Agenda

Agenda
MiraCosta College Classified Senate Council
Regular Meeting  November 17, 2015
1:00 p.m.  CLC Conference Room
Live Stream
Call to Order
Persons Wishing to Address the Council
Changes in Agenda
1. Approval of the Minutes/Actions
A. October 20, 2015 CSC Minutes (attached)
2. Informational Items
A. College Council Committee (attachment)
B. Outcomes Committee
C. Classified Recruitments and Hiring – Wright (attachment)
D. BP/AP 3261 - Macias (attachment)
E. Educational Master Plan Addendum Presentation – Gonzalez (attachment) – Time Certain 1:30 p.m.
F. Adult High School WASC Accreditation Progress Report – Gallucci (attachment) – Time Certain 1:45
p.m.
3. Discussion and Approval Items/New Business
A. Student Equity Plan - Stewart and Schumacher (attachment)
B. Equity and Inclusion Statement – Stewart and Schumacher
4. Action Items
5. Regular Reports
A. President – Partlow
B. Superintendent/President – Cooke
C. Vice President – Level
D. Treasurer – Willis
E. Secretary – Barragan
F. Academic Senate Representative – Fino
G. ASG Representative – Jimenez
6. Committee Reports – CSC, District, & Advisory
A. Classification Review Committee – Dikau
B. Professional Development Program – Schneider
7. Senator Reports
8. Future Agenda Items
9. Adjournment
MiraCosta College
Classified Senate Council Meeting
October 20, 2015
Minutes
The meeting was called to order at 1:02 p.m. by President Gwen Partlow.
Members Present: Aimee Barragan, Sara Cassetti, Erich Donze, Pamela LeBlanc, Lisa Level, Emilio Mejares,
Gwen Partlow, Kathy Thiele, and Heidi Willis
Members Absent: Joan Hackett, Dixie Schulz, and Fred Steffy
Others Present: Sunny Cooke, Mike Fino, Lori Schneider, and Sheri Wright
Persons Wishing to Address the Council: None
Changes in Agenda/Order: Item 3.A. was removed from the agenda and tabled to the next meeting.
Announcements: None
1. Approval of the September 15, 2015 Minutes
• It was moved and seconded by Level and Willis. Motion passed unanimously.
2. Informational Items
A. Tom Macias was not present to discuss BP/AP 3261. This information will be presented at the next
meeting. Partlow encourages everyone to review the documents attached to the agenda prior to this
discussion.
B. The September Financial Statement was discussed by Willis. Two emergency loans were used this last
month. The process for someone to receive an emergency loan was discussed and can be found on the
CSC website.
C. Wright discussed the report attached to the agenda.
D. Partlow received a thank you letter from a student who received the Classified Senate Scholarship and
shared it with the senate.
E. Wright addressed the group regarding “religious freedom.” She stated a government entity, such as
MiraCosta College, should not be displaying items endorsing a specific religion. Religious speech is
protected if you are speaking personally and not as a representative of the company/school. A
government office can have religious displays if they a promoting history or tolerance but there needs to
be more than one religion on display. Secular items are okay. MCC cannot put out specific guidelines
because it’s a case by case basis, depending on where someone’s workspace is. If an employee feels
uncomfortable with a religious display, they should contact Human Resources.
3. Discussion Items/New Business
A. Wendy Stewart was not present to discuss the Student Equity Plan. This information will be presented at
the next meeting.
B. Donze discussed the idea of people being able to pay with a credit card or debit card for different CSC
events. A Square for an iPad would charge a 2.7% transaction fee per purchase. CSC would need to
spend between $350-$400 to purchase an iPad and the Square.
C. Schneider presented the deposit information to secure tickets for the SD Padres game tickets in spring.
She announced the NY Yankees and Boston Red Sox are playing at Petco Park next season. Game
1
MiraCosta College
Classified Senate Council Meeting
October 20, 2015
Minutes
tickets include food and drink. It was moved and seconded by Willis and Mejares. Motion passed
unanimously.
4. Action Items
A. Donze motioned to purchase an iPad and Square with the maximum amount of $400 spent. Level
second. Motion passed unanimously with two abstentions.
B. Partlow discussed the 2015-2016 CSC budget and asked for approval from the council. If anything
changes, Partlow will bring back a revised budget. It was moved and seconded by Willis and Level.
Motion passed unanimously.
C. Partlow presented the current 2015-2016 CSC Committee Assignments and asked for a motion to
approve. After discussion, Mejares was removed from the Negotiations Committee, Taylor Tirona was
added to the CRC Committee, and Willis was added to the Membership Drive Committee. It was moved
and seconded by Mejares and Donze. Motion passed unanimously.
5. Regular Reports
CSC President – Partlow
• Dick Robertson will retire on June 30, 2016 after 29 years of working at MCC.
• A vendor for the Classification Review and Compensation Study has been selected and the contract will
go to the board in November. At that time, the name of the vendor will be public information.
• Nominations for the outstanding employee award will be sent via email soon. Partlow encouraged
everyone to submit nominations.
Superintendent/President – Cooke
• Many college long term plans are currently being updated. The Educational Master Plan is being revised
and updated, which will result in an update to the Facilities Master Plan. The Facilities Master Plan will
focus on all the three campuses. Everyone should complete the facilities survey being sent out via email
and/or participate in the upcoming focus groups.
• The Accreditation self-study rough draft is currently being compiled, and is due at the end of October.
The campus will look at the third draft in December. Dr. Cooke encouraged everyone to look at specific
parts of the document pertaining to their department once it is available and provide feedback.
• October 30 is Assessment Day. Attendance by everyone was encouraged. The morning session will
focus on ILOs. The afternoon session will focus on divisions and departments and PSLOs and SLOs.
• Dr. Cooke encouraged everyone to watch the video posted on our campus police website about how to
handle a campus shooting. Training from a PERT expert will be helpful and the professional
development internal committee has been discussing bringing in a PERT expert. Wright reminded
people there is an incident response form on the website for people to fill out if they are concerned about
someone or
something. https://publicdocs.maxient.com/reportingform.php?MiracostaCollege&layout_id=1
CSC Vice-President – Level
• At the ASG meeting, there was a presentation on the Student Representation Fee (SRF). This fee is an
optional fee of $2 each semester, which would go to two groups: MCC student government and the
statewide CCC representative group. It failed to pass on the ASG April 2015 ballot. ASG Senate has not
committed to pursuing implementing the SRF this year but may in the future.
2
MiraCosta College
Classified Senate Council Meeting
October 20, 2015
Minutes
•
At the Academic Senate meeting, there was discussion about the processes for non-tenure track, fulltime faculty hiring since Student Services will be hiring three non-tenure track counselors soon. These
positions are funded through SSSP funds; if the funding ends, these positions would be terminated. If
any of the counselors who occupied one of these three positions end up applying for and accepting a
full-time tenure track position, they will not have bumping rights and will receive years of service credit
towards tenure. Academic Affairs Committee (AAC) considered this issue on October 9 and forwarded
the following statement: Given that this specific hiring is out of the normal prioritization process AAC
wants assurance that these non-tenure track positions will not become permanent positions. The status of
this item is “to be determined” per the last meeting.
• Level learned at the Achieving the Dream meeting that the college wanted to engage in meaningful
conversations and activities with Classified Staff. Everyone was encouraged to participate in the
Assessment Day on Friday, October 30. Level announced classified should expect weekly updates in the
MiraCostan about Achieving the Dream and the collaboration of a variety of programs and initiatives on
behalf of student success.
• Level also shared that spring 2016 enrollment will begin Monday, November 16, the BP/AP Change
Management system is now available on the portal to manage the creation or revision of Board Policies
(BPs) and Administrative Procedures (APs), and urged departments and divisions to donate for the
Classified Senate Annual Gift Basket Auction. Proceeds from the auction will benefit Classified Senate
Student Scholarships. The deadline to donate is Monday, November 2.
CSC Treasurer – Willis
• No report.
CSC Secretary – Barragan
• No report.
Academic Senate Representative – Fino
• Fino stated he needed to fill the vice chair for IEC. It was announced that MCC may be eliminating IEC
and giving some of IEC’s responsibilities to Steering Council and Cabinet. SLOAC may merge into a
new committee with some governance aspects and would be called “Outcomes Committee.” Steering
Council and Cabinet may be combined and called “College Council.” Discussion ensued.
Student Government Representative – Jimenez
• None present. No report.
6. Committee Reports
Classification Review Committee – Dikau
• No report.
Budget and Planning – Gonzales
• No report.
Classified Professional Development (external) – Schneider
• Schneider discussed the attached report and stated people are starting to use the PDP monies. Everyone
is encouraged to use monies from both categories. There are still STAR passes available. Discussion
ensued.
7. Senator Reports
3
MiraCosta College
Classified Senate Council Meeting
October 20, 2015
Minutes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cassetti – shared an email she received from Joanne Gonzales encouraging classified to be involved
with Achieving the Dream.
Donze – holiday party flyers will be sent out soon.
Hackett – no report
LeBlanc – all student testing offices are now open on Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. There may
be a testing/proctoring center located at the CLC in the future.
Mejares – no report
Schulz – no report
Steffy – no report
Thiele – no report
Wright shared that October is domestic violence awareness month. An email was sent to “all governance” on
October 12 from PIO about the campus-wide events bringing awareness to domestic violence.
8. Future Agenda Items
• Student Equity Plan
• AP 3050
• BP/AP 3261
9. Adjournment
The meeting was adjourned at 2:29 p.m.
4
Classified Staff Professional Development
External Program Activity Report
submitted by Lori Schneider, Chair
For CSC Mtg - October 2015
$58,650.00
Beginning Balance
beginning balance
(391 employees x $150)
33 Submitted regular requests
10 Star 12 All-Access 1-year Training Pass
0 Special Request - Classified Senate (CLI Conference)
43
24
10
9
0
0
0
0
43
Regular request(s) - approved
Star 12 All-Access 1-year Training Pass (10 pre-purchased)
Regular request(s) - pending (incomplete/awaiting paperwork)
Special Request - Classified Senate (CLI Conference)
Requests - cancelled/unanable to attend
request(s) - denied by committee
request(s) - denied at Supervisor, Dean or VP level
Amount Approved
$9,943.00
$1,990.00
$3,040.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$14,973.00
Amount Available
$43,677.00
(8 passes available)
Guidelines ( please refer to the CS website for complete details ):
For FY16, approximately $58,000 will be available for Classified employees* who require funds
for professional development activities (specifically job enhancement, professional growth and
enrichment related) such as seminars, conferences, workshops, online courses, trainings, etc.
► Classified employees* are eligible to receive up to $800 per year ($400 Category I & $400 Category II)
for professional development external activities.
►Funds will be allocated on a first-come basis until depleted.
►Funds may be used towards the total cost of the requested activity.
►All activities must be job enhancement, professional growth and enrichment related
specific to be eligible for funding.
*Regular monthly classified employees (can be probationary, permanent and or interim).
Classified Administrators are ineligible to request and/or receive funds through this program.
Requesters normally receive official notification regarding the status of submitted requests
within 3 business days.
Upon completion of the approved activity, an Evaluation Form must be submitted.
►2015-16 CPDC members: Lori Schneider, Chair ; Emilio Mejares; and Erika Brown
10/19/2015
Nov 17, 2015 Classified Senate Council
Classified Positions filled since Oct meeting:
Title
Name of new hire
Student Success Evaluator
Vivi Ricardez Veasey
10/27/15
Hortensia Sanchez
TBD
Student Success Evaluator
Start date Reason for opening
Student Services Specialist - Counseling Amber Jackson
11/30/15
Student Services Specialist - Counseling Donney Cummins
11/30/15
Student Services Specialist - Counseling Tiffany Burnett
11/30/15
new position - Student
Success funded
new position - Student
Success funded
new position - Student
Success funded
new position - Student
Success funded
new position - Student
Success funded
Interim assignments appointed:
N/A
Classified recruitments which are currently underway:
Title
Reason for opening
Instructional Associate - Surg Tech
new position (temp conversion)
Student Services Specialist - Testing
new SSSP funded position
new position - Student Success
funded
new position - Student Success
funded
SSSP Programmer
Student Equity Specialist
Secretary I - SSSP/Student Equity
Student Services Coordinator - DSPS
Accounting Specialist
new position (instead of replacing
John Benefield as a Technician),
partially BFAP funded
new position - Student Success
funded
replace Maria Pena
replace John Fortune
Quick Copy Operator II
new position (temp conversion)
System & Procedure Analyst-Financial
Aid
Classified recruitments approved, but not yet announced:
Secretary II - Financial Aid
replace Alison Cotter
Sec Clerk I - Student Activities @ SEC
Program Aide - Testing
Student Services Coordinator - Service
Learning
new position (temp conversion)
replace Vanessa DeBenedetto
Sec Clerk I - A&R
new position (temp conversion)
Sec Clerk I - ASG Recording Secretary
GEAR UP School Site Coordinator
new position (temp conversion)
replace Daniel Andrade
replace Carol Wilkinson
ECE Program Specialist
Instructional Associate - Nursing
Instructional Aide - noncredit ESL
Instructional Aide - noncredit ESL
Box Office Cashier
Development Officer
Secretary Clerk II - Veterans
Student Accts & Admission Assistant
Administrative Secretary
replace Katie Donahue
replace Vicky Tam
replace Maria Torres
replace Zarela Guerrero
replace Donna Sheldahl
interim replacement for Cynthia
Rice Carroll
new position - SSSP funded
replace Sheila Manning
new position (SSSP & AB86 grant
funded)
new position (WIOA grant funded)
new position (AEBG grant
funded)
Project Coordinator - AEBG
new position (SSSP & AEBG
grant funded)
Research Analyst - Adult Ed
new position (WIOA & AEBG
grant funded)
Career Services Specialist - Adult Ed
new position (SSSP & district
Student Services Coordinator - Adult Ed funded)
Instructional Associate - Horticulture
replace Jason Kubrock
A&R Assistant
replace Vivi Ricardez Veasey
Lead Groundskeeper
replace Rich Richards
Project Coordinator - WIOA
New draft: September 15, 2015
Administrative Procedure 3261: Energy Conservation
The District is committed to, and responsible for, a safe and healthy learning
environment and every person is encouraged to become an “energy saver.”
• Faculty and staff members are encouraged to implement these procedures
during the times that they are present in the instruction room/office.
• The custodial staff is responsible for control of common areas, i.e. lights in
hallways, dining areas, etc.
• Campus police and custodial staff are responsible for verification of the nighttime
shutdown.
• The consulting Energy Manager provides regular (at least semiannually) program
update reports to district and college administration.
• The consulting Energy Manager has the authority to enter all district facilities,
without prior notice, in order to perform routine audits. Audit results will be
communicated to the appropriate personnel.
• The consulting Energy Manager is responsible for indirectly making adjustments
to the district’s energy management system (EMS), including temperature
settings and run times for heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), and
other controlled equipment. The Energy Manager provides monthly energy
savings reports to the Director of Facilities detailing performance results.
• Administration will regularly communicate the importance and impact of the
energy conservation program to its internal and external constituents
• To complement the district’s behavioral-based energy conservation program, the
district shall strive to have a preventive maintenance and monitoring plan for its
facilities and systems, including HVAC, building envelope, and moisture control.
1. General
1.1. Classroom doors shall remain closed when HVAC is operating. Ensure doors
between conditioned space and non-conditioned space remain closed at all
times (i.e. between hallways).
1.2. Proper and thorough utilization of data loggers will be initiated and maintained
by the Energy Manager to monitor relative humidity, temperature, and light
levels throughout campus buildings to ensure compliance with procedures.
1.3. All exhaust fans should be turned off daily where applicable.
1.4. Office machines (printers, copy machines, etc.) should be switched off each
night and during unoccupied times. Fax machines may remain on.
1.5. All computers should be turned off each night. This includes the monitor, local
printer, and speakers. Network (i.e. LAN) equipment and computers that are
required to run lighting, HVAC equipment, irrigation controllers, etc. are
excluded.
1.6. All capable personal computers should be programmed for the “energy saver”
mode using the power management feature. If network constraints restrict
this, ensure the monitor “sleeps” after 10-minutes of inactivity.
1
2. Cooling Season Thermostat Set Points: Occupied–74-78°F, Unoccupied–85°F
2.1.
2.2.
2.3.
2.4.
2.5.
Occupied temperature settings shall NOT be set below 74°F.
During unoccupied times when the buildings are not in use, the air
conditioning shall be off (data centers and computer labs are excluded).
Air conditioning start times may be adjusted (depending on weather) to
ensure instruction room comfort when instruction begins.
Ensure outside air dampers are closed during unoccupied times where
feasible.
Relative humidity levels shall not exceed 60% for any 24 hour period.
3. Heating Season Set Points: Occupied–68-72°F, Unoccupied–55°F
3.1.
3.2.
3.3.
3.4.
3.5.
3.6.
3.7.
Occupied temperature settings shall NOT be above 72°F
The unoccupied temperature setting shall be 55°F (i.e. setback). This may be
adjusted to a 60°F setting during extreme weather.
The unoccupied time shall begin when the students leave an area.
During the spring and fall when there is no threat of freezing, forced air
heating systems should be switched off during unoccupied times. Hot water
heating systems should be switched off using the appropriate loop pumps
where and if applicable.
Ensure all domestic hot water systems are set no higher than 120°F or 140°F
for cafeteria service.
Ensure all domestic hot water re-circulating pumps are switched off during
unoccupied times where and if applicable.
Ensure a 6°F dead-band between heating and cooling modes for heat pumps
where and if applicable.
4. Lighting
4.1.
4.2.
4.3.
4.4.
4.5.
All unnecessary lighting in unoccupied areas will be turned off. Faculty and
staff members should make certain that lights are turned off when leaving the
instruction room or office when empty. Utilize natural lighting where
appropriate.
All outside lighting shall be off during daylight hours.
Gymnasium lights should not be left on unless the gymnasium is being
utilized.
All lights will be turned off when students and staff leave for the day as
allowed by the lighting programs for each building. Custodial staff will turn on
lights only in the areas in which they are working.
Refrain from turning lights on unless definitely needed. (Lights not only
consume electricity but also give off heat that places an additional load on the
air conditioning equipment. This increases the use of electricity necessary to
cool the room).
2
5. Water
5.1.
5.2.
5.3.
5.4.
Ensure all plumbing and/or intrusion (i.e. roof) leaks are reported and repaired
immediately.
Ground watering should only be done per the local water district
requirements.
When spray irrigating, ensure the water does not directly hit the facility or run
off to the storm drains.
Consider installing water sub-meters on irrigation and cooling tower supply
lines to eliminate sewer charges.
The district encourages the adoption, observation and implementation of these
procedures as provided. However, these procedures are not intended to be all-inclusive,
and they may be modified for local conditions.
3
New draft: September 15, 2015
Board of Trustees Policy 3261: Energy Conservation
The Board embraces energy conservation and believes it to be our responsibility to ensure that
every reasonable effort is made to conserve energy and natural resources while exercising sound
financial management.
The Board recognizes the importance of adopting an energy conservation policy. The Board also
affirms the implementation of this policy will be the joint responsibility of the Board, District
administration, faculty, staff, students, and support personnel. Success is based on cooperation
amid all groups.
To ensure the overall success of our behavior-based energy conservation program, the following
areas will be emphasized:
•
•
•
•
A designated campus/site administrator will be accountable for energy conservation on
his/her campus/site including conducting energy audits and providing timely feedback.
All personnel at each campus/site are expected to make a positive contribution to maximize
energy conservation and produce real energy savings.
The District will implement its energy conservation in accordance with Administrative
Procedure 3261.
Accurate records of energy consumption and cost will be maintained by the designated
campus/site administrator to provide verifiable performance results on the goals and progress
of the energy conservation program.
Further, to promote a safe, healthy learning environment and to complement the energy
conservation program, each campus/site shall review and adhere to the preventive maintenance
and monitoring plan administered by the campus/site physical plant for its facilities and systems,
including heating, ventilation and air conditioning, building envelope, and moisture management.
ADDENDUM
2016–2020
EDUCATIONAL
MASTER PLAN
MiraCosta Community College District
December 2015
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Acknowledgments
Board of Trustees
District Leadership
Jeanne Shannon, President
Dr. David Broad, Vice President
Rick Cassar
Dr. William C. Fischer
George McNeil
Frank Merchat
Jacqueline Simon
Naweed Tahmas, Student Trustee
Dr. Sunita Cooke, Superintendent/President
Charlie Ng, Vice President of Business &
Administrative Services
Dr. Mary Benard, Vice President of
Instructional Services
Dr. Richard Robertson, Vice President of
Student Services
Educational Plan Update Team
Budget & Planning Council
Dr. Mary Benard
Dr. Theresa Bolanos
Kimberly Coutts
Scott Fallstrom
Mike Fino
Dr. Lise Flocken
Trudy Fore
Joanne Gonzales
Melissa Lloyd-Jones
Charlie Ng
Dr. Richard Robertson
Dr. Nikki Schaper
Rita Soza
Jane Sparks
Dr. Wendy Stewart
Dr. Al Taccone
Katie White
Sheri Wright
Brayan Astorga
Dr. Mary Benard
Paul Clarke
Marti Essman
Scott Fallstrom
Mike Fino
Ruth Gay
Joanne Gonzales
Malcolm Heard
Susan Herrmann
Dr. Bridget Herrin
Myla Kelly, Faculty Co-Chair
Dave Massey
David McField
Charlie Ng, Admin Co-Chair
Gwen Partlow
Trevor Presley
Dr. Richard Robertson
Kim Simonds
Kathy Thiele
Jeff Uhlik
Dr. Mario Valente
Janelle West
Katie White
Dr. Alketa Wojcik
Sheri Wright
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table of Contents
Letter from the President ............................................................................................................................ 1
Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 2
Mission Statement & Board of Trustees ..................................................................................................... 6
Institutional Goals & Objectives .................................................................................................................. 7
Part I: Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... 8
I.1 Overview of the District ....................................................................................................................... 8
I.2 Educational Master Plan Addendum Overview ................................................................................... 9
Part II: Information for Planning ................................................................................................................ 12
II.1 District Information ........................................................................................................................... 12
Population Projections ........................................................................................................................ 12
Importance of the Military in the Regional Economy ......................................................................... 13
Regional Economy ............................................................................................................................... 13
II.2 College Information .......................................................................................................................... 15
Student Diversity................................................................................................................................. 15
Changes in Student Demographics since 2010 ................................................................................... 15
Changes in Student Enrollment since 2010 ........................................................................................ 16
Student Data ....................................................................................................................................... 17
Enrollment Management Information................................................................................................ 19
Student Services and Special Programs .............................................................................................. 19
Part III: Ten-Year Institutional Goals, Strategic Objectives & Five-Year Directions ................................ 22
Ten Year Institution Goals, Strategic Objectives and Five-Year Directions............................................. 23
Five-Year Directions, 2016-2020 ............................................................................................................. 27
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal I: ....................................................................................... 27
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal II: ...................................................................................... 29
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal III: ..................................................................................... 30
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal IV: .................................................................................... 30
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal V: ..................................................................................... 30
PART IV: Enrollment Projections ............................................................................................................... 32
Introduction to the Enrollment Projections............................................................................................ 32
Enrollment Change: Fall 2011 & Fall 2014 .............................................................................................. 33
Enrollment Projections: Fall 2020 ........................................................................................................... 33
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
PART V: Implications for Facilities ............................................................................................................ 34
APPENDIX A: Information for Planning ..................................................................................................... 35
Table 1: Educational Attainment in the MCCCD Service Area, 2013 Percent of Population age 25+ .... 35
Table 2. Population Projections for the MCC District Area, by Age ........................................................ 35
Table 3: Credit Students by Ethnicity ...................................................................................................... 36
Table 4: Student Population by Age........................................................................................................ 36
Table 5: Student Population by Military Status ...................................................................................... 37
Table 6: Student Fall Semester Headcount Enrollment, 2000-2014....................................................... 37
Table 7: Enrollments per Campus ........................................................................................................... 38
Table 9: Course Retention and Completion ............................................................................................ 39
Table 10: Basic Skills Improvement Rates by Program ........................................................................... 39
Table 11: Units Earned Without a Degree .............................................................................................. 40
Table 12: College-wide WSCH/FTEF ........................................................................................................ 40
Table 13: Student Participation in Student Services Programs .............................................................. 41
Table 14: Enrollment Projections District-wide and by Campus 2020 ................................................... 42
Figure A: Career Opportunities by Entry Level Education, San Diego County, 2012 – 2022 .................. 46
Figure B: Ethnic Distribution by Population Group ................................................................................. 47
Figure C: Student Ethnicity by Campus ................................................................................................... 48
Figure D: Cross Enrollments between Palomar and MiraCosta .............................................................. 48
Figure E: One Year High School Capture Rate, Classes of 2010-2014..................................................... 49
Figure F: Student Persistence from Fall Term to the Subsequent Spring Term...................................... 50
Figure G: Student Persistence from Fall Term to the Subsequent Fall Term.......................................... 50
Figure H: Number of Degrees Awarded Annually, 2009/2010 to 2013/2014 ........................................ 51
Figure I: Number of Certificates Awarded Annually, 2009/2010 to 2013/2014..................................... 52
Figure J: Transfer Velocity ....................................................................................................................... 53
Figure K: District-wide FTES by Course Type........................................................................................... 54
APPENDIX B: Employment & Economic Activity in the Region ................................................................ 55
Traded Clusters of Employment and Regional Activity Centers ............................................................. 55
Table B.1 Traded Industry Cluster Employment and Wages, 2010 .................................................... 56
Table B.2 below presents the percentage of traded industry cluster jobs located within each of the
major Metropolitan Statistical Areas of San Diego County. ............................................................... 57
Economic Activity Centers in the MCCCD Service Area .......................................................................... 58
APPENDIX C: High School Capture Rate and Educational Requirements for Careers .............................. 60
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Appendix C.1: High School Capture Rate Data 2-Year Rate .................................................................... 60
Appendix C.2: Gaps in Careers Requiring an Associate’s Degree ........................................................... 63
Appendix C.3: Gaps in Careers Requiring a Postsecondary Certificate .................................................. 65
Appendix C.4: Gaps in Careers Requiring Some College......................................................................... 67
Appendix C.5: Gaps in Careers Requiring a High School Diploma .......................................................... 68
Appendix C.6: Careers Requiring a Bachelor’s Degree ........................................................................... 77
APPENDIX D: MiraCosta College Institutional Plans ................................................................................. 80
MiraCosta College Plans.......................................................................................................................... 80
Comprehensive Master Plan ............................................................................................................... 80
Strategic Plan 2014-2017 .................................................................................................................... 80
Staffing Plan 2015-2018 ...................................................................................................................... 80
Technology Plan 2011-2014 ................................................................................................................ 80
AB86 Plan ............................................................................................................................................ 80
Instruction ............................................................................................................................................... 80
Experiential Education Plan ................................................................................................................ 80
Online Education Plan (Closed) 2011-2014......................................................................................... 80
Student Services...................................................................................................................................... 80
EOPS Plan ............................................................................................................................................ 80
Student Equity Plan 2014-2017 .......................................................................................................... 80
Student Success Plan........................................................................................................................... 81
Student Success and Support Program Plan (SSSP) ............................................................................ 81
Transfer Center Plan ........................................................................................................................... 81
Athletics Plan ...................................................................................................................................... 81
Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan- Waiting to hear from Joe Mazza ............................. 81
Business and Administrative Services ..................................................................................................... 81
Final Budget for 2015-16..................................................................................................................... 81
District Deferred Maintenance Plan-Waiting to hear from Tom ........................................................ 81
2017-2021 5-Year Capital Construction Plan (yearly update) ............................................................ 81
Sustainability Plan ............................................................................................................................... 81
Emergency Operations Plan ................................................................................................................ 81
Workplace Violence Plan .................................................................................................................... 82
Superintendent/President Division......................................................................................................... 82
Equal Employment Opportunity Plan ................................................................................................. 82
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Foundation and Development Office Long Range Plan, 2010-2019 ................................................... 82
References .................................................................................................................................................. 83
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Letter from the President
MiraCosta College is proud of over 80 years of service to the beautiful North County Coastal
area, where 90 percent of our graduates return to live within 25 miles of our campus. They start
their families and begin their careers in industry clusters like biotechnology, health care, high
tech manufacturing, telecommunications, and education.
The MiraCosta Community College District mission is to provide superior educational
opportunities and student-support services to a diverse population of learners with a focus on
their success. Our graduates rave about their enriching experiences in our general education,
transfer, and career-technical programs.
In the coming months the college will enhance its mission as it expands the current full spectrum
of offerings from university-transfer courses, career-and-technical education, certificate
programs, basic skills education, and lifelong-learning opportunities, to include the nation’s first
bachelor’s degree in biomanufacturing and a bachelor’s degree in nursing through a
collaboration with Point Loma Nazarene University. These two new bachelor’s degrees will
meet critical workforce needs within our community.
As the college endeavors to meet tomorrow’s industry and community needs, the update of the
educational master plan required analysis of projections and trends in demographics, the labor
market, and other important information with an eye to the future.
The process enables the college to include a variety of information sources including our
relationships with industry leaders to ensure our educational programs and services remain vital
to our business, industry and community, particularly as related to workforce readiness.
The Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016 – 2020 updates will allow us to project and plan
for the resources we will need to realize the future directions and implications of our analysis and
our plan.
Many people from across the college and our community have contributed to the research that
supports this document. Their passion for the college and our students exemplifies MiraCosta
College’s commitment to our mission.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Executive Summary
The MiraCosta Community College District (MCCCD) is located along the Southern California
coast between Orange County to the north and the metropolitan area of San Diego to the south.
The district includes the cities of Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas, Solana Beach, and Del Mar;
the community of Rancho Santa Fe; and portions of Carmel Valley and U.S. Marine Corps base
Camp Pendleton. The district operates four sites: the Oceanside Campus on 121 acres in the city
of Oceanside; the San Elijo Campus on 42 acres in the Encinitas community of Cardiff-by-theSea; the Community Learning Center on 7.6 acres in Oceanside; and the Technology Career
Institute on a two-acre office/classroom complex in Carlsbad.
In 2014/15, the MCCCD Budget and Planning Committee (BPC) tasked the Enrollment
Management Subcommittee to work with the Enrollment Management Committee to prepare an
addendum to the Educational Plan in the 2011 Comprehensive Master Plan. This group came to
be known as the Educational Plan Update Team. The team was tasked with developing an
enrollment management plan that projects target enrollments for the second five years of the tenyear Comprehensive Master Plan (CMP).
The MCCCD Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 is intended to guide institutional
and program planning and development, and it will serve as the district’s blueprint for the next
five years. The Enrollment Management Subcommittee of BPC will review the enrollment
management plan annually and update initiatives, strategies, and benchmarks accordingly, based
on current district challenges, institutional objectives and priorities, and projected funding levels.
District Background. The San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) estimates that
393,136 people lived in the MiraCosta College service area in 2014—about 12.3 percent of the
total population of the San Diego region. The MCCCD area’s population tends to be a bit older
than the region as a whole and has much higher household incomes than average for the region.
MCCCD area residents also tend to be more highly educated than the regional average. The
population of the southern part of the district tends to be older, better educated, more affluent,
and less diverse than the population living in the northern part of the district (based on all
residents/students over the age of 18).
The MCCCD service area has more than 17 percent of the region’s employment in
biotechnology, biomedical devices, and clean technology.
Student Information. MiraCosta College serves greater proportions of African American,
Hispanic, and multiethnic students than exist in the district population, providing access to
education for traditionally underrepresented groups. There is a disparity between the percentage
of the population living in the district who are white (67 percent of all residents) and the
percentage of students enrolled at the college who are white (47 percent). In addition, the
committee noted the following:
•
Placement scores indicate a need for additional basic skills courses. Overall, 57 percent
of students are placing into transfer-level English, 71 percent into transfer-level reading,
and 23 percent into transfer-level mathematics.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
•
Course retention and completion rates have remained stable over the past five years.
About 82 percent of students completed their courses, and 70 percent completed them
successfully.
•
Persistence from the fall to the spring semester is up 2.9 percentage points since 2010.
•
Persistence to a second year is up 4.6 percentage points since 2010.
•
Many students complete 60 or more units without receiving a degree.
•
The number of degrees and certificates awarded is up significantly over five years.
•
Only 6 percent of entering students transfer within two years, and 54 percent transfer
within eight years.
College Information. Several changes since the CMP was completed in 2010 were noted during
the planning process:
•
A higher percentage of the students are Hispanic (up from 27 percent in fall 2010 to 33.8
percent in fall 2014).
•
The number of veteran students is down, but the number of students who are military
dependents has increased.
•
The total number of students enrolled for fall semester (unduplicated headcount) is down
3.2 percent since 2010.
•
Total class enrollment is up 6 percent since 2010, but this growth was not evenly
distributed: Oceanside Campus enrollments were up 3 percent, San Elijo Campus
enrollments were down 18 percent, and online enrollments showed the greatest gain at 43
percent.
•
Fewer students enroll at MiraCosta College directly from high school. The number of
students enrolling at the college directly out of high school has decreased 19.8 percent
since 2010.
•
The percentage of full-time equivalent students (FTES) who are in transfer and CTE
courses has increased 6.6 percentage points since 2010.
•
A college-wide measure of productivity (weekly student contact hours/full time
equivalent faculty or WSCH/FTEF) is lower than the state standard.
