
OFF
Removal and Replacement 5–25
Table 5–2 S2 Switch Settings
Position
Description
Default
1
If set to ON, configurations are cleared at each
power up (equivalent to setting configuration 16).
OFF
2
Disables PLL synch monitoring. Switch 2 must
be set to the default setting for normal operation.
OFF
3
Causes motors to lock at poweron, preventing the
find home sequence to run. First move attempt
after power on will fail. Switch 2 must be set to
the default setting.
OFF
4
When set in conjunction with switch 1, clears
configurations 16 and 18.
OFF
Note
Switches 1 and 2 are for factory use only and must remain in the default
settings.
5–26 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–19 Autochanger PCA Connectors/Components
1
2
3
12
4
5
6
11
7
10
8
9
Connector/Component #
Connector/Component #
1 power in
7 to interconnect PCA
2 to door interlock
8 ROM sockets
3 motor control (power)
9 lithium battery
4 motor control (functions)
10 RS-232 to control panel
5 power in
11 single-ended SCSI connector
Removal and Replacement 5–27
Connector/Component #
Connector/Component #
6 to sensor receiver PCA
12 cooling fan power
5.4.11 Removing the Cooling Fan Assembly
Requires a T-25 driver.
1. Remove the fan power cord (Figure 5–20, (1)).
2. Remove the shielded SCSI cable (Figure 5–20, (2)).
3. Remove the screw at the top of the fan plate (Figure 5–20, (3)).
4. Pull back and then lift up.
5. Disconnect the SCSI ribbon cable connected to all drives. (See Figure 5–21,
(1).)
6. Remove the fan mounting plate along with the fan.
5–28 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–20 Cooling Fan Panel Mounting
5.4.12 Removing the Optical Drives
Requires T-10 and T-25 drivers.
1. Follow the steps in Section 5.4.11 to removing the cooling fan assembly.
2. Remove the drive power and interface cables from the drives on the drive tray
that you want to remove. Stow them out of the way. See Figure 5–21, (2),
(3).
interface cable (#2)
Removal and Replacement 5–29
power cable (#3)
Figure 5–21 Drive Cabling and Mounting on the Drive Tray
3. Remove the two T-25 screws that are in the brackets that secure the drive
trays (1 bracket on each side of the trays). (Figure 5–21, (4)).
4. Pull the drive tray(s) out.
Note
If there is a cartridge in the optical drive, remove it by inserting the
eject tool (C1708-88803) in the hole on the front of the drive, turning it
clockwise until the cartridge ejects. For instructions, refer to Section 4.4.
For tool order information, refer to Appendix B.
5. Turn the drive tray over (drives down) and use a T-10 screwdriver to remove
the four screws that hold the drive(s) you are changing.
5–30 Removal and Replacement
5.4.13 Removing the Optical Sensors
Note
If the picker is in the way, raise the carriage to the middle of the
magazine stack, then pull out an optical cartridge a short distance so
the picker can rest on the cartridge. The picker also may be supported by
a screwdriver, etc. placed in the magazine stack.
Requires a T-15 and a T-25 driver.
1. Remove the black lower shield:
a. Remove the two T-25 screws closest to the sensors (Figure 5–22, (1)).
b. Loosen the other two screws in the keyholes on the shield. (Figure 5–22,
(2))
c.
Slide the shield to the rear and lift up to remove it.
2. Remove the screw holding the sensor to the casting (Figure 5–22, (3)).
3. Pull the sensor out. Note the positioning tab on the bottom of the sensor.
On re-assembly, this tab and the mounting screw line up the sensor on the
casting.
Removal and Replacement 5–31
Figure 5–22 Optical Sensors
5.4.14 Removing the Mailslot Assembly
Requires T-25 and T-20 drivers.
1. Remove the T-25 screws that mount the cover panel.
2. Remove the mailslot assembly mounting screws.
3. Loosen the T-25 mounting screws on the plastic cover for the Sensor
Transmitter PCA. Remove the plastic cover. See Section 5.4.8 for a full
description.
4. Remove the T-20 screw from the mailslot sensor cable holder.
5–32 Removal and Replacement
5. Remove the mailslot sensor connector from the sensor transmitter PCA.
Note
It is possible for loose cables to be caught by the mailslot actuator arm.
When re-installing the cables in the area of the actuator arm, clip the
mailslot sensor cable and the optical sensor cable together in the clip
provided on the top casting. Then push the cables up into the slot in the
casting above where the mailslot actuator arm comes out.
5.4.15 Removing the Interconnect PCA
Requires a T-15 driver.
1. Remove the two ribbon cables connected vertically on the PCA. (Figure 5–23,
(1,2))
2. Remove the UPS cable connected near the bottom of the PCA. (Figure 5–23,
(3))
3. Remove the power cable. (Figure 5–23, (4))
4. Remove the four drive interface cables (Figure 5–23, (5)). The numbers in the
illustration indicate which drive each cable connector is assigned.
5. Remove the four T-15 screws holding the PCA to the frame.
Removal and Replacement 5–33
Figure 5–23 Interconnect PCA and Cable Assignments
5.5 Re-initializing the Autochanger Controller PCA RAM
after Service
All the RAM on the autochanger controller PCA is battery backed and is,
therefore, non-volatile. Most of the RAM is initialized to known values
at powerup. Variables that are not changed are customer configurations,
autochanger logs, autochanger odometers, element status variables, and variables
that help the autochanger recover from power failures. These variables are set by
Configs 16 and 18.
NVRAM must be re-initialized after replacing the autochanger controller PCA,
after changing the autochanger controller PCA firmware, and after adding drive
mechanisms.
5–34 Removal and Replacement
5.5.1 Variables Cleared by Configuration 16
•
SCSI address of the autochanger
•
Configurable options set to system defaults (ROM-dependent)
whether the autochanger should report recovered errors (CONF 27)
whether the autochanger should rotate the mailslot inwards when in
secure mode (CONF 31)
whether the autochanger should automatically initialize element status
when cartridges are found in unexpected places (ROM-dependent)
•
Drive status variables
reported SCSI address of the drive set to system defaults
clear the source of the disk in the drive
•
RS-232 configuration set to system defaults
baud rate = 19,200
word length = 8
start/stop bits = 1
parity = none
•
Power fail variables
whether the last move was started is set to FALSE
clears the state of the last move
•
Recovery restore variables set to system defaults
maximum number of find home retries = 3
maximum number of error recovery retries = 3
maximum number of restore retries = 1
•
Security variables
clears Unit Reserved
clears Prevent Media Removal for each SCSI ID
•
Element Status variables
clears exception bits
Removal and Replacement 5–35
clears element reservations
•
Clear autochanger logs
clears Error Log (INFO 0)
clears Move Success Log (INFO 10)
clears Recovery Log
clears Runtime Log (INFO 11)
clears number of major retries
clears number of inline retries
•
Clears magazine and mailslot offsets (unused in most units)
•
Resets the security code to 0,0,0
5.5.2 Variables Cleared by Configuration 18
•
Resets the move odometer to zero (INFO 9)
•
Resets the flip odometer to zero (INFO 12)
•
Resets the translate odometer to zero (INFO 13)
•
Resets the mailslot rotation odometer to zero (INFO 14)
•
Resets the number of power-on hours to zero (INFO 5)
•
Resets the number of loads to each drive to zero (INFO 4)
5–36 Removal and Replacement
5.6 Replaceable Parts
5.6.1 Recommended Service Kit
The initial recommended service kit for the optical disk library includes the
exchange parts list and the non-exchange parts list for stocking at a logistics.
Note
The "x" in the part numbers listed below represents a number from "0"
to "9" depending on the revision of the part. For example, if the part is
newly released, the number will be "0". The first time the part is revised,
the number will be incremented to a "1"; the second time the part is
revised, the number will be incremented to a "2", and so on.
If you are unsure of the current part number, check your parts database
for part number information.
5.6.2 Assemblies
Refer to Figure 5–24 and Figure 5–25 for exploded views of the optical disk
library labeled with FRU numbers.
Table 5–3 Exchange Parts
FRU
Number
Description
HP Part Number
Digital Part
Number
1
AC Controller PCA (RW514 only)
C1705-66511‡
29-30099-01
1
AC Controller PCA (RW514 with
code)
5063-2707
29-30099-01 †
1
AC Controller PCA (RW516 only)
C1705-66501
29-30525-01
1
AC Controller PCA (RW516 with
code)
5063-2709
29-30525-01
20
MF 650-Mbyte drive singleended SCSI
C1716C-opt728
29-30871-01
20
MF 650-Mbyte drive singleended SCSI with code
5063-2701
29-30871-01
†Always order exchange version with code example
‡HP Part numbers containing a 66 as in C1705-66511 are silk screened on the boards, but these
translate to order numbers containing a 60 or 69 as in C1705-69511 The 60 or 69 numbers are on the
outside of the box that the board is shipped in.
(continued on next page)
Removal and Replacement 5–37
Table 5–3 (Cont.) Exchange Parts
FRU
Number
Description
HP Part Number
Digital Part
Number
20
MF 1.3-Gbyte drive
C1716T-opt728
29-31453-01
20
MF 1.3-Gbyte drive
5063-2715
29-31453-01
28
Power supply assembly
C1705-69x28
29-30102-01
40
Carriage assembly with picker
C1705-60x40
29-31077-01
Table 5–4 Non-exchange Assemblies
FRU
Number
Description
HP Part Number
Digital Part
Number
2
Sensor transmitter PCA
C1705-60x02
29-30095-01
3
Sensor receive PCA
C1705-60x03
29-30096-01
4
Interconnect PCA
C1705-60x06
29-30870-01
8
SCSI single-ended PCA
C1708-60x08
29-30874-01
9
SCSI differential PCA
C1708-60x09
29-30873-01
16
Fan
C1705-60x48
29-30116-01
21
Upper leadscrew bearing
assembly
C1705-60x31
29-30104-01
22
Front panel PCA
C1705-60x05
29-30098-01
23
Carriage motor assembly
C1705-60x23
29-30100-01
24
Lower leadscrew bearing
assembly
C1705-60x33
29-30106-01
25
Picker motor assembly
C1705-60x25
29-30101-01
26
Magazine
C1700-60x26
29-30047-01
28
Power supply assembly
C1705-60x28
29-30102-01
29
Mailslot w/dual sensors
C1705-60x29
29-30103-01
31
Optical sensor
C1700-60x30
29-30033-01
32
Leadscrew assembly
C1705-60x32
29-30105-01
34
Picker long belt
C1705-60x77
29-30141-01
341
Picker motor belt
C1705-60x35
29-30108-01
1
1 FRU
34 is either the picker long belt or the picker motor belt.
(continued on next page)
5–38 Removal and Replacement
Table 5–4 (Cont.) Non-exchange Assemblies
FRU
Number
Description
HP Part Number
Digital Part
Number
35
Carriage motor belt
C1705-60x34
29-30107-01
38
Mailslot door
C1705-60x47
29-30115-01†
39
Spring bearing block assembly
C1700-60x39
29-30040-01
42
Top tensioner assembly
C1705-60x42
29-30112-01
43
Upper shield
C1705-60x46
29-30114-01†
44
Battery
C1705-60x44
†
45
Lower shield
C1705-60x45
29-30113-01†
49
Door interlock switch
C1705-60x49
29-30117-01
50
Door interlock switch cable
C1705-60x50
29-30118-01
51
Internal UPS cable
C1705-60x72
†
52
Module power cable
C1705-60x51
29-30119-01
53
Interconnect power cable
C1705-60x71
†
54
MF drive power cable
C1705-60x73
†
55
SCSI drive cable
C1705-60x91
†
56
Front panel address cable
C1705-60x65
29-30133-01
57
Motor power/encoder cable
C1705-60x58
29-30126-01
58
SCSI AC cable
C1705-60x92
†
59
Interconnect cable
C1705-60x95
†
62
AC/drive I/O cable
C1705-60x93
†
71
Dual mailslot sensor
C1700-60x70
†
75
Carriage assembly belt
C1705-60x75
29-30139-01
76
ESD brush
C1705-60x76
29-30140-01
79
Top panel
C1705-60x79
†
80
Front door
C1705-60x80
†
81
Back Panel
C1705-60x82
†
83
Back door
C1705-60x83
†
84
Front door fillers/vent
C1705-60x84
†
†These parts are not stocked by Digital. Digital Logistics can place P1 orders for these parts directly
to Hewlett-Packard.
(continued on next page)
Removal and Replacement 5–39
Table 5–4 (Cont.) Non-exchange Assemblies
FRU
Number
Description
HP Part Number
Digital Part
Number
85
Front bezel assembly (RW514
only)
C1705-60x85
†
85
Front bezel assembly (RW516
only)
C1705-60x89
†
86
Magazine guide
C1705-60x86
29-30148-01†
87
Leveling foot
C1705-60x87
29-30149-01†
88
SCSI I/O cableloop
C1705-60x59
29-30127-01
89
RS-232 to front panel cable
C1705-60x64
29-30132-01
90
Front panel power cable
C1705-60x66
29-30134-01
91
Fan power cable
C1705-60x52
29-30120-01
92
Operation switch w/cable
C1705-60x60
29-30128-01
Front panel ground cable
C1705-60x67
29-30135-01
Front panel switch
3101-2917
29-30151-01†
Dual pulley assembly
C1705-60x74
29-30138-01
Receiver PCA to AC controller
cable
C1705-60x69
29-30137-01
Service key
C1705-60x78
29-30142-01†
Transmitter PCA to receiver
PCA cable
C1705-60x68
29-30136-01
Loopback connector
88780-60x95
†
Interconnect Cable
C1705-60057
29-30125-01
†These parts are not stocked by Digital. Digital Logistics can place P1 orders for these parts directly
to Hewlett-Packard.
5–40 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–24 Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)—Diagram 1
Removal and Replacement 5–41
Figure 5–25 Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)—Diagram 2
5–42 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–26 Cable Routing—Diagram 1
Removal and Replacement 5–43
Figure 5–27 Cable Routing—Diagram 2
5–44 Removal and Replacement
Figure 5–28 Cable Routing—Diagram 3
Removal and Replacement 5–45
Figure 5–29 Cable Routing—Diagram 4
5–46 Removal and Replacement
6
Theory of Operation
This chapter discusses the following aspects of the optical disk library:
•
the autochanger
command execution
mechanics
•
autochanger controller PCA
•
power supply
•
optical disk drive
In addition, autochanger error detection, diagnostic strategy, and the SCSI
interface and command set are discussed.
