PC Server 320
IBM
User's Handbook
for PCI/EISA
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general
information under Appendix B, “Notices” on page 273. Also read the general information
under “Product Warranties and Notices” in the User's Reference.
Third Edition (January 1996)
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such provisions are
inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in
certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may
make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at
any time.
It is possible that this publication may contain reference to, or information about, IBM products (machines and
programs), programming, or services that are not announced in your country. Such references or information
must not be construed to mean that IBM intends to announce such IBM products, programming, or services in
your country.
Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
 Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1994, 1996. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure
is subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Safety Information . . . . .
Laser Compliance Statement
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xvii
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Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
Features at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controls and Status Indicators
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Input/Output Connectors . . . . . . . . . .
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Expansion Bays
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Voltage Setting . . . . . . . .
Starting the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the CD-ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . .
IBM PC Server Startup Support . . . . . . .
Chapter 2. Installing Software . . .
Software Considerations . . . . . . .
Installing an Operating System . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . .
OS/2 SMP Installation . . . . . . .
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 Installation
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 Fixpaks . .
Novell NetWare Installation . . .
SCO OpenServer Installation . . .
Windows NT Installation . . . . .
All Other Installations . . . . . . .
About ServerGuide . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServerGuide Main CD
Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Adapter Device Drivers
Hardware Device Drivers . . . . .
Hardware Considerations . . . . . .
2.88 MB Diskette Drives . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
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About This Book . . . . . .
How This Book is Organized
Notices Used in This Book .
Related Publications . . . . .
Welcome and Thank You
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SCSI Hard-Disk-Drive Startup Sequence
IDE Label on System Board
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PC Server 320 Disk-Array Systems . .
Installation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arranging Your Workspace . . . . . . . .
Comfort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glare and Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . .
Air Circulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Outlets and Cable Lengths .
What to Do Next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array . . . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration Monitoring Utilities . . . . . . . .
RAID Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Hard Disk Drive Capacities
Additional Storage Capacity . . . . . . . . . . .
The RAID Configuration Program Screens
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RAID Adapter Configuration Program . . . . . .
Starting the RAID Configuration Program . . .
Viewing the RAID Configuration . . . . . . . . . .
Performing Common Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Logical Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a Hot-Spare Drive
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Deleting a Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redefining Space in an Array . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Maintenance
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Obtaining Drive Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Results of a Hard Disk Drive Failure . . . . . .
Logical and Hard Disk Drive Status Indications
Replacing a Faulty Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Functions
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Backing Up the Disk-Array Configuration . . .
Restoring the Disk-Array Configuration . . . .
Changing the Write Policy . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatting Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing RAID Parameters . . . . . . . . . . .
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
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Chapter 4. Installing Options . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling Static-Sensitive Devices
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Preparing to Install Options . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Installation Sequence
Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Internal Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal Drive Bays (Non-Disk-Array Models)
Internal Drive Bays (Disk-Array Models) . . .
SCSI Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IDE Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Preinstallation Steps (All Bays)
Installing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives
CD-ROM Drive Considerations . . . . . . . . .
Installing Optical Disc Drives and Tape Drives
Installing Hard Disk Drives
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Installing Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays
Removing Internal Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives
Removing CD-ROM Drives . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Optical Disc Drives and Tape Drives
Removing Hard Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Hot-Swappable Hard Disk Drives .
Changing Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Microprocessor
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Security Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security-Cover Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a U-Bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting External Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting External SCSI Devices
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Installing an Uninterruptible Power Supply . .
Chapter 5. Configuring Your Server
Configuration Overview . . . . . . .
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Contents
v
Using the Setup Program
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Changing Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording and Restoring Default Settings . . . . . . . .
Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Selectable Drive-Startup Sequence . . . . . .
Configuring EISA, ISA, and PCI Adapters . . . . . . . . .
Configuring ISA or EISA Features and Options
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Configuring PCI Features and Options . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the EISA Configuration Diskette . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up the EISA Configuration Diskette . . . . . .
Making Menu Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording EISA Configuration Settings
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Starting the EISA Configuration Diskette . . . . . . . .
Using EISA Configuration Diskette Advanced Function
Configuration Conflicts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolving Hardware Configuration Conflicts . . . . . .
Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts . . . . . . .
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the SCSISelect Utility Program
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SCSISelect Utility Program Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
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Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
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Power-On Self-Test (POST) . . . . . . . . .
POST Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Main Menu of the Diagnostic Diskette
Program Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IntruderAlert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Module Tests . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Selected Tests in Test Groups .
Creating Test Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
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Test Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Error Message Table . . . . .
SCSI Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Adapter Message Table . . .
Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . .
Checking the System for Damage
After Dropping It . . . . . . . . .
After Spilling Liquid on It . . .
Installing Additional Test Programs
Using the Utility Programs
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Formatting Diskettes . . . . . . .
Using the File Editor . . . . . . .
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Chapter 7. Getting Help, Service, and Information . .
Before You Call for Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Using the HelpWare Support Family
Getting Help by Telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Help Around the World
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Getting Information by Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Electronic Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purchasing Additional HelpWare Services . . . . . . . .
Using the World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enhanced PC Support Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network and Server Support Line
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Personal Computer Software Assistance Support Line
Ordering Support Line Services . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warranty and Repair Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Custom Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining IBM Operating System Updates . . . . . . . .
Ordering System Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ordering Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A. Server Records . . .
Recording the Server Serial Number
Installed Device Records . . . . . .
Appendix B. Notices
Trademarks . . . . . .
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Contents
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Index
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
275
Safety Information
DANGER:
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication
cables is hazardous. To avoid shock hazard, connect and
disconnect cables as shown below when installing, moving or
opening the covers of this product or attached devices. The
power cord must be used with a properly grounded outlet.
To Connect
To Disconnect
Turn everything OFF.
Turn everything OFF.
First, attach all cables to devices. 1
First, remove power cord from
outlet. 2
Remove signal cables from
receptacles.
Attach signal cables to
receptacles.
Remove all cables from devices.
Attach power cord to outlet.
Turn device ON.
1 In the U.K., by law, the telephone
cable must be connected after the
power cord.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1995
2
In the U.K., by law, the power
cord must be disconnected after the
telephone line cable.
vii
DANGER:
Le courant électrique provenant des câbles d’alimentation,
télephoniques et de transmission peut présenter un danger.
Pour éviter tout risque de choc électrique, connectez et
déconnectez ces câbles comme indiqué ci- dessous lorsque
vous installez ou déplacez ce matériel ou les unités connectées,
ou que vous soulevez un carter.*
Pour connecter
Pour deconnecter
Mettez tout hors tension.
Mettez tout hors tension.
Connectez d’abord tous les câbles
sur les unités.
Débranchez d’abord le cordon
d’alimentation de la prise murale.
Déconnectez les câbles de signaux
des prises murales.
Connectez les câbles de signaux
sur les prises murales.
Déconnectez tous les câbles
de unités.
Branchez le cordon d’alimentation
sur la prise murale.
Mettez l’unité sous tension.
*Le cordon d’alimentation doit être
branché sur un socle de prise de
courant correctement mis à la terre.
x
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Laser Compliance Statement
The PC Server 320 is a laser product. The drive has a label that
identifies its classification. The label, located on the drive, is shown
below.
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
LASER KLASSE 1
LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE
KLASS 1 LASER APPARAT
APPAREIL À LASER DE CLASSE 1
EN 60825
The PC Server 320 is certified in the U.S. to conform to the
requirements of the Department of Health and Human Services 21
Code of Federal Regulations (DHHS 21 CFR) Subchapter J for Class
1 laser products. Elsewhere, the drive is certified to conform to the
requirements of EN 60825.
CAUTION:
Do not open the drive; no user adjustments or serviceable parts
are inside.
Class 1 laser products are not considered to be hazardous. The PC
Server 320 has an internal Class 1 gallium-arsenide laser that is
nominally 0.14 milliwatts at 765 to 815 nanometers wavelength.
Safety Information
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
About This Book
This book contains the information needed to install options,
configure, modify, and troubleshoot your server. If you have not
yet set up your server, refer to the Setup sheet for instructions on
unpacking and cabling the server. See Chapter 2, “Installing
Software” on page 19 for details about installing an operating
system and other software. Refer to the User's Reference for more
detailed information about the server's features.
How This Book is Organized
Chapter 1, “Introducing the PC Server 320,” introduces and
describes the PC Server 320. This chapter also includes an overview
of the server's features and components. In addition, this chapter
contains instructions for starting the server and using the CD-ROM
drive.
Chapter 2, “Installing Software,” describes the factors that you
might want to consider before installing hardware and software in
your server. This chapter also contains information about device
drivers and describes how to install operating systems. Also
included are instructions for completing your installation and using
some of the programs that are provided on compact discs (CDs) in
the IBM ServerGuide package.
Chapter 3, “Configuring the Disk Array,” applies only to disk-array
models. This chapter provides instructions for configuring models
that come with a disk-array adapter. These instructions include
step-by-step procedures for the tasks necessary to configure, add,
change, and delete one or more disk arrays. This chapter also
contains information about the disk-array adapter configuration
program, drive maintenance, and device drivers.
Chapter 4, “Installing Options,” contains step-by-step instructions
for installing and removing hardware options, such as
memory-module kits, adapters, and internal drives. Instructions for
setting jumpers and connecting external options are also included in
this chapter.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
xiii
About This Book
Chapter 5, “Configuring Your Server,” contains instructions for
configuring your server. This chapter describes how to use the
configuration program and other utility programs. This chapter also
contains instructions for changing resource allocations.
Chapter 6, “Solving Problems,” contains information to help you
solve simple problems that you might have with your server. This
chapter includes an overview of the diagnostic tools, instructions for
testing the server, lists of error messages, and troubleshooting
charts. This chapter also contains information about checking the
server for damage, and resolving configuration conflicts.
Chapter 7, “Getting Help, Service, and Information,” contains
information to help you solve more complex problems that you
might encounter with your server. This chapter provides
instructions on how to obtain service and technical assistance for
your PC Server 320 and other IBM products that you might plan to
use. This chapter also contains information about other
publications, products, warranties, and services that IBM offers.
Also included are fax numbers, toll-free telephone numbers, and
access information for electronic bulletin boards, online services, and
the World Wide Web.
Appendix A, “Server Records,” provides a section to record and
update important information about your server, including the serial
numbers, key number, and device records (which contain
configuration information). Whenever you add options to your
server, be sure to update the information in this appendix.
Appendix B, “Notices,” contains product notices and trademarks.
If you find a term that you are not familiar with, refer to the
glossary located in the back of the User's Reference.
xiv
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
About This Book
Notices Used in This Book
This book contains information notices that relate to a specific topic.
The notice definitions are as follows:
Ÿ Notes
These notices provide important tips, guidance, or advice.
Ÿ Attention
These notices indicate possible damage to programs, devices, or
data. An attention notice appears just before the instruction or
situation in which damage could occur.
Ÿ Caution
These notices indicate situations that potentially can be
hazardous to you. A caution notice appears just before the
instruction or situation that could be hazardous.
About This Book
xv
About This Book
Related Publications
In addition to this handbook, the following publications are
included with your server:
Ÿ The Setup sheet contains the instructions for unpacking, setting
up, and cabling your server.
Ÿ The PC Server Service and Support pamphlet contains important
information and phone numbers to call for different types of
support for your PC Server.
Ÿ Included with the ServerGuide package is a publication that
describes the advantages of the IBM ServerGuide.
The IBM PC Servers Hardware Maintenance Manual Supplement is
available for purchase. It contains error codes, advanced diagnostic
procedures, and a parts catalog for most models. This manual is
intended for trained service technicians. (Diagnostic Diskettes are
not included.)
For a complete listing of publications available in the U.S. and
Puerto Rico, call 1-800-426-7282. In Canada, call Customer
Assistance at 1-800-465-1234. In all other countries, contact the IBM
support organization that services your area, your IBM marketing
representative, or your reseller.
xvi
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Welcome and Thank You
We appreciate your decision to purchase an IBM PC Server 320.
Your server offers speed, power, expandability, and compatibility
with various existing Network Operating Systems and application
programs.
The publications that come with your server are: the Setup sheet,
this User's Handbook, the User's Reference, and a PC Server Service and
Support pamphlet. The Setup sheet contains instructions to help you
set up your server. See “How This Book is Organized” on page xiii
for a complete description of the User's Handbook. The User's
Reference contains detailed information about the advanced features
of your PC Server. The PC Server Service and Support pamphlet
contains important information and phone numbers to call for
different types of support for your PC Server. Review these
publications thoroughly before you install an operating system,
additional software, or optional hardware in your server.
Also included is the ServerGuide package, which contains several
CDs. These CDs contain operating systems, application programs,
utility programs, online documentation, and more. Refer to the
ServerGuide documentation that comes with ServerGuide for more
information.
The PC Server 320 also comes with IBM PC Server Startup Support,
which provides coverage during the first 90 days after installation.
IBM PC Server Startup Support is available to PC Server customers
at no additional charge. This comprehensive program enhances
IBM's support for setup, installation, configuration, and problem
determination. It provides assistance for popular network operating
systems and network adapters from IBM and other vendors. If you
need assistance, call IBM at 1-800-772-2227 in the U.S., or call IBM at
1-800-565-3344 in Canada. In all other countries, contact the IBM
support organization that services your area, your IBM marketing
representative, or your IBM reseller.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
xvii
Welcome and Thank You
xviii
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
Your IBM PC Server 320, with an Intel Pentium microprocessor and
symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) upgradability, along with a
peripheral component interconnect (PCI) advanced bus and an IBM
PC Server SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter or IBM PC Server SCSI-2
Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter, create a high-performance local
area network (LAN) server platform to handle heavy file-server
applications or moderate database applications. Your server offers
super video graphics array (SVGA) graphics and provides
compatibility with a wide range of various existing Network
Operating Systems and application programs.
As an open-architecture, industry-standard system, the PC Server
320 has been tested for compatibility with numerous IBM and
non-IBM adapters and devices. Rugged dependability is achieved
by incorporating various quality standards and design points, such
as stringent IBM systems assurance testing, and a cooling design
called FloThru. FloThru cooling helps keep internal electronic
components of the PC Server 320 running cool to improve reliability
and accommodate the full configurations necessary in today's LAN
server solutions.
Your PC Server 320 comes with a full three-year, on-site warranty,
plus IBM PC HelpWare and PC Server Startup Support.
Refer to the Setup sheet for instructions for setting up your server.
Be sure to read the publications that come with the IBM
ServerGuide package before you set up your server.
This chapter contains an overview of the server features and
components. In addition, this chapter describes how to start the
server and use the CD-ROM drive.
See Chapter 2, “Installing Software” on page 19 for details about
installing an operating system and other software. In addition, this
book describes how to configure and use the server, and how to
install and remove options. The troubleshooting information will
help you solve some of the simpler problems that might occur.
Appendix A, “Server Records” on page 267 provides a section for
you to record all the important information about your server.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
1
Refer to the User's Reference for more detailed information about the
server features. That book also includes a glossary, warranty
information, and other important notices.
This chapter contains:
Features at a Glance . . . . . . .
Controls and Status Indicators
Input/Output Connectors . . .
Expansion Bays
. . . . . . . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . .
Moving the Server . . . . . . . .
Checking the Voltage Setting .
Starting the Server . . . . . . . .
Using the CD-ROM Drive . . .
IBM PC Server Startup Support
2
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
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3
4
6
8
10
10
11
12
16
18
Features at a Glance
Features at a Glance
The features in your server vary according to the model that you purchased. The following is a
summary of the features that are available with the PC Server 320.
Microprocessor
Ÿ Intel Pentium microprocessor with
16 KB of internal cache; clock rate
varies by model
Ÿ A processor upgrade, which adds
another Pentium microprocessor,
is available for symmetric
multiprocessing
Cache Memory
Ÿ 256 KB of level-2 cache,
upgradable to 512 KB
Memory
Ÿ Standard: 16 MB minimum,
parity memory, expandable to 256
MB
Ÿ Amount of memory is model
dependent
Ÿ Eight 72-pin, single-inline
memory-module (SIMM) sockets
Ÿ 70 ns speed memory-module kits
Diskette Drives
Ÿ Standard: One 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB
Ÿ Optional (internal):
– 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB
– 3.5-inch, 2.88 MB
– 5.25-inch, 1.2 MB
Hard Disk Drives
Ÿ Number of drives and drive
capacities are model dependent
Ÿ Disk-Array models support up to
seven hard disk drives, six of
them hot-swappable
Ÿ Non-Disk-Array models support
up to six non-hot-swap hard disk
drives
CD-ROM Drive
Integrated Functions
Ÿ Standard: SCSI-2 CD-ROM
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Keyboard and Auxiliary Device
Ÿ 101-key keyboard
Ÿ Mouse
Expansion Bays and Slots
Two PCI slots
Five combination EISA/ISA slots
One shared PCI/EISA slot
10 drive bays on all models
Hot-swap bays standard on some
models; available on all models
Ÿ Number of hot-swap bays varies
by model
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Video
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Bolt-down capability
Door lock
Selectable drive-startup
Security cover (optional)
Supervisor and User passwords
SCSI-2 Controller
Ÿ IBM PC Server SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI Adapter on non-disk-array
models
Ÿ IBM PC Server SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI-Bus RAID Adapter on
disk-array models
Power Supply
Ÿ Super video graphics array
(SVGA) connector
Ÿ Compatibility:
– Video graphics array (VGA)
– Color graphics adapter (CGA)
– Multicolor graphics array
(MCGA)
Security Features
LED usability support
Video connector
Two serial connectors
Parallel connector
Auxiliary device connector
Keyboard connector
Battery-backed clock and calendar
Ÿ 434 watt with automatic range
voltage selection (115–230 V ac)
Ÿ Built-in overload and surge
protection
Ÿ Power supply upgrade expansion
option
– 220 watt automatic range
voltage selection add-on
– Built-in overload and surge
protection
Upgradable Power-On Self-Test
(POST) and Basic Input/Output
System (BIOS)
Ÿ Upgradable electrically erasable
programmable read-only memory
(EEPROM) on the system board
Ÿ POST/BIOS upgrades (when
available)
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
3
Controls and Status Indicators
The most commonly used controls and indicators are on the front of
the server.
Diskette Drive In-Use Light
CD-ROM Drive In-Use Light
Diskette Eject Button
Power-On Light
Power Switch
SCSI Drive In-Use Light
Door Lock
4
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Diskette-Drive In-Use Light: This light is on when the drive is
accessing a diskette.
CD-ROM Drive In-Use Light: This light is on whenever the
CD-ROM drive is accessed.
Diskette Eject Button: Push this button to release the diskette
from the drive.
Power-On Light: This light comes on when you turn on your
server.
Power Switch: Press this switch to turn your server on or off.
Do not turn off your server if a drive In-Use light is on. This
might damage the information stored on a hard disk or diskette.
SCSI Drive In-Use Light: This light is on when your server is
accessing a SCSI device.
Door Lock: Use the key to lock the door, to help prevent
tampering with the internal components.
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
5
Input/Output Connectors
Input/Output Connectors
The following illustration shows the input/output ports (connectors)
on the PC Server 320.
115
Power
Connector
Keyboard
Connector
Mouse
Connector
Parallel
Connector
SCSI Connector
Knockout
Serial
Connectors
SCSI
Connector
Monitor
Connector
Note: For details about these connectors, see the User's Reference.
Use the Setup program to configure serial and parallel port
assignments, as described in “Using the Setup Program” on
page 191.
6
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Input/Output Connectors
Power Connector: The power cable connects here.
Note: Refer to the “Warranties and Notices” section of the User's
Reference for the power cord notice and information about the
availability of IBM power cords for a specific country.
Keyboard Connector: The keyboard cable connects here. Connect
the other end of the keyboard cable to the server by aligning the flat
side of the cable connector so that it faces the keyboard icon.
Mouse Connector: The mouse cable connects here. This port also is
called an auxiliary-device or pointing-device port.
Parallel Connector: The server has one 25-pin, parallel port. This is
where the signal cable for a parallel printer or other parallel device
connects to your server.
SCSI Connector Knockout: This knockout allows access to the
internal connector on a second SCSI-2 adapter.
Serial Connectors: The server has two 9-pin, serial connectors, A
(COM1) and B (COM2). The serial signal cable for a modem or
other serial device usually connects here. Serial connector A is
located next to the parallel port. If you are using a 25-pin signal
cable, you need a 9-pin-to-25-pin adapter cable.
SCSI Connector: External SCSI devices attach here.
Monitor Connector: The monitor signal cable attaches to the
connector on this adapter.
If your monitor has a separate signal cable, connect one end of the
signal cable to the monitor. Connect the other end of the signal
cable to the monitor connector on the server.
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
7
Expansion Bays
Expansion Bays
Non-Disk-Array Model
5 Open Bays
CD-ROM Drive
Diskette Drive
Open Bay
Disk-Array Model
6 Hot Swap Bays
CD-ROM Drive
Diskette Drive
Open Bay
8
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Expansion Bays
Open Bays: Your server's special design gives you the flexibility
to use combinations of 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch hard disk, tape, and
rewritable optical disk drives. In some models, your server can
use up to six hot-swap, 3.5-inch hard disk drives. For
installation instructions and information on the types of drives
that you can install in each bay, see Chapter 4, “Installing
Options” on page 77.
CD-ROM Drive: All models come with a SCSI-2 CD-ROM
drive.
Diskette Drive: The 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskette drive uses 1 MB
or 2 MB diskettes.
Hard Disk Drive: All models come with a SCSI-2 connector.
The number and capacities of the hard disk drives vary
according to the model that you purchased.
Note: See the User's Reference for additional information about the
drives. For the latest information on available options,
contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
9
Moving the Server
Before You Begin
Ÿ Make sure you have an adequate number of properly grounded
electrical outlets for your server, monitor, and any other options
that you intend to install.
Ÿ Place your server in a location that is dry. Rain or spilled
liquids might damage your server.
Ÿ Leave about 51 mm (2 in.) of space around the front and rear of
your server to allow the server's cooling system to work
properly.
Ÿ Have a supply of 1 MB and 2 MB, 3.5-inch diskettes available.
You will need these diskettes later, when you install your
operating system and backup your configuration and all
important data.
Ÿ Have small, flat-blade and Phillips screwdrivers available.
If you have not already done so, perform the following tasks.
Detailed instructions are located on the Setup sheet that comes with
your server.
Ÿ Unpack your server.
Ÿ Remove the packing material.
Ÿ If you are not installing any optional hardware at this time,
connect the cables and power cord.
After you complete these tasks, return here for further instructions.
Note: For information about arranging your PC for comfort and
ease-of-use, see “Arranging Your Workspace” on page 35.
Moving the Server
CAUTION:
Due to the weight of the server, do not attempt to lift the server
by yourself. To avoid possible injury while moving or lifting the
server, ask another person to help you.
10
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Checking the Voltage Setting
Checking the Voltage Setting
Check the voltage-selection switch and verify that it is in the correct
position.
Attention: If you set the voltage switch to the wrong position, you
might permanently damage your server when you turn it on.
Ÿ If the voltage range in your country is between 90 and
137 volts, check to see that 115 is visible. (Use the 115-volt
setting in the U.S. and Canada.)
Ÿ If the voltage range in your country is between 180 and
265 volts, check to see that 230 is visible.
If you need to adjust the voltage setting, slide the switch to the
correct position.
115
V
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
11
Starting the Server
Starting the Server
1. Turn on your monitor and adjust the Brightness and Contrast
controls to the approximate midpoint.
You can readjust these controls and the monitor location for
personal viewing comfort after you turn on your server.
Note: The locations of the Power Switch and the Brightness and
Contrast controls on your monitor might be different
from those shown above.
2. Adjust the keyboard feet and position the keyboard for personal
typing comfort.
12
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Starting the Server
3. Locate the keys; then, unlock and open the door. If the diskette
drive contains packing material or a diskette, remove it from the
drive.
4. If the server is turned on, turn it off.
To turn off the server, press the Power On/Off switch.
5. If you installed any external devices, such as printers, plotters,
or modems, turn them on now.
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
13
Starting the Server
6. Turn on the server.
To turn on the server, press the Power On/Off switch. The
power-on light comes on, and the power-on self-test (POST)
begins.
Power-On Light
Power Switch
14
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Starting the Server
7. Check your monitor. The screen displays the IBM logo and a
number that represents the amount of available server memory.
The server beeps once to indicate that it is working properly.
Notes:
Ÿ If you hear more than one beep, or no beep, check to
see if an error message appears. If an error message
appears, or if your screen is blank, see Chapter 6,
“Solving Problems” on page 215.
Ÿ If your server stops running during testing or normal
operation, call for service. Describe the problem to
the service technician.
Ÿ If no operating system is installed, a code of 1300
appears on the screen. Before you install an
operating system, be sure to start the ServerGuide
Main compact disc (CD) and read the README file
in the Start Here section. See “About ServerGuide”
on page 26 for additional information and
instructions.
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
15
Using the CD-ROM Drive
Using the CD-ROM Drive
A SCSI-2 CD-ROM drive is a standard feature on all PC Server 320
models. To use the CD-ROM drive:
1. Have the CD ready.
2. Press the CD-ROM tray-release button. The CD-ROM tray will
extend out approximately 25 mm (1 in.) from the server. Pull
the tray straight out until it stops.
Tray Load and
Eject Button
Manual Tray
Release Opening
CD-ROM
Tray
Drive
In-Use Light
Note: If the CD-ROM tray does not extend out, insert the end
of a paper clip into the manual tray-release opening and
gently pull the tray open.
16
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Using the CD-ROM Drive
3. With the label information facing up, center and place the CD
on the tray as shown.
4. Locate the tabs in the corners of the tray.
5. Insert a fingertip or a small, blunt object such as the tip of a pen
into the depression on each tab; then, slide the tabs over the CD.
6. Push the CD-ROM tray back into the server.
Chapter 1. Introducing the PC Server 320
17
IBM PC Server Startup Support
The IBM PC Server Startup Support program provides
comprehensive telephone assistance 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,
during the first 90 days after installation of your server, at no
additional charge.
IBM gives you direct access to trained specialists who can help you
set up, install, and configure your server.
Help is available for IBM and non-IBM network operating systems,
network interface adapters, and other optional peripherals. To
receive a list of the network products that the IBM PC Server
Startup Support program supports, call the IBM PC Company
Automated Fax System at 1-800-426-3395 in the U.S., or call
1-800-465-3299 in Canada, and ask for document number 16125. For
more information about this program, or for help with the
installation of your server:
Ÿ In the U.S., call IBM at 1-800-772-2227
Ÿ In Canada, call IBM at 1-800-565-3344
Ÿ In all other countries, contact the IBM support organization that
services your area, your IBM marketing representative, or your
IBM reseller.
Note: For additional information, service, or assistance, see
Chapter 7, “Getting Help, Service, and Information” on
page 257.
18
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Chapter 2. Installing Software
Before you install software in your server, you must determine the
software, hardware, and operating system requirements for your
operating environment. Because some models come with special
adapters, you might need to use the configuration programs on an
adapter option diskette, such as an IBM redundant array of
independent disks (RAID) Adapter Option Diskette, before you
install an operating system and other software.
This chapter describes the factors that you might want to consider
before selecting and installing an operating system and other
software in your server. This chapter also describes operating
system installation. You can install an operating system through
ServerGuide or a separately purchased, off-the-shelf operating
system. Finally, this chapter contains a comprehensive checklist for
completing the installation.
At this time, you should have unpacked your server and attached
cables to it. (Refer to the Setup sheet for instructions.) Be sure to
read the publications that come with the IBM ServerGuide package
before you set up your server. See Chapter 1, “Introducing the PC
Server 320” on page 1 for a description of your server features.
That chapter also includes instructions for using the CD-ROM drive.
Note: If you need service or assistance, see Chapter 7, “Getting
Help, Service, and Information” on page 257.
This chapter contains:
Software Considerations . . . . . . .
Installing an Operating System . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . .
OS/2 SMP Installation . . . . . . .
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 Installation
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 Fixpaks . .
Novell NetWare Installation . . .
SCO OpenServer Installation . . .
Windows NT Installation . . . . .
All Other Installations . . . . . . .
About ServerGuide . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the ServerGuide Main CD
Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Adapter Device Drivers
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
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Hardware Device Drivers . . . . . . . .
Hardware Considerations . . . . . . . . .
2.88 MB Diskette Drives . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Hard-Disk-Drive Startup Sequence
. . . . . .
IDE Label on System Board
PC Server 320 Disk-Array Systems . .
Installation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arranging Your Workspace . . . . . . . .
Comfort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glare and Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . .
Air Circulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Outlets and Cable Lengths .
What to Do Next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
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Installing an Operating System
Software Considerations
IBM and other manufacturers of operating systems, network
programs, and application programs periodically make software
updates available. These updates provide enhancements and
corrections. To ensure that the software that you install functions
properly, contact the manufacturers to obtain the most current
updates.
If you intend to install an IBM operating system or network
programs, such as OS/2 for SMP or OS/2 LAN Server, you can
obtain the most current software updates from the IBM Personal
Software Solutions Center. These software updates are called
FixPaks, ServicePaks, or corrective-service diskettes (CSDs). In the
U.S., you can call the IBM Personal Software Solutions Center at
1-800-992-4777.
For the latest information about hardware device drivers and SMP
operating systems supported by your PC Server 320:
Ÿ In the U.S., call IBM at 1-800-772-2227.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-565-3344.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact the IBM support organization that
services your area, your IBM marketing representative, or your
IBM reseller.
Installing an Operating System
The IBM PC Server 320 combines powerful microprocessor
performance, large data-storage capacity, and system expandability,
so that your server can adapt to handle ever-changing operating
requirements. The operating system that you select allows you to
optimize some of the features in your server. Your server offers
dual-processor capability through a second processor socket, using
SMP technology. You can maximize the benefits of this technology,
Chapter 2. Installing Software
21
Installing an Operating System
provided that you have an SMP-capable operating system, such as
one of the following, installed in your server:
Ÿ OS/2 for SMP
Ÿ Novell NetWare 4.1 for SMP
Ÿ Microsoft Windows NT
Some security features are operating system-dependent, which
means that if you want to use them, you must install an operating
system that supports them. To find out whether an operating
system supports specific security features, see the documentation
that comes with the operating system.
Before You Begin
You can install an operating system from ServerGuide or from
separately purchased diskettes or CDs.
Ÿ For all disk-array models, a RAID diskette is included. Before
you install an operating system on a disk-array model, use the
configuration programs on the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID
Adapter Configuration Option Diskette to view or change the
existing disk-array configuration. See Chapter 3, “Configuring
the Disk Array” on page 39 for detailed instructions; then,
return here.
Ÿ If you have not already installed your options, do so now,
before you install your operating system. Installing your
options now enables ServerGuide to install the necessary device
drivers during the operating-system installation process. See
Chapter 4, “Installing Options” on page 77 for step-by-step
instructions; then, return here. Some options might require
device drivers that are not available on ServerGuide. In this
case, follow the installation instructions that come with the
option; then, return here.
Ÿ If you are installing an operating system from the ServerGuide
CD, select Start Here and follow the instructions on the screen;
then, go to “Installation Checklist” on page 33.
22
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installing an Operating System
Ÿ If you are installing your own operating system:
1. Review “Software Considerations” on page 21 and
“Installing an Operating System” on page 21; then, return
here.
2. Follow the installation instructions that come with your
operating system; then, go to “Installation Checklist” on
page 33.
The following operating systems require special considerations.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
OS/2
Novell NetWare
SCO OpenServer 5.0 (UNIX operating system)
Windows NT
These considerations are discussed in the following sections.
OS/2 SMP Installation
For installation instructions for OS/2, refer to the README files in
the Start Here section of the ServerGuide Main CD.
If you have an OS/2 2.11 SMP license and you want to install OS/2
2.11 SMP on your PC Server 320 without using ServerGuide, call the
IBM Personal Software Solutions Center and request authorized
program analysis report (APAR) II08627. You must provide your
OS/2 license information. IBM will send you the required CD and
installation diskettes.
Ÿ In the U.S. and Puerto Rico, call 1-800-992-4777.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-565-3344.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 Installation
If you install OS/2 LAN Server 4.0, you must install the latest
NETBEUI.OS2 file. Request APAR IC10307 from the IBM Personal
Software Solutions Center.
Ÿ In the U.S. and Puerto Rico, call 1-800-992-4777.
Chapter 2. Installing Software
23
Installing an Operating System
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-565-3344.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
If you experience network errors, change the following parameters
in the IBMLAN.INI file.
Parameter
From
To
MAXCMDS
16
64
MAXTHREADS
10
32
NUMWORKBUFS
15
40
SRVHEURISTICS BIT 19=0
Anywhere in the PROTOCOL.INI file, add the following parameter:
SIDEBAND=ð
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 Fixpaks
Several Fixpaks are available for OS/2 LAN Server 4.0. These
Fixpaks are updated periodically to provide optimum support of
OS/2 LAN Server 4.0 functions across a wide range of hardware
configurations. To receive these updates in the U.S., call the IBM
Personal Software Solutions Center at 1-800-992-4777. In all other
countries, contact the IBM support organization that services your
area, your IBM marketing representative, or your IBM reseller.
Depending on your installation, you might require one or more of
the following Fixpaks:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
24
Fixpak
Fixpak
Fixpak
Fixpak
LS40REQ
LS40GUI
LS40ESRV
LS40RIPL
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installing an Operating System
Novell NetWare Installation
For installation instructions for Novell NetWare, refer to the
README files in the Start Here section of the ServerGuide Main
CD.
SCO OpenServer Installation
If you are installing Santa Cruz Operation (SCO) OpenServer 5.0 in
a disk-array model, you must obtain from SCO an additional device
driver, mdac. The Boot-Time Loadable Driver is required for the
preinstalled RAID adapter in your PC Server 320.
If you are installing an SCO operating system, you might need
updated device drivers for full compatibility with the latest
hardware used in IBM servers. Refer to the Start Here section on
the ServerGuide Main CD for information on how to obtain the
latest device drivers that are available from SCO. To install an SCO
operating system, follow the installation instructions that come with
the SCO operating system.
Windows NT Installation
If more than one logical drive is present in a single drive
configuration, and you intend to install Windows NT, install DOS
on the first logical drive and then install Windows NT.
For installation instructions for Windows NT, refer to the README
file on the diskette that comes with your operating system.
All Other Installations
If you are installing other operating systems, such as UnixWare, use
the installation instructions that come with the operating system.
Chapter 2. Installing Software
25
About ServerGuide
About ServerGuide
It is important that you read and understand the following
information, whether you choose to install an operating system that
is available in the ServerGuide package or you choose to install your
own operating system.
Note: The IBM ServerGuide package contains various
operating-system update programs, some of which are
designed specifically for the IBM PC Server 320. Some of
these updates might not be provided in existing, off-the-shelf
versions of the operating systems. For this reason, if you
intend to use one or more of the operating systems that are
provided in the ServerGuide package, you should use
ServerGuide for the installation.
You can install an operating system from ServerGuide, or you can
install your own operating system and still use many of the features
that are available on ServerGuide. (For example, you can install
NetFinity, which is a LAN systems-management program; run
demonstration programs; use the performance-tuning feature; and
do much more.) Take the time now to read the information that
comes with the ServerGuide package; then, return here.
The ServerGuide CDs contain SCSI and VGA device drivers that
will be installed automatically if you install one of the operating
systems from the ServerGuide CD package. However, if you choose
to install SVGA applications or your own operating system, you will
need to install the SCSI device drivers and the SVGA device drivers.
These device drivers are on the diskettes that come with the server.
Refer to the README files on the diskettes for installation
instructions.
For additional considerations regarding device drivers and operating
systems, be sure to read “Software Considerations” on page 21,
“Installing an Operating System” on page 21, and “Device Drivers”
on page 29.
26
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Using ServerGuide
Starting the ServerGuide Main CD
One of the easiest and most efficient ways to install an operating
system and take advantage of a wide variety of the latest software
for the network environment is to use ServerGuide.