•
Courses are usually 90 percent or more full.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Ten-Year Institutional Goals and Five-Year Directions, 2016-2020. The Educational Plan
Update Team reviewed the district and student demographic information and student outcomes
to identify directions that MCCCD needs to take over the next five years to achieve the goals of
the 2011Comprehensive Master Plan. The ten-year institutional goals and five-year directions
identified for each are presented in the table below.
Ten-Year Goal I: MiraCosta Community College District will become a vanguard educational
institution committed to innovation and researched best practices, broad access to higher education, and
environmental sustainability.
Five-Year Directions:
1.
Maintain comprehensive CTE, transfer, and basic skills programs and related student support
services at the Oceanside Campus.
2.
Create a strategic identity for the San Elijo Campus and build enrollment.
3.
Support growth of online instruction and support services.
4.
Expand and enhance adult education (noncredit) services throughout the district.
5.
Coordinate and integrate instructional and student support in the areas of scheduling strategies;
expand short-term and accelerated scheduling as appropriate; connect student education plan
assessment and planning to schedule development.
6.
Strengthen and expand instructional programming. The planning team identified four program
areas to expand to address the ten-year institutional goals: nursing and allied health programs;
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs; baccalaureate programs;
and the International Education Program.
7.
Support Kinesiology and Athletics, including intercollegiate and intramural programs.
8.
Enhance professional development to increase institutional capacity and performance.
Ten Year Goal II: MiraCosta Community College District will become the institution where each
student has a high probability of student success.
Five-Year Directions:
9.
Expand and enhance Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) core services and student
equity efforts for targeted populations identified in the Academic Success and Equity
Programs.
10.
Expand student access to learning communities.
11.
Incorporate a focus on the learning environment (including student gathering spaces and
flexible learning environments) in college planning.
12.
Coordinate and integrate learning support programs and services and student support programs
and services.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
13.
Expand cohort programs to include themed pathways.
Ten Year Goal III: MiraCosta Community College District will institutionalize effective planning
processes through the systematic use of data to make decisions.
Five-Year Directions:
14.
Employ student data analytics to improve outcomes at multiple levels.
Ten Year Goal IV: MiraCosta Community College District will demonstrate high standards of
stewardship and fiscal prudence.
Five-Year Directions:
15.
Use productivity benchmarks (FTES and WSCH/FTEF) and targets to determine need for and
plan new district facilities.
Ten Year Goal V I. MiraCosta Community College District will be a conscientious community
partner.
Five-Year Directions:
16.
Create stronger pathways from high school to MiraCosta College.
17.
Coordinate, integrate, and expand concurrent/dual enrollment.
18.
Expand and enhance partnerships with K-12 districts to support student preparation for
college-level courses.
19.
Expand and enhance business and industry services throughout the district service area.
20.
Expand and enhance community services throughout the district service area.
Implications for Facilities. The five-year directions outlined in this Educational Master Plan
Addendum create the need for new or remodeled facilities and instructional spaces. These needs
include: (a) remodeling at San Elijo to accommodate the nursing and allied health programs as
well as the biotechnology program; (b) remodeling for any space vacated at the Oceanside
Campus; (c) facilities and technology needed to support growth in online programs and services;
(d) facilities needed for adult education; and (e) more flexible learning environments and student
gathering places.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Mission Statement & Board of Trustees
MISSION STATEMENT
The MiraCosta Community College District mission is to
provide superior educational opportunities and studentsupport services to a diverse population of learners with a
focus on their success. MiraCosta offers undergraduate
degrees, university-transfer courses, career-and-technical
education, certificate programs, basic-skills education, and
lifelong learning opportunities that strengthen the
economic, cultural, social, and educational well-being of the
communities it serves.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
The seven elected members of the MiraCosta
Community College District Board of Trustees
each represent and must reside in a specific
area of the college district. The term of office
is four years, and beginning in 2014, members
are elected by district areas. The MiraCosta
College district includes the communities of
Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas, Cardiff,
Olivenhain, Leucadia, Solana Beach, Rancho
Santa Fe, Del Mar, Carmel Valley and parts of
Camp Pendleton. A student trustee elected by
the student body also sits on the Board of
Trustees.
Jeanne Shannon (District 1), President
Rick Cassar (District 2)
Jacqueline Simon (District 3)
Frank Merchat (District 4)
George McNeil (District 5)
David Broad (District 6), Vice President
William Fisher (District 7)
Naweed Tahman, Student Trustee
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Institutional Goals & Objectives
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Part I: Introduction
I.1 Overview of the District
During the Great Depression, the Oceanside-Carlsbad Union High School District Board of
Education bravely voted to establish a community college. Known then as the OceansideCarlsbad Junior College Department of the Oceanside High School District, the school opened
on September 3, 1934 with approximately 120 students. The college’s enrollment has since
grown to 15,000 credit students and an additional 12,000 noncredit and fee-based students. In
2014, MiraCosta College celebrated 80 years of educational excellence.
The MiraCosta Community College District (MCCCD) is located along the Southern California
coast between Orange County to the north and the metropolitan area of San Diego to the south.
MCCCD is approximately 35 miles north of San Diego and 90 miles south of Los Angeles. The
district includes the cities of Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas, Solana Beach, and Del Mar; the
community of Rancho Santa Fe; and portions of Carmel Valley and U.S. Marine Corps base
Camp Pendleton. The district operates four sites: the Oceanside Campus on 121 acres in the city
of Oceanside; the San Elijo Campus on 42 acres in the Encinitas community of Cardiff-by-theSea; the Community Learning Center on 7.6 acres in Oceanside; and the Technology Career
Institute on a two-acre office/classroom complex in Carlsbad.
The MiraCosta Community College District is the smallest (in terms of headcount) of the five
community college districts within San Diego County.
MiraCosta College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior
Colleges (ACCJC) of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. ACCJC is an
institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and
the U.S. Department of Education. The college is also approved by the California Department of
Education for the training of veterans under the provisions of the G.I. Bill of Regulations. The
University of California, California State University and high-ranking private universities give
credit for transfer courses completed at MiraCosta College.
MCCCD has demonstrated a progressive and innovative approach to aligning faculty,
curriculum, facilities, and student services with the region’s changing needs:
•
In collaboration with local business and industry, the new Technology Career Institute
offers not-for-credit fee-based industry-specific training and certificate programs.
•
In 2015 the district was selected as one of 15 California community colleges to offer a
baccalaureate program—the nation’s first biomanufacturing bachelor’s degree program.
Upper-division course work will build on existing MCCCD associate degrees in
biotechnology and will be offered starting in fall 2017.
•
The district population of older adults is projected to increase between 30 and 40 percent
in the next five years. In the midst of this demographic shift, all adult education classes
will be offered through MCCCD, including those currently offered by the San Dieguito
High School District. By summer 2016, MCCCD will offer all of the adult high school,
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
English as Second Language (ESL), older adult workforce re-entry, and parenting classes
in the southern end of the district.
I.2 Educational Master Plan Addendum Overview
Purpose and Process. In 2014/15, the Budget and Planning Committee tasked the Enrollment
Management Subcommittee to work with the Enrollment Management Committee to prepare an
addendum to the Educational Plan in the Comprehensive Master Plan (CMP). This group came
to be known as the Educational Plan Update Team. The team was tasked with developing an
enrollment management plan that projects target enrollments for the second five years of the tenyear CMP.
The Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 is driven by the institutional goals identified
in the CMP. The institutional objectives defined in the college’s Strategic Plan 2014-2017 also
are derived from the institutional goals outlined in the CMP. The college references these
institutional goals and objectives as it goes through its annual budgeting and planning process as
well as its annual program review process.
This Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 was built on the Educational Plan portion
of the 2011 Comprehensive Master Plan using a participatory, transparent planning process that
is well established at MiraCosta College. This planning process included four MCCCD councils
and extensive involvement from the campus at large during the development of the addendum to
the CMP, with more than 153 individuals (students, staff, and faculty) involved. The four
MCCCD councils include the following:
•
•
•
•
Academic Senate
Administrative Council
Classified Senate
Associated Student Government
Guiding Principles. The Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 is a comprehensive
document that will serve as the district’s blueprint for the next five years. It is intended to guide
institutional and program planning and development, providing guidance to instruction, student
services, and business services on the district's directions over the next five years. The
addendum’s guiding principles will inform college and district decisions about growth,
development, and resource-allocation and align with the mission and goals in the CMP.
The MiraCosta College Educational Plan Update Team identified the following principles to
guide enrollment management planning and decision making:
•
Enrollment management strategies demonstrate the college’s commitment to student
success and access through the following:
o Conducting outreach to the community through engaging communication
strategies.
o Delivering programs and services that address the needs of the students and
industry in the district’s service area.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
o Providing targeted services to support student success and equity.
•
The college ensures programs and services are flexible and responsive to student,
community, and industry needs through the following:
o Creating and maintaining local community and industry partnerships.
o Collaborating with K-12 and other educational institutions to support a collegegoing culture and to prepare high school graduates for college-level course work
(Oceanside Promise and Gear Up).
o Collaborating with community organizations to align and create noncredit
pathways to college-level course work and employment.
o Creating pathways to other higher education institutions for transfer purposes.
•
The college demonstrates its commitment to managing resources and ensuring
compliance with state and federal regulations, licensing, and accreditation requirements
as follows:
o Ensure an appropriate balance in the curriculum and course offerings among
transfer, occupational, degree/certificate, and developmental education programs.
o Steward campus resources in enrollment planning and delivery of student
services.
o Maintain compliance with state and federal regulations, licensing, and
accreditation (such as Title 5, California Code of Regulations; California
Education Code; ACCJC Accreditation Standards; Licensing Requirements; Title
IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; Office of Veterans Affairs; Americans
with Disabilities Act; and Federal Financial Aid).
Uses for Enrollment Management. The purpose of this Educational Master Plan Addendum
2016-2020 is to create a responsive, flexible, educationally and financially sound, research-based
approach to enrollment management. Enrollment management is an institution-wide, systematic,
research-driven system designed to attract and retain the students MCCCD wishes to serve while
helping them be successful. The Enrollment Management Plan identifies enrollment projections
and establishes future directions. The Enrollment Management Plan is tied to the budget
allocation process and institutional program planning.
MCCCD enrollment management efforts will accomplish the following:
• Support the mission and goals of the college by identifying and defining enrollment
projections/goals.
• Provide the greatest possible student access with a focus on educational quality, service
delivery and student success.
• Develop comprehensive, well-balanced educational programs and services that are
responsive to the needs of students and community.
• Inform resource allocation and facilities planning and drive campus resource allocation in
the areas of staffing, facilities, technology, equipment/supplies, and finances.
The Enrollment Management Committee assesses the Enrollment Management Plan annually
and updates initiatives, strategies, and benchmarks accordingly, based on current district
challenges, institutional objectives and priorities, and projected funding levels.
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Role in Guiding all Institutional Planning. The Enrollment Management Committee makes
recommendations to the Budget and Planning Committee and the superintendent/president on the
target number for full-time equivalent students (FTES) and WSCH/FTEF. These
recommendations drive the institutional program planning and review process.
The resource allocation process at MiraCosta College supports student success by allocating
resources (staffing, facilities, technology, supplies, and equipment) to support instructional
programs and student services. The allocation process begins with the Enrollment Management
Plan’s projection of courses, programs, and student services needed to respond to projected
student and community need. Budget and Planning Committee subcommittees review the
Strategic Plan and the plans prepared by MCCCD programs in the program review process and
recommends funding to support student success.
The Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 will be used to guide the college in
enrollment management and facilities planning. It will serve as a key reference for all MCCCD
programs as they complete their annual plans through program review. The Budget and Planning
Committee also will rely on the addendum to make recommendations regarding allocation of
resources.
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Part II: Information for Planning
II.1 District Information
The San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) estimates that 393,136 people lived in
the MiraCosta College service area in 2014—about 12.3 percent of the total population of the
San Diego region.
The MCCCD area’s population tends to be a bit older than the region as a whole (13.4 percent
are over age 65, compared to 12.6 percent regionally) and also has a higher percentage of the
population under age 18 (24.1 for MCCCD, 23.1 percent regionally). A much smaller percentage
of the MCCCD population is aged 18-24, the traditional college age (7.8 percent for MCCCD,
11.9 percent for the region). In total, there were about 30,700 residents of the MCCCD area
aged 18-24 in 2014.
The people residing in the MCCCD service area have much higher household incomes than
average for the region (an $86,707 median income in MCCCD, compared to $68,711 regionwide), with a much higher percentage of the households making over $100,000 per year (43
percent for MCCCD, 33 percent regionally).
MCCCD area residents tend to be more highly educated than the regional average as well. The
percentage of residents over age 25 who have a bachelor’s degree or higher is significantly
higher than the countywide average (34.6 percent) in five of the six cities located in the MCCCD
service area. More than half of the residents over age 25 in Carlsbad, Del Mar, Encinitas, Rancho
Santa Fe, and Solana Beach have a Bachelor’s degree or higher. Only Oceanside, at the northern
end of the district, has a lower percentage of residents over age 25 with a Bachelor’s Degree than
the countrywide average (24.8 percent versus 34.6 percent). Oceanside also has the highest
percentage of residents in the region over age 25 with less than a high school diploma (16.6
percent, higher than the 14.6 percent countywide). Table 1 in Appendix A presents educational
attainment in the MCCCD service area.
Population Projections
SANDAG projects that the population of the MCCCD service area will grow by 17 percent by
2050, but with a significant shift in the demographics of the region.
According to SANDAG, the population of the district area is projected to age significantly. A
similar trend is seen throughout San Diego County. The region will feel the effects of the Baby
Boom generation, who will live longer than previous generations and be less likely to move out
of the district. This will make it more difficult for younger families to move into the area. As a
result, there will be fewer traditionally college-aged students from which to draw.
The number of residents in the traditional college-aged population (18-24) is projected to decline
by nine percent by 2050; the number of residents aged 18-19 is projected to decline by 26
percent. In the meantime, the number of residents over the age of 61 is expected to more than
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double. See Table 2 in Appendix A for more detail about the population projections for the
MCCCD area.
Importance of the Military in the Regional Economy
San Diego County has the largest concentration of military in the world. The U.S. Navy has
designated San Diego Bay as a West Coast mega-port. About 33 percent of the U.S. Naval
Pacific Fleet is home ported in San Diego Bay. Naval bases in San Diego County include Naval
Air Station, North Island; Naval Station San Diego; Naval Amphibious Base, Coronado; Naval
Submarine Base, Point Loma; and Naval Medical Center San Diego. The U.S. Marines Corps
also has a significant presence in San Diego County, with the Marine Corps Base at Camp
Pendleton, the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar and the Marine Corps Recruit Depot. San
Diego also is home to the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR).
In fiscal year 2015, the military spent $24.8 billion in the San Diego region, up 75 percent from
the $14.2 billion that the U.S. Department of Defense spent in San Diego in 2007. The San
Diego Military Advisory Council (www.sdmac.org) estimates that with the multiplier effect (i.e.,
each military job leads to other jobs created to serve those workers), the military accounts for
$45 billion of the gross regional product (GRP) in 2015. That is 21.5 percent of the region’s
total GRP.
San Diego County ranks first in the nation for military and civilian Department of Defense
wages and salaries. The military sector is responsible for about 328,000 of the region’s total jobs
(including the ripple effect of defense spending) – about 22 percent of all the jobs in San Diego
County. A wide range of jobs are created as a result of defense spending, including jobs in
engineering, food services, retail sales, health care, education, real estate, shipbuilding, and
construction.
The MCCCD service area includes the base headquarters for Marine Corps Base Camp
Pendleton, the major West Coast base of the United States Marine Corps. With over 125,000
acres and17 miles of coastline, Camp Pendleton offers training facilities for many active and
reserve Marine, Army and Navy Units. Camp Pendleton is the largest local employer, and has a
daytime population of approximately 70,000 military and civilian personnel.
The Department of Veteran Affairs reports that more than 260,000 veterans reside in the county,
the largest number of military retirees anywhere in the nation.
Regional Economy
Industries Located in the San Diego Region and in MCCCD
The MCCCD has been fastest growing in the region in terms of industrial space. In 2007
(when SANDAG last published a regional activity centers study) the MCCCD service area had
about 15 percent of the existing industrial space in the county, and about 27 percent of the
industrial space that was then under construction. Over 68 percent of the new industrial space
that in 2007 had been proposed to be built was in the district service area. Although updated
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information has not been published to indicate how much of this space was built during the
recession, it is clear that the district serves the part of the county that is fastest growing in
industrial space.
The MCCCD service area has over 17 percent of the region’s employment in biotechnology,
biomedical devices and in clean technology. The Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) that most
closely aligns with the district service area (North County West) also accounts for a sizable
portion of the employment in industries that bring outside capital into the region (called traded
industry clusters). These traded industry clusters are the groups of companies that drive
economic growth. The MCCCD service area has over 17 percent of the jobs in the biomedical
devices and products cluster, in the biotechnology and pharmaceuticals cluster, and in the clean
technology cluster, which includes environmental services. (The largest concentration of jobs in
these industry clusters are found in the North City MSA, which includes Del Mar, part of the
MCCCD service area). The North County West MSA also has almost 60 percent of the jobs in
action sports manufacturing.
Appendix B presents more detailed information about regional activity centers and traded
clusters of employment.
Projections of Employment Growth by Occupation
Figure A in Appendix A lists the fastest and largest growing career opportunities in San Diego
County by educational level from the year 2012 through 2022. The term “fastest growing” refers
to new jobs that are generated by new growth in that industry. The term “largest growing” refers
to job openings that include both new jobs and replacement needs. (Data is based on Labor
Market Information from the California Employment Development Division and Economic
Modeling Specialists Inc.)
Registered nurses, web developers, environmental science technicians and preschool teachers are
among the most promising career fields that require an Associate’s Degree. There is also strong
demand for trained Licensed Vocational Nurses, Nursing Assistants, and workers in other allied
health occupations. For those students with Bachelor’s Degrees and above, marketing,
business/accounting, healthcare and the sciences offer the best opportunities.
MCCCD currently offers associate degree programs in nursing and programs for licensed
vocational nurses, medical and nursing assistants, and other health care technician programs. In
the fall of 2017, MiraCosta College will begin offering a Bachelor’s Degree in
Biomanufacturing. The college selected this program based on the number of biotechnology
manufacturing companies in the area and their expressed need for skilled workers. The data on
job opportunities supports this need: there are approximately 125 job openings annually in the
field, but only 50 graduates annually to fill them. MiraCosta College aims to become one of the
top suppliers of skilled Biotechnology workers in the region.
Almost every position in the healthcare-related field shows a need for more trained workers. A
gap analysis compares the number of jobs available in a service area with the number of
employees being produced by the educational institutions within that service area. Where there
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are more jobs than graduates, there is evidence of a gap. These situations are opportunities for
colleges to explore new programs.
Appendix C provides a list of positions reviewed, salaries, competing programs and graduates
produced by all of the colleges in the county. For the purpose of this analysis, the region is
defined as San Diego County rather than the specific district area. All San Diego community
colleges are included in the counts of degree programs as well as graduates because each of these
graduates could be competing for the same jobs. In terms of available jobs, only those with 50 or
more openings per year were considered. Note: The analysis does not account for the private
and for-profit institutions that may also provide graduates to the pool of job seekers.
Comparisons were made by matching Taxonomy of Programs (TOP) codes with the Standard
Occupational Classification (SOC) system in an attempt to match college programs to available
jobs. There is not a direct match. In many cases there is a “many to many” relationship, so there
will be some variability in the data.
Almost every position in the healthcare-related field shows a gap. Paralegals and legal secretaries
are in demand, as are preschool teachers and electrical engineering technicians.
II.2 College Information
Student Diversity
The credit student body of MiraCosta College is more diverse than the population the district
serves. There is a disparity between the percentage of the population living in the district who are
white (67 percent of all residents) and the percentage of students enrolled at the college who are
white (47 percent). The population of the southern part of the district tends to be older, better
educated, more affluent and less diverse than the population living in the northern part of the
district (based on all residents/students over the age of 18). Older students are less likely to need
access to community colleges, especially if they currently hold a bachelor’s degree or greater.
Families in affluent areas often do not consider community colleges as a choice for their
children’s advanced education.
MiraCosta College serves greater proportions of African American, Hispanic, and multiethnic
students than exist in the district population, providing access to education for traditionally
underrepresented groups. Please see Figure B in Appendix A for the Ethnic Distribution by
Population Group.
Changes in Student Demographics since 2010
•
A higher percentage of the students are Hispanic. In fall 2010, 52.6 percent of MCCCD
credit students were white, 27.0 percent were Hispanic, 7.7 percent were Asian, and 3.8
percent were African American. In fall 2014, 45.6 percent of the MCCCD credit students
were white (down 7 percentage points) and 33.8 percent were Hispanic (up 6.8 percentage
points). The percentage of students who were Asian (7.4 percent) and African American (3.4
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
percent) dropped slightly since 2010. See Table 3 in Appendix A for student credit
breakdown by ethnicity.
There is a great deal of difference in diversity among the campus sites. This is due in part to
the locations of each campus and the populations they serve. For more detail see Figure C in
Appendix A, Student Ethnicity by Campus.
•
The average age of the student population has become somewhat younger. Two age
groups increased as a percentage of the population between fall 2010 and fall 2014:
•
The traditional college age group, ages 18-24. In fall 2010, 57.8 percent of the MCCCD
credit student population was age 18 to 24; by fall 2014 that age group made up 59.3
percent of the student population.
•
Students ages 25-34. This age group made up 20.6 percent of the student population in
fall 2010, and 22.5 percent in fall 2014.
The percentage of fall semester students who were over age 35 declined from 14.2 percent in
2010 to 13.7 percent in fall 2014. See Table 4 in Appendix A for more information on
student population by age.
•
The number of veteran students is down, but the number of students who are military
dependents has increased. MCCCD enrolled 980 military veterans in 2014/15, down almost
16 percent from 1,162 veteran students in 2013/14 and down 3 percent from the 1,011
veterans enrolled in 2012/13. The number of students who are military dependents has been
increasing over the past three years, from 523 in 2012/13 to 912 in 2014/15. Student
population by military status is presented in Table 5 of Appendix A.
Changes in Student Enrollment since 2010
•
The total number of students enrolled for fall semester (unduplicated headcount) is down
3.2 percent since 2010. MCCCD’s total unduplicated headcount enrollment grew from
11,865 in 2000 to 17,140 in fall 2009, a 44.5 percent growth (the fastest in the San Diego
region). In fall 2010, 16,701 students enrolled at MCCCD. By fall 2014, unduplicated
headcount enrollment dropped to 16,173, a reduction of 907 students from the 2009 high (a
5.6 percent decline in total headcount enrollment). Total unduplicated headcount decreased
3.2 percent between 2010 and 2014. Table 6 of Appendix A presents fall semester headcount
enrollment data by year, 2000-2014.
•
Total class enrollment is up 6 percent since 2010, but enrollments are down 18 percent at
San Elijo and up 43 percent online. While total enrollments (in all classes) increased 6
percent between fall 2010 and fall 2014 (from 37,880 in 2010 to 40,038 in 2014), this growth
was not evenly distributed:
o Oceanside campus enrollments were up 3 percent (676 enrollments)
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o San Elijo enrollments were down 18 percent (1,440 enrollments)
o Online enrollments showed the greatest gain, at 43 percent (2,751 enrollments)
Table 7 of Appendix A presents more detail about enrollments per campus.
•
More students come from the Palomar district area than leave the MCCCD region to
attend Palomar. In 2014/2015, more students who live in the Palomar district area enrolled
in MCCCD classes (about 6,825) than students who live in the MCCCD area who enrolled at
Palomar (5,117 students). See Figure D in Appendix A, Cross Enrollments between Palomar
and MiraCosta for more detail.
•
Fewer students enroll in MCCCD directly from high school. The number of students
enrolling in MCCCD directly out of high school has decreased 19.8 percent since 2010, from
a total of 1,197 in 2010 to 960 in 2014. Overall, the number of students coming from indistrict high schools dropped 18.9 percent (from 919 to 745) and the number of students
coming from out-of-district high schools dropped 22.7 percent (down from 278 to 215).
Figure E in Appendix A presents the One-Year High School Capture Rate, 2010-2014.
•
The rapid rise in four-year college costs and student debt loads may cause more students to
complete their first two years of post-secondary education at a community college. In
2010, total student loan debt outstanding was approximately $833 billion. By 2015 the total
student loan debt outstanding had grown over 55 percent, to approximately $1.3 trillion.
Community colleges are the only colleges where graduates typically have no debt; only about
17 percent of community college students borrow for their education (www.acct.org).
Student Data
•
Placement scores indicate a need for additional basic skills courses. Placement scores in
English, reading, and math were quite consistent between 2010/11 and 2014/15. Overall, 57
percent of students are placing into transfer-level English, 71 percent into transfer-level
reading, and 23 percent into transfer-level mathematics.
The percentage of students who score one level below college-level ESL increased from 26
percent in 2010/11 to 35 percent in 2014/15. The percentage of students scoring two or more
levels below college-level in ESL has dropped from 75 percent to 64 percent over those five
years.
Table 8 in Appendix A presents more detail about placements rates in English, ESL, Reading
and Math over five years.
•
Course retention and completion rates have remained stable over the past five years.
About 82 percent of students completed their courses. The percentage of students who
complete their courses successfully has edged up slightly over the past five years, from 68
percent in 2010/11 to 70 percent in 2014/15. Table 9 in Appendix A presents the percentage
of courses completed successfully, 2010/2011 to 2014/2015.
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•
Persistence to a second semester is up 2.9 percentage points since 2010. The percentage of
incoming fall students who returned for a second semester was 71.2 percent in fall 2010,
dipped to 69.6 percent in fall 2011, and then increased to 74.1 percent in 2014-2015. Figure
F in Appendix A presents student persistence from fall term to the subsequent spring term.
•
Persistence to a second year is up 4.6 percentage points since 2010. The percentage of
incoming fall students who return for a second year (fall to fall) was 52.6 percent in fall 2010
and increased to 57.2 percent in 2014/15. Figure G in Appendix A presents student
persistence from fall term to the subsequent fall term.
•
ESL and basic skills improvement rates are increasing but not steadily. Basic skills
improvement rates are the percentage of students who have taken a basic skills class and who
within three years have successfully completed course work at least one level above their
prior basic skills enrollment.
o In English, 38.2 percent of the 2004/2005 student cohort improved; this percentage
increased to 40.0 percent for the 2007/2008 cohort, but dropped back to 38.9 percent
for the 2008/2009 cohort.
o There was fairly steady growth in improvement rates in math, from 36.5 percent for
the 2004/2005 cohort to 39.1 percent for the 2008/2009 cohort.
o In ESL, student improvement rates rose slowly (from 29.6 percent in 2004/2005 to
31.5 percent in 2006/2007, then jumped to 38.8 percent for the 2007/2008 cohort.
The improvement rate dropped back to 30.7 percent for the 2008/2009 cohort of
students.
Table 10 in Appendix A presents detail for the basic skills improvement rates by program.
•
Many students complete 60 or more units without receiving a degree. In 2014/15, a total of
904 students enrolled at MCCCD (9 percent of all students) had already completed 60 or
more units. Table 11 in Appendix A provides data on the number of students who have
earned over 60 units without a degree.
•
The number of degrees and certificates awarded is up significantly over five years. The
number of degrees awarded increased almost 150 percent over five years, from 529 in 20092010 to 1,319 in 2013/14. The number of certificates awarded increased more than 175
percent over five years, from 516 in 2009-2010 to 1,430 in 2013/14. Figures H and I present
the number of degrees and certificates awarded annually over the five years since 2009/2010.
•
Only 6 percent of entering students transfer within two years, and 54 percent transfer
within eight years. The population of students transferring is small both in terms of entering
cohort as well as total transfers. In order to be included in the analysis as a “transfer-bound”
student, an individual had to be a first-time college student in 2007-2008, complete a
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minimum of 12 units in 6 years and take a transfer-level English or math course. Figure J in
Appendix A presents transfer velocity over eight years.
Enrollment Management Information
•
The percentage of full-time equivalent students (FTES) who are in transferable and CTE
courses has increased 6.6 percentage points since 2010. CTE and transferable courses made
up 84.9 percent of the FTES in fall 2014, with 63.7 percent of FTES in transferable courses.
This is up from 78.3 percent of all FTES in fall 2010, with 59.8 percent in transferable
courses. Figure K in Appendix A presents the district-wide FTES by Course Type, fall 2010
through fall 2014.
•
College-wide WSCH/FTEF is lower than the state standard. College-wide WSCH/FTEF
ranged between 414 and 445 during the fall 2010 to fall 2014 semesters (see Table 12 in
Appendix A for detail). The state standard is 525. Due to facilities and class size maxima,
47 percent of courses enroll fewer than 35 students.
•
Courses are usually 90 percent or more full. Fill rates (the number of seats filled out of the
total seats available) are above 90 percent in most cases, but have declined recently as more
lower-enrolled classes are allowed to maintain student access.
Student Services and Special Programs
Student Support Services
MiraCosta College offers a variety of programs and services to support its students. Some
programs address the needs of the entire student population, while others target the needs of
specific student groups. District-wide data from fall 2011 to fall 2014 show an increase of 12
percent in FTES. Increased student enrollment has impacted student support services with
increases in student contacts and services provided over the past 5 years.
Table 13 in Appendix A presents student participation in student services programs. There are
several programs that have demonstrated marked increases in service utilization. The Academic
Proctoring Center has seen a 124 percent increase in the number of exams proctored in online,
hybrid, and on ground courses with a 111 percent increase in the number of assessments in the
Testing office. Through educational planning services including academic and career,
Counseling has seen a 15 percent increase in the number of students served. There has been a
significant growth in the number of students applying for and receiving financial aid with a 66
percent increase in the number of students served. The number of students served in DSPS has
increased by 18 percent with a growing diversity of disabilities.
In meeting the needs of a growing and changing population, coordinated and integrated services
are needed that remove barriers to student access and enhance student experience. Based on
effective practices and research, providing one-stop services is an effective strategy.
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Special Programming
Academic Success and Equity Programs. In an effort to meet the needs of a wide variety of
students, MCCCD recruits prospective students to participate in a variety of Academic Success
and Equity programs. These programs target at-risk populations including veterans, former
foster youth, first generation students, and disproportionately impacted populations. Programs
such as Resources and Assistance for Former Foster Youth (RAFFY), First Year Experience,
Puente, and Umoja provide support designed to help students to be both academically and
personally successful. Certain Academic Success and Equity programs have seen increases with
Umoja growing by 97 percent and Puente by 269 percent over the past 3 years. When compared
to college-wide data, both programs demonstrate higher levels of persistence for first-time to
college students, students attempting a math and English in their first year, and students
receiving degrees and certificates.
Student Support. The Student Success and Support Program (SSSP), which has received
increased funding from the State of California, addresses core services that the college provides
in the areas of orientation, assessment for placement, counseling/advising, and follow-up for atrisk students. The Student Success and Support Program plan focuses on innovative measures to
improve student transition and success including face-to-face orientations, drop-in advising and
mobile counseling services, an online educational planning tool (MyEdPlan), and workshops for
students at-risk. The plan calls for technology upgrades and improvements to help students
achieve their academic goals.
MCCCD uses data about student academic performance to make decisions about appropriate
interventions designed to help students to succeed in basic skills courses and in other areas where
academic performance is critical to successful completion of certificates and degrees.
Student Equity Program. MCCCD has a Student Equity Plan, which is designed to address
disproportionate impact in the areas of access, course completion, ESL and basic skills
completion, degree and certificate completion, and transfer. The plan is updated every three
years and includes initiatives to address areas of academic gap for target student populations.
Initiatives which emphasize collaboration between Instruction and Student Services include:
•
The GEAR UP for College Summer Program
•
Pathways to 21st Century Careers
•
Samoan Cultural Festival
•
Extension of library hours during finals week
•
Increased 4-year college visits for Umoja, Puente, Former Foster Youth, and First Year
Experience students
•
Student Equity Summit
Additional programs and services for students include:
Academic Proctoring Center
Admissions and Records
School Relations and Diversity Outreach
Service Learning
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Articulation
Associated Student Government
Bookstore
College Police
Scholarships
Student Accounts
Student Help Desk
Study Abroad
Wellness Center
Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics. The MiraCosta College Athletic Plan, completed in
2015, and the Pacific Coast Athletic Conference Program Review of MiraCosta Athletics, also
completed in 2015, provide insight into the future. Both include recommendations aimed at
sustaining and improving the current intercollegiate and intramural athletic programs and
improving the facilities that support the academic programs associated with athletics and the
Kinesiology Department. In 2015, MCCCD student athletes participated in six intercollegiate
activities (women’s soccer, men’s soccer, women’s basketball, men’s basketball, women’s
volleyball, women’s sand volleyball). The intercollegiate program served 108 student athletes in
2015. In order to sustain and improve the current programs it will be necessary to bring the
gymnasium and adjacent structures up to 21st century standards, add support staff, and assure that
MCCCD students and members of visiting athletic teams have access to modern equipment and
facilities. MCCCD continues to support a modest intercollegiate athletic program.
The addition of Women’s Volleyball and Women’s Sand Volleyball in 2014/15 brought
MCCCD into compliance with Title IX requirements for intercollegiate athletic competition,
meeting test one (participation proportionate to undergraduate full time student enrollment). The
balance between men’s and women’s opportunities for participation in intercollegiate
competition must be considered when decisions are made about athletics.
In 2007, 371 students participated in intramural activities. In 2014, 985 students participated in
69 intramural events and activities. Intramural athletic student participation has grown over the
years and students are participating through clubs and organizations in activities that complement
the classroom experience. Students have participated in hiking, kayaking, flag football, and
soccer, among a myriad of intramural opportunities.
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Part III: Ten-Year Institutional Goals, Strategic Objectives &
Five-Year Directions
The Educational Plan Update Team reviewed the district and student demographic information
and the student outcomes summarized in Part II to identify directions that MCCCD needs to take
over the next five years to achieve the goals of the 2010-2020 Comprehensive Master Plan.
During this review, the planning team considered its guiding principles for enrollment
management planning and decision-making to identify five-year directions. These guiding
principles include:
•
Demonstrating the College’s commitment to student success and access through outreach
to the community, by delivering programs and services that address the needs of students
and regional industries, and by providing targeted services to support student success and
equity.
•
Ensuring that programs and services are flexible and responsive to student, community,
and industry needs by maintaining community and industry partnerships; collaborating
with K-12 and other educational institutions; collaborating with community organizations
on noncredit pathways to college-level course work and employment; and creating
transfer pathways to baccalaureate-granting institutions.
•
Managing resources and ensuring compliance with state and federal regulations,
licensing, and accreditation requirements to ensure an appropriate balance in the
curriculum and course offerings among transfer, occupational, degree/certificate, and
developmental education programs; stewarding campus resources; and maintaining
compliance with state and federal regulations, licensing, and accreditation.
The planning team cross walked the strategic objectives identified in the MCCCD 2014-2017
Strategic Plan to the ten-year institutional goals established in the 2011 Comprehensive Master
Plan. The team then identified the key directions that need to be pursued between 2015 and 2020
to meet the goals of the 2011 Comprehensive Master Plan.
The cross-walk of the Ten Year Institutional Goals, Strategic Objectives and Five-Year
Directions is presented in Table 14 on the following pages.
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Ten Year Institution Goals, Strategic Objectives and Five-Year Directions
CMP: Ten-Year Institutional Goals
I. MiraCosta Community College
District will become a vanguard
educational institution committed
to innovation and researched best
practices, broad access to higher
education, and environmental
sustainability.
Strategic Plan 2014-17:
Strategic Objectives
Institutional Objective I.1: Foster
an Inclusive Community of learning
and practice.
Five-Year Directions 2016-2020
1. Maintain comprehensive CTE, Transfer, and
Basic Skills programs and related student
support services at the Oceanside Campus.
Institutional Objective I.2: Identify 2. Create a strategic identity for the San Elijo
and implement best practices for
Campus and build enrollment.
a. Augment the transfer identity with
promoting and increasing access to
new programs
college programs and services.
b. Draw students to the San Elijo
Institutional Objective I.3: Integrate
Campus by establishing San Elijo as
sustainability into the college
the Nursing, Allied Health &
Wellness, and Biotech campus.
environment, culture, and experience,
and extend outreach to the
communities we serve.
3. Support growth of online instruction and
support services.
4. Expand and enhance Adult Education
(noncredit) services throughout the district.
5. Coordinate and integrate Instructional and
Student Support in the areas of scheduling
strategies; expand short term and accelerated
scheduling as appropriate, connect student
education plan assessment and planning to
schedule development.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
6. Strengthen and expand instructional
programming.
a. Nursing and Allied Health programs
b. STEM
c. Baccalaureate programs
d. International Education Program.
7. Support Kinesiology and Athletics, including
intercollegiate and intramural programs.
8. Enhance professional development to
increase institutional capacity and
performance.
II. MiraCosta Community College
District will become the institution
where each student has a high
probability of student success
Institutional Objective II.1: Ensure 9. Expand and enhance SSSP core services and
educational planning tools, processes
student equity efforts for targeted
and resources are contemporary and
populations including Academic Success and
optimize student success.
Equity Programs.
Institutional Objective II.2: Foster
an intellectual environment where
faculty have regular access to and
opportunities to engage in practices
of teaching excellence.
Institutional Objective II.3: Utilize
researched best practices and
innovative strategies to develop
and/or sustain communities of
learning designed to produce equity
in student outcomes.
10. Expand student access to learning
communities.
11. Incorporate a focus on the learning
environment (including student gathering
spaces and flexible learning environments)
in college planning.
12. Coordinate and integrate both learning
support programs and services (including
TASC, Math Center and Writing Center
tutoring in the Hub at Oceanside, San Elijo,
and CLC Campuses) and student support
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
programs and services by providing one-stop
services.
III. MiraCosta Community College
District will institutionalize
effective planning processes
through the systematic use of data
to make decisions.
Institutional Objective III.1:
Advance our culture of evidence by
maximizing the access to and use of
data.
13. Expand cohort programs to include themed
pathways.
14. Employ student data analytics to improve
outcomes at multiple levels. Provide student
learning outcomes and student performance
and progress data for use in program review.
Institutional Objective III.2:
Employ strategic collaboration
throughout the institution to move
from evidence to action.
IV. MiraCosta Community College
District will demonstrate high
standards of stewardship and
fiscal prudence.
Institutional Objective IV.1:
Maintain budget practices that result
in sustainable, balanced budgets and
sufficient reserves.
15. Use productivity benchmarks (FTES, and
WSCH/FTEF) and targets to determine need
for and plan new district facilities.
Institutional Objective IV.2:
Maintain a system of internal
controls that results in unqualified
audits.
Institutional Objective IV.3: Invest
in and preserve assets (land and
physical plant, technology and
equipment) that serve district needs.
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
V. MiraCosta Community College
District will be a conscientious
community partner
Institutional Objective V.1:
Collaborate and partner with
employers and the business
community to address global
workforce needs and trends.
16. Create stronger pathways from high school to
MiraCosta College.
Institutional Objective V.2:
Collaborate with community partners
to create pathways for students that
provide opportunities for learning and
development outside of the classroom.
18. Expand and enhance partnerships with K-12
districts to support student preparation for
college-level courses.
Institutional Objective V.3: Increase
the two-year high school capture rate
in comparison to the fall 2010 rate.
17. Coordinate, integrate and expand
concurrent/dual enrollment.
19. Expand and enhance business and industry
services throughout the district service area.
20. Expand and enhance community services
throughout the district service area.
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Five-Year Directions, 2016-2020
Ten-Year Institutional Goal I:
MiraCosta Community College District will become a vanguard educational institution
committed to innovation and researched best practices, broad access to higher education,
and environmental sustainability.
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal I:
1.
Maintain comprehensive CTE, Transfer, and Basic Skills programs and related
student support services at the Oceanside Campus. The Oceanside Campus, while
growing more slowly than several other district campuses, is by far the largest, with 60
percent of the district’s total enrollment and 78 percent of the district’s in-person (not
online) enrollments. Programs and services provided at the Oceanside Campus will reach
the highest percentage of students.
2.
Create a strategic identity for the San Elijo Campus and build enrollment. San Elijo
Campus enrollments have dropped 18 percent since fall 2010, from 7,837 in fall 2010 to
6,397 in fall 2014. The focus of the academic offerings at the San Elijo campus has been
preparation for transfer, but this is not drawing enough students. MCCCD needs to
augment the transfer identity with new programs. Occupational projections indicate
strong career opportunities for students in nursing and allied health programs. In
addition, much of the region’s Biotechnology industry cluster is centered in Carlsbad,
close to the San Elijo campus. Therefore, the planning team proposes to draw students to
the San Elijo Campus from across the district by establishing San Elijo as the Nursing,
Allied Health & Wellness, and Biotechnology campus.
3.
Support growth of online instruction and support services. Enrollment in online
programs demonstrated the greatest growth between 2010 and 2014, increasing 43
percent (from an enrollment of 6,376 students in fall 2010 to 9,127 students in fall 2014).
Online programs accounted for 76 percent of the increase in enrollments district wide
during that period. It is therefore critical that students enrolled in online programs
receive the high quality academic and student services needed to support their academic
success.
4.
Expand and enhance Adult Education (noncredit) services throughout the district. In
2013/2014, there were over 6,000 student enrollments in noncredit/adult education
courses throughout the MCCCD region. Overall, the courses available met less than 12.5
percent of the identified need for adult basic education, ESL, career technical education
and programs for adults with disabilities. A year of collaborative planning by the Coastal
North County Consortium of adult education providers resulted in the recommendation to
expand the MCCCD adult education program by having MCCCD provide adult
education services throughout the region, including in the San Dieguito area (where adult
education had been provided by San Dieguito Union High School District).
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The comprehensive adult education plan found significant gaps between the number of
students needing adult education and the number of classrooms available for adult
education classes. It also noted a need for more computer facilities for all adult education
classrooms throughout the region, a need for a GED testing center in the Coastal North
County region, and gaps in the availability of assessment testing, placement services and
other student support services.
5.
Coordinate and integrate Instructional and Student Support in the areas of scheduling
strategies; expand short term and accelerated scheduling as appropriate, connect
student education plan assessment and planning to schedule development. To be most
effective, the enrollment management process needs stronger predictive data about the
classes that students need to meet their educational goals, and when students plan to take
each class. This predictive data could be available if data from student educational plans
could be accessed as part of the enrollment management system.
6.
Strengthen and expand instructional programming. The planning team identified four
program areas to expand to address the ten-year institutional goals:
7.
a.
Nursing and Allied Health programs. There is strong occupational demand for
trained Registered Nurses, Licensed Vocational Nurses, Medical Assistants and
Nursing Assistants.
b.
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) programs. Additional seats
in courses in science, technology, engineering and math will be needed to meet
the current and projected demand for more qualified workers in health-related
occupations, in engineering and in other technical occupations.
c.
Baccalaureate programs. MCCCD is currently developing its first baccalaureate
program in biomanufacturing. MCCCD is prepared to develop a baccalaureate in
nursing, to meet the growing demand by hospitals that nurses have a BSN to meet
the minimum qualifications for higher-paying jobs in the field.
d.
International Education Program. MCCCD has over 17 percent of the San Diego
region’s employment in industries that drive economic growth by bringing outside
capital into the region (called traded industry clusters). These industry clusters
include biomedical devices and products, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals, and
clean technology. The MCCCD region also has almost 60 percent of the jobs in
action sports manufacturing. The industries in traded clusters do international
business in a global economy, and need staff with a global perspective and
understanding of other cultures.
Support Kinesiology and Athletics, including intercollegiate and intramural programs.
The MiraCosta Athletic Plan (2014) and the Pacific Coast Athletic Conference Program
Review for MiraCosta Athletics (2015) include recommendations to provide better
facilities for the Kinesiology, Health and Nutrition (KHAN) academic department. The
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EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
plans make specific reference to adding women’s cross country and men’s baseball to the
intercollegiate program.
8.
Enhance professional development to increase institutional capacity and performance.
The college needs to support faculty and staff professional development efforts to gain
new knowledge and skills that will enable them to provide high quality instruction to all
students, throughout the curriculum.
Ten-Year Institutional Goal II:
MiraCosta Community College District will become the institution where each student has a
high probability of student success.
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal II:
9.
Expand and enhance SSSP core services and student equity efforts for targeted
populations including Academic Success and Equity Programs. The Student Success
and Support Program will augment services in the areas of orientation, assessment for
placement, counseling, advising and educational planning services, and follow-up for atrisk students. MCCCD’s 2014-2017 Student Equity Plan includes initiatives to address
gaps in these services for target student populations.
10.
Expand student access to learning communities. Students participate in learning
communities by enrolling in paired sets of classes so that they get to know their fellow
students and develop collaborative learning relationships with them. Participation in a
learning community in the first year of college particularly can be effective for students
both academically and socially (James, Bruch, & Jahangir, 2006; Tinto, 2008). MCCCD
currently offers two learning communities, both of which focus on basic skills courses.
11.
Incorporate a focus on the learning environment (including student gathering spaces
and flexible learning environments) in college planning. Collaborative learning
strategies (learning communities, project-based learning, study groups, small group
tutoring, etc.) require that students can find the spaces they need on campus to work
together in small groups. Student gathering areas with flexible spaces and furnishings are
needed to facilitate this collaborative learning.
12.
Coordinate and integrate both learning support programs and services and student
support programs and services by providing one-stop services. Students need to be able
to find and access the learning support programs and services that are available to help
them succeed. MCCCD will coordinate tutoring services available through the Tutoring
and Academic Support Center (TASC), the Math Center and the Writing Center. These
services are currently provided in the Hub at the Oceanside, San Elijo, and CLC
Campuses.
13.
Expand cohort programs to include themed pathways. MCCCD has developed program
roadmaps for eight themed pathways. These roadmaps provide a specific program of
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study for each pathway, and a semester-by-semester list of specific general education
classes and courses in the major. Enrolling a cohort of students into these themed
pathways will be facilitated by template scheduling, which will schedule the required
classes together each semester and guarantee that the required classes are available. The
themed pathway structure would encourage students to take their required math and
English courses in their first two semesters while exploring in their major. Students in the
themed pathway cohort would have priority registration into the template-scheduled
classes.
Ten-Year Institutional Goal III:
MiraCosta Community College District will institutionalize effective planning processes
through the systematic use of data to make decisions.
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal III:
14.
Employ student data analytics to improve outcomes at multiple levels. MCCCD has
developed the capacity to generate data on student learning outcomes, and student
performance and student progress and to use that information in program planning and
program review.
Ten-Year Institutional Goal IV:
MiraCosta Community College District will demonstrate high standards of stewardship and
fiscal prudence.
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal IV:
15.
Use productivity benchmarks (FTES, and WSCH/FTEF) and targets to determine need
for and plan new district facilities. MCCCD will use the benchmarks used by colleges
throughout California to maximize the productivity of the district’s classrooms,
laboratories and other facilities.
Ten-Year Institutional Goal V:
MiraCosta Community College District will be a conscientious community partner.
Five-Year Directions for Institutional Goal V:
16.
Create stronger pathways from high school to MiraCosta College. The number of
students enrolling in MCCCD directly out of high school has decreased 19.8 percent
since 2010. MCCCD needs to conduct more outreach to the high schools whose students
enroll at MCCCD to ensure that students see the community college as a strong option
for technical training and the first two years of their post-secondary education.
30 | P a g e
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
17.
Coordinate, integrate and expand concurrent/dual enrollment. Encouraging students to
take college classes while they are in high school will accelerate their academic progress
and help convince them to enroll at MCCCD when they complete high school.
18.
Expand and enhance partnerships with K-12 districts to support student preparation
for college-level courses. Overall, only 57 percent of new students place into transferlevel English, 71 percent place into transfer-level reading and 23 percent place into
transfer-level mathematics. Stronger partnerships with feeder school districts will focus
on increasing these percentages, so that more students can make more rapid progress in
their postsecondary education.
19.
Expand and enhance business and industry services throughout the district service
area. In March 2015 MCCCD opened the Technology Career Institute in a 22,699
square foot building owned by the City of Carlsbad. Supported by a $2.75 million grant
from the U.S. Department of Labor, the Technology Career Institute trains workers in the
skills needed to fill the growing demand for industrial technicians in North San Diego
County. The Technology Career Institute provides training in industries such as hightech manufacturing, maritime technology and biotech manufacturing. The Institute
expands the college’s machinist certificate program and created industry-recognized
electronics engineering and robotics/automation certificate programs. The new facility
also houses the San Diego North Small Business Development Center, through which
MCCCD provides resources, workshops and leadership programs for growing and
established small businesses.
20.
Expand and enhance community services throughout the district service area.
MCCCD will develop more engaging communication strategies to support outreach to
the community, to ensure that prospective students and community members are aware of
the programs and services provided by the district.
31 | P a g e
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
PART IV: Enrollment Projections
Introduction to the Enrollment Projections
The MCCCD Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 is a long-range, comprehensive
document that will serve as the district’s blueprint for the next five years. The addendum is
intended to guide institutional and program planning and development, providing guidance to
instruction, student services, and business services on the district's directions over the next five
years. The Educational Plan’s guiding principles will inform college and district decisions about
growth, development, and resource-allocation and align with the mission and goals in the
Comprehensive Master Plan.
The Enrollment Management Plan identifies enrollment targets and future directions to achieve
those targets while focusing on student success. The Enrollment Management Plan is tied to the
budget allocation process and institutional program planning.
Enrollment projections were created by comparing the growth/decline in sections, WSCH and
FTES between fall 2011 and fall 2014. An annualized rate of change was then calculated out to
the year 2020, based on the three-year rate of change for each program and assuming that (a) no
major changes occur to the existing course offerings, and (b) enrollment growth continues.
Minor adjustments were then made on established future directions:
•
MCCCD taking over all adult education in the district. Noncredit has an additional 5
percent increase beyond the difference between fall 2011 and fall 2014 due to expansion
into new areas of the district. These programs will not be located on MCCCD campus
sites.
•
Moving nursing, allied health, and biotechnology to the San Elijo campus. The
Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 includes a proposal to expand the allied
health (Nursing, Pharmacology, Surgical Technology) and Biotechnology programs and
to move these programs to the San Elijo Campus. None of these programs currently
offers courses at San Elijo, so the total in-person enrollment would move from the
Oceanside Campus to San Elijo. Moving these programs to the San Elijo campus would
increase its overall WSCH by 17 percent, assuming that the space and facilities needed to
offer those classes are available at that site.
Using the Enrollment Projections for Program Planning. The enrollment projections do not
take elements such as facilities or budgetary restraints into consideration. The Enrollment
Management Committee will assess the enrollment management plan annually to ensure that it
reflects current projected demand and can be supported by projected revenue. The Committee
will update initiatives, strategies and benchmarks annually based on current district challenges,
institutional objectives and priorities, and projected funding levels.
32 | P a g e
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
These are projections, not commitments of enrollment growth. The projections are based on past performance from the time period of
2011 and 2014 and are informed by trends identified in analysis of the demographic and labor market data.
Enrollment Change: Fall 2011 & Fall 2014
Enrollment Projections: Fall 2020
33 | P a g e
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
PART V: Implications for Facilities
The five-year directions outlined in this Educational Master Plan Addendum create the need for
new or remodeled facilities and instructional spaces. These needs have significant implications
for the facilities plan:
•
Remodeling at San Elijo to accommodate nursing, allied health programs and
biotechnology (Five-Year Direction 2)
•
Remodeling for any space vacated at the Oceanside campus (Five-Year Direction 1 and
2)
•
Facilities and technology needed to support growth in online programs and services
(Five-Year Direction 3)
•
Facilities needed for adult education (Five-Year Direction 4)
•
More flexible learning environments and student gathering places (Five-Year Direction
11)
34
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
APPENDIX A: Information for Planning
Table 1: Educational Attainment in the MCCCD Service Area, 2013 Percent of
Population age 25+
Less than a high school
diploma
High school graduate
(including equivalency)
Some college
Associate degree
Bachelor degree
Graduate/professional
degree
Percent high school or
higher
Percent bachelor's or
higher
Carlsbad
Del Mar
Encinitas
Oceanside
Rancho
Santa Fe
Solana
Beach
San
Diego
County
3.9
1.3
6.4
16.6
0.0
8.1
14.6
12.4
4.9
12.0
21.9
4.2
8.8
19.1
20.4
11.2
30.9
11.5
4.7
38.6
17.6
8.7
31.9
25.6
11.1
16.5
9.7
4.2
42.5
14.9
6.4
33.6
22.7
9.1
21.5
21.0
39.1
23.5
8.3
39.4
28.1
13.1
96.0
98.7
93.6
83.4
100
91.9
85.5
51.9
77.7
55.4
24.8
81.9
61.7
34.6
Table 2. Population Projections for the MCC District Area, by Age
18 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 to 44
45 to 49
50 to 54
55 to 59
60 to 61
62 to 64
65 to 69
70 to 74
75 to 79
80 to 84
85 and
over
2012
2020
2035
2050
Numeric
Change
2012 to
2020
12,950
27,438
24,749
24,690
24,049
27,605
27,928
28,798
25,665
9,014
12,704
15,929
10,244
7,935
6,717
8,044
10,341
29,233
27,096
26,557
29,506
27,753
26,430
26,197
27,922
11,251
15,936
22,833
17,573
10,891
6,981
8,762
11,276
28,995
24,036
23,958
27,481
31,967
30,012
28,919
23,928
8,624
13,213
21,781
21,875
19,412
14,576
14,803
9,578
27,231
24,870
27,103
28,702
28,017
26,228
26,285
26,908
9,690
15,132
24,234
19,118
15,882
13,716
22,356
-2,609
1,795
2,347
1,867
5,457
148
-1,498
-2,601
2,257
2,237
3,232
6,904
7,329
2,956
264
718
35
Percent
Change
2012 to
2020
Numeric
Change
2012 to
2050
Percent
Change
2012 to
2050
-20%
7%
9%
8%
23%
1%
-5%
-9%
9%
25%
25%
43%
72%
37%
4%
9%
-3,372
-207
121
2,413
4,653
412
-1,700
-2,513
1,243
676
2,428
8,305
8,874
7,947
6,999
14,312
-26%
-1%
0%
10%
19%
1%
-6%
-9%
5%
7%
19%
52%
87%
100%
104%
178%
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table 3: Credit Students by Ethnicity
Fall 2010
American Indian/Alaska Native
0.4%
Asian
7.7%
Black/African American
3.8%
Hispanic
27.0%
Pacific Islander
0.6%
Two or More Races
5.2%
Unknown
2.7%
White
52.6%
Fall 2011
0.4%
7.6%
3.8%
28.7%
0.6%
5.9%
2.1%
50.9%
Fall 2012
0.4%
7.3%
3.6%
30.8%
0.5%
6.5%
1.9%
48.9%
Table 4: Student Population by Age
17andUnder
18to20
21to24
25to29
30to34
35to39
40to44
45to54
55to64
65andOver
Fall 2010
4.7%
34.0%
23.8%
14.0%
6.6%
4.3%
3.6%
5.9%
2.7%
0.7%
Fall 2011
4.0%
34.1%
25.0%
14.3%
6.9%
4.0%
3.3%
5.5%
2.5%
0.5%
36
Fall 2012
3.8%
33.7%
25.3%
15.0%
7.0%
4.1%
3.0%
5.1%
2.3%
0.6%
Fall 2013
0.4%
7.3%
3.6%
32.3%
0.5%
6.7%
2.0%
47.2%
Fall 2013
3.6%
33.2%
26.2%
15.3%
7.0%
3.9%
2.8%
4.9%
2.4%
0.6%
Fall 2014
4.5%
33.8%
25.5%
15.5%
7.0%
3.8%
2.9%
4.4%
2.0%
0.6%
Fall 2014
0.3%
7.4%
3.4%
33.8%
0.5%
7.0%
2.0%
45.6%
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table 5: Student Population by Military Status
Member of the National Guard
Member of the Active Reserve
Veteran
Active Duty
Grand Total
Parent/Guardian/Spouse is a member of the
National Guard
Parent/Guardian/Spouse is a member of the
Active Reserve
Parent/Guardian/Spouse is a veteran
Parent/Guardian/Spouse is currently on
Active Duty
Grand Total
2012-2013
12
58
1,011
141
1,222
2013-2014
20
69
1,162
184
1,435
2014-2015
27
55
980
149
1,211
2012-2013
8
2013-2014
11
2014-2015
17
19
28
30
370
126
618
196
689
176
523
853
912
Table 6: Student Fall Semester Headcount Enrollment, 2000-2014
Fall Semester
Unduplicated
Headcount
11,865
12,306
14,588
13,352
13,035
13,409
16,611
14,038
15,429
17,140
16,701
16,138
16,328
16,125
16,173
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
37
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table 7: Enrollments per Campus
Community Learning
Center
Oceanside
San Elijo
Online
Other Locations
Grand Total
Fall 2010
Fall
2011
Fall
2012
Fall
2013
Fall
2014
Difference
between 2010
& 2014
%
Change
65
228
359
362
204
139
214%
23,439
7,837
6,376
163
37,880
23,276
6,933
7,165
80
37,682
23,986
6,827
8,135
11
39,318
23,621
6,620
8,747
11
39,361
24,115
6,397
9,127
195
40,038
676
(1,440)
2,751
32
2,158
3%
-18%
43%
20%
6%
Table 8: Placement Rates in English, ESL, Reading and Math
English Placement
Level
Course
Transfer
One Level Below
Two Levels Below
Two or More Levels
Below
English 100
English 50 or ESL 50
English 49 or ESL 49
Non-credit, English 49 or
ACE/ESL 49
20102011
56%
32%
7%
4%
20112012
56%
33%
7%
4%
20122013
54%
34%
8%
5%
20132014
55%
33%
8%
4%
20142015
57%
32%
6%
4%
ESL Placement
Level
Course
One Level Below
Two Levels Below
Two or More Levels
Below
More than Two Levels
Below
ESL 50/ACE 50
ESL 49/ACE 49
Noncredit or ESL
49/ACE 49
201020112012201320142011
2012
2013
2014
2015
26%
29%
32%
33%
35%
44%
39%
39%
40%
39%
Noncredit
21%
20%
20%
15%
19%
10%
13%
8%
12%
6%
Reading Placement
Level
Course
Transfer
One Level Below
Reading 100
Reading 30
20102011
73%
27%
20112012
72%
28%
20122013
69%
31%
20132014
71%
29%
20142015
72%
28%
20112012
3%
20122013
3%
20132014
3%
20142015
3%
Math Placement
Level
Transfer
Course
Math 150
20102011
3%
38
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Transfer
Transfer
Transfer
Transfer
One Level Below
One Level Below
Two Levels Below
Two Levels Below
Three Levels Below
Three or More Levels
Below
Math 135 or Math
150
Math 131
Math 103-130 except
Math 106
Math 64/Math 103130 except Math 106
Math 64
Math 30 or 64
Math 30
Math 20 or 30
Math 20
Noncredit or Math 20
No Placement
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
0%
13%
0%
11%
0%
10%
0%
11%
1%
11%
9%
9%
9%
9%
10%
8%
8%
18%
16%
9%
1%
8%
8%
17%
17%
11%
1%
8%
9%
17%
18%
10%
1%
8%
8%
17%
17%
11%
1%
7%
8%
17%
16%
10%
1%
14%
14%
14%
14%
16%
Table 9: Course Retention and Completion
Successful Course Completion (Passed course with a grade of “C” or better)
Annual
College
Statewide
68%
68%
2010-2011
69%
69%
2011-2012
69%
70%
2012-2013
70%
70%
2013-2014
70%
69%
2014-2015
Course Retention (Finished course without receiving a “W” grade)
Annual
College
82%
2010-2011
82%
2011-2012
82%
2012-2013
83%
2013-2014
82%
2014-2015
Statewide
84%
85%
86%
86%
86%
Table 10: Basic Skills Improvement Rates by Program
English
ESL
Math
2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
38.20%
38.30%
42.80%
40.00%
38.90%
29.60%
31.00%
31.50%
38.80%
30.70%
36.50%
36.60%
37.20%
39.20%
39.10%
39
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table 11: Units Earned Without a Degree
Number of Students
% of Non-Degree
Holders
807
2,799
2,381
1,813
1,152
869
501
252
88
63
8%
26%
22%
17%
11%
8%
5%
2%
1%
1%
No Units
0.5-12 Units Passed
12.5-24 Units
24.5-36
36.5-48
48.5-60 Units
60.5-72 Units
72.5-84 Units
84.5-96 Units
96.5 or More Units
Table 12: College-wide WSCH/FTEF
WSCH, FTES AND WSCH/FTEF – DISTRICT-WIDE, CREDIT AND NONCREDIT
Sections
Academic
Information
Services
Arts and
International
Languages
Behavioral
Science, History
and Community
Education
Career and
Technical
Education
Letters and
Communications
Math and Sciences
Noncredit
Student Services
Total
Fall 2011
WSCH
FTES
WSCH
/FTEF
Sections
Fall 2014
WSCH
FTES
WSCH
/FTEF
5
293.05
9.49
366
5
314.36
10.18
363
232
23,223.92
752.07
413
230
24,011.36
777.57
410
136
13,833.93
447.99
565
148
15,794.50
511.48
588
357
34,225.54
1,108.34
378
445
40,021.72
1,296.04
394
219
21,041.01
681.38
403
235
22,807.97
738.6
418
318
177
17
1,461
42,881.82
12,865.84
1,017.50
149,382.62
1,388.66
416.64
32.95
4,837.52
494
344
168
16
1,591
49,156.33
10,923.18
1,199.07
164,228.49
1,591.85
353.73
38.83
5,318.28
498
345
473
437
40
486
462
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table 13: Student Participation in Student Services Programs
Admissions & Records/Evaluations*
Academic Proctoring Center
Athletics - All
Career Center
Counseling
Applications
Graduation Evaluations
Counseling Oceanside
Counseling - San Elijo
Disabled Students Programs and Services
(DSPS)
Extended Opportunity Program and Services
(EOPS)
CalWORKS
CARE
Financial Aid
Health Services (RN, NP, MFT)
International Students
Library Services - All*
Testing
Military Benefits Recipient
Military Student Group
Puente
Service Learning
Umoja
Writing Center
*fall semester data only
20122013
20132014
20142015
31011
403
35529
428
29498
446
26451
454
25767
581
17
15
32
25
18
13
24
17
17
38
34
16
12
39
20
1,411
9,882
1,268
9,889
1,692
11,157
1,530
9,959
18
10
36
21
20
13
1,465
11,364
8,316
1,828
7,778
2,427
9,156
2,295
7,977
2,388
983
9,546
2,140
1,087
536
565
573
607
605
176
56
7,797
5806
208
165
41
9,320
6235
198
157
53
10,683
6449
224
164
45
11,325
5538
227
218
58
12,911
5461
262
7,999
924
Library Services - Chat
Library Services - Reference Desk
Library Services -EZ Proxy
Transfer Center - All
20112012
2408
88
Athletics - Men's Basketball
Athletics - Women's Basketball
Athletics - Men's Soccer
Athletics - Women's Soccer
Athletics - Women's Volleyball
Athletics - Women's Sand Volleyball
Tutoring - All
20102011
Student participants
Service Learning Courses
Tutoring - Oceanside
Tutoring - San Elijo
Transfer Center - Oceanside
Transfer Center - San Elijo
935
6,707
1,087
7,971
1,337
-
2912
105
947
3830
87
5399
108
123
615
7,741
-
9,007
1,489
1,296
26
11,019
1,356
1,554
45
14,178
1,208
1,345
96
1070
1223
855
1461
1196
2,304
1,891
1,815
1,728
1,344
1,904
533
1,644
1,616
400
1,673
1,584
342
1,911
1,450
374
2,234
1,117
283
2,151
1,377
318
1,440
281
1,675
305
1,966
339
1,451
819
1,439
41
2829
54
1,481
37
1,620
46
1,921
73
1,680
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table 14: Enrollment Projections District-wide and by Campus 2020
The Enrollment Management Plan identifies enrollment targets and outlines strategies and benchmarks to achieve those targets while
focusing on student success. The Enrollment Management Plan is tied to the budget allocation process and institutional program
planning.
Enrollment projections were created by comparing the growth/decline in sections, WSCH and FTES between fall 2011 and fall 2014. An
annualized rate of change was then calculated out to the year 2020, based on the three-year rate of change for each program and assuming
that (a) no major changes occur to the existing course offerings, and (b) enrollment growth continues.
Minor adjustments were then made on established future directions:
•
MCCCD taking over all adult education in the district. Noncredit has an additional 5 percent increase beyond the difference
between fall 2011 and fall 2014 due to expansion into new areas of the district. These programs will not be located on any of the
MCCCD campus sites.
•
Moving Nursing, Allied Health, and Biotechnology to the San Elijo Campus. In fall 2014, Allied Health and Biotechnology
generated 3,932.88 WSCH, approximately 2 percent of the total WSCH generated by the district, and 4 percent of the WSCH
generated by the Oceanside campus. The Educational Master Plan Addendum 2016-2020 includes a proposal to expand the allied
health (Nursing, Pharmacology, Surgical Technology) and Biotechnology programs and to move these programs to the San Elijo
Campus. None of these program currently offers courses at San Elijo, so the total in-person enrollment would move from the
Oceanside Campus to San Elijo. Moving these programs to the San Elijo campus would increase its overall WSCH by 17
percent, assuming that the space and facilities and facilities needed to offer those classes are available at that site.
Using the Enrollment Projections for Program Planning. The enrollment projections do not take elements such as facilities or
budgetary restraints into consideration. The Enrollment Management Committee will assess the enrollment management plan annually to
ensure that it reflects current projected demand and can be supported by projected revenue. The committee will update initiatives,
strategies and benchmarks annually based on current district challenges, institutional objectives and priorities, and projected funding
levels.
These are projections, not commitments of enrollment growth. The projections are based on past performance form the time period of
2011 and 2014 and are informed by trends identified in analysis of the demographic and labor market data.