6.1 The Autochanger
6.1.1 Movements
The mechanism code of the autochanger accepts high-level SCSI commands from
the interface, translates these commands into servo code for the autochanger,
executes the command, and reports status.
When a SCSI command is received, it is translated into a series of smaller
submoves in the servo code of the autochanger and executed.
Theory of Operation 6–1
Figure 6–1 SCSI Command Translation for Autochanger Operation
ID
Macro−move
Micro−move ID
Micro−move ID
Micro−move ID
ID
Macro−move
SCSI Command
Micro−move ID
Mechanism
Code
Profile
Micro−move ID
Micro−move ID
ID
Macro−move
Profile
Micro−move ID
Profile
Profile
Micro−move ID
Micro−move ID
Examples of high-level commands are:
•
Move/Exchange—move a cartridge from element A to element B.
•
Seek—position the transport at a target element
•
Test—test for the presence of a cartridge at a target element
•
Actuate mailslot—rotate the mailslot assembly to perform I/O with the user
The commands are translated into a series of moves which are basic autochanger
functions. These submoves are called macro-moves. In this library the macromoves are as follows.
•
move carriage—position the picker transport to a position along the rails.
•
flip—rotate the picker
•
cartridge I/O—plunge and retrieve the picker finger assembly to move
cartridges between the picker and magazines, drives, or the mailslot.
•
rotate mailslot—plunge and retrieve the picker finger assembly/leadscrew nut
to rotate the mailslot assembly toward and away from the user.
For example. "Move element 11 to element 2 with flip" is transformed into the
following sequence of autochanger functions.
1. Determine that element 11 is a storage slot and element 2 is a drive.
6–2 Theory of Operation
2. Move the picker to the front of the storage element.
3. Get the cartridge from the storage element.
4. Do a flip.
5. Move the picker to the front of the disk insertion slot on the drive element.
6. Put the cartridge into the drive element.
The basic autochanger functions (macro-moves) are then divided into a series of
smaller movements called "micro-moves." There are two types of micro-moves:
•
position move—move the driving motors a given distance at peak speed
•
saturation move—same as a position move except that motion is halted if
force exceeds a specified threshold.
Position moves are used for high-speed, unobstructed movements of a known
distance. Saturation moves are used in low-speed, adaptive movements of
variable distance.
Macro-moves consists of one or more combinations of position or saturation type
micro-moves. Each macro-move has a tailored set of these submoves to insure
that the macro-move will be gentle. As a macro-move is executed, servo gains are
adjusted to allow for changes in load characteristics.
An example of the process for a flip is as follows.
1. Move picker finger assembly backwards a fixed distance to engage the flip
lock.
2. Change the gain to prepare for upcoming flip.
3. Move the picker finger assembly backwards a fixed distance to trip the
mechanism and start the flip.
4. Make sure the flip is completed by doing a saturate on the picker motor until
the force exceeds a fixed threshold.
5. Change the gain to prepare for picker finger assembly movement.
6. Move the picker finger assembly forward to relieve the force.
Each micro-move within a specific macro-move has a unique set of stability,
performance, error recovery, force, and reliability criteria. Therefore, each micromove is assigned a unique identification code (ID) which is used to determine how
the move should be performed. Before a micro-move is executed, its ID is used
to fetch acceleration, velocity and force limits to use. If the move fails, its ID
determines the type of error recovery scheme to employ. This tailored technique
provides gentle, stable control of the mechanism, resulting in increased reliability.
Theory of Operation 6–3
6.2 The Autochanger Mechanism
The mechanics consist of the following major assemblies:
•
carriage assembly
•
picker assembly (mounted to the carriage assembly)
•
mailslot (disk loading and ejecting assembly)
•
carriage motor and carriage leadscrew
•
picker motor
The carriage/picker assembly is the heart of the mechanism. This assembly
positions disks in front of storage slots, drives, and the mailslot. The picker
inserts, removes, and flips disks. It also activates the mailslot mechanism.
The carriage has a slot at both ends of a rail that spans the carriage. When the
picker is translated to either end, a latch on the picker can enter the slot. When
latched at either of these two positions, the picker may be flipped.
The picker may be translated from one side of the carriage to the other when
the translate roller contacts the translate bar mounted across either end of the
chassis.
The disk insertion slot, referred to as the mailslot, accepts a disk (inserted
shutter-end-first) and rotates the disk 180 degrees. This allows the picker to
grasp the rear of the disk and insert the disk shutter-end into a drive or storage
slot.
The carriage motor rotates the carriage leadscrew, driving the carriage. The
motor also monitors the amount of movement with a built-in encoder wheel.
The picker motor provides drive to translate and flip the picker. Power is
transferred from the picker motor to the picker assembly by a toothed belt.
6.3 The Controller PCA
The autochanger controller PCA contains the following major components:
•
Microprocessor
•
SCRAP chip (interface from digital-to-analog pulse width modulation)
•
SPIFI Chip (SCSI bus control)
•
ROM
•
RAM
•
Pulse Width Modulation Amplifier
6–4 Theory of Operation
•
Front Panel Control and Filament Drive
•
SCSI Interface
•
Multi-function Peripheral Chip
Figure 6–2 Autochanger Controller PCA Block Diagram
The microprocessor is a Motorola 68000 running at 12 MHz. This microprocessor
controls all processes on the controller PCA such as servos, SCSI interface, and
commands to the control panel.
Associated with the microprocessor is clocking circuitry, battery-backed-up RAM,
decoding logic, and ROM.
Theory of Operation 6–5
The SCRAP CHIP is the interface between the 68000 processor and the servo
system. The SCRAP chip reads the position encoders via Schmitt triggers and
uses that information to increment or decrement counters on the chip. The
SCRAP chip also provides pulse width modulation (PWM) output signals to drive
the motor circuitry.
A programmed array logic interfaces the SCRAP Chip with the 68000
architecture. This PAL generates address strobes, read and write pulses,
and a DTACK signal for the 68000. Bus multiplexing is handled through a
bidirectional buffer and address buffer.
The SPIFI chip handles the SCSI protocol of the SCSI interface.
ROM. The controller firmware resides in two 128K X 8, 170 ns EEPROMs.
RAM. The two RAM chips are special, low-power CMOS static RAMs. A standby
battery on the PCA takes over powering these chips if main power is lost. The
chips remain in standby mode, providing a non-volatile memory storage capability
on the PCA.
The pulse width modulation (PWM) amplifier takes the signals from the SCRAP
chip and changes them into voltages for the picker motor (Z on Figure 6–2) and
carriage motor ( Y on Figure 6–2). Motor speed control is by feedback from the
picker and carriage motors through Z and Y encoders back to the SCRAP chip.
The front panel display and key pad is controlled by a 8751 microcontroller. This
microcontroller sequences and refreshes the vacuum fluorescent display and
reads/debounces keystrokes from the keypad.
The vacuum filament display uses a 7.5-volt supply tied to a 5-volt reference
resulting in an exitation voltage of from two to three volts. The grids of the
display are at approximately 20 volts.
The SCSI interface is basically the SPIFI chip and its associated transceiver. All
SCSI protocol is handled by the SPIFI under control of the main 68000 processor.
The bus transceiver provides the necessary drive to operate the bus properly.
The multifunction peripheral chip controls interrupts, RS-232 functions, and
certain timers throughout the controller PCA.
The servo, I/O, and sensors circuitry handle the servo communications (e.g.
shutdown control), I/O communications (e.g. drive eject and drive busy), and
sensor communications (e.g. mailslot sensor and vertical calibration sensor).
6–6 Theory of Operation
6.4 The Power Supply Module
The power supply module consists of an AC PCA and a DC PCA in a distributed
power architecture.
Figure 6–3 Overall Diagram of the Power Supply
6.4.1 The AC PCA
The AC PCA
•
takes the LINE and NEUTRAL from the site power
•
rectifies the AC to DC
•
produces a 300 VDC (nominal) crudely-regulated output bus.
•
produces an ENABLE signal
The line filter (not shown) - filters some transients and conducted interference
noise. This filter is in a box mounted on the top of the power supply cage. This
filter also provides a plug for the line input.
The EM/line spike filter block passes the primary and neutral inputs while
attenuating noise that the power supply tries to conduct back to the line. The
circuit also filters line transients such as high voltage noise, lightning, etc.
This filter, in combination with the line filter, enables the power supply to
withstand 6 KV spikes.
Theory of Operation 6–7
Figure 6–4 The AC PCA in the Power Supply
Auxillary Supply
(Secondary)
On/Off, Undervolt
Under Voltage
Over Voltage
Circuit (Primary)
From Line Filter
To
EMI / Line
Spikes Filtering
(Primary)
Bridge Rectifier
(Primary)
Bulk DC Filtering
and DC Supply
(Primary)
DC
PCA
Auto Ranging
Switch
(Primary)
The bridge rectifier block takes the sinusoidal ac signal and turns it into pulsating
dc voltage. This dc voltage is stored in the bulk filtering capacitors at a nominal
value of 300 VDC.
The autoranging switch is a hybrid chip that senses the voltage across the
primary. If the voltage is below 145 Vac, the neutral line is connected to the
middle of the two bulk filtering capacitors. That, in effect, makes the bridge
rectifier/capacitor combination a voltage doubler; enabling a 300-volt output from
120-volt AC input.
If the chip senses more than 145 VAC, the autoranging switch stays out of the
circuit and the bridge rectifier passes its output to the bulk DC supply.
This switch supplies the function of a 120/240 switch, automatically correcting for
any input.
The on/off and limits block works in parallel with the bulk DC block on the 300
VDC bus. The circuitry here senses the DC voltage on the bus and turns the
power modules on the DC PCA on or off according to the operating range needs of
the modules.
6–8 Theory of Operation
The DC power modules must have between 200 and 400 volts to operate without
damage. While the DC bus is powering up, the limits block keeps the DC power
modules off until the voltage level reaches 200. If a surge increases the voltage
level to above 400 volts, the DC power modules are turned off to prevent them
from being damaged.
The DC power modules may also be turned on or off through the operation switch
and the auxiliary supply circuit.
The operation switch is a "Safe Extra-Low Voltage" (SELV) switch on the
operator’s control panel. In previous products, this switch on the control panel
cut primary power, but this switch in the Models 60/100 is on the secondary side,
isolated from line potentials through the auxiliary supply block. Placing this
switch to on supplies the enable signal to the DC power modules.
The operation switch, in combination with the auxiliary power supply and on/off
/limits circuitry, allows the DC power modules to operate if all of the following
conditions are met:
•
the operation switch is on
•
the on/off and limits circuitry senses more than 200 volts on the bulk DC bus
•
the on/off and limits circuitry senses less than 400 volts on the bulk DC bus.
THE AC PCA IS ALWAYS LIVE AS LONG AS THE UNIT IS PLUGGED IN.
6.4.2 The DC PCA
The DC PCA receives the 300-volt bulk DC input from the AC PCA and converts
this to regulated outputs of +5, +12, and +24 volts if the enable signal is present.
Some of the +5 VDC that is generated is fed into a chip that further converts this
to +9.5 VDC. This voltage is used to bias some op amps.
Theory of Operation 6–9
Figure 6–5 The DC PCA in the Power Supply
+5V to −9V
−9V
Converter
+5V
+5V Module
75W
Power Valid
Power Valid
Circuit
+12V
+12V Module
100W
Enable
+24V Module
150W
Reverse
Current
Shunt
Circuit
+24V
{ 300V Bus
The power valid block looks at the +5 V and +12 V outputs. When these outputs
rise to operating range (~4.5 V and ~11 V), this circuit triggers a power-on reset.
The reverse current shunt block absorbs any reverse current generated by the
autochanger motors as they slow down.
6–10 Theory of Operation
6.4.3 Power Supply Specifications
Table 6–1 Input Requirements
Range
Input Voltage
88 to 137 VAC RMS
176 to 268 VAC RMS
Input frequency
47 to 66 Hertz
Input current
< 9 amperes AC RMS
Input power
< 475 W
Inrush current
< 40.0 amperes peakat cold start
Input fusing
on PCA
Power factor
0.6
Line surge
Steps from 129 to 150 VAC for 500 milliseconds with no failure
(including fuse)
Line sag
Steps from 108 to 80 VAC for 500 milliseconds with no failure
(including fuse)
Line brownout and
recovery
a. Linearly decrease from 90 to 0 VAC in 30 minutes. Then
120 volts is reapplied
b. Linearly increase input voltage from 0 to 90 VAC in 30
minutes
Total output power
375 W (sum of all outputs)
6.5 The Multifunction Magneto-Optical Drives
There are four major sub-assemblies within the optical drive: the controller
printed circuit assembly (PCA), servo printed circuit assembly (PCA), loader
mechanism, and the optical head.
6.5.1 Controller PCA
The controller PCA is a microprocessor-based collection of digital electronics that
handles functions performed by a SCSI controller, a data buffer, and a formatter
/sequencer.
6.5.1.1 SCSI Controller
The SCSI controller provides the SCSI interface connection to the host computer.
This interface consists of both the electrical signals and the firmware which
decodes the various commands and messages on the SCSI bus and instructs the
drive to take appropriate action.
Theory of Operation 6–11
6.5.1.2 Data Buffer
The data buffer and associated control electronics provide a buffer to speed match
transfers to and from the host computer and the optical disk. The data buffer
provides a cache for read and write operations, optimizing the speed of these
transfers. The RW514/RW516 data buffer contains 256-Kbytes of buffer RAM; the
RW534/RW536 data buffer contains 512-Kbytes of buffer RAM.
6.5.1.3 Formatter/Sequencer
The formatter/sequencer function formats and decodes data for read and write
transfers. During a write function user data is sent via the SCSI bus as bytes (8
bits each). The formatter converts these 8 bits of parallel data into an encoded
serial bit stream that includes all the format and error correction features
required to meet the ANSI and ISO specifications. During reads, the decoder
converts the serial data stream, which includes format and error correction
features, into parallel data.