To start the ServerGuide Main CD:
1. If you have not already done so, turn on the server (see
“Starting the Server” on page 12).
2. Locate the ServerGuide CD package and diskettes.
3. Have the main CD ready.
4. Press the CD-ROM tray-release button. The CD-ROM tray will
extend out approximately 25 mm (1 in.) from the server. Pull
the tray straight out until it stops.
Tray Load and
Eject Button
Manual Tray
Release Opening
CD-ROM
Tray
Drive
In-Use Light
Chapter 2. Installing Software
27
Using ServerGuide
Note: If the CD-ROM tray does not extend out, insert the end
of a paper clip into the manual tray-release opening and
gently pull the tray open.
5. With the label information facing up, center and place the
ServerGuide Main CD on the tray as shown.
6. Locate the tabs in the corners of the tray.
7. Insert a fingertip or a small, blunt object such as the tip of a pen
into the depression on each tab; then, slide the tabs over the CD.
8. Push the CD-ROM tray back into the server.
9. Insert the ServerGuide License Diskette into the diskette drive.
10. Press the Ctrl+Alt+Del key sequence to restart the server.
The ServerGuide logo screen appears, followed by a
language-selection screen.
11. Select a language; the Main Menu appears.
12. Select Start Here and review the information.
The README files in the Start Here section of the ServerGuide
Main CD contain important information about ServerGuide,
operating systems, and device drivers. Be sure to review the
README files before you install your operating system.
Note: After using ServerGuide, verify that the date and time are
correct. Update these values if necessary.
28
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Device Drivers
Device Drivers
Device drivers are programs designed to support a specific type of
hardware device. They provide instructions that enable the server
to interact with the device, or to take advantage of a device's special
feature. Not all devices require device drivers. However, the RAID
adapter requires the installation of device drivers.
With OS/2, Novell NetWare, Microsoft Windows NT, and SCO
UNIX, you must run the administration programs to monitor the
drive status. If you have a non-disk-array model, your IBM PC
Server SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter Support Package contains
device-driver files that must be installed when you use OS/2,
Novell NetWare, Windows NT, and SCO UNIX. If you have a
disk-array model, your PC Server SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID
Adapter Support Diskette contains device-driver files that must be
installed when you use OS/2, Novell NetWare, Windows NT, and
SCO UNIX.
Note: See the README file in the IBM PC Server SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI Adapter Support Package or on the PC Server SCSI-2
Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter Support Diskette that
comes with your server for detailed instructions.
Network Adapter Device Drivers
If you are using OS/2 LAN Server and you want to install a
network adapter in your PC Server 320 that does not appear as a
selectable choice in the ServerGuide window box, use the following
instructions:
1. Use the information and instructions provided with the
ServerGuide package to install OS/2 and OS/2 LAN Server.
Note: If there are other products provided on ServerGuide that
you want to install, install them now.
2. When the list of network adapters appears in the window box,
select None.
Note: The IBM 16/4 Busmaster extended industry standard
architecture (EISA) Adapter, which appear on the
ServerGuide device driver installation menus, are not
Chapter 2. Installing Software
29
Device Drivers
supported in the IBM PC Server 320. However, the IBM
PC Server 320 does support the IBM Auto LANStreamer
PCI Adapter, which is a replacement product.
3. When the installation has completed, restart the server.
4. Press Enter to bypass the BIND error messages.
Note: If you installed NetFinity, a driver could not be found
message might appear. Select OK to continue.
5. After the operating system loads, access MPTS (for OS/2 LAN
Server 4.0) or LAPS (for OS/2 LAN Server 3.0) and configure
your server with the appropriate network adapter device driver.
Note:
Ÿ MPTS = Multiple Protocol Transport Services
Ÿ LAPS = LAN Adapter Protocol Support
6. Go to the operating system prompt, then type:
COPY E:\GO4.CMD C:\
7. Press Enter.
8. At the operating system prompt, type:
COPY E:\RESTART2.CMD C:\
9. Press Enter.
10. Perform a Shutdown of your server.
11. Restart your server. This will enable OS/2 LAN Server to
install with the device driver configuration that you selected in
step 5.
Note: All of the products that you selected during the initial
installation will be reinstalled.
Hardware Device Drivers
For the latest information about hardware device drivers for the
IBM PC Server 320, OS/2 for SMP 2.11, and OS/2 LAN Server 4.0:
Ÿ In the U.S. and Puerto Rico, call IBM at 1-800-772-2227
Ÿ In Canada, call IBM at 1-800-565-3344
30
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Ÿ In all other countries, contact the IBM support organization that
services your area, your IBM marketing representative, or your
IBM reseller.
Note: In the United States and Canada, service is available toll-free,
24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Hardware Considerations
The following sections contain information about hardware updates
and modifications.
2.88 MB Diskette Drives
PC Server 320 systems with a basic input/output system (BIOS)
level of M54Pe-07, or lower, might experience problems reading 1.44
MB and 720 KB formatted diskettes in 2.88 MB diskette drives. If
you are having this problem, for the latest BIOS update, contact:
Ÿ In the U.S., call IBM HelpWare at 1-800-772-2227
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-565-3344
Ÿ In all other countries, contact the IBM support organization that
services your area, your IBM marketing representative, or your
IBM reseller.
SCSI Hard-Disk-Drive Startup Sequence
The BIOS code locates the startable (bootable) hard disk drive by
checking adapters as follows:
Ÿ ISA/EISA SCSI adapters start up before PCI SCSI adapters.
Ÿ ISA/EISA Adapters — The adapter with the lowest ROM
address (starting at hex C8000) starts up first. The system BIOS
scans for SCSI option ROMs from hex C8000 up to hex DFFFF
and initializes each one as it finds it.
Ÿ PCI Adapters — PCI SCSI adapters start up depending on
which slot they are plugged into. The order is Slot 3, Slot 2, and
Slot 1. That is, the adapter in Slot 3 starts before the adapter in
Slot 2, and the adapter in Slot 2 starts before the adapter in
Slot 1. See “Installing Adapters” on page 95 for an illustration
that shows the adapter slot locations.
Chapter 2. Installing Software
31
Note: PC Server 320 systems with a BIOS level of M54Pe-07, or
lower (based on the last two digits), do not follow the PCI
startup sequence based on slot locations. In those
systems, the PCI startup sequence is based on which
adapter has the lowest ROM address. The BIOS level
appears on the copyright screen when the system is
powered on.
IDE Label on System Board
The integrated drive electronics (IDE) port on the system board is
labeled Secondary. If you add an IDE adapter to your system and,
using the Setup utility program, configure that adapter as your
Primary port, configure the IDE port on the system board as your
Secondary port. Otherwise, configure the IDE port on the system
board as your Primary port.
PC Server 320 Disk-Array Systems
Logical Drive Limitation
In a disk-array configuration, logical drives may be any size, except
the startup drive. The startup drive must be less than 2046 MB if
you use the high-performance file system (HPFS), or 1024 MB if you
use the file-allocation table (FAT).
Setup Tip
Early versions of the EISA Configuration program do not display
the configuration setting for the PCI RAID adapter. Keep a record
of configuration settings for your PCI adapters when running the
EISA Configuration program. Be sure that adapters do not share
interrupts.
RAID Data Stripe Change
When the RAID stripe size is changed, data will be lost. There is no
warning message.
32
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installation Checklist
Installation Checklist
Important
Be sure to maintain at least 51 mm (2 in.) of space at the rear of
the server to allow the server's cooling system to work properly.
Blocking the air vents can cause overheating, which might result
in a malfunction or permanent damage.
Your server hardware is set up, and you are ready to learn about
your server. The order in which you do these tasks is up to you.
Use the following checklist as a guide.
Ø
Learn about your server and the system utility programs
Your server comes with utility programs to help you
configure your server and troubleshoot problems. See
Chapter 5, “Configuring Your Server” on page 189 for
information about configuring your server and using these
utility programs. See Chapter 6, “Solving Problems” on
page 215 for details about troubleshooting. If your server is a
disk-array model, read and become familiar with Chapter 3,
“Configuring the Disk Array” on page 39. Follow the
instructions to back up your disk-array configuration
information.
Ø
Record your identification numbers
Your server has important identification information that you
will need if you have it serviced. Appendix A, “Server
Records” on page 267 shows where to find these numbers,
and provides space to record and retain information. Be sure
to record your ServerGuide License Diskette serial number in
Appendix A.
Ø
Install options
If you decided earlier to delay installing your options, you
might want to complete these installations now. See
Chapter 2. Installing Software
33
Installation Checklist
Chapter 4, “Installing Options” on page 77 for step-by-step
installation instructions.
Ø
Complete setting up your PC Server 320
If you need to set passwords or drive-startup sequences, or do
other system setup tasks, use the procedures in “Using the
Setup Program” on page 191.
Ø
Install SVGA and SCSI device drivers
If you installed SVGA applications, or if you did not install
one of the operating systems from the ServerGuide CD
package, get the SVGA and SCSI device driver diskettes that
come with your server, and install these device drivers now.
These diskettes contain README files to help you install
device drivers and complete your installation. Be sure to
review the README files before you install the device drivers.
Ø
Install option files
Some options that you install might come with a diskette that
contains device drivers, configuration files, or test programs.
To install these files (after your operating system is installed),
follow the instructions that come with the diskettes.
Ø
Install application programs
To install application programs, follow the instructions
supplied with each application program.
Ø
Review your User's Reference
The User's Reference contains information about the hardware
and software features and expansion capabilities of your
server. This book also contains information about the
microprocessors, memory, data-storage devices, video
subsystems, input and output (I/O) ports, SCSI subsystem,
and security. For your convenience, the User's Reference also
includes a glossary and product warranty information.
34
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Arranging Your Workspace
To get the most from your server, arrange both the equipment you
use and your work area to suit your needs and the kind of work
you do. Your comfort is of foremost importance, but light sources,
air circulation, and the location of electrical outlets also can affect
the way you arrange your workspace.
Comfort
Although no single working position is ideal for everyone, here are
a few guidelines to help you find a position that suits you best.
Sitting in the same position for a long time can cause fatigue. A
good chair can make a big difference. The backrest and seat should
adjust independently and provide good support. The seat should
have a curved front to relieve pressure on the thighs. Adjust the
seat so that your thighs are parallel to the floor and your feet are
either flat on the floor or on a footrest.
When using the keyboard, keep your forearms parallel to the floor
and your wrists in a neutral, comfortable position. Try to keep a
light touch on the keyboard and your hands and fingers relaxed.
You can change the angle of the keyboard for maximum comfort by
adjusting the position of the keyboard feet.
Viewing Distance
Lower
Back
Support
Seat
Height
Adjust the monitor so the top of the screen is at, or slightly below,
eye level. Place the monitor at a comfortable viewing distance,
Chapter 2. Installing Software
35
usually 51 to 61 cm (20 to 24 in.), and position it so you can view it
without having to twist your body. Also position other equipment
you use regularly, such as the telephone or a mouse, within easy
reach.
Glare and Lighting
Position the monitor to minimize glare and reflections from
overhead lights, windows, and other light sources. Even reflected
light from shiny surfaces can cause annoying reflections on your
monitor screen. Place the monitor at right angles to windows and
other light sources, when possible. Reduce overhead lighting, if
necessary, by turning off lights or using lower wattage bulbs. If you
install the monitor near a window, use curtains or blinds to block
the sunlight. You might have to adjust the Brightness and Contrast
controls on the monitor as the room lighting changes throughout the
day.
Where it is impossible to avoid reflections or to adjust the lighting,
an antiglare filter placed over the screen might be helpful.
However, these filters might affect the clarity of the image on the
screen; try them only after you have exhausted other methods of
reducing glare.
Dust buildup compounds problems associated with glare.
Remember to clean your monitor screen periodically using a soft
cloth moistened with a nonabrasive liquid glass cleaner.
Air Circulation
Your server and monitor produce heat. Your server has one or
more fans that pull in fresh air and force out hot air. The monitor
lets hot air escape through vents. Blocking the air vents can cause
overheating, which might result in a malfunction or damage. Place
the server and monitor so that nothing blocks the air vents; usually,
51 mm (2 in.) of air space is sufficient. Also, make sure the vented
air is not blowing on someone else.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Electrical Outlets and Cable Lengths
The location of electrical outlets and the length of power cords and
cables that connect to the monitor, printer, and other devices might
determine the final placement of your server.
When arranging your workspace:
Ÿ Avoid the use of extension cords. When possible, plug the
server power cord directly into an electrical outlet.
Ÿ Keep power cords and cables neatly routed away from
walkways and other areas where they might get kicked
accidentally.
For more information about power cords, refer to the User's
Reference.
What to Do Next?
Ÿ If you have a disk-array model, you must configure your server
first, as described in Chapter 3, “Configuring the Disk Array”
on page 39, before proceeding with the instructions that are
given in the remainder of this handbook. That chapter also
contains instructions for what to do after you have configured
your disk arrays.
Ÿ If you have a non-disk-array model, go to Chapter 4, “Installing
Options” on page 77 if you need to install optional hardware or
security features in your server. After you complete the
instructions in Chapter 4, or if you have no options to install, go
to Chapter 5, “Configuring Your Server” on page 189 for
instructions for configuring your server, and a description of
your server configuration and utility programs.
Chapter 2. Installing Software
37
38
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
The information in this chapter applies only to disk-array models.
This chapter contains information about configuring the redundant
array of independent disks (RAID) adapter and maintaining drives
in the disk-array models of the IBM PC Server 320. In addition, this
chapter outlines step-by-step procedures for some of the more
common disk-array configuration and maintenance tasks, such as
adding, changing, or deleting one or more disk arrays.
First, install your hard disk drives, as described in “Installing
Internal Drives” on page 109. Return to this chapter and follow the
instructions for configuring your disk arrays. After you complete
the instructions in this chapter, you must install an operating
system. Follow the instructions in your operating
system-documentation, and note the software and operating
system-considerations in Chapter 2, “Installing Software” on
page 19. Then go to Chapter 5, “Configuring Your Server” on
page 189 for details about your server configuration and utility
programs. If you have not already done so, see “Using the Setup
Program” on page 191 for instructions for setting passwords. See
Chapter 4, “Installing Options” on page 77 if you need to install
additional optional hardware or security features in your server.
This chapter contains:
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration Monitoring Utilities . . . . .
RAID Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Disk Drive Capacities
. . . . . . . .
Additional Storage Capacity . . . . . . . .
The RAID Configuration Program Screens
RAID Adapter Configuration Program . . .
Starting the RAID Configuration Program
Viewing the RAID Configuration . . . . . . .
Performing Common Tasks . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Logical Drives . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a Hot-Spare Drive
. . . . . . . .
Deleting a Disk Array . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redefining Space in an Array . . . . . . .
Drive Maintenance
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
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Obtaining Drive Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Results of a Hard Disk Drive Failure . . . . . .
Logical and Hard Disk Drive Status Indications
Replacing a Faulty Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Functions
Backing Up the Disk-Array Configuration . . .
Restoring the Disk-Array Configuration . . . .
Changing the Write Policy . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatting Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing RAID Parameters . . . . . . . . . . .
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
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Device Drivers
Before You Begin
1. Familiarize yourself with the information in this chapter and the
RAID information in the User's Reference.
2. Verify the disk-array configuration. Your disk-array model
comes configured as one logical drive.
Ÿ To view the disk-array configuration, follow the directions
in “Viewing the RAID Configuration” on page 49.
Ÿ To create a disk array, follow the directions in “Creating a
Disk Array” on page 51.
3. After you configure the disk array, you can complete setup by
installing your operating system (from the ServerGuide CD that
is shipped with your server or from the diskettes that come with
your operating system). To install your operating system from
the ServerGuide CD, follow the instructions in “About
ServerGuide” on page 26.
4. After you install your operating system, back up the disk-array
configuration. See “Backing Up the Disk-Array Configuration”
on page 69.
Note: The SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter is also called
the IBM RAID adapter.
Device Drivers
The RAID adapter requires the installation of device drivers. See
the README file on the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Configuration Option Diskette for detailed instructions.
If you install an operating system from the ServerGuide CD, the
device drivers will be installed automatically. If, however, you
install your operating system from diskettes, you will need to install
the device drivers. See the README file on the RAID Adapter
Option Diskette for installation instructions.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
41
RAID Technology
Administration Monitoring Utilities
The RAID Adapter Option Diskette contains RAID monitoring
utility programs for several operating systems that your disk-array
model supports. The monitoring programs are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
OS/2 RAID Controller Administration and Monitor
OS/2 RAID NetFinity Alert Manager
OS/2 RAID Controller Administration for Novell NetWare
RAIDADMN.EXE for Windows NT
SCO400.EXE and OPS5400.EXE for SCO UNIX
These programs include many of the functions that are in the IBM
RAID configuration program, but unlike that program, they reside
on top of your operating system and do not require you to start the
program from a startable diskette or from a startable CD. You can
start these programs from your active operating system desktop.
Each of these monitoring programs allows you to view the RAID
configuration, reconfigure the array when replacing a defunct drive,
and perform tuning tasks such as changing the write policy.
To monitor the drive status with OS/2, Novell NetWare, Microsoft
Windows NT, and SCO UNIX, you must run the administration
programs. The RAID Adapter Option Diskette contains files that
you must install when you run these programs.
See the README file on the RAID Adapter Option Diskette for
installation and use instructions for these monitoring utilities. For
OS/2 RAID NetFinity Alert Manager, also see the ServerGuide CD
documentation.
RAID Technology
RAID is the technology of grouping several hard disk drives in a
server into an array that can be defined as a single logical drive.
This logical drive then appears to the operating system as a single
physical drive. This grouping technique greatly enhances
logical-drive capacity and performance. In addition, if one of the
hard-disk drives fails (becomes defunct), the system continues to
run, with no operator intervention required, at reduced
42
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
RAID Technology
performance. The defunct drive can be replaced (hot-swapped)
without turning off the server. For more information about
hot-swap hard disk drives, see “Installing Internal Drives” on
page 109. See the User's Reference for further details about RAID
technology.
Hard Disk Drive Capacities
With a server, it is important to understand the implications of hard
disk drive capacities and how they influence the way that you
create disk arrays.
Although the drives in the disk array can be of different capacities
(for example, 1 GB or 2 GB), they are treated in the disk array
configuration as if they all have the capacity of the smallest disk
drive. Therefore, if you have four drives of 1 GB, 1 GB, 1 GB, and
2 GB grouped in one disk array, the total capacity of the array is 1
GB times 4, or 4 GB (instead of the 5 GB physically available).
Notes:
Ÿ The total capacity of the array without protection would
be 4 GB. With RAID level 5, the usable data capacity
would be 3 GB.
Ÿ 1 GB equals approximately 1 000 000 000 bytes.
Additional Storage Capacity
When you add hard disk drives to your server, you must configure
a new disk array before you can use the drives. You can either
reconfigure the existing disk array to include the capacity offered
with the added drives, or group the added drives into their own
array (see “Creating a Disk Array” on page 51). You also can create
an array with only one drive.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
43
RAID Technology
The RAID Configuration Program Screens
When you configure your disk array, or even just view its
configuration, you will be using the IBM RAID configuration
program on the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Configuration Option Diskette (also called the IBM RAID Adapter
Option Diskette). The following figure is a compilation of many of
the IBM RAID Controller Disk Array Configuration (also called the
IBM RAID configuration program) screens. The list that follows the
figure describes the numbered areas of the figure.
2
1
4
5
3
6
1. This pop-up allows you to select the RAID level that you want
to assign to the logical drive that you are defining, and it allows
you to select the logical drive size. You can enter the size, in
megabytes, or you can accept the default value shown.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
RAID Technology
When you need to confirm an action, the Confirm pop-up
appears in this area.
2. You can select any of the choices that appear on the menus.
3. The Bay/Array selection list shows each bay in the server (for
each channel) numbered 1 through 7. The abbreviation in the
bay indicates the status of the drive installed in the bay.
Selections are made from this list to determine which bays (hard
disk drives) are in your arrays. The letter to the right of the bay
identifies the array in which the hard disk drive in that bay is
grouped.
Note: The Channel/Bay/Array area on the screen does not
reflect the physical configuration of the server. In your
server, the hot-swap hard disk drives are numbered 1
through 6 (from top to bottom). See “Installing Internal
Drives” on page 109 to see the physical location of the
hard disk drives.
4. The Array list indicates the array ID and the size (in megabytes)
of the array. When a drive is being rebuilt, this area, along with
the Logical Drive list area, shows the progression of the
rebuilding process.
5. The Logical Drive list identifies the logical drive (for example,
A1), the size of the logical drive, the RAID level assigned to the
logical drive, the date it was created, and the write policy.
The status of the logical drive also is shown. Good means that
no problem conditions are associated with the drive. Critical
means that you must replace the drive or do a rebuild
operation. (You will have received a message telling you the
drive is in a Critical state during startup time.) Offline means
that the logical drive is irrecoverable; the data in that drive is
lost.
When a drive is being rebuilt, this area, along with the Array
list area, shows the progression of the rebuilding process.
During an initialization process, the Write Policy area displays
the percent initialized; during a synchronization process, it
displays the percent synchronized.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
45
RAID Technology
6. The information area tells you the action you can perform on
this screen or pop-up.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
RAID Adapter Configuration Program
RAID Adapter Configuration Program
The Configuration program allows you to view the current
disk-array configuration, change or delete existing arrays, create and
initialize new arrays, and perform other array functions.
Starting the RAID Configuration Program
To start the Configuration program:
1. Insert the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Configuration Option Diskette into the primary diskette drive
and turn on the system.
If the system is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. The Startup Menu screen appears with option 1, Start Option
Diskette (Driver Install) and option 2, Start RAID Configuration
Program (Array Configuration). Select option 2, Start RAID
Configuration Program (Array Configuration).
3. If you have more than one RAID adapter, you get a screen
similar to the following for adapter selection. To select a RAID
adapter for configuration, follow the instructions on the screen.
If you have only one RAID adapter, the Main Menu appears.
The version numbers and slot numbers on your screens might be
different.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
47
RAID Adapter Configuration Program
The Main Menu of the IBM RAID Configuration Program is as
follows.
You can select Help from any menu. To return to the previous
screen or to the previous work area of a screen, press the Esc key.
To select a menu item, press the number of the item, or use the Up
Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the item; then, press
Enter.
The Main Menu offers the following items:
Ÿ Select Help when you need information about the choices on
the screen.
Ÿ Select View configuration to see the existing disk-array
configuration.
Ÿ Select Create/delete array to define a hot-spare drive, select the
drives for an array that you want to create, or delete an existing
array. This item also has choices for defining a logical drive
and formatting a drive.
Whenever you make changes to the configuration and then
select Exit, the Confirm pop-up window appears. You must
select Yes to save and activate the changes.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Ÿ Select Initialize/synchronize array after you create your array:
– If you are using RAID level 5 or level 1, you must select
Initialize logical drive for proper operation. This sets the
drive to a predetermined state. Any data that exists on the
drive is overwritten with zeros, and corresponding parity is
initialized to the correct value.
You can initialize more than one logical drive at a time.
You can interrupt the initialization process at any time by
pressing the Esc key. Then, you can restart the initialization
process by pressing Enter, or you can end the process by
pressing Esc again.
– Select Synchronize logical drive to recompute and rewrite
the parity data on the drive. You select this choice to
recompute parity data for RAID level 5. This choice does
not alter data on the drive. You can synchronize more than
one logical drive at a time.
Ÿ Select Rebuild device if you want to rebuild logical drives. The
Rebuild operation is supported only for RAID levels 1 and 5.
Ÿ Select Advanced functions to save your configuration
information to a diskette or restore it from a diskette, and to
change RAID parameters. You also can perform a low-level
format of hard disks from this choice.
Ÿ Select Drive information to view information about the SCSI
devices (hard disk, CD-ROM, tape, and so on) connected to the
RAID adapter.
Ÿ Select Exit to leave the Main Menu.
Viewing the RAID Configuration
To view the configuration of your disk array:
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
2. Select option 2, Start RAID Configuration Program (Array
Configuration).
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
49
3. Select View configuration. The current disk-array configuration
information appears on the screen.
4. Press Enter to show the stripe order. Stripe order shows how
data is accessed in sequential stripes. In the following example
of sequential data access, data is accessed from a stripe from
channel 1 bay 4, then channel 1 bay 5, and then channel 2 bay 1,
respectively.
5. Press any key to return to the View Configuration menu.
6. Press Esc to return to the Main Menu.
Performing Common Tasks
The Create/Delete Array menu of the Configuration program
contains the more common tasks for configuring disk arrays.
Procedures to complete these tasks are described in this section as
follows:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
50
“Creating a Disk Array” on page 51
“Defining Logical Drives” on page 52
“Defining a Hot-Spare Drive” on page 57
“Deleting a Disk Array” on page 59
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Creating a Disk Array
To create a disk array:
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
Note: If you want to create an array using hard disks in an
existing array, refer to “Redefining Space in an Array” on
page 61.
2. Select option 2, Start RAID Configuration Program (Array
Configuration).
3. Select Create/delete array from the Main Menu.
4. Select Create disk array from the Create/Delete Array menu.
The cursor becomes active in the Bay/Array selection list.
Note: In the following step, when you press Enter to select a
drive for an array, you cannot change your selection by
pressing Enter again, as you can with the hot-spare
selection process. Carefully determine which drives you
want in the array before beginning the selection process.
If you change your mind after selecting the drives for an
array, you can delete the array (by selecting Delete disk
array from the Create/Delete Array menu) and begin
again.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
51
5. Select each drive that you want in the array by using the Up
Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the drive and
then pressing Enter. As you select each drive, the status
changes from RDY (Ready) to ONL (Online).
6. When you have selected all the drives you want in the array,
press Esc. The cursor becomes active in the menu.
7. If you have drives you did not use in this array and you want
to create another array, you can do either of the following:
Ÿ Define the logical drive or drives for this array; then, create
another array and its logical drives.
Ÿ Create another array by repeating steps 2 through 5 in this
procedure; then, define logical drives for both arrays.
If you do not want to create another array, continue with
“Defining Logical Drives.”
Note: You must define at least one logical drive for each
created array before you can exit the Configuration
Program.
Defining Logical Drives
After you have created an array, you must define a logical drive.
(You cannot leave the Configuration Program until you define the
logical drives for any created arrays.)
1. Select Define Logical drive from the Create/Delete Array menu.
The following screen appears. The cursor is active in the Array
list.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
2. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the
array that you want to define; then, press Enter. The Select
RAID Level pop-up window appears. The cursor becomes
active in the window.
Note: The system automatically assigns RAID level 0 to any
logical drives defined in an array containing only one
hard disk drive. When this is the case, the Select RAID
Level pop-up window does not appear.
If you have only two hard disk drives in the array, the Select
RAID Level pop-up window appears, but RAID level 5 is not
selectable. You must have at least three hard disk drives in an
array to assign RAID level 5 to one of the logical drives.
Remember that you can define more than one logical drive for
your array. The only restriction is that the total number of
logical drives you can define is eight.
3. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the
RAID level that you want to assign to this logical drive; then,
press Enter.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
53
Note:
Because the level that you assign can influence the space
needed for the drive, you must assign a RAID level
before you enter the size of the logical drive.
The logical drive information appears in the Logical Drive list.
The Logical Drive list shows you the logical drive ID, the size of
each logical drive, the RAID level you assigned to that logical
drive, and the date created.
The status of the logical drive also is shown. Good means that
no problem conditions are associated with the drive. Critical
means that you must replace the hard disk drive and rebuild the
logical drive. (You receive a message telling you what has
happened to the drive during startup time.) Offline means that
the logical drive is irrecoverable; the data in that drive is lost.
The Logical Drive Size pop-up window shows the space in this
array that is available for logical drives. Type any size that you
want within this size limitation.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
4. Type the size, in megabytes, that you want for the logical drive;
then, press Enter. A pop-up window appears, asking you to
confirm your action.
Information about the new logical drive appears in the Logical
Drive list.
Note:
The size that appears in the Logical Drive list might be
different from the size that you typed. The size of a
logical drive is determined by several factors, but
basically the size must be divisible by the number of data
drives in the array.
Consider the following scenarios:
Scenario 1:
The array contains three drives. You assign RAID level 0
(which uses all the drives in the array with no parity storage),
and type 1ðððMB. The size shown in the Size (MB) column is
999, which is the number closest to and lower than 1000, and
divisible by 3.
Scenario 2:
The array contains three drives, and you assign RAID level 5.
Data is striped across all three drives in the array, but the space
equivalent to that of one drive is used for redundant storage.
Therefore, if you type 1ðððMB, the size shown in the Size (MB)
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
55
column remains 1000 because it is divisible by 2 (drives), which
is the space available for data.
If you do not use the entire array for this logical drive, you can
create another by assigning either the same or a different RAID
level for an additional logical drive. You can have as many as
eight logical drives among four disk arrays.
5. To return to the menu, press Esc. If you want to define more
logical drives, repeat steps 1 through 5 of this procedure.
6. To leave this menu, select Exit or press the Esc key. A pop-up
window appears asking you to confirm your action.
7. To save your changes, select Yes. To maintain the configuration
that was in place before you selected changes, select No.
8. If you are using RAID level 5 or level 1, you must select
Initialize logical drive for proper operation. This sets the drive to
a predetermined state. Any data that exists in the drive is
overwritten with zeros, and corresponding parity is initialized to
the correct value.
a. Select Initialize/synchronize array from the Main Menu;
then, select Initialize logical drive.
b. Select the logical drives you want to initialize from the
Logical Drive list by pressing the Spacebar (the drives
become highlighted as you press the Spacebar). To start the
initialization, press Enter. A pop-up window appears
asking you to confirm your action.
Attention: If you select Yes in the Confirm pop-up
window, information on the logical drive is overwritten
with zeros.
c. Select Yes to confirm that you want to initialize this logical
drive.
The initialization process begins, and you can see its
progress in the Pct. Int. column of the Logical Drive list.
d. To stop the initialization at any time, press Esc. Then, press
Esc again to return to the menu, or press Enter to continue
initializing the drive.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
You need a 3.5-inch, formatted diskette for the following backup
procedure.
9. Back up the configuration information to diskette:
a. Select Advanced functions from the Main Menu.
b. Select Backup config. to diskette.
Follow the instructions on the screen. A pop-up window
shows the default file name of config. You can change the
file name by typing over the default. The extension added
is .dmc
Defining a Hot-Spare Drive
To define a drive as a hot-spare drive:
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
2. Select Create/delete array from the Main Menu. The following
screen appears.
3. Select Define hot-spare drive. The cursor becomes active in the
Bay-Array selection lists.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
57
Note: Only disk drives are shown as RDY, ONL, DDD, OFL, or
HSP state. Tape and CD-ROM drives are not shown.
They appear when you select drive information.
The numbers to the left are the bay IDs. See “Bay/Array
Selection List” on page 65 for the drive status meanings.
4. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the
RDY (ready) drive you want to define as the hot spare; then,
press Enter. The RDY changes to HSP (hot spare). You can
press Enter again to alternate between HSP and RDY.
5. Press Esc when you have finished. The cursor becomes active
in the Create/Delete Array menu.
6. If you want to create a disk array, go to “Creating a Disk
Array” on page 51.
If you are finished:
a. Select Exit or press the Esc key. A pop-up window appears
asking you to confirm your change.
Note: The changes that you make are not saved until you
confirm them by selecting Yes in the Confirm pop-up
window.
b. Select No if you do not want the drive that you selected to
be a hot spare; select Yes to define it as a hot-spare drive.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
c. Back up the configuration information to diskette. Refer to
“Backing Up the Disk-Array Configuration” on page 69 for
instructions.
Deleting a Disk Array
The last array that you created must be the first array that you
delete.
Attention: All the data and programs in the array are lost during
this procedure. Before proceeding, back up any data and programs
that you want to save.
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
2. Select Create/delete array from the Main Menu.
3. Select Delete disk array from the Create/Delete Array menu.
The cursor becomes active in the Array list.
4. Review the Date Created column in the Logical Drive list; then,
press the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the
most recently defined array.
5. Press Del. The Confirm pop-up window appears.
Attention: All the data and programs in the array are lost
during this procedure.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
59
6. If you do not want to delete the array, select No. To delete the
array, select Yes.
Note: To use hard disks from the existing array when creating a
new array, you must confirm the deletion of the existing
array.
If a defunct drive is still in a bay, the status shows a blank bay, as
though there were no drive in that bay. When you replace the
drive, the status shows RDY after the reconfiguration is completed
and you have selected Yes in the Confirm pop-up window.
Attention: In some operating systems, deleting an array and
associated logical drives might change the drive letters that are
assigned to the existing drives.
Adding Drives to Create an Additional Array
The following procedure shows you how to add storage capacity to
your server without disturbing existing data.
1. Install the additional hard disk drive or drives. (See “Installing
Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays” on page 148 for
information about installing drives.)
2. Insert the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Configuration Option Diskette into the primary drive; then,
press Ctrl+Alt+Del. If your system is turned off, turn it on.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
3. Create a new disk array and define logical drives (see “Creating
a Disk Array” on page 51 for detailed instructions).
Redefining Space in an Array
You can redefine space in a disk array in several ways. For
example, you can combine a number of small logical drives to create
a larger one; you can redefine the existing logical drive into several
smaller drives; or you can add hard disk drives and use them along
with the existing drives to create a logical drive that is larger than
was possible with your existing storage capacity.
One method for redefining space in an array is to change the RAID
level that you assigned to a logical drive. For example, if you
assigned RAID level 1 to a logical drive and then decided that you
needed the capacity offered with RAID level 5, you can use this
procedure to replace the existing logical drive with another that is
assigned the new RAID level.
Before you can redefine the space in a disk array, you must first
delete the array. The last disk array that you defined must be the
first array that you delete.
Attention: In all cases, when you delete an array, all the data and
programs in the array are lost.
If you have data and programs that you want to save, you must
back up and then restore this information. To save time, you might
want to use a high-speed backup device, such as a tape drive.
Follow this procedure to redefine the space in an array:
1. Back up all data and programs in the array.
2. If needed, install additional hard disk drives.
Refer to “Hard Disk Drive Capacities” on page 43 for
information about selecting drive sizes. See “Installing Hard
Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays” on page 148 for information
about installing drives.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
61
3. Insert the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Configuration Option Diskette diskette into the primary drive;
then, press Ctrl+Alt+Del to start the Configuration program.
4. Delete the existing array:
a. Select Create/delete array from the Main Menu. The
Create/Delete Array menu appears.
b. Select Delete disk array. The cursor is then active in the
Array list.
c. Review the Logical Drive List Date Created column; then
press the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight
the most recently defined array.
Note:
You must delete disk arrays in descending order; the
last disk array that you created must be the first disk
array that you delete.
d. Press Del. The Confirm pop-up window appears.
Attention: All the data in the array is lost during this
procedure. Be sure to back up all data and programs that
you want to save.
e. If you do not want to delete the array select No. To delete
the array select Yes.
Note: To use the hard disks from the existing array in the
new array, you must confirm the deletion of the
existing array.
After you make your selection, the Confirm pop-up window
is no longer displayed, and the cursor becomes active in the
menu.
5. If you want to define a drive as a hot-spare drive, refer to
“Defining a Hot-Spare Drive” on page 57 for detailed
instructions.
6. Create a new disk array and define logical drives.
See “Creating a Disk Array” on page 51 for detailed instructions
on creating a disk array and defining logical drives.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Drive Maintenance
7. After you have created the new array and logical drive or
drives, select Initialize/synchronize array from the Main Menu;
then select Initialize logical drive to prepare the drives in the
array to receive data. This sets the drive to a predetermined
state. Any data existing in the drive is overwritten with zeros,
and corresponding parity is initialized to the proper value.
8. You need a 3.5-inch, formatted diskette for this backup
procedure. If you want to have a backup of this configuration
information, select Advanced functions from the Main Menu,
and then select Backup config. to diskette. Follow the
instructions on the screen.
9. Exit from the Configuration program by pressing the Esc key
while on the Main Menu, or by selecting Exit from the Main
Menu. A pop-up window appears, asking you to confirm your
action.
10. Reinstall your operating system and device drivers; then, restore
your data and programs.
Drive Maintenance
This section includes information about logical and hard disk drive
status indicators, and about the results of a hard disk drive failure.
It also has procedures for replacing defunct drives and for
redefining the space in an array by replacing logical drives.
Obtaining Drive Status
To see the ID, capacity, and other information about your hard disk
drives:
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
63
Drive Maintenance
2. Select Drive information.
3. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight each
of the drives shown in the Bay/Array selection list. As you
highlight each drive, the information for that drive appears at
the bottom of the screen.
4. Press Esc to return to the Main Menu.
Note: The status of the hard disk drive determines the status of the
logical drives in the array in which the hard disk is grouped.
Any of the following circumstances can cause the status area to be
blank:
Ÿ No hard disk drive is installed in that bay.
Ÿ The bay contains a hard disk drive, but the drive is not inserted
correctly.
Ÿ An array was deleted and a defunct drive is still in the bay.
Ÿ A new drive was installed, but the configuration program has
not been restarted. (The status changes to RDY when the
configuration program is restarted.)
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Drive Maintenance
Bay/Array Selection List
The status of the drives in the Bay/Array selection list is defined as
follows:
Status
Meaning
CDR
CD-ROM. A CD-ROM drive is installed.
DDD
Defunct Disk Drive. The drive is an online or hot-spare
drive that does not respond to commands. (If a RDY
drive is defunct or powered down, it shows as an empty
bay (a blank status), not a DDD status).
FMT
ForMaT. The drive is being reformatted.
HSP
Hot SPare. The drive will replace a similar drive that
becomes defunct in real time. At that time, its status
changes to ONL, and its array association appears.
OFL
OFfLine. The drive is a good drive that has replaced a
defunct drive in a RAID level 1 or level 5 array. It is
associated with an array, but does not contain any valid
data. The drive state remains OFL during the rebuild
phase.
ONL
ONLine. The drive is part of an array. If this drive fails,
logical drives defined in the array in which this drive is
grouped will have a status of Offline (if the logical drive is
assigned RAID level 0 with a good status) or Critical (if
the logical drive is assigned RAID level 1 or level 5 with a
good status).
RDY
ReaDY. The drive is recognized by the adapter and is
available for definition.
TAP
TAPe Drive. A tape drive is installed.
UFM
UnForMatted. The hard disk requires a low-level format
before it can be used in an array.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
65
Drive Maintenance
Results of a Hard Disk Drive Failure
Depending on the circumstances, a drive failure can generate several
results.
Ÿ If only one disk drive fails, and you have a hot-spare drive
defined that is the same as or greater than the size of the failed
drive, and the logical drives in the array are assigned RAID
level 1, level 5, or a combination of these two levels, the hot
spare takes over immediately.
Note: The hot-spare drive does not function for an array
containing a logical drive assigned RAID level 0; the data
in the logical drives assigned levels 1 and 5 is not lost,
even though the drives function with reduced
performance.
Ÿ If only one disk drive fails, and you do not have a hot-spare
drive defined, and the logical drives in the array are assigned
RAID level 1, level 5, or a combination of these two levels, no
data is lost. However, the system operates at a reduced level of
performance until the defunct drive is replaced and rebuilt.
Ÿ If more than one drive fails among the drives that are grouped
in one array, all the logical drives of that array lose all the data
that is stored within them. For this reason, it is important that
you replace and rebuild the data from a defunct drive as soon
as possible.
Logical and Hard Disk Drive Status Indications
The status of the hard disk drive determines the status of the logical
drives in the array in which the hard disk is grouped.
Ÿ A single hard disk drive failure indicated by a DDD status in
the Bay/Array selection list, causes logical drives in that array
that are assigned levels 1 and 5 to have a Critical status. Good
data remains in logical drives with a Critical status, but you
must replace the defunct hard disk drive promptly to avoid
losing all data in the array in the event of another disk drive
failure.
After you install a new hard disk drive, the Replace process
changes the drive status from DDD to OFL if there is a Critical
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Drive Maintenance
logical drive. After the Rebuild process, the hard disk drive
status changes from OFL to ONL.
Ÿ A single or multiple hard disk drive failure generates an Offline
status for the logical drives in an array that are assigned level 0.
Your server loses the data in the logical drives that have an
Offline status. However, with a multiple disk drive failure,
when the defunct drives are part of the same array, logical
drives in that array have an Offline status. This means that
your server loses the data in all the logical drives in that array,
regardless of which RAID level is assigned.
Replacing a Faulty Drive
Note: Hot-swap drives have a green light on the knob of the tray
that contains the drive. If the drive has a good electrical
connection upon installation, a solid green light illuminates
on the knob of the drive tray. When a hard disk drive fails
and needs to be replaced (DDD status only), a blinking green
light illuminates on the knob of the drive tray.
Check the drive for damage. If the drive is not damaged, check the
position of the drive. If it is not inserted correctly, reposition the
drive. Verify that the drive is positioned correctly, and then restart
the system.
If the light on the drive tray blinks, the drive is faulty. Do the
following steps:
1. Start the RAID configuration program by inserting the IBM
RAID Adapter Option Diskette into the primary diskette drive
and turning on the system. If the system already is turned on,
press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. Select Start RAID Configuration Program from the PC DOS
start-up menu. (See “Starting the RAID Configuration Program”
on page 47 if you need help.)
If the drive failed while the system was powered down, a screen
appears the next time the system is powered on, showing you
which drive is defunct.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
67
Drive Maintenance
3. If the drive is not damaged:
a. Turn off the system.
b. Correct the problem.
Make sure that the cables to the power supply and the
RAID controller are connected correctly. Check the RAID
controller, and the SCSI-2 connector on the RAID Adapter.
See Chapter 6, “Solving Problems” on page 215 for
troubleshooting information.
4. If the drive is defunct:
a. Press Y (Yes) to reconfigure the system.
b. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del when instructed to restart the system.
The Main Menu appears.
c. Select Rebuild device.
At this point, the drive status shows DDD.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Attention: Removing the wrong hard disk drive can cause
loss of data. Make sure you know which drive is the
defunct drive before removing a drive.
Replace the defunct drive. See “Installing Hard Disk Drives
in Hot-Swap Bays” on page 148 for instructions on
replacing the drive.
After you have replaced the drive, press Enter. The system
is reconfigured to include the drive, and the drive status
changes to OFL if the state of the logical drive is Critical or,
to ONL if the state of the logical drive is Offline.
Allow the system to complete the configuration (the screen
displays a completion message); then, select Rebuild drive.
Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight
the OFL drive you want to rebuild; then, press Enter.
The progress of the rebuilding process appears on the
screen.
h. When the rebuilding process is complete, press Esc to return
to the Main Menu. The system saves the new configuration.
i. Select Exit to end the Configuration program.
j. Remove the diskette and press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the
system.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Advanced Functions
Advanced Functions
This section contains procedures for performing additional, less
common, disk-array tasks. You can perform these tasks by selecting
the appropriate utility programs from the Advanced Functions
menu. These include:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Back up configuration to diskette
Restore configuration to diskette
Change the write policy
Format a drive
Change the RAID parameters
This section gives the procedures for using these advanced
functions.
Attention notices about these procedures appear throughout this
section to alert you about potential loss of data. Similar warnings
appear on the screen. Read these warnings carefully before
answering yes to the confirmations requested by the RAID
configuration program.
Backing Up the Disk-Array Configuration
The disk-array configuration is vital information.
The PC Server 320 maintains a record of the array configuration
information in its electrically erasable programmable read-only
memory (EEPROM) module. To protect this information, back up
the information to diskette as soon as you complete your tasks. You
need a blank, formatted, 3.5-inch diskette.
Note: Because dynamic changes in the configuration of your
disk-array occur due to hot-spare drive replacement or other
drive maintenance activity, the configuration backup
information on the diskette might be different from that in
the adapter. It is important that you back up the disk-array
configuration information frequently, to keep the backup
information on the diskette current.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
69
Advanced Functions
To back up the disk-array configuration information to diskette:
1. Label the blank diskette “Disk Array Configuration Backup,”
and date it.
2. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help). The
Main Menu appears.
3. Select Advanced functions.
4. Select Backup config. to diskette.
5. Remove the RAID adapter diskette from the primary drive and
insert the blank diskette.
6. Follow the instructions on the screen.
Restoring the Disk-Array Configuration
To restore the disk-array configuration information in the RAID
adapter EEPROM module, use the Configuration program and an
up-to-date Disk Array Configuration Backup diskette. To restore
the configuration information:
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
2. Select Advanced functions from the Main Menu.
3. Select Restore config. from diskette.
4. Follow the instructions on the screen.
Changing the Write Policy
When you configure a logical drive, the RAID adapter automatically
sets the write policy to write-through (WT) mode, where the
completion status is sent after the data is written to the hard disk
drive. Under certain workloads, you can improve performance, by
changing this write policy to write-back (WB) mode, where the
completion status is sent after the data is copied to cache memory,
but before the data is actually written to the storage device.
Although you gain performance with write-back mode, it creates a
greater risk of losing data due to a power failure. This is because
the system gets a completion status message when the data reaches
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Advanced Functions
cache memory, but before data is actually written to the storage
device.
If you change the write policy to write-back, wait at least 10 seconds
after your last operation before you turn off the server. It takes that
long for the system to move the data from the cache memory to the
storage device. Failure to follow this practice can result in lost data.
To change the write policy:
1. Start the RAID configuration program by inserting the IBM
RAID Adapter Option Diskette into the primary diskette drive
and turning on the system. If the system already is turned on,
press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. Select Start RAID Configuration Program from the PC DOS
start-up menu and press Enter.
3. Select Advanced functions from the Main Menu.
4. Select Change write policy from the Advanced Functions menu.
The cursor will be active in the Logical Drive list.
5. Select the logical drive whose write policy you want to change.
A screen similar to the following appears:
Note: Your information might be different from that shown in
this screen.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
71
Advanced Functions
The Logical Drive list contains the logical drive ID, the size in
megabytes of each logical drive, the RAID level you assigned to
that logical drive, and the date that you created it.
The status of the logical drive is also shown. Good means that
no problem conditions are associated with the drive. Critical
means that you must replace the hard disk drive and rebuild the
logical drive. (You will have received a message telling you
what has happened to the drive.) Offline means that the logical
drive is irrecoverable; the data in that drive is lost.
6. Locate the Wrt pol (Write Policy) field in the Logical Drive list.
The write policy is shown as either WT (write-through, which is
the default setting) or WB (write-back).
7. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to select the
logical drive whose write policy you want to change.
Attention: If you change the write policy to write-back, wait
at least 10 seconds after your last operation before you turn off
the server. It takes that long for the system to move the data
from the cache memory to the storage device. Failure to follow
this practice can result in lost data.
8. Press Enter to change the write policy.
Notice that WT changes to WB. You can press Enter to
alternate between WT and WB.
9. When you have made your choice, press Esc to return to the
Advanced Functions menu.
10. Select Exit. The Confirm pop-up window appears, asking you
to confirm your action.
11. To return the setting to its original state, select No. To save
your changes, select Yes.
12. Back up the disk-array model configuration information to
diskette. Refer to “Backing Up the Disk-Array Configuration”
on page 69 for more information.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Advanced Functions
Formatting Drives
You can perform a low-level format on drives with RDY (ready),
OFL (offline), or UNF (unformatted) status.
Note: The Format drive choice on the Advanced Functions menu
provides a low-level format. If you install a new hard disk
drive that requires a standard format, use the Format
command provided by your operating system.
The Format program is provided in the IBM RAID Configuration
program so that you can perform a low-level format on a drive
controlled by the RAID adapter. To perform a low-level format:
1. Start the Configuration program (see “Starting the RAID
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
2. Select Advanced functions from the Main Menu.
Attention: A low-level format erases all data and programs
from the drive.
3. Select Format drive. The low-level format program starts.
Follow the directions on the screen. You can perform a low-level
format on more than one drive at a time.
Changing RAID Parameters
To change the RAID parameters:
1. Start the Configuration program (see the “RAID Adapter
Configuration Program” on page 47 if you need help).
2. Select Advanced Functions from the Main Menu.
3. Select Change RAID parameters.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
73
Advanced Functions
RAID parameters are performance tuned and should be set in a user
environment.
The default settings are:
Ÿ Stripe unit size — 8K
Attention: Once the stripe unit is chosen and data is stored in
the logical drives, the stripe unit cannot be changed without
destroying data on the logical drives.
The stripe unit size is the amount of data written on a given
disk before writing on the next disk. This stripe unit should be
chosen such that the stripe-unit size is close to the size of the
system I/O request to maximize the overall performance. The
default is set to 8 K data bytes.
Ÿ Rebuild priority — Equal.
Rebuild priority can be set to equal, high, or low. When the
rebuild priority is set to equal, the rebuild I/O request and
system I/O request get equal priority in the execution order.
When the rebuild priority is set to high, the rebuild I/O request
will get a higher priority than a system I/O request. In a
heavily loaded system (with a high rate of system I/O requests),
the high-priority rebuild can significantly reduce the disk
rebuild time at the expense of handling I/O requests.
When the rebuild priority is set to low, the rebuild I/O requests
can execute only if no pending system I/O requests exist. In a
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Advanced Functions
moderately to heavily loaded system, low rebuild priority
significantly increases the disk rebuild time and gains higher
system performance.
Note: Rebuild priority can be changed without affecting data in
the logical drives.
Ÿ Parity placement — RA.
Attention: Once a parity placement scheme is chosen and data
stored, it cannot be changed without destroying data.
Parity placement defines how parity is placed in the disk array
with respect to data. The following illustration shows both the
Right Asymmetric (RA) and the Left Symmetric (LS) parity
placement in a four-drive disk array. Here AAA, BBB, CCC are
the data stripe units, and PP0 is the corresponding parity.
Similarly DDD, EEE, FFF are the data stripe units, and PP1 is
the corresponding parity.
Right Asymmetric (RA)
Disk
1
PPð
DDD
GGG
JJJ
Disk
2
AAA
PP1
HHH
KKK
Disk
3
BBB
EEE
PP2
LLL
Disk
4
CCC
FFF
III
PP3
Left Symmetric (LS)
Disk
1
AAA
EEE
III
PP3
Disk
2
BBB
FFF
PP2
JJJ
Disk
3
CCC
PP1
GGG
KKK
Disk
4
PPð
DDD
HHH
LLL
In some situations you may want to try LS parity placement to
improve performance. The default parity placement is RA.
Chapter 3. Configuring the Disk Array
75
Advanced Functions
Ÿ Read ahead — On.
Normally the RAID adapter transfers data from disk to its local
cache in steps of stripe-unit size. This provides excellent overall
performance when workloads tend to be sequential. However,
if the workload is random and system I/O requests are smaller
than stripe-unit size, reading ahead to the end of the stripe unit
results in a wasted SCSI bus bandwidth and wasted disk
utilization. When read-ahead is set to Off, the size of data
transfer from the disk to local cache is equal to the system I/O
request size, and no read-ahead to the end of the stripe unit is
performed.
Notes:
1. The read-ahead setting can be changed without
destroying data on a logical drive.
2. When configuration is saved on the diskette, the
RAID parameters are also saved.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Chapter 4. Installing Options
This chapter provides instructions to help you add options to your
server. Some option-removal instructions are provided, in case you
need to remove one option to install another. If you have several
internal options to install, these instructions enable you to add them
all at one time. See “Installation Sequence” on page 98 for the
installation sequence when installing a combination of industry
standard architecture (ISA), extended industry standard architecture
(EISA), and peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapters in
your server.
Before you start, be sure you are familiar with the safety and
handling guidelines in “Safety Information” on page ix, “Electrical
Safety” on page 79, and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 80. These guidelines will help you work safely with your
server or options.
This chapter contains:
Electrical Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling Static-Sensitive Devices
. . . . . . . . .
Preparing to Install Options . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Sequence
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Internal Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal Drive Bays (Non-Disk-Array Models)
Internal Drive Bays (Disk-Array Models) . . .
SCSI Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IDE Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preinstallation Steps (All Bays)
. . . . . . . . .
Installing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives
CD-ROM Drive Considerations . . . . . . . . .
Installing Optical Disc Drives and Tape Drives
Installing Hard Disk Drives
. . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays
Removing Internal Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
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79
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81
86
91
95
96
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105
109
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113
115
121
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124
136
137
137
148
151
151
77
Removing CD-ROM Drives . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Optical Disc Drives and Tape Drives
Removing Hard Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Hot-Swappable Hard Disk Drives .
Changing Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Microprocessor
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security-Cover Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a U-Bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting External Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting External SCSI Devices
. . . . . . .
Installing an Uninterruptible Power Supply . .
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
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187
Electrical Safety
Electrical Safety
CAUTION:
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication
cables can be hazardous. To avoid any shock hazard, disconnect
all power cords and cables as described in the following
information.
For your safety, always do the following before removing the cover:
1. Turn off the server and any attached devices, such as printers,
monitors, and external drives.
Note: If you are in the United Kingdom and have a modem or
fax machine attached to your server, you must disconnect
the telephone line from the server before unplugging any
power cords (also known as power cables). When
reassembling your server, reconnect the telephone line
after you plug in the power cords.
2. Unplug all the power cords from electrical outlets.
3. Disconnect all communication cables from external receptacles.
4. Disconnect all cables and power cords from the back of the
server.
Note: Do not reconnect any cables or power cords until you
reassemble the server and put the covers back on.
CAUTION:
Never remove the cover on the power supply. If you have a
problem with the power supply, have your system serviced.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
79
Handling Static Sensitive Devices
Handling Static-Sensitive Devices
Static electricity can seriously damage computer components and
optional devices.
Attention: When you are adding an internal option, do not open
the static-protective package that contains the option until you are
instructed to do so.
When you handle options and other computer components, take
these precautions to avoid damage from static electricity:
Ÿ Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to
build up around you.
Ÿ Always handle components carefully. Handle adapters and
memory-module kits by the edges. Never touch any exposed
circuitry.
Ÿ Prevent others from touching components.
Ÿ When you are installing a new option, touch the static-protective
package containing the option to an unpainted metal surface on
the server for at least two seconds. (This reduces static
electricity from the package and from your body.)
Ÿ When possible, remove the option and install it directly into the
server without setting the option down. When this is not
possible, place the static-protective package that the option
comes in on a smooth, level surface and place the option on it.
Ÿ Do not place the option on the server cover or other metal
surface.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Preparing to Install Options
Preparing to Install Options
Note: Before you begin, be sure you have read “Electrical Safety”
on page 79 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 80.
1. Unlock and open the door.
2. To remove the door, lift the door up and off its hinges. Store
the door in a safe place.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
81
Preparing to Install Options
3. Remove all media (diskettes, CDs, optical discs, or tapes) from
the drives; then, turn off the server and all attached options.
4. If you have a modem or fax machine attached to the server,
disconnect the telephone line from the wall outlet and the
server.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Preparing to Install Options
5. Unplug all power cords (cables) from electrical outlets.
6. Note the locations of the following; then, disconnect them from
the back of the server:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Power cord
Monitor cable
Keyboard cable
Any other cables and cords
Chapter 4. Installing Options
83
Preparing to Install Options
7. Remove the cover:
Note: The screws stay in place; do not attempt to remove
them.
a. Loosen the six screws in the recessed holes on the back of
the cover.
b. Grasp the sides of the cover and tilt it back a few inches.
c. Grasp the cover at the top front edge with one hand, and
just above the I/O slots with the other hand.
d. Carefully remove the cover, in a rotating motion, as shown.
e. Store the cover in a safe place.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Preparing to Install Options
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
85
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Adding memory to your server is an easy way to make programs
run faster. You can increase the amount of memory in your server
by installing options called memory-module kits. Your server uses
industry-standard, 72-pin, parity, single-inline, memory modules
(SIMMs) to increase system memory. The server does not support
nonparity memory.
You can order and install Error Correcting Code on SIMM (EOS)
memory modules to increase system reliability. EOS memory
detects 1-bit memory errors and corrects them in real time, without
reducing system performance.
You install memory-module kits in connectors inside the server.
Memory-module kits must be installed in pairs of the same size and
speed. All models have eight memory connectors. You can install
up to 256 MB of memory in your server. The memory-module kit
sizes available for your server are 4 MB, 8 MB, 16 MB, and 32 MB.
The correct speed for these kits is 70 ns.
Notes:
1. It is possible to install SIMMs in combinations where the
total amount of memory installed does not appear on the
memory configuration screen. In the unlikely event that
this occurs, select the next lower setting on the memory
configuration menu, and all of the installed memory will
be supported on your server.
2. The PC Server 320 does not support memory expansion
adapters.
3. Parity memory-module kits must not be used in
combination with EOS memory-module kits.
Before you begin, be sure you have:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 79 and “Handling
Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 80.
Ÿ Removed the server cover (see “Preparing to Install Options”
on page 81).
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installing Memory-Module Kits
The following illustration shows the memory-module connectors for
all models.
Bank 0
Bank 1
Bank 2
Bank 3
1. Locate the memory connectors on the system board.
When you are instructed to install the kits (in step 3 on
page 88), install them in pairs of adjacent memory connectors,
with no vacant memory connectors in between. Each pair of
connectors is a bank. Your server has four banks: 0, 1, 2, and 3.
Your server is shipped with two memory-module kits installed
in bank 0, located near the top of the system board. If
additional memory is required, install two kits in bank 1, and
then continue with banks 2 and 3, in that order. If you need to
install kits of a different size in bank 0, remove the preinstalled
kits as described in “Removing Memory-Module Kits” on
page 91, and install two other kits as described in this section.
As a minimum, your server requires memory modules of the
same size in bank 0. When you install memory-module kits in
any given bank, all of the kits in that bank must be the same
size.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
87
Installing Memory-Module Kits
2. Touch the static-protective package to any unpainted metal
surface on the server. Then remove the memory-module kit
from the package.
c
Stati vices
De
3. Install the kit:
Note: You must install the memory-module kits in pairs of the
same size.
a. Turn the memory-module kit so that the notched end is on
the right.
Notch
b. Insert the kit into the connector, downward at a 45-degree
angle.
c. Pivot the kit toward the top of the server, until it snaps into
place.
d. Repeat these steps for each kit that you install.
4. Go to “Configuring Memory” on page 203 to reconfigure your
PC Server 320 after you have installed all of the
memory-module kits. Then return here.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installing Memory-Module Kits
5. Go to Table 7 on page 269 to record the sizes of the
memory-module kits and the connectors into which they are
installed. Then return here and continue with “What to do
next?” on page 89 to determine your next step.
What to do next?
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
89
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Removing Memory-Module Kits
Removing Memory-Module Kits
1. Locate the memory-module kit connectors and determine which
memory-module kits you want to remove.
Note: You must remove the memory-module kits in pairs,
starting with the kits installed in the two bottom
connectors (bank 3).
Bank 0
Bank 1
Bank 2
Bank 3
Chapter 4. Installing Options
91
Removing Memory-Module Kits
2. Remove the memory-module kit:
a. Carefully press the two retainers on the connector outward.
b. Pivot the kit forward and lift it out.
Notch
3. Store any memory-module kits you are no longer using in a
static-protective package. Make a note of the kit size and speed
for future reference.
c
Stati vices
De
.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Removing Memory-Module Kits
4. If you are installing memory-module kits in the empty
connectors, go to “Installing Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
If you are not installing memory-module kits in the empty
connectors, go to Table 7 on page 269 to update the memory
information; then, return here.
5. After you finish removing the memory-module kits, reinstall the
cover (see “Completing the Installation” on page 177), and run
the EISA Configuration program (see Chapter 5, “Configuring
Your Server” on page 189). The next time you start the server,
a message will appear, indicating that memory has been added
or removed.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
93
Removing Memory-Module Kits
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installing Adapters
Installing Adapters
Before you begin, be sure you have:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 79 and “Handling
Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 80.
Ÿ Read the instructions that come with the adapter.
Ÿ Removed the server cover (see “Preparing to Install Options”
on page 81).
Your server has nine connectors called expansion slots. To locate the
expansion slot numbers for your server, refer to the following
illustration. The video adapter and the SCSI-2 adapter are installed
in two of the slots.
PCI
3
2
1
EISA
6
5
4
3
2
1
The remaining slots are available for future expansion and growth.
For example, you can add adapters to provide communication,
specialized graphics, and sound. This extends the capabilities and
power of your server. Many adapters provide bus-master
capabilities, which enable the adapters to perform operations
without interrupting the server's microprocessor.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
95
Installing Adapters
Note: If you have four bus master adapters, install them in slots 1,
2, 3, and 4. Slots 4, 5, and 6 share requests for system
resources.
These expansion slots have Plug and Play capabilities. This feature
requires a configuration file (.CFG) for each installed ISA adapter.
See “Configuration Files” on page 199 for information about
creating ISA Configuration files. If your operating system supports
this feature, your server will automatically configure itself when you
install ISA and PCI Plug and Play devices.
Considerations
Three types of adapters are available for your PC Server 320:
Ÿ ISA
Ÿ EISA
Ÿ PCI
Components on
the Other Side
ISA Connectors
Components on
the Other Side
EISA Connectors
Components on
This Side
PCI Connectors
Ÿ Review the documentation that comes with the adapter and
follow those instructions in addition to the instructions given in
this chapter. If you need to change the switch or jumper
settings on your adapter, follow the instructions that come with
the adapter documentation.
Ÿ Your server supports one monitor adapter. Your server comes
with an SVGA monitor adapter preinstalled in EISA expansion
slot 1 (bottom slot).
XGA adapters are not supported.
Ÿ You can install EISA or ISA adapters in EISA slots 1–6 only.
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Ÿ You can install PCI adapters in PCI slots only.
Ÿ EISA slot 6 and PCI slot 1 are shared slots. That is, if you
install an EISA or ISA adapter in EISA slot 6, you cannot install
a PCI adapter in PCI slot 1, and vice versa. This means that
only eight expansion slots can be occupied at any given time,
although the server has nine expansion slots.
Ÿ Your server comes with a SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter
preinstalled in PCI slot 1 (disk-array models come with a SCSI-2
Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter preinstalled in PCI slot 3).
Ÿ You can install full-size EISA or ISA adapters in EISA expansion
slots 1–4.
Ÿ You can install full-size PCI adapters in PCI expansion slots 2
and 3.
Ÿ Your PC Server 320 uses a rotational interrupt technique to
configure PCI adapters. This technique enables you to install a
variety of PCI adapters that currently do not support sharing of
PCI interrupts.
Attention: To avoid possible damage to adapters and server
components, be sure that the adapters that you install do not touch
each other or the components (such as the microprocessor) inside
the server. For example, if the adapter that you are installing
physically touches the microprocessor or another component, select
a different expansion slot that can adequately accommodate the
adapter.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
97
Installing Adapters
Installation Sequence
To ensure that your server configures correctly, you must observe
the following protocol if you install different types of adapters at the
same time:
1. Install the ISA adapters.
Note: Your PC Server 320 supports a new Plug and Play
feature. This feature requires a configuration file (.CFG)
for each installed ISA adapter. See “Configuration Files”
on page 199.
2. Reinstall the cover (see “Completing the Installation” on
page 177) and reconnect the cables (see step 2 on page 178).
3. Configure the ISA adapters (see Chapter 5, “Configuring Your
Server” on page 189).
Note: ISA interrupts cannot be shared.
4. Disconnect the cables (see step 5 on page 83) and remove the
cover (see “Preparing to Install Options” on page 81).
5. Install the EISA adapters.
6. Reinstall the cover (see “Completing the Installation” on
page 177) and reconnect the cables (see step 2 on page 178).
7. Configure the EISA adapters by running the EISA Configuration
program (see Chapter 5, “Configuring Your Server” on
page 189).
8. Disconnect the cables (see step 5 on page 83) and remove the
cover (see “Preparing to Install Options” on page 81).
9. Install the PCI adapters.
10. Reinstall the cover (see “Completing the Installation” on
page 177) and reconnect the cables (see step 2 on page 178).
Note: During POST, your server automatically configures all
currently installed ISA Plug and Play and PCI devices.
If you do not install and configure the adapters in this order, you
might receive system configuration errors or encounter configuration
conflicts. If a resource conflict occurs, resolve it using the
instructions given in “Configuration Conflicts” on page 209.
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Installation Procedure
1. Determine which expansion slot you will use for the adapter.
The bottom six slots are for EISA or ISA adapters, and the top
three slots are for PCI adapters. EISA slot 6 and PCI slot 1 are
the shared slots. If you use one of these slots, you cannot use
the other.
Check the instructions that come with the adapter for any
requirements or restrictions. If there are no restrictions other
than those listed in “Considerations” on page 96, you can use
any empty EISA or PCI slot.
PCI
3
2
1
EISA
6
5
4
3
2
1
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99
Installing Adapters
2. Remove the expansion-slot cover:
a. Loosen and remove the screw on the top of the
expansion-slot cover.
b. Slide the expansion-slot cover out of the server.
c. Store it in a safe place for future use.
PCI
3
2
1
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EISA
6
5
4
3
2
1
Installing Adapters
3. Install the adapter:
a. Carefully grasp the adapter and align it with the expansion
slot.
b. Support the server with one hand, and slide the adapter
straight into the expansion slot with the other hand. Press
the adapter firmly into the expansion slot.
c. Tighten the expansion-slot screw on the top of the adapter
bracket.
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101
Installing Adapters
4. Go to Table 8 on page 270 to write the adapter name next to
the slot into which it is installed; then, return here.
Note: If you installed an ISA or EISA adapter, you must run the
EISA Configuration program. See Chapter 5,
“Configuring Your Server” on page 189 for instructions
on running these programs.
Verifying Compatibility between Network Adapters and Device Drivers
Table 1 on page 103 lists the network adapters and device drivers
that support dual processors and have been verified to work with
the IBM PC Server 320, OS/2 for SMP 2.11, and OS/2 LAN Server
4.0.
If OS/2 LAN Server provides a device driver for your network
adapter, use Table 1 on page 103 to determine the appropriate
device driver to select during the installation process. If OS/2 LAN
Server does not provide the device driver, use the network driver
interface specification (NDIS) device driver on the diskettes that
come with the adapter. (Check the adapter documentation for
installation instructions.)
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Network Adapter
Device Driver
LAN Server 4.0 MPTS
3Com TokenLink III EISA
IBMTOKMP.OS2
IBM SMP Token-Ring
Network Adapter
3Com EtherLink II
3C503-16 ISA
ELNKII.OS2
3Com 3C503 EtherLink II
Adapter
3Com EtherLink III EISA
ELNK3.OS2
3Com EtherLink III Family
OS/2
3Com EtherLink III ISA
ELNK3.OS2
3Com EtherLink III Family
OS/2
IBM Token-Ring Network
16/4 ISA
IBMTOKMP.OS2
IBM SMP Token-Ring
Network Adapter
IBM Token-Ring 16/4
ISA-16
IBMTOKMP.OS2
IBM SMP Token-Ring
Network Adapter
IBM LAN Adapter for
Ethernet ISA
IBMENI.OS2
IBM LAN Adapter for
Ethernet
Intel TokenExpress 16S ISA
OLITOK16.OS2
Use the NDIS driver on the
adapter diskette
Intel EtherExpress 16C ISA
EXP16.OS2
Intel EtherExpress 16
Family
SMC EtherCard Elite 16
Ultra ISA
SMC8000.OS2
Use the NDIS driver on the
adapter diskette
Table 1. Network Adapters and Device Drivers for PC Server 320
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What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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Removing Adapters
Removing Adapters
1. Remove the adapter:
a. Note the slot number of the adapter you are removing.
b. Loosen and remove the screw on top of the adapter's
bracket.
c. If there are any internal cables attached to the adapter,
disconnect them.
d. Put one hand on top of the server for support, and with the
other hand, carefully pull the adapter out of the slot.
PCI
3
2
1
EISA
6
5
4
3
2
1
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105
Removing Adapters
2. If you are installing another adapter in this expansion slot, see
“Installing Adapters” on page 95 for instructions.
If you are not installing another adapter in this expansion slot,
replace the expansion-slot cover:
a. Locate the expansion-slot cover that you removed when you
installed your adapter.
b. Slide the cover over the open expansion slot.
c. Tighten the expansion-slot screw on the top of the
expansion-slot cover.
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Removing Adapters
3. Go to Table 8 on page 270 and delete the name of the adapter
you removed; then, return here.
Note: If you removed an ISA or EISA adapter, you must run
the EISA Configuration program. See Chapter 5,
“Configuring Your Server” on page 189 for instructions
on running these programs.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
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Removing Adapters
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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Installing Internal Drives
Several types of drives are available for installation in the PC Server
320, such as:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Diskette
Hard disk
Rewritable-optical disc
Tape
Before you install internal drives in your PC Server 320, see
“Internal Drive Bays (Non-Disk-Array Models)” on page 110 or
“Internal Drive Bays (Disk-Array Models)” on page 113 for
information on the following:
Ÿ Types of drives
Ÿ Preinstalled drives
Ÿ Numbering of bays
Ÿ Cabling information
Note: Also see Table 5 on page 183 for maximum SCSI cable
lengths.
Ÿ Basic installation information
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109
Installing Internal Drives
Internal Drive Bays (Non-Disk-Array Models)
Internal drives are installed in bays. The bays are numbered 1
through 9.
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Cover plates (sometimes called bezels) cover the front of some
installed drives. If you install a drive that uses removable media
(diskette, optical disc, or tape), you might need to remove or change
the cover plate.
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Ÿ Bay 1 is for 3.5-inch, hard disk drives only. Some models are
shipped with a hard disk drive preinstalled in bay 1.
Ÿ Bays 2 and 3 are for 3.5-inch, diskette-interface devices, such as
a diskette drive or tape backup unit that uses the diskette cable.
All models are shipped with a diskette drive preinstalled in
bay 3.
Ÿ Bay 4 has a preinstalled SCSI CD-ROM drive.
Ÿ Bays 5–9 are for 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch drives.
Ÿ The system board in your server supports a maximum of two
diskette-interface devices. You can install a second 3.5-inch,
diskette-interface device in bay 2. Be sure the screw holes in the
device line up with the screw holes in bay 2.
Ÿ Bays 5–9 contain trays for housing 3.5-inch drives. If you want
to install a 5.25-inch drive in one of these bays, you must
remove screws and the tray before you attempt to install the
drive.
Ÿ You can install a full-high drive between bays 6 and 7 by
removing the trays from these bays. You cannot install full-high
drives between bays 4 and 5, or between bays 8 and 9.
Ÿ If you are installing one or two integrated drive electronics
(IDE) drives, you must purchase an IDE cable, such as in the PC
Server Cable Kit. Contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
Ÿ If you are connecting two hard disk drives to the IDE controller,
you must reset the jumpers on one of the drives, as specified in
the documentation that comes with the drive.
Ÿ If your server did not come with a preinstalled hard disk drive,
and you plan to have more than four 8-bit internal SCSI drives
(including the CD-ROM drive), you might need additional
cables. Earlier models come with a 4-drop SCSI cable; to
connect five or more drives, use an optional 7-drop SCSI cable
in place of the 4-drop cable. More recent models come with a
7-drop SCSI cable.
If you install 16-bit devices, you must use a 16-bit cable. If you
have an earlier model and you want to connect the CD-ROM
Chapter 4. Installing Options
111
Installing Internal Drives
drive to a 16-bit cable, you must purchase and install the 16-bit
to 8-bit SCSI Internal Converter. To order cables and a
converter, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative. See “SCSI Drives” on page 115 for additional
information.
Ÿ The IBM 3.5-inch, rewritable-optical disc drive requires a special
mounting bracket. Contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative for more information.
If you have a SCSI drive in bay 1, you can have up to four
drives in the 5.25-inch bays (bays 5–9). If bay 1 does not contain
a SCSI drive, you can have up to five drives in the 5.25-inch
bays (bays 5–9).
