Molecular Diagnostics Program Student Handbook 2015-2016

Ferris State University Molecular
Diagnostics Program
Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
Molecular Diagnostics Program
Student Handbook
2015-2016
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Ferris State University Molecular
Diagnostics Program
Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
Contents
I.
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 5
A.
Purpose of this handbook............................................................................................................... 5
B.
Organization .................................................................................................................................. 6
C.
Molecular Diagnostics Program...................................................................................................... 7
D.
Program Accreditation Information ............................................................................................... 7
E.
Overview of the Program ............................................................................................................... 8
1.
F.
II.
Our Goals: .................................................................................................................................. 8
Program Check Sheet ..................................................................................................................... 9
General Program Policies ................................................................................................................. 13
A.
Admission Requirements .............................................................................................................. 13
B.
Advanced Placement and Proficiency Exams ............................................................................... 13
C.
Essential Requirements ................................................................................................................ 14
D.
ADA Accommodations .................................................................................................................. 16
E.
Classroom Rights and Responsibilities ......................................................................................... 16
F.
Policy on use of Molecular Diagnostics laboratory computers .................................................... 17
G.
Safety Policies ............................................................................................................................... 17
1.
General Laboratory Safety ........................................................................................................ 17
2.
Dress Code ................................................................................................................................ 19
3.
Blood-borne Pathogens ............................................................................................................ 19
4.
Hepatitis B Vaccination and Other Immunization Requirements ............................................ 19
5.
Chemical Hygiene ..................................................................................................................... 19
6.
Fire Safety ................................................................................................................................. 20
7.
Tornado/Severe Weather Safety and Emergency Communications ........................................ 20
H.
Incidental Program Expenses ....................................................................................................... 20
III. Academic Policies ............................................................................................................................. 20
1.
College of Health Professions Core Courses ............................................................................. 20
2.
Other Core Courses .................................................................................................................. 21
B.
General Education Requirements for Graduation ........................................................................ 22
1.
Communication ........................................................................................................................ 22
2.
Quantitative Skills ..................................................................................................................... 22
3.
Scientific Understanding ........................................................................................................... 22
4.
Cultural Enrichment .................................................................................................................. 22
5.
Social Awareness ...................................................................................................................... 22
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
6.
C.
Global Consciousness ............................................................................................................... 22
Academic Advising ........................................................................................................................ 23
1.
Pre-professional students ......................................................................................................... 23
2.
Professional Sequence students ............................................................................................... 23
D.
Progression in the Molecular Diagnostics Program ..................................................................... 23
1.
Grading Scale ............................................................................................................................ 23
2.
Progression Policy ..................................................................................................................... 23
E.
Graduation Audit .......................................................................................................................... 23
F.
Attendance Policies ...................................................................................................................... 24
G.
Cancellation of Classes ................................................................................................................. 24
H.
Affective Objectives .................................................................................................................... 24
I.
Disruptive Behavior Policy ............................................................................................................ 25
1.
University Academic Honesty Policy ........................................................................................ 26
2.
College of Health Professions’ Academic Honesty Policy ......................................................... 26
3.
Grade Change Appeal Procedure ............................................................................................. 26
4.
Ferris State Policy on Student Complaints ............................................................................... 26
5.
CHP Tobacco Use Policy............................................................................................................ 27
IV. Clinical Experience ............................................................................................................................ 27
A.
Affiliates ....................................................................................................................................... 27
B.
Assignment to Clinical Experience ................................................................................................ 28
1.
Eligibility.................................................................................................................................... 28
2.
Criminal background check ...................................................................................................... 28
3.
Interview and selection process ............................................................................................... 28
C.
Clinical Experience Requirements ................................................................................................ 28
1.
Criminal Background Check (see above) .................................................................................. 28
2.
TB Test ...................................................................................................................................... 28
3.
Hepatitis B vaccination ............................................................................................................. 29
4.
Health Insurance ....................................................................................................................... 29
5.
Other requirements .................................................................................................................. 29
D.
Clinical Experience Policies ........................................................................................................... 29
1.
Attendance ............................................................................................................................... 29
2.
Service Work Policy .................................................................................................................. 30
3.
Outside employment policy...................................................................................................... 30
4.
Client Rights policy.................................................................................................................... 30
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
E.
How you will be evaluated at the Clinical Site.............................................................................. 30
1.
Your skills .................................................................................................................................. 30
2.