6.5.2 Servo PCA
The servo PCA includes a digital signal processor (DSP) that controls the actions
of the many servo loops that interact with the optical head and the loader
assembly.
6.5.2.1 DSP Microprocessor and Support/Servo Control Loops
Most of the electronics on the servo PCA are analog circuitry. This circuitry
is designed into the control loops of the following servos: spindle motor/speed,
laser power control, track following, seek/position maintenance, focus actuation,
fine position actuation, and coarse position actuation. Whenever the drive is
performing a read or write operation, all these servos are activated.
Also on the servo PCA are control electronics for the loader assembly. Included
are drivers for the loader and spindle (speed control) motors, sensor circuitry
for the cartridge loaded and write protect detectors, LED drivers for the front
panel LEDs, and control circuitry for the bias magnet subassembly of the loader
mechanism.
6.5.2.2 Read and Write Channel Electronics
Read channel electronics take analog data from the optical head and convert it
into digital "transitions." These transitions are decoded by the decoder electronics
on the controller PCA in order to extract data from format and error correction
features. The write channel electronics take the serial data stream from the
formatter/sequencer and convert the digital pulses into analog data. This analog
data is then sent to the optical head.
6–12 Theory of Operation
6.5.3 Mechanism Assembly
6.5.3.1 Loader Mechanism
The loader mechanism consists of two motors: a spindle motor for speed control
and a loader motor for loading and unloading of the cartridge. The loader motor
includes a gear train and rack-and-pinion system that allow the cartridge shuttle
to raise and lower the cartridge within the loader housing. The bias magnet
subassembly sits on top of the cartridge shuttle and provides the correct polarity
for erasing or writing data.
6.5.3.2 Optical Head
A major feature of the optical head is a "split optics" design. This design
physically separates the laser diode and its associated detectors from the focus
/fine position actuators. This design results in a significant seek time performance
advantage due to less mass on the moving portion of the optical head.
There are several actuators in the optical head. The coarse position actuator
moves the focus/fine position actuators to the vicinity of the desired sector on the
optical disk. The fine actuator makes small corrections (+/- 25 tracks) to center
the optical head on the desired sector. The focus actuator then moves up and
down to provide optimal focus on the light beam. All these actuators, and the
laser diode (and its detectors) are controlled by the servo PCA.
The laser diode and its associated detectors are part of a flex circuit on the optical
head assembly. On this flex circuit are analog electronics which further condition
the control signals for the laser diode, and pre-amplifiers for the servo and data
control signals that are returned to the servo PCA.
6.6 Optical Disk Layout and Error Correction
Two optical disk formats are available. Optical Drives in the RW514/RW516/RW534/RW536
can read from and write to 650-Mbyte optical disks. The RW534/RW536 optical
drive can read from and write to both 650-Mbyte and 1.3-Gbyte optical disks. The
target’s role is to manage the 130mm multifunctional drive and disk as an optical
memory device through its SCSI interface. These optical drives support 130mm
rewritable optical disks conforming to ISO/IEC 10089 Format A, and write-once
optical disks conforming to ISO/IEC DIS 11560, for 650-Mbyte capacity. The
RW534/RW536 also supports the ECMA 184 standard for 1.3-Gbyte capacity, both
rewritable and write-once.
The following sections outline disk layout for both 650-Mbyte and 1.3-Gbyte
optical disks. Throughout this section, the sector number is that of a
1024 bytes/sector disk. The value of a 512-bytes/sector disk is written inside
parentheses just after the value for the 1024 bytes/sector disk.
Theory of Operation 6–13
6.6.1 Optical Disk Layout—650-Mbyte Capacity
This section highlights some of the aspects of an optical disk as outlined by the
ISO standard DIS 10089A and ISO/IEC DIS 11560.
There are three recording styles used on the optical disk that correspond to three
specified areas on the disk:
•
Phase encoded part (PEP)
•
Standard formatted part (SFP)
•
User zone
Both the PEP and SFP are areas that have been ‘‘recorded’’ by the media
manufacturer and cannot be altered by a drive. They contain information that
the drive uses to best read and write to the optical disk. Consult the ISO
standard for more information.
Figure 6–6 Optical Disk Layout
6–14 Theory of Operation
6.6.2 User Zone Layout—650-Mbyte Capacity
The User Zone consists of Defect Management Areas (DMAs), a User Area and
a Slipping Area. The DMAs contain information on the organization of the User
Area into User Groups and Spare Groups. The DMAs also contain a Primary
Defect List (PDL) and a Secondary Defect List (SDL) that provide information
on the locations of defects. The drive uses this information to perform defect
management.
Although the User Zone consists of tracks and sectors, it is often easier to think
of it in terms of a large memory space of consecutive sectors. Figure 6–7 shows
the following parts of the User Zone for 650-Mbyte media.
1. Four Defect Management Areas (DMAs) that each consist of:
Disk Definition Structure (DDS)
Primary Defect List (PDL)
Secondary Defect List (SDL)
2. Slipping Area
3. User Area that consists of:
g User Groups, of n sectors each
g Spare Groups, of m sectors each
Theory of Operation 6–15
Figure 6–7 User Zone Layout for 650-Mbyte Media
Track 0 DDS1
PDL and SDL 1
DMAs 1 and 2
DDS2
PDL and SDL 2
1 Sector Reserved
3
User Group 0
(n Sectors)
Spare Group 0 (m Sectors)
User Area
User Group g−1
(n Sectors)
Spare Group g−1 (m Sectors)
Slipping Area (2048 Sectors)
18748 DDS3
PDL and SDL 3
DDS4
18750
PDL and SDL 4
C1716C Defaults:
g=1
m=2048
6–16 Theory of Operation
n=314569 (576999)
DMAs 3 and 4
1 Sector Reserved
6.6.3 Optical Disk Layout—1.3-Gbyte Capacity
This section highlights some of the aspects of 1.3-Gbyte Capacity optical disks as
outlined by ECMA 184.
The disk is divided into various zones, similar to the 650-Mbyte capacity. See
Figure 6–6. In addition to the User Zone, where user data is stored, there are
other zones including the PEP and SFP zones. Both the PEP and SFP contain
information prerecorded by the media manufacturer and cannot be altered by
a drive. They contain information about media parameters that the drive uses
to read from and write to the optical disk. Consult the ISO standard for more
information.
6.6.4 User Zone Layout—1.3-Gbyte Capacity
The User Zone consists of Defect Management Area (DMAs), and User Area. The
DMAs contain information about the organization of the User Area into User
Groups and Spare Groups. The DMAs also contain a Primary Defect List (PDL)
and a Secondary Defect List (SDL) that provide information on the locations of
defects. The drive uses this information to perform defect management.
Although the User Zone consists of tracks and sectors, it is often easier to think
of it in terms of a large memory space of consecutive sectors. Figure 6–8 shows
the following parts of the User Zone for 1.3-Gbyte media.
1. Four Defect Management Areas (DMAs) each consisting of a
•
Disk Definition Structure (DDS)
•
Primary Defect List (PDL)
•
Secondary Defect List (SDL)
2. Slipping Area
3. User Area consisting of
•
g User Groups, of n sectors each
•
g Spare Groups, of m sectors each
Note
g = 1 or 16
Theory of Operation 6–17
Figure 6–8 and Figure 6–9 show the User Zone Layout for 1.3-Gbyte, for both
g=1 and g=16, respectively. It is important to note one significant difference
between 650-Mbyte and 1.3-Gbyte media. Both types of media can contain
multiple groups, however the start of each group on 650-Mbyte media can ‘‘slip
out’’ with any slip spares found prior to that group. 1.3-Gbyte media establishes
groups BEFORE accounting for slip spares. (Please refer to Section 6.6.5 for more
details.
6–18 Theory of Operation
Figure 6–8 User Zone Layout for 1.3-Gbyte Media, g=1
Track 0
DDS 1
PDL and SDL 1
DDS 2
PDL and SDL 2
Track 3
DMAs
1 and 2
1 Sector
Reserved
Data Group 0
(n Sectors)
User
Area
Spare Group 0
(m Sectors)
Track 37596
Track 37597 DDS 3
Track 37599
PDL and SDL 3
DDS 4
PDL and SDL 4
DMAs
3 and 4
1 Sector
Reserved
M−2264−2
Theory of Operation 6–19
Figure 6–9 User Zone Layout for 1.3-Gbyte,g=16
Track 0
DDS 1
Track 1
PDL and SDL 1
DDS 2
Track 2
PDL and SDL 2
Track 3
Data Group 0
(n0 Sectors)
Spare Group 0
(m0 Sectors)
Track 1599
Track 1600
Data Group 1
(n1 Sectors)
Spare Group 1
(m1 Sectors)
Track 3299
Track 34500
Data Group 15
(n1 Sectors)
Spare Group 15
(m1 Sectors)
Track 37596
Track 37597
DDS 3
Track 37598
Track 37599
PDL and SDL 3
DDS 4
PDL and SDL 4
M−2264−1
6–20 Theory of Operation
Table 6–2 shows the values for n and m for 1.3-Gbyte with g=16 (1024 media).
Table 6–2 Values for n and m for 1.3-Gbyte with g=16 (1024 media)
Band
n
m
Data Band 0
27064
85
Data Band 1
28815
85
Data Band 2
30498
102
Data Band 3
32198
102
Data Band 4
33898
102
Data Band 5
35581
119
Data Band 6
37281
119
Data Band 7
38981
119
Data Band 8
40664
136
Data Band 9
42364
136
Data Band 10
44064
136
Data Band 11
45747
153
Data Band 12
47447
153
Data Band 13
49147
153
Data Band 14
50830
170
Data Band 15
52462
187
The format of 1.3-Gbyte media is often referred to as a ‘‘sliding sector’’ format.
This means that logical tracks do not necessarily align with physical revolutions.
Table 6–3 details the physical revolution to logical track layout for 1.3-Gbyte
media.
Table 6–3 Physical Revolution to Logical Track Layout
Zone or Band
Physical Revolution Range
Logical Track Range
Inner SFP
(-369,-161)
(-369,-161)
Inner Mfg
(-128,-33)
(-128,-33)
Data Band 0
(0,1349)
(0,1599)
Data Band 1
(1350,2699)
(1600,3299)
(continued on next page)
Theory of Operation 6–21
Table 6–3 (Cont.) Physical Revolution to Logical Track Layout
Zone or Band
Physical Revolution Range
Logical Track Range
Data Band 2
(2700,4049)
(3300,5099)
Data Band 3
(4050,5399)
(5100,6999)
Data Band 4
(5400,6749)
(7000,8999)
Data Band 5
(6750,8099)
(9000,11099)
Data Band 6
(8100,9449)
(11100,13299)
Data Band 7
(9450,10799)
(13300,15599)
Data Band 8
(10800,12149)
(15600,17999)
Data Band 9
(12150,13499)
(18000,20499)
Data Band 10
(13500,14849)
(20500,23099)
Data Band 11
(14850,16199)
(23100,25799)
Data Band 12
(16200,17549)
(25800,28599)
Data Band 13
(17550,18899)
(28600,31499)
Data Band 14
(18900,20249)
(31500,34499)
Data Band 15
(20250,21599)
(34500,37599)
Outer Mfg
(21600,22949)
(37600,37785)
Outer SFP
(22950,24299)
(37786,38046)
6.6.5 Drive Defect Management
The optical drive mechanism supports the defect management scheme specified
by ISO 10089A and ISO DIS 11560, and ECMA 184.
Each DMA consists of a:
•
Disk definition structure (DDS)
•
Primary defect list (PDL)
•
Secondary defect list (SDL).
6–22 Theory of Operation
The DDS contains information on how the disk is organized into user and spare
groups. There are three important parameters; the variables g, n, and m are used
in the ISO standard, and are here for consistency:
•
g - number of groups
•
n - number of sectors in a user group
•
m - number of sectors in a spare group
User data is stored initially in the sectors of the user group, while the spare
groups are reserved sectors for the linear replacement sparing algorithm. The
values of g, n, and m are generally chosen so that they maximize the number of
spare sectors allowed, and maximize the size of the user area. (The ISO standard
for 650-Mbyte media allows for a maximum of 2048 spare sectors total from the
PDL and th SDL, while the ECMA standard for 1.3-Gbyte allows for 2057 or
1077, depending on the sector size of 1024 or 512 bytes per sector respectively.)
For 1.3-Gbyte the value for g must be 1 or 16.
In general for 650-Mbyte: g * (n + m) <= (size of User Area)
In general for 1.3-Gbyte: g = 1 or 16, (n, m or n0 thru n15 and m0 thru m15 are
predefined based on g).
For more details consult the ISO or ECMA standard.
The PDL contains a list of defective sectors determined by the manufacturer or
by a certification of the User Area, i.e. during a SCSI Format Unit Command.
Defective sectors in the PDL are managed according to the slip sparing algorithm
described in this chapter.
The SDL contains a list of defective sectors and corresponding replacement
sectors determined during disk use, after certification. Defect/replacement
entries in the SDL are managed according to the replacement sparing algorithm
described in this chapter.
The Slipping Area is a portion of the user zone used by the slip sparing algorithm.
Defects found during certification are excluded from use. The user accessible
space is slipped by a corresponding number of sectors into the slip area. This
area is large enough to account for a maximum of 2048 slip spares. Any unused
sectors in the slipping area are unavailable for user data.
Note
The slipping area applies only to 650-Mbyte media.
Theory of Operation 6–23
6.6.6 Slip Sparing Algorithm
The slip sparing algorithm maps logical blocks to physical blocks to avoid
defective sectors found during a certification process. The list of defective sectors
is maintained in the Primary Defect List (PDL). During an address translation,
the logical blocks are "slipped" past any defective sectors, thus the name "slip
sparing." As an example, say there are defective sectors at block addresses 20
and 30, and you want the physical address of logical block 40. Since addresses
20 and 30 are defective they should be slipped past, so logical block address 20 is
now physical block address 21, and logical block address 30 is now physical block
address 32, taking into account both physical blocks 20 and 30 being slipped past.
This would result in physical block address 42 being the translation for logical
block address 40.