Attention: Before you remove a drive, back up all data.
Drives come in a variety of sizes and types. The following table
shows the widths, types, and maximum heights for the drives that
you can install in each bay.
Bay
Drive Width
Drive Type
Maximum Drive Height
1
3.5-inch
Hard disk
25.4 mm (1 inch), with a
drive in bay 2
41.3 mm (1.6 inches), with
no drive in bay 2
2, 3
3.5-inch
Diskette1
25.4 mm (1 inch)
4
5.25-inch
CD-ROM
41.3 mm (1.6 inches)
5–9
3.5-inch or
5.25-inch
Hard disk,
removable media2
41.3 mm (1.6 inches)
Notes:
1. Or a drive that connects to the diskette cable. Be sure that the holes in the
drive align with the drive housing.
2. Removable media include CD-ROMs, optical discs, and tapes.
Table 2. Maximum Allowable Drive Sizes (Non-Disk-Array Models)
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Internal Drive Bays (Disk-Array Models)
Internal drives are installed in bays. The bays are numbered 1
through 10.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Cover plates (sometimes called bezels) cover the front of some
installed drives. If you install a drive that uses removable media
(diskette, optical disc, or tape), you might need to remove or change
the cover plate.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
113
Installing Internal Drives
Ÿ Bays 1–6 are for 3.5-inch, hot-swappable hard disk drives.
To install a hard disk drive in a hot-swap bay, see “Installing
Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays” on page 148.
Ÿ Bay 7 has a preinstalled SCSI CD-ROM drive.
Ÿ Bays 8 and 9 are for 3.5-inch, diskette-interface devices, such as
a diskette drive or a tape backup unit that uses the diskette
cable.
The system board in your server supports a maximum of two
diskette-interface devices. You can install a second 3.5-inch,
diskette-interface device in bay 9. Be sure the screw holes in the
device line up with the screw holes in bay 9.
Ÿ Bay 10 is for a 3.5-inch, hard disk drive only. Be sure the screw
holes in the device line up with the screw holes in bay 9.
If you are installing an integrated drive electronics (IDE) hard
disk drive in bay 10, you must purchase an IDE cable. Contact
your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Ÿ Disk-array models come with a 2-drop SCSI cable.
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Drives come in a variety of sizes and types. The following table
shows the widths, types, and maximum heights for the drives that
you can install in each bay.
Bay
Drive Width
Drive Type
Maximum Drive Height
1–6
3.5-inch
Hard disk
41.3 mm (1.6 inches)
7
5.25-inch
CD-ROM
41.3 mm (1.6 inches)
8, 9
3.5-inch
Diskette, 1/4-inch
SCSI tape backup
unit*
25.4 mm (1 inch)
10
3.5-inch
Hard disk
25.4 mm (1 inch), with a
drive in bay 9
41.3 mm (1.6 inches), with
no drive in bay 9
Note:
* Or a drive that connects to the diskette cable. Be sure the holes in the drive
align with the drive housing.
Table 3. Maximum Allowable Drive Sizes (Disk-Array Models)
SCSI Drives
Your server supports small computer system interface (SCSI) drives.
You can attach multiple SCSI drives to the preinstalled SCSI-2
adapter.
All PC Server 320 non-disk-array models come with a SCSI-2
Fast/Wide PCI Adapter. All PC Server 320 disk-array models come
with a SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter.
If you install additional SCSI devices in a non-disk-array model, you
must set a unique identification (ID) for each SCSI device that you
connect to the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter, so that the SCSI-2
adapter can identify the devices and ensure that different devices do
not attempt to transfer data at the same time.
The SCSI IDs in disk-array models with the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI-Bus RAID Adapter are hard-coded in the backplane of the
hot-swap bay and preset for the CD-ROM drive. Do not attempt to
change the SCSI IDs for internal SCSI devices on disk-array models.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
115
Installing Internal Drives
Refer to Table 4 on page 116 before setting SCSI IDs. Do not set
the SCSI IDs for other devices to these values.
Note: Any information about SCSI drives also applies to other SCSI
devices, such as scanners and printers.
SCSI IDs
For non-disk-array models, Fast/Wide (16-bit) devices support SCSI
IDs 0 to 15; narrow (8-bit) devices support SCSI IDs 0 to 7. For
disk-array models, the external channel connector supports SCSI IDs
0 to 7; the internal channel connector also supports SCSI IDs 0 to 7.
Table 4. SCSI IDs for Preinstalled SCSI Devices
SCSI ID
Bay
Device
0
1
Hard Disk Drive1
3
4
CD-ROM Drive
7
N/A
SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI
Adapter
0–53
1–6
Hot-Swappable Hard
Disk Drives4
6
7
CD-ROM Drive
7
N/A
SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Non-Disk-Array Models
Disk-Array Models2
Note:
1. This only applies to models with a hard disk drive preinstalled in bay 1.
2. Or non-disk-array models with the hot-swap bay option installed.
3. SCSI IDs are hard-coded into the hot-swap bay backplane.
4. Two hard disk drives are preinstalled in some disk-array models in bays 1
and 2. The SCSI IDs for the two hard disk drives are 0 and 1.
The drive from which you will start your non-disk-array server (also
known as the boot or startup drive) should have a SCSI ID of 0.
Therefore, if your server did not come with a preinstalled hard disk
drive and you install hard disk drives, set the SCSI ID of your first
drive (the boot drive) to 0.
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Note: If your BIOS is version M54Pe-08 or earlier and you have two
PCI SCSI adapters installed in the PCI slots, the system will
start from the hard disk drive attached to the SCSI adapter
with the least amount of read-only memory (ROM) and the
lowest ROM address space. (In the case of equal ROM size,
the system scans from slot 1 to 3 and assigns slot 1 as the
lowest ROM address.) Therefore, in order for the system to
load the operating system correctly, connect your startup
drive to the SCSI adapter with the lowest ROM address
space. If your version of BIOS is later than M54Pe-08, and
you have two PCI SCSI adapters installed in the PCI slots, the
system will start from the hard disk drive attached to the
SCSI adapter in descending order from slot 3 to slot 1.
If your disk-array model comes with a preinstalled hard disk drive
in bay 1, this drive is your startup drive, and it already has a SCSI
ID of 0. The SCSI ID of the preinstalled hard disk drive in bay 1 of
non-disk-array models is set to 0.
Refer to the instructions that come with the SCSI devices for
information about setting a SCSI ID.
The SCSI-2 adapter in your server has two internal connectors and
one external connector:
Ÿ On the non-disk-array models, the SCSI-2 adapter has one
internal connector for an 8-bit cable, and one internal connector
for a 16-bit cable.
Non-disk-array models that come with a preinstalled wide hard
disk drive use a 16-bit internal connector. Non-disk-array
models that do not come with a preinstalled hard disk drive or
come with a narrow hard disk drive use an 8-bit internal
connector.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
117
Installing Internal Drives
Ÿ On the disk-array models, the SCSI-2 adapter has two internal
connectors for 16-bit cables.
Note: To keep the external channel available for use on the
preinstalled RAID adapter, use Channel 2 for connecting
internal SCSI devices.
Internal
Channel 1
Internal
Channel 2
External
Channel 1
Ÿ On all models, the external connector is for 16-bit cable.
The SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter supports a total of seven 8-bit or
fifteen 16-bit SCSI devices. The SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID
Adapter supports a total of fourteen 16-bit SCSI devices.
Note: If you plan to install both internal and external SCSI devices,
you must follow the instructions given in “Connecting
External Options” on page 180 in addition to the instructions
in this section.
Termination (Internal SCSI Devices)
The devices at both ends of the SCSI bus must be terminated. If
you attach SCSI devices (internal or external), you must terminate
the last device in the chain. You must remove the termination from
the other devices within the chain. If you attach external devices to
a non-disk-array model with internal devices attached, you must
also change the termination setting of the SCSI-2 adapter from the
default in the SCSISelect utility program, as described in “Using the
SCSISelect Utility Program” on page 213.
Note: Read the README file on the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus
RAID Adapter Configuration Option Diskette for updated
information. Select Option Diskette from the first menu.
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Termination on disk-array models is automatically set.
The requirements for terminating internal SCSI devices on
non-disk-array models are:
Ÿ If you attach internal SCSI devices to only one of the SCSI-2
adapter internal connectors, you must terminate the last internal
device on the bus (cable) and disable the termination on the
other devices connected to the internal SCSI connector. The
SCSI-2 adapter is already terminated.
Ÿ If you attach internal SCSI devices to both of the SCSI-2 adapter
internal connectors, you must terminate the last internal device
on each internal cable and disable the termination on the other
devices connected to the internal SCSI connectors. You must
also change the termination setting of the SCSI-2 adapter from
the default in the SCSISelect utility program, as described in
“Using the SCSISelect Utility Program” on page 213.
Note: You can use only one of the two internal SCSI connectors
on the SCSI-2 adapter if you connect both internal and
external devices.
A CD-ROM drive is installed in bay 4 of non-disk-array models and
bay 7 of disk-array models. In earlier non-disk-array models that
come with a narrow hard disk drive, a narrow (8-bit) cable is
provided. More recent non-disk-array models come with a wide
(16-bit) cable. In non-disk-array models that do not come with a
hard disk drive:
Ÿ The CD-ROM drive is terminated.
Ÿ Earlier models come with a 4-drop, narrow (8-bit) cable. More
recent models come with a 7-drop, wide (16-bit) cable.
If you install 8-bit or 16-bit drives above the CD-ROM drive in
bays 5–9, remove the termination from those drives.
Ÿ If you install a drive in bay 1, you must terminate that drive
and remove the termination from the CD-ROM drive (see
“Removing the Termination on the CD-ROM Drive” on
page 137 for instructions).
Chapter 4. Installing Options
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Installing Internal Drives
If you install 16-bit devices, you must use a 16-bit cable. If you
have an earlier model and you want to connect the CD-ROM
drive to a 16-bit cable, you must purchase and install the 16-bit
to 8-bit SCSI Internal Converter. To order the cable and
converter, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
Refer to the instructions that come with the SCSI device for more
information about termination. Refer to the User's Reference for
additional information about the SCSI subsystem.
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IDE Controllers
The server has one IDE controller (all models also have a SCSI-2
adapter). You can connect two drives to the IDE controller on
non-disk-array models, and one drive to the IDE controller on
disk-array models. If you plan to do this, you must purchase an
IDE cable. Contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative for details.
The IDE controller is for low-speed devices, such as tape drives, but
you can connect hard disk drives.
When you connect two drives to the IDE controller, one drive is the
primary (master), and the other is the secondary or alternate
(subordinate). To set your jumpers to the secondary mode, follow
the instructions in the documentation that comes with the drives, or
contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Diskette Controller
The following illustration shows the location of the IDE controller
connector.
3
2
Memory
Sockets (8)
IDE Controller
PCI Slots
1
6
5
4
3
EISA/
ISA
Slots
Upgrade
Socket
Pentium
2
1
Chapter 4. Installing Options
121
Installing Internal Drives
Preinstallation Steps (All Bays)
Before you begin, be sure you have:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 79 and “Handling
Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 80.
Ÿ Removed the server cover (see “Preparing to Install Options”
on page 81).
Ÿ Read the manual that comes with the internal drive.
Ÿ Read “Installing Internal Drives” on page 109.
1. Choose the bay in which you want to install the drive. (Refer to
Table 2 on page 112 for the drive types and sizes available for
each bay in the non-disk-array models, and Table 3 on page 115
for the drive types and sizes available for each bay in the
disk-array models.
2. Touch the static-protective bag containing the drive to any
unpainted metal surface on the server; then, remove the drive
from the bag.
S
Devic tatic
es
3. Check the instructions that come with the drive or contact your
IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative to see if you need
to set any switches or jumpers on the drive. Change them if
necessary.
Note: The SCSI ID on the CD-ROM in models with the
hot-swap bay installed is preset to 6. The SCSI ID on the
CD-ROM in non-disk-array models is 3. If you upgrade
your non-disk-array server by installing a hot-swap bay,
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make sure that you change the SCSI ID on the CD-ROM
from 3 to 6 to avoid a conflict between devices if you
install a hard disk drive in bay 4 of the hot-swap bay. A
hard disk drive installed in bay 4 of the hot-swap bay is
automatically assigned SCSI ID 3. If two devices are
assigned the same SCSI ID, your server will not recognize
either device.
4. If your server did not come with a preinstalled hard disk drive,
and you plan to have more than four 8-bit internal SCSI drives
(including the CD-ROM drive), you might need additional
cables. Earlier models come with a 4-drop SCSI cable; to
connect five or more drives, use an optional 7-drop SCSI cable
in place of the 4-drop cable. More recent models come with a
7-drop SCSI cable.
5. If you are connecting two hard disk drives to the IDE controller,
you must reset the jumpers on one of the drives, as specified in
the documentation that comes with the drive.
For non-disk-array models, when adding IDE drives, set the first
drive that is attached to the IDE controller as the primary
(master) drive. Set the second IDE drive as the secondary or
alternate (subordinate) drive.
Note: Only one IDE drive can be attached to the IDE controller
in disk-array models.
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Select the appropriate item from the following list.
Ÿ Installing a diskette or IDE hard disk drive? — Go to
“Installing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives.”
Ÿ Installing a CD-ROM drive? — Go to “CD-ROM Drive
Considerations” on page 136.
Ÿ Installing a hard disk drive in a non-disk-array model? — Go
to “Installing Hard Disk Drives” on page 137.
Ÿ Installing a hard disk drive in a disk-array model? — Go to
“Installing Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays” on page 148.
Installing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives
The following information is important. Read the information
completely before you install diskette drives or IDE hard disk drives
in the bottom three bays (1–3 of the non-disk-array models or 8–10
of the disk-array models) of your PC Server 320.
The following information is important. Read this information
completely before you install any drives.
Your server was shipped with a 1.44 MB diskette drive installed in
the third bay from the bottom (bay 3 on non-disk-array models or
bay 8 on disk-array models). The system board supports two
diskette-interface devices. Therefore, you can install an additional
3.5-inch diskette-interface device in the second bay from the bottom
(bay 2 on non-disk-array models or bay 9 on disk-array models).
Each diskette-interface device connects to one cable (already
attached to the preinstalled diskette drive).
If you install 16-bit devices, you must use a 16-bit cable. If you
have an earlier model and you want to connect the CD-ROM drive
to a 16-bit cable, you must purchase and install the 16-bit to 8-bit
SCSI Internal Converter. To order the cable and converter, contact
your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
If your non-disk-array server was shipped without a hard disk
drive, you can install the first hard disk drive (3.5-inch only) in bay
1, the bottom bay. Additional hard disk drives may be installed in
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bays 5–9. If you install the drives in bays 5–9, and you do not
install a drive in bay 1, you do not have to remove the termination
from the CD-ROM drive.
Earlier non-disk-array models that come with a preinstalled narrow
SCSI hard disk drive in bay 1 come with a 4-drop, narrow (8-bit)
cable. More recent non-disk-array models that come with a
preinstalled narrow SCSI hard disk drive in bay 1 come with a
7-drop, Fast/Wide (16-bit) cable.
Non-disk-array models that are shipped with a preinstalled wide
SCSI hard disk drive in bay 1 come with a 7-drop, Fast/Wide
(16-bit) cable. Use this cable to install up to five more Fast/Wide
devices. The CD-ROM drive is connected to this cable through the
16-bit to 8-bit SCSI Internal Converter.
Note: If you install any 8-bit devices, you need the 16-bit to 8-bit
SCSI Internal Converter.
Earlier non-disk-array models that are shipped without a hard disk
drive come with a 4-drop, SCSI narrow (8-bit) cable connected to the
CD-ROM drive. That cable has three additional connectors for 8-bit
drives. More recent non-disk-array models that are shipped without
a hard disk drive come with a 7-drop, SCSI Fast/Wide (16-bit) cable
connected to the CD-ROM drive through the 16-bit to 8-bit SCSI
Internal Converter. That cable has six additional connectors for
16-bit or 8-bit devices.
The CD-ROM drive in these non-disk-array models is terminated. If
you install a SCSI drive in bay 1, you must remove the termination
from the CD-ROM drive (see “Removing the Termination on the
CD-ROM Drive” on page 137), and terminate the new drive in
bay 1.
Before installing drives, make sure that you have enough cables to
accommodate all of the drives. If you need additional cables,
contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
For information specific to the drives that you are installing, see the
instructions in the documentation that comes with the drives,
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including those that describe how to set jumpers and switches, and
how to remove termination.
If a tray is attached to an IDE drive that you intend to install, you
must remove the tray before installing the drive. Follow the
instructions in the documentation that comes with the drive.
If you are installing an IDE drive, you must purchase and install an
optional 2-drop cable. To order the cable, contact your IBM reseller
or IBM marketing representative.
To install a diskette drive in bay 2 on a non-disk-array model or bay
9 of a disk-array model:
1. Remove the cover plate:
a. Insert a small flat-blade screwdriver under the side of the
cover plate.
b. Lift the cover plate and remove it from the server front
panel. (Save the cover plate for future use.)
2. Remove four screws from the drive housing containing bays 1–3
(non-disk-array) or 8–10 (disk-array).
Note: Three screws are shown near the screwdriver in the
following illustration. The fourth screw is located under
the housing, on the left side.
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3. Remove the flat metal plate from the front of the bay. Remove
the two screws (one on each side of the housing) that connect
the metal plate to the housing.
4. Locate the cable connector that you will attach to the drive.
5. Position the drive so the drive connector is facing the rear of the
server.
6. Align the drive with the guides on the bottom of the bay and
slide it into the bay.
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7. Attach the drive to the housing, using the screws that came with
the drive kit.
Attention: To ensure that the drive functions properly, do not
overtighten the screws.
8. Connect the drive to one end of the signal cable.
9. Connect the other end of the cable to the appropriate connector
on the system board. (See the locations of the IDE controller
connectors shown in the illustration under “IDE Controllers” on
page 121.)
10. Connect one of the 4-pin power cables to the drive.
11. Reinstall the drive housing, making sure to align the far side
properly over the two brackets located under the bay that
contains the CD-ROM drive.
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12. Reinstall and tighten the four screws that you removed in step 2
on page 126.
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To install an IDE hard disk drive in bay 1 (non-disk-array models)
or bay 10 (disk-array models):
1. Remove four screws from the drive housing that contains bays
1–3 (non-disk-array models) or 8–10 (disk-array models).
Note: Three screws are shown near the screwdriver in the
following illustration. The fourth screw is located under
the housing, on the left side.
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2. Remove the flat metal plate from the front of the bay. Remove
the two screws (one on each side of the housing) that connect
the metal plate to the housing.
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3. Locate the cable connector that you will attach to the drive.
4. Position the drive so the drive connector is facing the rear of the
server.
5. Align the drive with the guides on the bottom of the bay and
slide it into the bay.
6. Attach the drive to the housing, using the screws that came with
the drive kit.
Attention: To ensure that the drive functions properly, do not
overtighten the screws.
7. Connect the drive to one end of the signal cable.
8. Connect the other end of the cable to the appropriate connector
on the system board. (See the locations of the IDE controller
connectors shown in the illustration under “IDE Controllers” on
page 121.)
9. Connect one of the 4-pin power cables to the drive.
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10. Reinstall the drive housing, making sure to align the far side
properly over the two brackets located under the bay containing
the CD-ROM drive.
11. Reinstall and tighten the four screws that you removed in step 1
on page 130.
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If you are installing another internal drive, return to step 1 on
page 122.
If you are not installing another internal drive, go to Table 9 on
page 271 to record the drive location, and if applicable, the SCSI ID
that you assigned to the drive (diskette drives do not require a SCSI
ID); then, return here to determine your next step.
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What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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CD-ROM Drive Considerations
All models of the PC Server 320 come with a CD-ROM drive
preinstalled in bay 4 (non-disk-array models) or bay 7 (disk-array
models).
Disk-array models come with a 2-drop cable connected to the
CD-ROM drive. Earlier non-disk-array models that are shipped
with a narrow hard disk drive or without a hard disk drive come
with a 4-drop, SCSI narrow (8-bit) cable connected to the CD-ROM
drive. That cable has three additional connectors for 8-bit drives.
More recent non-disk-array models that are shipped with a narrow
hard disk drive or without a hard disk drive come with a 7-drop,
SCSI Fast/Wide (16-bit) cable connected to the CD-ROM drive.
That cable has six additional connectors for 16-bit drives.
The CD-ROM drive in these non-disk-array models is terminated. If
you install a SCSI drive in bay 1 of a non-disk-array model, you
must remove the termination from the CD-ROM drive (see
“Removing the Termination on the CD-ROM Drive” on page 137),
and terminate the new drive in bay 1.
If you install 16-bit devices, you must use a 16-bit cable. If you
have an earlier model and you want to connect the CD-ROM drive
to a 16-bit cable, you must purchase and install the 16-bit to 8-bit
SCSI Internal Converter. If you want to install 8-bit devices in one
of the more recent models, you must purchase and install the 16-bit
to 8-bit SCSI Internal Converter. To order cables or a converter,
contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
The CD-ROM drive is connected to the 7-drop, Fast/Wide cable in
the earlier non-disk-array models, or to the 2-drop, Fast/Wide cable
in the earlier disk-array models, through the 16-bit to 8-bit SCSI
Internal Converter. In the more recent non-disk-array models and
disk-array models, the CD-ROM drive is connected to the 7-drop,
Fast/Wide cable through the 16-bit to 8-bit SCSI Internal Converter.
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Removing the Termination on the CD-ROM Drive
To remove the termination from the CD-ROM drive:
1. Remove the preinstalled CD-ROM drive. See “Removing
CD-ROM Drives” on page 157 After you remove the drive,
return to this section.
Termination
Jumper
2. The termination jumper covers both pins (second pair of pins
from the right side).
3. Remove and reinstall the termination jumper so that the jumper
covers only one pin, as shown.
4. Slide the CD-ROM drive into the open bay, connector end first.
5. Connect the cables (flat and power) to the rear of the drive.
6. Insert the screws (two on each side; one high, one low on the
drive). Tighten the screws.
Installing Optical Disc Drives and Tape Drives
To install rewritable-optical disc drives or tape drives, follow the
procedure for installing hard disk drives in non-disk-array models
in the following section.
Installing Hard Disk Drives
The following information is important. Read the information
completely before you install any hard disk drives in bays 5–9 in
non-disk-array models without the hot-swap bay option.
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For information about installing hard disk drives in servers with the
hot-swap bay option, see “Installing Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap
Bays” on page 148.
Note: All disk-array models are shipped with the hot-swap bay
option. The hot-swap bay option is also available for
non-disk-array models. For information about ordering a
hot-swap bay, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
Ÿ Non-disk-array models that are shipped with a preinstalled SCSI
hard disk drive in bay 1 come with a 7-drop, Fast/Wide (16-bit)
cable.
Note:
A 7-drop cable has eight connectors: one for attaching
the cable to the SCSI-2 adapter, and seven for attaching
the cable to the SCSI devices.
Use this cable to install up to five more Fast/Wide devices. The
CD-ROM drive is connected to this cable through the 16-bit to
8-bit SCSI Internal Converter.
Note: If you install any additional 8-bit devices, you need the
16-bit to 8-bit SCSI Internal Converter.
Ÿ Earlier non-disk-array models that are shipped without a hard
disk drive come with a 4-drop, SCSI narrow (8-bit) cable
connected to the CD-ROM drive. That cable has three
additional connectors for 8-bit drives.
If you install 16-bit devices, you must use a 16-bit cable.
Ÿ Before installing drives, make sure that you have enough cables
to accommodate all of the drives. If you need additional cables,
contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Ÿ For information specific to the drives that you are installing, see
the documentation that comes with the drives, including those
that describe how to set jumpers and switches, and how to
remove termination.
Ÿ If a tray is attached to a drive that you intend to install, you
must remove the tray before installing the drive. Follow the
instructions in the documentation that comes with the drive.
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Ÿ If you are installing an IDE drive, you must purchase and install
an optional, 2-drop IDE cable. To order the cable, contact your
IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative. To install an IDE
hard disk drive, see “Installing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk
Drives” on page 124.
To install a drive in a non-disk-array model:
1. Unlock and open the door.
2. Remove the door:
a. Lift the door up and off its hinges.
b. Store the door in a safe place.
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3. Remove the cover plate from the target bay:
a. Insert a small flat-blade screwdriver under the side of the
cover plate.
b. Lift the cover plate and remove it from the server front
panel. (Save the cover plate for future use.)
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4. Remove the screws that secure the tray (from both sides of the
tray housing) in the target bay. Then, slide the tray out of the
bay.
5. If you are installing a 5.25-inch drive, go to step 9 on page 142.
If you are installing a 3.5-inch drive, place the drive on the tray,
with the connectors facing the rear of the tray.
Attention: To ensure that the drive functions properly, do not
overtighten the screws.
6. Insert the screws that come with the drive into the holes on the
tray. Tighten the screws.
7. Slide the drive and tray into the target bay.
8. Reinstall and tighten the four screws that you removed in
step 4. Go to step 10 on page 143.
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9. If you are installing a 5.25-inch drive, complete the following
steps:
Note: Do not use the tray, but store it for future use. If this is a
rewritable-optical disc drive, a special tray kit is required.
(Contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative for additional information.)
a. Position the drive with the connectors facing the rear of the
server.
b. Slide the drive to the rear until it stops.
c. Loosely reinstall the four screws that you removed from the
tray housing in step 4 on page 141.
Attention: To ensure that the drive functions properly, do
not overtighten the screws.
d. Align the drive and tighten the screws.
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10. Connect the drive to a connector on the appropriate flat cable.
11. If this is the first IDE drive, connect the other end of the flat
cable to the IDE controller (see “IDE Controllers” on page 121).
If this is a SCSI drive, use the other internal connector on the
SCSI-2 adapter to attach the 16-bit cable. (See the following
illustration for an example of SCSI cable-routing.)
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12. Connect one of the 4-pin power cables to the drive.
13. If you are installing another internal drive, return to step 1 on
page 122.
If you are not installing another internal drive, continue with the
next step.
14. If necessary, replace the cover plate at the front of the bay:
a. If you installed a removable-media drive, do not install a
cover plate; instead, go to step 15 on page 146.
b. If you installed a nonremovable-media drive, use the cover
plate that you removed in step 3 on page 140.
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c. Insert the tabs on the right end of the cover plate into the
slots on the right side of the panel in front of the drive that
you just installed.
d. Pivot the plate and press it into place.
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15. Reinstall the door at the front of the server by aligning the pins
with the hinges and sliding the door down.
16. Close and lock the door.
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17. Go to Table 9 on page 271 to record the drive location, and if
applicable, the SCSI ID that you assigned to the drive (diskette
drives do not require a SCSI ID); then, return here to determine
your next step.
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
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Installing Internal Drives
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
Installing Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays
To install a hard disk drive in a hot-swap bay:
1. Unlock and open the exterior door.
2. Unlatch and open the interior door that covers the the hot-swap
bays.
3. Turn the blue locking-lever located on the front of the hot-swap
drive clockwise until it is pointing straight down in the open
position.
Open Position
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4. Slide the hot-swap hard disk drive into any open hot-swap bay.
5. Turn the locking-lever back, counter-clockwise, to secure the
hot-swap drive in the locked position.
Locked Position
6. Go to “RAID Adapter Configuration Program” on page 47, for
instructions on configuring your system after installing hard
disk drives.
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What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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Removing Internal Drives
Before you begin, be sure you have:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 79 and “Handling
Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 80.
Ÿ Removed the server cover (see “Preparing to Install Options”
on page 81).
Removing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives
1. Remove the four screws from the drive housing containing the
lower three bays.
Note: Three screws are shown near the screwdriver in the
following illustration. The fourth screw is located under
the housing, on the left side.
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2. Gently pull the housing away from the bracket that holds its
other side in place.
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3. To remove a drive from bays 1–3 (non-disk-array models) or
bays 8–10 (disk-array models):
a. Find the drive that you plan to remove.
b. Disconnect the cables (flat and power) from the rear of the
drive.
c. Remove the screws that hold the drive in the housing.
d. Slide the drive out of the bay and store it in a safe place.
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e. Reinstall the drive housing, making sure to align it properly
over the two brackets located under bay 4 (non-disk-array
models) or bay 7 (disk-array models).
f. If you are not installing another drive in place of the one
you've removed, reinstall and tighten the four screws you
removed in step 1 on page 151. Otherwise, return to
“Installing Diskette and IDE Hard Disk Drives” on
page 124.
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4. Replace the cover plate (bay 2 on non-disk-array models or bay
9 on disk-array models):
a. Locate the original blank cover plate that was shipped with
your server.
b. Insert the tabs on the right end of the cover plate into the
opening in front of bay 2 (non-disk-array models) or bay 9
(disk-array models) in the server's front panel.
c. Pivot the plate and press it into place.
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5. Update your records in Table 9 on page 271; then, return here
to determine your next step.
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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Removing CD-ROM Drives
To remove a CD-ROM drive from bay 4 in non-disk-array models or
bay 7 in disk-array models:
1. Unlock and open the door.
2. Remove the cover (see “Preparing to Install Options” on
page 81).
3. Remove the screws (two on each side; one high, one low on the
drive).
4. Disconnect the cables (flat and power) from the rear of the
drive.
5. Slide the CD-ROM drive out of the open bay.
Removing Optical Disc Drives and Tape Drives
To remove a rewritable-optical disc drive or tape drive, follow the
procedure for removing hard disk drives in non-disk-array models
in the following section.
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Removing Hard Disk Drives
To remove hot-swap hard disk drives from bays 1–6 in disk-array
models, see “Removing Hot-Swappable Hard Disk Drives” on
page 164. To remove hard disk drives from bays 5–9 on
non-disk-array models:
1. Unlock and open the door.
2. Remove the door:
a. Lift the door up and off its hinges.
b. Store the door in a safe place.
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3. Remove the cover plate from the target bay:
a. Insert a small flat-blade screwdriver under the side of the
cover plate.
b. Lift the cover plate and remove it from the server front
panel. (Save the cover plate for future use.)
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4. Complete the following steps:
a. Locate the drive that you plan to remove.
b. Disconnect the cables (flat and power) from the rear of the
drive.
c. If you are removing a 3.5-inch drive, remove the screws that
hold the drive tray in place. Then remove the drive from
the tray and store the drive in a safe place.
d. If you are removing a 5.25-inch drive, slide the drive out of
the bay and store it in a safe place.
e. If you are removing a rewritable-optical disc drive, also
remove the special mounting bracket that you installed
when you installed the drive, and store it with the optical
disc drive.
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Removing Internal Drives
5. Replace the cover plate:
a. Locate the original blank cover plate that was shipped with
your server.
b. Insert the tabs on the right end of the cover plate into the
slots on the right side of the panel in front of the empty
drive bay.
c. Pivot the plate and press it into place.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
161
Removing Internal Drives
6. Reinstall the door at the front of the server by aligning the pins
with the hinges and sliding the door down.
7. Close and lock the door.
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Removing Internal Drives
8. Update your records in Table 9 on page 271; then, return here
to determine your next step.
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
163
Removing Internal Drives
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
Removing Hot-Swappable Hard Disk Drives
To remove a drive from a hot-swap drive in a disk-array model:
1. Turn the blue locking-lever, located on the front of the hot-swap
drive, clockwise until it is pointing straight down.
Open Position
2. Slide the hot-swap hard disk drive out of the hot-swap bay.
3. If you are installing another hard disk drive in this bay, go to
“Installing Hard Disk Drives in Hot-Swap Bays” on page 148.
If you are not installing another hard disk drive in this bay,
close the interior door.
4. Close and lock the exterior door.
5. Configure the system as needed. Go to “RAID Adapter
Configuration Program” on page 47, for instructions.
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Jumper Settings
Changing Jumper Settings
The system board and the system-board jumper settings for your
model appear on a label inside your server. These values are preset.
If you need to change them, follow the instructions given in “How
to Set Jumpers.” You will see the label when you remove the cover.
(To remove the cover, go to “Preparing to Install Options” on
page 81.)
You might also need to change jumper settings on other devices,
such as adapters. Refer to the documentation that comes with the
devices for specific information about the appropriate jumper
settings.
How to Set Jumpers
A jumper covers pins on a pin block and might be positioned to the
left or to the right. The jumper setting depends on which pins are
covered. For example, on the three-pin administrator password
jumper, you cover the left and center pins to set the change state.
Jumper positions are indicated on the system board with the jumper
location identifier (for example, “J1”) and the “0” or “1” symbol.
The following illustration shows a jumper on a pin block being
moved from position 0 to position 1. The orientation and labels for
the jumpers on your system board might be different from those
shown here.
0
0
JMP2
JMP2
JMP2
1
0
1
1
Chapter 4. Installing Options
165
Jumper Settings
To change a jumper setting:
1. Lift the jumper straight up off the pin block.
2. Slide the jumper down over the correct pins.
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Installing a microprocessor? — Go to “Installing a
Microprocessor” on page 167.
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
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Installing a Microprocessor
Installing a Microprocessor
You can install a second microprocessor in your PC Server 320.
This microprocessor works with the Pentium microprocessor of the
same speed that is in your PC Server 320.
After you install the second microprocessor, your PC Server 320 can
operate as an SMP server. With SMP, certain operating systems and
application programs can distribute the processing load between the
two microprocessors. This enhances performance for applications,
such as database transactions, graphics or computer-aided design
(CAD) programs, and modeling or simulation programs.
Before you begin:
Be sure you have:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 79 and “Handling
Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 80.
Ÿ Removed the front and side covers (see “Preparing to Install
Options” on page 81).
Ÿ Obtained the Processor Upgrade Option Kit.
Ÿ Obtained one of the following operating systems (optional)
at the specified release level:
– IBM OS/2 for Symmetrical Multiprocessing Version 2.11
(OS/2 2.11 for SMP) or later
– Microsoft Windows NT 3.5 or later
– Novell NetWare 4.1 for SMP
Ÿ Located the documentation that comes with your server and
operating system.
Ÿ Reviewed the system-board label and verified that both
microprocessors have the same clock speed, and that the
microprocessor-speed jumpers are set to that speed.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
167
Installing a Microprocessor
Notes:
Ÿ The illustrations in this section might differ slightly from
your hardware.
Ÿ Install the microprocessor before you install OS/2 2.11 for
SMP. If you have already installed OS/2 2.11 for SMP,
you must add the statement PSD=OS2APIC.PSD to the
CONFIG.SYS file, or reinstall OS/2 2.11 for SMP.
1. Refer to the label inside the cover of your server to locate the
primary and secondary microprocessor sockets on the system
board. Your server comes with a microprocessor preinstalled in
the primary socket. Therefore, you will install the new
microprocessor in the secondary socket (also known as an
upgrade socket).
Note: Both microprocessors must have the same speed to
ensure proper server operation.
2. Remove the microprocessor from the static-protective bag.
Locate the notch (beveled corner) on the microprocessor.
3. Lift the latch on the secondary socket.
4. Carefully align the notch (beveled corner) of the microprocessor
with the notch (beveled corner) on the socket.
5. Center the microprocessor over the socket.
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Installing a Microprocessor
6. Carefully put the microprocessor into place. Ensure that the
pins on the microprocessor align with the holes in the socket.
Attention: Do not force the pins into the socket. If you feel
any resistance, remove the microprocessor and check the
orientation and alignment.
Heat sink
Latch
Notch
So
Microprocessor
So
cke
cke
t5
t5
Notch
Flange
7. Note the heat-sink clip that comes with the microprocessor, and
match it to one of the following figures.
Ÿ If it is the top clip, go to step 8 on page 170.
Ÿ If it is the bottom clip, go to step 12 on page 171.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
169
Installing a Microprocessor
8. Move the latch downward until the microprocessor is
completely locked into the socket. Make sure the latch is in the
fully closed position.
9. Position the heat-sink clip over the flange, as shown.
Note: Make sure that the tab on the heat-sink clip faces away
from the middle of the two sockets.
Heat-sink clip
Tab
So
cke
t5
Flange
10. Clip one end of the heat-sink clip over the flange. Then, place
the clip on top of the heat sink and press down until it is secure
on both sides of the socket.
So
cke
t5
11. Go to step 14 on page 172.
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Installing a Microprocessor
12. Move the latch downward until the microprocessor is
completely locked into the socket. Make sure the latch is in the
fully closed position.
Heat sink
Latch
Microprocessor
Notch
So
cke
t5
So
cke
t5
Flange
Notch
13. Push down on one of the rounded ends of the heat-sink clip
until it catches under the flange. Then, do the same to the other
end of the heat-sink clip to lock the microprocessor into
position.
3
1
4
2
Chapter 4. Installing Options
171
Installing a Microprocessor
14. If you have no other options to install, replace the cover on the
server (see “Completing the Installation” on page 177) and
reconnect the cables and power cord (see step 2 on page 178).
15. Because you installed a new microprocessor in your server, you
might want to upgrade your operating system. You must
update your server configuration.
a. Install one of the operating systems that is listed at the
beginning of this section. Follow the instructions in your
operating system-documentation and note the software and
operating system-considerations in Chapter 2, “Installing
Software” on page 19.
b. Run the Setup program. See “Using the Setup Program” on
page 191 for instructions.
c. If applicable, record your updated configuration information
in the appropriate tables in “Installed Device Records” on
page 268. Then, return here to determine your next step.
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing memory-module kits? — Go to “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 86.
Ÿ Removing memory-module kits? — Go to “Removing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 91.
Ÿ Installing an adapter? — Go to “Installing Adapters” on
page 95.
Ÿ Removing an adapter? — Go to “Removing Adapters” on
page 105.
Ÿ Installing an internal drive? — Go to “Installing Internal Drives”
on page 109.
Ÿ Removing an internal drive? — Go to “Removing Internal
Drives” on page 151.
Ÿ Setting a jumper? — Go to “Changing Jumper Settings” on
page 165.
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Security Procedures
Ÿ Installing a security feature? — Go to “Security Procedures” on
page 173.
Ÿ No internal devices to install or remove? — Go to “Completing
the Installation” on page 177.
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
Security Procedures
Your server is equipped with security features to help prevent theft
or unauthorized use of your server. Your User's Reference contains a
complete explanation of these features. To use or change some of
these features, you might need to remove the server's cover.
Two types of system passwords are available to prevent
unauthorized access to your server. These are the supervisor and
user passwords. They are described in detail in your User's
Reference. To set or change these passwords, follow the instructions
given in “Setting Passwords” on page 193.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
173
Security Procedures
Security-Cover Option
For additional security, you might want to control access to the
cables and cable connectors on your server. The optional IBM PC
Server 300 Security Cover II restricts cable access while creating a
sleek, streamlined profile. Your User's Reference describes this
feature. Instructions for installing this option are in a separate
booklet that comes with the security cover option.
If you want to purchase this option, contact your IBM reseller or
IBM marketing representative for additional information.
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Security Procedures
Installing a U-Bolt
Before you begin, make sure you have:
Ÿ Obtained a 19 mm (3/4 in.) U-bolt or wire rope (similar to
National Manufacturing No. 3230, STK No. 176-735).
Ÿ Obtained a security cable.
Ÿ Obtained a lock, such as a combination lock or padlock.
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 79 and “Handling
Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 80.
Ÿ Removed the server cover (see “Preparing to Install Options”
on page 81).
1. Install the U-bolt:
a. Locate the two holes for the U-bolt in the rear panel of the
server.
b. Insert the U-bolt through the holes and secure it in place
with the nuts.
2. Replace the server cover and attach the cables (see “Completing
the Installation” on page 177).
Chapter 4. Installing Options
175
Security Procedures
3. Insert the security cable through the U-bolt. Loop the cable
around (or through) an object from which it cannot be removed;
then, fasten the cable ends together with the lock.
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Completing the Installation
Completing the Installation
1. Replace the cover:
a. Align the cover over the frame of the server and slide the
cover in place.
b. Tighten the six screws in the recessed holes on the cover.
Attention: Be sure to maintain a clearance of at least 51 mm
(2 in.) around the front and rear of the server to allow for air
circulation.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
177
Completing the Installation
2. Connect all cables to the back of the server; then, plug all power
cords into properly grounded electrical outlets.
Note: If you are in the United Kingdom and have a modem or
fax machine attached to your server, reconnect the
telephone line after you plug in the power cords.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Completing the Installation
What to do next?
Ÿ Installing an external option? — Go to “Connecting External
Options” on page 180.
Ÿ No external options to install?
– If you installed options during the initial setup of your
server, go to Chapter 2, “Installing Software” on page 19 to
complete the installation procedure. Then return here.
– If you installed hot-swap drives, you might need to update
your server's configuration parameters. Go to Chapter 3,
“Configuring the Disk Array” on page 39 to see if you need
to configure your server.
If your server is a non-disk-array model, go to Chapter 5,
“Configuring Your Server” on page 189 to see if you need
to configure your server.
– If you removed memory modules or internal drives, you
must run the Setup program. See “Using the Setup
Program” on page 191 for instructions.
– If you removed an ISA or EISA adapter, you must run the
EISA Configuration program. See “Using the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 205 for instructions.
– Device drivers to install? (The instructions that come with
the option will tell you if device drivers are required and
how to install them.) If you don't need to install any device
drivers or configure the system, your server is ready to use.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
179
Connecting External Options
Connecting External Options
Your PC Server 320 supports external devices, that is, devices that
connect to the connectors on the back of the server. These external
options include SCSI-2 drives and storage enclosures, printers,
scanners, modems, and other serial and parallel devices, and an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
The information in this section supplements the instructions that
come with external options. To connect external options to your PC
Server 320, see the documentation that comes with the options.
Connecting External SCSI Devices
The IBM DASD Hot-Swap Storage Expansion Enclosure is one of
several SCSI storage enclosures that you can attach to the external
SCSI-2 connector on your server. Contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative for additional information.
Note: You cannot use both internal connectors on the SCSI-2
adapter and also use the external connector. For disk-array
models with the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter,
you cannot use the internal channel 1 connector and the
external connector at the same time. If you intend to use the
external connector, connect internal SCSI-2 devices to the
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Connecting External Options
internal channel 2 connector. Refer to the following
illustration.
Internal
Channel 1
Internal
Channel 2
External
Channel 1
Termination Requirements
The requirements for terminating external SCSI devices are:
Ÿ If you attach both internal and external SCSI devices, you must
terminate the last internal device and the last external device.
For non-disk-array models, you must also change the
termination setting of the SCSI-2 adapter in the SCSISelect utility
program, as described in “Using the SCSISelect Utility Program”
on page 213, so that the SCSI-2 adapter is no longer terminated.
Ÿ If you attach only external devices to the SCSI-2 adapter, you
must terminate the last device on the cable. If you install only
one external device, it must be terminated. Since the SCSI-2
adapter is already terminated, do not change the termination
setting.
Cabling Requirements
Before you install external SCSI devices, you must have the correct
external SCSI cables. See Table 5 on page 183 for information on
cable lengths. The cables must have the proper connector for the
SCSI-2 adapter on one end, and the proper connector for the first
external device on the other end. To select and order the correct
cables for use with external devices, contact your IBM reseller or
IBM marketing representative.
The SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter can support a total of 15 devices
and the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter can support a
Chapter 4. Installing Options
181
Connecting External Options
total of 14 devices, provided that you do not exceed the maximum
cable lengths listed in Table 5 on page 183.
If you are using a SCSI data transfer rate greater than 5 MB per
second, the maximum length of the SCSI bus (cable) must not
exceed 3 meters (9.8 feet). If you are using a SCSI data transfer rate
of 5 MB per second or slower, the maximum length of the SCSI bus
cable must not exceed 6 meters (19.7 feet). These lengths apply to
the combined lengths of the internal and external cables. Adhering
to these standards ensures that your server operates properly.
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Connecting External Options
The following table shows the maximum cable lengths for
connecting SCSI devices, based on data-transmission rates.
Note: The maximum cable length for an external cable is
determined by subtracting the length of the internal cable
being used from the maximum length of SCSI cable that can
be used based on the speed of the data transfer.
5 MB Per Second or Slower Data Transmission Rates
Note: Maximum cable length − internal cable length = external cable length.
Ÿ Maximum Length of SCSI cable = 6 meters (19.7 ft.)
Length of 4-drop, SCSI narrow cable = 1 meter (3.3 ft.)
Length of 7-drop, SCSI Fast/Wide cable = 1.5 meters (4.9 ft.)
Ÿ When a narrow internal cable is used, the maximum length of the SCSI
external cable = 5 meters (16.4 ft.)
6 meters − 1 meter = 5 meters, or
19.7 ft. − 3.3 ft. = 16.4 ft.
Ÿ When a Fast/Wide internal cable is used, the maximum length of the SCSI
external cable = 4.5 meters (14.8 ft.)
6 meters − 1.5 meter = 4.5 meters, or
19.7 ft. − 4.9 ft. = 14.8 ft.
Greater Than 5 MB Per Second Data Transmission Rate
Note: Maximum cable length − internal cable length = external cable length.
Ÿ Maximum Length of SCSI cable = 3 meters (9.8 ft.)
Length of 4-drop, SCSI narrow cable = 1 meter (3.3 ft.)
Length of 7-drop, SCSI Fast/Wide cable = 1.5 meters (4.9 ft.)
Ÿ When a narrow internal cable is used, the maximum length of the SCSI
external cable = 2 meters (6.5 ft.)
3 meters − 1 meter = 2 meters, or
9.8 ft. − 3.3 ft. = 6.5 ft.
Ÿ When a Fast/Wide internal cable is used, the maximum length of the SCSI
external cable = 1.5 meters (4.9 ft.)
3 meters − 1.5 meter = 1.5 meters, or
9.8 ft. − 4.9 ft. = 4.9 ft.
Table 5. Maximum External SCSI Cable Lengths
Chapter 4. Installing Options
183
Connecting External Options
Setting SCSI IDs for External Devices
The internal channel connector (you can only use one of the two
internal channel connectors) and the external channel connector on
the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter accept SCSI IDs from
0 through 7. Each device attached to the external channel connector
must have a unique SCSI ID and each device attached to the
internal channel connector must have a unique SCSI ID.
For example, you can have a SCSI ID of 0 on a device attached to
the channel 1 connector and a SCSI ID of 0 on a device attached to
the channel 2 connector of the same SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus
RAID Adapter. However, you cannot have a SCSI ID of 0 on two
devices attached to the same channel connector.
Note: Read the README file on the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus
RAID Adapter Configuration Option Diskette for updated
information. Select Option Diskette from the first menu
screen.
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Connecting External Options
The following table shows an example of using one internal and one
external channel on the RAID adapter. Channel 2 is connected to
bank A and Channel 1 is attached to an external DASD storage
enclosure. Refer to the documentation that came with the storage
enclosure for physical locations.
Displayed
Channel Number
Displayed Bay
Number
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Bank and Bay
Physical Location
External
External
External
External
External
External
External
SCSI ID
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
(CD-ROM)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Table 6. One Internal and One External Channel Mapping
You must set a unique SCSI ID for each external SCSI device that is
connected to the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter. Therefore, do not
set the SCSI IDs for external devices to the values that you use for
internal devices. (See “SCSI Drives” on page 115 for additional
SCSI IDs.) Refer to the instructions that come with the SCSI devices
for more information about setting a SCSI ID. The default ID for
the SCSI-2 adapter is 7. The ID for the preinstalled CD-ROM drive
is 3 on non-disk-array models, and 6 on disk-array models. If your
disk-array server comes with a preinstalled hard disk drive in bay 1,
the ID is 0.
Note: If you install a second SCSI-2 adapter, you can use the same
SCSI IDs that you use for the preinstalled SCSI-2 adapter.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
185
Connecting External Options
Installation Procedure
To attach an external drive:
1. Turn off the server and all attached devices.
2. Follow the instructions that came with the option to prepare it
for installation and to connect it to the server.
3. Go to Table 9 on page 271 to record the type of external device
that you installed and the location into which it is installed;
then, go to “What to do next?” on page 188 to determine your
next step.
115
Power Connector
Keyboard Connector
Mouse Connector
Serial Connectors
Parallel Connector
SCSI Connector
Expansion Slots
Monitor Connector
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Connecting External Options
Installing an Uninterruptible Power Supply
A 9-pin, serial-port cable comes with your server. You can use this
cable to attach an American Power Conversion (APC) UPS to your
floor-standing PC Server 320.
After you purchase and install an APC UPS, you must load the APC
support software that comes with ServerGuide onto your server. To
do this:
1. Start the main ServerGuide CD.
2. Go to the Diskette Factory; then, select PowerChute for
NetFinity.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to install the PowerChute
for NetFinity software.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
187
Connecting External Options
What to do next?
Ÿ If you installed options during the initial setup of your server,
go to Chapter 2, “Installing Software” on page 19 to complete
the installation procedure. Then return here.
Ÿ If you installed hot-swap drives, you might need to update your
server's configuration parameters. Go to Chapter 3,
“Configuring the Disk Array” on page 39 to see if you need to
configure your server. Then go to Chapter 5, “Configuring
Your Server” on page 189 for additional details about
configuration.
If your server is a non-disk-array model, go to Chapter 5,
“Configuring Your Server” on page 189 to see if you need to
configure your server.
Ÿ If you removed memory modules or internal drives, you must
run the Setup program. See “Using the Setup Program” on
page 191 for instructions.
Ÿ If you installed or removed an ISA or EISA adapter, you must
run the EISA Configuration program. See Chapter 5,
“Configuring Your Server” on page 189 for instructions.
Ÿ Device drivers to install? (The instructions that come with the
option will tell you if device drivers are required and how to
install them.) If you don't need to install any device drivers or
configure the system, your server is ready to use.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Chapter 5. Configuring Your Server
This chapter provides information about each of the configuration
and utility programs that come with your server, as well as
instructions that tell you when and how to use them.
For information about configuring the IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI-Bus RAID Adapter, see “Starting the RAID Configuration
Program” on page 47.
This chapter contains:
Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Setup Program
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording and Restoring Default Settings . . . . . . . .
Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Selectable Drive-Startup Sequence . . . . . .
Configuring EISA, ISA, and PCI Adapters . . . . . . . . .
Configuring ISA or EISA Features and Options
. . . .
Configuring PCI Features and Options . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the EISA Configuration Diskette . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up the EISA Configuration Diskette . . . . . .
Making Menu Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording EISA Configuration Settings
. . . . . . . . .
Starting the EISA Configuration Diskette . . . . . . . .
Using EISA Configuration Diskette Advanced Function
Configuration Conflicts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolving Hardware Configuration Conflicts . . . . . .
Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts . . . . . . .
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the SCSISelect Utility Program
. . . . . . . . .
SCSISelect Utility Program Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
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Configuration
Configuration Overview
You play a key role in how your server allocates resources to
organize and interconnect hardware devices and software programs.
This allocation process is referred to as configuration. The steps
required to configure your server depend on the number and
variety of devices and programs that you install.
Your server has the flexibility and power to support several types of
adapters. This flexibility lets you choose from among thousands of
adapters and devices that comply with any of the following
standards:
Ÿ Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI)
Ÿ Extended Industry Standard Architecture (EISA)
Ÿ Industry Standard Architecture (ISA)
In general, the greater the number and variety of hardware devices
and software programs you install in your server, the more you will
have to interact with your server and your devices to correctly
configure your system.
Three hardware configuration utility programs are shipped with
your server. The built-in Setup program configures system board
functions, such as the integrated drive electronics (IDE) controller
and serial and parallel port assignments that you install. It also
allows you to set passwords for starting up and accessing the Setup
program. Use the PC Server EISA Configuration Diskette to
configure EISA and ISA adapters (boards). For non-disk-array
models, use the built-in SCSI-2 adapter utility program (SCSISelect
Utility program) to configure the SCSI devices that you install in
your server. For disk-array models, use the program provided on
the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI-Bus RAID Adapter Configuration Option
Diskette.
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Using the Setup Program
The built-in Setup program is used for system board configuration.
The configuration information is stored in the nonvolatile
random-access memory (NVRAM). In most cases, the server
operates using the default settings, and you need to change the
settings only to resolve configuration conflicts or to enable or
change device function (for example, defining diskette or IDE drive
types).
Review this section and the information that came with the device
before making changes. Also, record the current settings (see
“Recording and Restoring Default Settings” on page 192) before
making any changes.
Changing Settings
You can advance through the screens by pressing the Page Up
(PgUp) or Page Down (PgDn) key. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down
Arrow (↓) key to advance through the items on the screen. Change
selections by first advancing to the item that you want to change;
then, use the plus key (+) or minus key (−) to make the change.
Online Help information is available on the right side of the screen
for each selection. To access menu-bar selections within the Setup
program, use the Right Arrow (→) or Left Arrow (←) key.
The Setup program consists of the following menu bar selections:
Main: Use the Standard System Parameters screen to set the
System Time and Date. This screen also allows you to view or
change configuration settings for diskette drives, IDE drives,
memory, video, and cache.
Advanced: The Advanced selection allows you to enable boot
(startup) options and to set up integrated peripherals.
Security: Use the Security Selection screen to set a supervisor-level
password to control access to the Setup program, or to set a
password on boot (startup). Also, use this menu selection to control
diskette drive access to a supervisor, user, or both. This selection
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also allows you to write protect the boot sector of a hard disk drive.
Write protecting the boot sector is a form of virus protection.
Help: When you scroll to any screen choice, an Item specific help
panel appears alongside the choices. General help information is
available by pressing F1.
Starting the Setup Program
To access the Setup program:
1. Remove all diskettes from the server.
Note: Never start the Setup program while using the EISA
Configuration program.
2. Turn on the server and watch the screen. Be ready to act
quickly.
3. After the IBM logo screen appears and then quickly disappears,
you are prompted to Press <F2> to enter SETUP. As soon as
you see that prompt, press F2. If the Setup program screen
doesn't appear, restart your system and try again.
Note: If a configuration error occurs, a prompt appears before
the operating system starts (see “Configuration Conflicts”
on page 209).
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to view or change the
configuration.
You must correctly exit from the Setup program to save the
configuration information.
5. Press Esc or move the cursor to the Exit menu option on the
menu bar.
6. Select Exit menu from the menu bar.
7. Select Save changes and exit.
Recording and Restoring Default Settings
If you have a printer attached to your server, you can use the Print
Screen key to print the configuration settings. The default settings
are helpful when you install additional options, or if you need to
have your system serviced. Also, record the new settings each time
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Setup Program
that you make changes. Be sure to record the current configuration
settings in the “Installed Device Records” on page 268. You can
restore default settings easily by using the Setup program.
To restore default settings:
1. Turn on the server.
2. Press F2 to enter the Setup program.
3. Press F9 to restore the default settings.
4. Select Exit menu from the menu bar.
5. Select Save changes and exit.
Setting Passwords
To control access to your server, you can implement several of the
security measures described in your User's Reference, including
password protection. Two types of passwords are available with
the PC Server 320. These are the supervisor and user passwords.
To set these passwords and other security features, select the
Security menu bar from the Setup program and follow the
instructions on the screen.
Note: The default values for all security-related data fields are
given in Table 7 on page 269.
After you set the supervisor password, Enter password appears on
the screen each time you attempt to access the Setup program.
After you set the user password, Enter password appears on the
screen each time you attempt to access your operating system. (The
passwords do not appear on the screen as you type them.) When
you enter the correct password, Password accepted appears on the
screen. If you enter the wrong password, Incorrect password
appears on the screen, and Enter password appears again. After
three incorrect attempts, you must turn off the server and start
again.
Supervisor Password
The supervisor password allows you to control who has access to
the Setup program. If a supervisor password is set, you must enter
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it to use the Setup program. Only someone who knows the
supervisor password can change it.
Before you can set a supervisor password, you must first set your
selectable drive-startup sequence, as described in “Setting the
Selectable Drive-Startup Sequence” on page 197.
Attention: If a supervisor password is set and then forgotten, it
cannot be overridden or removed. If you forget your supervisor
password, you must place a service call to regain access to your
server.
Note: To remove a supervisor password, press Enter when the
Enter new password data field is blank.
To set a supervisor password:
1. Start the Setup program.
2. Select Set Supervisor Password from the Security menu screen.
The Set Supervisor Password screen appears.
3. Type a password in the Enter new password data field.
Note: You can use any combination of up to seven characters
(A-Z, a-z, and 0-9) for your supervisor password. For
additional security, the user and supervisor passwords
should not be the same. Keep a record of your password
in a secure place.
4. Press Enter.
The cursor moves to the Re-enter new password data field.
5. To verify that you typed the correct password, type the
password in the Re-enter new password data field. If you did
not type the correct password, a warning message appears.
Press Enter to return to the Enter new password data field.
Return to 3.
6. If you typed the correct password, press Enter to save it.
The password becomes effective immediately after you enter it.
After you set the supervisor password, you are prompted to enter it
each time that you attempt to start the Setup program.
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User Password
You do not need to set a user password, but a password helps to
protect the information that you store in your server. The user
password controls access to your operating system and the
information stored on your hard disk drives.
Note: Before setting the user password, you must set the supervisor
password.
To set a user password:
1. Start the Setup program.
2. Select Set User Password on the Security menu screen.
The Set User Password screen appears.
3. Type the password in the Enter new password data field.
Note: You can use any combination of up to seven characters
(A–Z, a–z, and 0–9) for your user password. For
additional security, the user and supervisor passwords
should not be the same. Keep a record of your password
in a secure place.
4. Press Enter.
The cursor moves to the Re-enter new password data field.
5. To verify that you typed the new password correctly, type the
password in the Re-enter new password data field. If you did
not type the correct password, a warning message appears.
Press Enter to return to the Enter new password data field.
Return to step 3.
6. If you typed the correct password, press Enter to save it.
The password becomes effective immediately after you enter it. You
are prompted to enter the user password each time that you start
your operating system, after POST occurs.
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Setup Program
Password on Boot
Your server comes with the Password on boot feature set to
Disabled. If you enable this feature, you must enter a password
each time you start the system. To enable this feature:
1. Start the Setup program.
2. Select the Security menu option.
3. Type either your supervisor or user password in the Password
on boot data field.
Diskette Drive Access
The setting for this option controls who has access to the diskette
drives (user and supervisor, or supervisor only). Your server is
shipped with this feature set to User, so that both the user and
supervisor have diskette drive access. To change this setting so that
only the supervisor has access, select the Security menu option and
enter the word Supervisor in the Diskette access data field. If the
supervisor and user passwords are enabled, only the supervisor can
change this setting.
Fixed Disk Boot Sector
The setting for this option indicates whether the boot sector of your
hard disk is write protected. Write protecting the boot sector helps
to prevent viruses from corrupting your hard disk. (See your User's
Reference for additional information about viruses.) Your server is
shipped with this feature set to Normal. To change this setting so
that the disk is write protected, select the Security menu option and
enter Write Protect in the Fixed disk boot sector data field. If the
supervisor and user passwords are enabled, only the supervisor can
change this setting.
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Setup Program
Setting the Selectable Drive-Startup Sequence
Selectable drive startup (referred to as Boot Sequence on the
Advanced Setup program screen, under the Boot Options choice)
allows you to control the startup sequence of the drives in your
server. Each time you turn on the server, it checks the drives as it
looks for the operating system. The order in which the system
checks the drives is the drive-startup sequence.
In most cases, you do not need to change the default drive-startup
sequence. However, you might want to do so if you are working
with multiple operating systems, or diskette drives of different sizes.
The default drive-startup sequence first checks the primary diskette
drive for a self-starting (bootable) diskette. If one is present, the
operating system or program is loaded from the diskette. If not, the
system then checks the primary hard disk for an operating system.
If one is present, it loads the operating system from that hard disk.
If you start the system from a diskette, the drive that contains the
diskette becomes drive A, regardless of the defined sequence, and
the first hard disk selected in the startup sequence becomes drive C.
If you elect to switch the startup sequence of the diskette drives, use
the Swap Floppies selection.
To change the startup sequence:
1. Turn on the server. Be ready to act quickly.
2. After the IBM logo screen appears and then quickly disappears,
you are prompted to Press <F2> to enter SETUP. As soon as
you see that prompt, press F2. If the Setup program screen
doesn't appear, restart your system and try again.
3. Press the right cursor key to go to the Advanced menu of the
Setup program.
4. Select Boot Options; then, follow the instructions on the screen.
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Configuring EISA, ISA, and PCI Adapters
Configuring EISA, ISA, and PCI Adapters
Before installing a new device or program, read the documentation
that came with it. Reading the instructions helps you to determine
the steps required for installation and configuration. The following
list provides a preview of the actions that might be required to
configure your server.
When installing different types of adapters at the same time, install
and configure them in the following sequence:
1. ISA
2. EISA
3. PCI
Note: During POST, your server automatically configures ISA Plug
and Play and PCI devices.
1. Run the Setup program and record the current configuration
settings.
See “Starting the Setup Program” on page 192.
2. Backup the EISA Configuration Diskette.
See “Backing Up the EISA Configuration Diskette” on page 205.
3. Start the EISA Configuration Diskette and:
a. Record the current settings.
b. Install configuration files (.CFG).
Note: If the .CFG files didn't come with the adapter, see
“Configuration Files” on page 199.
See “Recording EISA Configuration Settings” on page 207 and
“Starting the EISA Configuration Diskette” on page 207.
4. Set jumpers or switches on the server system board.
See “Changing Jumper Settings” on page 165.
5. Set jumpers or switches on the device.
See the instructions that came with the adapter.
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6. Install the adapter in the server.
See “Installing Adapters” on page 95.
7. Install software programs.
See the installation instructions that came with the software.
8. Resolve configuration conflicts.
See “Configuration Conflicts” on page 209.
Configuring ISA or EISA Features and Options
Some ISA and most EISA devices are shipped with option diskettes.
These diskettes can contain any or all of the following types of
information:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Configuration files (.CFG)
Diagnostic files (.DGS)
Device drivers
Sample applications (mini-applications)
Configuration Files
A configuration file is required to configure the server for ISA or
EISA adapters. You have to copy this configuration file, which has
a file-name extension of .CFG, from the device diskette to the EISA
Configuration Diskette before installing the device in the server.
The configuration file reserves the system resources that the adapter
needs to function properly.
Some ISA adapters come with a diskette that contains the .CFG file
for the adapter. If you want to install ISA adapters that did not
come with their own .CFG files, you must use your PC Server EISA
Configuration Diskette to create a unique .CFG file for each adapter.
Note:
The unique .CFG files are slot sensitive. That is, do not use
these files to configure identical adapters in multiple systems
unless you install the adapters in the same expansion slots
within each system.
To create a unique .CFG file for an ISA adapter:
1. Insert the IBM PC Server EISA Configuration Diskette into
diskette drive A.
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ISA/EISA Configuration
2. Start the configuration utility program.
3. At the main menu, select Step 2, Add or remove boards..
4. At the next menu, select the slot in which you will install the
adapter.
5. At the next screen, select OK.
6. At the next screen, press F5; then select Create .CFG file.
7. Press Enter.
8. At the Create a board .CFG file screen, type in the adapter
manufacturer and description (for example, IBM Token Ring);
then, press Enter.
9. Refer to the adapter documentation for information about
specific configuration parameters (such as IRQ or DMA channel)
required for the adapter. Then, follow the instructions on the
screen to enter the appropriate parameters on the menu.
Notes:
Ÿ Normally, ISA adapters do not use every parameter.
Most adapters require only a PORT address.
Ÿ The SVGA video adapter in your server requires
specific memory and I/O address assignments to
function properly. To avoid configuration conflicts,
do not assign the following SVGA memory and I/O
addresses to other adapters or options in your server:
– Memory address space:
AðððH – C7FFH
– I/O address spaces:
ð2Eðh – ð2EFh
ð3Bðh – ð3DFh
46E8h
10. After you type in all of the appropriate parameters, press F10.
11. At the next screen, carefully verify that the information is
correct; then, press Enter.
12. At the Add Confirmation window, press Enter again.
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13. In the next window (add), press Enter.
The adapter description appears in the selected slot.
14. Verify the installation; then, press F10.
15. At the next menu, select Save and exit the configuration utility.
Note: PCI devices do not require .CFG files.
Diagnostic Files
The Diagnostic program that comes with your server is the primary
method of testing the server. Some optional devices and adapters
come with option-specific diagnostic files. These files provide a
more specialized test of the option. “Installing Additional Test
Programs” on page 252 provides additional information about
installing and using diagnostic files. Also, refer to the
documentation that came with the option for information on
installing and running option-specific diagnostics.
Device Drivers
Device drivers are programs designed to support a specific type of
hardware device. They provide instructions that enable the
computer to interact with the device, or to take advantage of a
device's special feature. The device driver might ship with the
operating system, the application program, or on the option diskette.
Not all devices require device drivers. Refer to the documentation
that came with the option for additional information.
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ISA/EISA Configuration
Sample Applications
Some optional devices provide small applications or sampler files.
These applications demonstrate the capabilities of the device and
serve as software examples for programming the device. Refer to
the documentation that came with the option for additional
information.
To configure your server for an ISA or EISA adapter:
1. Read the documentation that came with the adapter.
2. Copy any files with the extension of .CFG from the option
diskette to the EISA Configuration Diskette. See “Configuration
Files” on page 199 for important information about configuring
ISA adapters.
3. Start the EISA Configuration Diskette (see “Starting the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 207).
4. Record the new configuration information (see “Recording EISA
Configuration Settings” on page 207).
5. Save the new configuration settings to the EISA Configuration
Diskette and to the NVRAM (see “Starting the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 207).
6. Set any jumpers or switches on the adapter.
7. Install the adapter in the server (see “Installing Adapters” on
page 95).
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Configuring Memory
Configuring PCI Features and Options
PCI devices automatically communicate with the server's
configuration information. This usually results in automatic
configuration of a PCI device. If a conflict does occur, refer to
“Configuration Conflicts” on page 209.
Assigning Interrupt Levels
Your PC Server 320 uses a rotational interrupt technique to
configure PCI adapters. This technique enables you to install a
variety of PCI adapters that currently do not support sharing of PCI
interrupts.
Always use the IBM PC Server EISA Configuration Diskette when
assigning interrupts for EISA and ISA adapters. You cannot assign
an EISA or ISA adapter the same interrupt that you have assigned
to a PCI adapter. This is because the PC Server 320 does not
support interrupt sharing among PCI, EISA, and ISA adapters.
If a situation occurs where you need an additional interrupt, you
can use an interrupt from another function that you might not need,
such as the IDE controller (Interrupt 14) or COM2 (Interrupt 3).
Configuring Memory
After you add (or remove) extended memory, you must update the
EISA Configuration Diskette.
Note: Not performing the following procedure could result in
memory errors, and in your operating system not recognizing
your added (or removed) memory.
1. Start the EISA Configuration Diskette (see “Starting the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 207).
2. Select Step 3: View or edit details. The system information
appears.
3. Under Advanced System Feature Setup, select Total System
Memory.
4. Select the correct amount of memory; then, press F10.
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Configuring Memory
Note: It is possible to install single-inline memory modules
(SIMMs) in combinations where the total amount of
installed memory does not appear on the memory
configuration screen. In the unlikely event that this
occurs, select the next lower setting on the memory
configuration menu, and all of the installed memory will
be supported on your server.
5. Return to the Main Menu, save the configuration, and exit from
the utility program.
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EISA Configuration Diskette
Using the EISA Configuration Diskette
You must use the EISA Configuration Diskette anytime that you
want to change resource allocations, such as:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Adding or removing devices
Moving devices
Changing device function
Resolving conflicts
Adding or removing PCI adapters
Each time that you use the EISA Configuration Diskette to configure
your server, the configuration information is saved in a System
Configuration Information (SCI) file and in the NVRAM configuration.
Only devices that you install and configure correctly appear on the
EISA Configuration screens.
Backing Up the EISA Configuration Diskette
Use an operating system command, such as the DOS DISKCOPY
command, to make a complete backup copy of the EISA
Configuration Diskette. Using the backup copy can prevent damage
to the original diskette. Your operating system documentation
provides information on backing up diskettes.
Making Menu Selections
When you start the EISA Configuration Diskette, an introductory
screen appears. Type CF at the prompt. After you press Enter, the
main menu, Steps in configuring your computer, appears. The
EISA Configuration program main menu contains five steps:
Step 1
Important EISA configuration information: This step provides
information about the differences between the ISA configuration
process and the EISA configuration process.
Step 2
Add or remove boards: If the server is configured correctly, this
step provides a list of the devices installed in the EISA expansion
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EISA Configuration Diskette
slots. The Add choice allows you to add ISA devices to the
configuration. If EISA adapters are installed in your server, and you
have not copied the .CFG file to the EISA Configuration Diskette,
you are prompted to insert the adapter's configuration diskette into
the diskette drive. The .CFG file is copied to your diskette. If the
adapter's .CFG file is copied to the EISA Configuration Diskette
before starting the diskette, and the adapter is installed in your
server, EISA devices are added automatically.
Step 3
View or edit details: After adding EISA or ISA adapters in Step 2,
use the Edit selection of this step to configure them. Use the Edit
Resources selection of this step for complex configurations. If you
change a setting in this step, you might have to change a switch or
jumper setting on the system board or on a device.
Step 4
Examine switches or print report: After Steps 1 and 2 have been
completed correctly, this step displays the correct switch and jumper
settings for the installed devices that have switches and jumpers.
Also, you can choose to print a system configuration report.
Step 5
Save and exit: This step allows you to save your configuration or
to discard the changes before you exit from the program.
Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight your
selection; then press Enter to make your selection. To help you
track your progress, a checkmark (√) appears on the main menu
next to the completed steps.
You can access help information through:
Ÿ Help windows, which remain active.
Ÿ Information windows, which appear automatically as a result of
some configuration activities.
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EISA Configuration Diskette
Ÿ The Help=F1 prompt, which allows you to access the Help Menu
for screens displaying the prompt. To remove the Help Menu,
press Esc.
Recording EISA Configuration Settings
Record the configuration settings you made in Step 3, View or edit
details and Step 4, Examine switches or print report on a separate
sheet and store it in a safe place for future reference. If you have a
printer attached to your server, you can use the Print Screen key to
print these settings. The settings are helpful when you install
additional options, or if you need to have your system serviced.
Also, record the new settings each time you make changes. Be sure
to record the current configuration settings in the tables in “Installed
Device Records” on page 268.
Starting the EISA Configuration Diskette
Using a backup copy of the EISA Configuration Diskette can
prevent damage to the original diskette (see “Backing Up the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 205).
To start the EISA Configuration Diskette:
1. Insert the EISA Configuration Diskette into the diskette drive.
2. Turn on the server, or if it is already on, shut down the
operating system and restart the machine.
3. When the first screen appears, type CF and press Enter. Follow
the instructions on the screen until the main menu, Steps in
configuring your computer, appears.
4. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to advance
through the items on the screen. Use the Tab key to select
choices on the bottom of the screen. Press the Esc key to return
to a previous menu.
5. Press Enter to make a selection.
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EISA Configuration Diskette
6. Follow the instructions on the screen to view or change (edit)
the configuration information.
Note: Adapters installed in your server appear automatically on
the EISA Configuration screens after you copy the
adapter's configuration file (file with an extension of
.CFG) to the EISA Configuration Diskette. If you want to
manually add an adapter that you have not yet installed
in your server, add it using Step 2 from the menu. To
configure ISA adapters, follow the instructions on the
screen.
Using EISA Configuration Diskette Advanced Function
Locking an ISA adapter reserves the selected resources and prevents
the system from using them to resolve resource conflicts. Use the
Advanced function to lock ISA boards. An exclamation mark (!)
appears next to locked adapters.
To use the Advanced functions:
1. Start the EISA Configuration Diskette (see “Starting the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 207).
2. At the main menu, select Step 3,
screen appears.
The View or edit details
3. Press F7. The Advanced functions screen appears.
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to:
a.
b.
c.
d.
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Lock or unlock boards
View additional system information
Set verification mode
Maintain SCI files
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Configuration Conflicts
Configuration Conflicts
The resources used by your server consist of interrupt request levels
(IRQs), direct memory access channels (DMAs), I/O ports (for
example, serial and parallel), and memory. This information is
useful when a resource configuration conflict occurs.
Conflicts in the configuration occur if:
Ÿ A device is installed that requires the same resource as another
device. (For example, if you install an ISA network adapter and
an EISA network adapter, both requesting IRQ 5, only one of
the adapters can be configured.)
Ÿ A device resource is changed (for example, changing jumper
settings).
Ÿ A device function is changed (for example, assigning COM 1 to
two different serial ports).
Ÿ An installed software program requires the same resource as a
hardware device (for example, an expanded memory
specification (EMS) device driver that uses the address required
by the SVGA video adapter).
The steps required to resolve a configuration error depends on the
number and variety of hardware devices and software programs
you install. If a hardware configuration error is detected, a
configuration error message appears after the server completes POST,
but before the operating system starts. You can bypass the error or
start one of the configuration utility programs. Press F1 to bypass
the error and load the operating system. Press F2 to start the Setup
program. To start the EISA Configuration Diskette, insert the
diskette in the diskette drive and press F1.
The Setup program and the EISA Configuration program configure
only the system hardware. These programs do not consider the
requirements of the operating system or the application programs.
See “Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts” on page 211 for
additional information.
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Configuration Conflicts
Resolving Hardware Configuration Conflicts
Use the following information to help resolve hardware
configuration conflicts:
1. Run the Setup program to view and change resources used by
the system board functions. Record the current settings before
making any changes. (See “Starting the Setup Program” on
page 192 for instructions.)
2. Determine which adapter or device is causing the error. The
EISA Configuration program specifies how the server checks for
resource conflicts. Initially, this verification mode is set to
automatic. When the mode is set to automatic, the EISA
Configuration program tries to resolve configuration conflicts for
you. Use the Advanced selection of the EISA Configuration
Diskette's View or edit details screen to change the setting (see
“Using EISA Configuration Diskette Advanced Function” on
page 208).
If the automatic verification mode is set, the configuration
program attempts to resolve conflicts for you. However, this
might disable adapters or system board features. For example,
if you choose IRQ 4 for an adapter, the program disables Serial
Port 1, which uses IRQ 4. If this happens, and you do not want
this feature disabled, choose another IRQ for your adapter.
If you set the verification mode to manual, the configuration
utility program does not try to resolve a conflict. Instead, you
have to determine if a resource conflict has occurred and then
resolve the conflict. When the verification mode is set to
manual, an asterisk (*) appears on the View or edit details
screen next to adapters in conflict.
If the EISA Configuration program cannot resolve a
configuration error, it deactivates the adapter and displays the
deactivated status (<>) on the View or edit details screen.
3. Update system configuration information (.SCI) files. Use the
Advanced selection of the EISA Configuration Diskette's View
or edit details screen to update or copy the server's system
configuration information file (see “Using EISA Configuration
Diskette Advanced Function” on page 208).
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4. Change configuration resource allocations. Use the built-in
Setup program to view or change system board resource
allocations. Use the Advanced selection of the EISA
Configuration Diskette's View or edit details screen to view the
available or the used system resources (see “Using EISA
Configuration Diskette Advanced Function” on page 208). Use
the Edit Changes selection to change resource allocations for
complex configurations.
5. Change adapter jumpers or switches. Jumpers and switches
define the system resources that a device can use. If the settings
are incorrect or set to use a resource that cannot be shared, a
conflict occurs and the device remains deactivated by the
configuration program. Use the EISA Configuration Diskette's
Step 4, Examine switches or print report screen to verify
switches (see “Making Menu Selections” on page 205). If a
change is required, see “Preparing to Install Options” on
page 81, to remove the cover. In addition, read the
documentation that came with the device.
6. Change system board jumpers or switches. See “Preparing to
Install Options” on page 81, to remove the cover. Then refer to
the system-board diagram inside your server.
7. Remove the device or adapter. Some configurations are not
supported (for example, you cannot operate the server with two
ISA SVGA adapters installed). If you must remove an adapter,
see “Removing Adapters” on page 105.
Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts
The memory-address space and interrupt levels (IRQs) used by
some hardware options might conflict with addresses defined for
use through application programs or the EMS. (EMS is used only
with DOS.)
If there is a conflict, one or more of the following conditions might
exist:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The system cannot load the operating system.
The system does not work.
An application program does not operate, or it returns an error.
Screen messages indicate a conflict exists.
Chapter 5. Configuring Your Server
211
Configuration Conflicts
You can resolve conflicts by changing either the software or the
hardware configuration.
Note: Start the EISA Configuration Diskette to view the addresses
used by your system board functions. Use the Advanced
function of Step 3, View or edit details to view the addresses
used by your adapters. (See “Using EISA Configuration
Diskette Advanced Function” on page 208 for instructions.)
Changing the Software Configuration
The best way to resolve memory-address conflicts is to change the
addresses used by the application program or the device driver. To
do this, use the EISA Configuration program.
If a device driver is causing a memory-address conflict, refer to your
operating-system documentation or the documentation supplied
with the device drivers.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program
The SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI Adapter on a non-disk-array model has a
built-in menu-driven configuration utility program that allows you
to view and change SCSI settings.
You can use the SCSISelect Utility program to:
Ÿ Change the default values
Ÿ Verify and change configuration conflicts
Ÿ Format a new SCSI hard disk
Starting the SCSISelect Utility Program
You can access this program when you start your non-disk-array
server The SCSISelect prompt appears after the IBM PC Server
screen. Press Ctrl+A immediately after the SCSISelect prompt
appears.
Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to move the
highlight bar to the various menu choices. Press Esc to return to the
previous menu. Also, you can press F5 to switch between color and
monochrome modes (if your monitor permits). To change the
current settings of the items displayed in the menus, follow the
directions on the screen.
SCSISelect Utility Program Options
The following options appear on the SCSISelect Utility program
menu:
Ÿ Configure/View Host Adapter Settings
Ÿ SCSI Disk Utilities
Chapter 5. Configuring Your Server
213
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program
To view or change the SCSI-2 adapter settings, select
Configure/View Host Adapter Settings and follow the directions on
the screen. This menu has five selections:
Ÿ Host Adapter SCSI ID
Select this choice to change the SCSI ID of the SCSI-2 Fast/Wide
PCI Adapter from its default value of 7.
Ÿ SCSI Parity Checking
Select this choice to enable or disable SCSI-2 adapter parity
checking. The default value is Enabled.
Ÿ Host Adapter SCSI Termination
Select this choice to configure SCSI-2 adapter termination. The
default value is Low On / High On.
Ÿ SCSI Device Configuration
Select this choice to configure SCSI device parameters. Before
you can make updates, you must know the ID of the device
whose parameters you want to configure.
Ÿ Advanced Configuration Options
Select this choice to view the advanced configuration option
settings. Change these values only if necessary.
To see the SCSI device IDs or to format a drive, select SCSI Disk
Utilities from the SCSISelect Utility program menu.
When using the utility program, read the screens carefully before
making a selection.
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Chapter 6. Solving Problems
This chapter contains information to help you solve some of the
simpler problems you might have with your IBM PC Server 320. If
you encounter more complex technical problems, see Chapter 7,
“Getting Help, Service, and Information” on page 257.
This chapter contains:
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
. . . . . .
Power-On Self-Test (POST) . . . . . . . . .
POST Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Main Menu of the Diagnostic Diskette
Program Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IntruderAlert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Module Tests . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Selected Tests in Test Groups .
Creating Test Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Error Message Table . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Adapter Message Table . . . . . . . . .
Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the System for Damage
. . . . . .
After Dropping It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After Spilling Liquid on It . . . . . . . . .
Installing Additional Test Programs . . . . .
Using the Utility Programs
. . . . . . . . . .
Formatting Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the File Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
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Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
Getting Started
If you are not familiar with the diagnostic tools and programs,
continue reading this chapter, then return here. If you are familiar
with these topics, select the appropriate instructions from the
following list:
Ÿ To interpret an error message (for example, you have a 0164 on
the screen), go to “POST Error Message Table” on page 233.
Ÿ If you want to verify that the system is operating correctly, go
to “About the Test Programs” on page 221.
Ÿ For more information about a hardware failure (for example,
keys on the keyboard not working) or a screen prompt, go to
“Troubleshooting Charts” on page 242.
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
System problems can be caused by hardware, software, or user
error. (An example of a user error is pressing the wrong key.) You
might be able to solve the problem yourself or provide helpful
information to a service technician.
The following tools are available to help you identify and resolve
hardware-related problems:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
216
Power-on self-test (POST)
POST beep codes
Test programs
Error messages
Troubleshooting charts
Option Diskettes
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
Power-On Self-Test (POST)
Each time you turn on the system, it performs a series of tests that
check the operation of the system and some options. This series of
tests is called the power-on self-test, or POST. POST does the
following:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Checks some basic system-board operations
Checks the memory operation
Starts the video operation
Verifies that the diskette drives are working
Verifies that the hard disk drive is working
If POST finishes without detecting any problems, a single beep
sounds and the first screen of your operating system or application
program appears.
If POST detects a problem, an error message appears on your
screen. A single problem can cause several error messages to
appear. When you correct the cause of the first error message, the
other error messages probably will not appear on the screen the
next time you turn on the system.
POST Beep Codes
POST generates a beeping sound to indicate successful completion
of POST or to indicate that the tests detect an error.
One beep and the appearance of text on the monitor indicates
successful completion of the POST. More than one beep indicates
that POST detects an error.
Test Programs
The QAPlus/PRO test programs, developed by DiagSoft, Inc. for
IBM, are the primary method of testing the IBM PC Server 320.
These programs require minimal interaction from you. You can use
them to test the IBM components of the system and some external
devices. The amount of time required to test all components
depends on the number of components. The more optional adapters
and devices you have attached to your system, the longer the testing
takes.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
217
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
If you cannot determine whether a problem is caused by the
hardware or by the software, you can run the test programs to
confirm that the hardware is working correctly.
The programs on the Diagnostic Diskette include the following:
Ÿ Diagnostic Tests
The diagnostic tests identify most problems associated with the
major components of your system. These programs test the
system board, hard disk drives, diskette drives, CD-ROM drives,
RAM, serial and parallel ports, video adapter, printer, keyboard,
and mouse.
Test options let you run groups of tests in a batch, specify
parameters to use for each test (for example, video modes, port
addresses, and so on), specify the number of passes you want to
run (one to continuous), log the test results to a text format file,
and save all test settings for future use.
These test programs also allow you to view the server's
configuration information. For example, you can view the
IRQ/DMA assignments, memory usage, device drivers, and so
on.
Ÿ Utility Programs
The Diagnostic Diskette also contains utility programs, such as
an ASCII text editor, low-level format program, and a diskette
format program.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
Error Messages
Error messages indicate that a problem exists; they are not intended
to be used to identify a failing part. Troubleshooting and servicing
of complex problems indicated by error messages should be
performed by a trained service technician. Hardware error
messages that appear on the screen can be text, numeric, or both.
Messages generated by your software—the operating system or
application programs—generally are text messages, but they also
can be numeric. Basically, there are four types of error messages.
These include POST error messages, diagnostic error messages,
POST beep codes, and software-generated messages.
POST Error Messages
POST error messages appear when, during startup, POST finds
problems with the hardware or detects a change in the hardware
configuration. A list of these error messages is given in “POST
Error Message Table” on page 233.
POST Beep Codes
POST beep codes are sounds emitted from the speaker, if POST
finds a problem. One beep indicates the POST completed
successfully. Multiple beeps indicate a problem was found by the
POST. A list of the beep error codes is given in “Beep Codes” on
page 241.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
219
Overview of the Diagnostic Tools
Diagnostic Error Messages
Diagnostic error messages appear when a test program finds a
problem with a hardware option. Normally, these messages are
text, but they can be numeric. The test programs will generate one
of the following return codes:
0
A return code of “0” indicates that the device
passed its test.
1
A return code of “1” indicates that the device
failed its test.
2 or higher
A return code of “2” or higher indicates that the
test stopped.
Software-Generated Error Messages
These messages appear if a problem or conflict is found by an
application program, the operating system, or both. For an
explanation of these messages, refer to the information that comes
with your software package.
Troubleshooting Charts
The troubleshooting charts given in “Troubleshooting Charts” on
page 242 list symptoms of problems (for example, perhaps the
symptom is “the mouse is not working”), as well as steps to correct
the problems.
Option Diskettes
An optional device or adapter might come with a diskette. Option
Diskettes usually contain diagnostic files or configuration files that
the system needs to recognize and activate the option.
If your optional device or adapter comes with an Option Diskette,
you might need to install some configuration (.CFG) files or
diagnostic files (.EXE or .COM). See Chapter 4, “Installing Options”
on page 77 for instructions on installing the configuration or see
“Installing Additional Test Programs” on page 252 for installing
diagnostic files.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
About the Test Programs
About the Test Programs
This section includes useful information about navigating through
the test programs, as well as procedures for starting and stopping
them. These programs are designed to test the IBM PC Server 320.
Non-IBM products tested with these programs might present
misleading error messages or unexpected system responses. If you
want to test a non-IBM product, refer to the information that comes
with that product.
Note: You might have to install a wrap connector on your active
parallel port to obtain accurate parallel-port test results. If
you do not have a wrap connector, contact your IBM reseller
or IBM marketing representative.
The Main Menu of the Diagnostic Diskette
The Main Menu is the starting point for all of the diagnostic tests.
It contains the following choices:
Ÿ Diagnostics: When you select this choice from the Main Menu,
the Diagnostics Menu appears. The Diagnostic Menu contains
the following selections:
– Quick Check automatically checks the hardware
configuration and builds a group of tests based on the
configuration check. The diagnostic program then runs the
tests for each of the devices or modules found during the
configuration check. Upon completion of the Quick Check,
you are prompted to: Press any key to continue.
Pressing any key at that point brings you back to the
Diagnostic Menu.
– Module Tests allow you to more rigorously test an
individual module (or device such as a diskette drive) or
specify a group of tests for several modules. In addition,
you can specify how many times to run an individual test
and how the test program should note and log any errors it
finds. See “Using the Module Tests” on page 228 for more
information about running the module tests.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
221
About the Test Programs
– Options allows you to set or change defaults that affect the
reporting, error logging, and presentation of the error
information. For more information about the options
available, see “Test Options” on page 230.
Ÿ System Info: When you select this choice from the Main Menu,
the System Info Menu appears. The System Info Menu allows
you to view the server's hardware and software configuration
information. For example, you can view the IRQ/DMA
assignments, memory usage, device drivers, and so on.
Ÿ Reports: When you select this choice from the Main Menu, the
Reports Menu appears. The Reports Menu allows you to print
the system information.
Ÿ Utilities: When you select this choice from the Main Menu, the
Utilities Menu appears. The Utilities Menu provides access to
additional programs on the Diagnostic Diskette. These utility
programs include: the File Editor, the Format Diskette, and the
Hard Disk Utilities. For more information about the File Editor,
see “Using the File Editor” on page 254.
Ÿ Exit: Select this choice to exit from the Diagnostic Diskette.
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About the Test Programs
Program Navigation
You can maneuver within the test programs by typing the first letter
of a menu choice, using the function keys, or using command-line
options.
Using the Function Keys
You can use the following keys to maneuver within the test
programs:
Enter
Selects an item, runs the test module, or runs
the test.
Down Arrow (↓)
Moves the cursor down.
Up Arrow (↑)
Moves the cursor up.
F1
Displays the appropriate Help information.
Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key
to scroll through the information. Pressing F1
from within a Help screen provides a Help
index from which you can select different
categories. One of the important help
categories is function key usage. Pressing Esc
exits Help and returns to where you left off.
Esc
Returns to the previous menu.
Additional keys are active in the Test Module Selection and Test
Group screens. These include:
Tab
Moves the highlight bar (or cursor ) to the test
group (or moves to parameters).
Spacebar
Toggles modules on or off (or toggles tests on
or off).
F2
Displays current test results log.
F10
Displays the Local Menu when the Module
Tests Menu is displayed or from individual
Test Group test screens. Local Menu includes
the following selections:
Ÿ Test Options serves as a shortcut to
accessing and changing the test options
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
223
About the Test Programs
without having to back up through
menus.
Ÿ Single Test moves from the Module Test
Menu to the relevant Test Group window
for test selection.
Ÿ Next and Previous LUN changes from one
Logical Unit Number (LUN) or device to
another (for example, HD1 to HD2, or
Base Memory to Extended Memory).
224
+
Displays next logical unit number (for
example, COM1, COM2, or First
Microprocessor, Second Microprocessor, and
so on).
−
Displays previous logical unit number.
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
About the Test Programs
Using the Command Line Options
The following Command Line Options allow you to define specific
conditions for running the diagnostic programs at startup time.
At the operating system prompt, type QAPRO /XXX (where /XXX
represents one of the following from the list below); then press
Enter:
/B&W
The /B&W option forces the program to load
in black and white (monochrome) mode.
/LOG=file
The /LOG=file option directs the test programs
to start using a specified Error Log file.
/INT10
The /INT10 option forces the test programs to
use the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) for
screen writes.
/OXXX
The /OXXX option, where XXX=test group
(for example, MBD/MEM/VID/HDU/FDU
/KBD/COM/LPT, and so on), omits the
designated test group from testing.
/USRCONFIG=file
The /USERCONFIG=file option tells the test
programs to look for a user diagnostic
configuration file other than the default
USERDIAG.CFG.
/SCRIPT=file[,R]
The /SCRIPT=file[,R] option with the [,R] runs
the selected script.
Note: You can use a “–” instead of a “/” as
the command line switch.
IntruderAlert
Each time that you start the diagnostic programs (using the QAPRO
command), IntruderAlert checks for damage to the Diagnostic
Diskette. If a virus or program alteration is detected, the diagnostic
programs will not load.
To suspend IntruderAlert and continue loading the diagnostic
programs, press Esc.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
225
Starting the Test Programs
Starting the Test Programs
To start the test programs from diskette:
Note: Use your backup copy of the Diagnostic Diskette to run the
diagnostic programs.
1. Insert the Diagnostic Diskette into the primary diskette drive
(usually drive A).
2. Turn on the system. The IBM PC Server 320 logo appears on
your screen, followed by the system running POST. When
POST completes, QAPlus/PRO for IBM appears on your screen.
3. Press any key to continue. The Welcome window appears.
4. Press any key to continue.
Note:
IntruderAlert starts and runs automatically after you
press any key. If IntruderAlert detects a problem with
the diagnostic diskette, it will automatically stop further
testing. See “IntruderAlert” on page 225 for more
information.
5. Press Enter.
Several analysis programs start and run automatically. When
they complete, the Main Menu appears.
6. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to move the
highlight bar to your desired Main Menu selection.
7. Press Enter.
Note: To stop running a specific test or stop testing after you
have started a test, press Esc while the test is running.
The test pauses at the first possible opportunity, and the
Skip/Abort Test Menu appears.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Starting the Test Programs
The Test Group Window
When you select Quick Tests or Module Tests from the Diagnostic
Menu, a Test Group window appears. (For Module Tests, if you
press Tab, the window expands to a full screen.) The Test Group
window shows the attributes, parameters, and selected tests of the
corresponding Test Group. The diamond “♦” mark indicates a
module or device selected for testing.
Test Group Specifications: In the upper portion of the Test
Group window are the specifications for the related test group.
The following illustration is an example of the Test Group Window
when the System Board is selected from the Module Tests Menu.
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
QAPlus\PRO
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
for ValuePoint v5.20 Copyright (c) 1989-1994 DiagSoft, Inc.
Main Menu
Diagnostics Menu
Module Tests Menu
( ) System Board
( ) Memory
( ) Video
- - - Hard Disks
( ) Floppy Disks
( ) Keyboard
( ) Com Ports
( ) Lpt Ports
- - - Pointer Device
- - - SCSI Devices
- - - User Diags
- - - CD-ROM Device
Run All Selected
System Board Test Group
CPU
: Pentium-5
NPU
: Pentium
BIOS
: xxx
Bus Type: EISA
CMOS Clock/Calendar Present Ref Int 30
( ) CPU
( ) IC Data Paths
( ) Interrupt Controllers
( ) Interval Timer
( ) Refresh Interrupt
( ) CMOS RAM
( ) Clock/Calendar
( ) DMA Transfer
( ) NPU
( ) Speaker
F1:Help F2:Log F10:Local Menu
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
227
Starting the Test Programs
Using the Module Tests
To start the Module Tests from the Main Menu of the Diagnostic
Diskette:
1. Start the diagnostic programs. If you do not know how to do
this, see “Starting the Test Programs” on page 226.
2. Select Diagnostic from the Main Menu, then press Enter.
3. Select Module Tests, then press Enter. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or
Down Arrow (↓) key to move the highlight bar from one
selection to the next within the Module Tests menu.
4. To select or deselect a test, use the Spacebar (the Spacebar
toggles your selection on or off). When you have selected a test,
a ♦ appears next to the selection.
5. If you want to run all of the selected tests, you can do so by
moving the highlight bar to the last choice, Run All Selected
Modules, then pressing Enter. If you want to run each test, one
at a time, press Enter at the highlight bar of the desired
selection.
Attention: An (*) directly adjacent to an item indicates that
running that test might damage your data. Make sure to back
up all of your data before running the tests.
6. When you are done, press Esc to return to the Test Group
window.
Note: As you move the highlight bar up or down the selection
menu, the Test Group window to the right changes to
correspond to the highlighted module.
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Starting the Test Programs
Changing Selected Tests in Test Groups
To add or remove a test from a Test Group:
1. In the Module Tests Menu, use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down
Arrow (↓) key to move the highlight bar to your selection.
2. Press Tab to move into the expanded Test Group window.
3. Move the highlight bar to the test you want to select or deselect.
4. Press the Spacebar at the highlighted test to toggle between
select (indicated by a “♦”) and deselect.
Attention: An (*) directly adjacent to an item indicates that
running that test might damage your data. Make sure to back
up all of your data before running the tests.
5. Press Enter.
Creating Test Scripts
Scripting allows you to select specific groups of tests, testing
parameters, and options. You can then save your selections for later
use as a test script.
To set up a test script:
1. Select Diagnostics from the Main Menu; then press Enter.
2. Select Module Tests; then press Enter.
3. Select the test groups and specific tests.
4. Select Save Script (the last item on the Options Menu).
5. Type in a file name. The test program automatically adds the
extension “QA.”
6. To load and run the test program with this test setting, type:
QAPRO /SCRIPT-Filename,R and then, press Enter.
Note: Adding the “,R” runs the tests listed in the named Test
Script. If this is omitted, the diagnostic program loads
only the program with the test settings as previously
saved in the chosen Script File.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
229
Starting the Test Programs
Test Options
Each option that appears on the Options Menu is briefly described
below.
Ÿ Halt on Error: The default is No. If you select Yes, you can
resume testing after a halt by pressing any key. If you select
No, any error detected is logged (only if you enabled the Test
Log) and the program continues testing without halting.
Ÿ Beep on Error: The default is No. If you select Yes, a beep
sounds whenever the test program detects an error.
Ÿ Lap Count: This option allows you to set the number of times
to run each group of tests. The default setting is 1. You can
enter a number from 0 to 10. The looping is controlled on a
block basis, not on an individual test basis. Therefore, if you
select tests A, B, and C and the Lap Count is set to 3, the test
sequence is ABC/ABC/ABC.
Ÿ Pause Control: You can choose to have the test programs pause
between test modules and wait for you to press any key to
continue. Also, you can choose to have the test program wait
for a user response to indicate if the video tests pass. The
default setting is Pause Between. The available choices are
Pause Between and No Pause. If you choose No Pause, the test
programs continue testing without a pause from one video test
to the next, and from one test module to the next.
Ÿ Test Log: Allows you to select whether or not to do logging.
You can select one of the following five choices:
–
–
–
–
–
No Logging
COM1
LPT1
ASCII
.DBF
No Logging is the only selection that turns off Test Log. The
other four selections enable Test Logging.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Starting the Test Programs
When Test Log starts, the test programs create a log with the
following information:
– The date and time the log was opened
– The start and end times of each module tested and for each
test selected for that module
– The results of testing
– The date and time the log was closed
Disabling the Test Log writes the date and time to the Test Log
along with a message that the log was closed. Any Test Log is
automatically closed upon exiting the program.
If you enable Test Log, the hardware configuration is
automatically entered at the beginning of the log.
If you select ASCII File, the test programs prompt you to type
in the name of the Test Log file. The test programs
automatically assign the extension .LOG to the file if you do not
specify a file-name extension. The file is stored in ASCII text
format. You can then examine the file with most word
processors at a later time.
If you select .DBF File, the test programs prompt you to fill in
the information on an Open DBF File screen. This creates a new
file or opens an existing data base compatible file to insert new
information on the current test machine. The Machine Type,
Serial Number, and Work Center lines identify the system that
is being tested.
Note: If you plan to run hard disk tests and to do test logging,
do the test logging on a drive other than the drive to be
tested. If you log to a drive that is to be tested, the
logging is disabled for the remainder of the test cycle.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
231
Starting the Test Programs
– Test Log Mode: This choice determines the amount of data
to be logged after you select COM1, LPT1, ASCII, or .DBF.
The available options are LogAll or LogFail. LogAll logs all
test information. LogFail logs only failures.
– Log Message Queue: Pressing F2 allows you to examine
the test results to date via a Log Message Queue. This
information is generated whether or not you select a Test
Log. It does not, however, allow you to examine previous
Test Logs.
Ÿ Save Script: This choice enables you to save a custom test
script. See “Creating Test Scripts” on page 229 for a more
detailed description of scripting.
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POST Error Messages
POST Error Message Table
The following table shows error messages that might appear on the
screen during the power-on self-test (POST).
Sometimes the first error to occur causes additional errors. In this
case, the system displays more than one error message. Always
follow the suggested action instructions for the first error message
that appears.
POST Message
Description
0103
0107
A failure occurred during testing of the system board and
microprocessor.
Action: Turn off the system, wait 30 seconds, then turn it
back on. If the error message recurs, have the system
serviced.
0115
A hardware error occurred.
Action: Have the system serviced.
0121
A system-board 256 KB ROM error occurred.
Action: Run the test programs to determine the cause of the
problem and the action to take. If the test programs
find nothing wrong, but the problem remains, have the
system serviced.
0130
The system is not able to start the diskette in the drive. The
diskette might be damaged, incorrectly formatted, or inserted
incorrectly.
Action: Try another startable diskette. If the problem recurs,
have the system serviced.
0163
The time-of-day clock is not set.
Action: Run the Setup program to set the correct date and
time. To start the Setup program, turn on the server,
or press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the server. When the
IBM logo screen disappears, press F2 quickly, when
prompted, to enter Setup. If the problem recurs, have
the system serviced.
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233
POST Error Messages
POST Message
Description
0164
A change in the memory configuration occurred. Installing
memory, incorrectly installing memory, or removing memory
can cause this problem. It also can occur if a defective
memory module is disabled.
Action:
Ÿ If you have just added or removed memory, you
must run the EISA Configuration Diskette and
update the EISA configuration information. If the
problem recurs, have the system serviced.
Ÿ If you have not just installed memory, have the
system serviced.
0165
A change in the adapter configuration occurred. This error
generally occurs under one or more of the following
conditions:
Ÿ A new adapter was installed and the system was not
reconfigured.
Ÿ One or more adapters were moved to a different slot.
Ÿ An adapter is failing and is no longer recognized by the
system as being installed.
Action:
Ÿ If you have just added, removed, or changed the
location of an EISA or an ISA adapter, start the
EISA Configuration Diskette and update the
configuration information. If the problem recurs,
have the system serviced.
Some adapters have an additional diskette
containing a configuration file (CFG) for the
adapter. If the adapter comes with its own
configuration file, use the EISA Configuration
programs to install the file.
Ÿ If you did not add, remove, or change the location
of an adapter, an adapter probably failed. Have
the system serviced.
0168
An error occurred during the testing of the real-time clock.
Action: Run the test programs to determine the cause of the
problem and the action to take. If the problem recurs,
have the system serviced.
0171
An error occurred during testing of the battery-backed
memory that stores the configuration information.
Action: Have the system serviced.
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POST Error Messages
POST Message
Description
0173
0174
A change in device configuration occurred. This error occurs
under one or more of the following conditions:
Ÿ A new device was installed
Ÿ A device was moved to a different location or cable
connection
Ÿ A device was removed
Ÿ A device is failing and is no longer recognized by the
system as being installed
Ÿ An external device is not turned on
Action: Verify that all external devices are turned on.
External devices must be turned on before the system
is turned on.
Ÿ If you have just added, removed, or changed the location
of an EISA or an ISA adapter, start the EISA
Configuration Diskette and update the configuration
information. If the problem recurs, have the system
serviced.
Ÿ If you have not just added, removed, or changed the
location of a device, run the test programs to identify the
failing device. Then have the system serviced.
0201
A memory error occurred during testing of the system board.
Action: Ensure that the memory modules are installed
properly. If the modules are properly installed, run the
test programs to determine the cause of the problem
and the action to take. If the test programs do not find
the problem, replace the failing memory module.
0301
0303
0304
An error occurred during testing of the keyboard and its
controller.
Action:
Ÿ Make sure that nothing is resting on the keyboard
and pressing a key.
Ÿ Verify that the keyboard cable is connected
correctly to the keyboard and to the correct port on
the system.
Ÿ If you have just connected a new mouse or other
pointing device, turn the system off and disconnect
that device. Wait at least five seconds; then turn
on the system. If the error message goes away,
replace the device.
If the error message recurs, have the system, keyboard,
and cable serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
235
POST Error Messages
POST Message
Description
0601
0610
0612
0616
0632
0642
An error occurred during testing of the diskette drive and
diskette-drive controller. This error can be caused by a loose
or incorrectly connected cable, a failing drive, or a failing
system board. Error code 0610 signifies that the test program
cannot find the diskette-drive controller for drive A. Error
code 0612 signifies that the test program cannot find the
diskette-drive controller for drive B. Error code 0632 signifies
that diskette drive A is failing. Error code 0642 signifies that
diskette drive B is failing.
Action: The system can be used, but one or more diskette
drives might not work. Check the configuration
information and ensure that it is correct. If the
configuration information is correct, start the test
programs and test the failing diskette drive. If the
problem recurs, have the system serviced.
0653
The system is not able to start the diskette in the drive. The
diskette might be damaged, incorrectly formatted, or inserted
incorrectly.
Action: Try another startable diskette. If the problem recurs,
have the system serviced.
0655
A hardware error occurred.
Action: Have the system serviced.
1701
1702
1726
A hard disk drive failure occurred.
02401
An error occurred during testing of the video controller. This
error can be caused by a monitor, system board, or video
adapter failure.
Action: Press F1 to restart the system. If the problem recurs,
have the system serviced.
Action:
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Verify that the monitor is connected correctly to the
video adapter or video port. Then ensure that the
switch or jumper settings for your video adapter are set
correctly. If the items above are correct, have the
monitor and system serviced.
SCSI Messages
SCSI Messages
If your server has at least one hard disk drive, review the following
information before having the system serviced.
Note: If your server has a CD-ROM drive but does not have a hard
disk drive, ignore any message that indicates that the BIOS is
not installed.
SCSI Messages
Description
All
One or more of the following might be causing the problem.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
A failing SCSI device (adapter, drive, controller)
An improper SCSI configuration
Duplicate SCSI IDs in the same SCSI chain
An improperly installed SCSI terminator
A defective SCSI terminator
An improperly installed cable
A defective cable
Action: Verify that:
Ÿ The external SCSI devices are turned on. External
SCSI devices must be turned on before the system.
Ÿ The cables for all external SCSI devices are
connected correctly.
Ÿ The last device in each SCSI chain is terminated
correctly. (See “SCSI Drives” on page 115 for more
SCSI chain information.)
Ÿ The SCSI devices are configured correctly.
If the items above are correct, run the diagnostics for
additional information about the failing device. If the error
recurs, have the system serviced.
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237
RAID Adapter Message Table
This table lists, in alphabetic order, messages associated with the
IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Streaming-RAID Adapter/A.
Where the “Action” information tells you to start the IBM RAID
Configuration program, insert the RAID Adapter Option Diskette
into the primary diskette drive (usually drive A) and press
Ctrl+Alt+Del. The action column also provides general information
about the message.
Where m or n are used in these messages, a number will appear in
the actual message displayed by the server.
RAID Adapter Message
Action
n logical drives are
installed.
n represents the number of logical drives that are
defined.
Information only; no action is required.
Controller cannot recover
from data
inconsistencies.
The controller does not have a complete list of all
pending operations from the last system use.
Controller firmware
error. Reload firmware.
The controller is not operational.
Controller hardware
error; run RAID
Controller diagnostics
program.
The controller is not operational.
Controller is not
responding to
commands. No logical
drives are installed.
The controller is not operational.
Data on critical logical
drive is inconsistent.
A power loss occurred when the logical drive was in
Critical state. Data is lost.
Start the IBM RAID Configuration program and
synchronize all logical drives.
Have the system serviced.
Have the system serviced.
Have the system serviced.
Replace the defunct drive and re-create the data.
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RAID Adapter Message
Action
Drive identified for
channel n bay m found
at channel x bay y.
A hard disk drive is installed in the incorrect bay.
Install the drive in the correct bay, or leave it where it
is and reassign it to its present bay. Data in the logical
drive will be lost when you reassign it to a new bay.
To reassign the drive:
1. Start the IBM RAID Configuration program.
2. Select Create/delete array from the Main Menu.
The Bay/Array selection list will appear and you
can reassign the drive.
Drive in channel n bay m
does not respond.
The drive in this bay does not respond to commands
from the controller.
Insert the RAID Adapter Option Diskette and press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system. A screen will
appear to help you decide whether to declare the drive
irrecoverable. If you declare the drive irrecoverable,
start the IBM RAID Configuration program to resolve
the problem.
Installation stopped.
The controller cannot be accessed.
This message is a follow-on to a preceding message.
Follow the Action instructions for the preceding
message you received to resolve the problem.
Irrecoverable
configuration error; run
Configuration program.
An error exists in the configuration data stored on the
RAID controller.
Restore the configuration from your Disk Array
Configuration Backup diskette.
1. Start the IBM RAID Configuration Program.
2. Select Advanced functions from the Main Menu;
then, select Restore config. from diskette.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen.
If the configuration stored on your Disk Array
Configuration Backup diskette is not current (or if you
do not have a backup of your configuration
information), have the system serviced.
Irrecoverable controller
error - memory parity
failure.
The controller is not operational.
No drives are available
to be formatted.
You can only perform a low-level format on a hard
disk drive with the status of RDY (Ready), OFL
(Offline), or UNF (Unformatted).
Have the system serviced.
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239
RAID Adapter Message
Action
No free RAM found; no
logical drives are
installed.
The controller could not initialize its BIOS.
No logical drives found;
none are installed.
No logical drives are defined.
RAID firmware
version x.yy
This is the version level.
Recoverable
configuration error; run
Configuration program.
An error exists in the configuration data stored on the
controller.
Recovery from data
inconsistency is in
progress.
The most likely cause is a sudden power loss during
the last operation.
Starting drives...
The controller is starting drives in the array.
Have the system serviced.
Start the IBM RAID Configuration program and define
a logical drive.
Information only; no action is required.
Insert the IBM RAID Adapter Option Diskette and
press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system. Follow the
instructions on the screen.
No action is required.
Information only; no action is required.
240
Unidentified drive found
in channel n bay m.
The drive in this bay is not recognized by the system.
WARNING: n logical
drives are critical; n
logical drives are offline.
One or more drives have failed.
WARNING: The
firmware flash EEPROM
is failing and must be
replaced.
The EEPROM on the controller is reaching the end of
its life and must be replaced.
WARNING: Too many
entries in the change list.
Reset the system to clear
it.
Temporary tables in the controller are full; the
controller needs to be reset.
IBM RAID BIOS System in protect mode;
cannot continue.
System halted
The system is operating in protect mode without a
device driver.
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Information only; the system will assign it to that bay.
Replace the defunct drives as soon as possible to
prevent data loss.
Have the system serviced.
Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system; then, follow
the instructions on the screen.
Update the CONFIG.SYS file with the proper device
drivers and restart the system.
Beep Codes
Beep Codes
One beep and the appearance of text on the monitor indicates
successful completion of POST. More than one beep indicates that
POST detects an error.
Beep codes are sounded in a series of four sets of beeps. The
duration of each beep is constant, but the length of the pause
between the beeps varies. For example, a 1–2–3–3 beep code sounds
like one beep, a pause, two consecutive beeps, another pause, three
more consecutive beeps, another pause, and three more consecutive
beeps.
It is possible to misinterpret a beep code if you do not understand
exactly how they work. Keeping in mind that POST error codes
vary in the length of the pause, and not the duration of the beep
tones will help you to distinguish the beeps.
Beep Code Chart
Beep Code
Description
1-2-3-3
1-3-1-3
2-1-2-3
2-2-3-1
BIOS ROM check failure.
The keyboard controller failed.
ROM copyright notice test failed.
The interrupt test failed.
Action: Have the system serviced.
1-3-1-1
1-3-4-1
1-3-4-3
RAM refresh verification failed.
There is an address line failure within the first 512 KB of RAM.
There is a memory test failure within the first 512 KB of RAM.
Action:
1. Reseat the memory module.
2. Run the diagnostic program. See “Starting the Test
Programs” on page 226.
If the problem recurs, have the system serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
241
Troubleshooting Charts
Troubleshooting Charts
You can use the troubleshooting charts in this section to find
solutions to problems that have definite symptoms.
Look for the symptom in the left column of the chart. Instructions
and probable solutions to the problem are in the right column of the
chart.
In these charts, an X can be any alphanumeric character.
CD-ROM Drive
Problems
Action
CD-ROM Drive Tray Not
Working
The system must be turned on. If the system is on and
the tray does not eject, insert the end of a paper clip
into the small hole (to the left of the tray load and eject
button) on the front of the CD-ROM drive. If the drive
still doesn't work correctly, have the system serviced
Diskette Drive Problems
Action
Diskette drive In-Use
light stays on, or the
system bypasses the
diskette drive.
If there is a diskette in the drive, verify that:
1. The diskette is good and not damaged. (Try
another diskette if you have one.)
2. The diskette is inserted correctly (label up and
metal-shutter end first) in the drive.
3. The diskette contains the necessary files to start the
system.
4. Your software program is OK (see the Software
Problems troubleshooting chart provided later in
this section).
5. Your Boot Sequence is set correctly (check the Boot
Sequence setting in the Setup program).
If the diskette drive In-Use light stays on, or the system
continues to bypass the diskette drive, have the system
serviced.
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Troubleshooting Charts
Monitor Self-Tests
Action
Some IBM monitors have their own self-tests. If you
suspect a problem with your monitor, refer to the
information supplied with the monitor for adjusting
and testing instructions.
If you still cannot find the problem, have the monitor
and system serviced.
Monitor Problems
Action
Wavy, unreadable,
rolling, distorted screen,
or screen jitter.
If the monitor self-tests show the monitor is OK,
consider the location of the monitor. Magnetic fields
around other devices (such as transformers, appliances,
fluorescent lights, and other monitors) can cause screen
jitter or wavy, unreadable, rolling, or distorted screen
images. If this happens, turn off the monitor. (Moving
a color monitor while it is turned on might cause
screen discoloration.) Then move the device and the
monitor at least 305 mm (12 in.) apart. Turn on the
monitor.
Notes:
1. The distance between monitors and diskette
drives should be at least 76 mm (3 in.) to
prevent diskette drive read/write errors.
2. Non-IBM monitor cables might cause
unpredictable problems.
3. An enhanced monitor cable with additional
shielding is available for the 9521 and 9527
monitors. See your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative for information
about the enhanced monitor cable.
If the problem recurs, have the monitor and system
serviced.
The monitor works when
you turn on the system,
but goes blank when you
start some application
programs.
Verify that the primary monitor cable is connected to
the video port.
To find the video port, see “Input/Output Connectors”
on page 6.
Be sure you installed the necessary drivers for the
application.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
243
Troubleshooting Charts
Monitor Problems
Action
Blank screen
Verify that:
1. The voltage-selection switch is set to the correct
setting.
2. The system power cord is plugged into the system
and a working electrical outlet.
3. The monitor is turned on and the Brightness and
Contrast controls are adjusted correctly.
4. The monitor signal cable is connected to the correct
connector on the system.
If the items above are correct and the screen remains
blank, have the system serviced.
244
Only the cursor appears.
Have the system serviced.
Wrong characters appear
on the screen.
Have the system serviced.
EISA Adapter Problems
Action
BCLK default setting
causing system to hang
when using EISA
Adaptec SCSI adapter.
Change the default setting from 28 to 12.
General Problems
Action
Problems such as broken
cover locks or indicator
lights not working.
Have the system serviced.
System continuously
restarts.
Have the system serviced.
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Troubleshooting Charts
Intermittent Problems
Action
A problem occurs only
occasionally and is
difficult to detect.
Verify that:
1. All cables and cords are securely connected to the
rear of the system and attached options.
2. When the system is turned on, air is flowing from
the rear of the system at the fan grill. If there is no
air flow, the fan is not working. This causes the
system to overheat and shut down.
3. The last external device in each SCSI chain is
terminated correctly. (See “SCSI Drives” on
page 115 for more information about SCSI
terminators.)
If the items above are correct, have the system serviced.
Keyboard, Mouse,
or PointingDevice Problems
All or some keys on the
keyboard do not work.
Action
1. Make sure the keyboard cable is properly
connected to the system.
2. Make sure the system and the monitor are turned
on.
If the items above are correct, have the system serviced.
The mouse or pointing
device does not work.
Verify that the mouse or pointing-device cable is
securely connected and the device drivers are installed
correctly.
Note: The pointing-device port is also known as the
auxiliary-device port or mouse port.
If the problem recurs, have the system and the device
serviced.
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245
Troubleshooting Charts
Memory Problems
Action
The amount of memory
displayed is less than the
amount of memory
installed.
Verify that:
1. The memory modules are seated properly.
2. Memory modules must be installed in pairs. See
“Installing Memory-Module Kits” on page 86 for
more information.
3. You updated the configuration information.
Whenever memory or an option is changed, you
must update the configuration. Run the EISA
Configuration program (see “Starting the EISA
Configuration Diskette” on page 207).
If the items above are correct, have the system
serviced.
Run the memory test program from your
Diagnostic Diskette (see “Starting the Test
Programs” on page 226). The system might have
detected a bad memory module and automatically
reallocated memory to enable you to continue to
operate. If the memory tests fail, have the system
serviced.
Experiencing client
dropoff due to heavy
traffic on the server.
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Increase memory to 32 MB from 16 MB (default).
Troubleshooting Charts
Option Problems
Action
An IBM option that was
just installed does not
work.
Verify that:
1. The option is designed for the system.
2. You followed the installation instructions supplied
with the option.
3. The option is installed correctly.
4. You have not loosened any other installed options
or cables.
5. You updated the configuration information.
Whenever memory or an option is changed you
must update the configuration by running the EISA
Configuration program. press F2 quickly, when
prompted, to enter Setup.
If you are using an expanded- or enhanced-memory
manager, such as the DOS Expanded Memory
Specification (EMS) driver, go to Chapter 4, “Installing
Options” on page 77.
If all of the items above are correct, start the test
programs. If the test programs find no problem, have
the system and the option serviced.
An IBM option that used
to work does not work
now.
Verify that all of the option hardware and cable
connections are secure.
If the option came with its own test instructions, use
those instructions to test the option.
If the items above are correct and the test programs
found no problem, have the system and option
serviced.
If the failing option is a SCSI option, verify that:
1. The cables for all external SCSI options are
connected correctly.
2. The last option in each SCSI chain, or the end of
the SCSI cable, is terminated correctly. (See “SCSI
Drives” on page 115 for more information on SCSI
terminators.)
3. All external SCSI options are turned on. External
SCSI options must be turned on before the system
is turned on.
If the problem recurs, have the system serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
247
Troubleshooting Charts
Parallel Port Problems
Action
The number of parallel
ports displayed is less
than the number of
parallel ports installed.
Verify that:
1. Each port is assigned a unique address.
2. The parallel-port adapter, if you installed one, is
seated properly.
If the items above are correct, have the system
serviced.
Serial Port Problems
Action
The number of serial
ports displayed is less
than the number of serial
ports installed.
Verify that:
1. Each port is assigned a unique address.
2. The serial-port adapter, if you installed one, is
seated properly.
If the items above are correct, have the system
serviced.
Printer Problems
Action
The printer does not
work.
Verify that:
1. The printer is turned on and is online.
2. The printer signal cable is connected to the correct
serial or parallel-port on the system. (For the
location of the serial or parallel port, see the User's
Reference.)
Note: Non-IBM printer cables might cause
unpredictable problems.
3. You have assigned the printer port correctly in
your operating system or application program.
4. You have assigned the printer port correctly using
the Setup program.
If the items above are correct and the printer still does
not work, run the tests described in the manual that
came with your printer. If the tests show the printer is
OK, have the system serviced.
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Troubleshooting Charts
Software Problems
Action
Is your software
program OK?
To determine if problems are caused by the software,
verify that:
1. Your system has the minimum memory
requirements needed to use the software. Refer to
the information supplied with the software to
verify memory requirements.
Note: If you have just installed an adapter or
memory, you might have a memory address
conflict (see “Configuration Conflicts” on
page 209).
2. The software is designed to operate on your
system.
3. Other software works on your system.
4. The software you are using works on another
system.
If you received any error messages when using the
software program, refer to the information supplied
with the software for a description of the messages and
solutions to the problem.
If the items above are correct and the problem remains,
contact your place of purchase or service technician for
help.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
249
Checking for Damage
Checking the System for Damage
This section provides instructions on what to do if your system is
damaged.
After Dropping It
Obvious damage:
Look for loose cables and obvious damage. If any cables are loose,
reconnect them securely. If there is obvious damage to the system,
have it serviced.
No obvious damage:
If you see no damage, turn on the system. If it works correctly, the
system probably did not suffer any damage.
CAUTION:
Observe all safety and electrostatic precautions listed in “Safety
Information” on page ix to avoid personal injury or damage to
your system.
If it does not work correctly, turn off the system and check the
adapters and memory modules to ensure that they are seated
correctly. See Chapter 4, “Installing Options” on page 77 and
follow the instructions for opening your system; then reseat all
adapters and memory modules.
If the system still does not work correctly, start the test programs
and test the system. Refer to “Starting the Test Programs” on
page 226 for instructions.
After Spilling Liquid on It
If liquid gets on the keyboard:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Turn off the system.
Unplug the keyboard from the back of the system.
Turn the keyboard upside down to drain excess liquid.
Dry off the keyboard with a lint-free cloth.
After the keyboard is completely dry, plug it in and turn on the
system. If it does not work correctly, have the keyboard serviced.
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Checking for Damage
If liquid gets inside the monitor:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Turn off the monitor.
Turn off the system.
Unplug the monitor from the system and the electrical outlet.
Have the monitor serviced immediately.
If liquid gets inside the system:
1. Turn off the system and all attached devices.
2. Unplug the system from the electrical outlet and all attached
devices.
3. Have the system serviced immediately.
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251
Installing Additional Test Programs
Installing Additional Test Programs
You can add other test programs to the Diagnostic Diskette. These
other programs are usually provided on the diskette that comes
with a device. After you add the programs to the Diagnostic
Diskette, you can include information from the programs in the Test
Log.
Before the test programs can find these programs to run as the User
Diags test group, information about them must be included in a file
called USERDIAG.CFG. This is an ASCII text file. It must include
the following three items for each test to run:
Ÿ Program Name (.COM and .EXE files only)
Ÿ Test Description of the test to be run
Ÿ Command-line parameters to be passed to the program
identified in the first item of this list
Notes:
1. All of the information for a given test must be on a single
line, and a semicolon (;) must separate the items on the
line.
2. Make sure you press Enter at the end of each line of text
in the USERDIAG.CFG file. This creates a carriage return
line feed (CR LF) which is necessary for the User
Diagnostics to be found and executed.
3. If the program executable file is in a directory other than
the QA directory (or other directory you have designated
to contain the QA files), that directory must be listed in
the PATH= section of the AUTOEXEC.BAT.
4. You can use a .CFG file other than USERDIAG.CFG if
you use the command line “USRCONFIG=filename,” when
running the diagnostic programs. For example, you
might use: QAPLPRO /USRCONFIG=MYTESTS.CFG.
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Installing Additional Test Programs
USERDIAG.CFG Example
An example USERDIAG.CFG file might look like the following:
Program Name
Test Description
BBSMODEM.EXE;
9600 Baud 5 Line
Modem;
Generic 1;
Generic 2;
CMD 1;
CMD 2;
CMD 3;
TEST1.EXE;
TEST2.EXE;
TESTALL.EXE;
TESTALL.EXE;
TESTALL.EXE;
Command-Line
Parameter
5
1
2
3
Note: You can have more than one command-line parameter for
any given test.
When you view these tests on the Test Group window for the User
Diag test group, they appear as follows:
(♦)
(♦)
(♦)
(♦)
(♦)
(♦)
9600 Baud 5 Line Modem
Generic 1
Generic 2
CMD 1
CMD 2
CMD 3
The diagnostic program automatically assigns a test number to each
test. The test numbers start at 201 and continue upward as needed.
The numbers for the tests listed above are as follows:
202
203
204
205
206
207
9600 Baud 5 Line Modem
Generic 1
Generic 2
CMD 1
CMD 2
CMD 3
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
253
Using the Utility Programs
Using the Utility Programs
The Diagnostic Diskette contains utility programs for formatting
diskettes and editing.
Formatting Diskettes
To format a diskette within the diagnostic programs, select one of
the following options:
Format A: high density
Format B: high density
After selecting one of the above options to format a diskette, follow
the instructions that appear on the screen.
Using the File Editor
The file editor allows you to modify text files. By modifying files,
such as your AUTOEXEC.BAT or CONFIG.SYS files, you can
improve the test system's performance and eliminate unnecessary
lines of information in those files.
Note: Always make a backup copy on a self-starting diskette of the
AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files before making any
changes.
The File Editor is an ASCII text editor that uses the following
function keys:
254
Key
Description
Arrows
Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the place in the
text where you want to make changes.
Home
To move the cursor to the start of the current line, press
Home once. To move to the beginning of the current
screen, press Home twice. To move to the beginning of
the file, press Home three times.
End
To move the cursor to the end of the current line, press
End once. To move the cursor to the end of the current
screen, press End twice. To move the end of the file,
press End three times.
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Using the Utility Programs
F2
To be in search mode, press F2. You are prompted to
enter the search word or words on a reverse highlighted
line at the bottom of the File Edit Screen. After typing in
the search word, press Enter.
F3
To find the next occurrence of a search word, press F3.
F4
To mark the start of a block of text (if you have not
previously marked it), press F4. If you previously marked
the block of text, pressing this key unmarks the text block.
F5
To complete the block marking (started with F4), press F5.
If you did not previously press F4 to start marking a block
of text, F5 is ignored.
F6
To move an active (marked) block of text, first press F6
while the cursor is within the active block. Then, move the
cursor to the new location where the active block is to be
moved, and press F6 again. If there is no active block of
text, F6 is ignored.
F7
To copy an active (marked) block of text to the new
location, move the cursor to the new location and press
F7. If there is no active block of text, F7 is ignored.
F8
To delete an active (marked) block of text, move the
cursor within the active block and press F8. If there is no
active text block, F8 is ignored.
F10
To save all changes and exit the file, press F10.
Insert
Insert is the default text-editing mode of the File Editor.
To toggle between replace and insert modes, press Insert.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
255
Using the Utility Programs
To access the File Editor:
1. Select File Editor from the Utilities Menu; then, press Enter.
2. Insert a diskette into drive A or drive B before selecting the file
that you want to edit; then, select the file from the Files
Selection box.
3. Press Enter.
4. Make your changes.
5. When you are done, press F10 to update the file with the
changes that you made, or press Esc to quit the editing process
without saving the changes.
Note: When you are using the File Editor, you may press F1 to
display all of the available keyboard functions.
256
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Chapter 7. Getting Help, Service, and Information
If you need help, service, technical assistance, or just want more
information about IBM products, you will find a wide variety of
sources available from IBM to assist you. This chapter provides
information about those sources.
Services available and telephone numbers listed are subject to
change without notice.
Before You Call for Service
Many server problems can be solved without outside assistance, by
using the online help or by looking in the online or printed
documentation that comes with your server or software. Also, be
sure to read the information in any README files that come with
your software.
Most servers, operating systems, and application programs come
with documentation that contains troubleshooting procedures and
explanations of error messages. (For troubleshooting and error
information about your PC Server 320, see “Troubleshooting Charts”
on page 242, “POST Error Message Table” on page 233, “SCSI
Messages” on page 237, and “RAID Adapter Message Table” on
page 238). The documentation that comes with your server also
contains information about the diagnostic tests that you can perform
(see “Starting the Test Programs” on page 226).
If you suspect a hardware problem, run the diagnostic tests and
make a note of any error messages that you receive. Then look up
the message in Chapter 6, “Solving Problems” on page 215, and
take the appropriate action.
If you suspect a software problem, consult the documentation
(including README files) for the operating system or application
program.
Using the HelpWare Support Family
IBM HelpWare is the “full-service” solution for IBM PC service and
support wherever IBM products are sold and serviced. Purchasing
an IBM PC hardware product entitles you to standard help and
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
257
support during the warranty period. If you need additional support
and services, HelpWare provides a wide variety of extended
services that address almost any need.
Getting Help by Telephone
During the warranty period, you can get help and information by
telephone through the IBM HelpWare PC Support Line. Expert
technical-support representatives are available to assist you with
questions you might have on the following:
Ÿ Setting up your server and IBM monitor
Ÿ Installing and setting up IBM options purchased from IBM or an
IBM reseller
Ÿ 60-day, preinstalled-operating-system support
Ÿ Arranging for service (on-site or carry-in)
Ÿ Arranging for overnight shipment of customer-replaceable parts
In addition, your purchase of an IBM PC Server makes you eligible
for Server Startup Support for 90 days after installation. This
service provides assistance for:
Ÿ Setting up your network operating system
Ÿ Installing and configuring interface cards
Ÿ Installing and configuring network adapters
Your HelpWare representative can also fax or mail additional
technical or product information to you, such as:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Sales information
Product brochures
Locations of IBM resellers
Services available through IBM
Please have the following information ready when you call:
Ÿ Serial and model numbers of your server, monitor, and other
components, or your proof of purchase
Ÿ Description of the problem
Ÿ Exact wording of any error messages
Ÿ Hardware and software configuration information for your
system
258
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
If possible, be at your server when you call.
These services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
(excluding some holidays).
Ÿ In the U.S. and Puerto Rico, call 1-800-772-2227.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-565-3344.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
Getting Help Around the World
If you need to move your server to another country, you can
register for International Warranty Service. When you register with
the International Warranty Service Office, you will receive an
International Warranty Service Certificate that is honored virtually
worldwide, wherever IBM or IBM resellers sell and service IBM PC
products.
For more information or to register for International Warranty
Service in the U.S. or Canada, call 1-800-497-7426.
Getting Information by Fax
If you have a touch-tone telephone and access to a fax machine, in
the U.S. and Canada you can receive by fax free marketing and
technical information on many topics, including hardware, operating
systems, and local area networks (LANs). You can call the IBM PC
Company Automated Fax System 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Follow the recorded instructions, and the requested information will
be sent to your fax machine.
To access the IBM PC Company Automated Fax System, do the
following:
Ÿ In the U.S., call 1-800-426-3395.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-465-3299.
Using Electronic Support Services
If you have a modem, you can access public electronic bulletin
boards and public messaging areas, electronic conferences, and
Chapter 7. Getting Help, Service, and Information
259
searchable databases available in several of the most popular online
information services.
Bulletin boards and online services contain information on many
topics, such as:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
PC user groups
PC questions and answers
OS/2 topics
Solving problems
Technical information
Hardware and software configurations
Networking
The IBM PC Company Bulletin Board System (BBS) can be reached
24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Modem speeds of up to 14 400 baud
are supported. Long distance telephone charges might apply. To
access the PC Company BBS:
Ÿ In the U.S., call 1-919-517-0001.
Ÿ In Canada:
– In Markham, call 905-316-4255.
– In Montreal, call 514-938-3022.
– In Toronto, call 416-492-1823.
– In Vancouver, call 604-664-6466.
Commercial online services that contain information about IBM
products include:
Ÿ CompuServe
Use the following GO words: IBMPS1, IBMPS2, ThinkPad,
PowerPC, ValuePoint, IBMSVR, or IBMOBI.
Ÿ PRODIGY
Use the Jump command; type IBM and select PC Product
Support.
Ÿ America Online
Use the “Go to” keyword IBM.
260
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Purchasing Additional HelpWare Services
During and after the warranty period, you can purchase additional
HelpWare services, such as support for IBM and non-IBM hardware,
operating systems, and application programs; network setup and
configuration; upgraded or extended hardware repair services; and
custom installations. Service availability and name might vary by
country.
Using the World Wide Web
Also available to you is the latest information about product
compatibility and configuration. This information is updated as
new PC Server products are announced. For a product to be
included in the PC Server compatibility list, it must pass a strict set
of hardware and operating system compatibility tests. The
following is a sample of the information available at
http://www.pc.ibm.com/servers/ on the World Wide Web.
Ÿ A listing of products that have been tested for compatibility
with IBM PC Server.
Ÿ Certification and compatibility information about Network
Operating Systems (NOS) and Operating Systems (OS).
Ÿ Direct access to device drivers, flash BIOS updates, and other
code.
Ÿ Descriptions of PC Server compatibility and certification tests.
Ÿ Detailed reports about the performance of PC Servers.
Enhanced PC Support Line
Enhanced PC Support is available for desktop and mobile IBM
computers that are not connected to a network. Technical support is
provided for IBM computers and IBM or non-IBM options,
operating systems, and application programs on the Supported
Products list.
This service includes technical support for:
Ÿ Installing and configuring your out-of-warranty IBM computer
Ÿ Installing and configuring non-IBM options in IBM computers
Ÿ Using the operating system or application programs
Chapter 7. Getting Help, Service, and Information
261
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Tuning performance
Installing device drivers remotely
Setting up and using multimedia devices
Identifying system problems
Interpreting documentation
You can purchase this service for a single incident, for multiple
incidents, or through a 900 number (you will be billed by the
telephone company). For more information about purchasing
Enhanced PC Support, see “Ordering Support Line Services” on
page 263.
Network and Server Support Line
Network and Server Support is available for simple or complex
networks made up of IBM servers and workstations using major
network operating systems. In addition, many popular non-IBM
adapters and network interface cards are supported.
This service includes technical support for:
Ÿ Installing and configuring client workstations and servers
Ÿ Identifying system problems and correcting problems on the
client or the server
Ÿ Using IBM and non-IBM network operating systems
Ÿ Interpreting documentation
You can purchase this service for a single incident or for multiple
incidents. For more information about purchasing Network and
Server Support, see “Ordering Support Line Services” on page 263.
Personal Computer Software Assistance Support Line
This service is an individual year-long subscription for assistance
with desktop application programs installed in IBM and
IBM-compatible computers. In Canada, this service is called PC
Professional. Product experts will provide telephone assistance, 24
hours a day, 7 days a week, for application programs on the
Supported Products list.
For more information about purchasing this service, see “Ordering
Support Line Services” on page 263.
262
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Ordering Support Line Services
Enhanced PC Support Line, Network and Server Support Line, and
Personal Computer Software Assistance Support Line services are
available for products on the Supported Products list. To receive a
Supported Products list:
Ÿ In the U.S.:
1. Call 1-800-772-2227.
2. Select the automated fax system option.
3. Select the service for which you would like a Supported
Products list:
– For Enhanced PC Support Line, select document 11682.
– For Network and Server Support Line, select document
11683.
– For Personal Computer Software Assistance Support
Line, select document 11684.
Ÿ In Canada, contact IBM Direct at 1-800-465-7999, or:
1. Call 1-800-465-3299.
2. Select the HelpWare catalog.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
For more information or to purchase these services:
Ÿ In the U.S., call 1-800-772-2227.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-465-7999.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
Warranty and Repair Services
You can upgrade your standard hardware warranty service or
extend the service beyond the warranty period.
Warranty upgrades in the U.S. include:
Ÿ Carry-in service to on-site service
If your warranty provides carry-in repair service, you can
upgrade to on-site repair service, either standard or premium.
Chapter 7. Getting Help, Service, and Information
263
The standard upgrade provides a trained servicer within the
next business day (9 a.m. to 5 p.m., local time, Monday though
Friday). The premium upgrade provides 4-hour average
response, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Ÿ On-site service to premium on-site service
If your warranty provides for on-site service, you can upgrade
to premium on-site service (4-hour average on-site response, 24
hours a day, 7 days a week).
You also can extend your warranty. HelpWare Warranty and
Repair Services offers a variety of post-warranty maintenance
options. Availability of the services varies by product.
For more information about warranty upgrades and extensions:
Ÿ In the U.S., call 1-800-426-7697.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-465-7999.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
Consulting
If you want to better understand and more effectively use IBM PC
Servers and other Personal Computer products, in the U.S. you can
purchase HelpWare Consult Line support. This service offers
telephone access to experts for consultation on agreed-to topics. The
experts provide recommendations and corrective actions, as
appropriate.
For more information about HelpWare Consult Line, call
1-800-772-2227.
Custom Services
If you are setting up a network and need help installing the network
or the application programs, in the U.S. you can purchase assistance
from HelpWare Custom Services. The following services are
available:
Ÿ LAN Startup Services
264
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
This service provides assistance with setting up and customizing
your network, including:
–
–
–
–
–
Unpacking equipment
Setting up and testing the hardware
Connecting systems to LAN cabling
Customizing the network operating system
Customizing the network printer server
Ÿ Connectivity Services
This service provides hardware installation and connection to
support a server and five or more workstations, using
token-ring or 10BaseT Ethernet cabling.
For more information about LAN Startup and Connectivity Services,
call 1-800-772-2227.
Obtaining IBM Operating System Updates
IBM provides update diskettes, called ServicePaks or corrective
service diskettes (CSDs), to customers who report a DOS or OS/2
problem for which there is or will be a corrective program.
You can obtain update diskettes from the following sources:
Ÿ IBM PC Company BBS. See “Using Electronic Support Services”
on page 259 for information on how to access this bulletin
board system.
Ÿ IBM Software Solutions Center. In the U.S. or Canada, call
1-800-992-4777.
Ÿ IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Ordering System Diskettes
If you have damaged Reference or Diagnostic Diskettes, you can
order replacements from IBM.
To order replacements:
Ÿ In the U.S., call 1-800-845-4263.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-565-3344.
Chapter 7. Getting Help, Service, and Information
265
Ÿ In other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
Ordering Publications
Additional publications are available for purchase from IBM. For a
list of publications available in your country:
Ÿ In the U.S. and Puerto Rico, call IBM PC Books at
1-800-426-7282.
Ÿ In Canada, call 1-800-465-1234.
Ÿ In other countries, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
266
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Appendix A. Server Records
Whenever you add options to your server, be sure to update the
information in this appendix. Accurate, up-to-date records make it
easier to add other options and, if the need should arise, to report a
hardware problem.
Recording the Server Serial Number
Record and retain the following information. In the box below,
check or highlight the applicable server information for future
reference.
Product Name
IBM PC Server 320
Machine Type
Pentium Microprocessor
Model
Ø
with preinstalled hard disk drive
Ø
without preinstalled hard disk drive
Serial Number
Key Serial Number
ServerGuide License Diskette
Serial Number
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
267
Installed Device Records
The locations of the PC Server 320 identification numbers are shown
in the following illustration. They are located near the bottom, on
the front of the server.
7
123456
Product Name
Machine Type/Model
Serial Number
Note: Two keys are provided with your server. Always store the
keys in a safe place. If you lose them, you must order a
replacement lock mechanism and keys from IBM.
Installed Device Records
Use the following tables to keep a record of your system default
configuration settings and the options currently installed in or
attached to your server. This information can be helpful when you
install additional options in your server or if you ever need to have
your server serviced. It is recommended that you copy these tables
before recording information in them, in case you need extra space
to write in new values later, when you update your system
configuration.
268
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installed Device Records
Option
Default Value
New Value
Additional Information
Diskette A
Diskette B
IDE Device 0 Master
IDE Device 0
Subordinate
Video System
1.44 MB, 3.5 in.
Not installed
None
None
Record additional drive information
in Table 9 on page 271.
SVGA
Video BIOS
Shadowed
Record additional information in Table 8 on
page 270.
Select Disabled for adapters that cannot be
shadowed.
System Memory
Extended Memory
Bank 0 Socket 1
Bank 0 Socket 2
Bank 1 Socket 3
Bank 1 Socket 4
Bank 2 Socket 5
Bank 2 Socket 6
Bank 3 Socket 7
Bank 3 Socket 8
Total Memory
Cache State
COM1 Port
COM2 Port
LPT Port
LPT mode
Diskette controller
Integrated IDE bus
adapter
Large disk DOS
compatibility
Memory gap
Boot sequence
Swap diskettes
Diskette check
Setup prompt
Post errors
Supervisor Password is
User password is
Set supervisor
password
Set user password
Password on boot
Diskette access
Hard disk boot sector
640 MB
15 MB
8 MB Kit
8 MB Kit
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Kit
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
MB
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
16 MB
Enabled
3F8, IRQ 4
2F8, IRQ 3
378, IRQ 7
Output only
Enabled
Disabled
DOS
Disabled
A: then C:
Normal
Disabled
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Press Enter
Press Enter
Disabled
User
Normal
C: First will not check Drive A.
Controls access to the Setup program.
Must set supervisor password first.
Table 7. Setup Program Configuration Defaults and Changes
Appendix A. Server Records
269
Installed Device Records
Diskette Controller
Refer to the following system-board illustration when completing
Table 8.
Memory
Sockets (8)
IDE Controller
3
PCI Slots
2
1
6
5
EISA/
ISA
Slots
4
3
Upgrade
Socket
Pentium
2
1
Slot
IRQ
DMA
I/O Port
ROM/RAM Address
Option Description and
Additional Information
6
5
4
3
2
1
Video: SVGA
Note: Do not use slot 6 if the adjacent PCI slot is occupied. Before setting values, review Chapter 4, “Installing Options”
on page 77 and follow the instructions for avoiding configuration conflicts.
Table 8. EISA/ISA Expansion Slot Configuration Information
270
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Installed Device Records
Location
Drive or Device Description
Bay 1
Bay 2
Bay 3
Bay 4
Bay 5
Bay 6
Bay 7
Bay 8
Bay 9
Bay 10
External Devices
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
SCSI ID
Table 9. Internal and External Drives and Devices
Note: If you attach a drive or other device to an adapter, be sure to
record the descriptive information in the appropriate column
in Table 8 on page 270 (in the same row as the
expansion-slot number of the adapter).
Appendix A. Server Records
271
Installed Device Records
272
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Appendix B. Notices
References in this publication to IBM products, programs, or
services do not imply that IBM intends to make these available in all
countries in which IBM operates. Any reference to an IBM product,
program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that
IBM product, program, or service may be used. Subject to IBM’s
valid intellectual property or other legally protectable rights, any
functionally equivalent product, program, or service may be used
instead of the IBM product, program, or service. The evaluation
and verification of operation in conjunction with other products,
except those expressly designated by IBM, are the responsibility of
the user.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering
subject matter in this document. The furnishing of this document
does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license
inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
500 Columbus Avenue
Thornwood, NY 10594
U.S.A.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the IBM Corporation in the
United States or other countries or both:
FloThru
IBM
NetFinity
OS/2
PowerPC
ServerGuide
ValuePoint
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
HelpWare
LANStreamer
Operating System/2
Personal System/2
PS/2
ThinkPad
XGA
273
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
3Com
Adaptec
America Online
APC
CompuServe
DiagSoft
EtherCard
EtherExpress
EtherLink
Intel
Microsoft
NetWare
Novell
NT
OpenServer
Pentium
PowerChute
PRODIGY
QAPlus
SCO
SCSISelect
SMC
TokenExpress
TokenLink
UnixWare
3Com Corporation
Adaptec, Inc.
America Online, Inc.
American Power Conversion
Corporation
CompuServe Incorporated
DiagSoft, Inc.
Standard Microsystems
Corporation
Intel Corporation
3Com Corporation
Intel Corporation
Microsoft Corporation
Novell, Inc.
Novell, Inc.
Microsoft Corporation
The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc.
Intel Corporation
American Power Conversion
Corporation
Prodigy Services Company
DiagSoft, Inc.
The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc.
Adaptec, Inc.
Standard Microsystems
Corporation
Intel Corporation
3Com Corporation
Novell, Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other
countries licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Other company, product, and service names, which may be denoted
by a double asterisk (**), may be trademarks or service marks of
others.