Your knowledge ........................................................................................................................ 30
3.
Your professional behaviors ..................................................................................................... 31
4.
Policy concerning National Certification Examinations ............................................................ 31
F.
G.
Who does what at the Clinical Site? ............................................................................................. 32
1.
Student Responsibilities at the Clinical Site.............................................................................. 32
2.
Clinical Instructors’ Activities.................................................................................................... 32
3.
Clinical Education Coordinator ................................................................................................. 33
Communication with Ferris State University ................................................................................ 33
V. Student Evaluation Form………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...34
Ferris State University Non-Discrimination Statement
Ferris State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion or creed, national origin,
sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, marital status, veteran or military status, height, weight,
protected disability, genetic information, or any other characteristic protected by applicable State or
federal laws or regulations in education, employment, housing, public services, or other University
operations, including, but not limited to, admissions, programs, activities, hiring, promotion, discharge,
compensation, fringe benefits, job training, classification, referral, or retention. Retaliation against any
person making a charge, filing a legitimate complaint, testifying or participating in any discrimination
investigation or proceeding is prohibited.
Students with disabilities requiring assistance or accommodation may contact Educational Counseling &
Disabilities Services at (231) 591-3057 in Big Rapids, or the Director of Counseling, Disability & Tutoring
Services for Kendall College of Art and Design at (616) 451-2787 ext. 1136 in Grand Rapids. Employees
and other members of the University community with disabilities requiring assistance or
accommodation may contact the Human Resources Department, 420 Oak Street, Big Rapids, MI 49307
or call (231) 591-2150.
Inquiries or complaints of discrimination may be addressed to the Director of Equal Opportunity, 120
East Cedar Street, Big Rapids, MI 49307 or by telephone at (231) 591-2152; or Title IX Coordinator, 805
Campus Drive, Big Rapids, MI 49307, or by telephone at (231) 591-2088.
Reference:
Ferris State University Board Policy Part 7. Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Policy, Subpart
7-3 Policy on Non-Discrimination.
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Ferris State University Molecular
Diagnostics Program
Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
I.
Introduction
Welcome to the Molecular Diagnostics Program! You're beginning an interesting and rewarding
career. More than 70% of the decisions made by doctors are based on the results of laboratory
testing. You’ll be doing important work, whether you are employed by a hospital laboratory, a
blood donor center, a research laboratory, or in private biomedical industry.
In the Molecular Diagnostics program, you’ll learn how to perform and interpret the results of
molecular-based medical tests. You’ll learn how to provide blood products for patients needing
transfusion, how to identify which bacteria and other microorganisms are causing infection, how
to identify genetic changes that cause cancer and influence medication decisions, and how to
perform a broad set of molecular biology laboratory skills, including DNA sequencing. Then
you’ll be assigned to a clinical affiliate for a 12-week internship in an actual laboratory.
You will spend long hours in classes and labs. But you’ll be joining some of the best and nicest
students in the university. You’ll make friends among both students and faculty. We all work
together to help you succeed.
Although you’ll be assigned to one academic advisor when you enter the professional phase of
the program, please feel free to ask any of the program faculty for help or information at any
time. We want you to learn, prosper, and thrive at Ferris and in the clinical laboratory. This
handbook provides some of the information you need to plan for and succeed in the program.
Refer to it often. The handbook is updated every year.
A.
Purpose of this handbook
The Molecular Diagnostics Student Handbook provides you with information about the policies
of the Molecular Diagnostics program. The target audience is current and prospective students in
the Molecular Diagnostics Program at Ferris State University.
This handbook does not replace the Ferris Student Handbook. This book serves as an extra source
of information specific to the DMOL programs. We recommend that you refer to the Ferris State
University web site for the most current information throughout your course of study at Ferris
State University. You can find the online version of the University’s policies at:
http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/administration/studentaffairs/judicial/homepage.htm
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
B.
Organization
The Molecular Diagnostics program is in the College of Health Professions (CHP). The
organizational chart below shows the organization of the College of Health Professions, so you
can better understand the structure and programming of the College.