Note that this is not a truly accurate example for three reasons:
1. PDL entries are given in track/sector form, not as block addresses. The final
translated address must also be in track/sector form.
2. There is a 3-track offset added to the physical block address, 51 sectors for
1024 bytes/sector media and 93 sectors for 512 bytes/sector media.
3. This example does not take into account the effects of Spare Groups preceding
this sector. The User and Spare Groups are determined after slip sparing, for
650-Mbyte media, and before slip sparing for 1.3-Gbyte media.
For 650-Mbyte media, slip sparing is always the first step of address translation,
followed by User and Spare Grouping, and replacement sparing. For 1.3-Gbyte
media, user and Spare Grouping is always the first step of address translation,
followed by slip sparing, and replacement sparing.
The data structures for slip sparing and User and Spare Grouping (the PDL
and DDS respectively) are created or updated only during a certification/format
process, such as during a SCSI Format Unit Command. After certification, any
additional defect management updating is done through the replacement sparing
algorithm.
6.6.7 Replacement Sparing Algorithm
Once a disk has been certified and is being used by a customer, additional
defective sectors may develop. The replacement sparing algorithm is intended to
manage these defective sectors.
As was mentioned earlier, the DDS allows for a number of sectors to be reserved
for future use by the replacement sparing algorithm. These "spare sectors" reside
in the Spare Groups, and are referred to via entries in the SDL. Each SDL entry
consists of a defect and its replacement pair. The defect is always a sector in a
6–24 Theory of Operation
User Group, and the replacement is a sector from a Spare Group. Both are given
in track/sector form.
During normal address translation, after the original physical address is found
via the slip sparing algorithm, the SDL is checked to see if that physical address
was ’spared’ through the replacement sparing algorithm. If so, the replacement
physical address is substituted for the original physical address.
In the event a sector needs to be replaced, i.e. due to a Reassign Blocks Command
or automatic reallocation during a write command, a new defect/replacement pair
is added to the SDL (if the new defects not already in the SDL) or an existing
defect/replace is updated (if the new defect is already in the SDL). Updating an
existing defect/replacement pair only occurs on 650-Mbyte media. For 1.3-Gbyte
media a new defect/replacement pair is added, thus creating a ‘‘chain’’ of defect
/replacement pointers.
6.6.8 Error Thresholds
Although not directly related to disk format, the various error thresholds are the
basis for deciding whether or not to spare a sector. This could happen during the
certification process (i.e. the slip sparing algorithm) or auto-reallocation during
a SCSI Write command (i.e. the replacement sparing algorithm). These error
thresholds are related to the format of a sector in the user zone.
Each sector in the user zone consists of a header, user data, and parity bytes
for error correction. The first error threshold of importance involves information
in the sector header. Each header consists of three copies of the sector’s track
number, sector number, and a Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). The error
threshold is determined by the number of sectors found ‘‘good.’’
The other error threshold of interest pertains to the degree of error correction
required on the data. The error correction code (ECC) used causes parity bytes to
be written following the user data. During a data recovery operation, these bytes
are used to detect and correct up to 8 defective bytes in an interleave. Each sector
has 10 (5) interleaves with 120 (122) bytes in each interleave. The actual number
of bytes per interleave requiring correction is used as an error threshold. Consult
the ISO standard for more details. Table 6–4 shows the error thresholds for the
optical drive. The sector IDs column refers to the minimum number of sector
IDs that must be read correctly for the corresponding operation to be deemed
successful. The ECC level column refers to the maximum number of bytes per
interleave that require correction in order for the corresponding operation to be
deemed successful.
Theory of Operation 6–25
Table 6–4 Error Thresholds
Operation
Sector IDs
ECC Level
Format
2
3
Write
2
-
Erase
2
-
Verify
2
4
Read (Recovered)
1
7
Read
1
8
6.7 Error Detection and Recovery
Refer to Figure 6–10 during the discussion in the next two sections.
Figure 6–10 Error Detection and Recovery
6–26 Theory of Operation
6.7.1 Error Detection
The autochanger error detection methods are extensive. Both processes and
sensors detect errors.
Each of the processes that detect errors are interrelated. Depending on the error
condition, the autochanger expects feedback from one or more of the following
processes before a diagnosis is made:
•
overforce shutdown
•
sense of touch
•
motor position
An overforce shutdown occurs when the motors exert more force than is expected
or required. If this occurs, the servo automatically shuts itself down to prevent
parts damage. After an overforce shutdown occurs, the autochanger analyzes the
situation, self-calibrates, and attempts a retry.
Sense of touch is the process where actual force used is compared to the
recommended force for each move. The autochanger uses this information
to detect errors or qualify moves. The difference between sense of touch and
overforce shutdown is that the servo is not automatically shut down if sense of
touch detects an error.
The positions of the motors are continuously monitored by the controller PCA.
The position, along with the sense of touch feedback, is a valuable source of error
detection.
These processes also combine to detect errors. For example, the sense of touch
and the motor position processes continuously monitor the motor position and
motor force levels to sense whether a potential error has occurred. It does not
imply a sensing of complete force profiles, but the ability to continuously sample
the force profile.
The physical parts of the error detection system are the sensors. These hardwired sensors provide information that is impossible to determine through other
means. This feedback information is fed to the autochanger controller PCA.
There are two forms of sensors:
•
drive handshake - the drive provides a "BUSY" signal back to the autochanger
controller to indicate the status of certain loader operations.
•
optical sensors - detect conditions that are otherwise difficult to detect and
are used to calibrate the unit. There are two mailslot sensors to detect if a
cartridge is properly inserted into the mailslot, and a sensor for detecting
Theory of Operation 6–27
which side of the picker faces the mailslot-end of the chassis and allow
calibration of the picker’s position in relation to the drive and storage slots.
6.7.2 Error Recovery Processes
The autochanger uses the following processes to recover from errors:
•
inline recovery
•
find home sequence
•
calibrate
For certain well-defined error conditions, recovery operations that have little
effect on position or performance of the autochanger are executed inline. These
are used only if the error condition can be determined exactly, and in cases where
further motion may make recovery difficult.
The purpose of FIND HOME is to initialize the machine to a known state. For
power-on, this means finding a "home" (zero) position for the carriage/picker
assembly.
The calibrate procedure is then called to further locate reference points other
than the zero locations found during FIND HOME. Using sensors, the picker
is characterized as to its relationship with the mechanism. The positions of
the drive, mailslot, and storage slots are calculated based on the location of the
sensors.
For recovery after power-on, many subsets of FIND HOME may be called. One
mode, for example, only determines which side of the picker faces the mailslot-end
of the chassis. If any of the subsets of FIND HOME fail, the full FIND HOME
sequence is run. A successful running of FIND HOME gives the autochanger
code the exact positions of each end of the carriage rail and the rear plane of the
picker assembly. Also, the autochanger then knows which side of the picker is
facing the mailslot-end of the chassis and whether the picker holds a disk or not.
6.7.3 SCSI Detected Errors
For the vast majority of potential error conditions that may exist, the SCSI
interface retrieves immediate information about the error with no motion
required. Potential error conditions include:
•
the machine not being ready for a new command due to another previouslyissued command or a previously-detected hardware fault that prevents
motion
•
an illegal request to move a cartridge from an empty location or to a full
location
•
an illegal request to do an unsupported command or operation
6–28 Theory of Operation
•
invalid syntax or parameters in a command
•
various bus-level communication errors
In all of these cases, the command is rejected immediately and the autochanger is
not moved.
6.7.4 Move Errors
If an error is detected during an autochanger motion, the state of the machine
is recorded in internal memory and a retry procedure is called. Errors of this
type may be either physical or logical, and may be recoverable or unrecoverable.
Results of the error recovery are returned to the host when the command
completes. If possible, the cartridge is returned to its original location before
command completion, putting the autochanger back into its original state.
Logical errors refer to conditions in which source locations were found
unexpectedly empty or destination locations were found unexpectedly full.
These conditions indicate that a cartridge was moved without the knowledge of
the autochanger, possibly during service. At this point, the host must become
involved in locating the source of the error.
The host’s actions can include issuing a Read Element Status command to
find the difference between the host’s location (element) list and that of the
autochanger, followed by an Initialize Element Status command to find the actual
locations of all disks. When the differences are determined, a final check of
data on the disk should be done, with replacement to the appropriate location
(element).
The picker "element status" always reflects the physical state of the picker. The
autochanger will not give a status when the picker is found unexpectedly full or
empty because this logical error is not allowed. At power-on, the picker is checked
to see if it contains a cartridge. The mechanical design of the picker prevents a
cartridge from being fully inserted into the picker without first going through an
initial power-on cycle in the autochanger.
Physical errors refer to conditions in which something physically changes in
the system that prevents normal operation of the motion. These can be either
temporary or permanent. Error recovery attempts to recover from every physical
error without host intervention. Any error that is detected through overforce,
sense of touch, or by a sensor calls a procedure to attempt the recovery.
One exception to the no-host-intervention rule is in the drive/autochanger
interaction. If the autochanger indicates that a cartridge has been inserted
into the drive, but the drive does not read it, the host must become involved in
identifying the source of the problem. Likewise, if the drive is commanded to
eject a cartridge and does not do so, the drive is considered to be empty and the
Theory of Operation 6–29
host must identify either the final position of the cartridge or determine if the
drive has failed.
6.7.5 Hardware Error Codes
If an error is unrecoverable (i.e., something is broken or jammed to a point that
manual intervention is required), the autochanger takes an additional step in an
attempt to identify the Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) that is causing the failure.
A routine is called automatically that performs a process of elimination for
various FRUs. This routine attempts to isolate the error to three (or less) FRUs.
If no error can be found (or if recovery was made from the error), the unit returns
a "no error" status. If an error is found, a hardware error code and a move
error code is returned when the command completes. Up to three FRU numbers
are returned. The FRUs, and a time stamp, are listed in decreasing order of
probability.
6.7.6 Real Time Event Logging
Logs
The optical disk library provides information logs about the autochanger’s
operation and error history. The logs can provide predictive information which
could lead to early detection of autochanger problems.
All the logs are maintained within the non-volatile RAM and are accessible
through the control panel and by the SCSI Log Sense command over the SCSI
interface. The main functions provided with operational logs are described below.
Error Log
The autochanger maintains a history of past diagnostic test errors which have
occurred within the autochanger, together with a time stamp of when they
occurred. The error message maintained for each error indicates the failure and
the possible FRUs which may have caused the failure.
Move Success Log
A cumulative number of move recoveries and a total move count are maintained.
This gives service a view of the history of the autochanger soft error rate. The
last ten hard errors are marked in this log by indicating how many good moves
occurred since the last hard error.
Force Log
Each cartridge move is actually a sequence of many small moves, known as
micro-moves. This log is a record of the maximum force measured during every
micro-move situation.
6–30 Theory of Operation
Recovery Log
This is a record of recoverable (soft) errors, and related information on error
recovery methods used and their success or failure.
Drive Log
This data indicates the number of times the autochanger uses each drive.
Run-Time Log
An entry is put into this log each time an error occurs which requires any form
of recovery. Both "on-the-fly" and extensive recovery methods are logged. The
type of error, the method of recovery, and the number of moves to that point are
recorded.
Odometer
This value indicates the total number of moves executed since the non-volatile
RAM was first initialized. Power-on hours are also logged.
6.8 The SCSI Interface
As defined by ANSI (American National Standards Institute), SCSI allows up to
eight devices on the bus in any combination of computers and peripherals. The
devices can communicate with one another without control from a host computer.
Another powerful feature is the ability of SCSI to perform arbitration. SCSI
allows the host to initiate transactions, then break communication with a device,
do something else, and re-establish communication when the device is ready.
Finally, SCSI is capable of high data transfer rates. Synchronous data transfer
rates may be as fast as 4 Mbytes/second, and asynchronous rates up to 1.5
Mbytes/second, limited only by the capabilities of the computer and peripheral.
CAUTION
Do not switch off any peripheral on the SCSI bus without first checking
that the bus is not active.
Switching off can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus states.
Theory of Operation 6–31
6.8.1 SCSI Command Set
The following SCSI-2 commands can be used with the optical disk library.
Note
Detailed descriptions of these commands and their functionality with
optical products can be found in the following documents:
•
Offline Diagnostics, located in Appendix A.
•
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) document titled,
"Small Computer System Interface - 2 (SCSI-2)," revision 10H which
is dated September, 1991. Copies of this publication can be obtained
by writing to: Global Engineering Documents, 2805 McGaw, Irvine,
CA 92714, or call: (800) 854-7179 or (714) 261-1455. Please refer to
document X3.131-SCSI-2.
•
Multifunction Optical Drive and Library SCSI-2 Command Reference.
This document can be obtained by ordering part number 5960-7606
from the Sales Response Center at Hewlett-Packard. For order
information, refer to Appendix B.
•
HP Technical Guide Optical Drives and Libraries, obtained by
ordering part number 5960-7605 from the Sales Response Center at
Hewlett-Packard. For order information, refer to Appendix B.
The following tables list the SCSI-2 commands numerically, by group.
Table 6–5 Group 0 Commands (6-byte command)
Code (Hex.)
Name
Description
00
Test Unit Ready
Provides a means to check if the logical unit is
ready
01
Rezero Unit
Moves the optical head to its recalibration
position
03
Request Sense
Requests the detailed error information
04
Format Unit
Initializes the optical disk (done only once for
unformatted, write-once disks)
07
Reassign Blocks
Reassigns defective sectors
(continued on next page)
6–32 Theory of Operation
Table 6–5 (Cont.) Group 0 Commands (6-byte command)
Code (Hex.)
Name
Description
08
Read
Reads data from the specified logical block
address
0A
Write
Writes data to the specified logical block
address
0B
Seek
Moves the optical head to the physical track
where the specified logical block exists
12
Inquiry
Reads the information related to the controller
and the drive unit
15
Mode Select
Sets optical disk, drive unit, or controller unit
parameters
16
Reserve
Gains the exclusive control of a specified
logical unit
17
Release
Releases a specified logical unit from the
reservation state
1A
Mode Sense
Reads optical disk, drive unit, or controller
unit parameters
1B
Start/Stop Unit
Starts or stops rotating the optical disk, and/or
ejects the optical disk from the drive unit
1C
Receive Diagnostic
Results
Requests analysis data be sent to the initiator
1D
Send Diagnostic
Requests the disk controller to perform
diagnostic tests
1E
Prevent/Allow Medium
Removal
Prevents or allows removal of the optical disk
in the logical unit
Table 6–6 Group 1 and 2 Commands (10-byte command)
Code (Hex.)