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PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Index
Numerics
1-800 telephone assistance xvi, 18,
258
1/4-inch tape drive 115
115 V ac 3
16-bit devices
cable connections 125, 138, 143
maximum SCSI cable
lengths 183
ports 118
SCSI IDs supported 116
230 V ac 3
25-pin parallel port 6
8-bit devices
cable connections 124, 138
connectors 118
maximum SCSI cable
lengths 183
SCSI IDs supported 116
9-pin serial port 6
A
about this book xiii
accessing
America Online 260
CompuServe 260
consulting services 264
custom services 264
diskette drive 196
EISA Configuration
program 205
electronic support services 259
fax 258
file editor 256
HelpWare support family 257
LAN startup services 264
network connectivity
services 265
network support services 258,
262
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1996
accessing (continued)
operating system 195
operating system updates 265
PC support services 261
PRODIGY 260
SCSISelect Utility program 213
server support services 258, 262
Setup program 192, 193
software assistance 262
software updates 265
support line services 263
technical support services 261
World Wide Web 261
adapter
See also the User's Reference
bus-master 96
compatibility 96, 98
configuration 198
considerations 96
deactivated 211
EISA/ISA locations 96, 270
failure 70
illustration 96
installation sequence 98
installing 95, 99
jumpers and switches,
changing 211
location 95, 96
messages, RAID 238
network, compatibility with
device drivers 102
PCI locations 96, 269
removing 105
SCSI ID 116
SCSI-2 116, 119
super video graphics array
(SVGA) 96
types 96
using, with external
devices 181, 182
275
adding
adapter 95, 99
drives 60
external options 186
internal drive 112, 113, 115
memory to server 86
memory-module kits 86
optional security cover 174
security for server 173
storage capacity 43, 60
test programs 252
U-bolt 175
adjusting
chair 35
controls 36
lighting 36
monitor 35
advanced functions
disk array 49
EISA Configuration Diskette 205
using 69
advantages of product 22
air circulation 35, 36
air circulation clearances 33, 177
air vents 36
America Online 260
American Power Conversion
(APC) 187
antiglare filter 36
application program assistance,
fee 262
architecture
See also the User's Reference
EISA 96, 199
ISA 96, 199
PCI 96, 203
arranging workspace 35
array
See disk array
276
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Array list 44
assistance and service 18, 30
attaching
external devices 180
internal drive 112, 113, 115
server door 146, 162
automatic configuration 235
B
back view 6
backing up
disk-array configuration 69
EISA Configuration Diskette 205
backup tape 111, 115
Basic Input/Output System (BIOS)
See also the User's Reference
upgrading 3
battery-backed clock 3
Bay/Array selection list 44, 65
bays
See also the User's Reference
1–3 (non-disk-array models)
removing a drive from 151
4 (non-disk-array models)
preinstalled CD-ROM
drive 111
5–9 (non-disk-array models)
installing a drive in 137
removing a drive from 158
7 (disk-array models)
preinstalled CD-ROM
drive 114
8–10 (disk-array models)
drive sizes 112, 115
drive types 110, 112, 113, 115
expansion 3, 8, 110, 113
identification 110, 113
internal drive locations 111, 112,
114, 115, 271
bays (continued)
locations 110, 113
beep codes, POST 217
before you begin 10, 41
bezel
See cover plates
blank screen 243
blank status 60
bolt-down capability 3
bolt-down facility
See U-bolt
boot
drive 117
password 196
sector, write protecting 196
sequence 194, 197, 269
broken cover lock 244
bulletin boards 260
bus-master adapters 96
C
cable-down facility
See U-bolt
cables
See also the User's Reference
chaining drives with 117
connecting two hard disk
drives 111
for uninterruptible power
supply 187
IDE 126, 139
lengths 37
maximum lengths for SCSI
devices 182
optional security feature 174
removing 82
requirements
for attaching external
devices 181, 182
for bays 1–3 (non-disk-array
models) 124
cables (continued)
requirements (continued)
for bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 138
for bays 8–10 (disk-array
models) 124
safety ix, x, 79
SCSI 124, 138, 181, 182
security 176
cache 191, 269
See also the User's Reference
calculating maximum SCSI cable
lengths 182, 183
calendar, battery-backed 3
Canadian safety requirements x
capacity of hard disk drives 43
card
See adapter
caution
avoiding damage from static
electricity 80
clearances for air circulation 33,
177
damage to server
components 97
electrical hazards 79
general information 10
handling static-sensitive
devices 80
laser compliance statement xi
lifting the server 10
opening a static-protective
package 80
power supply cover 79
setting voltage switch 11
CD-ROM
See also the User's Reference
drive
installing 136, 139, 142
location 110, 113
preinstalled 8, 111, 114
Index
277
CD-ROM (continued)
drive (continued)
problems 242
removing 157, 158
SCSI ID 116
sizes 110, 112, 113, 115
standard 3
termination 119, 137
using 16, 27
ordering 23
ServerGuide Main CD
starting 27
using 26
chaining SCSI drives 117
chair adjustments 35
changing
configuration settings 191
device jumpers and
switches 211
jumper settings 165, 211
memory addresses 211
RAID parameters 73
startup sequence 197
switch settings 211
termination
on CD-ROM drive 119, 137
on SCSI devices 118, 119
on SCSI-2 adapter 119, 181
write policy 70
channels, SCSI 116, 184, 185
checklist, installation 33
choices, selecting 48
circulation, air 36, 177
cleaning
monitor 36
clearances for air circulation 33,
177
clock, battery-backed 3
comfort 35
278
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
Command Line Options 225
common tasks 50
communication
modem and fax requirements for
the United Kingdom 79, 178
requirements ix, x
compatibility tests 261
compatibility, adapter 96, 98
completing the installation 177
CompuServe 260
computer
See server
configuration
adapters
change 234
installation sequence 98, 198
backing up to diskette 69
battery-backed information 234
before you begin 41
conflicts 98, 209
default settings
changing 191
device records 269, 270
recording and restoring 192,
207
device change 235
disk array 39
EISA/ISA adapter locations 270
extended industry standard
architecture (EISA)
adapter locations 96
Configuration Diskette 96,
205
devices 191
features and options 199
files (.CFG) 198, 199, 208
hardware change 233
industry standard architecture
(ISA)
adapter locations 96
features and options 199
configuration (continued)
installing or removing
memory 203
invalid SCSI 237
memory change 234
NVRAM 191, 202
overview 190
PCI adapter locations 269
peripheral component
interconnect (PCI) architecture
adapter locations 96
devices 191
features and options 203
power-on self-test (POST) 190
program
Main Menu choices 48
starting 47
RAID 39
record, disk-array 69
records, EISA/ISA expansion
slot 270
restoring 70
Setup program 192
utility programs 190
viewing 49
conflicts, configuration 98, 209
connecting
adapter 95
cables
bays 1–3 (non-disk-array
models) 124, 125
bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 138
bays 8–10 (disk-array
models) 124, 125
general information 111, 114
requirements for external
devices 182
safety requirements ix, x, 79
external options 180, 186
connecting (continued)
internal drives
all bays 110, 113, 122
bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
two hard disk drives 111,
114
optional security cover 174
SCSI devices
cable requirements 117
input/output connectors 6
maximum SCSI cable
lengths 182
termination
requirements 118, 119, 181
server door 146, 162
U-bolt 175
connectivity services, network 265
connectors
See also the User's Reference
cable requirements 117, 119
default settings 269
expansion slots 6, 95
input/output locations 6
keyboard 6
knockout 7
memory 86
memory-module kits 87
monitor 6
mouse 6
parallel device 6, 269
pointing device 6
printer 6
rear view of server 6
rules for using 118
SCSI
location 6
rules for using 180
serial device 6, 269
Index
279
considerations
cable requirements 181
device drivers 29
hardware 30, 31
installing
adapters 96
CD-ROM drives 136
external SCSI devices 181
internal drives (disk-array
models) 113
internal drives (non-disk-array
models) 110
microprocessors 167
operating system 21, 23, 25
security 173
ServerGuide 26
software 21
termination requirements 181
consulting services 264
controller
See also the User's Reference
IDE 111, 114, 121
illustration 270
monitor 12
SCSI-2 adapter 117, 119
server 4
controlling diskette drive
access 196
cords, power
See the User's Reference
corrective service diskette
(CSD) 21, 265
cover
installing 177
removing 81, 84
security 174
cover lock broken 244
cover plates
description 110, 113
installing 144, 155, 161
280
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
cover plates (continued)
removing 126, 140, 159
CPU (central processing unit)
See microprocessor
Create/delete array 48
creating a comfortable work
environment 35
creating disk arrays 51, 60
CSD 21, 265
custom services 264
customer assistance
error messages 219
getting assistance 18, 30
online 257
ordering publications xvi, 266
solving problems 18, 30
telephone numbers 18, 30, 257
toll-free numbers 18, 30
D
damaged system
cover lock broken 244
dropped 250
spilled liquid 250
DASD (direct access storage device)
See also the User's Reference
Hot-Swap Storage Expansion
Enclosure 180
DDD (Defunct Disk Drive) 42, 65
deactivated adapters 211
dealer locations 258
default
configuration values 269
drive-startup sequence 197, 269
settings, recording and
restoring 192, 207
values for Setup program 269
defining
hot-spare drive 57
defining (continued)
logical drive pop-up 44
logical drives 52
defunct disk drive (DDD) 42, 65
deleting arrays 59
description
advanced functions (disk
array) 49
advanced functions (EISA
Configuration Diskette) 205
chapters and appendixes xiii
configuration 189
device drivers 201
EISA Configuration Diskette
operations 205
EISA/ISA configuration 199
memory configuration 203
notices xv
PC Server Startup Support 258
PCI configuration 203
product features 3
RAID technology 42
related publications xvi
screen area 44
SCSI IDs 116
SCSISelect Utility program 213
server 1
service and technical
assistance 257
Setup program 191
device
configuration 198
drivers
compatibility with network
adapters 102
considerations 29
description 201
hardware 30
installing 34
external 180
device (continued)
jumpers and switches,
changing 211
locations
EISA/ISA adapters 96, 269,
270
external 271
internal 271
PCI adapters 96, 269
preinstalled 8
RAID drivers 41
records 268
SCSI 116
static-sensitive, handling 80
video diskettes, installing 34
Diagnostic Diskette
main menu 221
replacing 265
starting 226
diagnostic files 201
diagnostic program
description 217
formatting diskettes 254
main menu 221
starting 226
tools overview 216
using the file editor 254
disconnecting
adapter 105
cables
before installing options 82
electrical safety
requirements ix, x, 79
cover 84
internal drives
from bays 1–3 151
from non-disk-array
models 158
memory-module kits 91
server door 81, 139, 158
Index
281
disk array
backing up configuration 69
capacity 43
configuration 39
controller 3
creating 51, 60
drive information, viewing 49
failure results 66
hardware considerations 32
initialize 48
redefining space in 61
restoring configuration 70
synchronize 48
with one hard disk drive 53
disk drive
See hard disk drive
diskette drives
See also the User's Reference
1.44 MB 3
default settings 269
EISA Configuration 205
in-use light 4
installing
in bay 5 (non-disk-array
models) 112, 139
in disk-array models 115
preinstalled 8
problems 242
removing
from bays 2 and 3
(non-disk-array
models) 151, 153
from bays 8 and 9 (disk-array
models) 151, 153
from non-disk-array
models 158
sizes 3, 112, 115
diskette eject button 4
diskettes
See also the User's Reference
282
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
diskettes (continued)
controlling access 196
option 220
ordering 23
ServerGuide License 28, 267
starting test programs from 226
support 34
video device driver,
installing 34
display
See monitor
door lock 3, 4
drivers
See also the User's Reference
device
compatibility with network
adapters 102
considerations 29
hardware 30
installing 34
RAID 41
video diskettes, installing 34
drives
See also the User's Reference
adding, to create an array 60
bay locations 110, 113
cable 111, 114
CD-ROM
location 110, 113
preinstalled 111
SCSI cable connectors 124
SCSI ID 116
termination 119, 137
using 16, 27
chaining 117
cover plates
description 110, 113
installing (bay 2
non-disk-array
models) 155
installing (bay 9
disk-array models) 155
drives (continued)
cover plates (continued)
installing (bays 5–9
non-disk-array
models) 161
installing (non-disk-array
models) 144
removing (bay 2
non-disk-array
models) 126
removing (bay 9
disk-array models) 126
removing (bays 5–9
non-disk-array models) 140
removing (bays 5–9
non-disk-array
models) 159
default settings 269
defunct 42
description 109
diskette
bay 5 (non-disk-array
models) 112
in disk-array models 115
failure results 66
hard disk
bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139
IDE 121, 126, 139
identification 110, 113
information, viewing 49
installation hardware for 111,
114
installation requirements 110,
113
installing
all bays 122
diskette drives 124, 126
IDE hard disk drives 124,
130
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 137, 139
drives (continued)
jumpers 123
locations
by drive type 112, 115
device records 271
illustration 110, 113
maintenance 63
preinstalled 8, 114
removing
diskette drives 151
from non-disk-array
models 158
IDE hard disk drives 151
SCSI 116, 119, 124
SCSI in-use light 4
sizes 111, 112, 114, 115
startup sequence, selectable 197,
269
status 63
tape
bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
terminating
external 119, 181
internal 119
types 110, 112, 115
dropped system 250
duplicate keys 268
E
editor, ASCII text 254, 256
EEPROM (electrically erasable
programmable read-only
memory) 3, 69
EISA (extended industry standard
architecture)
See also the User's Reference
adapters
installation 98, 99, 102
locations 96, 270
Index
283
EISA (extended industry standard
architecture) (continued)
adapters (continued)
problems 244
removal 105, 107
Configuration Diskette
advanced functions 205
backing up 205
requirements for using 205
default settings, recording and
restoring 207
features and options 199
eject button, diskette 4
electrical outlets 37
electrical safety ix, x, 79
electronic support 260
Error Correcting Code on SIMM
(EOS) 86
error messages
description 219
diagnostic 219
numeric 233
POST 219, 233
RAID adapter or disk array 238
software-generated 219
types 219
errors
software 221, 249
Exit 49
expansion bays 3, 8, 110, 113
expansion slots
adapter installation 99
adapter locations 96, 269, 270
description 3, 95
location in server 6
shared 97, 99
extension cords 37
external
device records 269, 270, 271
maximum SCSI cable
lengths 182, 183
284
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
external (continued)
options, connecting 180, 186
SCSI connector
cable requirements 117, 119
location 6
rules for using 118, 180
SCSI devices
IDs 184
terminating 181
views 6, 8
F
failed hard disk drive results 66
fan problems 245
Fast/Wide devices
See 16-bit devices
fatigue 35
fax, getting information by 258,
259
features
See also the User's Reference
1.44 MB diskette drive 3
at a glance 3
diskette drives 3
door lock 3
EISA, configuring 199
front view 8
hard disk drive 3
internal 269, 270, 271
internal cache 3
ISA, configuring 199
math coprocessor 3
microprocessor 3
PCI, configuring 203
Pentium 3
rear view 6
records 268
security 173, 174, 175
selectable drive-startup
sequence 197, 269
features (continued)
summary 3
supervisor password 193
user password 195
fee services 261
file editor
accessing 256
using 254
fixed disk
See hard disk drive
Fixpaks, OS/2 LAN Server 24
flash memory 3
See also the User's Reference
FMT (Format) 65
forgotten supervisor password 194
format, low-level
See also Low-Level Format
program
disk-array model 73
formatting drives 73
front view 8
function keys, using 223
functions, integrated 3
G
general information
arranging workspace 35
before you begin 10
configuration 190
controls and status indicators 4
expansion bays 8
input/output connectors 6
installing adapters 96
installing drives (disk-array
models) 114
installing drives (non-disk-array
models) 110
installing memory-module
kits 86
general information (continued)
RAID 42
Setup program 191
system security 173
test programs 221
troubleshooting 242
using CD-ROM drive 16
general problems 244
getting service 18, 30, 257
getting started 216
glare 36
glossary
See the User's Reference
H
handling static-sensitive devices 80
hard disk drive
See also the User's Reference
adding 43, 61
capacity 43
connecting two drives 111, 114
defunct 42, 49
failure results 66
formatting 73
function, monitoring 29, 42
hot-swappable
See hot-swap drives
information 63
information, viewing 49
installing
in bay 1 (non-disk-array
models) 126
in bay 10 (disk-array
models) 126, 130
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
to add storage capacity 60
monitoring function of 42
multiple failures 66, 67
Index
285
hard disk drive (continued)
one in an array 53
order of deleting 59
preinstalled 8
rebuild 49
removing
from bay 1 (non-disk-array
models) 153
from bay 10 (disk-array
models) 153
from non-disk-array
models 158
IDE hard disk drives 151
replacing, through the
Configuration Program 67
SCSI 119, 143, 158
SCSI ID 116
setting 123
sizes 112, 115
status 66
bay/array selection list 65
hot-swap 67
obtaining 63
supported 3
write protecting the boot
sector 196
hardfile
See hard disk drive
hardware
considerations 31
device drivers 30
help 48, 257
See also customer assistance
HelpWare 258
hot-spare drive
defining 57
status 65
hot-swap bays, installing hard disk
drives in 148
286
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
hot-swap drives
installing 148
RAID 43
removing 164
HSP (hot spare status)
65
I
IDE (integrated drive electronics)
cable 126, 139
controller 111, 114, 121
default settings 269
drives, installing 126, 139
identification numbers 267, 268
in-use lights 4, 242, 244
information area 44
information, drive 63
Initialize logical drive 49, 56
Initialize/synchronize array 48
input/output (I/O)
connectors
See connectors
port locations 6
installation
checklist 33
completing 177
diskettes 23
hardware 10, 111, 114
preparing for 81
problems 247
sequence, for adapters 98
installing
adapters 95, 99
application programs 34
CD-ROM drives 136, 139, 142
cover 177
cover plates
in bay 2 (non-disk-array
models) 155
in bay 9 (disk-array
models) 155
installing (continued)
cover plates (continued)
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 161
in non-disk-array models 144
device drivers 34
diskette drives
in bay 5 (non-disk-array
models) 112, 139
in disk-array models 115
external options 180, 186
hard disk drives
in bay 1 (non-disk-array
models) 126, 130
in bay 10 (disk-array
models) 126
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
in hot-swap bays 148
to add storage capacity 60
hot-swap bays, hard disk drives
in 148
IDE drives 126, 139
internal drives
all bays 122
considerations 136
diskette drives 124, 126
general information 110, 113
IDE hard disk drives 130
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 137
types and sizes for each
bay 112, 115
internal options 77
memory-module kits 86
microprocessor 167
network adapters 102
Novell NetWare 25
operating system 22, 26
optical disc drives (bays 5–9
non-disk-array models) 139,
142
installing (continued)
optional security cover 174
options 34
OS/2 operating system 23
rewritable-optical disc
drives 137
SCO OpenServer 25
SCSI drives 119, 124, 138
security-cover option 174
server door 146, 162
software 34
support diskettes 34
tape drives
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
procedure 137
test programs 252
U-bolt 175
UnixWare 25
video device driver diskettes 34
Windows NT 25
integrated drive electronics (IDE)
See IDE (integrated drive
electronics)
integrated functions 3
interfaces
See the User's Reference
intermittent problems 245
internal
device records 269, 270, 271
drives
considerations 136
IDE 121
installing 110, 113, 122
locations 111, 112, 114, 115
removing 151, 158
SCSI 116
sizes 111, 112, 114, 115
maximum SCSI cable
lengths 182
Index
287
internal (continued)
preinstalled 8
SCSI connector 117
SCSI devices, terminating 119,
181
international warranty service 259
interrupt levels, assigning
(PCI) 203
interrupt request (IRQ) settings 269
introduction 1
IntruderAlert 225, 226
ISA (industry standard architecture)
See also the User's Reference
adapters
installation 98, 99, 102
locations 96, 270
removal 105, 107
features and options 199
J
jumpers
changing a setting 165, 211
microprocessor 167
on internal drives 111, 114, 123
settings 165
termination 119
K
keyboard
angle of 35
arm and wrist position 35
connector 6
port 3, 6
problems 245
types 3
keys
file editor 254
function 223
program navigation 223
288
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
keys (continued)
replacing 268
kits, memory-module
See also memory-module kits
compatibility requirements 86
sizes 86, 269
speed 86
knockout, SCSI connector 7
L
LAN (local area network)
See also the User's Reference
Server Fixpaks 24
Server installation 23
startup services 264
laser compliance statement xi
LED (light-emitting diode)
See lights
License Diskette
serial number 267
ServerGuide 28, 33
lifting the server, caution 10
lighting 36
lights
drive status 67
not working 244
liquid spilled on system 250
locations
adapters 95, 96, 97
bays 110, 113
cover plates 110, 113
devices 271
drives 110, 113, 271
expansion slots 95, 121
external SCSI connector 119
features 6, 8
IDE controller connectors 121
jumpers 165
memory 86, 121
locations (continued)
memory-module kits 86
microprocessor 121
optional security cover 174
Power On/Off switch 12, 14
power-on light 13, 14
server identification
numbers 268
server records 269, 270, 271
termination 118, 119, 181
U-bolt 175, 176
lock for cover, broken 244
lock, door 3
locking adapters (boards) 208
logical drive
adding 60
defining 52
initialize 49, 56
list 44
one hard disk drive 53
replacing existing 61
size, determination of 55
startup drive sizes 32
status 45, 66
synchronize 49
Logical Drive Size pop-up 45
Low-Level Format program
using 73
M
machine type 267
Main Menu, Configuration
Program 48
maintaining hard disk drives 63
maximum SCSI cable lengths 182,
183
media types 112, 115
memory
See also the User's Reference
memory (continued)
compatibility requirements 86
configuring after adding or
removing 203
default settings 269
Error Correcting Code on SIMM
(EOS) 86
features 3
nonvolatile 191, 202
parity 86
sizes 86
specifications 86
standard 3
memory-module kits
compatibility requirements 86
connector locations 86
installing 86
purpose 86
removing 91
sizes 86
speed 86
menus
Diagnostic Diskette 221
EISA Configuration program
description 205
help information 206
Local 223
Module Tests 229
Options 230
SCSISelect Utility program 214
Setup program 191
messages
error 233
POST 233
RAID adapter or disk array 238
microprocessor
See also the User's Reference
damage 97
description 3
installing 167
Index
289
microprocessor (continued)
jumper 167
location 121
Pentium 3
preinstalled 168
model type 267
module tests
description 221
starting 228
test group 227
using 228
monitor
See also the User's Reference
adapter 96
adjusting of 35
blank screen 243
controls 12
distorted screen 243
dusting of 36
jittering screen 243
placement of 36
port 6
problems 243, 244
rolling screen 243
self-tests 243
wavy screen 243
monitoring drive function 29, 42
monitoring programs
OS/2 RAID Controller
Administration and
Monitor 42
OS/2 RAID Controller
Administration for Novell
NetWare 42
OS/2 RAID NetFinity Alert
Manager 42
RAIDADMN.EXE for Windows
NT 42
SCO400.EXE and OPS5400.EXE
for SCO UNIX 42
290
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
mouse
See also the User's Reference
connector 6
port 3
problems 245
moving the server 10
multiple drive failure 66
N
narrow devices
See 8-bit devices
network
See also LAN (local area network)
adapter device drivers 29
adapters, compatibility with
device drivers 102
and server startup support 258
and server support services,
fee 262
connectivity services, fee 265
environment, software for 27
operating systems,
compatibility 1, 261
non-disk-array model
cable connections 124, 125
installing diskette drives in bay
5 139
installing hard disk drives in bay
1 126, 130
installing hard disk drives in
bays 5–9 137, 139
maximum drive sizes 112
removing cover plates 126
removing diskette drives from
bays 2 and 3 153
removing hard disk drives from
bay 1 153
nonremovable media 110, 112, 113
nonvolatile random-access memory
(NVRAM) 191, 202
notices
definitions xv
laser compliance statement xi
product 273
safety information ix
Novell NetWare installation 25
O
occasional problems 245
office space, arranging 35
OFL (Offline) 65
ONL (Online) 65
online help 257
online information services 260
opening server door 148
operating systems
See also the User's Reference
compatibility 261
considerations 21, 23, 25
controlling access to 195
installing 22, 26
LAN Server Fixpaks 24
LAN Server installation 23
Novell NetWare 25
OS/2 installation 23
overview 22
RAID Controller Administration
and Monitor 42
RAID Controller Administration
for Novell NetWare 42
RAID NetFinity Alert
Manager 42
SCO 42
SCO OpenServer 25
UnixWare 25
updates 265
Windows NT 25, 42
optical disc drives
installing
bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
general information 137
laser compliance statement xi
removing 157
sizes 110, 112, 113, 115
options
See also the User's Reference
Command Line 225
Diagnostic Diskette 221
diskettes 220
EISA, configuring 199
external 180
external, connecting 186
installation preparation 81
installation problems 247
installing 34, 77
internal 86, 95, 109
ISA, configuring 199
locations 269, 270, 271
PCI, configuring 203
removing 151, 158, 160
SCSISelect Utility program 213
security 174
security cover 174
Setup program 191
test 230
order of
installing adapters 98
installing memory-module
kits 87
removing memory-module
kits 91
ordering
cables 124, 138
CDs 23
diskettes 23
optional security cover 174
Index
291
ordering (continued)
publications xvi, 266
replacement keys 268
SCSI cable 181
support line services 263
System Diskettes 265
output ports 6
overload protection 3
overview
adapter installation
considerations 96
sequence 98
configuration 190
device drivers 29
electrical safety ix, x, 79
handling static-sensitive
devices 80
hardware considerations 31
installing
CD-ROM drives 136
external options 180
internal drives (disk-array
models) 113
internal drives (non-disk-array
models) 110
microprocessors 167
operating system
considerations 21, 23
installation 22
preparing to install options 81
security features 173
ServerGuide 26
software considerations 21
system components 1
P
parallel port
default setting
location 6
292
269
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
parallel port (continued)
problems 248
parameters
default, configuration 269
ISA adapter settings 205
jumper settings 165
parity
error 239
memory 86
part numbers
keys 268
publications xvi
serial 267
passwords
See also the User's Reference
controlling diskette drive
access 196
default setting 269
forgotten supervisor 194
general information 193
on boot 196
purpose 173
setting 194, 195
supervisor 173, 193
user 173, 195
write protecting the hard disk
boot sector 196
PC support services, fee 261
PCI (peripheral component
interconnect) architecture
See also the User's Reference
adapter expansion slot
numbers 99
adapters
installation 98, 99, 102
locations 96, 269
removal 105, 107
assigning interrupt levels 203
features and options 203
Pentium microprocessor 121, 167
percent initialized 44
percent synchronized 44
phone numbers
See telephone numbers
planning workspace 35
plates, cover 110, 113
pointing device
See mouse
ports, input/output
See also connectors
9-pin serial 3
keyboard 6
monitor 6
mouse 6
parallel 6
See also parallel port
SCSI 180
serial 6
See also serial port
POST
See power-on self-test (POST)
power cords
See also the User's Reference
lengths 37
power supply
434 watt 3
auxiliary 3
surge protection 3
uninterruptible 187
voltage-switch feature 3
power switch 4
power-on
light 4, 13, 14
Power On/Off switch 12, 14
power-on self-test (POST)
See also the User's Reference
beep codes 217
definition 217
during configuration 190
power-on self-test (POST) (continued)
during setup 14
message table 233
overview 217
upgradable 3
PowerChute 187
preface xiii
preinstallation
diskette drive 110, 113
hard disk drive 110, 113
monitor adapter 96
SCSI-2 Fast/Wide PCI
Adapter 97
steps 122
preinstalled devices 8, 168
preparing
for installation
external options 180, 186
tasks required 81
tools and supplies 10
printer port 6
printer problems 248
printers, SCSI 116
problems
fan 245
getting assistance and
service 18, 257
intermittent 245
keyboard 245
memory problem 246
monitor 243
network adapter
compatibility 102
occasional 245
only the cursor appears 243
option 247
parallel port 248
POST 233
printer 248
screen jitter 243
Index
293
problems (continued)
serial port 248
software 249
SVGA 243
processor
See microprocessor
PRODIGY 260
product
advantages 22
See also the User's Reference
compatibility 261
description 3
identification numbers 267
name 267
notices 273
See also the User's Reference
warranties
See the User's Reference
program navigation 223
programs
administration monitoring 42
test 221
protecting
data 193, 195
the server 10, 97
publications
ordering xvi, 266
part numbers xvi
R
RAID (redundant array of
independent disks)
See also disk array
adapter 32
adapter failure 70
administration monitoring utility
programs 42
advanced functions 69
assigning levels 61
294
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
RAID (redundant array of
independent disks) (continued)
backup 69
changing parameters 73
configuration
backing up to diskette 69
before you begin 41
program, starting 47
data stripe size 32
device drivers 41
level 5 53
messages 238
technology 39, 42
troubleshooting 238
RAM (random-access memory)
See the User's Reference
RDY (Ready) 65
read-only memory (ROM)
See ROM (read-only memory)
rear view 6
reassigning RAID levels 61
reconfiguring
reconfiguring the server 88
recording default settings 192, 207
records, device 268
redefining space in a disk array 61
reducing glare 36
Reference Diskette, replacing 265
related publications xvi
removable media 110, 112, 113
removing
adapters 105
CD-ROM drives 157
cover 84
cover plates
from bay 2 (non-disk-array
models) 126
from bay 9 (disk-array
models) 126
from bays 5–9 140
from bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 159
removing (continued)
diskette drives
from bays 2 and 3
(non-disk-array
models) 151, 153
from bays 8 and 9 (disk-array
models) 151
from non-disk-array
models 158
hard disk drives
from bay 1 (non-disk-array
models) 153
from non-disk-array
models 158
IDE hard disk drives 151
hot-swappable hard disk
drives 164
internal drives
memory-module kits 91
optical disc drives
(non-disk-array) 157, 158
server cables 82
server door 81, 139, 158
tape drives
from bays 2 and 3
(non-disk-array
models) 151
from bays 8 and 9 (disk-array
models) 151
from non-disk-array
models 158
general information 157
termination on CD-ROM
drive 119, 137
termination on SCSI devices 119
repair, getting assistance 18, 257
replacing
existing logical drive 61
hard disk drive, using the
Configuration Program 67
replacing (continued)
keys 268
System Diskettes 265
requirements for terminating SCSI
devices 119, 181
reserving resources 208
restoring
default settings 192, 207
disk array configuration 70
rewritable-optical disc drives
See optical disc drives
ROM (read-only memory)
See also the User's Reference
description 3
S
safety
electrical ix, x, 79
general information 10
handling static-sensitive
devices 80
laser compliance statement xi
sales information 258
saving configuration settings 192
saving disk array configuration 69
scanners, SCSI 116
SCO monitoring programs 42
SCO OpenServer 25
screen filter 36
screen, blank 243
screens
messages 238
RAID 44
SCSI (small computer system
interface)
See also the User's Reference
adapter 116, 117, 119
adapter location 97
cable 124, 138
Index
295
SCSI (small computer system
interface) (continued)
chaining drives 117
connector
cable requirements 117
knockout 7
location 6
rules for using 118, 180
description 116
devices 8, 116
drive in-use light 4
drives
cable routing 143
chaining 117
external 181, 182
installing (bay 1 on
non-disk-array models) 124
installing (bay 10 on
disk-array models) 124
installing (bays 5–9) 143
internal 109, 124, 137
removing (IDE hard disk
drives) 151
removing
(non-disk-array) 158
termination 119, 120, 181
failing 247
Fast/Wide devices
See 16-bit devices
ID
assignments 117, 184, 185
device records 271
for preinstalled devices 116
illustration 119
purpose 116
maximum SCSI cable
lengths 182
narrow devices
See 8-bit devices
port 6
296
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
SCSI (small computer system
interface) (continued)
problems 237
SCSISelect Utility program
menu description 214
starting 213
using 213
security procedures
See also the User's Reference
bolt-down capability 3
controlling diskette drive
access 196
door lock 3, 4
features 3
general information 173
installing a U-bolt 175
installing the optional security
cover 174
password on boot 196
replacing keys 267
selectable drive-startup
sequence 197, 269
setting passwords
general information 193
supervisor password 193
user password 195
write protecting the hard disk
boot sector 196
selectable boot
See selectable drive-startup
sequence
selectable drive-startup sequence
See also the User's Reference
changing 197
default 269
desciption 197
selecting choices 48
self-tests, internal 217
sequence for installing adapters 98
serial numbers
keys 267, 268
server 267
ServerGuide License
Diskette 33, 267
serial port
default setting 269
integrated function 3
location 6
problems 248
server
See also the User's Reference
adding memory 86
cover
installing 177
removing 84
description 1
door
installing 146, 162
removing 81, 139, 158
unlocking 148
external options 180
IDE controller 121
identification numbers 268
illustrated views
front 8
rear 6
internal options 86, 95, 109
jumper settings 165
PCI adapter expansion slot
numbers 99
preparing, for installation of
options 81
records
default configuration
values 269
EISA/ISA configuration
values 270
internal and external
options 271
server (continued)
security features
general information 173
passwords 193, 194, 195
security-cover option 174
summary 3
U-bolt 175
ServerGuide License Diskette
serial number 267
software 34
starting 12
starting ServerGuide Main
CD 27
startup support 18, 258
support for SCSI drives 117
using ServerGuide 26
ServerGuide
Main CD
starting 27
using 26
service, how to get 18, 30, 257
ServicePak 265
services, fee 261
setting
hard disk drives 123
jumpers
instructions 165
on internal drives 111, 114,
123
to resolve configuration
conflicts 211
passwords 193, 195
SCSI IDs 184, 185
voltage switch 11
Setup program
cache setting 191
controlling access to 193
controlling diskette drive
access 196
default configuration
values 269, 270
Index
297
Setup program (continued)
menu description 191
password on boot 196
setting passwords 193, 195
setting the selectable
drive-startup sequence 197
starting 192
using 191
write protecting the hard disk
boot sector 196
single-inline memory module
(SIMM) 86
sizes
internal drives 112, 115
memory 86
startup drive 32
slots, expansion
See expansion slots
small computer system interface
(SCSI)
See SCSI (small computer system
interface)
software
assistance, fee 262
considerations 21
error 249
installing 34
solving problems
See also troubleshooting charts
getting assistance and
service 18, 257
speed, memory 86
spilled liquid on system 250
starting
Diagnostic Diskette 226
EISA Configuration Diskette 207
RAID Configuration
Program 47
SCSISelect Utility program 213
server 12
298
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
starting (continued)
ServerGuide Main CD 27
Setup program 192
test programs 226
without operating system 15
startup
drive 117
drive sizes 32
sequence 194, 197
support 18, 258
static-sensitive devices,
handling 80
status
hard disk drive 63, 65, 66, 67
indicators, in-use lights 4
logical drive 45, 66
monitoring 29
storage capacity
adding 43, 60
hard disk drives 43
storage devices 9, 109
See also the User's Reference
summary of features 3
super video graphics array (SVGA)
adapter 3, 96
device drivers 26
supervisor password
controlling diskette drive
access 196
forgotten 194
password on boot 196
purpose 173, 193
setting 194
supplies 10
support diskettes, installing 34
support line services, ordering 263
surge protection 3
surge protectors 37
swap diskettes 269
swap floppies 197
switches
changing 211
power 4
Synchronize logical drive 49
system architecture
See architecture
system board
illustration 270
jumper settings 165
system damage 250
System Diskettes
See also the User's Reference
replacing 265
system utility programs 33
T
tape drives
See also the User's Reference
installing
general information 137
in bays 5–9 (non-disk-array
models) 139, 142
removing
from bays 2 and 3
(non-disk-array
models) 151
from bays 8 and 9 (disk-array
models) 151
from non-disk-array
models 158
general information 157
sizes 112, 115
tasks, common 50
technical support
fee 261
warranty 258
technology, RAID 42
telephone assistance 258
telephone line requirements for the
United Kingdom ix, 79, 178
telephone numbers
See also the User's Reference
IBM service center 18, 30
ordering publications xvi, 266
termination
See also the User's Reference
on CD-ROM drive 119, 137
on disk-array models 119
on external devices 181
on internal devices 119
on non-disk-array models 119
on SCSI devices 118, 119
test
compatibility 261
group specifications 227
group window 227
module 228, 229
options 230
programs
description 217
installing 252
starting 226
scripts 229
Test the Computer program
Diagnostic Diskette main
menu 221
overview 217
testing the monitor 243
testing the system 221
text editor 254, 256
toll-free numbers 18, 30
tools 10
trademarks 273, 274
troubleshooting charts
diskette drive problems 242
general problems 244
how to use 242
Index
299
troubleshooting charts (continued)
keyboard problems 245
monitor problems 243
monitor self-tests 243
mouse problems 245
option problems 247
overview 220
parallel port problems 248
pointing-device problems 245
printer problems 248
RAID adapter or disk array 238
serial port problems 248
software problems 249
types of media 112, 115
U
U-bolt
capability 3
installing 175
location 175, 176
UFM (Unformatted) 65
uninterruptible power supply
(UPS) 187
United Kingdom’s telephone line
requirements ix, 79, 178
UnixWare installation 25
unlocking server door 148
update system configuration
information (.SCI) files 205, 210
updates, operating system 265
updating
device records 268, 269
RAID configuration 179, 188
upgrading the microprocessor 167
user password
controlling diskette drive
access 196
password on boot 196
purpose 173, 195
300
PC Server 320 User's Handbook for PCI/EISA
user password (continued)
setting 195
using
electronic support services 259
HelpWare support family 257
ServerGuide 26
World Wide Web 261
utility programs
administration monitoring 42
configuration 190
diagnostic 221, 254
SCSISelect 213
Setup 192
V
venting of hot air 36
video
See also the User's Reference
adapter location 95, 96
compatibility 3
connector 3
default settings 269
device driver diskettes
port 6
SVGA 3
view
configuration 48, 49
drive information 49
front 8
rear 6
virus checking 196, 225
voltage settings 11
W
warranty information
See also the User's Reference
extensions and upgrades 263
service 258
welcome letter xvii
wide devices
See 16-bit devices
Windows NT
administration program 42
installation 25
RAIDADMN.EXE 42
work area, arranging 35
World Wide Web, using 261
write policy 49
changing 70
display 45
WB (write-back) mode 70
WT (write-through) mode 70
write protecting the hard disk boot
sector 196
Index
301

IBM
Part Number: 62H7100
Printed in U.S.A.
January 1996
62H71ðð