The Department of Clinical Laboratory, Respiratory Care, and Health Administration Programs
houses an associate degree program in Medical Laboratory Technology, baccalaureate degrees
in Molecular Diagnostics and Medical Laboratory Science, the associate degree program in
Respiratory Care, the baccalaureate degree program in Health Services Administration, the
associate degree in Health Information Technology, the baccalaureate degree in Health
Information Management, and two academic minors—one in Lean Healthcare and another in
Medical Informatics. Most recently, the department has added a baccalaureate and master
degree in Public Health. The Department Head is Dr. Gregory Zimmerman. Dr. Zimmerman is
responsible for overall administration of all of these programs. His office is in VFS 402,
telephone 231.591.2313. His e-mail address is GregZimmerman@ferris.edu. The Department
Secretary is Ms. Nancy Alles. Her office is VFS 403, telephone 231.591.2266. Her e-mail address is
allesn@ferris.edu.
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
C.
Molecular Diagnostics Program
Jacqueline Peacock, PhD, MB(ASCP)cm is the Molecular Diagnostics Program Coordinator. Dr.
Peacock is responsible for many program activities including accreditation, and recruiting and
retention of students. The Clinical Coordinator is Dr. David Petillo. Students should consult with
him regarding their clinical experience (internship).
Fully staffed, there are two full time faculty, occasional part-time faculty who are experts
working full-time in the field, and several support staff employed in the Molecular Diagnostics
Program.
D.
Program Accreditation Information
Ferris State University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). The Molecular
Diagnostics program at Ferris State University is seeking full accreditation by the National
Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). NAACLS can be contacted as
follows:
NAACLS
info@naacls.org
5600 N. River Road Suite 720
http://www.naacls.org
Rosemont, IL 60018 – 5119
847.929.3597
773.714.8880
773.714.8886 (Fax)
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
E.
Overview of the Program
The Molecular Diagnostics Program at Ferris State University is a 4-year baccalaureate degree
program requiring 2 years of pre-professional study plus 2 years of professional phase classes.
The Molecular Diagnostics Program combines specified courses in biology, chemistry,
mathematics, statistics, CHP core courses, and the general education courses required for the
Bachelor of Science degree. Pre-professional courses may be completed by Molecular Diagnostics
students within the College of Health Professions, by students in another program or College at
Ferris, or at any other accredited college or university. The professional phase of the Molecular
Diagnostics Program takes place in Grand Rapids and includes advanced courses in natural
sciences and basic and advanced courses in clinical laboratory disciplines. Students can complete
this program via two routes. Most students complete all prequalification courses on campus in
Big Rapids and then finish the final two years of the program in the Molecular Diagnostics
laboratory in Grand Rapids (concluding with a clinical experience/internship). Other students
complete an associate degree or prequalification courses at community colleges with clinical
laboratory science curricula and then enter the program to gain the advanced knowledge and
skills for the baccalaureate degree in Grand Rapids (concluding with a clinical experience/
internship).
1.
Our Goals:
a) To prepare graduates for entry level employment in a variety of careers.
b) To define clearly what is expected of students at all levels of the program, to make
these expectations clear to all students, and to help students fulfill those
expectations.
c) To incorporate appropriate liberal arts, science, and Health Professions core
c o u r s e s into the curriculum and to educate professionals who are aware of the
needs and values of a changing world.
d) To provide evaluation mechanisms which recognize individual competencies and
allow for advanced placement where appropriate.
e) To provide the opportunity for worthwhile clinical experiences for all qualified
students.
f)
To offer appropriate continuing education opportunities to medical laboratory
professionals.
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
F.