Name
Description
25
Read Capacity
Reads the capacity of the optical disk
28
Read
Reads data from the specified logical block
address
2A
Write
Writes data to the specified logical block
address
(continued on next page)
Theory of Operation 6–33
Table 6–6 (Cont.) Group 1 and 2 Commands (10-byte command)
Code (Hex.)
Name
Description
2B
Seek
Moves the optical head to the physical track
where the specified logical block exists
2C
Erase
Executes erase operation from the specified
logical block address on rewritable disks only
2E
Write and Verify
Writes data to the optical disk and then
verifies the written data by checking the
error correction code
2F
Verify
Verifies the data starting from the specified
logical block address by checking the error
correction code
34
Pre-Fetch
Reads the data from the specified logical
block address into the drive’s controller cache
memory
35
Synchronize Cache
Initiates the writing of all cached write data to
the optical disk
37
Read Defect Data
Reads the optical disk defect information
3B
Write Buffer
Writes data to the controller data buffer
3C
Read Buffer
Reads data from the controller data buffer
3E
Read Long
Reads data from the specified logical block
address including ECC data
3F
Write Long
Writes data to the specified logical block
address without using the ECC generation
circuitry
4C
Log Select
Clears drive resident logs and odometers
4D
Log Sense
Reads drive resident logs and odometers
55
Mode Select
Sets optical disk, drive unit, or controller unit
parameters
5A
Mode Sense
Reads optical disk, drive unit, or controller
unit parameters
6–34 Theory of Operation
Table 6–7 Group 5 Commands (12-byte command)
Code (Hex.)
Name
Description
A8
Read
Reads data from the specified logical block
address
AA
Write
Writes data to the specified logical block
address
AC
Erase
Executes erase operation from the specified
logical block address on rewritable disks only
AE
Write and Verify
Writes data to the optical disk and then
verifies the written data by checking the
error correction code
AF
Verify
Verifies the data starting from the specified
logical block address by checking the error
correction code
B7
Read Defect Data
Reads the optical disk defect information
Theory of Operation 6–35
A
Offline Diagnostic Information
A.1 System Error Report
Figure A–1 shows a typical VAX/VMS system error report. After analyzing the
report for symptoms, proceed to Section A.2.
Offline Diagnostic Information A–1
Figure A–1 System Error Report
V A X / V M S
SYSTEM ERROR REPORT
COMPILED
******************************* ENTRY
ERROR SEQUENCE 6552.
DATE/TIME 8−APR−1993 15:10:09.37
SYSTEM UPTIME: 5 DAYS 21:14:31
SCS NODE: KAWA
8−APR−1993 15:11:43
PAGE
1.
9. *******************************
LOGGED ON:
SID 0A000005
SYS_TYPE 04010102
VAX/VMS V5.4−2
SCSI Command Code
DEVICE ERROR
KA420
CPU FW REV# 6.
Internal Device Code (15h = 21d)
GENERIC DK SUB−SYSTEM, UNIT _KAWA$WDB300:
HW REVISION
00A50015
HW REVISION = ..¥.
ERROR TYPE
05
SCSI ID
03
SCSI LUN
00
EXTENDED SENSE DATA RECEIVED
SCSI ID = 3.
SCSI LUN = 0.
SCSI SUBLUN
00
PORT STATUS
00000054
SCSI SUBLUN = 0.
%SYSTEM−F−CTRLERR, FATAL CONTROLLER
ERROR
SCSI CMD
00000003
0078
REQUEST SENSE
SCSI STATUS
00
GOOD
EXTENDED SENSE DATA
EXTENDED SENSE
000B0070
0A000000
00000000
0000004E
00A50000
1A000000
00000100
07030000
00
Extended Sense Data Sense Key 0Bh
1st Byte of Extended Sense
Byte 12
SCSI Command Packet
ABORTED COMMAND
SENSE CODE = 4E(X)
UCB$B_ERTCNT
03
UCB$B_ERTMAX
03
3. RETRIES REMAINING
3. RETRIES ALLOWABLE
ORB$L_OWNER
00000000
UCB$L_CHAR
1CC54008
OWNER UIC [000,000]
DIRECTORY STRUCTURED
FILE ORIENTED
SHARABLE
AVAILABLE
ERROR LOGGING
ALLOCATED
CAPABLE OF INPUT
A–2 Offline Diagnostic Information
Sense Key
Additional Sense
Code (ASC) 4Eh =
Bus Protocol Error
A.2 Autochanger Error Codes
This section contains the following autochanger error code tables:
Request Sense Codes
Request Sense Maps
Move Error Codes
Micro-Move Failure Type Codes
Figure A–2 Jukebox Request Sense Data Parameter Block Format
Byte
7
0
Valid
(0)
6
5
4
3
2
0
Error Code (70h or 71h)
1
Reserved (0)
2
Reserved (0)
3−6
Sense Key *
Reserved (0)
7
Additional Sense Length *
8−11
Reserved (0)
12
Additional Sense Code
13
Additional Sense Code Qualifier
14
Reserved (0)
15
1
SKSV
16−17
Sense Key Specific
Sense Key Specific
Error Code Either 70h (current error under VMS) or 71h (deferred error)
* = See Table A–1
Offline Diagnostic Information A–3
Table A–1 Sense Key and Additional Sense Length Values
Sense
Key
(hex)
Description
Additional Sense
Length
00
No Sense—Normal conditions
10
01
Recovered Error—Usually everything is OK
70
02
Not Ready—Typically a disk isn’t spun up or inserted
10
03
Medium Error—May or may not be a serious problem
04
Hardware Error—Usually a serious problem
70
05
Illegal Request—Usually a software problem
10
06
Unit Attention—Power on, RESET, a disk inserted, etc.
10
07
Data Protect—Tried to write to a write-locked disk
08
Blank Check—A blank sector was encountered on a
READ or wasn’t blank on a WRITE
0B
Aborted Command
10
Additional Sense Code— The Additional Sense Code specifies detailed information
related to the error reported in the Sense Key field.
Additional Sense Code Qualifier—The Additional Sense Code Qualifier specifies
detailed information related to the Additional Sense Code.
SKSV—When set to 1, the Sense Key Specific bytes contains valid data. When
set to 0, bytes 15, 16, and 17 are null.
Sense Key Specific— Valid only when the Sense Key field is set to Illegal Request
(05H) and SKSV is 1.
Additional Sense Bytes—This field may contain information when the Additional
Sense Length field contains a value greater than 10. See Figure A–3.
A–4 Offline Diagnostic Information
Figure A–3 Jukebox Request Sense—Additional Sense Data
Byte
7
6
18
5
4
3
2
1
0
Move Error Code *
19
Hardware Error Code (See list of Hardware Errors in Service Manual)
20
First FRU (See list of FRUs in Service Manual)
21
Second FRU
22
Third FRU
23
MvCap
Last
24−25
26
Rsvd
(0)
PosLost
Cartin
Reserved (0)
DinRty
DEjRty PkrRec CarAssy
Reserved (0)
BFHm
FHR
Reserved (0)
BFHm
FHR
CartEl UnexpMt UnexpF Cartinv
ElRty
27
Retry Count
28−29
Reserved (0)
30
Reserved (0)
DinRty
DEjRty PkrRec CarAssy
31
Recovery Count
32−34
35
Reserved (0)
Valid
ErrEn
36−37
Cartin
Source Element Number
* = See Table A–2
Offline Diagnostic Information A–5
Jukebox Request Sense − Additional Sense Data (continued)
Byte
38
7
Valid
6
5
ErrEn
Cartin
39−40
41
3
2
ErrEn
42−43
CartEl UnexpMt UnexpF Cartinv
0
ElRty
Cartin
CartEl UnexpMt UnexpF Cartinv
ElRty
Secondary Source Element Number
Valid
ErrEn
Cartin
CartEl UnexpMt UnexpF Cartinv
45−46
Second Destination Element Number
47−49
Reserved (0)
Micro−Move ID History *
50−54
Failed Micro−Move ID
55
Micro−Move Error Code **
56
1
Destination Element Number
Valid
44
4
57−60
Vertical Motor Commanded Position
61−64
Vertical Motor Actual Position
65−68
Horizontal Motor Commanded Position
69−72
Horizontal Motor Actual Position
73−77
Reserved (0)
* = See the Micro-Move ID Table
** = See Table A–3
A–6 Offline Diagnostic Information
ElRty
Move Error Code— The movement that was being performed when the error
occured. The values of the Move Error Codes are in Table A–2.
Hardware Error Code – Determined by fault isolation, this error code indicates
the cause of the failure. Hardware error codes are listed in the ‘‘Troubleshooting
and Diagnostics’’ chapter of the service manual.
First FRU –The most likely field replaceable unit (FRU) to be the cause of the
failure. See the ‘‘Removal and Replacement’’ chapter of the service manual for a
list of FRUs.
Second FRU— The second most likely field replaceable unit (FRU) to be the cause
of the failure. See the ‘‘Removal and Replacement’’ chapter of the service manual
for a list of FRUs.
Third FRU—The third most likely field replaceable unit (FRU) to be the cause of
the failure. See the ‘‘Removal and Replacement’’ chapter of the service manual
for a list of FRUs. NOTE The FRUs returned should be considered ++pointers++
to the best area within the unit to check for the fault. Simply changing the FRU
listed may or may not fix the associated problem.
MvCap— A Move Capable bit of 1 indicates the autochanger is capable of
performing move commands.
LastSCSI – A Last bit of 1 indicates the autochanger has successfully returned
the cartridge to the state they were in before the failed command was executed.
PostLost— A Position Lost bit of 1 indicates the autochanger cannot calibrate the
mechanism and has lost position of the picker.
CartTrans— A Cartridge in Transport bit of 1 indicates a cartridge is in the
picker mechanism.
DInRty—A Drive Insert Retry bit of 1 indicates that more than one attempt was
needed to insert the cartridge into the drive. (For byte 26, this attempt refers to
Retry algorithm and for byte 30 it refers to Recovery algorithm).
DEjRty—A Drive Eject Retry bit of 1 indicates that more than one attempt was
needed to eject the cartridge from the drive. (For byte 26, this attempt refers to
Retry algorithm and for byte 30 it refers to Recovery algorithm).
PkrRec—A Picker Retracted bit of 1 indicates the picker fingers were fully
retracted after a failure. (For byte 26, this attempt refers to Retry algorithm and
for byte 30 it refers to Recovery algorithm).
CarAssy—A Carriage Locked bit of 1 indicates the picker fingers were fully
retracted after a failure and the translate pin is engaged. (For byte 26, this
attempt refers to Retry algorithm and for byte 30 it refers to Recovery algorithm).
Offline Diagnostic Information A–7
BFHm—A Bad Find Home bit of 1 indicates the Find Home algorithm was
started while the optical sensors were inoperable. (For byte 26, this attempt
refers to Retry algorithm and for byte 30 it refers to Recovery algorithm).
FHR—A Find Home Recalibration bit of 1 Find Home algorithm was invoked to
recalibrate the mechanism (For byte 26, this attempt refers to Retry algorithm
and for byte 30 it refers to Recovery algorithm).
Retry Count— The total number of retry attempts that were performed.
Recovery Count— The total number of recovery attempts that were performed.
Valid— A ‘‘0’’ indicates that this and the next two bytes contain invalid data.
Valid in bytes 41 and 44 are only set during the Exchange Medium Command.
ErrEn—An Error Encountered bit of 1 indicates an error occurred while the
picker was enroute to this element.
CartEl—A Cartridge in Element bit of 1 indicates the cartridge associated with
this move is in this element.
UnexpMt—An Element Unexpected Empty bit of 1 indicates this element was
unexpectedly empty.
UnexpFl—An Element Unexpected Full bit of 1 indicates this element was
unexpectedly full.
CartInv—A Cartridge Inverted bit of 1 indicates the cartridge is inverted from its
state before the operation began.
ElRty—An Element Required Retry bit of 1 indicates an operation in or out of
this element required one or more retries.
Source Element Number—The Element Number to which the Source Element Bit
Map (byte 35) refers.
Destination Element Number—The Element Number to which the Destination
Element Bit Map (byte 38) refers.
Secondary Source Element Number—The Element Number to which the
Secondary Source Element Bit Map (byte 41) refers.
Second Destination Element Number— The Element Number to which the
Second Destination Element Bit Map (byte 44) refers.
Micro-Move ID History—The last five autochanger Micro-Move IDs for the
original movement command prior to the failure. Refer to the Micro-Move ID
Table in this manual.
Failed Micro-Move ID –Actual micro-move that failed.
A–8 Offline Diagnostic Information
Micro-Move Error Code—The error code associated with the failed Micro-Move
ID. See Table A–3.
Vertical Motor Commanded Position—The position to which the carriage motor
was commanded.
Vertical Motor Actual Position—The actual position of the carriage motor.
Horizontal Motor Commanded Position—The position to which the picker motor
was commanded.
Horizontal Motor Actual Position—The actual position of the picker motor.
Table A–2 Autochanger Move Errors
Error
Codes
Failure Description
00
Failure occurred before any servo-controlled motions were attempted during
Power on Selftest.
02
Failure while Picker is not moving.
04
Failure while moving the carriage/picker assembly away from drives.
06
Failure while moving the carriage/picker assembly toward drives.
08
Failure while flipping the picker.
0A
Failure while translating the picker assembly.
0E
Failure while moving the picker fingers back in preparation to translate.
10
Failure while moving the picker fingers to engage the cartridge from the source
storage element.
12
Failure while moving the picker fingers back to remove the cartridge from the
source storage element.
18
Failure while moving the picker fingers forwards to insert a cartridge in the
destination storage element.
1A
Failure while moving the picker fingers back after inserting a cartridge in the
destination storage slot.
20
Failure while moving the picker fingers forwards to engage the cartridge ejected
from the drive (source).
22
Failure while moving the picker fingers back to remove the cartridge from the
drive (source).
28
Failure while moving the picker fingers forwards to insert the cartridge into the
drive (destination).
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–9
Table A–2 (Cont.) Autochanger Move Errors
Error
Codes
Failure Description
2A
Failure while moving the picker fingers back after inserting a cartridge into the
drive (destination).
30
Failure while moving the picker fingers forward to engage the cartridge in the
mailslot (source).
32
Failure while moving the picker fingers back to remove the cartridge from the
mailslot (source).
38
Failure while moving the picker fingers forward to insert the cartridge in the
mailslot (destination).
3A
Failure while moving the picker fingers back after inserting the cartridge in the
mailslot (destination).
40
Failure while rotating the mailslot actuator inward.
42
Failure to ensure that the mailslot rotated inward.
48
Failure while rotating the mailslot actuator outward.
4A
Failure to ensure that the mailslot rotated outward.
50
Failure while the finding the home position.
52
Failure while calibrating the carriage/picker assembly.
60
Initializing element status failed while testing an element with a cartridge in the
picker assembly.
80
Failure to remove a cartridge from a source element.
84
Failure to leave a cartridge properly in a destination element.
88
An obstruction was encountered before the cartridge had been inserted the proper
distance.
90
Source element unexpectedly empty.
94
Destination element unexpectedly full.
A0
Front mailslot sensor failed.
A2
Inside mailslot sensor failed.
A4
Drive light stuck on.
B0
Door interlock open.
A–10 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–3 Autochanger Micro-Move Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Description
Micro-Move Errors are reported in byte 56 of the additional sense bytes (Figure A–3).
0
No error.
1
Carriage motor drive voltage exceeded limit set by firmware.
2
Carriage motor overcurrent detected by hardware.
3
Carriage motor force exceeded limit set by firmware.
4
Picker motor drive voltage exceeded limit set by firmware.
5
Picker motor overcurrent detected by hardware.
6
Picker motor force exceeded limit set by firmware.
7
Low power supply during motion.
8
High power supply during motion.
9
Move stopped because cartridge-in-path beam blocked.
A
Cartridge not detected by cartridge-in-path beam.
B
Carriage motor not tracking properly.
C
Picker motor not tracking properly.
D
Carriage motor measured voltage less than expected.
E
Picker motor measured voltage less than expected.
10
Find origin failed.
11
Calibrate failed.
12
Diagnose FRU failed.
13
Initial recovery failed.
14
Find home failed.
15
Picker initialization failed.
16
Cartridge-in-path beams are blocked.
20
Failed to find hard stop at end of flip.
22
Failed to see sensor close at the end of translate.
23
Failed to move to the vertical position needed to engage the translate pin.
24
Failed to see sensor close at the start of translate.
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–11
Table A–3 (Cont.) Autochanger Micro-Move Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Description
25
Failed to see height sensor re-open after closing at the start of a translate.
28
The translate distance was too long.
29
The translate distance was too short.
31
Failed while checking for cartridge in a drive.
32
Failed to find a hard stop returning cartridge to storage after testing for presence
of cartridge.
33
Failed while checking for cartridge in a storage slot.
34
Failed while checking for cartridge in the Picker.
35
Failed while checking for cartridge in the mailslot.
36
Could not free fingers after testing for a cartridge in a drive.
38
Failed to verify that cartridge exists after insert.
40
Failed finding the back of storage slot during retraction.
41
Failed to verify that a disk is in the storage slot on get using cartridge-in-path
beams.
42
Not able to measure the depth of the storage slot.
43
Failed to free fingers from the storage slot.
48
Could not find the back of the storage slot after insert.
49
Failed to verify that a cartridge exists in the storage slot after insert.
4A
Could not free fingers from storage slot after insert.
50
Could not find the back of the mailslot after get.
51
Failed to verify that a disk is in the mailslot on get using cartridge-in-path
beams.
52
Not able to measure the depth of the mailslot.
58
Could not find the back of the mailslot after insert.
59
Failed to verify that a cartridge exists in the mailslot after insert.
60
Failed to rotate the mailslot in.
61
Failed to rotate the mailslot out.
70
Exhausted retries while attempting to get the drive to eject the cartridge.
(continued on next page)
A–12 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–3 (Cont.) Autochanger Micro-Move Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Description
71
Could not verify that the drive ejected the cartridge.
72
Could not free fingers from the drive.
73
No cartridge in drive.
74
No load complete.
75
Drive error signal.
76
Unexpected cartridge in the drive.
77
Unexpected load complete.
78
Exhausted retries attempting to get drive to accept the cartridge.
79
Could not verify that the drive accepted the cartridge.
7E
Inline recovery attempts exhausted.
Errors above are counted in the runtime log as in-line, errors below as retries.
90
Drive access was disallowed because drive busy signal was active.
91
Drive light stuck off.
94
Outside mailslot sensor failed.
95
Inside mailslot sensor failed.
96
Mailslot rotation failure; possibly caused by operator.
FA
Test drive insert retry.
FB
Timed out waiting for drive to eject when testing for the presence of a cartridge;
retry being attempted.
FC
Retry being attempted on drive insert.
FD
Retry being attempted on drive eject.
FE
Mechanism error.
A.3 Drive SCSI-2 Reference
This section contains the following information:
Request Sense Command sense key values
Request Sense Command additional sense code values
HP-Specific Error Codes
Offline Diagnostic Information A–13
Figure A–4 Drive Request Sense Data Parameter Format
Byte
7
0
AV
6
5
4
2
1
0
Error Code (70H or 71H)
Reserved (0)
1
2
3
Reserved (0)
ILI
Rsvd (0)
Sense Key*
3
Information (MSByte)
4
Information
5
Information
6
Information (LSByte)
7
Additional Sense Length (0AH)
8
Command Specific Information (MSByte) (reassign blocks only)
9
Command Specific Information (reassign blocks only)
10
Command Specific Information (reassign blocks only)
11
Command Specific Information (LSByte) (reassign blocks only)
12
Additional Sense Code**
13
Additional Sense Code Qualifier**
14
15
Reserved (0)
SKSV
Sense Key Specific Information (if Sense Key = 1,3,4,5)
16
Sense Key Specific Information
17
Sense Key Specific Information
18
HP−Specific Error Code***
19
HP−Specific Error Code***
20
Reserved (0)
21
HP−Specific DSP Error Information (MSByte)
22
HP−Specific DSP Error Information (LSByte)
23
HP−Specific DSP Status Byte
MR−6080−RA
A–14 Offline Diagnostic Information
These asterisks are keyed to Figure A–4:
* = See Table A–1
** = See Table A–4
*** = See Table A–5
AV– A Valid bit of 1 indicates the information field contains valid information. A
Valid bit of 0 indicates that the information field does not contain valid data.
ILI– An Incorrect Length Indicator bit of 1 usually indicates that the requested
logical block length did not match the logical block length of the data on the
medium.
Information–
1. The logical block address associated with the sense key.
2. The difference (residue) of the requested length minus the actual length in
either bytes or blocks, as determined by the command, when the ILI bit is set.
Command Specific Information– The logical block address of the first defect
descriptor not reassigned is returned in this field.
SKSV– A Sense Key Specific Valid bit of 1 indicates that the Sense Key Specific
Information is valid. A SKSV bit of 0 indicates that there is no sense key specific
information.
Sense Key Specific Information– If the Sense Key equals 1, 3, or 4, then byte 16
(MSbyte) and byte 17 (LSbyte) indicate Actual Retry Count.
If the Sense Key Specific Information (Byte 2, Bits 0-3) is set to 5-Illegal Request
and the SKSV bit is set to 1, the sense key specific field is defined as Field
Pointers, byte 16 (MSbyte) and byte 17 (LSbyte).
The Field Pointer field indicates which illegal parameters in command descriptor
blocks or data parameters are in error.
A data bit of 1 in byte 6 indicates bad command.
A data bit of 0 indicates bad data.
Offline Diagnostic Information A–15
Table A–4 Drive Request Sense - Additional Sense Code Values
Sense
Code and
Qualifier
(hex)
Sense
Key
Description (Bytes 12 and 13)
00 00
0H - NS
No Additional Sense Information
02 00
4H - HE
No ESDI Command Complete
04 01
2H - NR
LUN in Process of Becoming Ready
04 02
2H - NR
LUN Not Ready, Initializing Command Required
04 03
2H - NR
LUN Not Ready, Manual Intervention Needed
04 04
2H - NR
LUN Not Ready, Format in Progress
06 00
4H - HE
No Reference Position Found
09 01
4H - HE
Tracking Servo Failure
09 02
4H - HE
Focus Servo Failure
09 03
4H - HE
Spindle Servo Failure
0C 01
1H - RE
Write Error Recovered with Auto Reallocation
0C 02
3H - ME
Write Error - Auto Reallocation Failed
10 00
4H - HE
ID CRC or ECC Error
11 00
3H - ME
Unrecovered Read Error
11 02
3H - ME
Error Too Long to Correct
11 07
3H - ME
Data Resynchronization Error
11 0B
3H - ME
Uncorrected Read Error - Recommend reassignment
11 0C
3H - ME
Uncorrected Read Error - Recommend rewrite
11 80
3H - ME
Unrecovered error, sparing failed
12 00
3H - ME
Address Mark Not Found for ID Field
13 00
3H - ME
Address Mark Not Found for Data Field
15 01
4H - ME
Mechanical Positioning Error
17 01
1H - RE
Recovered Data With Retries
17 05
1H - RE
Recovered Data Using Previous Sector ID
17 80
1H - RE
Recovered Data With Retries, Data Auto Reallocated
17 81
1H - RE
Recovered data - Auto Reallocate Failed
18 00
1H - RE
Recovered Read Data With ECC Procedure
(continued on next page)
A–16 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–4 (Cont.) Drive Request Sense - Additional Sense Code Values
Sense
Code and
Qualifier
(hex)
Sense
Key
Description (Bytes 12 and 13)
18 01
1H - RE
Recovered Data With ECC/Retries
18 02
1H - RE
Recovered Data With ECC/Retries, Data Auto Reallocated
19 01
3H - ME
Defect List Not Available
19 02
3H - ME
Defect List Error in Primary List
19 03
3H - ME
Defect List Error in Grown List
1A 00
5H - IR
Parameter List Length Error
1C 01
3H - ME
Primary Defect Lists Not Found
1C 02
3H - ME
Grown Defect Lists Not Found
1D 00
3H - ME
Miscompare During Verify Operation
20 00
5H - IR
Invalid Command Operation Code
21 00
5H - IR
Illegal Logical Block Address
22 00
5H - IR
Illegal Function
24 00
5H - IR
Invalid Field In CDB
25 00
5H - IR
Invalid LUN
26 00
5H - IR
Invalid Field In Parameter List
27 00
7H - DP
Write Protected
28 00
6H - UA
Medium Changed
29 00
6H - UA
Power-On, Reset or Bus Device Reset Occurred
29 80
4H - HE
Power-on, Reset or Bus Device Reset Occurred and Selftest
Failed
2A 01
6H - UA
Mode Parameters Changed
2F 00
BH - AC
Commands Cleared by Initiator
30 01
3H - ME
Cannot Read Medium - Unknown Format
30 02
3H - ME
Cannot Read Medium - Incompatible Format
31 00
3H - ME
Medium Format Corrupted
32 00
3H - ME
No Defect Spare Location Available
32 01
3H - ME
Defect List Update Error
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–17
Table A–4 (Cont.) Drive Request Sense - Additional Sense Code Values
Sense
Code and
Qualifier
(hex)
Sense
Key
Description (Bytes 12 and 13)
3A 00
2H - NR
Medium Not Present
3D 00
5H - IR
Invalid Bits in Identify Message
3F 01
6H - UA
Microcode Has Been Changed
3F 03
6H - UA
Inquiry Data Has Changed
44 00
4H - HE
Internal target failure
40 80
4H - HE
Diagnostic Failure in NVRAM Odometers
40 81
4H - HE
Diagnostic Failure in NVRAM Configurations
40 82
4H - HE
Diagnostic Failure in NVRAM Logs
40 83
4H - HE
DSP Poweron Failure
40 84
4H - HE
DM Exception (unexpected flag)
43 00
BH - AC
Message Error
47 00
BH - AC
SCSI Parity Error
48 00
BH - AC
Initiator Detected Error
4E 00
BH - AC
Overlapped Commands Attempted
53 00
4H - HE
Media Load/Unload Failed
53 02
5H - IR
Medium Removal Prevented
55 00
2H - NR
System Resource Failure (xaction queue full)
92 00
8H - BC
Overwrite Attempted
93 00
8H - BC
Empty Sector Detected
94 00
8H - BC
Written Sector Detected
95 00
2H NR
Power Interruption Pending
A–18 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–5 HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
0201
No seek complete
0202
No reference position found
0203
Tracking servo failed
0204
Focus servo failed
0205
Spindle servo failed
0206
Mechanical position error
0207
Load unload failed
0208
DSP download failed
0209
DSP import x failed
020A
DSP import y failed
020B
DSP import p failed
020C
DSP export x failed
020D
DSP export y failed
020E
DSP export p failed
020F
DSP upload log failed
0210
DSP log checksum failed
0211
DSP passthru failed
0212
Fault spinup failed
0213
Recalibrate optical disk gain failed
0214
DSP log command error
0215
DSP log unsupported
0216
DSP log status error
0220
Active sector SPDET error
0221
Active sector empty sector
0222
Data DMA error
0223
PECC DMA error
0224
EDAC shift register error
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–19
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
0225
ID CRC OR ECC error
0226
Data resync error
0227
Address mark error
0228
Sync mark error
0229
Incompatible format
022A
Active sector ENDEC unexpected
022B
Active sector higain with syncdet error
022C
Active sector syncmark dubbed error
022D
Active sector underflow/overflow error
022E
Active sector not empty
022F
Active sector no DSP status
0230
ENDEC locked on sector
0231
ENDEC locked prearmed
0232
ENDEC locked unexpected
0240
SEQ no transfer started
0241
SEQ unexpected EOHG
0242
SEQ unexpected status
0250
Media recognition failed
0251
Prearmed Watchdog timeout
0260
DM Task bad event
0261
DM mailbox bad event
0262
Next CD bad state
0263
Next operation bad state
0264
DM retry sector operations bad state
0265
Retry drive state bad state
0266
Retry sector operations bad state
0267
DM retry operations, bad operation type
(continued on next page)
A–20 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
02FF
DM abort transaction
2001
DSP recovery
2002
DSP error
2003
DSP fault
2004
DSP warning
2011
Active sector DSP recovery
2012
Active sector DSP error
2013
Active sector DSP fault
2014
Active sector DSP warning
2021
DSP unsolicited recovery
2022
DSP unsolicited error
2023
DSP unsolicited fault
2024
DSP unsolicited warning
202A
DSP unresponsive
202B
DSP over responsive
202C
DSP poweron failure
3001
SCSI controller kill error
3002
SCSI controller message error
3003
SCSI controller command error
3004
SCSI controller RAM error
3005
SCSI controller register error
3006
SCSI controller FIFO error
3007
SCSI controller target sequence error
3008
SCSI controller command sequence error
3009
SCSI controller STS sequence error
3010
Reselection timeout
4101
Error too long to correct
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–21
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
4102
Data CRC failure
4103
ECC errors in interleave threshold exceeded
4401
DDS sector not found
4402
DDS reserved field not zero
4403
PDL reserved field not zero
4404
SDL reserved field not zero
4405
DDS ID field invalid
4406
PDL indicator field invalid
4407
Number of user groups (G) field invalid
4408
Number of user blocks per group (N) field invalid
4409
Number of spare blocks per group (M) field invalid
440A
User + spare blocks too large for media
440B
PDL sector not found
440C
SDL sector not found
440D
PDL length field invalid
440E
SDL number of sublists field not equal to one
440F
SDL list length field invalid
4410
PDL list incomplete
4411
PDL list not sorted
4412
PDL entry invalid
4413
SDL list incomplete
4414
SDL list not sorted
4415
SDL defect entry invalid
4416
SDL replacement entry invalid
4417
SDL defect entry in a spare group
4418
SDL replacement entry in a user group
4419
Too many defects (PDL + DSL)
(continued on next page)
A–22 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
441A
DMA length too short for PDL to exist
441B
DMA length too short for SDL to exist
441C
No spare remaining
441D
Number of SDLs greater than total spares allocated
441E
DDS ID invalid for CCW media
441F
CCW media rejected
4420
Certification, erase pass failure
4421
Certification, write pass failure
4422
Certification, verify pass failure
4423
Certification, no defects remain
4424
Certification aborted
4425
No SD list for certification erase
4426
No maximum SD list for certification erase
4427
No SD list for certification write
4428
No maximum SD list for certification write
4429
No SD list for certification verify
442A
No maximum SD list for certification verify
442B
No write image memory available for certification
442C
No write buffer memory available for certification
442D
No SD list for reassign blocks read
442E
No SD list for reassign blocks write
442F
No SD list for reassign blocks read long
4430
No SD list for reassign blocks write long
4431
Reassign blocks, unexpected CD before read
4432
Reassign blocks, unexpected CD before write
4433
Reassign blocks, unexpected CD before read long
4434
Reassign Blocks, unexpected CD before write long
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–23
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
4435
Reassign blocks, can’t move data on CCW
4436
No defect maps found
4437
PDL duplicate entry found
4438
SDL duplicate entry found
4439
SFP not found
443A
SFP format field invalid
443B
SFP modulation field invalid
443C
SFP angular velocity field invalid
443D
SFP ECC code field invalid
443E
SFP sector size differs from detected
443F
SFP sectors in track 0 invalid
4440
SFP medium type invalid
4441
SFP largest track less than or equal to zero, invalid
4442
SFP download P-block failed
4443
DMA write failed all attempts
4444
EWR calibration error, no memory
4445
EWR calibration error, retries failed
4446
Spare retries were exhausted
4447
No memory for next spare table
4448
No working memory for read maps
4449
Retry error after DM error
444A
Sector was spared successfully
444B
No SD list for Reassign Blocks erase
444C
Reassign Blocks, unexpected CD before erase
444D
Format, number of user groups
444E
Format, number of user sectors per group
444F
Format, number of spare sectors per group
(continued on next page)
A–24 Offline Diagnostic Information
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
4450
Sparing, empty sector following spare attempt
4451
Sparing, overwritten sector following spare attempt
4452
DMA 1 write failed
4453
DMA 2 write failed
4454
DMA 3 write failed
Be aware that error codes printed in boldface type are unique to a 1.3-Gbyte,
Multifunction Drive.
4455
SFP at outer diameter is invalid
4456
SFP at inner diameter is invalid
4457
SFP track pitch is invalid
4458
SFP number of bands is invalid
4459
SFP banding constant is invalid
445A
SFP number revolutions per band is invalid
445B
SFP media type differs
445C
SDL ID is invalid
445D
SDL 2X group kind invalid
445E
Format, no replacement CD available
445F
Too many PDL entries per band
4460
Format, initial erase maps failed
4461
DMA erase during write failed
4462
Blank check during format/certification failed
4463
No SD list for certification blank check
4464
No maximum SD list for certification blank check
8201
Previous sector ID
8401
Recovered data spare failed
(continued on next page)
Offline Diagnostic Information A–25
Table A–5 (Cont.) HP-Specific Drive Error Codes
Error
Code
(hex)
Message
C000
Invalid diagnostic test
C001
Register error
C002
RAM test error
C003
Checksum error
C004
CPU test error
C005
Forced test error
C006
NVRAM test error
C007
Microprocessor test error
C008
Microprocessor ROM test error
C009
Microprocessor RAM test error
C00A
EDAC test error
C00B
SEQ test error
C00C
ENDEC test error
C00D
Active sector test error
C00E
HMAC test error
C00F
Buffer RAM test error
C010
Data loopback error
C020
Connector loopback DBO IO error
C021
Connector loopback DB1 CD error
C022
Connector loopback DB2 MSG error
C023
Connector loopback DB3 REQ error
C024
Connector loopback DB4 ACK error
C025
Connector loopback DB5 ATN error
C026
Connector loopback DB6 SEL error
C027
Connector loopback DB7 BSY error
C028
Connector loopback DBP RST error
A–26 Offline Diagnostic Information
A.4 Offline Diagnostics
A diagnostic utility called DOSDASS2 is available from Hewlett-Packard for
accessing the optical disk library through the SCSI bus.
DOSDASS2 fully exercises either standalone multifunction optical drives or
autochangers that contain multifunction optical drives. Information for getting
and using DOSDASS2 is found in Appendix B.
Offline Diagnostic Information A–27
B
Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts
B.1 Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts
While no special tools are required to service the optical library, there are some
commonly used items that may be stocked and available as an area resource.
Item
HP Part Number
Digital Part Number
Rewritable Optical Disk Cartridges
(512 bytes/sector) Formatted capacity is
594 Mbytes per disk†
RWX1K-01 (30-38754-01)
Rewritable Optical Disk Cartridges
(512 bytes/sector) Formatted capacity is
1.2 Gbytes per disk†
RWX5K-01 (30-38754-02)
Quantity 5 of RWX1K-01 Cartridges
DL-RWX1K-AA
Write-Once Optical Disk Cartridges
(512 bytes/sector) Formatted capacity is
594 Mbytes per disk†
RWX1K-02 (30-40952-01)
Write-Once Optical Disk Cartridges
(512 bytes/sector) Formatted capacity is
1.2 Gbytes per disk†
RWX5K-02 (30-40952-02)
Quantity 5 of RWX1K-02 Cartridges
DL-RWX1K-BA
0.9m (3 ft) SCSI jumper cable; Champ to
Champ connectors
BC09K-03
1.8m (6 ft) SCSI interface cable
BC06P-06 (17-02659-02)
2.7m (9 ft) SCSI interface cable
(External UPS); Champ to Honda
connectors
C1708-60080
Power cord
Single-ended SCSI terminator
BC09D-09
(Storage Server)
RW1KA-AA
K2291
H8574-A
†To reorder media, call 1-800-DIGITAL or 1-800-344-4825
Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts B–1
Item
HP Part Number
Differential SCSI terminator‡
A1658-62024
115 V replacement fuse 3A 250 V‡
2110-0003
230 V replacement fuse 3A 250 V‡
2110-0780
Eject tool‡
C1708-88803
Optical disk cleaning kit‡
C1700-88800
Optical disk cleaner accessory kit (extra
swabs and alcohol)‡
C1700-88801
Optical Disk Library System Technical
Reference Manual
5959-3559
(GSD)
Technical Guide Optical Drives and
Libraries
5960-7605
Optical Drive and Library SCSI-2
Command Reference
5960-7606
Offline Diagnostics for HP Optical
Products ‡
5960-7626
Digital Part Number
‡These parts can be ordered directly from the Hewlett-Packard SMO facility in California. Call
1-800-227-8164 between the hours of 6 A.M. and 5 P.M. Pacific Standard Time.
B–2 Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts
The Instruction Manual for the Offline PC based diagnostics, DOSDASS2, can
also be ordered from the Hewlett-Packard SMO facility in California. The title of
this manual is Offline Diagnostics for Hewlett-Packard Optical Products and the
part number is 5960-7626. Extra copies may be available from Digital’s Storage
External Products Continuation Engineering Group in Shrewsbury (SHR), MA.
NOTE
To run the DOSDASS2 diagnostics, you must have an IBM AT-compatible
computer, an adapter interface board (152x/154x), a SCSI cable, and the
Offline Diagnostics for Hewlett-Packard Optical Products manual.
All other manuals and the DOSDASS2 diagnostic software are available from the
Hewlett-Packard Support Center in Greeley, Colorado. Call the Hewlett-Packard
Support Hotline, (303) 350-4646, to order. Diagnostics and SCSI-2 Command
Reference manuals are also available from internal CSC or from the Storage
External Products, Continuation Engineering Group in Shrewsbury (SHR), MA.
Basic Supplies and Reorderable Parts B–3
C
Capacity Upgrade Installation
Instructions
This appendix includes instructions for installing the RW516-UA/RW536-UA
capacity upgrade kits in the RW514 and RW534 optical disk libraries.
C.1 RW516/RW536-UA Upgrade Kit Parts
•
7 cartridge magazines (P/N C1700-60026)
•
1 product serial number label
•
1 service information label
•
1 nameplate
•
1 controller PCA
C.2 Tools Needed
•
T-10, T-15, T-20, and T-25 Torx® drivers
•
5/32 ball tip hex wrench, at least 4 inches long
•
needle-nose pliers
•
service key for rear door
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–1
C.3 Removing Power from the Optical Disk Library
CAUTION
Do not press the optical disk library system operation switch or unplug
the AC power cord until you are sure that the SCSI bus is inactive.
Either pressing the operation switch or unplugging the power cord when
the SCSI bus is active can cause data loss and/or indeterminate bus
states. (Check the host system reference manuals for information on
checking the status of the SCSI bus.)
Opening the rear cabinet door automatically removes power to the optical
disk library motors. When the rear cabinet door is open, disks that are
already in a drive can be read: however, if the host issues an autochanger
command to access a disk not currently in the drive, an error condition,
or host "hang" results.
C.3.1 Opening the Rear Door
Note
The rear door may be secured with a lock added by the customer (see
locking bracket location on Figure C–1). You may have to contact the
system administrator to remove the lock.
C–2 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
Figure C–1 Rear Panel Keyholes and Locking Bracket
1
2
1. SEE CAUTION NOTE ON PREVIOUS PAGE.
2. Remove power from the autochanger by switching off the operation switch
and then unplugging the optical disk library from line power.
3. Request that the customer remove the lock on the rear door (if necessary).
See Figure C–1 for the location of the lock bracket.
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–3
4. Open the rear door using an access key. Each of the two latches has to be
turned approximately 1/2 turn counterclockwise (Figure C–1).
CAUTION
When power is removed, the carriage/picker drifts down toward the
bottom of the rails. As it drifts down, the picker fingers extend and finally
catch on either the edge of a cartridge or the edge of a storage slot.
When the picker fingers are supported this way, it is possible to damage
them if the carriage is struck during service.
You can allow the carriage/picker assembly to slide all the way to the
bottom of the rails (and out of your way) by pulling the picker leadscrew
back and then moving the carriage down. The picker flips once as you
move it down, but this is normal.
C.3.2 Removing the Lower Rear Panel
1. Remove power from the optical disk library by switching off the operation
switch and then unplugging the optical disk library from line power.
2. Remove the external SCSI cable(s) and the external UPS cable, if present.
3. Remove the electronics shield.
a. Loosen the two screws in the keyhole openings on the electronics shield
(Figure C–2).
b. Remove the remaining two screws.
c.
Lift off the electronics shield.
4. Remove the SCSI ribbon cable from the top connector on the controller board.
5. Remove the red and black power cable from the SCSI repeater PCA and the
cable clamp.
6. Remove the internal UPS cable from the interconnect board at the front of
the autochanger. Unlatch the three cable clamps that route the cable to the
lower rear panel, and remove the UPS cable from the clamps.
C–4 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
Figure C–2 Electronics Shield
Electronics
Shield
7. Remove the two screws that hold the lower rear panel to the power supply
(Figure C–3, 1).
8. Loosen the five screws in the keyholes around the perimeter of the lower rear
panel (Figure C–3, 2).
9. Lift the panel up and away.
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–5
Figure C–3 Lower Rear Panel
C.4 Removing the Controller PCA
1. Remove all cables connected to the autochanger controller PCA.
2. Remove the screw holding the metal PCA mounting plate to the frame
(Figure C–4). Slide the PCA away from the frame.
3. Unpack the upgrade autochanger controller PCA.
4. Unpack the 4 upgrade ROMs.
5. Use the old autochanger controller PCA as a guide to placing the upgrade
firmware into the correct locations on the upgrade PCA. The location of the
ROM sockets is shown in Figure C–5.
6. Slide the new autochanger controller PCA into place.
7. Attach the PCA mounting plate to the frame with the single T-25 screw
previously removed.
C–6 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
8. Replace the connectors to the PCA as they were on the original controller
PCA.
Figure C–4 Autochanger Controller PCA Mounting
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–7
Figure C–5 Autochanger PCA Connectors/Components
1
2
3
12
4
5
6
11
7
10
8
9
C–8 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
No.
Connector/Component
No.
Connector/Component
1
Power in
7
To interconnect PCA
2
To door interlock
8
ROM sockets
3
Motor control (power)
9
Lithium battery
4
Motor control (functions)
10
RS-232 to control panel
5
Power in
11
Single-ended SCSI connector
6
To sensor receiver PCA
12
Cooling fan power
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–9
C.5 Installing the Additional Magazines
C.5.1 Opening the Front Door
Loosen the front panel latches by turning them counterclockwise with a long,
5/32-inch hex wrench. It may take several turns to release the spring-tensioned
latch.
•
The top latch is behind the TOP hole (Figure C–6).
•
The bottom latch is behind the BOTTOM hole of the second panel up from the
bottom (Figure C–6).
Figure C–6 Front Door Latch Holes
C–10 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
C.5.2 Mounting the Additional Magazines
1. Remove the T-25 screws that mount the mailslot cover panel (Figure C–7, 1).
Figure C–7 Mailslot Cover Panel
2
1
1
2
Note
Figure C–7, 2 also shows the guide pins used to position the cover during
re-assembly.
2. Remove the 14 T-25 screws holding the spacer panel in place (Figure C–8).
3. Remove the spacer.
4. Slide the seven magazines in the kit into their rails in the magazine rack.
5. Use the 14 screws removed from the old spacer to hold the additional
magazines in place (Figure C–9).
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–11
Figure C–8 Magazine Spacer and Mounting Screws
Magazine Spacer
Mounting
Screws (14)
C–12 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
Figure C–9 Installing the Additional Magazines
Magazine Assembly
Align Just the Upper Rail
of the Magazine with Side Slots
C.6 Reassembling the Optical Disk Library
Follow the appropriate instructions, in reverse, to reassemble the optical disk
library.
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–13
C.7 Adding Product Change Labels
1. Stick the upgrade product serial number label on the top rear of the rail
frame to the right of the existing product serial number label.
2. Stick the service information label on the lower rear outside panel above the
existing labels.
3. Remove the 60C nameplate on the front bezel and replace it with the 100C
nameplate, or remove the 120T nameplate and replace it with the 200T
nameplate.
4. Close and latch the front and rear doors.
C.8 Initializing NVRAM
The non-volatile RAM on the autochanger controller PCA MUST BE
INITIALIZED after firmware is changed or a new PCA is installed.
1. Set the default configuration—run CONF 16; CLEAR option.
2. Run CONF 18; "CLEAR" option.
3. Cycle power.
4. Run Test 10 to initialize the status of the elements.
C.9 Testing Optical Disk Library Operation
Note
Do not load cartridges into the new slots, 89 - 144 until testing is
complete.
Test the alignment of the mailslots.
1. Run Test 65, Calibrate Magazines. THIS TEST REQUIRES A DISK IN THE
MAILSLOT. The magazines must be empty.
To test magazine 12:
a. With READY displayed, press
b. Press
ENTER
c.
NEXT
Press
OPTION
. TEST 0 displays.
until 65 displays.
C–14 Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions
. TEST displays.
d. Press
ENTER
. ONCE * displays.
e.
Press
ENTER
. A flashing 1 displays.
f.
Press
NEXT
g. Press
until 12 displays.
ENTER
. RUN 65 displays.
2. Repeat the sequence above for magazines 13 to 18.
This test calculates a minimum and maximum clearance for each magazine.
The test passes if clearance is 85 encoder counts (1 mm) up and down. Check
INFO 24 (for magazine 1) through INFO 41 (for magazine 18) for actual
values. INFO 24-41 give the values in hexadecimal.
Note
Each running of Test 65 takes approximately one minute.
Capacity Upgrade Installation Instructions C–15
Index
A
AC PCA, 6–7
Adding Product Change Labels, C–14
Additional Explanation of Some Hardware
Error Codes, 4–27
AEC, A–3
Assemblies, 5–37
Exchange Parts, 5–37
Non-exchange, 5–38
Autochanger, 6–1
Autochanger Configuration Choices, 3–9
Autochanger Mechanism, 6–4
B
Basic Supplies, B–1
C
C1721C Upgrade Kit, C–1
Capacity Configurations, 1–5
Capacity Upgrade Installation
Instructions, C–1
Cleaning, 4–7
Tools Available, 4–8
Components, 1–2
Configuration, 3–4
Configuration 16, 5–35
Configuration 18, 5–36
Configurations, 1–5
Contents of Shipment, 2–3
Control Panel, 3–1, 3–2
Operations, 3–1
Tips, 3–2
Control Panel Operations, 3–1
Control Panel Tips, 3–2
Controller PCA, 6–4, 6–11
Controlling Mailslot Rotation, 3–8
D
Data Buffer, 6–12
DC PCA, 6–9
Diagnostic Test
Command Descriptions, 4–32, 4–36
Diagnostic Test Command Descriptions,
4–32, 4–36
Electronic Core Tests, 4–36
Sequence Tests, 4–32
Diagnostic Tests
Internal, 4–30
Diagnostics, 4–1, 4–30
Internal, 4–30
Offline, 4–30
Differential-ended SCSI Interface, 1–7
Disk Formats, 6–13
Drive Defect Management, 6–22
Drive SCSI-2 Reference, A–13
DSP Microprocessor and Support, 6–12
Index–1
E
G
Electronic Core Tests, 4–36
Environmental Requirements, 2–1
Clearance Requirements, 2–1
Operating Temperature, 2–1
Environmental/Installation/PM, 2–1
Error Detection, 6–27
Error Detection and Recovery, 6–26
Hardware Error Codes, 6–30
Move Errors, 6–29
Real Time Event Logging, 6–30
SCSI Detected Errors, 6–28
Error Information Through SCSI
Commands, 4–29
Error Recovery Processes, 6–28
Error Thresholds, 6–25
ESD Precautions, 5–1
Exchange Parts, 5–37
Exerciser Tests, 4–34
External Ground, 2–2
g=16
Values for n and m for 1.3-Gbyte, 6–21
F
Features, 1–1
Field Replaceable Units, 5–40, 5–42,
5–43, 5–44, 5–45, 5–46
Field-Replaceable Assemblies, 5–1
FIND HOME Sequence, 4–39
FIND HOME Sequence
Micro-Move Reference Table, 4–46
Formatter/Sequencer, 6–12
Front Panel
Operations, 3–1
Front Panel Operations, 3–1
FRU Isolation Test Sequence, 4–13
FRUs, 5–40, 5–42, 5–43, 5–44, 5–45,
5–46
H
Hardware Error Codes, 4–16, 6–30
Additional Explanation, 4–27
Hardware Error Codes and Recovery
Procedures, 4–16
Hardware Errors, 4–15
Codes, 4–16
Recovery Procedures, 4–16
Hardware Verification, 2–8
Host Configuration, 3–9
How to Use the Results of the Internal
Tests, 4–12
HP-Specific Error Codes, A–19
I
Information Logs, 4–14, 4–49
Procedure, 4–14
Initializing NVRAM, C–14
Installation Procedures, 2–3
Installing the Additional Magazines,
C–10
Installing the Optical Library, 2–6
Internal Diagnostic Tests, 4–30
Internal Tests, 4–12
L
Loader Mechanism, 6–13
Location Requirements, 2–2
Weight Bearing Requirements, 2–2
M
Magneto-Optical Disks, 1–6
Mechanism Assembly, 6–13
Micro-Move Reference Table, 4–46
Index–2
Mounting the Additional Magazines,
C–11
Move Errors, 6–29
Moving the Optical Disk Library, 2–9,
2–10
Long Distance, 2–10
Short Distance, 2–9
Multifunction Magneto-Optical Drives,
6–11
N
Non-exchange Assemblies, 5–38
O
Offline Diagnostic Information, A–1
System Error Report, A–1
Offline Diagnostics, 4–30, A–27
Opening the Front Door, 5–7
Opening the Rear Door, 5–3
Operation Error Information, 4–2
Optical Disk Cleaning, 4–7, 4–8
Optical Disk Error Correction
Error Thresholds, 6–25
Replacement Sparing Algorithm, 6–24
Slip Sparing Algorithm, 6–24
Optical Disk Layout
650-Mbyte Capacity, 6–14
User Zone Layout, 650-Mbyte Capacity,
6–15
Optical Disks, 1–6
Optical Drive Mechanism, 1–5
Optical Head, 6–13
Overview, 1–1
P
Physical Characteristics, 1–10
Physical Revolution to Logical Track
Layout, 6–21
Power Supply Module, 6–7
Power Supply Specifications, 6–11
Power-on Self-test, 4–5
Preventative Maintenance, 2–15
Primary Power, 2–2
Product Components, 1–2
Product Configuration, 3–1
Product Matrix, 1–8
Product numbers, 1–8
Product Operation, 3–1
R
Re-initializing the Autochanger Controller
PCA RAM, 5–34
Read and Write Channel Electronics,
6–12
Real Time Event Logging, 6–30
Reassembling the Optical Disk Library,
C–13
Recommended Service Kit, 5–37
Recovery from Hardware Errors, 4–15
Related Documents, 1–15
Removal and Replacement, 5–1
Assembly/Disassembly Procedures,
5–2
Autochanger Controller PCA, 5–23
Carriage/Picker Assembly, 5–20
Cooling Fan Assembly, 5–28
Front Panel PCA, 5–8
Interconnect PCA, 5–33
Leadscrew Motor, 5–14
Leadscrew/Leadscrew Motor Drive Belt,
5–15
Lower Rear Panel, 5–9
Mailslot Assembly, 5–32
Opening the Front Door, 5–7
Opening the Rear Door, 5–3
Optical Drives, 5–29
Optical Sensors, 5–31
Picker Motor and/or Picker Motor Drive
Belts, 5–17
Power Supply, 5–12
Removing the Rear Door, 5–6
SCSI Repeater PCA, 5–11
Sensor Receiver PCA, 5–21
Sensor Transmitter PCA, 5–20
Index–3
Removal and Replacement (cont’d)
Service Access, 5–3
Tools Required, 5–2
Removing a Disk, 4–8
Using the Eject Tool, 4–8
Removing the Autochanger Controller
PCA, 5–23
Removing the Carriage/Picker Assembly,
5–20
Removing the Cooling Fan Assembly,
5–28
Removing the Front Panel PCA, 5–8
Removing the Interconnect PCA, 5–33
Removing the Leadscrew Motor, 5–14
Removing the Leadscrew/Leadscrew Motor
Drive Belt, 5–15
Removing the Lower Rear Panel, 5–9
Removing the Mailslot Assembly, 5–32
Removing the Optical Drives, 5–29
Removing the Optical Sensors, 5–31
Removing the Picker Motor and/or Picker
Motor Drive Belts, 5–17
Removing the Power Supply, 5–12
Removing the Rear Door, 5–6
Removing the SCSI Repeater PCA, 5–11
Removing the Sensor Receiver PCA, 5–21
Removing the Sensor Transmitter PCA,
5–20
Reorderable Parts, B–1
Replaceable Parts, 5–37
Replacement Sparing Algorithm, 6–24
Restricting Disk Insertion and Removal,
3–7
Results of the Internal Tests, 4–12
S
SCSI Address, 3–3
SCSI Command Set, 6–32
SCSI Commands
Error Information, 4–29
SCSI Controller, 6–11
SCSI Detected Errors, 6–28
Index–4
SCSI Interface, 6–31
SCSI Interface Options, 1–7
Differential-ended SCSI Interface, 1–7
Single-ended SCSI Interface, 1–7
Securing the Optical Disk Library, 3–5
Controlling Mailslot Rotation, 3–8
Restricting Disk Insertion and
Removal, 3–7
Setting a Security Code, 3–6
Sequence Tests, 4–32
Service Access, 5–3
Service Recommendations, 2–15
Servo PCA, 6–12
Setting a Configuration, 3–4
Setting the SCSI Address, 3–3
Single-ended SCSI Interface, 1–7
Slip Sparing Algorithm, 6–24
Specifications, 1–9
T
Testing Optical Disk Library Operation,
C–14
Theory of Operation, 6–1
AC PCA, 6–7
Autochanger, 6–1
Autochanger Mechanism, 6–4
Controller PCA, 6–4, 6–11
Data Buffer, 6–12
DC PCA, 6–9
Drive Defect Management, 6–22
DSP Microprocessor and Support/Servo
Control Loops, 6–12
Formatter/Sequencer, 6–12
Loader Mechanism, 6–13
Mechanism Assembly, 6–13
Movements, 6–1
Multifunction Magneto-Optical Drives,
6–11
Optical Head, 6–13
Power Supply Module, 6–7
Read and Write Channel Electronics,
6–12
SCSI Command Set, 6–32
SCSI Controller, 6–11
Theory of Operation (cont’d)
SCSI Interface, 6–31
Servo PCA, 6–12
Troubleshooting, 4–1, 4–9, 4–10, 4–12
Autochanger Lists the First "Possibles",
4–10
FRU Isolation Test Sequence, 4–13
Results of the Internal Tests, 4–12
Using the Control Panel and
Observation, 4–9
Variables Cleared by Configuration 18,
5–36
W
Weight Bearing Requirements, 2–2
U
Uncrating, 2–4
Upgrade, C–1
Upgrade Kit
Adding Product Change Labels, C–14
Initializing NVRAM, C–14
Installing the Additional Magazines,
C–10
Mounting the Additional Magazines,
C–11
Opening the Front Door, C–10
Opening the Rear Door, C–2
Reassembling the Optical Disk Library,
C–13
Removing Power from the Optical Disk
Library, C–2
Removing the Controller PCA, C–6
Removing the Lower Rear Panel, C–4
Testing Optical Disk Library Operation,
C–14
Tools Needed, C–1
Upgrade Kit Parts, C–1
Using the Eject Tool to Remove a Disk,
4–8
V
Values for n and m for 1.3-Gbyte with
g=16, 6–21
Variables Cleared by Configuration 16,
5–35
Index–5