42
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
43
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
44
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
45
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure A: Career Opportunities by Entry Level Education, San Diego County, 2012 –
2022
Fastest Growing
(New Jobs from Industry Growth)
Entry Level
Education
Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary (40.0% or
360 jobs)
Biochemists and Biophysicists (26.1% or 480 jobs)
Computer and Information Research Scientists (24.3%
or 280 jobs)
Physical Therapists (22.6% or 330 jobs)
Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary (22.5% or
180 jobs)
Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary
(41.5% or 170 jobs)
Urban and Regional Planners (38.2% or 210 jobs)
Statisticians (35.7% or 150 jobs)
Physician Assistants (34.7% or 250 jobs)
Nurse Practitioners (30.9% or 250 jobs)
Doctoral or
Professional
Degree
Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists
(49.1% or 3,120 jobs)
Operations Research Analysts (45.3% or 390 jobs)
Cost Estimators (43.3% or 1,200 jobs)
Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary (43.0%
or 650 jobs)
Meeting, Convention, and Event Planers (40.2% or 470
jobs)
Web Developers (34.9% or 680 jobs)
Environmental Science and Protection Technicians,
Including Health
(34.7% or 170 jobs)
Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (31.5% or 170 jobs)
Paralegals and Legal Assistants (29.8% or 980 jobs)
Veterinary Technologists and Technicians (28.1% or
340 jobs)
Skincare Specialists (41.8% or 280 jobs)
Telecommunications Equipment Installers and
Repairers, Except Line Installers (35.9% or 700 jobs)
Audio and Video Equipment Technicians (29.6% or
160 jobs)
Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration
Mechanics and Installers(27.1% or 390 jobs)
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses
(25.6% or 1,300 jobs)
Computer User Support Specialists (34.1% or 2,090
jobs)
Teacher Assistants (9.9% or 840)
Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine
Repairers (7.2% or 100)
Bachelor’s
Degree
Brickmasons and Blockmasons (62.3% or 380 jobs)
First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and
Extraction Workers(40.3% or 1,960 jobs)
Carpenters (39.0% or 2,350 jobs)
Glaziers (38.3% or 310 jobs)
Tire Repairers and Changers (37.6% or 320 jobs)
Personal Care Aides (52.7% or 10,940 jobs) Tile and
Marble Setters (46.8% or 360 jobs)
Painters, Construction and Maintenance (46.3% or
2,500 jobs) Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers
(42.9% or 540 jobs) Construction Laborers (42.8% or
4,040 jobs)
Master’s
Degree
Largest Growing
(New Jobs and Replacement Needs)
Lawyers (2,760 jobs)
Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists (1,740
jobs)
Biochemists and Biophysicists (1,000 jobs)
Pharmacists (880 jobs)
Physical Therapists (700 jobs)
Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational
Counselors (1,060 jobs)
Education Administrators, Postsecondary (680
jobs)
Healthcare Social Workers (460 jobs)
Urban and Regional Planners (460 jobs)
Education Administrators, Elementary and
Secondary School (440 jobs)
General and Operations Managers (8,960 jobs)
Accountants and Auditors (6,200 jobs)
Management Analysts (4,510 jobs)
Market Research Analysts and Marketing
Specialists (3,990 jobs)
Software Developers, Applications (3,420 jobs)
Associate’s
Degree
Registered Nurses (6,750 jobs)
Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education
(1,950 jobs)
Paralegals and Legal Assistants (1,520 jobs)
Web Developers (990 jobs)
Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians
(960 jobs)
Postsecondary
Non-degree
Award
Nursing Assistants (3,430 jobs)
Medical Assistants (2,660 jobs)
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses
(2,540 jobs)
Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers (2,140
jobs) Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists
(2,020 jobs)
Some College,
No Degree
Computer User Support Specialists (3,050 jobs)
Teacher Assistants (2,770)
Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine
Repairers (390)
High School
Diploma or
Equivalent
Less than High
School
46
Office Clerks, General (10,350 jobs)
Customer Service Representatives (9,040 jobs)
Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except
Legal, Medical, and Executive (6,730 jobs)
First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative
Support Workers (5,630 jobs)
First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers
(4,840 jobs)
Retail Salespersons (21,150 jobs) Waiters and
Waitresses (19,020 jobs) Cashiers (17,760 jobs)
Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers,
Including Fast Food (16,200 jobs)
Personal Care Aides (12,420 jobs)
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure B: Ethnic Distribution by Population Group
Ethnic Distribution by Population Group
2%
3%
African-American/Black
0.4%
0.3%
American Indian/Alaska Native
9%
7%
Asian/Pacific Islander
19%
Hispanic
33%
2%
Two or More Races/Other/Unknown
9%
67%
White
47%
0%
District Residents
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
Credit Students Living Within the District
47
70%
80%
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure C: Student Ethnicity by Campus
Ethnicities by Campus
100%
90%
2%
4%
80%
12%
19%
3%
3%
38%
31%
42%
37%
17%
3%
4%
25%
70%
60%
15%
15%
18%
34%
50%
40%
30%
20%
58%
42%
47%
48%
46%
Online (n=5,806)
Other (n=189)
Districtwide
(n=14,746)
39%
10%
0%
Oceanside
(n=10,527)
San Elijo (n=3316)
White
Community
Learning Center
(n=201)
Hispanic
African-American
All Other
Figure D: Cross Enrollments between Palomar and MiraCosta
Cross Enrollments Between Palomar and MiraCosta
8,000
7,000
6,000
6,673
5,927
6,851
6,620
6,842
6,825
5,197
4,957
4,953
5,117
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
2010-2011
Lives in MCC District but Attends Palomar
48
Lives in Palomar but Attends MiraCosta
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure E: One Year High School Capture Rate, Classes of 2010-2014
49
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure F: Student Persistence from Fall Term to the Subsequent Spring Term
Persistence from Fall Term to Subsequent Spring
100.00%
90.00%
80.00%
71.17%
69.61%
FALL 2010
FALL 2011
70.00%
73.28%
72.73%
74.14%
FALL 2012
FALL 2013
FALL 2014
60.00%
50.00%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
Figure G: Student Persistence from Fall Term to the Subsequent Fall Term
Persistence from Fall Term to Subsequent Fall
100.00%
90.00%
80.00%
70.00%
60.00%
52.57%
53.20%
FALL 2010
FALL 2011
55.63%
55.25%
57.21%
FALL 2012
FALL 2013
FALL 2014
50.00%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
50
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure H: Number of Degrees Awarded Annually, 2009/2010 to 2013/2014
51
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure I: Number of Certificates Awarded Annually, 2009/2010 to 2013/2014
Certificate Recipients and Certificates Awarded
1,600
1,430
1,367
1,400
1,226
1,133
1,200
1,000
912
733
800
600
400
1,086
999
516
390
200
2009-2010
2010-2011
2011-2012
Total Certificate-Earning Students
52
2012-2013
Total Certificates Earned
2013-2014
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure J: Transfer Velocity
Transfer Velocity
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
40%
46%
52%
54%
Year 7
Year 8
32%
30%
15%
20%
10%
0%
1%
Year 1
6%
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
2007-2008 Cohort (n=1,237)
53
Year 6
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Figure K: District-wide FTES by Course Type
FTES by Course Type
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Fall 2010
Fall 2011
Fall 2012
Fall 2013
Fall 2014
Transferable
59.8%
61.8%
63.5%
62.9%
63.7%
CTE & Transferable
18.5%
20.1%
20.9%
21.3%
21.2%
CTE
4.7%
2.5%
1.1%
1.0%
0.9%
Degree Applicable Only
0.1%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Degree Applicable Basic Skills
2.5%
2.6%
4.3%
2.9%
4.4%
Basic Skills
6.0%
5.8%
4.3%
5.9%
4.5%
Noncredit
8.4%
7.2%
6.0%
6.0%
5.3%
54
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
APPENDIX B: Employment & Economic Activity in the Region
Traded Clusters of Employment and Regional Activity Centers
Traded Clusters: Major drivers of the regional economy. The drivers of the regional
economy are those industries that bring outside capital into the area. This external capital creates
local economic activity as firms use incoming money to buy goods and services from other
regional businesses, and their employees spend their paychecks at local shops and restaurants.
Before the 1990s, manufacturing was the primary driver of the regional economy by bringing
outside capital into the area. In the 1990s, major cuts in defense spending forced a restructuring
of San Diego’s regional economy, making it more export-driven. Today, “employment clusters”
– groups of interrelated businesses – are better than the traditional industrial sectors (those
described by the NAICS coding system) in describing the emerging sources of new capital in the
economy.
Thirteen employment clusters export goods and services and therefore drive the creation of
wealth in the region. Table B.1 below provides the 2010 employment and the average annual
wage in each cluster (note that these clusters do not include military employment).
55
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table B.1 Traded Industry Cluster Employment and Wages, 2010
2010
Employment
4,177
2010 Wages
Advanced Precision Mfg.
4,416
$51,800
Aerospace, Navigation, and Maritime Tech.
32,099
$79,300
Apparel Mfg.
2,870
$30,400
Biomedical Devices and Products
12,012
$99,500
Biotechnology and Pharmaceuticals
22,636
$107,000
Cleantech
7,986
$87,400
149,352
$21,800
Fruits and Vegetables
4,241
$26,900
Horticulture
6,013
$29,100
Info. and Communications Tech.
72,043
$94,400
Publishing and Marketing
11,848
$56,600
Specialty Foods and Microbreweries
1,717
$43,500
TRADED INDUSTRY CLUSTER TOTAL
331,410
$56,000
1,233,300
$50,700
Action Sports Mfg.
Entertainment and Hospitality
REGIONAL TOTAL
$65,300
Source: San Diego Association of Governments, 2012
The Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) that most closely aligns with the district service area
(North County West) also accounts for a sizable portion of the employment in industries that
bring outside capital into the region (the traded industry clusters). The MCCCD service area has
over 17 percent of the jobs in clusters in biomedical devices and products, in biotechnology and
pharmaceuticals, and in clean technology (the largest concentration of jobs in these industry
clusters are found in the North City MSA, which includes Del Mar and much of northern San
Diego).
The North County West MSA also has almost 60 percent of the jobs in action sports
manufacturing.
56
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Table B.2 below presents the percentage of traded industry cluster jobs located within each of the major Metropolitan Statistical
Areas of San Diego County.
57
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Economic Activity Centers in the MCCCD Service Area
In 2006 the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) compiled an inventory of what
it calls "activity centers" – attractions such as shopping centers, tourist attractions and business
parks that create economic activity as they attract thousands of people on a daily basis, and
identified the areas of the region in which those activity centers are located. SANDAG provides
economic data, estimates and projections broken out by Major Statistical Areas (MSAs). These
MSAs are aggregations of Census tracts that divide the San Diego region into seven parts:
Central, North City, South Suburban, East Suburban, North County West, North County East,
and East County.
The North County West MSA best describes the area served by MCCCD: the suburban portion
of San Diego County north of the City of San Diego and Del Mar, up to the San Diego County
line. Please note that all data is from 2006; SANDAG has not published an update to this report
since 2007.
There are eight categories of activity centers on the San Diego region:
•
Major employers. The North County West MSA has about 11 percent of the total number of
major employers (those with more than 500 people at a single site), and 9 percent of the total
employment at major employers. Between 1996 and 2006 the number of employees at major
employers rose by 41.3 percent to a 2006 total of 11,492 employees at 10 firms. The regionwide growth rate was 49.3 percent.
•
Office buildings. In 2006, the North County West MSA accounted for just over 7.7 percent
of the existing buildings with over 25,000 square feet of space countywide. About 12.5
percent of the 9.5 million square feet of large office buildings either under construction or
proposed throughout the county in 2006 were to be located in the North County West MSA.
•
Industrial sites. In 2006, there was about 88 million square feet of industrial space (research
and development parks, industrial parks, and individual industrial sites with over 100,000
square feet of space) in San Diego County. The North County West MSA had about 12.5
million square feet of industrial space, 14.3 percent of the total. About 379,89 of the
1,426,107 square feet of industrial space then under construction was in the North County
West MSA. Over 68 percent of the 7.3 million square feet of new industrial space (5.5
million square feet) that had been proposed was in the North County West MSA.
•
Hospitals. In 2006 North County West MSA had 1.4 hospital bed per 1,000 population;
region-wide the ratio of beds to population was 2.3 in 2006, down from 3.2 in 1996.
•
Retail centers. In 2006 the North County West MSA had 10.1 million square feet of retail
center space (n retail centers with 75,000 square feet or more), which is 18 percent of the
region's total or 56.2 million square feet, and up 38 percent since 1996.
58
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
•
Visitor attractions (including hotels). Legoland is the only major visitor attraction in the
North County West MSA. The North County West MSA has 803 rooms in large hotels (those
with 200 or more rooms), which is about 3.4 percent of the over 23,500 rooms in large hotels
in the San Diego Region. None of the almost 5,300 new hotel rooms under construction and
proposed in 2006 were located in the North County West MSA.
•
Colleges and universities. MCCCD is the only public postsecondary institution in the North
County West area; SANDAG reported that 895 students attended a private university in the
North County West area in 2006.
•
Government facilities (including schools). There are over 221 local, state and federal
government centers in the San Diego region, employing over 206,700 people in 2006. Each
MSA has at least local government facilities; no breakdowns by sub-regional area are
reported.
Source: San Diego Association of Governments, Activity Centers in the San Diego Region, August
2007.
59
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
APPENDIX C: High School Capture Rate and Educational Requirements for Careers
Appendix C.1: High School Capture Rate Data 2-Year Rate
Class of
2002
Class of
2003
Class of
2004
Class of
2005
Class of
2006
Class of
2007
Class of
2008
Class of
2009
Class of
2010
Class of
2011
Class of
2012
Class of
2013
All Public Districts in
MiraCosta College Service
Area
MCC Credit Students
1,065
1,074
1,077
1,214
1,206
1,226
996
1,464
1,502
1,351
1,397
1,415
HS Graduates
3,071
3,172
3,211
3,352
3,458
3,549
3,796
3,931
4,078
3,914
4,016
3,925
Capture Rate
35%
34%
34%
36%
35%
35%
26%
37%
37%
35%
35%
36%
Carlsbad Unified School
District
MCC Credit Students
181
198
212
254
285
261
210
292
326
258
276
261
HS Graduates
602
580
623
652
753
693
759
716
745
700
703
689
Capture Rate
30%
34%
34%
39%
38%
38%
28%
41%
44%
37%
39%
38%
MCC Credit Students
174
193
200
242
269
242
196
270
301
246
586
560
570
577
660
613
680
646
664
237
636
257
HS Graduates
Capture Rate
30%
34%
35%
42%
41%
39%
29%
42%
45%
37%
642
40%
650
38%
MCC Credit Students
7
5
12
12
16
19
14
22
25
19
15
HS Graduates
16
20
53
75
93
80
79
70
81
21
64
Capture Rate
44%
25%
23%
16%
17%
24%
18%
31%
31%
33%
61
31%
39
38%
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Carlsbad High School
Carlsbad Village Academy
Sage Creek High School
MCC Credit Students
60
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Class of
2002
Class of
2003
Class of
2004
Class of
2005
Class of
2006
Class of
2007
Class of
2008
Class of
2009
Class of
2010
Class of
2011
Class of
2012
Class of
2013
HS Graduates
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Capture Rate
Oceanside Unified School
District
MCC Credit Students
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
365
374
339
371
345
360
304
443
473
460
544
529
HS Graduates
936
982
913
971
974
982
1,020
1,198
1,312
1,200
1,293
1,229
Capture Rate
39%
38%
37%
38%
35%
37%
30%
37%
36%
38%
42%
43%
MCC Credit Students
211
195
210
223
207
204
156
244
272
300
313
HS Graduates
546
540
557
551
550
542
602
653
738
268
671
Capture Rate
39%
36%
38%
40%
38%
38%
26%
37%
37%
40%
709
42%
681
46%
MCC Credit Students
15
18
14
17
24
17
13
26
13
31
47
37
38
63
67
48
47
66
58
27
58
27
HS Graduates
Capture Rate
32%
49%
37%
27%
36%
35%
28%
39%
22%
47%
71
38%
71
44%
MCC Credit Students
139
161
115
131
114
139
135
173
188
217
185
HS Graduates
343
405
318
357
357
392
371
479
516
165
471
Capture Rate
San Dieguito Unified
School District
MCC Credit Students
41%
40%
36%
37%
32%
35%
36%
36%
36%
35%
513
42%
477
39%
519
502
526
589
576
605
482
729
703
633
577
625
HS Graduates
1,533
1,610
1,675
1,729
1,731
1,874
2,017
2,017
2,021
2,014
2,020
2,007
Capture Rate
34%
31%
31%
34%
33%
32%
24%
36%
35%
31%
29%
31%
1
66
143
136
125
107
109
El Camino
Ocean Shores
Oceanside
Canyon Crest Academy
MCC Credit Students
61
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Class of
2002
Class of
2003
Class of
2004
Class of
2005
Class of
2006
Class of
2007
Class of
2008
Class of
2009
Class of
2010
Class of
2011
Class of
2012
Class of
2013
HS Graduates
1
401
427
441
405
Capture Rate
100%
16%
33%
31%
31%
428
25%
452
24%
132
161
544
24%
510
32%
122
142
379
37%
La Costa Canyon
MCC Credit Students
157
165
154
176
182
199
134
166
156
HS Graduates
570
587
571
519
582
596
564
528
505
155
576
Capture Rate
28%
28%
27%
34%
31%
33%
24%
31%
31%
27%
MCC Credit Students
121
111
125
142
115
141
110
152
164
HS Graduates
305
306
306
388
312
349
354
348
383
112
332
Capture Rate
40%
36%
41%
37%
37%
40%
31%
44%
43%
34%
346
35%
Class of
2002
Class of
2003
Class of
2004
Class of
2005
Class of
2006
Class of
2007
Class of
2008
Class of
2009
Class of
2010
Class of
2011
Class of
2012
Class of
2013
Sunset and North Coast
Alternative Schools
MCC Credit Students
32
38
28
45
30
23
26
50
55
37
54
HS Graduates
53
42
49
50
53
46
78
67
82
34
54
Capture Rate
60%
90%
57%
90%
57%
50%
33%
75%
67%
63%
77
48%
74
73%
MCC Credit Students
209
188
219
226
249
241
146
218
192
159
605
675
749
772
784
882
620
647
610
207
647
179
HS Graduates
Capture Rate
35%
28%
29%
29%
32%
27%
24%
34%
31%
32%
625
29%
592
27%
San Dieguito Academy
Torrey Pines
62
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Appendix C.2: Gaps in Careers Requiring an Associate’s Degree
SOC
Occupational Title
Av
An
Jobs
2014 Q1
Median
Hourly
2014 Q1
Median
Annual
291141
Registered Nurses
675
$40.45
$84,134
252011
195
$15.61
$32,466
232011
Preschool Teachers, Except
Special Education
Paralegals and Legal Assistants
152
$25.15
$52,316
151134
Web Developers
99
$29.83
$62,038
173023
Electrical and Electronics
Engineering Technicians
Dental Hygienists
96
$28.77
$59,843
80
$44.82
$93,230
Life, Physical, and Social Science
Technicians, All Other
Life, Physical, and Social Science
Technicians, All Other
Computer Network Support
Specialists
Engineering Technicians, Except
Drafters, All Other
Engineering Technicians, Except
Drafters, All Other
Engineering Technicians, Except
Drafters, All Other
Medical and Clinical Laboratory
Technicians
Totals
65
$22.66
$47,146
$22.66
$47,146
57
$34.85
$72,489
55
$32.81
$68,250
$32.81
$68,250
$32.81
$68,250
$20.52
$42,684
292021
194099
194099
151152
173029
173029
173029
292012
53
Entry Ed Level
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
Associate's
degree
1,527
63
Work
Experience
OJT
TOP Code
Nbr Degree
Programs
None
None
123010
9
Av An
Degree
Grads
2009-2014
304
None
None
130580
4
2
193
None
None
140200
5
51
101
None
None
061430
3
9
90
None
None
None
None
124020
None
None
093473
None
None
192000
6
None
None
070600
3
None
None
093480
55
None
None
095420
0
None
None
094610
0
None
None
120500
Gap
371
96
1
29
51
65
2
0
5
52
14
39
416
1,111
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
On-The-Job (OJT) Training Definitions
I/R
Internship/Residency
LT
Apprenticeship, at least 144 hours of occupational-specific instruction & 2,000 hours of on-the-job training
per year over 3-5 years
Long-term, 12 months or that and classroom instruction
MT
Moderate-term, 1 to 12 months and informal training
APP
ST
Short-term, one month or less
64
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
SOC
Appendix C.3: Gaps in Careers Requiring a Postsecondary Certificate
Occupational Title
Av An
Jobs
2014 Q1
Median
Hourly
2014 Q1
Median
Annual
Entry Ed
Levels
Work
Experience
OJT
TOP
Code
Nbr
Degree
Programs
Nbr Cert
Programs
311014
Nursing Assistants
343
$13.40
$27,882
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
123030
319092
Medical Assistants
266
$16.63
$34,573
None
None
120820
3
5
319092
Medical Assistants
$16.63
$34,573
None
None
120810
1
319092
Medical Assistants
$16.63
$34,573
None
None
051420
319092
Medical Assistants
$16.63
$34,573
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
120800
292061
533032
395012
319091
492022
395092
499021
1
Av An
Cert
Grads
20092014
Total Av
An
Grads
20092014
Gap
89
89
10
35
45
3
3
9
13
2
2
2
3
5
1
1
7
19
27
176
34
Subtotal
Gap
44
0
214
2
2
10
254
Licensed Practical
and Licensed
Vocational Nurses
Heavy and TractorTrailer Truck Drivers
Hairdressers,
Hairstylists, and
Cosmetologists
Dental Assistants
254
$23.44
$48,755
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
214
$19.56
$40,690
None
ST OJT
202
$12.47
$25,957
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
300700
1
2
6
60
66
136
135
$17.77
$36,961
None
None
124010
1
1
14
44
57
78
Telecommunications
Equipment Installers
and Repairers, Except
Line Installers
Manicurists and
Pedicurists
Heating, Air
Conditioning, and
Refrigeration
97
$30.91
$64,304
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
None
MT OJT
093430
3
3
4
5
9
88
82
$9.16
$19,045
None
None
300700
1
2
6
60
66
16
75
$24.53
$51,012
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
None
LT OJT
094600
3
7
9
41
50
25
65
123020
Av An
Degree
Grads
2009-2014
210
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
332011
Mechanics and
Installers
Firefighters
73
$28.77
$59,824
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
None
LT OJT
<5 years
None
213300
4
4
107
137
244
-171
0
70
511011
First-Line Supervisors
of Production and
Operating Workers
70
$29.17
$60,672
292071
Medical Records and
Health Information
Technicians
Medical Records and
Health Information
Technicians
62
$17.46
$36,331
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
122310
0
2
1
$17.46
$36,331
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
122300
1
0
24
24
292071
493011
$27.77
$57,750
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
095000
4
4
8
16
$27.77
$57,750
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
095010
1
2
2
13
14
$27.77
$57,750
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
095020
1
2
2
14
16
15
Subtotal
Gap
20
35
30
30
23
18
19
32
870
1,222
60
254031
Library Technicians
55
$19.45
$40,458
292041
Emergency Medical
Technicians and
Paramedics
Massage Therapists
53
$11.45
$23,816
51
$9.54
$19,851
493011
319011
Totals
10
Subtotal
Gap
24
Aircraft Mechanics
and Service
Technicians
Aircraft Mechanics
and Service
Technicians
Aircraft Mechanics
and Service
Technicians
493011
9
Postsecond
Cert.
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
160200
None
None
125000
Postsecond
Cert.
None
None
126200
5
0
2,092
[6] In occupations where worker do not work full-time all year-round, it is not possible to calculate an hourly wage.
66
4
1
29
6
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
On-The-Job (OJT) Training Definitions
I/R
LT
Apprenticeship, at least 144 hours of occupational-specific instruction & 2,000 hours of on-the-job training
per year over 3-5 years
Long-term, 12 months or that and classroom instruction
MT
Moderate-term, 1 to 12 months and informal training
APP
ST
SOC
Internship/Residency
Short-term, one month or less
Appendix C.4: Gaps in Careers Requiring Some College
Occupational
Title
Computer
User Support
Specialists
259041 Teacher
Assistants
Total
Av An
Jobs
2014 Q1
Median
Hourly
2014 Q1
Median
Annual
Entry
Ed
Level
305
$23.49
$48,866
Some
College
None
MT
OJT
070820
1
1
277
[6]
$29,117
Some
College
None
None
080200
0
1
151151
Work
Experience
OJT
582
TOP
Code
Nbr
Degree
Programs
Nbr Cert
Programs
Av An
Degree
Grads 20092014
Av An Cert
Grads 20092014
Total Av
An Grads
20092014
Gap
4
7
11
294
1
1
276
4
[6] In occupations where worker do not work full-time all year-round, it is not possible to calculate an hourly wage.
67
8
570
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
Appendix C.5: Gaps in Careers Requiring a High School Diploma
SOC
439061
434051
436014
413099
431011
411011
411011
411011
131199
351012
Occupational Title
Office Clerks,
General
Customer Service
Representatives
Secretaries and
Administrative
Assistants, Except
Legal, Medical, and
Executive
Sales
Representatives,
Services, All Other
First-Line
Supervisors of Office
and Administrative
Support Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of Retail
Sales Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of Retail
Sales Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of Retail
Sales Workers
Business Operations
Specialists, All Other
First-Line
Supervisors of Food
Preparation and
Serving Workers
Av An
Jobs
2014
Q1
Median
Hourly
2014 Q1
Median
Annual
1,035
$14.12
$29,344
904
$17.82
$37,070
673
$18.22
$37,901
597
$26.69
563
484
Entry
Ed
Levels
High
School
High
School
Nbr Cert
Programs
Av An
Cert
Grads
20092014
Total Av
An Grads
20092014
Gap
Work
Experience
OJT
None
ST OJT
0
1,035
None
ST OJT
0
904
High
School
None
ST OJT
051400
18
21
33
57
90
583
$55,523
High
School
None
ST OJT
050650
3
3
1
3
4
593
$25.24
$52,512
High
School
<5 years
None
051440
2
2
1
2
3
560
$20.13
$41,856
High
School
<5 years
None
010920
2
2
1
2
3
481
$20.13
$41,856
High
School
<5 years
None
070910
3
4
0
1
1
-1
$20.13
$41,856
High
School
<5 years
None
050650
3
3
1
3
4
-4
481
$34.29
$71,314
High
School
None
None
0
481
479
$13.55
$28,184
High
School
<5 years
None
0
479
68
TOP
Code
Nbr
Degree
Programs
Av An
Degree
Grads
20092014
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
433031
339032
Bookkeeping,
Accounting, and
Auditing Clerks
Security Guards
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
119199
Managers, All Other
414012
Sales
Representatives,
Wholesale and
Manufacturing,
Except Technical
441
$19.45
$40,452
High
School
None
MT OJT
050200
8
7
128
186
314
127
438
$11.62
$24,174
High
School
None
ST OJT
210530
1
1
7
4
11
427
423
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
200100
10
0
245
4
249
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
200300
1
0
7
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
050500
13
4
410
223
632
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
050640
3
3
15
21
37
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220100
5
1
630
630
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220200
7
0
23
23
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220400
4
0
23
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220500
12
0
57
57
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220600
8
0
6
6
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220610
1
1
7
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220700
10
0
41
41
$57.49
$119,575
<5 years
None
220800
10
0
95
95
420
$24.94
$51,884
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
None
69
MT OJT
7
3
18
26
24
Subtotal
Gap
-1,405
0
420
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
499071
434171
and Scientific
Products
Maintenance and
Repair Workers,
General
Receptionists and
Information Clerks
399011
Childcare Workers
399011
Childcare Workers
399011
Childcare Workers
399011
Childcare Workers
472031
Carpenters
471011
First-Line
Supervisors of
Construction Trades
and Extraction
Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of
Construction Trades
and Extraction
Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of
Construction Trades
and Extraction
Workers
471011
471011
419
$18.19
$37,832
High
School
None
LT OJT
0
419
347
$13.55
$28,180
High
School
None
ST OJT
0
347
322
$11.22
$23,317
None
ST OJT
130540
4
4
14
12
26
$11.22
$23,317
None
ST OJT
130550
1
1
1
1
2
$11.22
$23,317
None
ST OJT
130500
9
13
134
241
375
$11.22
$23,317
None
ST OJT
130590
1
1
3
20
24
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
Subtotal
Gap
-105
0
310
310
$21.89
$45,527
High
School
None
APP
248
$36.61
$76,148
High
School
≥5 years
None
095700
2
2
6
7
13
$36.61
$76,148
High
School
≥5 years
None
095220
4
4
6
129
135
$36.61
$76,148
High
School
≥5 years
None
095230
4
4
1
28
29
70
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
471011
435071
First-Line
Supervisors of
Construction Trades
and Extraction
Workers
472111
Shipping, Receiving,
and Traffic Clerks
Electricians
436013
Medical Secretaries
493023
Automotive Service
Technicians and
Mechanics
Tellers
433071
434081
Hotel, Motel, and
Resort Desk Clerks
119051
Food Service
Managers
Food Service
Managers
Food Service
Managers
Food Service
Managers
119051
119051
119051
433021
119141
Billing and Posting
Clerks
Property, Real
Estate, and
Community
$36.61
$76,148
243
$14.95
$31,086
233
$27.81
$57,842
229
$17.80
$37,020
227
$20.91
$43,480
224
$13.24
$27,542
208
$12.13
$25,233
192
$24.97
$51,929
$24.97
$51,929
$24.97
$51,929
$24.97
$51,929
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
≥5 years
None
095720
2
3
11
28
39
Subtotal
Gap
33
None
ST OJT
0
243
None
APP
0
233
None
MT OJT
051420
2
2
2
3
5
224
None
LT OJT
094800
6
15
29
146
175
52
None
ST OJT
0
224
None
ST OJT
0
208
<5 years
None
130710
3
4
5
12
17
<5 years
None
130720
3
6
5
9
14
<5 years
None
130700
3
4
8
18
25
<5 years
None
130620
0
1
6
6
191
$17.41
$36,210
High
School
None
ST OJT
189
$27.51
$57,208
High
School
<5 years
None
71
051100
7
9
17
41
Subtotal
Gap
130
0
191
58
131
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
533033
436011
472152
491011
435061
514041
433011
333021
333051
512092
519061
371011
Association
Managers
Light Truck or
Delivery Services
Drivers
Executive
Secretaries and
Executive
Administrative
Assistants
Plumbers,
Pipefitters, and
Steamfitters
First-Line
Supervisors of
Mechanics,
Installers, and
Repairers
Production,
Planning, and
Expediting Clerks
Machinists
Bill and Account
Collectors
Detectives and
Criminal
Investigators
Police and Sheriff's
Patrol Officers
Team Assemblers
Inspectors, Testers,
Sorters, Samplers,
and Weighers
First-Line
Supervisors of
181
$14.44
$30,040
High
School
None
ST OJT
178
$26.89
$55,935
High
School
<5 years
None
178
$26.26
$54,624
High
School
None
APP
162
$34.38
$71,521
High
School
<5 years
None
148
$24.28
$50,507
High
School
None
MT OJT
146
$19.79
$41,166
None
LT OJT
145
$17.75
$36,929
None
MT OJT
136
$48.35
$100,564
<5 years
MT OJT
210500
9
5
152
136
$37.05
$77,075
None
MT OJT
210500
9
5
152
132
$11.69
$24,303
None
132
$19.67
$40,902
High
School
129
$23.81
$49,526
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
0
181
90
88
0
178
48
114
0
148
27
119
0
145
63
215
-79
63
215
-79
MT OJT
0
132
None
MT OJT
0
132
<5 years
None
0
129
72
051400
093440
095630
18
5
2
21
6
3
33
10
6
57
38
21
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
131031
413021
439041
339092
211093
333012
131023
253021
419022
435032
435052
339099
499052
Housekeeping and
Janitorial Workers
Claims Adjusters,
Examiners, and
Investigators
Insurance Sales
Agents
Insurance Claims
and Policy
Processing Clerks
Lifeguards, Ski
Patrol, and Other
Recreational
Protective Service
Workers
Social and Human
Service Assistants
Correctional Officers
and Jailers
Purchasing Agents,
Except Wholesale,
Retail, and Farm
Products
Self-Enrichment
Education Teachers
Real Estate Sales
Agents
Dispatchers, Except
Police, Fire, and
Ambulance
Postal Service Mail
Carriers
Protective Service
Workers, All Other
Telecommunications
Line Installers and
Repairers
128
$30.48
$63,385
High
School
None
LT OJT
125
$27.64
$57,488
High
School
None
122
$17.33
$36,037
High
School
119
$12.71
$26,421
High
School
118
$15.23
$31,677
109
$29.20
$60,731
108
$32.55
$67,707
106
$15.14
$31,485
103
$20.19
$41,997
102
$17.16
$35,703
100
$27.50
$57,210
99
$16.69
$34,714
99
$28.30
$58,880
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
0
128
MT OJT
0
125
None
MT OJT
0
122
None
ST OJT
0
119
None
ST OJT
0
118
None
MT OJT
0
109
None
LT OJT
0
108
<5 years
None
0
106
None
LT OJT
0
103
None
MT OJT
0
102
None
ST OJT
0
100
None
ST OJT
0
99
None
LT OJT
9
90
73
051200
093430
1
3
1
3
0
4
5
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
433051
499099
514121
512099
119013
119013
119013
Payroll and
Timekeeping Clerks
Installation,
Maintenance, and
Repair Workers, All
Other
Welders, Cutters,
Solderers, and
Brazers
Assemblers and
Fabricators, All
Other
Farmers, Ranchers,
and Other
Agricultural
Managers
Farmers, Ranchers,
and Other
Agricultural
Managers
Farmers, Ranchers,
and Other
Agricultural
Managers
393011
Gaming Dealers
533031
Driver/Sales
Workers
Operating Engineers
and Other
Construction
Equipment
Operators
472073
96
$21.13
$43,946
High
School
None
MT OJT
95
$16.07
$33,424
High
School
None
91
$20.72
$43,097
High
School
90
$12.98
$26,997
84
$36.79
314
-218
MT OJT
0
95
None
MT OJT
0
91
High
School
None
MT OJT
0
90
$76,503
High
School
≥5 years
None
010900
1
1
3
1
4
$36.79
$76,503
High
School
≥5 years
None
010930
3
3
4
7
11
$36.79
$76,503
High
School
≥5 years
None
010300
1
3
0
1
1
84
$9.08
$18,893
82
$13.76
$28,617
81
$32.87
$68,356
High
School
High
School
High
School
None
ST OJT
None
ST OJT
None
MT OJT
74
050200
050650
8
3
7
3
128
1
186
3
Subtotal
Gap
67
0
84
4
78
0
81
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
499051
131022
434061
292052
533021
499098
371012
436012
391021
411012
434151
Electrical PowerLine Installers and
Repairers
Wholesale and
Retail Buyers,
Except Farm
Products
Eligibility
Interviewers,
Government
Programs
Pharmacy
Technicians
Bus Drivers, Transit
and Intercity
Helpers-Installation,
Maintenance, and
Repair Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of
Landscaping, Lawn
Service, and
Groundskeeping
Workers
Legal Secretaries
First-Line
Supervisors of
Personal Service
Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of NonRetail Sales Workers
Order Clerks
80
$47.28
$98,350
High
School
None
LT OJT
76
$26.63
$55,385
High
School
None
LT OJT
75
$21.93
$45,616
High
School
None
74
$19.52
$40,600
73
$13.60
$28,282
71
$12.71
$26,453
70
$21.77
70
0
80
18
58
MT OJT
0
75
None
MT OJT
0
74
None
MT OJT
0
73
High
School
None
MT OJT
0
71
$45,284
High
School
<5 years
None
0
70
$20.95
$43,571
High
School
None
MT OJT
6
64
69
$18.58
$38,643
High
School
<5 years
None
0
69
69
$28.99
$60,290
High
School
<5 years
None
0
69
68
$16.24
$33,779
High
School
None
ST OJT
0
68
High
School
High
School
75
050900
051410
4
5
3
19
9
2
10
5
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
372021
531031
472211
499041
434131
435111
519199
493093
519111
434111
531021
419099
419011
Pest Control
Workers
First-Line
Supervisors of
Transportation and
Material-Moving
Machine and
Vehicle Operators
Sheet Metal
Workers
Industrial Machinery
Mechanics
Loan Interviewers
and Clerks
Weighers,
Measurers,
Checkers, and
Samplers,
Recordkeeping
Production Workers,
All Other
Tire Repairers and
Changers
Packaging and Filling
Machine Operators
and Tenders
Interviewers, Except
Eligibility and Loan
First-Line
Supervisors of
Helpers, Laborers,
and Material
Movers, Hand
Sales and Related
Workers, All Other
Demonstrators and
Product Promoters
66
$16.45
$34,230
High
School
None
MT OJT
0
66
66
$26.85
$55,842
High
School
<5 years
None
0
66
65
$25.91
$53,896
None
APP
32
33
65
$26.82
$55,785
None
LT OJT
0
65
64
$19.19
$39,906
None
ST OJT
0
64
64
$13.40
$27,866
None
ST OJT
0
64
63
$15.17
$31,540
None
MT OJT
0
63
62
$11.61
$24,142
None
ST OJT
0
62
62
$11.01
$22,901
High
School
None
MT OJT
0
62
61
$17.06
$35,481
High
School
None
ST OJT
0
61
59
$20.45
$42,540
High
School
<5 years
None
0
59
57
$13.07
$27,192
None
None
050650
3
3
1
3
4
53
56
$15.36
$31,949
None
ST OJT
050650
3
3
1
3
4
52
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
High
School
76
095640
2
2
0
32
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
351011
519023
413011
472121
Chefs and Head
Cooks
Mixing and Blending
Machine Setters,
Operators, and
Tenders
Advertising Sales
Agents
Glaziers
Totals
54
$23.84
$49,597
High
School
≥5 years
None
54
$13.14
$27,343
High
School
None
53
$22.27
$46,321
50
$29.80
$61,991
High
School
High
School
130630
4
12
32
53
85
-31
MT OJT
0
54
None
MT OJT
0
53
None
APP
0
50
16,280
4,288
Appendix C.6: Careers Requiring a Bachelor’s Degree
Occupational Title
Av An
Jobs
2014 Q1
Median
Hourly
2014 Q1
Median
Annual
Entry Level
Education
Work
Experience
On-theJob
Training
896
$48.94
$101,782
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
Total Av
An Grads
20092014
632
896
$48.94
$101,782
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
451
$39.33
$81,813
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
11,992
Total
Degree
Grads
Total
Cert
Grads
410
223
71
34
36
None
632
410
223
<5 years
None
71
34
36
Bachelor's degree
None
None
5
5
$99,522
Bachelor's degree
None
None
13
5
8
$41.83
$87,018
Bachelor's degree
None
None
58
27
31
268
$53.62
$111,532
Bachelor's degree
None
None
5
5
268
$53.62
$111,532
Bachelor's degree
None
None
13
5
8
234
$47.08
$97,943
Bachelor's degree
None
MT OJT
632
410
223
234
$47.08
$97,943
Bachelor's degree
None
MT OJT
71
34
36
TOP Code
SOC
050500
111021
050600
111021
050500
131111
General and Operations
Managers
General and Operations
Managers
Management Analysts
050600
131111
Management Analysts
451
$39.33
$81,813
Bachelor's degree
070600
151132
342
$47.84
$99,522
070710
151132
342
$47.84
070810
151121
Software Developers,
Applications
Software Developers,
Applications
Computer Systems Analysts
279
070600
151133
070710
151133
050500
119021
Software Developers,
Systems Software
Software Developers,
Systems Software
Construction Managers
050600
119021
Construction Managers
77
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
100200
252031
100400
252031
170100
252031
220500
252031
050500
220
[6]
$70,537
Bachelor's degree
None
I/R
49
49
0
220
[6]
$70,537
Bachelor's degree
None
I/R
25
22
2
220
[6]
$70,537
Bachelor's degree
None
I/R
114
107
8
220
[6]
$70,537
Bachelor's degree
None
I/R
57
57
131051
Secondary School Teachers,
Except Special and
Career/Technical Education
Secondary School Teachers,
Except Special and
Career/Technical Education
Secondary School Teachers,
Except Special and
Career/Technical Education
Secondary School Teachers,
Except Special and
Career/Technical Education
Cost Estimators
209
$30.50
$63,435
Bachelor's degree
None
None
632
410
223
050600
131051
Cost Estimators
209
$30.50
$63,435
Bachelor's degree
None
None
71
34
36
050500
112022
Sales Managers
183
$55.21
$114,830
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
632
410
223
050600
112022
Sales Managers
183
$55.21
$114,830
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
71
34
36
070600
113021
150
$67.35
$140,099
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
5
5
020110
119041
138
$66.85
$139,041
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
1
0
070600
151131
Computer and Information
Systems Managers
Architectural and
Engineering Managers
Computer Programmers
137
$38.52
$80,118
Bachelor's degree
None
None
5
5
070710
151131
Computer Programmers
137
$38.52
$80,118
Bachelor's degree
None
None
13
5
8
043000
194021
Biological Technicians
125
$22.07
$45,902
Bachelor's degree
None
None
140
50
90
050500
111011
Chief Executives
115
N/A
N/A
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
632
410
223
050600
111011
Chief Executives
115
N/A
N/A
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
71
34
36
050500
113011
110
$42.67
$88,755
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
632
410
223
050600
113011
110
$42.67
$88,755
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
71
34
36
083520
399032
Administrative Services
Managers
Administrative Services
Managers
Recreation Workers
98
$11.32
$23,539
Bachelor's degree
None
None
66
66
083520
272022
Coaches and Scouts
92
[6]
$28,379
Bachelor's degree
None
None
66
66
070600
151199
Computer Occupations, All
Other
87
$44.39
$92,339
Bachelor's degree
None
None
5
78
5
1
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
061410
271014
070810
151143
170100
65
$19.26
$40,064
Bachelor's degree
None
MT OJT
32
14
18
64
$48.16
$100,170
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
58
27
31
119121
Multimedia Artists and
Animators
Computer Network
Architects
Natural Sciences Managers
60
$80.09
$166,587
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
114
107
8
490200
119121
Natural Sciences Managers
60
$80.09
$166,587
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
704
702
2
150600
273031
Public Relations Specialists
53
$28.23
$58,710
Bachelor's degree
None
None
85
85
0
070600
151122
Information Security Analysts
45
$43.39
$90,255
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
5
5
070810
151122
Information Security Analysts
45
$43.39
$90,255
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
58
27
31
050500
119151
43
$28.69
$59,677
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
632
410
223
050600
119151
43
$28.69
$59,677
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
71
34
36
150600
273043
Social and Community
Service Managers
Social and Community
Service Managers
Writers and Authors
39
$22.58
$46,964
Bachelor's degree
None
MT OJT
85
85
0
110400
273091
Interpreters and Translators
34
$22.35
$46,478
Bachelor's degree
None
ST OJT
4
4
050500
113051
30
$45.02
$93,641
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
632
410
223
050600
113051
30
$45.02
$93,641
Bachelor's degree
≥5 years
None
71
34
36
100700
272012
Industrial Production
Managers
Industrial Production
Managers
Producers and Directors
25
$33.09
$68,837
Bachelor's degree
<5 years
None
26
18
7
020110
171012
Landscape Architects
23
$33.88
$70,466
Bachelor's degree
None
I/R
1
0
1
100600
271027
Set and Exhibit Designers
16
$20.48
$42,593
Bachelor's degree
None
None
3
1
3
051100
132021
12
$31.07
$64,634
Bachelor's degree
None
LT OJT
58
17
41
050200
439111
Appraisers and Assessors of
Real Estate
Statistical Assistants
7
$23.62
$49,140
Bachelor's degree
None
None
314
128
186
150600
273011
Radio and Television
Announcers
7
$22.84
$47,510
Bachelor's degree
None
None
85
85
0
79
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
APPENDIX D: MiraCosta College Institutional Plans
MiraCosta College Plans
Comprehensive Master Plan
• 2011-2020 see BP 3250 for Title 5 sections
• https://www.miracosta.edu/governance/budgetandplanning/downloads/2011%20CMP%2
0Document%20Low%20Appendix.pdf
• Education Plan/Facilities Plan (BPC)
o http://www.miracosta.edu/governance/budgetandplanning/downloads/MCC_Draft
FacilitiesPlans_8-19-2011.pdf
Strategic Plan 2014-2017
• http://www.miracosta.edu/governance/budgetandplanning/downloads/MCCCD_Strategic
_Plan_2014-2017.pdf
Staffing Plan 2015-2018
• http://www.miracosta.edu/governance/budgetandplanning/downloads/MCCDraftStaffingPlan-v8-3-11-15.pdf
Technology Plan 2011-2014
• http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/accreditation/downloads/MCC%20Techn
ology%20Plan%202011-2014.pdf
AB86 Plan
• http://www.miracosta.edu/instruction/ab86/index.html
Instruction
Experiential Education Plan
• AP 4103 Title 5 55250
o http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/4103APExperientialEducation-Effective1-19-10-PeriodicReview5-8-12-6-16-15.pdf
• Donna Davis received electronic copy approved by BOT 4/20/2010
Online Education Plan (Closed) 2011-2014
• http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/accreditation/appendix2014/AppendixL.p
df
Student Services
EOPS Plan
• BP/AP 5150 Ed Code 69640-69656 Title 5 56200
o http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/5150BPExtendedOpportunityProgramsandServices-Adopted5-5-09.pdf
Student Equity Plan 2014-2017
• (BP/AP 5300 Ed Code 66030, 66250, 72010 Title 5 54220)
80
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
•
https://www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/studentequity/downloads/MiraCosta%20Colle
ge%20Student%20Equity%20Plan%202014-17%20-CCCCO.pdf
Student Success Plan
• https://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/StudentSuccessPlanFin
al7-2-15.pdf
Student Success and Support Program Plan (SSSP)
• Formerly Matriculation Plan (BP/AP 5050 Ed Code 78210 Title 5 51024, 55500-55534,
58106)
• http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/SSSP2014PlanwithApp
endixandBudgetLarge_000.pdf
Transfer Center Plan
• BP/AP 5120 Title 5 51027
• http://www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/transfercenter/downloads/MasterPlan.pdf
Athletics Plan
• Pending approval by the Board of Trustees
Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan- Waiting to hear from Joe Mazza
• Required by Title 8 5193
• Joe Mazza sent link to Cal Osha Plan:
https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/expplan2.pdf
Business and Administrative Services
Final Budget for 2015-16
• http://miracosta.edu/administrative/downloads/FinalBudgetFY2016.pdf
District Deferred Maintenance Plan-Waiting to hear from Tom
• Schedule Maintenance Plan
• Located on Statewide system Fusion
2017-2021 5-Year Capital Construction Plan (yearly update)
• http://www.miracosta.edu/administrative/facilities/downloads/SFACILITIES1506160657
0.pdf
Sustainability Plan
• Tom Macias working on a new plan, using current to measure progress on annual
objectives
Emergency Operations Plan
• https://portal.miracosta.edu/Resources/Site%20Assets/emergency_preparedness_manual.
pdf
• Emergency Response Plan (BP/AP 3505 Ed Code 32280)
81
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
•
http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/3505APEmergencyResponsePlan-Effective2-16-10-Revised7-7-15.pdf
Workplace Violence Plan
• BP/AP 3510 Labor Code 6300
• http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/3510BPWorkplaceViolencePlan-Adopted12-8-09-RefUpdate4-15_000.pdf
Superintendent/President Division
Equal Employment Opportunity Plan
• http://www.miracosta.edu/administrative/hr/downloads/eeoplan.pdf
• BP/AP 3420 Ed Code 87100 Title 5 53000, 59300
o http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/3420BPEqualEmploymentOpportunity-Adopted10-6-09-6-24-15-RefUpdate4-15.pdf
Foundation and Development Office Long Range Plan, 2010-2019
• Please contact the MiraCosta College Foundation & Development Office to request a
copy of this plan.
82
EDUCATIONAL MASTER PLAN ADDENDUM 2016-2020
References
Cochrane, D. & Miller, B. (2015). Student Loans, Defaults, and the Impact on Community
Colleges. Presentation at the 2015 Community College National Legislative Summit, Higher
Education Policy Academy. Retrieve from http://www.acct.org.
James, P.A., Bruch, P.L., & Jahangir, R.R. (2006). Ideas in practice: Building bridges in a
multicultural learning community. Journal of Developmental Education 26(3), 10-18.
San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG, 2007). Activity Centers in the San Diego
Region. Info, August 2007, No. 2.
San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG, 2012). Traded Industry Clusters in the San
Diego Region. Info, December 2012.
San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG, 2015). Population Estimates and
Projections. Retrieve from http://datasurfer.sandag.org.
San Diego Military Advisory Council (SDMAC, 2015). 7th Annual SDMAC Military Economic
Impact Study, San Diego Region 2015. Retrieve from http://sdmac.org/ImpactStudy.htm.
Tinto, V. (2008). Access without support is not opportunity. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from
http://insidehighered.com/layout/set/print/views/2008/06/09/tinto
83
MIRACOSTA COLLEGE
PROGRESS REPORT
1831 Mission Avenue
Oceanside, CA 92054
MiraCosta Community College District
Accrediting Commission for Schools
Western Association of Schools and Colleges
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
2
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table of Contents
Table of Contents .................................................................................................................3
Table of Figures ...................................................................................................................4
I: Student/Community Profile Data ....................................................................................5
II: Significant Changes and Developments ......................................................................48
III: Ongoing School Improvement ....................................................................................58
IV: Progress on Critical Areas for Follow-up/Schoolwide Action Plan ............................ 61
Institution’s Critical Areas for Follow-Up ................................................................................. 61
Responses to Critical Areas for Follow-up ................................................................................ 62
Area 1 ..............................................................................................................................62
Area 2: .............................................................................................................................63
Area 3: .............................................................................................................................65
Area 4: .............................................................................................................................67
Area .................................................................................................................................69
V: Schoolwide Action Plan Refinements ..........................................................................72
Synthesizing and Addressing Key Issues .................................................................................. 72
Creating the Action Plan .............................................................................................................. 74
Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 77
Appendices ........................................................................................................................88
3
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table of Figures
Figure I-1. 2014-2015 Student Residency Based on Service Area .................................. 11
Figure I-2 2014-2015 Student Residency based on Oceanside, Vista, and other
Communities. ....................................................................................................................... 12
Figure I-3. AHS Student Enrollment by Ethnicity........................................................... 16
Figure I-4. District Population by Ethnicity ..................................................................... 16
Figure I-5 Ethnic Distribution by Academic Year ........................................................... 18
Figure I-6. MiraCosta Community College District Organizational Chart ................ 19
Figure I-7. MiraCosta College SLO Assessment Loop................................................... 24
Figure I-8. Average Enrollments per Section .................................................................. 26
Figure I-9 AHS Employees by Gender 2015.................................................................... 27
Figure I-10. Geographical Map of AHS’s Service Area .................................................. 29
Figure I-11 Elementary Basic Skills by Zip Code ............................................................ 30
4
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
I: Student/Community Profile Data
Include the following:
•
•
An updated student/community profile that includes the following: a brief, general
description of the school and its programs; the school’s vision, mission, and learner
outcomes; student and faculty/staff demographics; and student achievement data
for a three-year period.
An updated summary of data with implications, identified critical learner needs,
and important questions for staff discussion.
Note: Use the current student/community profile and summary that has been updated annually
since the last full visit and other annual progress reports. (See Task 1 of the Focus on Learning
manual.)
Institutional, Community and Student Characteristics
Introduction
MiraCosta College’s Adult High School Diploma (AHS) has collected and reviewed
the relevant data to explain the program’s characteristics and to analyze evidence of
student learning and achievement. Due to the program’s small size, the leadership
team and focus groups were one and the same.
The leadership team included all full-time faculty, staff, and administrators of the
program as well as staff and administrators from the Office of Institutional
Effectiveness (OIE, formerly known as the Office of Institutional Planning, Research
and Grants, or OIPRG). The team produced two versions of AHS’s profile:
•
•
A detailed data profile (Appendix A: AHS Data Profile)
A summary pamphlet for distribution to the campus community (Appendix
B: AHS Summary Pamphlet).
AHS faculty, staff, and other stakeholders have examined the data, dialogued about
the evidence, assessed the impact of the information, and brainstormed conclusions
to assist the program in updating and revising its Schoolwide Action Plan for
Continuing Improvement. With this collective effort, AHS has continued to
demonstrate its “culture of collaboration and open communication to carry out the
school’s mission,” an institutional strength recognized in the 2013 WASC “Self
Study Visiting Committee Report.”
Their engagement with the data revealed how important reliable and valid evidence
is to inform good decision making. The need to expand both the capacity and the
use of evidence to chart program improvement and measure student learning is the
5
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
key issue for the next accreditation cycle. Again demonstrating the AHS culture of
collaboration and open communication, the leadership team acted as a professional
learning community to engage in the process of inquiry and to forge a culture of
experimentation and investigation. Specifically, an interim research analyst for
noncredit programs was hired and has begun several crucial research projects: The
creation of a data warehouse to capture quantitative information related to student
demographics and progress and a student-led qualitative research project whereby
students document barriers and bridges to their academic success. These projects
enable administration, faculty, and staff to focus on improving student learning and
achievement outcomes.
Basic Institutional Information
Narrative Description
The Community Learning Center (CLC) is one of two MiraCosta Community
College District (MCCCD) centers. In addition to AHS, the CLC houses the
following noncredit programs: Noncredit ESL, Other Noncredit, and Short-Term
Vocational. The CLC also offers selected credit college courses to assist students in
transitioning from noncredit to credit programs.
While many courses are offered at the center, AHS is the only CLC program offering
the completion of a degree (high school diploma). AHS is also preparing to offer the
Certificate of Competency-Basic Education for Academic or Workforce Preparation.
Prior to the initial accreditation process in 2010, the college decided to apply for full
accreditation for the AHS through the Accrediting Commission for Schools.
AHS prepares adults for higher education and increased employability in a
simultaneously encouraging, challenging, and accessible environment that respects
and honors diversity; according to the 2013 WASC “Self Study Visiting Committee
Report,” the AHS program has a “nurturing environment” that fosters student
support, an institutional area of strength. The report also noted the college
administration’s and Board of Trustee’s “strong and ongoing commitment to the
high school;” as such, the program is fully integrated within all of MCCCD’s policies
and procedures.
6
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
MiraCosta College is the only post-secondary institution in Coastal North San Diego
County to offer an adult high school diploma. The program is tuition-free, with both
day and evening courses to accommodate the varying schedules of students in the
community. AHS is committed to classroom innovation and its faculty take a
comprehensive approach to instructional modalities: AHS classes include face-to
face instruction, open lab, and self-paced courses with one-on-one instruction.
Furthermore, in fall 2014, AHS began offering hybrid courses. This shift from
traditional classroom instruction to flexible, technology-centric pedagogies and
course offerings allows the faculty to respond more effectively to student needs and
mirrors online educational approaches taking place within the college, around the
state, and throughout the nation.
School Address, Website, and Extension Site
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta College
One Barnard Drive
Community Learning Center
Oceanside, CA 92056
1831 Mission Avenue
www.miracosta.edu
Oceanside, CA 92058
www.miracosta.edu/AHS
History of the Institution
In spring 1934, the Board of Trustees of the Oceanside-Carlsbad Union High School
District chose to establish a junior college department on the high school’s campus,
located in downtown Oceanside. In 1960, with the encouragement of state and
county educational agencies, Oceanside and Carlsbad voters agreed to develop a
separate junior college district to be governed by the same Board of Trustees that
oversaw the high school district.
When the College separated from the high school districts to become OceansideCarlsbad Community College District, and soon thereafter the MiraCosta
Community College District, both Carlsbad and Oceanside Unified School Districts
asked the College to accept responsibility for all adult education in the district.
As reflected in the Board of Trustees minutes, the College agreed to accept that
charge at a meeting on April 18, 1972. In addition, on June 23, 1972, the Oceanside
Unified School District Board of Education granted MiraCosta permission to grant
7
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
eighth grade and high school diplomas. On August 1, 1972, the District’s Board of
Trustees approved the graduation requirements as submitted (Appendix C:
MiraCosta Community College District Board of Trustee’s August 1, 1972 Minutes).
In 1976, when the state determined that open community college districts would no
longer be allowed, it annexed the San Dieguito geographic area, which included the
cities of Del Mar, Solana Beach, Olivenhain, Encinitas, and Leucadia to MCCCD.
Because the San Dieguito Union High School District (SDUHSD) was already
operating an adult school, MiraCosta agreed not to offer noncredit classes or
programs in that area of the district; however, at their request, in 2006 the college
offered a few adult high school classes at the San Elijo Center to assist some
SDUHSD students who had not passed the California High School Exit Exam. In
2015, MiraCosta College and SDUHSD entered an agreement, whereby MiraCosta
College began piloting adult high school classes at Sunset High School, a SDUHSD
continuation school in Encinitas. SDUHSD plans to transition its adult high school
classes to MiraCosta College, which will continue to expand its adult high school
course offerings at Sunset High School.
The community college districts bordering MCCCD are Palomar Community
College District and San Diego Community College District (SDCCD). Palomar does
not offer an adult high school, but SDCCD does. At the request of the SDUHSD
Board of Trustees, MiraCosta College did not offer its adult high school classes in
the southern part of MiraCosta College district that borders SDCCD. In 2015,
however, SDUHSD requested a change to this agreement, as summarized in the
previous paragraph. In addition to collaborating with SDUHSD to begin offering
adult high school courses at the SDUHSD Sunset High School, the college works
cooperatively with all the K-12 adult schools in nearby districts that do provide an
adult high school.
Originally, the MiraCosta College AHS offered only evening classes in one wing of
an Oceanside High School building. In the late 1970s, MiraCosta College also
assumed the responsibility for the general educational development program on
Camp Pendleton, previously offered by the San Diego Army and Navy Academy
private prep school.
In the 1980s, MiraCosta College’s noncredit programs, including AHS, moved from
Oceanside High School to leased facilities in Oceanside. The new facility was called
the Adult Learning Center. As a result of changes in the Camp Pendleton Marine
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Base population in the 1990s, MiraCosta College closed its offices and AHS on the
base; from that time until the present, the college has served the Marine Corps
population off the base in Oceanside.
In 1998, MCCCD purchased 7.8 acres at 1831 Mission Avenue in Oceanside for the
construction of a new facility to house the college’s noncredit programs. The site
included a strip mall with a large supermarket structure and a connected smaller
structure, plus two separate buildings containing fast-food restaurants.
The district invested approximately eight million dollars to purchase the site and
remodel the strip-mall buildings as well as one fast-food building. Arby’s still leases
the second restaurant building, and the college uses the revenue to help pay off the
certificates of participation that funded the remodel. The current site was named
MiraCosta College Community Learning Center (CLC). The CLC is located in a
commercial area, with frequent bus stops nearby. Residential areas border the
commercial area in which it is located.
Student Demographics
A meaningful and relevant adult high school program depends upon a critical
review of the demographics of the community and of the students in the program.
Additionally, effective evaluation of program improvement and student learning
and achievement involves the study of the factors impacting success and aligning
interventions to facilitate diploma completion.
Student Residency
Approximately 73 percent of the program’s students are from the district’s service
area with the majority coming from Oceanside where the center is located. The
second largest group of AHS students resides in Vista (13 percent), which is outside
the service area. In analyzing this fact, the leadership team hypothesized that the
proximity of the program’s boundaries to the CLC allows students to choose
between MiraCosta College’s program and the adult high school diploma program
offered through the Vista Unified School District. Table I-1 represents student
residency for the most recent academic year.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table 1-0-1. 2014-2015 AHS Student Residency
CITY
Oceanside
Vista
Carlsbad
Fallbrook
Encinitas
San Marcos
Escondido
San Diego
Solana Beach
Bonsall
Cardiff
San Luis Rey
Temecula
Borrego Springs
Del Mar
El Cajon
La Mesa
Los Angeles
Murrieta
National City
Rancho Santa Fe
Grand Total
Count
492
104
95
27
25
11
8
8
5
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
792
Percent of Total
62.12%
13.13%
11.99%
3.41%
3.16%
1.39%
1.01%
1.01%
0.63%
0.38%
0.25%
0.25%
0.25%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
100.00%
Upon review of the data, the leadership team noted that about one in four enrolled
students resides outside the district’s service area, as illustrated in Figure I-1, either
in a neighboring community. Further reflection led the leadership team to recognize
the need to access database information from local school districts and the students
the program serves. More data is needed from students not only within AHS’s
service area but also outside the district about their reasons for choosing MiraCosta
College’s program and how their needs may be met.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
2014-2015 Student Residency Based on Service Area
Other Local
Communities
27%
Within Service Area
73%
Figure I-1. 2014-2015 Student Residency Based on Service Area
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
2014-2015 Student Residency (Oceanside, Vista, All
Other Communities)
24.75%
62.12%
13.13%
Oceanside
Vista
All Other Communities
Figure I-2 2014-2015 Student Residency based on Oceanside, Vista, and other
Communities.
Gender
The gender composition of students enrolled in the program has remained about
equally split between males and females over the past five academic years, as Table
I-2 shows. It is important to note that in evaluating the enrollment trends by gender
for the self-study report, the leadership team reviewed the dropout gender
discrepancies for the local high schools and discovered that males appear to be an
underrepresented group in the AHS student population. For the Adult Education
Block Grant, categorical funding designed to encourage pathways from noncredit
education to credit institutions and professional careers, AHS has access to
demographic data that point to gender disparities, including lower enrollment and
persistence rates for young men of color; to determine better support systems for
these vulnerable populations, student-centric research is being conducted. The goal
of this research is to determine specific roadblocks for young men of color and to
devise ways to remove these obstacles, through tailored support programs and
resources.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table I-2. AHS Enrollment by Gender
Gender
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
Female
48%
52%
54%
53%
53%
Male
52%
48%
46%
47%
47%
However, at this point it is not possible to determine whether the program is
capturing the students who are dropping out from the local high schools because the
information is not currently obtained at enrollment. There are many possible factors
impacting this result, including the large number of out of district students who
attend as well as the high percentage of students concurrently enrolled in local high
schools.
The issue of gender is an area that the team is interested in exploring. Better
background information from the students is needed at the point of enrollment to
see if the program is providing an educational alternative for students who have
discontinued attending local high schools; as such, the noncredit research analyst is
working with student support staff to revise a supplementary questionnaire that
students complete during registration. This information will supplement California
Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO) Management Information
Services (MIS) Data Mart data collected by way of each student’s registration
application.
Age
Currently, almost half of the program’s enrolled students (44 percent) are between
18 and 24 years old, with over three-fourths of the students under the age of 30.
While the percentage of students 17 and younger has declined over the past five
academic years, as Table I-3 illustrates, almost 17 percent of the students in the most
recent academic year are of traditional high school age. Students under 18 could be
affiliated with a local traditional high school and take AHS courses concurrently to
make up credits for graduation.
Table I-3. AHS Enrollment by Age over Five Years (Percentage)
17 and Under
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
16.00%
18.47%
18.38%
19.38%
16.41%
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
18 to 20
31.53%
27.31%
26.70%
23.83%
27.02%
21 to 24
20.82%
21.15%
21.08%
20.62%
16.92%
25 to 29
13.76%
12.72%
14.05%
16.79%
17.30%
30 to 34
8.00%
8.97%
7.49%
8.40%
9.85%
35 to 39
5.18%
4.55%
4.92%
6.05%
4.17%
40 to 44
5.06%
4.69%
3.75%
3.58%
3.66%
45 to 54
3.88%
5.09%
5.15%
6.54%
6.94%
55 to 64
0.71%
1.34%
1.41%
1.11%
0.76%
65 and Over
0.47%
0.67%
0.47%
0.25%
0.76%
Total
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
Table I-4. AHS Enrollment by Age over Five Years (Numbers)
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
17 and Under
136
138
157
157
130
18 to 20
268
204
228
193
214
21 to 24
177
158
180
167
134
25 to 29
117
95
120
136
137
30 to 34
68
67
64
68
78
35 to 39
44
34
42
49
33
40 to 44
43
35
32
29
29
45 to 54
33
38
44
53
55
55 to 64
6
10
12
9
6
65 and Over
4
5
4
2
6
Total
850
747
854
810
792
Since most of AHS’s students are younger than 30, they expect technology to be
used in the classroom; thus, faculty have included many technological resources for
learning. In their 2013 “Self Study Visiting Committee Report,” WASC committee
members noted this access to technology as an institutional area of strength. While
the leadership team continues to view face-to-face instruction as crucial to student
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
success, in an effort to better prepare students for university-level coursework and
workforce demands, faculty have increased the integration of technology into
pedagogy. Self-paced lab and hybrid courses have been added to the program
schedule for the last three academic years and by the 2016/2017 schoolyear, all AHS
courses will be approved for hybrid instruction. While the program will not offer all
courses as hybrid, faculty and administration have planned for this option, in
response to a statewide emphasis on online secondary education; furthermore,
recommendations made in the 2013 WASC report have also motivated these
modifications and more: To increase student access to and guided experience with
technology, faculty now have access to mobile computer carts, which can be moved
into classrooms for particular technology-centric lessons and activities. These
computers were funded through the college’s Student Success Committee and with
the Basic Skills grant and demonstrate the college’s commitment to adult education
in general and AHS in particular. Program faculty will continue to analyze student
needs and incorporate different methodologies for learning. Likewise, through
curriculum and program review processes, AHS will continue to address increased
student needs for access to technology-based education.
Student Ethnicity
The ethnic breakdown of AHS students indicates that more than 80 percent are from
historically underrepresented groups (Figure 1-0-2). Table 1-4 demonstrates that
these rates have been relatively constant for the past five academic years.
AHS student enrollment does not mirror the ethnic breakdown of the district’s
residents, as Figure 1-3 shows. These data bring to light the importance of
understanding the needs of underrepresented student groups so that more tailored
student services and instruction can be provided to maximize their success. The data
also demonstrates the value AHS has for the district’s most vulnerable populations.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
AHS Student Enrollment by Ethnicity
Black/African
American, 4.2%
Asian, 6.2%
American
Indian/Alaska
Native, 0.9%
White,
16.3%
Unknown, 2.0%
Pacific Islander,
0.9%
Hispanic, 68.1%
Two or More
Races, 1.5%
American Indian/Alaska Native
Asian
Black/African American
Hispanic
Pacific Islander
Two or More Races
Unknown
White
Figure I-3. AHS Student Enrollment by Ethnicity
District Population by Ethnicity
American Indian
0.36%
Asian
8.81%
Black
2.13%
Hispanic
21.55%
Other
0.25%
Pacific Islander
0.59%
Two or More
3.26%
White
63.05%
American Indian
Asian
Black
Hispanic
Other
Pacific Islander
Two or More
White
Figure I-4. District Population by Ethnicity
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table I-4. AHS 5-Year Enrollment by Ethnicity
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
Native
0.7%
0.4%
0.4%
1.0%
0.9%
Asian
5.5%
6.0%
5.3%
5.9%
6.2%
American
5.4%
5.4%
5.5%
4.8%
4.2%
Hispanic
62.7%
66.0%
68.0%
67.2%
68.1%
Pacific Islander
1.3%
1.5%
0.9%
0.7%
0.9%
Races
2.5%
2.8%
2.3%
2.0%
1.5%
Unknown
0.7%
1.5%
1.2%
1.5%
2.0%
White
21.2%
16.5%
16.4%
16.9%
16.3%
Grand Total
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
American
Indian/Alaska
Black/African
Two or More
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Ethnic Distribution by Academic Year
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
American Indian/Alaska Native
Asian
Black/African American
Hispanic
Pacific Islander
Two or More Races
Unknown
White
2014-2015
Figure I-5 Ethnic Distribution by Academic Year
Governance Structure of the Institution
MCCCD is governed by an elected Board of Trustees and led by a
superintendent/president; according to WASC feedback from the 2013 visit, these
governing parties continue to “demonstrate a strong and ongoing commitment to
the high school. The dean of Community Education serves as the CLC site
administrator and reports directly to the MiraCosta College District vice president of
Instructional Services.
MiraCosta College’s governance structure consists of three primary groups: the
Board of Trustees, superintendent/president, and constituent groups. Their
responsibilities are as follows:
•
The Board of Trustees serves as a policy making body that is responsible for
the quality, integrity, and financial stability of the institution.
18
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
•
The superintendent/president is the chief executive officer of the institution
whose administrative staff assists in MiraCosta College’s operations, as
illustrated in Figure 1-5 and in Appendix D: MiraCosta College
Organizational Chart.
•
The constituency groups include administrators, faculty, staff, and students.
Their respective roles are defined through the MiraCosta College governance
structure.
Figure I-6. MiraCosta Community College District Organizational Chart
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
The college’s governance structure, which was approved in spring 2009 and
implemented in summer and fall 2009, consists of two main types of governing
bodies: committees and councils.
The Institutional Effectiveness Committee
(IEC) measures the effectiveness of the
governance structure’s processes and
maintains the currency of its system of
committees and councils. In addition to IEC,
five governance committees form the basis
of the decision-making structure at
MiraCosta College:
•
•
•
•
•
Academic Affairs
Budget and Planning
Courses and Programs
Institutional Program Review
Student Success
Board of Trustees
• Makes policy
• Provides oversight
Superintendent/President
• Makes decisions
• Dialogues with Board of
Trustees
Councils
• Review proposals
• Make recommendations
Committees
• Review/update plans,
policies and procedures
• Make proposals on issues
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
These governance committees develop and update plans, board policies, and
administrative procedures and recommend them to the governance councils.
Composed of members from all four constituent groups, committees have subjectmatter purview and are advisory in nature to the councils (Appendix E: Board
Policy 2510).
Councils, on the other hand, with the exception of the Steering Council, represent
homogenous constituent groups; each council’s members belong to the same group.
They review and approve recommendations and committee proposals but do not
expressly formulate plans, board policies, or administrative procedures.
Four governance councils, in addition to the Steering Council, provide overarching
support of MiraCosta College’s decision-making processes:
•
•
•
•
Associated Student Government
Academic Senate
Classified Senate
Administrative
The Steering Council routes governance issues to appropriate governance
committees and governance councils. Its composition represents the leadership from
each of the college’s constituent groups and governance committees.
The four governance councils submit their recommendations directly to the
superintendent/president, who then decides whether or not to forward their
recommendations to the Board of Trustees for final approval.
Schoolwide Learning Outcomes
Student learning is identified at three critical levels at MiraCosta College:
institutional, program, and course. In addition, administrative units and service
areas conduct outcomes assessment to measure student learning that occurs outside
of the classroom.
Institutional Level Outcomes
Institutional learning outcomes (ILOs) at MiraCosta College were created to
measure the broad-based learning that occurs for all students, regardless of program
or certificate. MiraCosta College’s institutional level outcomes parallel the general
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
education outcomes that are measured as a part of degree completion.
MiraCosta College has established five ILOs:
•
•
•
•
•
Effective Communication
 Write, speak, read, listen, and otherwise communicate
 Communicate clearly, accurately, and logically
 Communicate appropriately for the context.
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
 Define and analyze problems clearly
 Think independently, creatively, logically, and effectively
 Apply appropriate problem solving methods
 Analyze and synthesize information from multiple perspectives.
Professional and Ethical Behavior
 Demonstrate responsible and professional conduct, in the classroom,
workplace, and community
 Demonstrate the ability to work independently and collaboratively.
Information Literacy
 Identify information needed
 Collect information effectively and efficiently
 Evaluate and analyze information
 Use and apply information accurately and appropriately.
Global Awareness
 Demonstrate respect for diversity and multiple perspectives

Value his/her place and role in an increasingly interconnected global
community

Demonstrate cultural and environmental awareness.
AHS Program- and Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes
Through the process and analysis of the self-study, the leadership team realized
AHS’s PSLOs needed to be connected more directly to the program’s student
population. Moreover, the evaluation of ILOs needed to reflect the level of
achievement appropriate for a high school diploma. Therefore, the AHS PLO’s were
re-written in spring 2013.
The AHS has four PLOs:
•
Students will obtain an awareness of, and preparation for, higher education.
22
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
•
•
•
 Effective oral and written communication
 Critical thinking and analysis for academic problem solving
 Reading comprehension skills necessary for continued education
 Increased knowledge of higher education options
Students will acquire improved workplace skills for employability.
 Critical thinking and analysis for workplace problem solving
 Effective oral and written communication for the workplace
 A facility with numbers for real world applications
 Reading comprehension skills necessary for the workplace
Students will demonstrate improved self-efficacy.
 Technology literacy through a variety of mediums
 Efficient use of student services
 Responsible conduct in an academic and professional environment
Students will model a sensitivity to and awareness of diverse perspectives.
 Exposure to multiple cultural and historical perspectives
 Demonstration of diversity awareness
Each AHS course records its three course-level SLOs (CSLOs) and associated
methods of assessment in an official course outline of record, which is stored in the
college’s online course management system (Curricunet). Faculty assess their course
SLOs each term, and the assessment records are maintained in MiraCosta College’s
online reporting program and repository (TracDat).
Course level outcomes continue to be assessed every time a course is taught. All fulltime and associate faculty members participate in course level assessment. The
faculty secretary then annually compiles the data, and full-time faculty create a
comprehensive chart accordingly. This chart is reviewed by faculty work groups
towards the end of each spring semester. As a result of this process, course level
outcomes in English, math and social science courses have recently been revised to
better reflect alignment with program level outcomes and to streamline the
outcomes process. The course level process described above has positioned AHS to
move effectively into a more streamlined process for evaluating program and
institutional outcomes. Program Learning Outcomes have become a larger focus for
AHS, are now posted in all classrooms, and will be included in all course syllabi
effective spring 2016. AHS faculty worked closely with the faculty secretary to
develop a tracking system that synthesizes course-level data and allows AHS to
seamlessly apply the data to program-level outcomes. Program-level data has been
compiled for the 2014-2015 school year will be analyzed by faculty work groups in
fall 2016, with the expectation that this procedure will be added to the AHS annual
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
review beginning spring 2016. In addition to this data, AHS faculty have begun
piloting a student survey that measures achievement of program learning outcomes
in select courses; AHS will expand this survey to all courses by fall 2016. These data
are based on student perceptions and provide qualitative data that, combined with
quantitative data, will provide a more comprehensive means to analyze outcomes.
AHS program-level learning outcomes are highly informed by institutional
outcomes and the AHS mission to prepare noncredit students for higher education
and the workforce. While AHS faculty do not expect all noncredit student to achieve
all institutional outcomes, AHS faculty will consider the qualitative and quantitative
measures described above to assess student readiness to achieve institutional level
outcomes. AHS faculty are in the process of re-mapping CSLOs to the revised PSLOs
and ILOs.
All outcomes assessment follows a feedback loop, illustrated in Figure I-6; this
process gives the faculty a mechanism for maintaining continuous quality
improvement.
Figure I-7. MiraCosta College SLO Assessment Loop
Outcomes assessment and student success data are incorporated into all program
reviews to guide pedagogical improvements, curriculum analyses and review,
24
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
resource allocations, organizational improvement, and quality assurance. ILOs are
reviewed by the Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment Committee (SLOAC).
Enrollment and Program Types at AHS
AHS issues high school diplomas and will soon offer the Certificate of CompetencyBasic Education for Academic or Workforce Preparation. Students can enter the
program at different stages (as determined by their deficiency of courses) to achieve
the high school diploma.
Typical Class Size
The average class size for AHS is depicted in Table 0-5. Program personnel
examined fill rates and, as a result, adapted schedule needs, which, in turn,
contributed to improved program efficiency and response to student needs. In the
“Self Study Visiting Committee Report,” the WASC visiting committee highlighted
this attention to student schedules as an institutional area of strength.
Table I-5. Average Enrollments per Section
Average Enrollments
Per Section (AHS)
Per Section College
2010-11
20.88
2011-12
22.83
2012-13
20.64
2013-14
22.92
2014-15
23.35
25.47
26.37
24.79
25.58
25.34
Wide (Credit)
The program’s average class size is smaller than the college wide average for two
reasons. First, AHS and most credit course enrollments are calculated based on the
census date. Second, the class size maximum for the AHS courses is between 24 to 50
while some college credit courses have a range from 12 to 60. Figure I-8 compares
the average class sizes for AHS and the College.
25
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
30.00
25.00
20.00
15.00
10.00
5.00
0.00
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Average Enrollments Per Section
2014-15
College-Wide Average
Figure I-8. Average Enrollments per Section
Types of Certificates Awarded
The program awards a high school diploma and will soon offer a Certificate of
Competency-Basic Education for Academic or Workforce Preparation.
Administrative and Teaching Staff
AHS employs a total of 38 full-time and part-time administrators, faculty, and staff,
as depicted categorically in Table I-6. In 2015, two full-time counselors resigned: One
retired and the other was hired as a credit counselor. Therefore, the number of parttime counselors has increased and the number of full-time counselors decreased;
also, a noncredit SSSP coordinator was added and is being filled on an interim basis,
which these data also reflect. Through the program review process, AHS analyzes its
current administrative and teaching staff and requests additional personnel to meet
the program’s needs as necessary. At least one full-time counselor will be replaced,
depending on these district staffing processes and allocations.
Table I-6. AHS Personnel
2013
Assignment
2015
Female
Male
26
Female
Male
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Administration
1
0
1
0
Faculty
Counselors
Staff
Librarian
14
4
6
2
6
0
3
1
7
9
18
3
3
0
11
1
Total
27
10
38
15
AHS Employees by Gender 2015
18
11
9
7
1
0
3
ADMINISTRATOR CLASSIFIED STAFF
3
0
COUNSELOR
Female
FACULTY
1
LIBRARIANS
Male
Figure I-9 AHS Employees by Gender 2015
Calendar System
AHS utilizes an academic calendar approved by the district’s Board of Trustees and
Academic Senate. Designated as the Noncredit Calendar, it operates on the same
overall schedule as the Credit Academic Calendar as regards fall, spring, and
summer start and end dates and all-campus holiday observations. Both calendars
have four eight-week terms during the fall and spring and one term during the
summer (Appendix F: 2015-2016 Noncredit and Credit Academic Calendars).
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Typical Load for the Average Student
AHS offers courses in eight-week terms, scheduling two terms per semester. Table I7 shows that in the last five years, students enrolled in an average of two courses per
term. This average is in line with the expectations of the program’s fast pace and
students’ personal lives outside of the program.
Table I-7. AHS Average Student Course Load over Five Years
Fall
2010
Fall
2011
Fall
2012
Fall
2013
Fall
2014
Average number of courses
enrolled
2.47
2.38
2.23
2.33
2.34
Maximum classes enrolled
by any one student in a
semester
9
9
7
8
8
Community Information
The program’s service area is Oceanside and Carlsbad under an agreement with the
local unified school districts. AHS is located in the Community Learning Center
(CLC) in a commercial area of Oceanside. Residential areas border the commercial
area. Figure I-8 depicts a map of the geographic region served by the program.
Approximately 62 percent of AHS students come from Oceanside; the second largest
group of AHS students resides in Vista (13 percent), which is outside the service
area. In analyzing this dynamic, the leadership team hypothesized that the
proximity of the program’s boundaries to the CLC allows students to choose
between the MiraCosta College AHS and the adult high school diploma program
offered through the Vista Unified School District.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Figure I-10. Geographical Map of AHS’s Service Area
Population of Area Served by the School
AHS uses zip codes to identify its service area and the remaining southern portion
of the district’s area, as profiled in Table I-8.
Table I-8. Zip Code Composition of MCCCD’s Service Area
AHS
Southern Portion of the district
92008 - Carlsbad NW
92007 - Cardiff
92009 - Carlsbad SE (La Costa)
92014 - Del Mar
29
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
92010 - Carlsbad NE
92024 - Encinitas
92011 - Carlsbad SW (La Costa)
92067 - Rancho Santa Fe
92054 - Oceanside S
92075 - Solana Beach
92055 - Camp Pendleton
92091 - Rancho Santa Fe
92056 - Oceanside E
92130 - Carmel Valley
92057 - Oceanside N
92058 - Oceanside (Central)
Population Characteristics
The chart below depicts the locations of all elementary and secondary basic skills
programs being offered in the consortium, along with zip code boundaries that
demarcate the density of populations who need these services.
Figure I-11 Elementary Basic Skills by Zip Code
30
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
*Zip code area 92055 represents Camp Pendleton, and while this area is not specifically assigned as a part of
MCCCD, programs and services are often accessed by these students.
The population of AHS’s service area is projected to increase by approximately 1.5
percent over the next five years and 2.5 percent over the next decade, as depicted in
Table I-9.
Table I-10. Five- and Ten-Year Population Projections
Five and Ten-Year Population Projections
5-yr 5-yr % 10-yr 10-yr %
City
2010 Pop 2015 Pop 2020 Pop
Growth Growth Growth Growth
158,771 161,962 163,632 3,191 2.00% 4,861 3.10%
Oceanside
99,576 101,519 102,879 1,943 2.00% 3,303 3.30%
Carlsbad
49,250 49,517 49,795
267 0.50%
545 1.10%
Encinitas
42,969 42,957 43,149
-12 0.00%
180 0.40%
San Diego (Carmel Valley)
Camp Pendleton
35,268 36,572 37,030 1,304 3.70% 1,762 5.00%
14,220 14,345 14,433
125 0.90%
213 1.50%
Del Mar
13,282 13,315 13,430
33 0.20%
148 1.10%
Rancho Santa Fe
13,233 13,481 13,664
248 1.90%
431 3.30%
Solana Beach
10,610 10,694 10,727
84 0.80%
117 1.10%
Cardiff by the Sea
North Section
236,053 241,469 244,160 5,416 2.30% 8,107 3.40%
201,126 202,893 204,580 1,767 0.90% 3,454 1.70%
South Section
C
h
a
n
g
e
b
y
Change
by
Change
by
Change
by
Change
by
Chang
e by
%
20
25
%
2030
%
203
5
%
2040
%
204
5
2035
2040
2045
2050
%
2020
31,982
32,741
33,296
33,244
33,280
6.9
11
.3
15.4
18.1
20.1
19.9
20,366
20,508
20,749
20,718
20,701
20,700
35.3
37
.0
37.9
39.5
39.3
39.2
43,455
44,077
44,404
44,546
44,318
44,278
44,328
5.2
7.5
7.9
7.3
7.2
24,207
24,666
24,956
25,262
25,178
25,150
25,160
6.3
9.6
11.0
10.6
10.5
Zip Code
2012
2020
2025
Carlsbad
- 92008
27,720
29,632
30,847
Carlsbad
- 92010
14,870
20,121
41,297
22,767
La Costa
- 92009
La Costa
- 92011
Cha
nge
by
2030
31
6.
7
8.
3
%
2
0
5
0
2
0
.
1
3
9
.
2
7
.
3
1
0
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Camp
Pendleto
n - 92054
38,116
40,440
42,397
44,684
46,642
46,909
46,902
46,936
6.1
11
.2
17.2
22.4
23.1
23.1
Oceansid
e - 92056
52,333
55,451
56,719
57,489
57,663
57,756
57,858
57,955
6.0
8.
4
9.9
10.2
10.4
10.6
Oceansid
e - 92057
55,101
57,869
58,946
59,158
59,259
59,502
59,240
59,487
5.0
7.
0
7.4
7.5
8.0
7.5
Oceansid
e - 92058
23,498
23,827
24,049
24,242
24,733
24,878
24,824
24,743
1.4
2.
3
3.2
5.3
5.9
5.6
Grand
Total
275,70
2
295,00
2
302,06
7
307,42
3
311,59
5
312,55
5
312,19
7
312,58
9
7.0
9.
6
11.5
13.0
13.4
13.2
.
5
2
3
.
1
1
0
.
7
8
.
0
5
.
3
1
3
.
4
The 2011 Comprehensive Master Plan does not project enrollment growth in AHS over
the next decade; however, marginal growth can be accommodated through
reallocations of noncredit hours.
Anticipated Changes
AHS’s service area gender population percentages are predicted to remain the same
over the next ten years. Males will remain a greater percentage in the 20- to 24-yearold category, due likely to the presence of the Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton
in the primary zip code area. Significant changes in gender are not expected over the
next 35 years, as Table I-10 demonstrates.
Table I-11. AHS’s Service Area Gender Projection
Year
Females
Males
2010
49%
51%
2020
48%
52%
2030
48%
52%
32
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
*
Female
Male
2012
2020
2025
2030
2035
2040
2045
2050
139,990
150,133
154,487
158,365
161,697
163,171
163,615
163,883
135,712
144,869
147,580
149,058
149,898
149,384
148,582
148,706
275,702
295,002
302,067
307,423
311,595
312,555
312,197
312,589
2012
2020
2025
2030
2035
2040
2045
2050
Female
Male
51%
49%
51%
49%
51%
49%
52%
48%
52%
48%
52%
48%
52%
48%
52%
48%
* Note that these include all residents, not just those 18 and over.
The two age pyramids illustrated in Figures I-12 and I-13 show the current and
projected age and gender makeup of AHS’s service area. Counts of females in each
age category are on the left, and counts of males are on the right.
Population Projection by Age &
Gender - 2012
80+
70 to 79
60 to 69
50 to 59
40 to 49
30 to 39
20 to 29
10 to 19
Under 10
-25000
-20000
-15000
-10000
-5000
0
Female
5000
Male
33
10000
15000
20000
25000
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Figure I-12. Age and Gender Pyramid for the AHS Service Area – 2012
Population Projection by Age and Gender
- 2030
80+
70 to 79
60 to 69
50 to 59
40 to 49
30 to 39
20 to 29
10 to 19
Under 10
-25000
-20000
-15000
-10000
-5000
0
Female
5000
10000
15000
20000
25000
Male
Figure I-13. Age and Gender Pyramid for the AHS Service Area – 2030
Although the ethnicity of AHS’s service area will likely not change much over the
next ten years, as Figure I-10 illustrates, the current ethnic breakdown of AHS
students does not mirror that of the population. While Hispanics comprise
approximately 68 percent of the AHS student population, they comprise only 22
percent in the program’s service area. Further investigations from the increased data
access and use will help explain the difference and assist the program in providing
the appropriate services and supports for students.
34
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
59.0%
60%
53.6%
50%
40%
31.2%
30%
26.6%
20%
10%
0%
3.5% 4.5%
0.4% 0.4%
7.0% 6.8%
0.2% 0.2%
2010 Census
2030 Forecast
3.3%3.3%
(Source U.S. Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts. Data derived from Population Estimates,
American)
35
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Projected Ethnic Makeup by Service Area 2012-2050
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2012
White
2020
Two or More
2025
Pacific Islander
2030
Other
2035
Hispanic
2040
Black
2045
Asian
2050
American Indian
Figure I-14. Change in Ethnic Makeup of the AHS Service Area 2010 and 2030
Student Learning Data
The program captures and reviews five critical metrics to measure student success
and achievement: retention, success, diploma completion rate, transition to
MiraCosta College credit, and workforce related success measures.
•
Retention is defined as the percentage of students who enroll and do not withdraw
from the class. This definition applies to both credit and noncredit programs.
•
Success in AHS classes is defined as the percentage of students who pass a course
with a grade of “D” or better. Some students are awarded an “NP” to indicate they
have passed one or more competency areas, but the student does not receive credit
for the course, nor is the “NP” score considered course “success,” according to
existing data metrics. This internal issue needs to be addressed in order to more
accurately reflect AHS student success. Success rates are disaggregated based on
gender, ethnicity, and age. Additionally, success rates are reported by discipline.
•
Diploma completion rate is measured in two ways: the number of diplomas granted
in an academic year and the percentage of students who receive a high school
diploma within five years of their first enrollment.
•
Transition to MiraCosta College credit is based on the percentage of first-time AHS
36
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
students who took at least one credit course after their first AHS course. Students
with previous college credit are not included in the cohort. Students who attempted
another credit course simultaneously or following their first AHS course were
included in the percentages.
•
Workforce success measures include student self-reported plans after receiving their
diplomas.
Retention and Success
Course retention is an indicator of student perseverance throughout the term.
Student success measures the successful credit towards the diploma. Retention and
success rates have remained relatively constant during the last five academic years
despite enrollment fluctuations, curricula adjustments, and student changes. The
AHS leadership team has reflected on the value of such aggregate metrics and why
the rates are constant. To identify key issues, AHS has outreached to OIE for ways to
disaggregate the data to discover group differences in outcomes.
Additionally, AHS would like to learn about the retention rates at peer adult high
school programs to better assess whether the retention and success rates are at
acceptable levels. Figure I-XX displays the program’s retention and success rates for
the last five academic years.
37
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Success and Retention by Academic Year
90%
83%
82%
78%
80%
70%
64%
63%
60%
59%
58%
60%
79%
77%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
Success
2013-2014
2014-2015
Retention
Figure I-15. Success and Retention of All AHS Enrollments
On average, retention rates exceed 75 percent. The high and consistent rates may be
attributed to the short-term, eight-week courses that comprise the program. Table I11 displays the program’s retention rates by discipline for the past five academic
years.
Table I-12. AHS Retention by Discipline
201011
201112
201213
201314
201415
High School American Government
84%
90%
61%
72%
72%
High School Economics
79%
87%
69%
79%
76%
High School English
81%
84%
57%
81%
80%
High School Introduction to Fine Arts
78%
79%
73%
71%
76%
High School Mathematics
82%
81%
52%
74%
76%
High School Science
85%
80%
59%
76%
82%
38
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
High School U.S. History
78%
80%
59%
65%
89%
High School World History and
Geography
85%
82%
68%
84%
86%
Grand Total
81%
83%
61%
76%
78%
Retention rates and success rates vary across disciplines, as Table I-12 illustrates. The
leadership team is particularly interested in the potential barrier relatively low
success in core subjects such as mathematics and American government might play
in students achieving their diploma. Also, the gap between retention and success
rates in mathematics reveals a potential need for additional support, such as a math
learning center that could provide struggling students with the help they need to
successfully complete the class.
Table I-9. AHS Success by Discipline
201011
201112
201213
201314
201415
High School American
Government
73%
82%
61%
62%
66%
High School Economics
64%
73%
69%
70%
59%
High School English
64%
63%
57%
57%
56%
High School Introduction to Fine
Arts
75%
66%
73%
65%
74%
High School Mathematics
57%
59%
52%
59%
59%
High School Science
62%
61%
59%
60%
64%
High School U.S. History
62%
63%
59%
53%
72%
High School World History and
Geography
74%
73%
68%
74%
83%
Grand Total
64%
67%
61%
59%
67%
39
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Success by Age, Ethnicity, and Gender
Success rates for younger students tend to be lower than for students over the age of
25, as Table I-13 demonstrates. Since over 60 percent of AHS students are under the
age of 25, the leadership team wants to explore the role motivation plays in student
success and how motivation might be increased in younger learners.
Table I-14. Success Based on Age
17 and Under
18-20
21-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-54
55-64
65 and Older
Overall
2010-11
53%
54%
70%
67%
73%
71%
71%
79%
58%
82%
68%
2011-12
59%
54%
65%
71%
75%
82%
81%
76%
62%
50%
68%
2012-13
51%
47%
58%
66%
68%
77%
60%
73%
65%
78%
64%
2013-14
57%
47%
51%
64%
75%
76%
78%
72%
83%
75%
68%
2014-15
56%
45%
55%
68%
69%
80%
87%
72%
46%
75%
65%
Success rates for Hispanic students, the largest group of students enrolled in the
program, are at or exceed the overall success rate of AHS students and are higher
than for whites, the second largest group, as Table I-14 makes evident. However, the
leadership team is concerned with the low success rates for African-Americans and
Native Americans despite the lower enrollment numbers.
Table I-15. AHS Success Rates Based on Ethnicity
2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
American Indian/Alaska Native
29%
56%
29%
54%
9%
Asian
77%
73%
73%
75%
68%
Black/African American
56%
50%
37%
60%
55%
Hispanic
63%
66%
58%
59%
62%
Pacific Islander
68%
59%
78%
50%
68%
40
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Two or More Races
53%
50%
55%
40%
49%
Unknown
62%
74%
43%
35%
49%
White
64%
60%
60%
59%
57%
Overall
59%
61%
54%
54%
52%
Female success rates exceed those of male students for each of the past five academic
years, as Table I-15 demonstrates. The AHS leadership team has asked the Office of
Institutional Effectiveness (OIE) to provide success rates cross-tabulated for all three
groups because greater granularity in the data will provide sub-group differences.
Table I-16. Success Rates by Gender
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
Female
67%
66%
61%
63%
65%
Male
60%
62%
55%
54%
55%
Overall
63%
64%
58%
59%
60%
Transition to MiraCosta College Credit
Graduation numbers over the past five academic years have been relatively stable,
as Figure I-12 makes evident. The 2010-2011 academic year had a larger number of
graduates, which paralleled the increase in enrollment for that time period.
41
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
High School Diplomas
120
108
100
101
85
85
75
80
60
40
20
0
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
Figure I-21. High School Diplomas Awarded by Academic Year
The leadership team has attempted to create measures that track time to completion;
however, due to varied student goals for taking AHS courses, capturing more
meaningful metrics has been elusive.
Currently AHS tracks the rate of students who obtain the diploma within five years
of first enrolling in the program, which is illustrated in Figure I-13. Analysis based
on reviewing the metric have been inconclusive because the rates include students
whose goal is not to receive a high school diploma, such as students concurrently
enrolled in traditional high school and those who take the courses for selfimprovement. Beginning fall 2012, the program began collecting additional
information from new students at enrollment that captures their intent for enrolling
in AHS; upon further review of this enrollment information, however, the data
remain as generated through a supplemental questionnaire remain inconclusive as
related to stated goals and completion of those goals. As such, the noncredit
research analyst is working with noncredit student services and support to collect
more detailed data during the enrollment process. Future analysis will provide a
better picture of the time to completion.
42
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
25%
20%
20%
18%
18%
16%
15%
14%
15%
16%
16%
14%
13%
12%
10%
5%
0%
Year Degree Awarded
Cohort
Year
Entire
Cohor
t
20
05
20
06
200
6200
7
200
7200
8
200
8200
9
200
9201
0
201
0201
1
201
1201
2
201
2201
3
201
3201
4
201
4201
5
No
Degr
ee
%
Receiv
ing
Degre
e
within
5
Years
2005-2006
851
22
24
17
15
16
5
5
3
3
2
739
11%
13%
2006-2007
710
21
32
7
9
5
5
3
2
4
622
10%
12%
2007-2008
656
29
28
22
7
14
4
1
1
550
15%
16%
2008-2009
690
27
30
16
8
6
4
3
596
13%
14%
2009-2010
530
35
24
13
7
6
2
443
16%
16%
Total %
Receving
Degree
Figure I-22. AHS Students Receiving a High School Diploma Within Five Years
The program also defines completion as successful enrollment in the college’s credit
courses. As the college’s district strategic plan details, increasing the rate of students
transitioning from noncredit to credit programs is an institutional objective.
Figure XX represents the enrollment patterns of nine separate AHS student
cohorts. Students within each cohort were first-time AHS students in that academic
year. These data were disaggregated by students who did and did not receive an
AHS diploma. Each cohort is measured from the point of enrollment to the 201443
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
2015 academic year, so the more recent cohorts will not have had as much time as
their predecessors to achieve the outcome. There has been an increase in the
credit enrollment of diploma holders between 2010 and 2013, due to increased
programmatic and other support for students transitioning from noncredit to credit
coursework. AHS faculty, staff, and administration will continue to monitor this
metric over time, determining how best to facilitate student transitions to credit
pathways, should students indicate that as their educational goal.
60%
50%
49%
44%
39%
40%
38%
32%
32%
31%
34%
30%
20%
Has Not Earned Diploma
19%
16%
18%
19%
17%
16%
12%
Has Earned Diploma
11%
10%
7%
6%
0%
Figure XX: Credit Enrollments by Noncredit AHS Students (by Cohort)
Figure XX represents the entire AHS population and their transition to credit
courses. Similar to cohort patterns represented in Figure XX, the percentage of AHS
students transitioning to credit courses eight years following their first enrollment is
23%, though almost half of the students with high school diplomas make the
transition. AHS faculty, staff, and administration are exploring options to determine
whether educational goals match credit enrollment and, if not, how to increase
transitions from AHS to credit courses and programs.
44
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table I-10 AHS Students Enrolled in MiraCosta College Credit Courses
AHS to
Credit
Credit
before NC
No Credit
Enrollment
2005-2006
23%
5%
71%
2%
High School
Diploma
49%
3%
48%
0%
No
Diploma
19%
5%
74%
2%
2006-2007
20%
8%
71%
2%
High
School
Diploma
44%
6%
49%
1%
No
Diploma
16%
8%
74%
2%
2007-2008
22%
9%
68%
2%
High
School
Diploma
39%
12%
48%
2%
No
Diploma
18%
8%
71%
2%
2008-2009
21%
7%
71%
1%
High
School
Diploma
32%
8%
56%
3%
No
Diploma
19%
7%
74%
1%
2009-2010
15%
8%
75%
2%
High
School
Diploma
32%
6%
59%
3%
45
Simultaneous AHS and
CRED First Terms
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
No
Diploma
12%
9%
78%
1%
2010-2011
14%
11%
75%
1%
High
School
Diploma
31%
15%
53%
2%
No
Diploma
11%
10%
78%
1%
2011-2012
19%
8%
72%
1%
High
School
Diploma
34%
11%
53%
2%
No
Diploma
16%
8%
75%
1%
2012-2013
11%
8%
81%
0%
High
School
Diploma
38%
16%
45%
2%
No
Diploma
7%
7%
86%
0%
2013-2014
7%
5%
87%
1%
High
School
Diploma
17%
7%
77%
0%
No
Diploma
6%
5%
88%
1%
18%
7%
74%
1%
Grand Total
Figure I-23. AHS Students Enrolled in MiraCosta College Credit Courses
Workforce Success Measures
46
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
AHS has collected anecdotal information about future workforce plans from
students attending the graduation ceremony. More adequate and reliable methods,
such as surveys used by the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office or
the Research and Planning Group of California, are needed to provide systematic
data on job placement. In Section II: Significant Changes and Developments, plans to
improve workforce success measures are discussed in relation to AEBG, the Adult
Education Block Grant.
Summary
AHS student demographics differ from the general MiraCosta Community College
District population and the overall community that the district serves. Located in a
low-income area with a diverse population, the program has a unique opportunity
to educate underrepresented groups and be prepared for the demographic and
social changes expected in the future. AHS is striving to improve through acquiring
more meaningful data to better analyze the needs of the students from enrollment to
graduation and beyond.
47
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
II: Significant Changes and Developments
•
•
Include a description of any significant changes and/or developments, i.e., program
additions since the last full visit, changes in student enrollment, staffing changes.
Describe the impact these changes and/or developments have had on the school
and/or specific curricular programs.
Fiscal Climate
Since the 2013 MiraCosta College AHSDP Self-Study Postsecondary Report and
related WASC visit, the college’s economic forecast has improved. Due to its basic
aid funding structure, MiraCosta College was able to maintain its status quo during
the recession that forced many other adult education institutions to significantly
reduce operational and programmatic expenditures. In fiscal year 2013-2014, the
college was able to fund some program review plans, but in 2014-2015, the fiscal
climate rebounded. As a result, the college allocated approximately $600,000 to
converting long-time temporary employees to permanent positions; this conversion
directly impacted AHS support, as described in “Expansion of Continuing
Education.”
In addition, with funding from the Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG), noncredit
Student Success and Support Program, and the Basic Skill Initiative, the college and
its AHS have been able to use that funding to augment instructional offerings and
service levels. Grant-funded initiatives bypassed the normal resource allocation
process and were sent directly to the college’s executive management team for
approval. As such, the college was able to add to AHS programs, as detailed in the
following section, “Legislation Implementation.”
Legislation Implementation
Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG)/ Assembly Bill (AB) 86
Wage gain and gainful employment measures have been the focus of the state and
federal governments over the past two years. AHS has been looking at options for
collecting these data. Specifically, the Research and Planning Group of California
developed a CTE Employment Outcomes Survey in 2012 (Appendix G: RP Group
CTE Survey); AHS is considering using this tool when a student petitions for
graduation. As another option, noncredit research staff are gathering information
related to determining employment outcomes. As a model, they are examining a
study conducted for Cabrillo College’s Career/Technical Education (CTE) program,
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
whereby graduates completed surveys that captured their intended goals as
compared to their achieved goals. The survey included questions such as, “If you
stopped taking classes at Cabrillo before completing a program, please tell us why
you left.” To ascertain employment outcomes, the survey asked alumni about
employment status, wages, and satisfaction with the college’s ability to prepare
them for their career. As part of the Adult Education Block Grant, which focuses on
career pathways, MiraCosta College is working to conduct a similar study based on
regional demographic information and market needs; the study will be designed to
collect information related to AHS students. In addition, the noncredit research
agenda includes a qualitative study created to examine the contributing factors to
AHS and other noncredit students “stopping out” and curtailing their studies before
completion.
With Assembly Bill (AB) 86 and its implementation grant (AEBG), MCCCD and San
Dieguito Union High School District (SDUHSD) have formed the Coastal North
County Adult Education Consortium (CNCAEC). As such, MCCCD has continued
to evolve its relationship with regional adult education providers: In 1973, MCCCD,
Carlsbad Unified School District (CUSD), and Oceanside Unified School District
(OUSD) signed memorandums of understanding (MOUs), whereby MCCCD
assumed full responsibility for adult education in the northern region of the
CNCAEC district. In the southern region, SDUHSD has been the sole adult
education provider, but has begun to phase out its adult high school. MCCCD and
SDUHSD have signed a MOU whereby MCCCD began piloting adult high school
classes at Sunset High School, a SDUHSD continuation school. In fall 2015, MCCCD
associate faculty taught four classes: English, history, algebra. MCCCD has been
collaborating with SDUHSD to provide administrative support as well. MCCCD and
SDUHSD anticipate that, by July 2016, SDUHSD will phase out its adult high school
and MCCCD will establish a similar memorandum of understanding with SDUHSD
similar to that of OUSD and CUSD. In essence, MCCCD will become the sole
provider of adult education in the region.
In addition to SDUHSD phasing out its adult high school and MCCCD becoming the
region’s sole adult education provider, CNCAEC will utilize its resource allocation
rubric to determine whether and to what extent MCCCD might expand its AHS. In
September 2015, CNCAEC was notified that it was awarded $1,001,000 for its AEBGrelated work. In October 2015, CNCAEC began using a resource allocation rubric to
determine the feasibility of any AHS expansion.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Based on AEBG data reports, the MCCCD Budget & Planning Committee updated
its 2015-2020 Educational Master Plan (EMP) to include information about AHS as it
relates to the fulfillment of area demographics and workforce needs; specifically, the
committee relied on community demographic information (age, gender,
socioeconomic status, project population growth, and workforce needs, for example)
gathered in association with AEBG to inform the district’s enrollment management
plan, an EMP addendum (Appendix H: Educational Master Plan). The EMP
documents the district’s continued responsiveness to service area community needs;
as those needs shift, each iteration of the EMP is updated accordingly. The 2015-2020
EMP specifically and clearly calls out noncredit programs and AHS as a means to
react to dynamic regional economic indicators. To complete this work, a Budget &
Planning subcommittee formed in spring 2015, reviewed the AEBG-related
demographic and workforce needs data, and began drafting the enrollment
management plan, a future-focused document that looks at enrollment over the next
five years.
The work related to AEBG addresses an institutional critical areas for follow-up, as
recommended in the 2013 WASC visit: Specifically, this work establishes
“meaningful data for decision making and program improvement” and “relevant
data points…as the school seeks to improve schoolwide academic achievement.”
Through the noncredit research agenda, quantitative data show success and
retention rates and qualitative data present student perspectives on barriers and
bridges to success and retention; overall, the research agenda examines how
students are encouraged and discouraged to complete their adult education goals
and transfer to credit programs and employment.
Noncredit Student Success and Support Program (SSSP)
Similar to AEBG, MCCCD has received funding from SSSP, a state funded program
that targets the implementation of core services: orientation, counseling, advising,
and other education planning areas. On October 30, 2015, the advisory board for
noncredit SSSP submitted the plan for 2015-2016. Adult High School, ESL, Shortterm Vocational, and Counseling provided input in the areas of orientation, testing,
and advisement. Each department identified gaps in services to students and created
an action plan to address those gaps. Changes to date include more user-friendly
webpage and application, processing continuing students while class is in session,
and providing refreshments and student ambassadors during registration to answer
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
questions and help new students feel welcome. Students were surveyed during the
registration process and, as result, noncredit SSSP is examining ways to streamline
that process. With the intent of maximizing efficiencies and accessibility, the
advisory board will continue to discuss changes in registration. For example, adult
high school is exploring an e-testing format, which would allow students to test
more efficiently. In addition, a new testing center is being planned, which will
enable testing to take place on-demand throughout the term rather than only five
times per term. This will alleviate wait time to see a counselor after taking the
placement test. Starting in spring 2016, students will be able to take the test and
make an appointment to see a counselor immediately after.
Similar to AEBG, SSSP augments funding and, therefore, bolsters AHS student
services. As an impact of SSSP funding requirements, the AHS assessment tool will
change to CASAS, since the California Community College Chancellor’s Office
(CCCCO) has not approved the current assessment tool, TABE. CCCCO will be
implementing a common statewide assessment tool, but that implementation will
not take place until approximately 2017. As a vital component of this program, the
noncredit SSSP project coordinator is collaborating with credit SSSP personnel to
encourage student transitions from noncredit to credit. The SSSP project coordinator
has planned a calendar of events, which began in fall 2015; this calendar is
referenced in “Critical Areas for Response” and included as Appendix I: SSSP
Calendar of Events. In short, in response to the critical areas follow-up, noncredit
SSSP has surveyed students, identified areas to expand student engagement, and
planned accordingly. Due to staffing transitions and anticipated changes based on
incoming CCCCO MIS data, some action plan deadlines have not been met, but the
college is positioned to fulfill grant requirements as soon as possible.
Basic Skills Initiative (BSI)
Continuing Education received notification of available Basic Skills Initiative
funding and responded accordingly: Faculty leads met with the dean, counselors,
and noncredit SSSP coordinator in early spring of 2015 to develop a process for
making a BSI request. The team generated a list of needed items based on feedback
from the represented groups at the next meeting. The decision was made to
concentrate the requests on the community learning lab since all programs had and
continue to have increased presence there. Specifically, the list included:
•
•
Signage
Independent study areas for test taking and pronunciation practice
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
•
•
Supplies (including a label maker, visual aids, and paper organizers)
Two mobile labs with 30 tablets each to allow computer instruction in non-lab
classrooms
The group completed the request and BSI funds were granted and spent on the
items above. In addition, the group decided to continue meeting in the fall of 2015 to
begin the feedback and action plan process even earlier, and to move towards using
the process yearly to anticipate needs and wants across programs.
Staffing
Since the last WASC visit, MCCCD continuing education has undergone several
staffing changes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The former dean of continuing education, transferred to a lateral position in
Student Services. A new dean has been appointed on an interim basis.
MCCCD expects to recruit a permanent dean in the fall of 2015, with the
position beginning in the spring of 2016.
On July 1, 2014, MCCCD hired an additional full-time noncredit counselor,
thus, increasing the number of full-time noncredit counselors to two.
As of July 1, 2015, both full-time noncredit counselor positions were vacated,
leaving noncredit counseling with no full-time faculty leadership.
As of July 1, 2015, all noncredit counselors were reassigned to report to the
MCCCD dean of counseling and student development. This new
organizational structure may impact noncredit counseling support for AHS
students, especially should the full-time counseling positions remain unfilled.
The CLC has appointed an interim noncredit SSSP coordinator. This position
coordinates daily counseling operations that serve all noncredit students,
including AHS. The noncredit SSSP coordinator works under the direction of
the dean of continuing education to plan, organize, and implement the
noncredit SSSP program for noncredit students; SSSP also currently oversees
outreach and engagement opportunities for students, faculty, and staff, but
that organizational structure may be changed.
The CLC has also created and filled a position for an interim noncredit
research analyst. The noncredit research analyst conducts research and assists
the district and the CNCAEC in using research to guide resource allocation
and practice. Specifically, the research analyst: researches, analyzes data, and
prepares reports across program projects; assesses the implications of survey
and research findings for policy and practice, and provides technical
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
assistance to the district and consortium members in data-driven program
improvement.
Expansion of Continuing Education Services
On an annual basis, the college conducts program review, a process graphically
represented in Figure XX, which summarizes the student learning outcomes
assessment cycle. During this time, program funding requests are established and
prioritized based on the following criteria: their alignment with the District mission
statement, with institutional goals, and with program review student learning
outcomes, administrative unit outcomes, and service area outcomes; they are also
evaluated on how well they include measurable outcomes, an implementation plan,
and an assessment plan. Since the 2013 adult high school self-study report and
WASC visit, MiraCosta College district-wide library services conducted its program
review, which referenced a 161% increase in Community Learning Center student
reference transactions from 2010-2011 to 2012-2013. As such, the College allocated
resources for expanded library services at the Community Learning Center, as
detailed below. Likewise, the district Writing Center has expanded its presence at
the Community Learning Center and, specifically, in AHS classrooms, as also
detailed below.
Library Services
With funding from the Basic Skills Initiative, Community Learning Center library
services expanded in the 2014-2015 academic year: While library services were
previously available in the evening for three hours per week, with additional Basic
Skills Initiative funding, evening library services are now available to AHS students
for six hours per week. More specifically, for the 2015-2016 academic year, the
library now offers evening services for three (3) two-hour periods per week. This
increased level of service provides AHS students with expanded opportunities to
meet with librarians who assist students with conducting and documenting
research, a requirement for many AHS classes. Library services also entails
providing information during orientation, supporting reading festival and other
literacy-related activities, and circulating required and supplemental classroom
materials, including DVDs and audio recordings for students with special learning
needs. As detailed graphically in Appendix J: CLC Library Statistics 2014-2015, in
the 2014-2015 academic year, library staff presented 71 orientations and workshops
with over 1500 students in attendance; they also worked with faculty and staff to
coordinate curriculum across disciplines in conjunction with the Community
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Learning Center Reading Festival, a three-day annual event that culminated with
the selected author discussing their work in classroom and campus-wide settings. In
2014-2015, for example, a committee selected a book about the Holocaust and the
library provided copies of the book and related books, audio books, DVDs, and
other materials related to the subject and event. Library staff also developed
comprehensive online guides for the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 reading festivals, with
extensive references and resources related to each festival’s topic. In addition, library
staff have collaborated with AHS faculty to create a cross-disciplinary online
resource guide, with tabs for specific AHS courses; this guide encourages
information literacy and provides details on how to most effectively utilize library
resources for particular courses, assignments, and competencies. In short, the
library’s presence in Continuing Education and AHS has grown and library staff
and services have become an increasingly integral component to the noncredit
campus culture.
Writing Center Services
The MiraCosta College Writing Center has expanded its services to Continuing
Education and AHS, with writing coaches and consultants being placed in AHS
classes. As a result of the temporary-to-permanent employee conversion process
discussed in “Fiscal Climate,” the Writing Center now provides two part-time (20
hours per week each) permanent writing coaches to Continuing Education and
AHS. These writing coaches, who typically have advanced degrees and extensive
teaching experience, give AHS students one-on-one reading and writing support on
specific assignments. The writing coaches are also available to work with AHS
students during open computer lab sessions. These services supplement classroom
instruction and allow students to focus on literacy skills that are critical across
disciplines and across academic and professional contexts.
Service Area Changes
As noted previously, in 2015, SDUHSD began phasing out its adult high school and
requested that MiraCosta College extend their AHS program into its district. The
addition of SDUHSD students impacted student demographics as represented in the
following tables, beginning with geographical distribution, which, by nature of the
service area change, shifted southward, as table X0 represents.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table X0. 2014-2015 AHS Student Residency
CITY
Oceanside
Vista
Carlsbad
Fallbrook
Encinitas
San Marcos
Carmel Valley
Escondido
San Diego
Solana Beach
Bonsall
Cardiff
San Luis Rey
Temecula
Borrego Springs
Del Mar
El Cajon
La Mesa
Los Angeles
Murrieta
National City
Rancho Santa Fe
Grand Total
CLC
Count
492
104
95
27
25
11
0
8
8
5
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
792
CLC
Percent of Total
62.12%
13.13%
11.99%
3.41%
3.16%
1.39%
0%
1.01%
1.01%
0.63%
0.38%
0.25%
0.25%
0.25%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
100.00%
SDUHSD
Count
0
0
20
0
70
2
10
1
0
6
0
12
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
123
SDUHSD
and CLC
Total Percent
53.77%
11.37%
12.57%
3.0%
10.38%
1.4%
1.1%
.1%
.9%
1.2%
.38%
1.5%
.22%
.22%
.1%
.22%
.1%
.1%
.1%
.1%
.1%
.22%
100.00%
With the addition on 123 AHS students at SDUHSD in the southern region of the
MCCCD district, student population ethnicity shifted slightly in age and more
significantly in ethnicity. For age, students at SDUHSD tend to be younger, as
represented in Table XX1; for ethnicity, a greater number of White students
comprise the student population at SDUHSD than at the CLC, as detailed in Table
XX2.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Table XX1. 2014-2015 AHS Enrollment by Age (Percentage)
CLC
SDUHSD
2014-15
2014-2015
CLC and
SDUHSD
2014-2015
17 and Under
16.41%
0.0%
14.0%
18 to 20
27.02%
50.0%
30.0%
21 to 24
16.92%
30.0%
18.0%
25 to 29
17.30%
14.0%
16.0%
30 to 34
9.85%
4.0%
9.0%
35 to 39
4.17%
2.0%
3.0%
40 to 44
3.66%
0.0%
3.0%
45 to 54
6.94%
>1.0%
6.0%
55 to 64
0.76%
0.0%
0.6%
65 and Over
0.76%
0.0%
0.4%
Total
100.00%
100.00%
100%
Table XX2. 2014-2015 AHS Enrollment by Age (Numbers)
CLC
SDUHSD
2014-15
2014-2015
CLC and
SDUHSD
2014-2015
17 and Under
130
0
130
18 to 20
214
61
275
21 to 24
134
37
171
25 to 29
137
17
154
30 to 34
78
5
83
35 to 39
33
2
35
40 to 44
29
0
29
45 to 54
55
1
56
55 to 64
6
0
6
65 and Over
6
0
0
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Total
792
123
915
At the CLC, over 68% of students were Hispanic; at SDUHSD, 51% were Hispanic.
Combining the CLC and SDUHUSD, 66% of students were Hispanic. While the
percentage of Hispanic students decreased, the percentage of White students
increased: At the CLC, 16.3% of students were White; at SDUHSD, 41% of students
were White. Combined, the grand total became
Table XX. AHS 2014-2015 Enrollment by Ethnicity
CLC and SDUHSD
CLC
SDUHSD
2014-15
2014-2015
Alaska Native
0.9%
>1%
>1.0%
Asian
6.2%
>1%
6.0%
African American
4.2%
0%
4.0%
Hispanic
68.1%
51%
66.0%
Pacific Islander
0.9%
0%
>1.0%
Two or More Races
1.5%
0%
1.0%
Unknown
2.0%
6%
1.0%
White
16.3%
41%
20.0%
Grand Total
100%
100%
100%
2014-2015
Grand Total
American Indian/
Black/
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
III: Ongoing School Improvement
•
•
Describe the process of engagement of all stakeholders in review of the student
achievement data and the implementation and monitoring of the schoolwide action
plan.
Describe the process used to prepare the progress report.
Development of the Mid-Cycle Progress Report has been completed over a threeyear period, with the 2011-2014 strategic plan revised to include 2015-2017. Annual
progress checks have been built into existing organizational planning structures:
Implementation and monitoring of the schoolwide plan is discussed at all AHS
department meetings and amongst the dean of continuing education, the Office of
Institutional Effectiveness dean and staff, and the noncredit technical writer/research
analyst; all parties met monthly to track progress as cross-departmental team
members wrote, reviewed, and edited content on a regular basis. The continuing
education leadership team worked with the district’s Office of Institutional
Effectiveness to develop the process for creating the report. The AHS leadership
team provided the core evidence collection, data analysis, and synthesis of progress
for section I and section IV. In order to provide this information to the division
leadership team, the program teams implemented department goals, including those
contained in the Action Plan, and regularly discussed and evaluated progress
during regular AHS department meetings. The revision, which overlaps with the
district’s accreditation cycle, includes parts that relate to adult education and
adjustments made mid-cycle. AHS paused in writing its strategic objectives so that
the AHS plan aligned with the district’s strategic plan. Program teams collected
evidence for the Mid-Cycle Progress Report from a variety of sources, including
student and staff surveys, student focus groups, advisory groups, faculty and staff
meetings, and other college documents.
An important activity that contributed to the development of the Mid-Cycle Report
was the participation of the Adult Education Block Grant/AB86 work group,
composed of faculty, classified program representatives, and management. The
work group discussed significant changes in the division, external and internal
factors impacting division work, and Action Plan progress. In early fall 2014, a midcycle kick-off meeting was held with the work group and the AHS leadership team.
Together they reviewed the Mid-Cycle Report timeline and completion progress,
devised plans and tools to facilitate participation in the writing process, and
explored ways to encourage continual engagement of all constituencies in the Mid58
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Cycle Report development.
The leadership team drafted chapters 2, 3, and 5, using feedback from the work
group and division planning for institutional effectiveness annual summaries.
Throughout the Mid-Cycle Report development, the leadership team also validated
data and evidence collected, revised narrative drafts, and communicated progress to
division employees.
In late fall 2014, the Adult Education Block Grant/AB86 work group participated in
an all-day Mid-Cycle Report Retreat. In preparation for the meeting, work group
members reviewed their Program and Division Planning for Institutional
Effectiveness (PIE) summaries for the past three years and brought ideas to share at
the meeting. There was meaningful discussion about the next steps for the Action
Plans and upcoming changes in legislation that will impact work done for students.
This group continues to meet on a quarterly basis, at which time they look at ways
to improving programming.
In January 2016, a working draft of the Mid-Cycle Report was posted on the
district’s internal web portal and stakeholders were invited to contribute content
and feedback. The leadership team incorporated changes before submitting the
document to the Board of Trustees for review. The Board of Trustees approved the
final document during their XXXX (date) meeting (Appendix K: Board of Trustees
January 21, 2006 Minutes.)
Institution’s Areas of Strength
1. MiraCosta College’s Adult High School and MiraCosta College have
integrated services, planning, and strategies to create a seamless transition for
students to access college classes and programs.
2. The MiraCosta College’s Administration and Board of Trustees have
demonstrated a strong and ongoing commitment to the high school.
3. The Administration, Faculty, and Staff foster a culture of collaboration and
open communication to carry out the school’s mission.
4. MiraCosta College’s Adult High School has a supportive, caring,
knowledgeable Administration, Faculty, and Staff and a nurturing
environment that supports expectations for all students.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
5. Administration, Faculty, and Staff have created a robust system for serving
students. The components of registration, student orientation, placement
testing, counseling, and graduation planning ensure that students are
supported at every phase as they enter the high school environment.
6. MiraCosta College’s Adult High School is committed to providing access to
all students by providing flexible scheduling that includes day and evening
hours.
7. Access to technology in classrooms and open labs provides a variety of
learning modalities for students and faculty.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
IV: Progress on Critical Areas for Follow-up/Schoolwide Action Plan
Provide analytical comments on the accomplishment of each schoolwide action
plan section referencing the critical areas for follow-up addressed through each
section; provide supporting evidence, including how each area has impacted
student achievement.
• If any critical areas for follow-up were not included in the school’s action plan,
indicate what actions have been taken to address this issue and provide supporting
evidence, including the impact on student achievement.
Note: The school’s schoolwide action plan should have incorporated all the critical areas of
•
follow-up or major recommendations that were stated in the last self-study visiting committee
report.
Institution’s Critical Areas for Follow-Up
1. The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to review and quantify the current
Schoolwide Learning Outcomes and create measureable benchmarks to
connect to the curriculum, instruction, assessment, and school culture. The
Schoolwide Learning Outcomes need to match the skills of the specific
students at the school.
2. The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to create and implement a plan
to increase capacity to access meaningful data for decision making and
program improvement and use the data to drive instruction. Finding
relevant data points are important as the school seeks to improve schoolwide
academic achievement.
3. The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to create and implement a plan
to incorporate various methods of learning linked to student data and
schoolwide learning outcomes. Using technology as a tool to provide a
variety of services should constitute a component of the plan.
4. The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to construct an infrastructure to
increase collaboration with all full- and part-time faculty and staff providing
a meaningful relationship to ensure all stakeholders participate in the
decision making process and sharing of best practices.
In addition, the Visiting Committee recommends:
5. The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to increase ways to communicate
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
the various programs and opportunities the school provides to all students.
This will engage students and provide avenues for student voices lo be heard
throughout the various activities and service outreach projects.
Responses to Critical Areas for Follow-up
Area 1: The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to review and quantify the
current Schoolwide Learning Outcomes and create measurable benchmarks to
connect the curriculum, instruction, assessment, and school culture. The Schoolwide
Learning Outcomes need to match the skills of the specific students at the school.
Key Issue One: AHS needs to have more meaningful data and evidence to inform
program improvement, evaluate progress on the institutional objective under the
strategic plan, and increase student success.
Specific Goal One: Discover meaningful data metrics as part of the existing database
system which would help identify student educational goals, better track student progress
through the program, assess progress on the strategic plan, and evaluate program
effectiveness
At the beginning of each school year, AHS faculty members receive data packets
that include program information such as enrollment numbers, part-time to fulltime faculty ratios, grade distributions, and success and retention rates. This
program review process is conducted for all of the college’s credit and noncredit
programs. For the 2012-2013 school year, AHS received this data; for 2013-2014 and
2014-2015 school years, however, the data packets were incomplete. To ensure these
data are fully captured on an annual basis, the CLC dean is working with the
research analyst for noncredit programs, the district’s Office of Institutional
Effectiveness, and Academic Information Services to develop a noncredit data
warehouse that provides AHS faculty with increased access to information related to
student success and outcomes and program efficacy. As of fall 2015, Office of
Institutional Effectiveness and Academic Information Services programmers were
working on this data warehouse, with input from noncredit personnel. The
noncredit data warehouse is expected to be completed in fall 2016.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Area 2: The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to create and implement a plan
to increase capacity to access meaningful data for decision making and program
improvement and use the data to drive instruction. Finding relevant data points are
important as the school seeks to improve school wide academic achievement.
Key Issue One: The AHS needs to have more meaningful data and evidence to
inform program improvement, evaluate progress on the institutional objective under
the strategic plan, and increase student success.
Specific Goal One: Discover meaningful data metrics as part of the existing database
system which would help identify student educational goals, better track student progress
through the program, assess progress on the strategic plan, and evaluate program
effectiveness.
Student Educational Goals
As a member of the Coastal North County Adult Education Consortium (CNCAEC),
an organization formed in response to Assembly Bill 86 and the associated Adult
Education Block Grant, MiraCosta College Continuing Education has worked with
BW Research, an external agency, to obtain economic data related to regional
employer sectors and their needs. Based on this data, the college is determining
programmatic improvements and areas for follow-up, to ensure that AHS and other
departments design academic and career pathways that reflect employment needs.
Specifically, the CNCAEC workgroup, composed of faculty, administration, and
staff, worked with BW Research to create data metrics that foster a greater
understanding of appropriate adult education goals and ways in which the college
can meet those goals. Those data metrics were completed in 2015 and include:
•
•
Geographic Information System (GIS) Maps: The College worked with BW
Research to produce five supply and demand static GIS maps that represent
adult education facilities and locations of services overlaid by potential
demand in four adult educational categories that intersect with AHS students
and their needs: adults with disabilities, basic skills, classes for immigrants,
and career and technical education.
Resource Allocation Rubric (Appendix L: CNCAEC Resource Allocation
Rubric): This initial resource allocation rubric provides the college with a tool
for determining adult education program and project priorities. This version
has been made available to CNCAEC stakeholders to revise according to
evolving needs.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
•
•
Current student need assessment device: Building on the allocation rubric,
BW Research worked with college staff to identify and develop the data
sources and algorithms to be used in the creation of a current and a potential
student need assessment device. This assessment device will includes the
development of a capacity analysis and a current student assessment survey.
In this component, BW Research worked closely with the district’s research
staff to document and develop the capacity analysis and an evaluation of the
current student assessment survey, how it can be used and refined as needed.
Potential Student Need Assessment Device: BW Research, the district’s Office
of Institutional Effectiveness, and the research analyst for Noncredit
Programs are collaborating to develop online potential student maps and
dashboards. To begin this process, district programmers are building a data
warehouse that houses data from the 2013 AHS Self-Study Report; these data
are comprehensive and encompass operational, programmatic, and student
statistics. These data will provide the backbone for the data warehouse,
which will be designed to give particular users the ability to run ad hoc
queries and scheduled reports; the data warehouse will also enable specific
users to use tabular models and create their own data dashboards. With
access to this information, faculty, staff, and administration can tailor
program elements to better track student progress through AHS, assess
progress on the strategic plan, and evaluate program effectiveness. The data
warehouse will house information that correlates specific programs with
student pathways: If a student takes a math bridge program, for example, the
data warehouse will enable a user to look at the relationship between that
bridge program and subsequent performance in courses. Similarly, the data
warehouse will enable users to create dashboards that represent pathways
from AHS and other noncredit programs to credit classes and programs. In
tandem with the economic data related to regional employment demand,
these data metrics provide information related to milestones along academic
and professional pathways.
Student Educational Progress
Since the 2013 WASC visit, AHS faculty, staff, and administration have begun
making changes to determine how existing data metrics can simultaneously capture
student progress and program efficacy. When a student completes an AHS
application, the district’s PeopleSoft database stores the student’s class schedule and
demographics (age, gender, and ethnicity); furthermore, as the student completes
classes, PeopleSoft stores grades and, beginning 2015, TABE scores that capture preand post-course completion testing. Prior to 2015, TABE scores were collected in
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
spreadsheets. With this data, the noncredit research analyst is working on
correlating TABE test scores, grades, and course completion rates; with this analysis,
AHS personnel can examine relationships between placement, TABE scores, class
performance, and course efficacy. AHS competencies (for reading, writing, and
math) are currently recorded in CLCGradebook (https://apps.miracosta.edu/), which
may be accessed to evaluate performance, but this system is difficult to use and
there are no reporting features. The noncredit research analyst, however, is
exploring ways to import CLCGradebook data into statistical software with more
robust reporting features.
To better track student progress through programs, the MiraCosta Community
College District has begun the process of installing Degree Works, which includes an
education planning module. The complete installation, setup, and testing of Degree
Works will take approximately 12-18 months; however, as modules become
available, they will be brought online and used as soon as possible. While the initial
roll out will focus on credit programs, the software will be expanded to include
AHS. During 2015-2016, comprehensive education plans will be developed and
recorded using the Degree Works module, which will also be integrated with
PeopleSoft. To more effectively capture and analyze student data, the MiraCosta
College Office of Institutional Effectiveness, Academic Information Services, and
Continuing Education personnel are developing a data warehouse that integrates
disparate internal databases and, thereby, enable AHS faculty, staff, and
administration to access and generate reports on student progress, course outcomes,
and program efficacy. The Continuing Education department also expects to receive
updated CCCCO MIS data elements related to tracking student success in AY 20152016; once the department receives these anticipated data and builds a more robust
data warehouse, it will conduct similar studies and explore potential correlations.
Area 3: The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to create and implement a plan
to incorporate various methods of learning linked to student data and schoolwide
learning outcomes. Using technology as a tool to provide a variety of services
should constitute a component of the plan.
Specific Goal One: Explore, and if applicable, implement flexibility in course offerings.
Explore the need for hybrid or online courses to allow a more flexible schedule for
students
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Following the 2013 WASC accreditation process, a renewed focus on hybrid or
online courses began. A new course, English 40: Integrated Information Literacy,
was written with the expectation that it would be piloted as a hybrid course. In
addition, all AHS English and social science courses were approved through the
Courses and Programs curriculum process for online/hybrid. Other AHS courses
will be submitted to Courses and Programs in 2015-2016, so these courses can have
an approved online/hybrid option. Curriculum planning and course offerings will
be based on data results, in time for the 2016-2017 course schedule.
In the 2014-2015 school year, the college’s Public Information Office (PIO) began
conducting large scale student surveys that captured student information on a
variety of topics, from preferences in social media to class times. 1900 students
responded to the first survey; unfortunately, credit and noncredit students were not
disaggregated. As a follow up, however, two surveys specific to noncredit and to
AHS students were conducted. In spring 2015, PIO conducted one of those surveys
and asked students to indicate when they preferred to take classes; students could
check as many options as they liked (Appendix M: Spring 2015 Noncredit Student
Survey). Although these responses may be skewed toward the times students were
able to meet for the class where they completed the survey, survey results indicated
that students prefer classes before noon and after 6:00 p.m. on Monday through
Thursday.
The survey also asked students to identify their greatest challenges to attending
school; the highest numbers of responses were work schedules (39%) and
transportation (28%). While the survey did not specifically ask about hybrid or
online course offerings, these results indicate that more flexible school schedules
might better meet student needs.
A pilot of English 40 (Integrated Information Literacy) has been offered five times,
with an average fill-rate of 50.2%. The class had a fill-rate of 80% in fall 2014, when a
large student campaign and strong counseling support seemed to encourage
students to enroll. In fall 2015, the class was cancelled due to low enrollment, but
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
this enrollment issue coincided with a change in counseling leadership. Two English
30 courses and a U.S. History 2 course were also offered in fall 2015. These courses
are being offered at a satellite campus, Sunset High School in Encinitas, and success
rates and fill rates will be examined at the end of the semester. At least six hybrid
courses are planned for spring 2016, again in English and social science. Following
Curriculum & Planning approval of all courses for online/hybrid, the piloting of
more hybrid courses in disciplines other than English and social science are being
considered for the 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 SY.
During fall 2015 registration, the AHS conducted a follow-up survey specifically
addressing student interest in hybrid courses. The same online student survey will
be given in the second weeks of terms 2, 3 and 4 of the 2015-2016 school year. At the
end of the year, results from these surveys will be compiled and analyzed, and
curriculum planning will be based on the results.
Specific Goal Two: Through online tools, increase students’ knowledge of degree
requirements so they will take more charge of their path to graduation.
MiraCosta Community College District has begun installing Degree Works, which
includes an online education planning module. While the initial implementation
focuses on credit programs, the next phase will include AHS. During 2015-2016, the
Degree Works module will provide AHS students comprehensive education plans
and, beginning spring 2016, My EdPlan will enable AHS students to track progress
towards their academic goals. SSSP is also creating a system to identify students as
who are close to completing their graduation requirements; this system will
encourage students nearing graduation to make a counseling appointment and
discuss their remaining requirements. MiraCosta College Continuing Education
programs are also developing new, interactive online orientations, which will cover
all of the policies and procedures required by title 5 section 55521.
Area 4: The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to construct an infrastructure to
increase collaboration with all full- and part-time faculty and staff providing a
meaningful relationship to ensure all stakeholders participate in the decision
making process and sharing of best practices.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Specific Goal One: Increase faculty and staff involvement in learning outcomes for
students and program improvement
AHS faculty and staff have deliberately facilitated regular dialogue between fulltime and part-time faculty since the 2013 WASC visit. In fall 2015, changes in
MiraCosta College District professional development policies provided associate
faculty compensation for FLEX workshop participation, enhancing learning
outcome communication. In addition to professional development, during
discipline-based quarterly meetings, all faculty are encouraged to collaboratively
discuss learning outcomes, student success, and best practices. Finally, a faculty
survey was conducted at the start of the fall 2015 term; respondents were asked to
give feedback about future FLEX content and scheduling preferences. Future
workshops and collaboration opportunities will be planned based on these survey
results.
Course level outcomes continue to be assessed every time a course is taught. Fulltime and associate faculty participation in course-level outcome assessment is 100%.
The faculty secretary annually compiles the data and full-time faculty create a
comprehensive chart that faculty work groups review towards the end of each
spring semester. As a result of this process, course level outcomes in English, math,
and social science courses have recently been revised to better reflect alignment with
program level outcomes and to streamline the outcomes process. This revision was
done in collaboration with associate faculty in each discipline. In addition, AHS has
intensified its focus on Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) and Institutional
Learning Outcomes (ILOs); as such, program faculty and staff are working on data
collection tools and a meeting schedule that will maintain the existing collaborative
spirit that permeated the CSLO process.
To work more closely with other AHS stakeholders, specifically noncredit support
staff, the noncredit support supervisor has begun attending quarterly noncredit
program meetings and many support staff have become involved in campus
initiatives and meetings for the Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG), noncredit
SSSP, and the annual reading festival. In collaboration with the dean of Community
Education, support staff will continue to be invited and involved in more meetings
that focus on student learning, support services, and related areas.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Area 5: The Administration, Faculty and Staff need to increase ways to
communicate the various programs and opportunities the school provides to all
students. This will engage students and provide avenues for student voices to be
heard throughout the various activities and service outreach projects.
In response to Critical Area 5, in July 2015, the department of Continuing Education
purchased and began using iContact, an email-based newsletter that highlights
services, engagement opportunities, important deadlines, and other vital
information to students. iContact is also specifically used to remind current AHS
students to register—and to encourage former students who have not completed the
program to return in time for registration and course enrollment.
Furthermore, according to the noncredit student survey conducted in spring 2015,
the most desired student activities were related to obtaining employment and to
volunteer opportunities. In response to this need, Continuing Education expanded
its collaboration with the district’s Service Learning program to include student
activities related to volunteer opportunities. Specifically, AHS students will be
provided avenues for service learning/civic engagement (volunteer opportunities
not connected with courses) focused around the CLC community; they will also be
able to work in partnership with students currently enrolled in
credit/degrees/certificates/transfer programs. The district’s Service Learning
department is pursuing partnerships with:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Title I schools within 5-10 miles of CLC: Mission, Laurel, Garrison, Del Rio,
Nichols, Foussat Elementary Schools; and Middle Schools: Jefferson, Cesar
Chavez, and Martin Luther King Middle Schools
Teri Inc.
BASE (Before and After School Enrichment)
Brother Benno’s Foundation
Quality Children’s Services
North County Lifeline: La Casita (K-5th grade) & Club Crown Heights (6th-12th
grade)
Vista Community Clinic: Project REACH
The Service Learning department will also offer AHS/CLC students with an
“alternative spring break” that focuses on a topic that students are interested in,
such as hunger/homelessness, health, or education. Also, as part of National Make a
Difference Day, during the week of October 24, AHS/CLC will be given service
learning options:
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
•
•
•
•
•
Encuentros at MiraCosta College (activity option to be determined)
Operation Hope Vista—getting the homeless shelter for women and families
ready for the season
Teri Inc.—working on the farm
Oceanside Unified School District Project (beautification)
North County Lifeline’s La Casita (painting and hands-on college awareness
activities)
In response to student need and to support student success, a career specialist
position has been created to prepare students for career readiness and employment.
Additionally, the college is in the process of refurbishing space to accommodate the
new position and create an area where students can utilize computer terminals to
search for jobs and work on their application materials. The career specialist will
provide technical assistance to students and orient them to databases and resources
available to them online.
Externally from MiraCosta, the career specialist will interface and disseminate
information to employers and work collaboratively with local one stop career
centers, coordinate job fairs, career oriented events and recruitment appointments.
In addition to these avenues for student engagement, community outreach has
improved dramatically: Beginning academic year 2014-2015, outreach staff have
increased Continuing Education and AHS presence dramatically. In February 2015,
a part-time outreach coordinator was hired, funded by the Student Success and
Support Program (SSSP) grant. Since March 2015, outreach staff and volunteers have
attended an average of four events per month, with 50-100 people at each event.
These events take place at local community centers, non-profit organizations and
libraries. Materials have also been disseminated at events such as back-to-school
nights, cultural fairs, and bridge programs like Gear Up. In addition, Continuing
Education has collaborated with student services (testing, counseling, and financial
aid), library services, ESL, tutoring and academic support, to develop an extensive
calendar of events that addresses specific adult high school student needs, such as
diploma requirements, transitioning to credit programs, and job and career fairs
(Appendix N: Continuing Education Workshops and Events—Fall 2015). SSSP has
also expanded AHS relationships with high school counselors and begun working
with them to provide enhanced support for students transitioning from community
high schools to AHS.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Specific Goal One: Provide direct methods of communicating student services and
programs to students.
A district-wide student survey was conducted in 2014-2015, which asked students to
indicate their communication preferences (Appendix O: 2014-2015 Student Survey).
Based on district-wide results, MiraCosta College noncredit student services and
support staff implemented the use of iContact, a cloud-based notification system
that reminds students of important deadlines and events. An AHS student-specific
survey will be conducted in 2015-2016 and reviewed to explore best practices in
communication.
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V: Schoolwide Action Plan Refinements
•
•
Comment on the refinements made to the single schoolwide action plan since the
last self-study visit to reflect schoolwide progress and/or newly identified issues.
Include a copy of the school’s latest updated schoolwide action plan.
Synthesizing and Addressing Key Issues
Table 0-1 represents key issues for AHS, as documented in Chapter III of the 2013
WASC Visiting Committee report. As Table 0-1 illustrates, the AHS team prioritized
key issues within each criterion and created action plans accordingly. This section
includes these key issues and corresponding action plans.
Table V-1. Key Issue Inventory
Criterion
1
2
KEY ISSUES
Program Student Learning Outcomes: identification of SLOs that better
assess student educational goals; improved mapping of course student
learning outcomes to program and institutional level learning outcomes.
Improved data acquisition at all stages of matriculation: enrollment,
course sequencing, and post-graduation employment, wage gain and
successful transition to postsecondary education. Consider instituting
an annual AHS student survey separate and distinct from the Noncredit
Student Survey and a completion survey for the students applying to
graduate.
The inclusion of research-based learning strategies and outcomes
assessment techniques at all levels of student learning.
Improved communication of results from the integrated planning
model committees and governance groups.
Institutional evaluations disaggregated to separate noncredit faculty
and staff responses.
3
Include all full- and part-time staff in departmental meetings and
discussions to improve student learning outcomes and success.
4
Offer a way for students to monitor electronically their individual
progress towards the diploma through an electronic degree audit
program.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Develop an on-site library.
Exploration of effective online course work for future class offerings.
5
More training opportunities for collaboration with associate faculty.
CSLOs need to be better aligned to the mission.
6
ILOs need to be assessed at an expectation level appropriate for a high
school diploma.
Need to find more authentic measures of learning; triangulation of
learning.
Need to explore possibility of using student portfolios to assess
summative learning.
Work with the Office of Institutional Effectiveness (OIE), formerly
known as the Office of Institutional Planning, Research and Grants
(OIPRG), to establish focus groups, conduct interviews, and review of
student files and standard instruments to assess availability of student
services and the impact on the quality of learning.
Create a parallel plan that facilitates the transition to better employment
opportunities.
7
Create data-collection instruments to measure wage gain, employment,
and transition to higher education.
Creation of data metrics that provide information on pathway success
and milestone clearance.
Create data metrics that provide information on pathway success and
milestone clearance.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
8
9
10
No key issues identified.
Explore the idea of building partnerships with local high schools to
capture dropouts earlier.
Create data-collection instruments to measure wage gain, employment,
and transition to higher education.
Ability to capture reliable employment or transitional data about
students after graduation.
Institutional capacity to implement improved data usage.
Creating the Action Plan
After the team studied the prioritized key issues and reflected upon their similarities
across the criteria, they developed four essential themes among the key issues:
•
Increase capacity to access meaningful data for decision making and program
improvement
•
Revise program-level SLOs (PSLOs) to match the skills needed for AHS
students
•
Explore availability and different methods of learning and services to the
students
•
Increase collaboration with faculty and staff.
Each of the four key issue themes was carefully evaluated to determine the critical
impact each had on student achievement. The team concluded that the need for data
and better alignment of PSLOs were critical for program improve at this time. The
other two themes (increasing methods of learning and collaboration) are just as
critical for the program to address; however, those areas will be addressed at a faster
pace using the existing structures and the identified strengths of the program.
Action plans under each key issue provide a clear, collegially developed set of steps
to follow to make continuous program improvement. Each plan includes the
following:
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
•
Specific goals
•
Intermediate objectives
•
Responsible persons
•
Timelines for completion
•
Benchmarks
•
Methods of assessment
•
Progress evaluation.
The action plans will serve as the focus in addressing the student learning and the
future of the program.
Action Plan One: Increase Capacity to Access Meaningful Data for Decision
Making and Program Improvement
The key issue concerning access to meaningful data for decision making was
divided into two goals: The first goal directs the program to develop metrics that
will help identify student goals at the beginning of the program and track their
progress toward the diploma and as they transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. For example, data on student outcomes beyond AHS were not
collected; since the 2013 WASC visit, however, improvements in this area have been
made.
Key objectives towards reaching this goal continue to include the following:
•
Refining data elements that better capture educational goals at enrollment
•
Identifying course-enrollment patterns and milestones towards diploma
completion
•
Developing methods to measure success after program completion, including
wage gain and enrollment in postsecondary institutions
•
Identifying more appropriate program review metrics to track student
achievement, program efficiency, and satisfaction
To reach these objectives, the program continues to work with the Academic
Information Services Department to identify methods of data collection.
The second goal directs the program to work with the Office of Institutional
Effectiveness (OIE) to create a set of on-demand reports based on standard queries
for use in program review and operations.
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Intermediate objectives towards reaching the goal include the following:
•
Building the data warehouse to store unique AHS data elements
•
Identifying the essential data elements to be included in the data warehouse
•
Exploring other tools currently provided by the California Community
College Chancellor’s Office to provide reports that support the data
warehouse.
•
Creating a desktop interface that allows drop-down access to common
queries for program evaluation.
To reach these objectives, the program has created a formal implementation plan
with the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, utilized professional statistical software
to process the data requests, and purchased business intelligence software to act as
an interface between AHS personnel and the data. Furthermore, funded by the
Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG), Continuing Education has hired a full-time
research analyst for noncredit programs, a position that will collaborate with the
Office of Institutional Effectiveness to ensure the establishment and maintenance of
centralized, accessible AHS data collection tools.
Action Plan Two: Revise PSLOs to Match the Skills Needed for AHS Students
The key issue concerning the identification and assessment of better aligned learning
outcomes with student needs was divided into two specific goals. The first goal
directs the program to develop PSLOs that appropriately reflect the knowledge,
skills, abilities, and attitudes acquired from an AHS diploma. As stated previously,
all program learning outcomes were revised in spring 2013.The second goal directs
the program to evaluate whether AHS course and program level outcomes
sufficiently measure student preparedness for ILOs. Now that the PLOs have been
revised, AHS faculty will re-align course PLOs and ILOs.
Intermediate objectives towards reaching the second goal include the following:
•
Re-mapping CSLOs to PSLOs with ILOs
•
Assuring pedagogical, curricular, and resource-allocation decisions are
informed by outcomes assessment results.
To reach these objectives, AHS will consult the Student Learning Outcomes and
Assessment Committee to examine ILO assessment, consider an assessment tool to
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
measure ILOs independent of program-level outcomes, and create an ILO
assessment plan that tracks student progress.
Action Plan Three: Explore Availability and Different Methods of Learning and
Services to the Students
AHS needs to explore other methods of providing services and instruction that are
more in line with current technology, such as a degree audit program or online and
hybrid courses, to provide students greater flexibility in their learning, including in
their understanding of the program and the work involved to earn a high school
diploma. As described in this document, AHS has increased the number of hybrid
and online courses. Also, Degree Works is being implemented as a way for students
to keep track of their progress through AHS, with milestones indicated along the
way. As also described in this document, library services have increased their
presence at the Community Learning Center. Together, these strategies offer
students with multiple learning modalities and support services.
Action Plan Four: Increase Collaboration with Faculty and Staff
AHS faculty discuss how student learning is being achieved in the classroom, but it
is also imperative to include staff in these discussions as a means to learn about
student needs from multiple perspectives. More training is needed for staff and
associate (part-time) faculty to have larger discussions of student learning at the
PSLO and ILO levels. As such, AHS plans to include staff in departmental meetings
and discussions that address student learning outcomes and success; provide more
opportunities for full- and part-time faculty to collaborate.
Summary
The AHS leadership team’s identification, discussion, and analysis of the program’s
strengths and key issues were fundamental to creating the action plans. Finding
from the initial accreditation visit motivated changes to the program’s processes and
culture and inspired the entire college to include critical areas in its strategic plan.
77
MiraCosta AHS Schoolwide Action Plan One for Continuing
Improvement
Key Issue One: AHS needs to have more meaningful data and
evidence to inform program improvement, evaluate progress on the
institutional objective under the strategic plan, and increase student
success.
Specific Goal 1: Discover meaningful data metrics as part of the existing database
system to help identify student educational goals, better track student progress,
assess progress on the strategic plan, and evaluate program effectiveness.
Strategies
Intermediate
Objectives
2
3
4
Description
Brainstorm
data elements
that identify
key student
characteristics
to augment
already
gathered
information
collected from
students at
enrollment
Develop data
elements in
the existing
college
database to
provide
information
about course
taking
patterns,
course
success,
persistence,
completion to
diploma
Develop
methods to
measure
success after
completion of
the program,
including
wage gain,
enrollment in
postsecondary
institutions,
subsequent
course and
program
success, and
degree or
certificate
completion
Develop a better
set of program
metrics that can
be included in
program review
to track student
achievement,
program
efficiency, and
satisfaction
Responsible
Persons
AHS faculty,
dean of
Continuing
Education,
OIE
AHS faculty,
dean of
Continuing
Education,
OIE
AHS faculty,
dean of
Continuing
Education,
OIE
AHS faculty,
dean of
Continuing
Education, OIE
Timelines for
Completion
1
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
lxxviii
Fall 2014
Fall 2013
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Benchmarks
Align
electronic
application
with CCC
Apply and
collect
additional
information
relevant to
AHS students
Create tables
in PeopleSoft
and MIS data
elements that
track AHS
students who
have become
MCC credit
students
Use CalPass
and other
tools to track
AHS alumni
progress to
employment
or
matriculation
in higher
education
Collaborate
with the IPRC
and OIE to
develop a set of
metrics that
measure success
and
achievement
through
administrative
unit outcomes,
including
efficiency,
inputs, and
effectiveness
Run queries
that extract
cohort
information
and facilitate
pathway
progression
analysis
Use RP Group
post-degree
surveys to
track wage
gain and
employment
status; use the
National
Clearinghouse
, CalPass and
CPEC tools to
track
enrollment in
public and
private twoand four-year
institutions
Deliver AHSspecific
program review
packet with
program
efficiency,
demand,
student success,
and student
progress; create
a standard set of
administrative
unit metrics to
measure
program
efficiency
Methods of
Assessment
Observe and
conduct focus
groups of
students while
they complete
the online
application, to
determine how
to improve the
application
process
Resources
Noncredit
research
analyst,
student focus
groups
AIS/OIE
programmer
Noncredit
research
analyst
Noncredit
research analyst,
OIE research
analysts,
AIS/OIE
programmer
Progress
This plan is on
hold while the
recruitment of
As of fall 2015,
the AIS/OIE
programmer
Noncredit
research
analyst hired
In fall 2015, OIE
established a
data governance
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MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
a permanent
Registrar is
established in
spring 2016.
Evaluation
Improvements
Planned
Pending hiring
of permanent
registrar and
implementation of CCC
Apply.
Pending
findings
has written a
program to
generate this
data, which
will be
integrated
into the
noncredit data
warehouse.
in June 2015
and working
on designing
and
implementing
this study
group, which
includes the
noncredit
research analyst.
Data are
complete and
available for
analysis, as
shown in
Table XX.
The
personnel
required to
fulfill this
goal are in
place as of
June 2015 and
has begun
designing the
study.
All parties are
beginning a
district-wide
dialogue to
determine data
standards and
needs. Once
personnel were
put into place,
the goal could
be pursued.
Data to be
integrated
into data
warehouse
Currently,
AHS has no
means to
gather this
information,
so any study
will improve
the current
lack of data.
Currently, data
is generated by
way of disparate
systems. As
such,
standardizing
data will
improve data
reliability
substantially.
Strat
Specific Goal 2: In cooperation with OIE, develop a set of standard reports in a data
warehouse environment to produce on-demand reports for program review and to
evaluate administrative and service area outcomes.
Intermediate
Objectives
1
2
80
3
4
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Description
Develop plan
to work with
the OIE to
build out the
data
warehouse to
meet AHS
specifications
Identify data
elements
to be included
in the data
warehouse
Launch the
data
warehouse;
explore the
use of the
IEBC program
review tool to
provide
standard
reports;
resubmit data
to the CCCCO
to correct past
term data and
track cohorts
more
accurately
Responsible
Persons
AHS faculty,
dean of
Continuing
Education,
OIE
OIE and dean
of Continuing
Education
OIE and dean
of Continuing
Education
Timelines for
Completion
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2015
Fall 2016
Create the
plan
Comprehensi
ve list of data
elements
delivered to
the AIS
programming
unit for
examination
and review
Database
warehouse in
SPSS, SAS,
Access or
other
database unit
in place.
Installation of
desktop
interface on all
AHS computers
Evaluate plan
efficacy
Progress plan
from AIS to
implement
data elements
into the
PeopleSoft
environment
Beta version
of database
warehouse
used by AHS
staff for
feedback and
improvement
Final version of
the interface
and query
system in place
Benchmarks
Methods of
Assessment
81
Create a
desktop
interface that
contains a set of
standard reports
that provide ondemand and
real-time access
to student data
AIS/OIE/AHS
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Resources
AHS faculty,
staff, and
administration
and OIE/AIS
staff
AHS faculty,
staff, and
administratio
n and OIE/AIS
staff
Progress
With the
transition of
leadership and
the onset of
AB86/AEBG,
through the
work of the
Coastal North
County Adult
Education
Consortium
(CNCAEC),
AHS started
working on
this plan in fall
2014; the plan
was completed
in spring 2015
(see Appendix
P: CNCAEC
Regional
Comprehensiv
e Plan) and
implementatio
n began in
summer 2015
A scan of all
noncredit data
sources and
elements was
conducted in
summer 2015;
In progress
a PeopleSoft
fall 2015
programmer
was hired in
June 2015 and
began the
technical work
immediately.
Through the
CNCAEC
Regional Plan,
programming
staff were
identified to be
hired in 20152016. Pending
executive
management
team approval
and other
college
processes, this
programmer
will be in place
in spring 2016.
Evaluation
The plan was
presented to
the CNCAEC
leadership
team and the
noncredit SSSP
advisory
committee to
evaluate and
provide input
on its
OIE and AIS
are on track
with the plan
that was put
forth to AHS
in spring 2015
(Appendix Q:
OIE/AIS
Project
Timeline)
To be completed
fall 2016
82
AHS faculty,
staff, and
administratio
n and
OIE/AIS staff
In progress
fall 2015
AHS faculty,
staff, and
administration
and OIE/AIS
staff
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
effectiveness
Improvements
Planned
As
performance
outcomes have
been identified
through AB104
and NCSSSP,
new data
elements have
been added
and new
reports are
being built.
A data
dashboard to
include
external labor
market data
and a resource
allocation
rubric has
been
integrated to
inform the
work of
CNCAEC.
83
In progress
fall 2015
To be
completed fall
2016
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
MiraCosta AHS Schoolwide Action Plan Two for Continuing
Improvement
Key Issue Two: Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs) need to
better address skills necessary for our students to succeed in entering the
workforce or to transition to post-secondary education.
Specific Goal 1: Develop Program Leaning Outcomes that appropriately reflect the
knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes acquired from an adult high school diploma
Intermediate
Objectives
Strategies
Description
1
Identify
appropriate
PSLOs related
to workforce
entry and
transition to
higher
education
Responsible
AHS faculty
Persons
Timelines for
Completion
Fall 2013
Revised PSLOs
that act as
criterionreferenced
Benchmarks
benchmarks
vetted by the
SLOAC
Committee
2
3
4
Develop
authentic
methods of
Align and revise assessment,
as needed the
including the
course level SLOs possible creation
of a student
to the PSLOs.
portfolio of
embedded
course work
Develop a feedback
loop to assure
pedagogical,
curricular, and
resource allocation
decisions are
informed by
outcomes results
AHS faculty
AHS faculty, dean of
Continuing Education
Fall 2013
Revised PSLOs
vetted by the
SLOAC
Committee
84
AHS faculty
Spring 2014
Investigate
student
portfolios,
signature
assignment, or
embedded
course
assessments for
program level
evaluation
Fall 2014
Create and develop
three-year program
assessment plan with
timeline, methods of
assessment,
triangulation of
results, qualitative
and quantitative data,
indirect and direct
assessment of
learning
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Methods of
Assessment
PSLOs posted
in syllabi,
course outlines
of record,
catalogue,
brochures and
program
literature
SLO program
alignment matrix
demonstrating
the introduction,
practice, and
mastery of
program level
outcomes
Methods of
program
outcomes
assessment
vetted with the
SLOAC
Resources
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty and AIS Faculty and AIS
Completed
spring 2013
Alignment is in
progress, has
been completed Student
in several courses, portfolios are
and continues in being piloted in
other courses that the English
have not been
Information
formally
Literacy course.
reviewed for
alignment.
Reviewed by
full- and parttime faculty
spring 2013
Alignment will
continue to be
reviewed by fulland part-time
faculty.
Pilot ongoing
At the end of the
three-year cycle (2016)
and may be
AHS faculty expect to
implemented
program-wide, complete the
assessment program
depending on
portfolio efficacy. and timeline.
PLO revisions
will be
considered, if
necessary.
Assess portfolio
pilot to
determine
program-wide
portfolio
feasibility.
Progress
Evaluation
Improvement
None
s Planned
85
Implement the
assessment plan and
incorporate into
program review
analysis
Outcomes are
addressed in annual
program reviews, but
the assessment
program and timeline
are in progress.
Explore use of My
EdPlan tools to gather
and house
quantitative and
qualitative data.
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Specific Goal 2: Evaluate the college-wide Institutional Learning Outcomes for
appropriateness to reflect those expected for an adult high school diploma
Intermediate
Objectives
Description
Responsible
Persons
Timelines for
Completion
Benchmarks
1
Identify
appropriate ILOs
related to the
expectations of a
high school
graduate
AHS faculty
Fall 2013
2
3
4
Develop a rubric
to evaluate
Align and revise authentic
course level
examples of
SLOs with
student work
PSLOs and
that could be
ISLOs, as
evaluated for
institutional
necessary
student learning
levels
Develop a
feedback loop to
assure
pedagogical,
curricular, and
resource
allocation
decisions are
informed by
outcome results.
AHS faculty
AHS faculty,
Dean of
Continuing
Education
Fall 2013
Revised ILOs that
act as criterion
Revised ILOs
referenced
vetted by the
benchmarks vetted SLOAC
by the SLOAC
Committee
Committee
86
AHS faculty
Spring 2013
Fall 2014
Create and
develop threeyear ISLO
Establish an
assessment plan
assessment tool
with timeline,
that would
methods of
provide
assessment,
institutional
triangulation of
level outcomes
results,
analysis
qualitative and
independent of
quantitative
program level
data, indirect
considerations
and direct
assessment of
learning
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Methods of
Assessment
SLO program
alignment
PSLOs posted in
matrix
syllabi, course
demonstrating
outlines of record,
the introduction,
catalogue,
practice and
brochures, and
mastery of
program literature
program level
outcomes
Methods of
program
outcomes
assessment
vetted with the
SLOAC
Implement the
assessment plan
and incorporate
into program
review analysis.
Resources
AHS Faculty
AHS Faculty
AHS Faculty
AHS Faculty
Completed
Completed
Completed
Completed
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Spring 2013
Fall 2014
Progress
Evaluation
Improvements
Planned
PSLOs now reflect AHS faculty
expectations
created an
appropriate for
alignment
AHS students.
matrix.
None
Ongoing
assessment
87
Once the
assessment
AHS has
process and
determined that
rubric are
the graduation
complete,
portfolio will be
results will be
the assessment
incorporated
tool.
into program
review.
Process and
Implementation
rubric are being
of plan
developed.
MiraCosta College Adult High School ACS WASC Progress Report
Appendices
A. AHS Detailed Data Profile (in folder)
B. AHS Summary Pamphlet
C. MiraCosta Community College District Board of Trustee’s August 1, 1972
minutes
D. MiraCosta Community College District Organizational Chart (in folder)
E. Board Policy 2510
F. 2015-2016 Noncredit and Credit Academic Calendars
G. RP Group CTE Employment Outcomes Survey (in folder)
H. Educational Master Plan
I. Student Success and Support Calendar of Events (in folder)
J. CLC Library Statistics 2014-2015 (in folder)
K. To come: January 2016 Board of Trustees Minutes
L. Coastal North County Adult Education Consortium (CNCAEC) Resource
Allocation Rubric
M. Spring 2015 Noncredit Student Survey (in folder)
N. Continuing Education Workshops and Events—Fall 2015 (in folder)
O. Coastal North County Adult Education Consortium (CNCAEC) Regional
Comprehensive Plan (in folder)
88
STUDENT EQUITY PLAN
2015-2018
Executive Summary
The Student Equity Plan assesses outcomes in what the Board of Governors policy on student
equity has defined as five key success indicators: access, course completion, ESL and basic skills
completion, degree and certificate completion, and transfer. Specifically, the indicators are
defined as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Access: The percentage of each population group that is enrolled compared to that group’s
representation in the adult population within the community served. This percentage is
frequently calculated as a participation rate.
Course Completion: The ratio of the number of credit courses that students, by population
group, successfully complete (A, B, C, or P) compared to the number of courses in which
students in that group are enrolled on the census day of the Fall term.
ESL and Basic Skills Completion: The ratio of the number of students by population group
who successfully complete the related degree-applicable course within 6 years after having
begun the ESL or Basic Skills sequence.
Degree and Certificate Completion: The ratio of the number of students who complete at
least 6 units and attempt at least 1 math or English course by population group and
subsequently receive a degree or certificate within 6 years of starting to the number of
students in that group with a goal of degree or certificate completion.
Transfer: The ratio of the number of students by population group who transfer or become
transfer-prepared, to the number of students in that group with a goal of transfer.
Target populations are identified through an analysis of indicator data for the following
subgroups: ethnicity, gender, age, disability status, economically disadvantaged, veterans, and
foster youth (Title 5, §54220). In 2014 the MiraCosta College Student Equity Committee
convened to develop a three-year plan tied to statewide allocated funds ($437,000). To
determine disproportionate impact, MiraCosta College employed the Proportionality Equity
Index established by the University of Southern California Center for Urban Education to
measure a specific group’s proportion of all students who reached a given successful outcome
compared to that group’s proportion of the starting cohort. Any indexes below a 1.0 were
identified as a possible disproportionate impact. Signature activities from the plan’s inaugural
year that demonstrated a high level of success include:
•
•
•
•
•
GEAR UP for College! Summer Program: yielding a 97% success rate for 57 enrolled high school
students in summer Communication 101 courses
Pathways to 21st Century Careers: promoting college awareness and a college going culture at
local Title I schools, over 180 5th grade students participated in a careers research project to
develop lyrics to songs that through partnerships with MiraCosta College Recording Arts
students produced several performances at promotion ceremonies and at a MiraCosta College
gala in the concert hall
Samoan Cultural Festival: part of a series of city-wide events in July, MiraCosta College served
as the host kickoff event with over 500 participants celebrating Samoan culture on campus
Alignment of Academic Success and Equity programs (Puente, RAFFY, FYE, and Umoja) through
the hiring of a Student Services Coordinator serving all programs
Hiring of a Director of Student Equity to oversee equity efforts
Due to revisions of the plan template and additional reporting requirements from the
Statewide Chancellor’s Office, an updated 2015-2018 plan was required to improve academic
outcomes for targeted groups. The revision presented an opportunity to look at updated data
as well as revamp goals to focus on enhancing current efforts that have proved to have high
success for target groups in addition to establishing new ones.
In addition to the
Proportionality Equity Index, this year’s plan utilizes a new metric, Percentage Point Gap, as an
additional tool for determining disproportionate impact for all indicators except Access.
Percentage Point Gap analysis compares each disaggregated subgroups’ “success rates” with
the success rates of the overall group. A negative gap indicates the focal group is below average
and may be experiencing disproportionate impact. Acknowledging institutional responsibility to
ensure success for all MiraCosta College students, this plan represents the college's ongoing
commitment toward removing barriers and creating pathways to student success.
The success indicators addressed in this Student Equity Plan reflect essential findings including: target groups, equity index/PPG,
goal and goal year, and activities:
SUCCESS
INDICATOR
TARGET GROUPS
ACCESS
Veterans (.53
equity index)
Native
Hawaiian/Pacific
Islander
Economically
Disadvantaged
(.13 equity index)
EQUITY
INDEX
PERCENTAGE
POINT GAP
GOAL & GOAL
YEAR
.53
Increase index to
.65 by 2018
.83
Increase index to
.95 by 2018
.13
Increase index to
.25 by 2018
COURSE
ESL/BASIC SKILLS
COMPLETION COMPLETION
LGBTQIA
Males
Black/AfricanAmerican
Hispanic/Latino
Intensify outreach to veteran students, veterans’
organizations, and veterans’ service centers to improve
transition to college
Strengthen outreach to Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander
(NHPI) communities, particularly in the northern part of
the district.
Create a program that connects economically
disadvantaged students from Title I schools to MiraCosta
College
Investigate the extent of LGBTQIA access gaps through
survey analysis, snowball sampling, and focus groups
and develop targeted outreach tactics based on findings.
.98
2.4% below
average
Reduce gap to 1% Focus expanded efforts in Umoja and Puente towards
by 2018
male students
.89
8.7% below
average
Reduce gap to 3% Expand the Umoja Program to offer students enhanced
by 2018
support services.
.94
4.0% below
average
Reduce gap to 2% Expand the Puente Project to offer students enhanced
by 2018
support services
5.9% below
Avg.
Reduce gap to 2% Pilot alternative placement in ESL/English utilizing high
by 2018
school transcripts
.2% below
average
Eliminate gap by
2018
ESL
.8
Males
ACTIVITIES
Math
1.0
Scale the Bridge to Success program to serve all basic
skills math students
Males of Color
TRANSFER
DEGREE &
CERTIFICATE
COMPLETION
(Asian
Black/AfricanAmerican
Filipino
Hispanic/Latino
Native
American/Alaska
Native
Pacific
Islander/Native
Hawaiian)
English
.8
(aggrega
6.3% below
average
te)
4.0% below
average
Scale accelerated English courses to assist students with
basic skills English course completion and progression
Reduce gap to 3%
by 2018
Implement best practices for embedded and intrusive
counseling/advising in pre-transfer courses
Math
Reduce gap to 2%
by 2018
.9
2.5% below
average
Males
Alaskan
Native/Native
American
Hispanic/Latino
Black/AfricanAmerican
Native
Hawaiian/Pacific
Islander
.9
.3
.9
.9
.7
Reduce gap to
1.25% by 2018
16.6% below
average
7.5% below
average
7.1% below
average
15.6% below
average
Implement institution-wide professional development
opportunities for instructional faculty, particularly those
teaching basic skills math and English courses, to learn
about key strategies teaching men of color
Providing counseling services for students outside of
traditional office setting including providing intrusive
mobile counseling at highly populated student areas on
campus.
Create a professional development conference to learn
about, evaluate, and adopt effective practices when it
comes to addressing degree and certification
completion by male students.
Develop a research agenda and conduct relevant
qualitative and quantitative research to further assess
gaps in equity for men.
Develop a cultural club for Alaskan Native/Native
Reduce gap to 8%
American students that is connected to
by 2018
counseling/advising
Reduce gap to 3% Expand the Puente Project to offer students enhanced
by 2018
support services
Eliminate gap by
Expand the Umoja Program to offer students enhanced
2018
support services.
Create a community based cohort program that
Reduce gap to 5%
increases transfer and transfer velocity for NHPI
by 2018
students
Detailed in the activities implementation plan section, identified activities were based on
researched effective practices and data demonstrating successful programs that could be
enhanced at MiraCosta College. Also detailed are methods of evaluation for each activity to
continually assess progress towards the identified goal and goal year. Activities are aligned
with current strategies identified through the Student Success and Support Program, Basic Skills
Initiative, and Achieving the Dream initiative.
The college has moved toward institutionalizing work around Student Equity by incorporating it
as one of three foci of the Student Success Committee, part of the college’s governance
structure. This ensures that work around Student Equity is integrated with the other two foci,
the Basic Skills Initiative and Student Success and Support Program. Dialogue will be ongoing
with regular evaluation of goals and activities designed to ultimately improve student success at
MiraCosta College. The college identifies issues related to student diversity and equity as a
priority through Board Policy and Administrative Procedure 5300 "Student Equity” and is in the
process of adopting the following Equity and Inclusion statement for the college:
MiraCosta College is committed to providing a strong, supportive, and authentic environment
where difference is valued, respected, encouraged, and honored; where all faculty, staff, and
students experience a sense of belonging and the freedom to express themselves, and where
their experiences are recognized and valued.
MiraCosta College strives to be a model for equity and inclusion. The college is committed to
providing opportunities for engagement both across the campus and within the communities
the college serves. The college seeks to remove barriers to learning, participation, and success,
with a focus on changing procedures and practices that disproportionately affect certain
groups.
Anchored in a culture of evidence, MiraCosta promotes increased awareness and appreciation
of individual, collective, and intersecting identities within our diverse society and acknowledges
that different students learn in different and unique ways.
Resources are budgeted through the college’s general fund, categorical programs, and grantfunded program focused on addressing student equity. Additionally, allocated monies from the
California State Legislature will be utilized to implement identified goals and activities in this
plan.