Program Check Sheet
Name_____________________________________
CWID__________________
MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS – Bachelor of Science (BS) Degree
REQUIRED
COURSE TITLE (Pre-­‐requisites)
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/academics/gened/courses/GenEd-­‐bachelor.pdf
Communication Competence: 12 Credits Required
Communications Foundation Course (none) Select one:
COMM 105 COMM 105: Interpersonal Communication or
or 121 or
COMM 121: Fundamentals of Public Speaking or
221
COMM 221: Small Group Decision Making
ENGL 150
ENGL 250
ENGL 321
OR 323
English 1 (ENGL 074 or minimum ACT subscore of 14 or 370 on SAT)
English 2 (ENGL 150)
ENGL 321 Advanced Composition (ENGL 250) OR
ENGL 323 Proposal Writing (ENGL 250)
Scientific Understanding: 39 Credits Required
Intro to General Chemistry (CHEM 103 with a C- or better or a
CHEM 114 year of HSCHEM and MATH 110 with a C- or better or minimum
ACT 19 or SAT 460)
CHEM 214 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (CHEM 114 with a C- or better)
CHEM 324
BIOL 121
BIOL 122
Fundamentals of Biochemistry (CHEM 214 with a grade of C- or
better)
General Biology (CHEM 121 or CHEM 114)
General Biology (BIOL 121 with a C- or better and CHEM 121 or
CHEM 114 with a C- or better)
Human Anatomy and Physiology (CHEM 114 or CHEM 121 with a
C- or better)
BIOL 108 or Medical Microbiology or General Microbiology (CHEM 122 with a Cor better)
BIOL 286
Pathophysiology (BIOL 205 or 321 with a C- or better and CHEM 124 or
BIOL 300
214 or 321 with a C- or better)
Cell Biology (BIOL 122 with a C- or better and CHEM 124 or 214 or 322
BIOL 373
with a C- or better)
Principles of Genetics (BIOL 122 with a C- or better)
BIOL 375
Bioinformatics (BIOL 375 with a C- or better)
BIOL 475
Quantitative Skills: 3 Credits or Proficiency Required
BIOL 205
CREDITS
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
4
4
5
3
3
3
3
3
See all proficiency options: http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/academics/gened/courses/GenEd-­‐
bachelor.pdf
MATH 115 Intermediate Algebra (MATH 110 with a grade of C- or better, or
3
minimum 19 on ACT or 460 on SAT)
or ACT
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
*Social Awareness: 9 Credits Required
•
Choose three Social Awareness courses, in at least two different subject areas
•
One of the Social Awareness courses must be a Foundations course
One of the Social Awareness courses must be at the 200-­‐level or higher
*Cultural Enrichment: 9 Credits Required
•
Choose three cultural enrichment courses
•
At least ONE course at the 200-­‐level or higher
*Race-Ethnicity-Gender: one course
3
3
3
3
3
3
Please note that many Race/Ethnicity/Gender courses also meet Social
Awareness or Cultural Enrichment requirements.
*Global Consciousness: one course. Please note that many Global Consciousness courses
also meet Social Awareness or Cultural Enrichment requirements.
MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Core Curriculum for Health Professions: 8 Credits Required
COHP 100
Orientation to Medical Vocabulary (none)
COHP 101
The U.S. Health Care Systems (none)
COHP 102
Safety Issues in Health Care (none)
COHP 350
Statistics in Health Care (MATH 110)
Professional Support Courses: 10 Credits Required
Clinical Laboratory Science Orientation
CLLS 101
Hemostasis (BIOL 205 with a C or better)
CLLS 219
Hematology (BIOL 205 and CHEM 214 with C or better)
CLLS 231
Diagnostic Microbiology (BIOL 108 or BIOL 286 with a C or better;
CLLS 236
BIOL205 and CHEM 214 with a C or better)
Virology-Mycology-Parasitology (BIOL 108 or BIOL 286 with a C or
CLLS 241
better)
Introduction to Clinical Immunology (BIOL 205 with a C or better)
CLLS 252
Molecular Diagnostics Courses: 34 Credits Required
Lab Techniques in Molecular Diagnostics (Co-requisites CLLS
DMOL 110
219 and CLLS 252)
Advanced Lab Techniques in Molecular Diagnostics (DMOL 110
DMOL 210
with a C or better, co-requisites CLLS 231, CLLS 236)
Clinical Flow Cytometry (DMOL 210, CLLS 231 and CLLS 252 with
DMOL 220
a C or better )
Clinical Flow Cytometry Lab (DMOL 210, CLLS 219, CLLS 231,
DMOL 221
and CLLS 252 with a C or better.
Principles of Molecular Diagnostics (DMOL 220, BIOL 300, BIOL
DMOL 410
373, BIOL 375, BIOL 475 with a C or better)
1
3
1
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
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DMOL 411
Principles of Molecular Diagnostics Lab (Co-requisites DMOL 410)
2
DMOL 420
Molecular Diagnosis of Infectious Disease (DMOL 410, DMOL
411 with a C or better)
Molecular Diagnosis of Infectious Disease Lab (Co-requisite DMOL
420)
2
DMOL 430
Molecular Hematology/Oncology (DMOL 410, DMOL 411 with a C or
better)
2
DMOL 431
Molecular Hematology/Oncology (DMOL 410, DMOL 411 with a C or
better; co-requisites DMOL 430)
1
DMOL 440
Molecular Genetics (DMOL 410, DMOL 411 with a C or better)
2
DMOL 441
Molecular Genetics Lab (DMOL 410, DMOL 411 with a C or better; corequisite DMOL 440)
1
DMOL 450
Molecular Forensics/Identity Based Testing (DMOL 410, DMOL 411
with a C or better)
2
DMOL 451
Molecular Forensics/Identity Based Testing Lab (DMOL 410, DMOL
411 with a C or better; co-requisite DMOL 450)
1
DMOL 460
Management and Regulation in Molecular Diagnostics (DMOL 410,
DMOL 411, DMOL 420, DMOL 421, DMOL 430, DMOL 431, DMOL 440,
DMOL 441, DMOL 450, DMOL 451 with a C or better)
2
DMOL 491
Molecular Diagnostics Internship (DMOL 410, DMOL 411, DMOL 420,
DMOL 421, DMOL 430, DMOL 431, DMOL 440, DMOL 441, DMOL 450,
DMOL 451 with a C or better)
Molecular Diagnostics Seminar (DMOL 410, DMOL 411, DMOL 420,
DMOL 421, DMOL 430, DMOL 431, DMOL 440, DMOL 441, DMOL 450,
DMOL 451 with a C or better)
Total Program Credits
6
DMOL 421
DMOL 499
1
1
124
OTHER PROGRAM INFORMATION: Progression / Graduation
Program Grade Requirements:
Students must complete BIOL 300, BIOL 373, BIOL 375, BIOL 475, all DMOL courses,
all CLLS courses, and all COHP courses with a grade of C or better.
Policy on Repeated Courses:
•
•
If a student earns less than a C in any DMOL or CLLS course, he/she will be required
to repeat that course when there is a seat available. Students in good academic
standing have priority over a student who needs to repeat the course.
•
A student may repeat a maximum of 3 credits of DMOL or CLLS courses. Earning less
than a C in DMOL orCLLS courses totaling 4 or more credits will result in a student's
being denied from progressing further in the DMOL program.
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Program Progression Policy:
•
A student may repeat a maximum of 3 credits of DMOL or CLLS courses. Earning
less than a C in courses totaling 4 or more credits will result in a student's being
denied from progressing further in the DMOL program.
•
Failing to earn a C or better in the same course after two (2) attempts will result in a
student's being dismissed from the program. An attempt is defined as enrollment in the
course for one week or longer.
•
Students must complete the professional phase within 5 years of beginning. If a
student cannot complete the program within the stipulated time, he/she will be
required to reapply to the professional phase of the program.
•
No student will be allowed to enter the clinical experience or graduate from the
program with less than a 2.50 cumulative grade point average, or with a grade of less
than a C in any of the required professional courses.
Policy on FSU Credit Requirement:
•
A minimum of 40 credits must be earned at the upper division (300 or 400) level
for the BS degree.
•
Students must earn a minimum of 30 of the total BS degree credits from FSU.
FSU Sunset Policy:
•
If a student returns to the university after an interrupted enrollment (not
including summer semester), the requirements of the curriculum (including
General Education) which are in force at the time of return must be met, not the
requirements in effect at the time of original admission. In special circumstances,
the academic department head/chair may permit the student to finish under the
program requirements in force at the time of original admission to the program.
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
Graduates will be able to successfully
carry out molecular clinical assays
involving a polymerase chain reaction
(PCR) amplification.
•
ASSESSMENT METHODS
Final lab practicum assessment
•
Internship Preceptor Evaluation
•
Employer Survey
Graduates will communicate effectively
to acquire/develop/convey ideas and
information to diverse populations.
•
Internship Preceptor Evaluation
•
Employer Survey
Graduates of the DMOL program will
demonstrate professional and ethical
behaviors regarding conduct toward
coworkers, conduct toward patients,
and conduct toward patient specimens.
•
Faculty evaluation of affective behaviors in
final lab practicum
•
Internship evaluation by preceptor
•
Employer Survey 1 year post-graduation
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II.
General Program Policies
A.
Admission Requirements
Students intending to enter the professional phase of the Molecular Diagnostics program will be
admitted to the Pre-Molecular Diagnostics program. College students wishing to transfer into
the pre-professional phase of the program must have at least a 2.50 GPA, a “C” or better in
MATH 115 or equivalent and a “C” or better in one semester of biology and in one semester of
chemistry with a lab component.
Students in the Pre-Molecular Diagnostics program must:
1) