Q45H-63 Combined Chlorine Measurement System

Model Q45H/63
Combined Chlorine
Measurement
System
Home Office
Analytical Technology, Inc.
6 Iron Bridge Drive
Collegeville, PA 19426
Ph: 800-959-0299
610-917-0991
Fax: 610-917-0992
Email: sales@analyticaltechnology.com
European Office
ATI (UK) Limited
Unit 1 & 2 Gatehead Business Park
Delph New Road, Delph
Saddleworth OL3 5DE
Ph: +44 (0)1457-873-318
Fax: + 44 (0)1457-874-468
Email:sales@atiuk.com
PRODUCT WARRANTY
Analytical Technology, Inc. (Manufacturer) warrants to the Customer that if any part(s)
of the Manufacturer's products proves to be defective in materials or workmanship
within the earlier of 18 months of the date of shipment or 12 months of the date of startup, such defective parts will be repaired or replaced free of charge. Inspection and
repairs to products thought to be defective within the warranty period will be completed
at the Manufacturer's facilities in Collegeville, PA. Products on which warranty repairs
are required shall be shipped freight prepaid to the Manufacturer. The product(s) will be
returned freight prepaid and allowed if it is determined by the manufacturer that the
part(s) failed due to defective materials or workmanship.
This warranty does not cover consumable items, batteries, or wear items subject to
periodic replacement including lamps and fuses.
Gas sensors, except oxygen sensors, are covered by this warranty, but are subject to
inspection for evidence of extended exposure to excessive gas concentrations. Should
inspection indicate that sensors have been expended rather than failed prematurely, the
warranty shall not apply.
The Manufacturer assumes no liability for consequential damages of any kind, and the
buyer by acceptance of this equipment will assume all liability for the consequences of
its use or misuse by the Customer, his employees, or others. A defect within the
meaning of this warranty is any part of any piece of a Manufacturer's product which
shall, when such part is capable of being renewed, repaired, or replaced, operate to
condemn such piece of equipment.
This warranty is in lieu of all other warranties (including without limiting the generality of
the foregoing warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose),
guarantees, obligations or liabilities expressed or implied by the Manufacturer or its
representatives and by statute or rule of law.
This warranty is void if the Manufacturer's product(s) has been subject to misuse or
abuse, or has not been operated or stored in accordance with instructions, or if the
serial number has been removed.
Analytical Technology, Inc. makes no other warranty expressed or implied except as
stated above.
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Table of Contents
PART 1 - INTRODUCTION ................................. 5
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
PART 7 – CALIBRATION ...................................65
General ...................................................... 5
Standard System ....................................... 6
Features ..................................................... 9
Q45H/63 System Specifications ..............11
Q45H Performance Specifications ...........13
7.1
7.11
7.12
7.2
7.3
7.31
7.32
PART 2 – ANALYZER MOUNTING .................14
2.1
2.2
2.3
General .....................................................14
Wall or Pipe Mount..................................17
Panel Mount, AC Powered Monitor ........19
PART 8 – PID CONTROLLER DETAILS .........72
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
PART 3 – SENSOR/FLOWCELL MOUNTING 20
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
General .....................................................20
Constant-Head Flowcell...........................20
Sealed Flowcell ........................................21
Submersion Mounting ..............................23
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
General .....................................................24
Two-Wire .................................................25
Load Drive ...............................................28
115/230 VAC w/Relays ...........................28
Sensor Wiring ..........................................31
Direct Sensor Connection ........................31
Junction Box Connection .........................33
Optional pH Sensor Input ........................34
9.7
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
Chlorine Sensor Preparation ....................37
Optional pH Sensor ..................................39
PART 6 – CONFIGURATION .............................40
6.1
User Interface ...........................................40
6.11 Keys .........................................................41
6.12 Display .....................................................41
6.2
Software ...................................................43
6.21 Software Navigation ...............................43
6.22 Measure Menu [MEASURE] ...................46
6.23 Calibration Menu [CAL].............................47
6.24 Configuration Menu [CONFIG] ..............49
6.25 Control Menu [CONTROL] ....................55
6.26 Diagnostics Menu [DIAG] .........................61
General .....................................................82
External Sources of Problems ..................82
Analyzer Tests .........................................84
Display Messages ....................................85
Sensor Tests .............................................87
Troubleshooting (Q22P Sensor)...............89
SPARE PARTS ......................................................90
SPARE PARTS (CONT’D) ...................................91
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General .....................................................77
Analyzer Maintenance .............................77
Sensor Maintenance .................................77
Sensor Acid Cleaning ..............................78
Q22P Sensor Cleaning .............................79
Replacing the Saltbridge and Reference
Buffer Solution ..........................................80
Flow Cell Maintenance ............................81
PART 10 – TROUBLESHOOTING ....................82
PART 5 – SENSOR ASSEMBLY .........................37
5.1
5.2
PID Description .......................................72
PID Algorithm .........................................72
Classical PID Tuning ...............................74
Manual PID Override Control..................75
Common PID Pitfalls ...............................75
PART 9 – SYSTEM MAINTENANCE ................77
PART 4 – ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION ......24
4.1
4.2
4.21
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
Chlorine Calibration.................................65
Chlorine Zero Cal ....................................65
Chlorine Span Cal ....................................66
Temperature Calibration ..........................68
pH Calibration..........................................69
Two-Point pH Cal ....................................70
One-Point pH Cal.....................................71
Table of Figures
FIGURE 1 - TYPICAL; MONITORING SYSTEM .................................................................................... 6
FIGURE 2 - CHLORINE SYSTEM W/OPTIONAL PH BAYONET STYLE SENSOR ...................................... 7
FIGURE 3 - SEALED FLOWCELL ASSEMBLIES WITH FLOW CONTROL ................................................. 8
FIGURE 4 - Q45 ENCLOSURE DIMENSIONS, AC POWERED UNITS .................................................. 15
FIGURE 5 - Q45 ENCLOSURE DIMENSIONS, 2-WIRE & BATTERY UNITS .......................................... 16
FIGURE 6 - WALL OR PIPE MOUNT BRACKET ................................................................................ 17
FIGURE 7 - PIPE MOUNTING DIAGRAM.......................................................................................... 17
FIGURE 8 - WALL MOUNTING DIAGRAM ........................................................................................ 18
FIGURE 9 - 115/230 VAC PANEL MOUNT AND CUT-OUT ................................................................ 19
FIGURE 10 - CONSTANT HEAD FLOWCELL DETAILS ....................................................................... 20
FIGURE 11 - SEALED FLOWCELL DETAILS..................................................................................... 21
FIGURE 12 - SEALED PH FLOWCELL DETAILS ............................................................................... 22
FIGURE 13 - SUBMERSIBLE SENSOR MOUNTING ASSEMPART 4 – ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION.......... 23
FIGURE 14 - LOOP-POWER SENSOR CONNECTION ....................................................................... 26
FIGURE 15 - AC POWER SENSOR CONNECTION ........................................................................... 27
FIGURE 16 - LINE POWER CONNECTION ....................................................................................... 30
FIGURE 17 - DC POWER CONNECTION......................................................................................... 30
FIGURE 18 - RELAY CONTACTS ................................................................................................... 31
FIGURE 19 - SENSOR CABLE PREPARATION ................................................................................. 32
FIGURE 20 - JUNCTION BOX INTERCONNECT WIRING .................................................................... 33
FIGURE 21 - OPTIONAL PH SENSOR CONNECTION ........................................................................ 35
FIGURE 22 - OPTIONAL PH SENSOR CONNECTION W/JUNCTION BOX ............................................. 36
FIGURE 23 - CHLORINE SENSOR ASSEMBLY ................................................................................. 37
FIGURE 24 - SUBMERSIBLE CHLORINE SENSOR ASSEMBLY ........................................................... 38
FIGURE 25 - USER INTERFACE..................................................................................................... 40
FIGURE 26 - SOFTWARE MAP ...................................................................................................... 45
FIGURE 27 - AUTOMATIC PH BUFFER TABLES ............................................................................... 54
FIGURE 28 - CONTROL RELAY EXAMPLE, HYSTERESIS AND TOW OPPOSITE PHASE OPTIONS ......... 59
FIGURE 29 - ALARM RELAY EXAMPLE .......................................................................................... 60
FIGURE 30 - Q45H ISA (IDEAL) PID EQUATION ............................................................................ 73
FIGURE 31 - REPLACING THE SALTBRIDGE AND REFERENCE BUFFER ............................................ 80
FIGURE 32 - Q45H DISPLAY MESSAGES ...................................................................................... 85
FIGURE 33 - Q45H DISPLAY MESSAGES (CONTINUED) ................................................................. 86
FIGURE 34 - PT100 RTD TABLE .................................................................................................. 88
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Part 1 - Introduction
1.1
General
The Model Q45H/63 is a highly versatile on-line monitoring system designed for the
continuous measurement of combined chlorine in solution. The full scale operating
range of the system may be selected by the user for 0-200.0 ppb, 0-2.000 ppm, 0-20.00
ppm, or 0-200.0 ppm, and the sensing system will operate on water streams with
temperatures ranging from 0 to 55°C. The Q45H/63 Combined Chlorine Measurement
System is well suited for chloraminated potable water systems, activated carbon filter
break-through detection, and for monitoring wastewater treatment effluents where
sufficient ammonia is present to insure that the majority of the chlorine residual is
monochloramine.
The basic sensing element used in the combined chlorine monitor is a polarographic
membrane sensor which measures chlorine directly. Water simply flows past the
sensor and directly to drain, with the flow rate and pressure across the sensor controlled
by a constant head flow cell assembly. The chlorine measurement does not alter the
sample or add any chemicals to the sample stream, so the water flow can return to the
system if desired.
Q45H/63 Monitors are available in four electronic versions, a loop-powered 2-wire
transmitter, an AC powered monitor with integral alarm relays and dual 4-20 mA output
capability, a 12-24 VDC unit with dual output and relays, or a 9 VDC battery operated
portable unit with two voltage outputs and built-in data logger.
In addition to normal chlorine measurement, the Q45H/63 is also available with an
optional pH input with provides a two-parameter monitoring system. On AC or battery
operated units, analog outputs are available for BOTH chlorine and pH.
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1.2
Part 1 - Introduction
Standard System
The standard model Q45H/63 system includes three main components, the
Q45H analyzer, a constant head flow cell, and a combined chlorine sensor. A
low-volume flowcell is also available for applications where sample flowrate and
pressure can be carefully controlled. Figure 1 shows a typical installation
including the optional pH sensor.
For connection of the sensor to the electronics, a 25' cable is supplied. An
additional 100 feet of interconnect cable may be added using #07-0100 junction
box. All required spare parts are also provided with the basic system, including
spare membranes, electrolyte, o-rings, and any special hardware.
Figure 1 - Typical; Monitoring System
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Figure 2 below shows the same standard flowcell assembly and chlorine sensor
along with the conventional type pH sensor. A special adapter is required to hold
the pH sensor in its proper location in the flowcell inlet chamber.
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Figure 2 - Chlorine System w/Optional pH Bayonet Style Sensor
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Figure 3 below shows an installation using a 00-1522 sealed flowcell for the chlorine
sensor and a 00-1527 sealed flowcell for the pH sensor. This type of installation
requires careful flow control. We recommend the use of our 03-0372 flow control
assembly when using sealed flowcells. This assembly consists of an in-line filter and a
fixed-flow regulator which will maintain a constant 400 cc/min flowrate through the
system. This flow will be maintained so long as inlet pressures are between 5 and 125
PSIG. The in-line filter is used mainly to protect the flow control element against larger
particles that might cause plugging of the device.
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Figure 3 - Sealed Flowcell Assemblies with Flow Control
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1.3
Part 1 - Introduction
Features
·
Standard Q45H/63 electronic transmitters are designed to be a fully isolated,
loop powered instruments for 2-wire DC applications. Optional integral power
supply card for 115/230 VAC operation, 12-24 vdc, and optional battery power
supply card for portable datalogging applications are available.
·
High accuracy, high sensitivity system, measures from 0.1 ppb to 200.0 ppm
through 4 internal automatic ranges. User ranges of 200.0 ppb, 2.000 ppm,
20.00 ppm, or 200.0 ppm.
·
Output Hold, Output Simulate, Output Alarm, and Output Delay Functions. All
forced changes in output condition include bumpless transfer to provide gradual
return to on-line signal levels and to avoid system control shocks on both analog
outputs.
·
AC power option provides dual SPDT relay operation and one additional isolated
analog output. Software settings for relay control include setpoint, deadband,
phase, delay, and failsafe. Software controls automatically appear in menu list
when hardware option card is plugged in and system power is applied.
·
Selectable PID controller on main analog output. PID controller can operate with
instrument configured as loop-power transmitter, or as one of the two outputs on
the AC powered instrument. PID includes manual operation feature, and
diagnostic “stuck-controller” timer feature for relay notification of control
problems.
·
Two analog outputs on the relay version may be configured to track chlorine and
temperature, chlorine and chlorine, or chlorine and pH. Both analog outputs can
be individually programmed to fail to specific values.
·
Optional pH sensor feature enables active pH measurement with the Q45H/63
monitor. The pH reading can also be sent to one of the analog outputs for
complete pH + chlorine monitoring.
·
Selectable Output Fail Alarm feature on Relay B allows system diagnostic
failures to be sent to external monitoring systems.
·
Large, high contrast, custom Super-Twist display provides excellent readability
even in low light conditions. The secondary line of display utilizes 5x7 dot matrix
characters for clear message display two of four measured parameters may be
on the display simultaneously.
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·
Diagnostic messages provide a clear description of any problem with no
confusing error codes to look up. Messages are also included for diagnosing
calibration problems.
·
Quick and easy one-point calibration method and sensor zero-cal. To provide
high accuracy, all calibration methods include stability monitors that check
temperature and main parameter stability before accepting data.
·
High accuracy three-wire Pt100 temperature input. Temperature element can be
user calibrated.
·
Security lock feature to prevent unauthorized tampering with transmitter settings.
All settings can be viewed while locked, but they cannot be changed.
·
High reliability, microprocessor-based system with non-volatile memory back-up
that utilizes no batteries. Low mass, surface mount PCB construction containing
no adjustment potentiometers. All factory calibrations stored in non-volatile
EEPROM.
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1.4
Part 1 - Introduction
Q45H/63 System Specifications
(Common to all variations)
Displayed Parameters
Main input, 0.1 ppb (0.0001 ppm) to 200.0 ppm
Sensor temperature, -10.0 to 55.0 °C (23 to 131 ºF)
Sensor Current, 0.0–999.9 nA, 0.000 to 99.99 uA
Loop current, 4.00 to 20.00 mA
Sensor slope/offset
Model number and software version
PID Controller Status
Optional pH Input value. 0.00 to 14.00 pH
Main Parameter Ranges
Manual selection of one of the following ranges,
0.000 to 200.0 ppb
0.0 to 2.000 ppm
0.00 to 20.00 ppm
0.00 to 200.0 ppm
Display
Large, high-contrast, Super-Twist (STN) LCD;
4-digit main display with sign, 0.75" (19.1 mm) sevensegment characters
12-digit secondary display, 0.3" (7.6 mm) 5x7 dot matrix
characters
Keypad
4-key membrane type with tactile feedback, polycarbonate
with UV coating
Weight
DC transmitter configuration: 1 lb. (0.45 kg)
Line powered unit:
1.5 lb. (0.68 kg)
Ambient Temperature
Analyzer Service, -20 to 60 °C (-4 to 140 ºF)
Sensor Service, -5 to 55°C (23 to 131 °F)
Storage, -5 to 70 °C (-22 to 158 ºF)
Ambient Humidity
0 to 95%, indoor/outdoor use, non-condensing to rated
ambient temperature range
Altitude
Up to 2000 m (6562 Ft.)
Electrical Certification
Ordinary Location, cCSAus (CSA and UL standards - both
approved by CSA), pollution degree 2, installation category
2
EMI/RFI Influence
Designed to EN 61326-1
Output Isolation
600 V galvanic isolation
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Filter
Adjustable 0-9.9 minutes additional damping to 90% step
input
Temperature Input
Pt100 RTD with automatic compensation
Sensor
2-electrode polarographic membrane sensor for direct
measurement of chlorine,
Sensor Materials
Noryl and stainless steel
Sensor Cable
25 ft. (7.5 meter) cable with 6-pin plug.
Max. Sensor-to-Analyzer
Distance
100 feet (30.5 meters), with junction box
Optional pH Input
0-14 pH corresponding to approx. 0.3 – 1.5 VDC
Flow Cell
Constant head overflow, clear cast acrylic, 7-30 GPH, 15
GPH recommended, inlet is ¼” hose barb at 1/8” MNPT,
outlet is ½” hose barb at 3/8” MNPT
(NOT common to all variations)
Standard 2-Wire (Loop-powered) Transmitter:
Power
16-35 VDC (2-wire device)
Enclosure:
NEMA 4X, polycarbonate, stainless steel hardware,
weatherproof and corrosion resistant,
HWD: 4.4" (112 mm) x 4.4" (112 mm) x 3.5" (89 mm)
Mounting Options
Wall or pipe mount bracket standard. Bracket suitable for
either 1.5” or 2” I.D. U-Bolts for pipe mounting.
Conduit Openings
Two PG-9 openings with gland seals
DC Cable Type
Belden twisted-pair, shielded, 22 gauge or larger
Insertion Loss
16 VDC
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12-24 VC/115/230 VAC + Dual Relay Option:
Power
115/230 VAC ± 10%, 50/60 Hz, 10 VA max
12-24 VDC, 250 mA max.
Enclosure, AC Powered
NEMA 4X, polycarbonate, stainless steel hardware,
weatherproof and corrosion resistant,
HWD: 4.9" (124 mm) x 4.9" (124 mm) x 5.5" (139 mm)
Mounting Options
Wall or pipe mount bracket standard. Bracket suitable for
either 1.5” or 2” I.D. U-Bolts for pipe mounting.
Panel mount adapter optional.
Conduit Openings
Three ½” NPT. Gland seals supplied but not installed.
Relays, Electromechanical:
Two SPDT, 6 amp @ 250 VAC, 5 amp @ 24 VDC
contacts. Software selection for setpoint, phase, delay,
deadband, hi-lo alarm, and failsafe. A-B indicators on
main LCD.
Analog Outputs
Two 4-20 mA outputs. Output one programmable for PPM
chlorine or PID. Output 2 programmable for PPM chlorine,
Temperature, or pH. Max load 500 Ohms for each output.
Outputs ground isolated and isolated from each other.
Max. load for outputs on 12-24 VDC powered units is 400
ohms.
1.5
Q45H Performance Specifications
(Common to all variations)
Accuracy
0.5% of selected range or 0.02 PPM
Repeatability
0.3% of selected range or 0.01 PPM
Sensitivity
0.05% of selected range
Non-linearity
0.1% of selected range
Warm-up Time
3 seconds to rated performance (electronics only)
Supply Voltage Effects
± 0.05% span
Instrument Response Time
60 seconds to 90% of step input at lowest damping
Equipment bearing this marking may not be discarded by traditional
methods in the European community after August 12 2005 per EU Directive
2002/96/EC. End users must return old equipment to the manufacturer for
proper disposal.
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Part 2 – Analyzer Mounting
2.1
General
All Q45 Series instruments offer maximum mounting flexibility. A bracket is
included with each unit that allows mounting to walls or pipes. In all cases,
choose a location that is readily accessible for calibrations. Also consider that it
may be necessary to utilize a location where solutions can be used during the
calibration process. To take full advantage of the high contrast display, mount
the instrument in a location where the display can be viewed from various angles
and long distances.
Locate the instrument in close proximity to the point of sensor installation - this
will allow easy access during calibration. The sensor-to-instrument distance
should not exceed 100 feet. To maximize signal-to-noise ratio however, work
with the shortest sensor cable possible. The standard cable length of the
chlorine sensor is 25 feet.
Due to the flexibility of the instrument design, some of the mounting features
change based on the configuration that was ordered. For example, the 2-wire
transmitter version is different for the 115/230 VAC controller because the rear of
the enclosure is much deeper when the AC powered unit is used. In addition, the
AC powered unit has an integrated panel mount flange requiring a single cutout
for flush mounting. In the 2-wire transmitter configuration, just the front of the
enclosure can be mounted, but the cutout also requires accurate location of 4
mounting holes. Refer to Figure 4 and Figure 5 for detailed dimensions of each
type of system.
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Figure 4 - Q45 Enclosure Dimensions, AC Powered Units
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4.38
(111.2)
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(66.3)
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4.38
(111.2)
2.61
(66.3)
#10-32 UNF
(4 PLACES)
FRONT VIEW
BACK VIEW
1" NPT
.82
(20.8)
1.23
1.23
(31.2) (31.2)
1.68
(42.7)
PORT
(2 PLACES)
3.45
(87.6)
BOTTOM VIEW
SIDE VIEW
Figure 5 - Q45 Enclosure Dimensions, 2-Wire & Battery Units
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2.2
Part 2 - Introduction
Wall or Pipe Mount
A PVC mounting bracket with attachment screws is supplied with each
transmitter (see Figure 6 for dimensions). The multi-purpose bracket is attached
to the rear of the enclosure using the four flat head screws. The instrument is
then attached to the wall using the four outer mounting holes in the bracket.
These holes are slotted to accommodate two sizes of u-bolt that may be used to
pipe mount the unit. Slots will accommodate u-bolts designed for 1½ “ or 2” pipe.
The actual center to center dimensions for the u-bolts are shown in the drawing.
Note that these slots are for u-bolts with ¼-20 threads. The 1½” pipe u-bolt (2”
I.D. clearance) is available from ATI in type 304 stainless steel under part
number (47-0005).
Figure 6 - Wall or Pipe Mount Bracket
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Figure 8 - Wall Mounting Diagram
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2.3
Part 2 - Introduction
Panel Mount, AC Powered Monitor
Panel mounting of an AC powered monitor uses the panel mounting flange
molded into the rear section of the enclosure. Figure 9 provides dimensions for
the panel cutout required for mounting.
The panel mounting bracket kit must be ordered separately (part number 050068). This kit contains a metal retainer bracket that attaches to the rear of the
enclosure, 4 screws for attachment of this bracket, and a sealing gasket to insure
that the panel mounted monitor provides a water tight seal when mounted to a
panel.
The sealing gasket must first be attached to the enclosure. The gasket contains
an adhesive on one side so that it remains in place on the enclosure. Remove
the protective paper from the adhesive side of the gasket and slide the gasket
over the back of the enclosure so that the adhesive side lines up with the back of
the enclosure flange. Once in place, you can proceed to mount the monitor in
the panel.
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Figure 9 - 115/230 VAC Panel Mount and Cut-out
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Part 3 – Sensor/Flowcell Mounting
3.1
General
Select a location within the maximum sensor cable length for mounting of the
sensor flow cell.
3.2
Constant-Head Flowcell
Chlorine sensors are best used in a constant-head overflow chamber because
variations in sample flow rate and pressure can cause unstable readings. When
monitoring low concentrations (below 0.5 PPM), this method should always be
used.
Mechanical installation of the flow cell requires that it be mounted to a wall or
other convenient flat surface. Alternatively, the mounting holes on the plate will
accommodate a 2" U-bolt for mounting the plate to a 2" pipe. Figure 10 shows
the dimensions and mounting hole locations for the flow cell. Be sure to allow
enough clearance on the left side of the flow cell for insertion and removal of the
sensor. About 12 inches clearance is recommended.
Figure 10 - Constant Head Flowcell Details
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Part 3 – Sensor/Flowcell Mounting
Once mounted, inlet and drain connections must be made. The flow cell
contains a 1/8" MNPT inlet connection and a 3/8" MNPT drain connection. Hose
barbs for the inlet and drain connections are supplied with the flow cell for use
with flexible tubing. The inlet hose barb is used with ¼" I.D. tubing and the drain
hose barb is used with ½" I.D. tubing.
3.3 Sealed Flowcell
Applications where the sample inlet flow is well controlled can use a simpler
sealed flowcell. Using this flowcell requires that flow be controlled externally to
about 400 cc/min. Variable flow rate or variable pressure will cause unstable
readings in this flowcell. ATI offers a special flow control element that can be
used ahead of this flowcell on the incoming sample line. The flow control is part
no. (55-0048). It will control the inlet flowrate at 400 cc/min. with inlet pressure
variations from 5-150 PSIG. A 50 micron y-strainer ahead of the flow control
element is recommended. The sealed flowcell provides a drain vent with check
valve to avoid pulling a vacuum on the flow chamber.
Figure 11 - Sealed Flowcell Details
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Figure 12 - Sealed pH Flowcell Details
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3.4
Part 3 – Sensor/Flowcell Mounting
Submersion Mounting
Some applications are much easier done using the submersible sensor. This
method can sometimes be used where flow is reasonably constant, and hydraulic
head does not vary appreciably. Chlorine sensors can never be used in
completely stagnant conditions. A flow velocity of at least 0.3 feet per second is
normally required for measurement. Any applications for a submersible chlorine
sensor should first be discussed with ATI. A trial of such installations may be
necessary.
Submersible sensors are mounted to a 1" pipe using a standard 1" PVC thread
by thread pipe coupling. The mounting pipe can be secured to standard 1½"
pipe rail using a mounting bracket kit available from ATI (part number 00-0628)
as shown in Figure 13.
SENSOR CABLE
2" HANDRAIL
SWIVEL MOUNTING BRACKET WITH
HARDWARE, SUPPLIED BY ATI
1" T x T PVC COUPLING
SUPPLIED BY ATI
1" ALUMINUM CONDUIT, THREADED
ONE END OR 1" SCHED 80 PVC PIPE
LENGTH AS REQUIRED
(SUPPLIED BY CUSTOMER)
SENSOR, TYPICAL
2 - 3 FT. SUBMERGENCE
Figure 13 - Submersible Sensor Mounting AssemPart 4 – Electrical Installation
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4.1
General
The Q45 is powered in one of two ways, depending on the version purchased.
The 2-wire version is a 16-35 VDC powered transmitter. The integral 115/230
VAC version requires line power. DC powered units with relays may be powered
from either 12 or 24 VDC regulated power supplies (customer supplied). Please
verify the type of unit before connecting any power.
WARNING: Do not connect AC line power to the 2-wire module.
Severe damage will result.
Important Notes:
1. Use wiring practices that conform to all national, state and local
electrical codes. For proper safety as well as stable measuring
performance, it is important that the earth ground connection be made
to a solid ground point from terminal 15 (Figure 14). The AC power
supply contains a single 100mA (115V) or 50mA (230V) slo-blo fuse.
The DC powered version contains a 250 mA fuse. The fuse F1 is
located adjacent to TB5 and is easily replaceable.
2. Do NOT run sensor cables or instrument 4-20 mA output wiring in the
same conduit that contains AC power wiring. AC power wiring should
be run in a dedicated conduit to prevent electrical noise from coupling
with the instrumentation signals.
3. This analyzer must be installed by specifically trained personnel in
accordance with relevant local codes and instructions contained in this
operating manual. Observe the analyzer's technical specifications and
input ratings. Proper electrical disconnection means must be provided
prior to the electrical power connected to this instrument, such as a
circuit breaker - rated 250 VAC, 2 A minimum. If one line of the line
power mains is not neutral, use a double-pole mains switch to
disconnect the analyzer.
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4.2
Part 4 – Electrical Installation
Two-Wire
In the two-wire configuration, a separate DC power supply must be used to
power the instrument. The exact connection of this power supply is dependent
on the control system into which the instrument will connect. See Figure 14 for
further details. Any twisted pair shielded cable can be used for connection of the
instrument to the power supply. Route signal cable away from AC power lines,
adjustable frequency drives, motors, or other noisy electrical signal lines. Do not
run sensor or signal cables in conduit that contains AC power lines or motor
leads.
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Note: The BLUE wire is NOT
used when connecting a Flow
Style Probe to the transmitter
Figure 14 - Loop-Power Sensor Connection
Notes:
1. Voltage between Terminals 12 and 13 MUST be between 16 and 35 VDC.
2. Earth ground into Terminal 15 is HIGHLY recommended. This connection
can greatly improve stability in electrically noisy environments.
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Note: The BLUE wire is NOT
used when connecting a Flow
Style Probe to the transmitter
Figure 15 - AC Power Sensor Connection
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4.21
Part 4 – Electrical Installation
Load Drive
The amount of resistance that the analog output can drive in the 115/230 VAC
version is fixed. However, in the two-wire configuration, the load-drive level is
dependant on the DC supply voltage provided to the controller.
The two-wire instrument can operate on a power supply voltage of between 16
and 35 VDC. The available load drive capability can be calculated by applying
the formula V/I=R, where V=load drive voltage, I=maximum loop current (in
Amperes), and R=maximum resistance load (in Ohms).
To find the load drive voltage of the two-wire Q45, subtract 16 VDC from the
actual power supply voltage being used (the 16 VDC represents insertion loss).
For example, if a 24 VDC power supply is being used, the load drive voltage is 8
VDC.
The maximum loop current of the two-wire Q45 is always 20.00 mA, or .02 A.
Therefore,
(Power Supply Voltage - 16)
.02
=
RMAX
For example, if the power supply voltage is 24 VDC, first subtract 16 VDC, and
then divide the remainder by .02. 8/.02 = 400; therefore, a 400 Ohm maximum
load can be inserted into the loop with a 24 VDC power supply.
Similarly, the following values can be calculated:
Power Supply Voltage (VDC)
16.0
20.0
24.0
30.0
35.0
4.3
Total Load (Ohms)
0
200
400
700
950
115/230 VAC w/Relays
In the 115/230 VAC configuration, a DC power supply is mounted into the inside
rear of the enclosure. The power supply must be ordered with the proper
operating voltage. Verify that the unit requires either 115 VAC or 230 VAC
before installing. Also verify that power is fully disconnected before attempting to
wire.
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AC powered Q45 systems are supplied with 3 cable gland fittings and two ½”
conduit adapters. One of the cable glands has a larger hole in the rubber gland
and should be used for the power cord entry if a flexible power cord will be used
for installation. One of the cable glands with the smaller gland opening should
normally be used for the sensor cable. Cable glands and conduit hubs will screw
into any of the three threaded holes on the bottom of the enclosure.
Connect HOT, NEUTRAL, and GROUND to the matching designations on
terminal strip TB5.
WARNING
Disconnect line power voltage BEFORE connecting
line power wires to Terminal TB5 of the power supply.
The power supply accepts only standard three-wire
single phase power. The power supply is configured
for 115 VAC or 230 VAC operation at the factory at
time of order, and the power supply is labeled as
such. Do NOT connect voltages other than the
labeled requirement to the input.
The analog outputs from the system are present at terminals TB1 and TB2. The
loop-load limitation in this configuration is 500 Ohms maximum for each output.
Also note that these two outputs are completely isolated from each other to
insure that ground loops do not result from the connection of both outputs to the
same device such as a PLC or DCS.
In the line-powered unit, a ribbon cable connects the power supply assembly with
the microprocessor assembly located in the front section of the enclosure. This
cable can be removed during installation to facilitate wiring if desired. It is best to
unplug only one end. The ribbon cable has a marking stripe on one edge that is
used to indicate proper orientation. The indicator stripe should be on the bottom
edge of the cable when installed as shown in Figure 16.
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Figure 16 - Line Power Connection
The power strip, TB5, allows up to 12 AWG wire. A wire gauge of 16
AWG is recommended to allow for an easy pass-through into the ½” NPT
ports when wiring.
Figure 17 - DC Power Connection
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Two sets of SPDT relay contacts are provided on the power supply board. None
of the relay contacts are powered. The user must supply the proper power to the
contacts. For applications that require the same switched operating voltage as
the Q45 (115 or 230 V), power may be jumpered from the power input terminals
at TB5. Relay wiring is connected at TB3 as shown below. Note that the relay
contact markings are shown in the NORMAL mode. Programming a relay for
“Failsafe” operation reverses the NO and NC positions in this diagram.
Figure 18 - Relay Contacts
4.4
Sensor Wiring
The sensor cable can be quickly connected to the Q45 terminal strip by matching
the wire colors on the cable to the color designations on the label in the monitor.
Note that some submersible sensors have a brown wire instead of an
orange wire. If so, connect the brown wire to the terminal marked orange. A
junction box is also available to provide a break point for long sensor cable runs.
Route signal cable away from AC power lines, adjustable frequency drives,
motors, or other noisy electrical signal lines. Do not run sensor or signal cables
in conduit that contains AC power lines or motor leads.
4.5
Direct Sensor Connection
Sensor connections are made in accordance with Figure 19. The sensor cable
can be routed into the enclosure through cord-grips supplied with the unit.
Routing sensor wiring through conduit is only recommended if a junction box is to
be used. Some loose cable is needed near the installation point so that the
sensor can be inserted and removed easily from the flowcell.
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Cord-grips used for sealing the cable should be snugly tightened after electrical
connections have been made to prevent moisture incursion. When stripping
cables, leave adequate length for connections in the transmitter enclosure as
shown below. The standard 25 ft. sensor cable normally supplied with the
system is already stripped and ready for wiring. This cable can be cut to a
shorter length if desired to remove extra cable in a given installation. Do not cut
the cable so short as to make installation and removal of the sensor difficult.
.
Figure 19 - Sensor Cable Preparation
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4.6
Part 4 – Electrical Installation
Junction Box Connection
For installations where the sensor is to be located more than 25 feet from the
monitor (max. 100 feet), a junction box must be used. The junction box is shown
in Figure 20, and is supplied with two Pg9 gland seals, for sensor and
interconnect wiring installation.
Note: The BLUE wire is NOT
used when connecting a Flow
Style Probe to the transmitter
Figure 20 - Junction Box Interconnect Wiring
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4.7
Part 4 – Electrical Installation
Optional pH Sensor Input
The Q45H may be configured for pH compensation to maintain excellent
accuracy in applications where the pH can vary. To utilize the feature, a 0.3 –
1.5 VDC pH signal must be properly connected to terminals 5 and 6 of the
instrument. The pH input for compensation can come from either a combination
pH sensor, an ATI Q22 pH Sensor, or from the output of another pH transmitter
(see asterisk on next page). When using the input from a separate pH
transmitter, input isolation is critical and an isolator may be required for proper
operation. In addition, the pH input feature must be enabled, and the pH input
signal must be properly calibrated and the correct pH Sensor Type selected in
the Configuration Menu. Combination electrode Sensors, select Sensor Type #1,
& ATI Q22P or pH 4-20 Transmitters select Sensor Type #2. Note that jumpers
are installed at the factory between terminals 3 and 5, and terminals 6 and 9
when no pH sensor input is connected to reduce the potential for noise pickup.
Remove the jumpers if a pH sensor is added. See diagram on the next page
for sensor hook-up information.
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* Note: pH compensation signal may be
supplied from a separate isolated
voltage input of 0.3-1.5 VDC
(75 Ohm resistance across a 4-20
output)
Figure 21 - Optional pH Sensor Connection
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QUANTUM
Note: The BLUE wire is NOT
used when connecting a Flow
Style Probe to the transmitter
Figure 22 - Optional pH Sensor Connection w/Junction Box
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Part 5 – Sensor Assembly
5.1
Chlorine Sensor Preparation
The chlorine sensor supplied with the Q45H is shipped dry. It will not operate
until it is prepared by adding electrolyte and a membrane. Preparation of the
sensor for operation must be done carefully. The procedure should be done by a
qualified technician, and it should only be done when the system is ready for
operation. Until then, it is best to leave the sensor in the condition in which it is
received.
Figure 23 - Chlorine Sensor Assembly
Submersible chlorine sensors are made up of two separate parts, a submersion
holder that also contains the temperature compensating element and a sensing
module. The sensing module screws into the holder, with an o-ring providing a
water tight connection.
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Part 5 – Sensor Assembly
Figure 24 - Submersible Chlorine Sensor Assembly
Follow the procedure below to prepare the chlorine sensor for operation:
1. Unscrew the electrolyte chamber from the assembled sensor and also
remove the vent screw from the side of the sensor body.
2. Remove the front nut from the bottom of the chamber and discard the
protective membrane. O-rings are contained in grooves on both the bottom
and top of the chamber. Be sure that these o-rings remain in place.
3. From the package of membranes supplied with the sensor, place a new
membrane into the front nut. The membrane is white in color and is
separated from other membranes by a light blue paper spacer.
CRITICAL NOTE:
The 05-0023 membrane used on the combined chlorine
sensor MUST be installed with the proper side facing the
sample. Examine the membrane carefully to identify the
“shiny” side. The membrane has a dull side and a shiny
side. The shiny side must face out, or be in contact with
the measured sample. Reversing the membrane will cause
no damage, but the measurement will be very unstable.
4. Screw the front nut on to the chamber until you feel the o-ring compress.
Hand tight compression is all that is needed. Do not use tools to tighten. The
membrane should be flat across the bottom of the chamber without wrinkles.
5. Fill the chamber with electrolyte until the level reaches the bottom of the
internal threads. A drop or two of electrolyte may drip from the white vent on
the side of the sensor, but this is not a problem.
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6. Slowly screw the chamber onto the sensor body. A small amount of
electrolyte will run out of the hole from which the vent screw was removed.
Place a paper towel around the sensor to absorb the electrolyte overflow.
The electrolyte is harmless and will not irritate skin. Tighten the chamber until
the o-ring at the top of the chamber is compressed. Once again, do not use
tools to tighten.
7. Shake excess electrolyte from the fill hole on the side of the sensor and
replace the vent screw.
The sensor is now ready for operation. The membrane should be stretched
tightly across the tip of the sensor.
CAUTION:
5.2
When handling the assembled sensor, do not set the sensor on its
tip or damage to the membrane will result. Severe impacts on the tip
of the sensor from dropping or other misuse may cause permanent
damage to the sensor.
Optional pH Sensor
An optional battery powered pH sensor is available for use with the Q45H system
that puts out a nominal signal of 0.3-1.5 VDC proportional to pH over a range of
0-14 pH units. The Q25P pH sensor can also be used and provides a standard
4-20 mA signal. The sensor is shipped with a protective rubber boot containing a
small amount of salt solution to keep the glass elements in good condition and
ready for use.
No special preparations are required for use of this electrode. The protective
boot should remain in place until the system is to be placed into continuous
service. Do not remove the protective boot and allow the sensor to sit in
the air for an extended period of time. The pH electrodes MUST stay wet.
When ready for operation, simply remove the rubber boot from the end of the
sensor and place the sensor into the inlet chamber of the chlorine overflow cell.
It is placed directly above the sample inlet tube. You will need to slide the
flowcell chamber cover out of the way to put the pH sensor in place.
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Part 6 – Configuration
6.1
User Interface
The user interface for the Q45 Series instrument consists of a custom display
and a membrane keypad. All functions are accessed from this user interface (no
internal jumpers, pots, etc.).
RELAY
INDICATOR
4-DIGIT
MAIN DISPLAY
MENU ICONS
MENU ICONS
SIGN
A
UNITS
RELAY/LO-BAT
INDICATOR
UNITS
DIAG
CAL FAIL
CONF HOLD
B
12-CHARACTER
SECONDARY
DISPLAY
12-CHARACTER
SECONDARY
DISPLAY
MENU
ESC
4-KEY USER
INTERFACE
MENU/ESCAPE
KEY
ENTER KEY
UP ARROW
KEY
LEFT ARROW
KEY
Figure 25 - User Interface
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MEMBRANE
KEYPAD
MEMBRANE ENTER
KEYPAD
ATI Q45H/63 Chlorine Manual
6.11
Part 6 - Configuration
Keys
All user configurations occur through the use of four membrane keys. These
keys are used as follows:
6.12
MENU/ESC
To scroll through the menu section headers or to escape
from anywhere in software. The escape sequence allows
the user to back out of any changes in a logical manner.
Using the escape key aborts all changes to the current
screen and backs the user out one level in the software tree.
The manual will refer to this key as either MENU or ESC,
depending upon its particular function. In the batterypowered version of the Q45, this is also the ON button.
UP (arrow)
To scroll through individual list or display items and to
change number values.
LEFT (arrow)
To move the cursor from right to left during changes to a
number value.
ENTER
To select a menu section or list item for change and to store
any change.
Display
The large custom display provides clear information for general measurement
use and user configuration. There are three main areas of the display: the main
parameter display, the secondary message line, and the icon area.
Main Parameter
During normal operation, the main parameter display
indicates the present process input with sign and units. This
main display may be configured to display any of the main
measurements that the system provides.
During
configuration, this area displays other useful set-up
information to the user.
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Lower Line
During normal operation, the lower line of the display
indicates user-selected secondary measurements that the
system is making. This also includes calibration data from
the last calibration sequence and the transmitter model
number and software version. During configuration, the
lower line displays menu items and set-up prompts to the
user. Finally, the lower line will display error messages
when necessary. For a description of all display messages,
refer to Section 10.4
Display Messages.
Icon Area
The icon area contains display icons that assist the user in
set-up and indicate important states of system functions.
The CAL, CONFIG, CONTROL and DIAG icons are used to
tell the user what branch of the software tree the user is in
while scrolling through the menu items. This improves
software map navigation dramatically. Upon entry into a
menu, the title is displayed (such as CAL), and then the title
disappears to make way for the actual menu item. However,
the icon stays on.
HOLD
The HOLD icon indicates that the current output of the
transmitter has been put into output hold. In this case, the
output is locked to the last input value measured when the
HOLD function was entered. HOLD values are retained
even if the unit power is cycled.
FAIL
The FAIL icon indicates that the system diagnostic function
has detected a problem that requires immediate attention.
This icon is automatically cleared once the problem has
been resolved.
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Relay Area A/B
6.2
Part 6 - Configuration
The relay area contains two icons that indicate the state of
the system relays (if the relay card is installed). If the battery
board is installed instead, the B icon indicates that the
battery voltage is at a low level. The battery power option
and the relay option cannot be installed together.
Software
The software of the Q45H is organized in an easy to follow menu-based system.
All user settings are organized under five menu sections: Measure, Calibration
[CAL], Configuration [CONFIG], Control [CONTROL] and Diagnostics [DIAG].
Note: The default Measure Menu is display-only and has no menu icon.
6.21
Software Navigation
Within the CAL, CONFIG, CONTROL, and DIAG menu sections is a list of
selectable items. Once a menu section (such as CONFIG) has been selected
with the MENU key, the user can access the item list in this section by pressing
either the ENTER key or the UP arrow key. The list items can then be scrolled
through using the UP arrow key. Once the last item is reached, the list wraps
around and the first list item is shown again. The items in the menu sections are
organized such that more frequently used functions are first, while more
permanent function settings are later in the list. See Figure 26 for a visual
description of the software.
Each list item allows a change to a stored system variable. List items are
designed in one of two forms: simple single variable, or multiple variable
sequences. In the single variable format, the user can quickly modify one
parameter - for example, changing temperature display units from °F to °C. In
the multiple variable sequence, variables are changed as the result of some
process. For example, the calibration of chlorine generally requires more than
one piece of information to be entered. The majority of the menu items in the
software consist of the single variable format type.
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Any data that may be changed will be flashing. This flashing indicates user entry
mode and is initiated by pressing the ENTER key. The UP arrow key will
increase a flashing digit from 0 to 9. The LEFT arrow key moves the flashing
digit from right to left. Once the change has been completed, pressing ENTER
again stores the variable and stops the flashing. Pressing ESC aborts the
change and also exits user entry mode.
The starting (default) screen is always the Measure Menu. The UP arrow key is
used to select the desired display. From anywhere in this section the user can
press the MENU key to select one of the four Menu Sections.
The UP arrow icon next to all list items on the display is a reminder to scroll
through the list using the UP arrow key.
To select a list item for modification, first select the proper menu with the MENU
key. Scroll to the list item with the UP arrow key and then press the ENTER key.
This tells the system that the user wishes to perform a change on that item. For
single item type screens, once the user presses the ENTER key, part or all of the
variable will begin to flash, indicating that the user may modify that variable using
the arrow keys. However, if the instrument is locked, the transmitter will display
the message Locked! and will not enter user entry mode. The instrument must
be unlocked by entering the proper code value to allow authorized changes to
user entered values. Once the variable has been reset, pressing the ENTER key
again causes the change to be stored and the flashing to stop. The message
Accepted! will be displayed if the change is within pre-defined variable limits. If
the user decides not to modify the value after it has already been partially
changed, pressing the ESC key aborts the modification and returns the entry to
its original stored value.
In a menu item which is a multiple variable sequence type, once the ENTER key
is pressed there may be several prompts and sequences that are run to complete
the modification. The ESC key can always be used to abort the sequence
without changing any stored variables.
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MENU
SECTIONS
Part 6 - Configuration
Start
MEASURE
(display only)
MENU
ESC
CAL
* PID % Output
Loop Current (#1)
CONFIG
MENU
ESC
CONTROL
ENTER
ENTER
ENTER
or
or
or
Cal
Entry Lock
*PID 0% #1
Set Hold
** Cal pH
Set Delay
*PID 100% #1
Fault List
Cal Temp
Contrast
*PID Setpoint #1
Sim Out
Set Range
Main Units
*PID Prop #1
*PID Timer
Zero Filter
*PID Int #1
Fail Out #1
Main Display
*PID Deriv #1
Fail Val #1
I out 1 Mode
Set 4mA (#1)
Fail Out #2
I out 2 Mode
Set 20mA (#1)
Fail Val #2
Relay A Mode
Set 4mA (#2)
Failsafe
Relay B Mode
Set 20mA (#2)
Slope
Software Version
** pH
** mV
DIAG
or
Loop Current (#2)
Offset
MENU
ESC
ENTER
Temperature
nA
MENU
ESC
** pH Slope
Temp Units
** pH Offset
pH Input
MENU
ESC
Set Default
* pH Type
LIST
ITEMS
** pH Buffer
*** pH Comp.
Relay A= AL
Relay A= CON
Setpnt A- HI
Setpnt A
Hyst A- HI
Relay A= FAIL
Hyst A
Delay A- HI
Delay A
Setpnt A- LO
Phase A
Hyst A- LO
Delay A- LO
Phase A
Relay B= CON
Relay B= FAIL
Setpnt B
Hyst B
Delay B
Phase B
Figure 26 - Software Map
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* If PID is enabled
** If pH is enabled
*** If pH is enabled and
Instrument is a Type
Q45H0
ATI Q45H/63 Chlorine Manual
6.22
Part 6 - Configuration
Measure Menu [MEASURE]
The default menu for the system is the display-only menu MEASURE. This menu
is a display-only measurement menu, and has no changeable list items. When
left alone, the instrument will automatically return to this menu after
approximately 30 minutes. While in the default menu, the UP arrow allows the
user to scroll through the secondary variables on the lower line of the display. A
brief description of the fields in the basic transmitter version is as follows:
TRANSMITTER MEAS SCREENS:
25.7°C
Temperature display. Can be displayed in °C or °F,
depending on user selection. A small “m” on the left side of
the screen indicates the transmitter has automatically
jumped to a manual 25°C setting due to a failure with the
temperature signal input.
32.0 nA
Raw sensor current. Useful for diagnosing problems.
100% 20.00 mA
PID Status screen (if enabled.) Shows the present controller
output level on left, and actual transmitter current on the
right. The controller can be placed in manual while viewing
this screen by pressing and holding the ENTER key for 5
seconds until a small flashing “m” appears on the screen. At
that point the controller output can be adjusted up or down
using the UP and LEFT arrow keys. To return to automatic
operation, press and hold the ENTER key for 5 seconds and
the “M” will disappear.
4.00 mA
Transmitter output current # 1.
20.00 mA
Transmitter output current # 2.
Slope = 100%
Sensor output response vs. ideal calibration. This value
updates after each calibration. As the sensor ages, the slope
reading will decay indicating sensor aging. Useful for
resolving sensor problems.
Offset = 0.0 nA
Sensor output current at a zero ppm input. This value
updates after a zero-calibration has been performed. Useful
for resolving sensor problems.
Q45H0 v 4.02
Transmitter software version number.
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Part 6 - Configuration
7.56 pH
Measured pH value on AUX input (if enabled.)
5.00 mV
pH sensor mV output (if enabled)
Slope = 100%
pH sensor slope response vs. ideal calibration. This value
will update after each calibration. As the pH sensor ages, the
slope reading will decay. This is useful for solving sensor
problems (if enabled).
Offset =X.X mV
pH sensor current output at 7 pH input. This value updates
after calibration is performed and is useful for resolving
sensor problems.
Note: A display test (all segments ON) can be actuated by pressing and
holding the ENTER key while viewing the model/version number on
the lower line of the display.
For the relay-based analyzer version, or the portable battery powered version of
the transmitter, the screens are basically the same, with additions to show two
analog outputs instead of one (#1 and #2.)
The MEASURE screens are intended to be used as a very quick means of
looking up critical values during operation or troubleshooting.
6.23 Calibration Menu [CAL]
The calibration menu contains items for frequent calibration of user parameters.
There are four items in this list: Cal Chlor, Cal Temp, Set Range, and Cal Zero.
Cal Cl2
The chlorine calibration function allows the user to adjust the
transmitter span reading to match a reference solution, or to
set the sensor zero point. See The Set Default function
allows the user to return the instrument back to the factory
default data for all user settings of for just the calibration
default. It is intended to be used as a last resort
troubleshooting procedure. All user settings of the calibration
data remains unchanged. Press ENTER to initiate user entry
mode and select either All or Cal with the UP arrow key. See
for more details.
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Cal pH
(if enabled)
Part 6 - Configuration
The pH calibration function allows the user to adjust the
transmitter offset and span to match the sample or
reference buffers. See The Set Default function allows the
user to return the instrument back to the factory default data
for all user settings of for just the calibration default. It is
intended to be used as a last resort troubleshooting
procedure. All user settings of the calibration data remains
unchanged. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode and
select either All or Cal with the UP arrow key See
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Part 7 – Calibration for more details
6.24
Cal Temp
The temperature calibration function allows the user to
adjust the offset of the temperature response by a small
factor of ±5 °C. The temperature input is factory calibrated
to very high accuracy. However, long cable lengths and
junction boxes may degrade the accuracy of the temperature
measurement in some extreme situations. Therefore, this
feature is provided as an adjustment. See The Set Default
function allows the user to return the instrument back to the
factory default data for all user settings of for just the
calibration default. It is intended to be used as a last resort
troubleshooting procedure. All user settings of the calibration
data remains unchanged. Press ENTER to initiate user entry
mode and select either All or Cal with the UP arrow key for
more details. See Part 7 – Calibration for more details.
Set Range
This function allows the user to set the display range of the
transmitter to a specific application. Once set, all output
functions use this display range to establish configuration
settings. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the
value will flash. Use the arrow keys to modify value;
available ranges include 200.0 ppb, 2.000 ppm, 20.00 ppm,
and 200.0 ppm. Press ENTER to store the new value. The
display range does not affect the internal auto ranging scaler
that, therefore, sensitivity is to specification in any user
selected range.
Configuration Menu [CONFIG]
The Configuration Menu contains all of the general user settings:
Entry Lock
This function allows the user to lock out unauthorized
tampering with instrument settings. All settings may be
viewed while the instrument is locked, but they cannot be
modified. The Entry Lock feature is a toggle-type setting;
that is, entering the correct code will lock the transmitter and
entering the correct code again will unlock it. The code is
preset at a fixed value. Press ENTER to initiate user entry
mode and the first digit will flash. Use arrow keys to modify
value. See end of manual for the Q45H lock/unlock
code. Press ENTER to toggle lock setting once code is
correct. Incorrect codes do not change state of lock
condition.
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Set Delay
The delay function sets the amount of damping on the
instrument. This function allows the user to apply a first
order time delay function to the chlorine measurements
being made. Both the display and the output value are
affected by the degree of damping. Functions such as
calibration are not affected by this parameter.
The
calibration routines contain their own filtering and stability
monitoring functions to minimize the calibration timing.
Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the value will
flash. Use the arrow keys to modify value; range is 0.1 to
9.9 minutes. Press ENTER to store the new value.
Contrast
This function sets the contrast level for the display. The
custom display is designed with a wide temperature range,
Super-Twist Nematic (STN) fluid.
The STN display provides the highest possible contrast and
widest viewing angle under all conditions. Contrast control
of this type of display is generally not necessary, so contrast
control is provided as a means for possible adjustment due
to aging at extreme ranges. In addition, the display has an
automatic temperature compensation network.
Press
ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the value will flash.
Use arrow keys to modify the value; range is 0 to 8 (0 being
lightest). Press ENTER to update and store the new value.
Main Units
This function allows the user to select either PPM or mg/l for
the chlorine measurement.
Zero Filter
This function forces the reading to zero when the reading is
below the entered value. For example, if the entered value
were 0.0020 the display at 0.0019 would then indicate
0.0000. This feature is useful in blanking zero noise.
Main Display
This function allows the user to change the measurement in
the primary display area. The user may select between
chlorine, sensor temperature, or output current. Using this
function, the user may choose to put temperature in the main
display area and chlorine on the secondary, lower line of the
display. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the
entire value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to modify the
desired display value. Press ENTER to store the new value.
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Iout#1 Mode
Part 6 - Configuration
This function sets analog output #1 to either track chlorine
(default) or enables the PID controller to operate on the
chlorine input. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode,
and the entire value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to
modify the desired value; selections include 1-ppm for
chlorine tracking or 2-PID for chlorine PID control. Press
ENTER to store the new value.
AC OPERATED UNITS ONLY
*Iout#2 Mode
This function sets analog output #2 for temperature (default),
chlorine, or pH. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode,
and the entire value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to
modify the desired value; selections include 1-C/F for
temperature, 2-ppm for chlorine, or 3-pH for pH. Press
ENTER to store the new value.
AC OPERATED UNITS ONLY
*Rly A Mode
Relay A can be used in three different ways: as a setpoint
control, as a fail alarm, or as a HI-LO alarm band. The three
settings for Rly A Mode are CON, FAIL and AL.
The CON setting enables normal control operation for Relay
A, with settings for setpoint, hysteresis, delay and phasing
appearing in the CONFIG menu automatically. See Figure
28 for further details.
The FAIL setting enables the fail alarm mode for Relay A.
Relay A will then trip on any condition that causes the FAIL
icon to be displayed on the LCD. Using this mode allows the
User to send alarm indications to other remote devices.
The AL setting allows two setpoints to be selected for the
same relay, producing a HI-LO alarm band. In this mode,
Relay A will trip inside or outside of the band, depending
upon the Phase selected. See Figure 29 for further details.
AC OPERATED UNITS ONLY
*Relay B Mode
Relay B can be used in a number of ways: as a setpoint
control, or as an alarm. The two settings for Relay B Mode
are CON and FAIL.
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The CON setting enables normal setpoint operation for
Relay B. Relay B then operates identically to Relay A, with
settings for setpoint, hysteresis, delay and phasing
appearing in the CONFIG menu automatically. See Figure
28 for details.
The FAIL setting enables the fail alarm mode for Relay B.
Relay B will then trip on any condition that causes the FAIL
icon to be displayed on the LCD. Using this mode allows the
User to send alarm indications to other remote devices. See
Figure 29 for details.
Temp Units
This function sets the display units for temperature
measurement. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode,
and the entire value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to
modify the desired display value. The choices are °F and
°C. Press ENTER to store the new value.
pH Input
Enables the auxiliary pH input on the instrument. Once
enabled, an optional pH sensor (part number 07-0096) can
be added to the instrument to provide for additional
monitoring of pH (dual instrument, chlorine + pH output.)
For the relay-based analyzer with two analog outputs, the pH
signal can also be sent to one of the analog outputs for
monitoring of pH. Once enabled, the pH input value is
displayed on the lower line of the MEASURE screens. Press
ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the entire value will
flash. Use the UP arrow key to modify the desired display
value. The choices are OFF and ON. Press ENTER to
store the new value.
pH Type
Allows the user to select either 1-Comb or 2-Q22P. The 1Comb selection configures the monitor for a standard pH
electrode without using its temperature compensation but in
turn, uses the temperature compensator from the chlorine
sensor. The 2-Q22P selection configures the monitor for use
with the Q22P sensor or for the 4-20 mA input from any
other pH monitor.
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pH Buffer
Part 6 - Configuration
This is a multiple variable function that allows the user to
choose which pH buffer sets that will be utilized in the 2point calibration mode. The Q45H contains 3 sets of built-in
buffer tables with compensation values ranging from 0 to 95
°C. During 2-point calibration, the instrument will
automatically identify which buffer is being used and
compensate for the value based on the built-in tables. This
allows very quick, highly accurate calibrations by the user.
The order in which the buffers are used during calibration is
unimportant, since the system automatically chooses the
correct buffer.
The default setting for this feature is OFF, which disables the
auto-recognition function. Press ENTER to change this
setting. The buffer table set options are: 1: [4/7/10], 2:
[4/7/9.18], and 3: [4.65/6.79/9.23]. See Figure 27 for buffer
tables. Once the buffer set is selected, press ENTER and
the message Accepted! will be displayed on the lower line.
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Table 1
4.00 pH
Table 2
7.00 pH
4.00 pH
10.00 pH
7.00 pH
9.18 pH
ºC
pH
°C
pH
°C
pH
0
4.00
0
7.10
0
9.46
10
3.99
10
7.06
10
9.33
10.05
20
4.00
20
7.02
20
9.23
30
9.95
30
4.01
30
6.99
30
9.14
6.97
40
9.87
40
4.03
40
6.97
40
9.07
50
6.98
50
9.80
50
4.05
50
6.98
50
9.01
4.08
60
6.98
60
9.75
60
4.08
60
6.98
60
8.96
70
4.12
70
6.97
70
9.73
70
4.12
70
6.97
70
8.92
80
4.16
80
6.99
80
9.73
80
4.16
80
6.99
80
8.89
90
4.21
90
7.01
90
9.75
90
4.21
90
7.01
90
8.85
95
4.24
95
7.01
95
9.77
95
4.24
95
7.01
95
8.83
ºC
0
10
pH
4.00
3.99
°C
0
10
pH
7.10
7.06
°C
0
10
pH
10.27
10.15
20
4.00
20
7.02
20
30
4.01
30
6.99
40
4.03
40
50
4.05
60
Table 3
4.65 pH
ºC
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
95
pH
4.67
4.66
4.65
4.65
4.66
4.68
4.70
4.72
4.75
4.79
4.79
6.79 pH
9.23 pH
°C
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
95
°C
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
95
pH
6.89
6.84
6.80
6.78
6.76
6.76
6.76
6.76
6.78
6.80
6.80
Figure 27 - Automatic pH Buffer Tables
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pH
9.48
9.37
9.27
9.18
9.09
9.00
8.92
8.88
8.85
8.82
8.82
ATI Q45H/63 Chlorine Manual
pH Comp
6.25
Part 6 - Configuration
Enables pH compensation of free chlorine measurements
using a built in comp table. An optional pH sensor (part
number 07-0096) is required for this compensation method,
and “pH Input” menu item above must be selected to be ON.
Once enabled, this feature will compensate for reduced
chlorine readings that would normally result at elevated pH
readings. A built-in compensation table increases the
chlorine reading gradually as pH increases – in an effort to
maintain a constant chlorine measurement. Press ENTER
to initiate user entry mode, and the entire value will flash.
Use the UP arrow key to modify the desired display value.
The choices are OFF and ON. Press ENTER to store the
new value. See The Set Default function allows the user to
return the instrument back to the factory default data for all
user settings of for just the calibration default. It is intended
to be used as a last resort troubleshooting procedure. All
user settings of the calibration data remains unchanged.
Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode and select either
All or Cal with the UP arrow key See Part 7 – Calibration
for details
Control Menu [CONTROL]
The Control Menu contains all of the output control user settings:
Set PID 0%
Set PID 100%
[Iout1=PID]
If the PID is enabled, this function sets the minimum and
maximum controller end points. Unlike the standard 4-20
mA output, the controller does not “scale” output values
across the endpoints. Rather, the endpoints determine
where the controller would normally force minimum or
maximum output in an attempt to recover the setpoint (even
though the controller can achieve 0% or 100% anywhere
within the range.)
If the 0% point is lower than the 100% point, then the
controller action will be “reverse” acting. That is, the output
of the controller will increase if the measured value is less
than the setpoint, and the output will decrease if the
measured value is larger than the setpoint. Flipping the
stored values in these points will reverse the action of the
controller to “direct” mode.
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The entry value is limited to a value within the range
specified in “Set Range”, and the 0% and the 100% point
must be separated by at least 1% of this range Use the
LEFT arrow key to select the first digit to be modified. Then
use the UP and LEFT arrow keys to select the desired
numerical value. Press ENTER to store the new value.
PID Setpnt
[Iout1=PID]
PID Prop
[Iout1=PID]
PID Int
[Iout1=PID]
PID Deriv
[Iout1=PID]
The value which the controller is attempting to maintain by
adjusting output value. It is the nature of the PID controller
that it never actually gets to the exact value and stops. The
controller is continually making smaller and smaller
adjustments as the measured value gets near the setpoint.
Proportional gain factor. The proportional gain value is a
multiplier on the controller error (difference between
measured value and setpoint value.) Increasing this value
will make the controller more responsive.
Integral is the number of “repeats-per-minute” of the action
of the controller. It is the number of times per minute that
the controller acts on the input error. At a setting of 2.0 rpm,
there are two repeats every minute. If the integral is set to
zero, a fixed offset value is added to the controller (manual
reset.) Increasing this value will make the controller more
responsive.
Derivative is a second order implementation of Integral, used
to suppress “second-order” effects from process variables.
These variables may include items like pumps or mixers that
may have minor impacts on the measured value. The
derivative factor is rarely used in water treatment process,
and therefore, it is best in most cases to leave it at the
default value. Increasing this value will make the controller
more responsive.
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Set 4 mA
Set 20 mA
[Iout1=chlorine]
Part 6 - Configuration
These functions set the main 4 and 20 mA current loop
output points for the transmitter. The units displayed depend
on the selection made in the CONFIG menu for Iout #1
Mode. Also, when the Relay Option Board is installed, the
units will also display #1 or #2 – since there are actually two
analog outputs present in this version.
The value stored for the 4 mA point may be higher or lower
than the value stored for the 20 mA point. The entry values
are limited to values within the range specified in “Set
Range”, and the 4 mA and the 20 mA point must be
separated by at least 1% of this range Use the LEFT arrow
key to select the first digit to be modified. Then use the UP
and LEFT arrow keys to select the desired numerical value.
Press ENTER to store the new value.
AC POWERED UNITS ONLY
*Set 4 mA #2
*Set 20 mA #2
[temp/chlor/pH]
These functions set the second 4 mA and 20 mA current
loop output points for the transmitter. The output may be set
to track temperature (default), pH, or chlorine. The values
stored for the 4 mA point may be higher or lower than the
value stored for the 20 mA point.
The entry value is limited to a value between 0 and 55 °C if it
is set for temperature, within the range specified in “Set
Range” if the output is set to track chlorine, and must be
within 0-14 pH if set to track pH. The 4 mA and the 20 mA
point must be at least 20 units away from each other. Press
ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the value will flash.
Use arrow keys to modify value. Press ENTER to store the
new value.
NOTE: If the temperature units are changed between °C and
°F (see Temp Units in this section), the default settings for
this output will be stored (present data is not converted.)
NOTE: If the battery board option is installed, the menu will
be shown as Set 0 V #2 – since the battery board has two 02.5 VDC voltage output signals instead of current outputs.
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ALARM CONFIGURATIONS APPLY TO AC POWERED UNITS ONLY
*A Setpoint
This function establishes the chlorine trip point for relay A.
The entry value is limited to a value within the range
specified in “Set Range”. Use the LEFT arrow key to select
the first digit to be modified. Then use the UP and LEFT
arrow keys to select the desired numerical value. Press
ENTER to store the new value.
*A Hysteresis
This function establishes the hysteresis, or “deadband”, for
Relay A. Hysteresis is most often used to control relay
chattering; however, it may also be used in control schemes
to separate the ON/OFF trip points of the relay. Press
ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the value will flash.
Use the arrow keys to modify value. Press ENTER to store
the new value.
*A Delay
This function places an additional amount of time delay on
the trip point for relay A. This delay is in addition to the main
delay setting for the controller. The entry value is limited to a
value between 0 and 999 seconds. Press ENTER to initiate
user entry mode, and the value will flash. Use arrow keys to
modify value; range is 0 to 999 seconds. Press ENTER to
store the new value.
*A Phasing
This function establishes the direction of the relay trip.
When phase is HI, the relay operates in a direct mode.
Therefore, the relay energizes and the LCD indicator
illuminates when the chlorine value exceeds the setpoint.
When the phase is LO, the relay energizes and the LCD
indicator illuminates when the chlorine level drops below the
setpoint. The failsafe setting does have an impact on this
logic. The description here assumes the failsafe setting is
OFF. Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the
entire value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to modify the
desired value; selections include HI for direct operation or
LO for reverse operation. Press ENTER to store the new
value.
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See Figure 28 below for a visual description of a typical
control relay application.
When value rises to ≥ 1.050 ppm, relay opens.
When value rises to ≥ 1.000 ppm, relay closes.
ON
1.000 ppm
PHASE: HI
0.950 ppm
OFF
X
HYSTERESIS
}“DEADORBAND”
1.050 ppm
PHASE: LO
1.000 ppm
OFF
When value falls to ≤ 0.950 ppm, relay opens.
HYSTERESIS
ON
X
} “DEADORBAND”
When value falls to ≤ 1.000 ppm, relay closes.
Settings:
Setpoint:
Hyst:
Delay:
Failsafe:
1.000 ppm
0.050
000
OFF
Figure 28 - Control Relay Example, Hysteresis and Tow Opposite Phase Options
*Setpnt A-HI
*Hyst A-HI
*Delay A-HI
*Setpnt A-LO
*Hyst A-LO
*Delay A-LO
If Relay A Mode is set to Alarm Mode, AL, then the following
settings will appear in the Config Menu list automatically. In
this mode, two setpoints can be selected on the same relay,
to create an alarm band. Phase HI selection causes the
relay to energize outside of the band, and Phase LO causes
the relay to energize inside of the band. This feature
enables one relay to be used as a control relay while the
other is used as a HI-LO Alarm relay at the same time.
Setpoint A-LO must be set lower than Setpoint A-HI. When
AL mode is first selected, Setpoint A-LO is defaulted to 0.
Figure 29 is a visual description of a typical alarm relay
application.
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When value rises to ≥ 1.000 ppm, relay
closes, until value falls back to < 0.950 ppm.
When value falls to < 1.000 ppm, relay
closes, until rises back to > 1.050 ppm.
ON
1.000 ppm
0.950 ppm
PHASE: HI
OFF
} HYST - HI
X
1.050 ppm
1.000 ppm
PHASE: LO
OFF
0.550 ppm
0.500 ppm
} HYST - LO
X
ON
0.500 ppm
0.450 ppm
ON
} HYST - HI
X
} HYST - LO
X
OFF
When value falls to < 0.500 ppm, relay
closes, until rises back to > 0.550 ppm.
When value rises to ≥ 0.500 ppm, relay
closes, until value falls back to < 0.450
ppm.
Settings:
Setpoint A-HI:
Hyst
A-HI:
Delay A-HI:
*B Setpoint
*B Hysteresis
*B Delay
*B Phasing
1.000 ppm Setpoint A-LO: .500 ppm
0.050
Hyst
A-LO: .0.050
000 29 - AlarmDelay
A-LO: 000
Figure
Relay Example
If Relay B Mode is set to CON (see Relay B Mode), then
Relay B will function identically to Relay A. Relay B settings
appear in the CONFIG menu list automatically.
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6.26 Diagnostics Menu [DIAG]
The diagnostics menu contains all of the user settings that are specific to the
system diagnostic functions, as well as functions that aid in troubleshooting
application problems.
Set Hold
The Set Hold function locks the current loop output values
on the present process value, and halts operation of the PID
controller. This function can be used prior to calibration, or
when removing the sensor from the process, to hold the
output in a known state. Once HOLD is released, the
outputs return to their normal state of following the process
input. The transfer out of HOLD is bumpless on the both
analog outputs - that is, the transfer occurs in a smooth
manner rather than as an abrupt change. An icon on the
display indicates the HOLD state, and the HOLD state is
retained even if power is cycled. Press ENTER to initiate
user entry mode, and entire value will flash. Use the UP
arrow key to modify the desired value, selections are ON for
engaging the HOLD function, and OFF to disengage the
function. Press ENTER to store the new value.
Note: When the Relay Option Board is installed, the Set
Hold function holds BOTH current levels, as well as ALL
relay settings.
The Set Hold function can also hold at an output value
specified by the user. To customize the hold value, first turn
the HOLD function on. Press the ESC key to go to the DIAG
Menu and scroll to Sim Output using the UP arrow key.
Press ENTER. Follow the instructions under Sim Output
(see following page).
CAUTION: There is no time-out on the hold feature.
Once placed into hold mode, return to normal operation
must be done manually.
Fault List
The Fault List screen is a read-only screen that allows the
user to display the cause of the highest priority failure. The
screen indicates the number of faults present in the system
and a message detailing the highest priority fault present.
Note that some faults can result in multiple displayed failures
due to the high number of internal tests occurring. As faults
are corrected, they are immediately cleared.
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Faults are not stored; therefore, they are immediately
removed if power is cycled. If the problem causing the faults
still exists, however, faults will be displayed again after
power is re-applied and a period of time elapses during
which the diagnostic system re-detects them. The
exception to this rule is the calibration failure. When a
calibration fails, no corrupt data is stored. Therefore, the
system continues to function normally on the data that was
present before the calibration was attempted.
After 30 minutes or if power to the transmitter is cycled, the
failure for calibration will be cleared until calibration is
attempted again. If the problem still exists, the calibration
failure will re-occur. Press ENTER to initiate view of the
highest priority failure. The display will automatically return
to normal after a few seconds.
PID Timer
This function sets a timer to monitor the amount of time the
PID controller remains at 0% or 100%. This function only
appears if the PID controller is enabled. If the timer is set to
0000, the feature is effectively disabled. If the timer value is
set to any number other zero, a FAIL condition will occur if
the PID controller remains at 0% or 100% for the timer value.
If one of the relays is set to FAIL mode, this failure condition
can be signaled by a changing relay contact.
Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the entire
value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to modify desired
value; range of value is 0-9999 seconds. Press ENTER to
store the new value.
Sim Out
The Sim Out function allows the user to simulate the chlorine
level of the instrument in the user selected display range.
The user enters a ppm value directly onto the screen, and
the output responds as if it were actually receiving the signal
from the sensor. This allows the user to check the function
of attached monitoring equipment during set-up or
troubleshooting. Escaping this screen returns the unit to
normal operation. Press ENTER to initiate the user entry
mode, and the right-most digit of the value will flash. Use
arrow keys to modify desired value.
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The starting display value in SIM mode will be the last read
value of the input. The output will be under control of the
SIM screen until the ESC key is pressed. The instrument
will automatically terminate the simulated output after 30
minutes and return to normal operation unless the “HOLD”
function is engaged.
Note: If the HOLD function is engaged before the Sim Output
function is engaged, the simulated output will remain the
same even when the ESC key is pressed. Disengage the
HOLD function to return to normal output.
Fail Out
This function enables the user to define a specified value
that the main current output will go to under fault conditions.
When the Relay Option Board is installed, the display will
read Fail Out #1. When enabled to ON, the output may be
forced to the current value set in Fail Val (next item.) With
the Fail Out setting of ON, and a Fail Val setting of 6.5 mA,
any alarm condition will cause the current loop output to drop
outside the normal operating range to exactly 6.5 mA,
indicating a system failure that requires attention.
Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the entire
value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to modify desired
value; selections are ON, OFF. Press ENTER to store the
new value.
Fail Val
Sets the output failure value for Iout#1. When Fail Out
above is set to ON, this function sets value of the current
loop under a FAIL condition. When the Relay Option Board
is installed, the display will read Fail Out #1. The output
may be forced to any current value between 4-20 mA.
Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode, and the entire
value will flash. Use the UP arrow key to modify desired
value; selections are between 4mA, and 20mA. Press
ENTER to store the new value.
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AC POWERED UNITS ONLY
Fail Out #2
This function sets the fail-mode of current loop output #2
under a FAIL condition. The settings and operation are
identical to Fail Out for output #1.
Fail Val #2
This function sets the value of current loop output #2 under a
FAIL condition. The settings and operation are identical to
Fail Out for output #1.
AC POWERED UNITS ONLY
*Failsafe
This function allows the user to set the optional system
relays to a failsafe condition. In a failsafe condition, the relay
logic is reversed so that the relay is electrically energized in
a normal operating state. By doing this, the relay will not
only change state when, for example, a chlorine limit is
exceeded, but also when power is lost to the controller.
When failsafe is selected to be ON, the normally-open
contacts of the relay will be closed during normal operation.
In an attempt to make this configuration less confusing, the
LCD icon logic is reversed with this setting, and the icon is
OFF under this normal condition. Therefore, when the trip
condition occurs, the closed N.O. contacts will be opened
(relay de-energized), and the LCD icon will illuminate. In
addition, a power fail would also cause the same contacts to
open.
Set Default
The Set Default function allows the user to return the
instrument back to factory default data for all user settings or
for just the calibration default. It is intended to be used as a
last resort troubleshooting procedure. All user settings or
the calibration settings are returned to the original factory
values. Hidden factory calibration data remains unchanged.
Press ENTER to initiate user entry mode and select either
All or CAL with the UP arrow key.
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Part 7 – Calibration
7.1
Chlorine Calibration
Once power is applied, the sensor must be given time to stabilize. This is best
done by following the zeroing procedure below. Establishing a stable zero is
critical to the proper operation of the monitor. A complete calibration will include
zeroing and spanning the sensor. It is generally unnecessary to set the zero at
every calibration; however, it should be done during the initial installation.
7.11
Chlorine Zero Cal
Chlorine sensors have extremely low offset currents at zero. For this reason, it is
normally sufficient to simply leave the zero at the factory default of 0.0 nA. As an
alternative, an electronic zero can be set by disconnecting the sensor from the
cable and performing steps 3-5 below.
The steps below assume that the sensor has been prepared in accordance with
section 5.1 Chlorine Sensor Preparation, earlier in this manual. Note that the 8
hour waiting time in step 2 below is not required if the monitor has been running
for 24 hours prior to zeroing. If the unit has been running with the sensor
connected, the sensor will normally return to a stable zero within 15 minutes.
1. Connect the sensor to the electronics by plugging the cable plug into the
receptacle on the top of the sensor.
2. Place about an inch of water in a small beaker or other convenient container
and immerse the tip of the sensor. The water used need not be distilled, but it
must not contain residual chlorine. For submersible sensors, submerge the
entire sensor in a bucket of unchlorinated water. Allow the sensor to sit
undisturbed for at least 8 hours.
3. Scroll to the CAL menu section using the MENU key and press ENTER or the
UP arrow key. Cal Chlor will then be displayed.
4. Press the ENTER key. The screen will display a flashing 1-Ref for span
calibration or a 2-Zer for zero calibration. Using the UP arrow key, set for a 2Zer zero calibration and press ENTER.
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The system now begins acquiring data for the sensor zero calibration value.
As data is gathered, the units for sensor current in nanoamps (nA) and
temperature may flash. Flashing units indicate that this parameter is
unstable. The calibration data point acquisition will stop only when the data
remains stable for a pre-determined amount of time. This can be overridden
by pressing ENTER. If the data remains unstable for 10 minutes, the
calibration will fail and the message Cal Unstable will be displayed.
5. If accepted, the screen will display the message PASS with the new sensor
zero reading (offset), then it will return to the main measurement display. If
the calibration fails, a message indicating the cause of the failure will be
displayed and the FAIL icon will be turned on. The range of acceptable value
for sensor offset is -25nA to +25 nA. Should a FAIL occur, carefully inspect
the sensor for a tear in the membrane. It will probably be necessary to
rebuild the sensor as described in section 5.1
Chlorine
Sensor
Preparation. Should the offset value remain high and result in calibration
failures, review the Service section of this manual, and then contact the
service dept. at ATI for further assistance.
The sensor zero offset value in nA from the last zero calibration is displayed
on the lower line of the Default Menus for information purposes.
7.12
Chlorine Span Cal
Span calibration of the system must be done against a laboratory measurement
on the same sample that the sensor is measuring. A sample should be collected
from the inlet line feeding the flow cell and quickly analyzed for chloramine.
When calibrating, it is best to have a reasonably high concentration of chloramine
in the system. The higher the value, the smaller will be the calibration errors
caused by errors in the laboratory analytical procedure. It is generally preferable
to calibrate at values above 0.5 PPM to reduce calibration errors. If possible, the
amperometric titration procedure for combined chlorine should be used as the
reference method. The chlorine monitor should be calibrated while operating on a
chlorinated sample stream in the flow cell assembly.
Start flow cell and calibrate system as follows:
1. Place the previously zeroed sensor into the sensor chamber of the flow cell
assembly. The sensor is inserted into the side of the flow cell and is sealed in
place with a double o-ring. The o-rings are lubricated at the factory to allow
the sensor to slide smoothly into place. If insertion becomes difficult, use a
small amount of silicon grease to lubricate the o-rings. If the low-volume flow
cell is used, screw the sensor into the flow cell until the membrane cap
bottoms out on the acrylic flow cell. Do not over-tighten
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2. Turn on the inlet water flow to the flow cell and adjust the inlet flow rate so
that water is overflowing from the inlet chamber. The best performance will
be obtained when some water is always overflowing. This maintains constant
flow and pressure on the sensor at all times.
3. Allow the system to operate undisturbed for 30-60 minutes. Assuming the
water contains chlorine, the display will be reading positive sensor current
values. If the system is stable, the value on the display will increase to some
PPM value and remain at that level. At that point, calibration can continue.
4. If the sensor is on-line, the user may want to set the output HOLD feature
prior to calibration to lock out any output fluctuations.
5. Scroll to the CAL menu section using the MENU key and press ENTER or the
UP arrow key. Cal Chlor will then be displayed.
6. Press the ENTER key. The screen will display a flashing 1-Ref for span
calibration or a 2-Zer for zero calibration. Using the UP arrow key, set for a 1Ref span calibration and press ENTER.
7. The system now begins acquiring data for the calibration value. As data is
gathered, the units for ppm and temperature may flash. Flashing units
indicate that this parameter is unstable. The calibration data point acquisition
will stop only when the data remains stable for a pre-determined amount of
time. This can be overridden by pressing ENTER. If the data remains
unstable for 10 minutes, the calibration will fail and the message Cal
Unstable will be displayed.
8. The screen will display the last measured ppm value and a message will be
displayed prompting the user for the lab value. The user must then modify
the screen value with the arrow keys and press ENTER. The system then
performs the proper checks.
9. If accepted, the screen will display the message PASS with the new sensor
slope reading, and then it will return to the main measurement display. If the
calibration fails, a message indicating the cause of the failure will be
displayed and the FAIL icon will be turned on. The range of acceptable
values for sensor slope is 20% to 500%. It may be necessary to rebuild the
sensor as described in section 5.1 Chlorine Sensor Preparation. Should
the slope value remain out of range and result in calibration failures, review
the Service Section of this manual, then contact the service dept. at ATI for
further assistance.
The sensor offset value in % from the last span calibration is displayed on the
lower line of the Default Menus for information purposes.
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7.2
Part 7 - Calibration
Temperature Calibration
The temperature calibration sequence is essentially a 1-point offset calibration
that allows adjustments of approximately ±5 °C.
The sensor temperature may be calibrated on line, or the sensor can be removed
from the process and placed into a known solution temperature reference. In any
case, it is critical that the sensor be allowed to reach temperature equilibrium with
the solution in order to provide the highest accuracy. When moving the sensor
between widely different temperature conditions, it may be necessary to allow the
sensor to stabilize as much as one hour before the calibration sequence is
initiated. If the sensor is on-line, the user may want to set the output HOLD
feature prior to calibration to lock out any output fluctuations.
1. Scroll to the CAL menu section using the MENU key and press ENTER or the
UP arrow key.
2. Press the UP arrow key until Cal Temp is displayed.
3. Press the ENTER key. The message Place sensor in solution then press
ENTER will be displayed. Move the sensor into the calibration reference (if it
hasn’t been moved already) and wait for temperature equilibrium to be
achieved. Press ENTER to begin the calibration sequence.
4. The calibration data gathering process will begin. The message Wait will
flash as data is accumulated and analyzed. The °C or °F symbol may flash
periodically if the reading is too unstable.
5. The message Adjust value - press ENTER will be displayed, and the rightmost digit will begin to flash, indicating that the value can be modified. Using
the UP and LEFT arrow keys, modify the value to the known ref solution
temperature.
Adjustments up to ± 5°C from the factory calibrated
temperature are allowed. Press ENTER.
Once completed, the display will indicate PASS or FAIL. If the unit fails, the
temperature adjustment may be out of range, the sensor may not have achieved
complete temperature equilibrium, or there may be a problem with the
temperature element. In the event of calibration failure, it is recommended to
attempt the calibration again immediately.
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7.3
Part 7 - Calibration
pH Calibration
The pH calibration menus will not be seen unless the optional pH sensor input is
turned ON and a special pH sensor is connected to the input of the instrument.
See section 6.23 Calibration Menu [CAL] pH Input for more details.
The pH calibration functions appear in the CAL menu listing when the optional
pH input is enabled in the CONFIG menu. When enabled, the pH input signal is
used to compensate the free chlorine signal. Calibration of pH is performed in
one of two methods; one-point or two-point. For new sensors or for calibration in
two different pH buffers with the sensor removed from the process, choose a
two-point calibration. For on-line calibrations with the sensor still mounted in the
process, choose a one-point calibration. For two-point calibrations, it is highly
recommended to use fresh pH buffers of 7 pH and 9.18 pH.
The conductivity difference between the process water and the sensor reference
solution can cause an effect called a “junction potential”. The junction material of
the pH sensor is porous ceramic, which allows the sensor reference solution to
be in electrical continuity with the process solution. One problem is caused by
the reference junction and the diffusion rate of the electrolyte through the junction
material. The inside surface of the junction material is in contact with the
reference cell solution, which has a very high ionic strength. The outside surface
of the junction material is in contact with the process water, which can have low
ionic strength. This concentration gradient creates what is called a “junction
potential” which can vary with the flow rate of the process. The magnitude of this
potential can be upwards of 30 mV (half a pH unit). The lower the conductivity of
the water the larger the effect.
It is not possible to eliminate this effect; however it usually is constant or very
slow changing.
A full calibration of the pH sensor consists of an initial 2-point calibration in
buffers. This sets the slope and zero offset of the sensor. The sensor should then
be left in the process water for enough time for the system to fully stabilize to
process conditions. This may take up to a few hours, depending on process
conditions. A 1-point calibration must then be carried out. The ideal way to do
this is by calibrating to a laboratory sample. After the 1-point calibration only the
zero offset will have changed.
Routine calibration of the pH sensor is a 1point calibration.
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7.31
Part 7 - Calibration
Two-Point pH Cal
1. Thoroughly clean the pH sensor and place it into the first pH calibration
buffer, stirring is several times before letting it rest in the beaker. Allow
sensor to sit in solution long enough to achieve temperature equilibrium with
the pH buffer (maybe 5 minutes.) It is important that both pH buffers be fresh
and at room temperature.
2. Scroll to the CAL menu section using the MENU key and press ENTER or the
UP arrow key.
3. Press the UP arrow key until Cal pH Type is displayed.
4. Press the ENTER key. The display will begin to flash. Using the UP arrow
key, adjust the displayed number to a 2 pt calibration type. This will allow the
user to offset+slope adjust the sensor input for two separate pH point. Once
value has been adjusted, press the ENTER key and the message Accepted!
will be displayed.
5. Scroll to the next menu item by pressing the UP arrow key once. The menu
item Cal pH buf1 will be displayed.
6. Press the ENTER key. The display will begin to flash. Using the UP and
LEFT arrow keys, adjust the displayed number to the known value of the pH
buffer. The exact temperature compensated number for pH buffers is
typically written on the side of the buffers shipping container. Once value has
been adjusted, press the ENTER key.
7. The message Accepted! will be displayed, or an error describing the cause
the failure. If the cal point was accepted, rinse the sensor in distilled or deionized water and move it into the second pH buffer. Stir it slightly several
times and let the sensor rest in the beaker.
8. Scroll to the next menu item by pressing the UP arrow key once. The menu
item Cal pH buf2 will be displayed.
9. Press the ENTER key. The display will begin to flash. Using the UP and
LEFT arrow keys, adjust the displayed number to the known value of the
second (higher or lower value) pH buffer. Once value has been adjusted,
press the ENTER key.
10. The message Accepted! will be displayed, or an error describing the cause
the failure. The system is now two-point calibrated for pH.
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7.32
Part 7 - Calibration
One-Point pH Cal
1. For this calibration method, the sensor may be removed, cleaned, and placed
into a known pH buffer, or, it may be calibrated on-line against a known
reference value. If the sensor is removed, thoroughly clean the pH sensor
and place it into the pH calibration buffer, stirring is several times before
letting it rest in the beaker. Allow sensor to sit in solution long enough to
achieve temperature equilibrium with the pH buffer (maybe 5 minutes.) It is
important that the pH buffer be fresh and at room temperature.
2. Scroll to the CAL menu section using the MENU key and press ENTER or the
UP arrow key.
3. Press the UP arrow key until Cal pH Type is displayed.
Press the ENTER key. The display will begin to flash. Using the UP arrow key,
adjust the displayed number to a 1 pt calibration type. This will allow the user to
offset-adjust the sensor input for one pH point. Once value has been adjusted,
press the ENTER key and the message Accepted! will be displayed.
4. Scroll to the next menu item by pressing the UP arrow key once. The menu
item Cal pH buf1 will be displayed.
5. Press the ENTER key. The display will begin to flash. Using the UP and
LEFT arrow keys, adjust the displayed number to the known value of the pH
buffer. If the sensor is till mounted in the process, enter the known reference
value. The exact temperature compensated number for pH buffers is typically
written on the side of the buffers shipping container. Once value has been
adjusted, press the ENTER key.
6. The message Accepted! will be displayed, or an error describing the cause
the failure. The system is now two-point calibrated for pH.
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Part 8 – PID Controller Details
8.1
PID Description
PID control, like many other control schemes, are used in chemical control to
improve the efficiency of chemical addition or control. By properly tuning the
control loop that controls chemical addition, only the amount of chemical that is
truly required is added to the system, saving money. The savings can be
substantial when compared to a system which may be simply adding chemical at
a constant rate to maintain some minimal addition under even the worst case
conditions. The PID output controller is highly advantageous over simple control
schemes that just utilize direct (proportional only) 4-20 mA output connections for
control, since the PID controller can automatically adjust the “rate” of recovery
based on the error between the setpoint and the measured value – which can be
a substantial efficiency improvement..
The PID controller is basically designed to provide a “servo” action on the 4-20
mA output to control a process. If the user requires that a measured process
stay as close as possible to a specific setpoint value, the controller output will
change from 0% to 100% in an effort to keep the process at the setpoint. To
affect this control, the controller must be used with properly selected control
elements (valves, proper chemicals, etc.) that enable the controller to add or
subtract chemical rapidly enough. This is not only specific to pumps and valves,
but also to line sizes, delays in the system, etc.
This section is included to give a brief description of tuning details for the PID
controller, and is not intended to be an exhaustive analysis of the complexities of
PID loop tuning. Numerous sources are available for specialized methods of
tuning that are appropriate for a specific application.
8.2
PID Algorithm
As most users of PID controllers realize, the terminology for the actual algorithm
terms and even the algorithms themselves can vary between different
manufacturers. This is important to recognize as early as possible, since just
plugging in similar values from one controller into another can result in
dramatically different results. There are various basic forms of PID algorithms
that are commonly seen, and the implementation here is the most common
version; The ISA algorithm (commonly referred to as the “ideal” algorithm.)
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1
de( t ) ù
é
output = P êe(t ) + ò e(t )d ( t ) + D
dt úû
I
ë
Where:
output =
P=
I=
D=
t=
e(t) =
controller output
proportional gain
integral gain
derivative gain
time
controller error (e=measured variable – setpoint)
Figure 30 - Q45H ISA (Ideal) PID Equation
The most notable feature of the algorithm is the fact the proportional gain term
affects all components directly (unlike some other algorithms - like the “series”
form.) If a pre-existing controller utilizes the same form of the algorithm shown
above, it is likely similar settings can for made if the units on the settings are
exactly the same. Be careful of this, as many times the units are the reciprocals
of each other (i.e. reps-per-min, sec-per-rep.)
PID stands for “proportional, integral, derivative.” These terms describe the three
elements of the complete controller action, and each contributes a specific
reaction in the control process. The PID controller is designed to be primarily
used in a “closed-loop” control scheme, where the output of the controller directly
affects the input through some control device, such as a pump, valve, etc.
Although the three components of the PID are described in the setting area
(section 6.25 Control Menu [CONTROL], here are more general descriptions of
what each of the PID elements contribute to the overall action of the controller.
P
Proportional gain. With no “I” or “D” contribution, the controller output is
simply a factor of the proportional gain multiplied by the input error
(difference between the measured input and the controller setpoint.)
Because a typical chemical control loop cannot react instantaneously to a
correction signal, proportional gain is typically not efficient by itself – it
must be combined with some integral action to be useful. Set the P term to
a number between 2-4 to start. Higher numbers will cause the controller
action to be quicker.
I
Integral gain. Integral gain is what allows the controller to eventually drive
the input error to zero – providing accuracy to the control loop. It must be
used to affect the accuracy in the servo action of the controller. Like
proportional gain, increasing integral gain results in the control action
happening quicker. Set the I term to a number between 3-5 to start (1-2
more than P). Like proportional gain, increasing the integral term will
cause the controller action to be quicker.
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D
Part 8 – PID Controller
Derivative gain. The addition of derivative control can be problematic in
many applications, because it greatly contributes to oscillatory behavior.
In inherently slow chemical control processes, differential control is
generally added in very small amounts to suppress erratic actions in the
process that are non-continuous, such as pumps and valves clicking on
and off. However, as a starting point for chemical process control, its best
to leave the “D” term set to 0.
Based on these descriptions, the focus on tuning for chemical applications really
only involves adjustment of “P” and “I” in most cases. However, increasing both
increases the response of the controller. The difference is in the time of recovery.
Although combinations of high “P’s” and low “I” will appear to operate the same
as combinations of low “P’s” and high “I’s”, there will be a difference in rate of
recovery and stability. Because of the way the algorithm is structured, large “P’s”
can have a larger impact to instability, because the proportional gain term
impacts all the other terms directly. Therefore, keep proportional gain lower to
start and increase integral gain to achieve the effect required.
Many of the classical tuning techniques have the user start with all values at 0,
and then increase the P term until oscillations occur. The P value is then
reduced to ½ of the oscillatory value, and the I term is increased to give the
desired response. This can be done with the Q45H controller, with the exception
that the I term should start no lower than 1.0.
If it appears that even large amounts of integral gain (>20) don’t appreciably
increase the desired response, drop I back to about 1.0, and increase P by 1.00,
and start increasing I again. In most chemical control schemes, I will be
approximately 3 times the value of P.
8.3
Classical PID Tuning
Unlike many high speed position applications where PID loops are commonly
used, the chemical feed application employed by this instrument does not require
intense mathematical exercise to determine tuning parameters for the PID. In
fact, the risk of instability is far greater with overly tuned PID control schemes. In
addition, many of the classical mathematical exercises can be damaging or
wasteful in the use of chemicals when the process is bumped with large amounts
of input error to seek a response curve. Because of this, the general adjustment
guidelines described in section 8.2
PID Algorithm, are sufficient for almost
all application tuning for this instrument. Beyond this, many sources are
available for classical tuning methods.
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8.4
Part 8 – PID Controller
Manual PID Override Control
The Q45 PID output function allows the user to take manual control of the PID
control signal. This is often useful when starting up a control loop, or in the event
that you wish to bump the system manually to measure system response time.
To access the manual PID control, you must be in the MEASURE mode of
operation and you must have the PID output displayed on the lower line. This
line will indicate “XX.X% XX.X mA” with the X values simply indicating the
current values. With this display on the screen, press and hold the ENTER key
for about 5 seconds. You will see a small “m” show up between the % value and
the mA value. This indicates you are now in manual mode.
Once in manual, you may increase the PID output by pressing the UP arrow or
you may decrease the output by pressing the LEFT arrow. This will allow you to
drive the PID output to any desired setting.
To revert to normal PID control, press and hold the ENTER key again until the
“m” indicator disappears.
8.5
Common PID Pitfalls
The most common problem occurring in PID control applications involves the
false belief that proper settings on only the PID controller can balance any
process to an efficient level.
Close-loop control can only be effective if all elements in the loop are properly
selected for the application, and the process behavior is properly understood.
Luckily, the nature of simple chemical control processes are generally slow in
nature. Therefore, even a de-tuned controller (one that responds somewhat
slowly) can still provide substantial improvements to setpoint control. In fact,
damaging oscillatory behavior is far more likely in tightly tuned controllers where
the user attempted to increase response too much.
When deciding on a PID control scheme, it is important to initially review all
elements of the process. Sticking valves, undersized pumps, or delays in
reaction times associated with chemical addition can have a dramatic effect on
the stability of the control loop. When controlling a chemical mix or reaction, the
sensor should be placed in a location that ensures proper mixing or reaction time
has occurred.
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The easiest processes to control with closed-loop schemes are generally linear,
and symmetrical, in nature. For example, controlling level in tank where the
opening of valve for a fixed period of time corresponds linearly to the amount that
flows into a tank. Chemical control processes can be more problematic when the
nature of the setpoint value is non-linear relative to the input of chemical added.
For example, pH control of a process may appear linear only in a certain range of
operation, and become highly exponential at the extreme ranges of the
measuring scale. In addition, if a chemical process is not symmetrical, that
means it responds differentially to the addition and subtraction of chemical. It is
important in these applications to study steady-state impact as well as stepchange impact to process changes. In other words, once the process has
apparently been tuned under normal operating conditions, the user should
attempt to force a dramatic change to the input to study how the output reacts. If
this is difficult to do with the actual process input (the recommended method), the
user can place the control in manual at an extreme control point such as 5% or
95%, and release it in manual. The recovery should not be overly oscillatory. If
so, the loop needs to be de-tuned to deal with that condition (reduce P and/or I.)
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Part 9 – System Maintenance
9.1
General
The Q45H/63 Combined Chlorine System will generally provide unattended
operation over long periods of time. With proper care, the system should
continue to provide measurements indefinitely.
For reliable operation,
maintenance on the system must be done on a regular schedule. Keep in mind
that preventive maintenance on a regular schedule is much less troublesome
than emergency maintenance that always seems to come at the wrong time.
9.2
Analyzer Maintenance
No unusual maintenance of the analyzer is required if installed according to the
guidelines of this operating manual. If the enclosure door is frequently opened
and closed, it would be wise to periodically inspect the enclosure sealing gasket
for breaks or tears.
9.3
Sensor Maintenance
Sensor maintenance is required for accurate measurements. The primary
requirement is simply to keep the sensor membrane clean. The membrane is a
micro-porous polymer that is resistant to anything that will be encountered in
water streams. However, deposits can form on the surface or in the pores of the
membrane, and these deposits will reduce the sensitivity. Certain constituents in
water, mainly iron and manganese, will for precipitates when the water is
chlorinated. These precipitates can sometimes form a coating on the membrane.
Because membranes are micro-porous, they can be relatively difficult to clean
effectively. Immersing the tip of the sensor in 1N nitric acid solution will
sometimes remove deposits that cause low sensitivity, but this is not always the
case. The recommended practice is to simply replace the membrane when it
becomes fouled. To change a membrane, follow the Sensor Assembly
procedure (see Section 5.1
Chlorine Sensor Preparation). Do not reuse
the electrolyte from the sensor when changing a membrane. Always refill with
fresh electrolyte. The electrolyte is stable and does not have a limited shelf life.
Refer again to the explanation of the sensor slope number after an accepted
span calibration on the lower MEASURE screen. In normal operation, the slope
of the sensor output will decrease over time as the membrane becomes fouled.
This reduction indicates that the sensor is losing sensitivity to chlorine. It is good
practice to replace the membrane if the slope number falls to 30-40%. The value
will not go below 20%.
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Even if no buildup is apparent on the membrane, it should be changed on a
regular schedule. The recommended membrane change interval is every 3
months. For high purity water applications, this can probably be extended if
desired, but a more frequent changing interval is a small price to pay for avoiding
membrane failure at the wrong time.
While the sensor is disassembled for membrane changing, examine the condition
of the o-rings on both ends of the electrolyte chamber. If the o-rings show any
signs of damage, replace them with new ones from the spare parts kit. It is good
practice to change these o-rings once a year, regardless of their condition.
9.4
Sensor Acid Cleaning
Over an extended operating period, chlorine sensors can slowly accumulate
deposits on the surface of the platinum electrode. Typically, this type of buildup
occurs over years of operation, but can sometimes occur more quickly in high
levels of manganese, iron, or other metals are dissolved in the water. The
platinum electrode can be “acid cleaned” using nitric acid solutions.
WARNING
THIS ACID CLEANING PROCEDURE INVOLVES THE
USE OF HIGHLY CORROSIVE ACID SOLUTIONS. IT
SHOULD ONLY BE COMPLETED BY TRAINED
PERSONNEL USING PROTECTIVE EYEWEAR AND
GLOVES. IF THERE IS ANY DOUBT ABOUT YOUR
ABILITY
TO
SAFELY
ACCOMPLISH
THIS
PROCEDURE, RETURN THE SENSOR TO ATI FOR
FACTORY CLEANING!
To acid clean the electrode assembly, remove the electrolyte chamber from the
sensor so that the so that both electrodes are exposed. Then follow the
procedure below.
1. Place a small amount of 50% nitric acid solution in a beaker. Put in just
enough so that the platinum tip of the sensor can be submerged without any
contact with the silver coil.
2. Allow the sensor to soak in this acid solution for 2 minutes. Remove the
sensor body and rinse the platinum tip thoroughly with distilled water. Discard
the nitric acid safely and according to all environmental regulations.
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ATI Q45H/63 Chlorine Manual
Part 9 – System Maintenance
3. Fill the beaker with distilled water to the level sufficient to submerge both the
tip and the silver coil. Do not allow the connector at the back of the sensor to
be submerged. Allow the electrodes to soak in distilled water for 30 minutes.
4. Put a new membrane and fresh electrolyte in the electrolyte chamber and
reassemble the sensor. Connect to the chlorine monitor electronics and allow
the sensor to stabilize for at least 2-4 hours. The sensor can be placed in the
flow cell with chlorinated water running through it during stabilization.
However, the readings will not be useful for 24 hours.
9.5
Q22P Sensor Cleaning
Keep the sensor as clean as possible for optimum measurement accuracy - this
includes both the saltbridge and the measuring electrode glass. Frequency of
cleaning depends upon the process solution.
Carefully wipe the measuring end of the sensor with a clean soft cloth. Then
rinse with clean, warm water - use distilled or de-ionized water if possible. This
should remove most contaminate buildup.
Prepare a mild solution of soap and warm water. Use a non-abrasive detergent
(such as dishwashing liquid).
NOTE: DO NOT use a soap containing any oils (such as lanolin). Oils can
coat the glass electrode and harm sensor performance.
Soak the sensor for several minutes in the soap solution.
Use a small, extra-soft bristle brush (such as a mushroom brush) to thoroughly
clean the electrode and saltbridge surfaces. If surface deposits are not
completely removed after performing this step, use a dilute acid to dissolve the
deposits. After soaking, rinse the sensor thoroughly with clean, warm water.
Placing the sensor in pH 7 buffer for about 10 minutes will help to neutralize any
remaining acid.
NOTE: DO NOT soak the sensor in dilute acid solution for more than 5
minutes. This will help to prevent the acid from being absorbed into the
saltbridge.
WARNING: ACIDS ARE HAZARDOUS. Always wear eye and skin
protection when handling. Follow all Material Safety Data Sheet
recommendations. A hazardous chemical reaction can be created when
certain acids come in contact with process chemicals. Make this
determination before cleaning with any acid, regardless of concentration.
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9.6
Part 9 – System Maintenance
Replacing the Saltbridge and Reference Buffer Solution
1. Hold the sensor with the process electrode pointing up. Place a cloth or towel
around the saltbridge. Turn the saltbridge counterclockwise (by hand) to
loosen and remove the saltbridge. Do NOT use pliers.
2. Pour out the old reference buffer by inverting the sensor (process electrode
pointing down). If the reference buffer does not run out, gently shake or tap
the sensor.
3. Rinse the reference chamber of the sensor with de-ionized water. Fill the
reference chamber of the sensor with fresh Reference Cell Buffer. The
chamber holds 6 to 7 mL of solution. MAKE SURE that 6 to7 mL is used
when refilling. The chamber should be FULL.
4. Inspect the new saltbridge to verify that there are 2 o-rings inside the
threaded section of the saltbridge
5. Place the new saltbridge over the ground assembly of the sensor. Place a
cloth or towel around the saltbridge and hand-tighten the saltbridge by turning
it clockwise.
NOTE:
Every ATI Q25P Sensor includes a spare bottle of Reference
Buffer Solution, 7.0 pH. This is NOT typical pH 7 buffer, it is a special
“high-capacity” buffer developed to ensure the highest possible stability
of the reference portion of the pH measurement. No substitutions should
be made.
Figure 31 - Replacing the Saltbridge and Reference Buffer
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9.7
Part 9 – System Maintenance
Flow Cell Maintenance
The maintenance on the flow cell is simple cleaning. The flow cell is clear to
make examination of the condition of the sensor easier without interfering with
operations. The flow cell may be cleaned by wiping or by washing with
detergents or dilute acids. Do not try to clean with solvents as the acrylic may
craze or crack.
Change the o-ring in the flow cell yearly or if any damage is observed. If
insertion of the sensor into the flow cell becomes difficult, use silicon grease to
lubricate the o-rings that hold the sensor in place. Use only enough grease to
provide surface lubrication. Excess grease could foul the sensor membrane.
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Part 10 – Troubleshooting
10.1
General
The information included in this section is intended to be used in an attempt to
quickly resolve an operational problem with the system.
During any
troubleshooting process, it will save the most time if the operator can first
determine if the problem is related to the analyzer, sensor, or some external
source. Therefore, this section is organized from the approach of excluding any
likely external sources, isolating the analyzer, and finally isolating the sensor. If
these procedures still do not resolve the operational problems, any results the
operator may have noted here will be very helpful when discussing the problem
with the factory technical support group.
10.2
External Sources of Problems
To begin this process, review the connections of the system to all external
connections.
1. Verify the analyzer is earth grounded. For all configurations of the analyzer,
an earth ground connection MUST be present for the shielding systems in the
electronics to be active. Grounded conduit provides no earth connection to
the plastic enclosure, so an earth ground wiring connection must be made at
the power input terminal strip. Verify metal shield is present over incoming
power connections. This shield is for safety purposes, but also blocks
electrical spikes from relay and power wiring.
2. Verify the proper power input is present (115/230 VAC or 16-35 VDC).
3. Verify the loads on any 4-20 mA outputs do not exceed the limits in the
Instrument Specifications. During troubleshooting, it is many times helpful to
disconnect all these outputs and place wire-shorts across the terminals in the
instrument to isolate the system and evaluate any problems which may be
coming down the analog output connections.
4. Do not run sensor cables or analog output wiring in the same conduits as
power wiring. If low voltage signal cables must come near power wiring,
cross them at 90° to minimize coupling.
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Part 10 - Troubleshooting
5. If rigid conduit has been run directly to the Q45 enclosure, check for signs
that moisture has followed conduit into the enclosure.
6. Check for ground loops. Although the membrane sensor is electrically
isolated from the process water, high frequency sources of electrical noise
may still cause erratic behavior in extreme conditions. If readings are very
erratic after wiring has been checked, check for a possible AC ground loop by
temporarily disconnecting feed and drain lines from the flow cell while there is
still water on the inside. The reading should be initially stable and then fall
very slowly in a smooth fashion as chlorine is depleted in the static sample.
7. On relay based systems, check the load that is connected to the relay
contacts. Verify the load is within the contact rating of the relays. Relay
contacts which have been used for higher power AC current loads may
become unsuitable for very low signal DC loads later on because a small
amount of pitting can form on the contacts. If the load is highly inductive
(solenoids, motor starters, large aux relays), note that the contact rating will
be de-rated to a lower level. Also, due to the large amount of energy present
in circuits driving these types of loads when they are switched on an off, the
relay wiring placement can result in electrical interference for other devices.
This can be quickly resolved by moving wiring, or by adding very inexpensive
snubbers (such As Quencharcs) to the load.
8. Carefully examine any junction box connections for loose wiring or bad wire
stripping. If possible, connect the sensor directly to the analyzer for testing.
9. Check the sensor membrane to be sure that the “shiny” side of the membrane
is facing out. See Critical Note on page 38.
10. Check sensor membrane for fouling. Look closely for signs of grease or oil
which may be present. Replace membrane and electrolyte, allow to stabilize,
and re-check. The procedure in section 5.1 Chlorine Sensor Preparation, on
page 38, must be followed when replacing the membrane.
11. Check to see that the chlorine in the water is combined chlorine and not free
chlorine.
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10.3
Part 10 - Troubleshooting
Analyzer Tests
1. Disconnect power and completely disconnect all output wiring coming from
the analyzer. Remove sensor wiring, relay wiring, and analog output wiring.
Re-apply power to the analyzer.
2. Using the Simulate feature, check operation of analog outputs and relays with
a DMM.
3. Check cell drive circuit. With a digital voltmeter (DVM), measure the voltage
between ORANGE (-) and WHITE (+) Terminals. Verify that the millivolt
value is actually -400 mV.
4. Check TC drive circuit. Place a wire-short between the GREEN and BLACK
terminals. With a digital voltmeter (DVM), measure the voltage between the
BLACK and RED terminals on the back of the monitor to verify that the TC
drive circuit is producing about 4.8-5.1 VDC open circuit. Remove DVM
completely and connect a 100 Ohm resistor from the BLACK to RED
terminals. The temperature reading should display approximately 0°C and
the chlorine reading should display approximately 0 ppm.
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10.4
Part 10 - Troubleshooting
Display Messages
The Q45 Series instruments provide a number of diagnostic messages which
indicate problems during normal operation and calibration. These messages
appear as prompts on the secondary line of the display or as items on the Fault
List.
MESSAGE
DESCRIPTION
POSSIBLE CORRECTION
Max is 200
Entry failed, maximum user value allowed is 200. Reduce value to ≤ 200
Min is 200
Entry failed, minimum value allowed is 200.
Increase value to ≥ 200
Cal Unstable Calibration problem, data too unstable to Clean sensor, get fresh cal solutions, allow
calibrate. Icons will not stop flashing if data is too temperature and conductivity readings to fully
unstable. User can bypass by pressing ENTER. stabilize, do not handle sensor or cable during
calibration.
Out of Range Input value is outside selected range of the Check manual for limits of the function to be
specific list item being configured.
configured.
Locked!
Transmitter security setting is locked.
Enter security code to allow modifications to
settings.
Unlocked!
Transmitter security has just been unlocked.
Displayed just after security code has been
entered.
Offset High
The sensor zero offset point is out of the Check wiring connections to sensor. Allow
acceptable range of -20 to +20 nA.
sensor to operate powered a minimum of 12
hours prior to first zero cal.
Sensor High The raw signal from the sensor is too high and Check wiring connections to sensor.
out of instrument range.
Sensor Low
The raw signal from the sensor is too low.
Chlor High
The chlorine reading is greater than
maximum of the User-selected range.
Temp High
The temperature reading is > 55ºC.
The temperature reading is over operating
limits. Check wiring and expected temp level.
Perform RTD test as described in sensor
manual.
Recalibrate sensor temperature
element if necessary.
Temp Low
The temperature reading is < -10 ºC
Same as “Temp High” above.
TC Error
TC may be open or shorted.
Check sensor wiring and perform RTD test as
described in sensor manual. Check j-box
connections.
Check wiring connections to sensor.
the The chlorine reading is over operating limits.
Set measuring range to the next highest level.
Figure 32 - Q45H Display Messages
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MESSAGE
Part 10 - Troubleshooting
DESCRIPTION
POSSIBLE CORRECTION
Chlor Cal Fail
Failure of chlorine calibration. FAIL icon will
not extinguish until successful calibration
has been performed, or 30 minutes passes
with no keys being pressed.
Clean sensor redo zero and span calibration.
If still failure, sensor slope may be less than
25% or greater than 250%. Perform sensor
tests as described in section 10.5. Replace
sensor if still failure.
TC Cal Fail
Failure of temperature calibration. FAIL icon
will not extinguish until successful
calibration has been performed, or 30
minutes passes with no keys being
pressed.
Clean sensor, check cal solution temperature
and repeat sensor temp calibration. TC
calibration function only allows adjustments
of +/- 6 ºC. If still failure, perform sensor
tests as described in section 10.5. Replace
sensor if still failure. .
EPROM Fail
Internal nonvolatile memory failure
System failure, consult factory.
Chcksum Fail
Internal software storage error.
System failure, consult factory.
Display Fail
Internal display driver fail.
System failure, consult factory.
Range Cal Fail
Failure of factory temperature calibration.
Consult factory.
Figure 33 - Q45H Display Messages (Continued)
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10.5
Part 10 - Troubleshooting
Sensor Tests
1. Check the membrane condition. A membrane that is not stretched smoothly
across the tip of the sensor will cause unstable measurements. If necessary,
change membrane and electrolyte.
2. Residual chlorine sensors can be tested with a digital voltmeter (DVM) to
determine if a major sensor problem exists. Follow the steps below to verify
sensor integrity:
A. Disconnect the five sensor wires from the back of the chlorine monitor.
Those wires are color coded white, brown, red, black, and green. Note
that the brown wire may be replaced with an orange wire in some cables.
B. Remove the electrolyte chamber from the sensor and dry the electrodes
with a paper towel.
C. Connect a DVM between the white and brown (or orange) wires. Reading
resistance, you should find an open circuit value of infinite resistance.
There must be no measurable resistance at all between these wires. Any
resistance at all indicates either water in the cable connector or the
breakdown in an electrode seal.
D. Connect a DVM between the red and white wires. The red wire is part of
the RTD circuit and the white wire is part of the measuring cell. There
should be no connection. Reading resistance, you should find an open
circuit value of infinite resistance. Any resistance at all indicates either
water in the cable connector or the breakdown in an electrode seal.
E. Connect the DVM between the red and black wires. These are the RTD
leads, and you should find a resistance value that depends on the
temperature. The table below lists the resistance values for various
temperatures. Reading resistance between the red and green wires
should give exactly the same values as between red and black.
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Part 10 - Troubleshooting
Temperature
°C
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
Resistance
W
100.0
101.9
103.9
105.8
107.8
109.7
111.7
113.6
115.5
117.5
119.4
Figure 34 - Pt100 RTD Table
If you suspect that water has gotten into a cable connection on a flow type
sensor or into the plug connection of a submersible sensor, disconnect the
cable and allow the parts of the sensor to sit in a warm place for 24 hours.
If water in the connector is the problem, it should dry out sufficiently to
allow normal sensor operation. However, steps 2c thru 2e above will have
to be repeated after drying to see if the problem is gone.
3. Acid clean the measuring electrode in accordance with the procedure in
section 9.4 Sensor Acid Cleaning.
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Part 10 - Troubleshooting
10.6 Troubleshooting (Q22P Sensor)
The first step in resolving any measurement problem is to determine whether the
trouble lies in the sensor or the transmitter. Since measurement problems can
often be traced to dirty sensor electrode glass and/or saltbridge, cleaning the
sensor using the method outlined in Section 9 should always be the first step in
any troubleshooting.
If the sensor cannot be calibrated after cleaning, replace the saltbridge and
reference cell buffer pH 7 as outlined in Section 9.
If the sensor still cannot be calibrated, perform the following test. A multimeter,
pH 7 buffer and pH 4 buffer will be needed.
1. With transmitter power on and sensor connected, place the multimeter’s
positive (+) lead on the white position of the transmitter terminal strip and the
negative (-) lead on the black position. The multimeter should read between
–4.2 and –6.5 VDC.
2. Disconnect the sensor’s black and red wires from the transmitter or junction
box. Re-check Step 1.
3. Place the sensor in pH 7 buffer. As in calibration, allow the temperatures of
the sensor and buffer to equilibrate at room temperature (approximately 25
ºC).
4. Connect the multimeter’s positive (+) lead to the red wire and its negative (-)
lead to the black wire. With the sensor in the pH 7 buffer at approximately 2030 ºC, measure the DC millivolts. The sensor reading should be between 680
– 750 mV. If it is not, replace sensor reference solution, saltbridge and
re-test.
5. With the multimeter connected as in Step 4, rinse the sensor with clean water
and place it in the pH 4 buffer. Allow the temperatures to equilibrate as
before. Now measure the sensor span reading. It should be between +450 –
550 mV.
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Spare Parts
Part No.
07-0049
07-0110
07-0111
01-0242
00-1510
02-0016
00-1506
02-0222
02-0017
02-0031
03-0029
03-0315
48-0001
45-0010
05-0007
05-0023*
05-0004*
09-0010*
07-0096
63-0101
45-0268
09-0052
05-0066
00-0043
42-0014
00-0625
07-0100
31-0038
23-0018
23-0019
23-0022
38-0063
38-0064
38-0065
31-0173
44-0260
44-0263
44-0274
Description
2-Wire monitor electronics assembly
AC Powered monitor electronics assembly, 115 VAC
AC Powered monitor electronics assembly, 230 VAC
Power supply circuit board assembly (specify 115 or 230 VAC)
Chloramine Sensor – Flow Type, vented
Sensing element body, (for #00-1510)
Chlorine sensor, submersion type with 25’ cable, vented
Submersion sensing module, (for #00-1506)
Submersion element body, (for #02-0222)
Submersion holder, 25’ cable (for #00-1506)
Sensor interconnect cable with connector, 25 ft.
Vented Chamber Assembly (For use with 00-1506 or 00-1510)
Membrane holder, type 316 stainless steel
Membrane holder, noryl
Membranes, pkg. of 10 (for older systems)
Combined Chlorine Membranes backed – pkg 10
Spare Parts Kit, screw & o-ring
Combined chlorine electrolyte, 4 oz (120 cc)
Q22P pH Sensor with connector
25’ Combination pH Sensor (w/Solution Ground)
1” NPT Flow Adapter (63-0021)
Reference Solution for pH sensor (07-0096)
Salt bridge for pH sensor (07-0096)
Constant-Head Flowcell assembly with mounting plate
Flowcell o-ring (each)
1½” Flow tee assembly
Junction box
Interconnect cable for junction box to monitor wiring
Fuse, 100 mA, 250V (115VAC)
Fuse, 50mA, 250V (230VAC)
Fuse, 250 mA, 250V (12-24 VDC)
Terminal block plug, 2 position (outputs)
Terminal block plug, 6 position (relays)
Terminal block plug, 3 position (power)
20 Pos. Ribbon cable assembly for AC units
Pg9 cord grip (each)
½” NPT 2-hole cord grip
½” NPT cord grip (each)
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Spare Parts (cont’d)
Part No.
48-0108
03-0372
00-1522
00-1527
05-0110
Description
2-Hole Cord Grip Adapter
Fixed Flow Regulator Assy
Sealed Cl2 Flowcell Assy
Sealed pH Flowcell Assy
Sealed Flowcell Vacuum Breaker
Note: Instrument is supplied with sufficient spare parts for 6-12 months of operation.
For 2 year spare parts inventory, 3 each of the items marked with an asterisk are
required.
Lock/Unlock Code: 1456
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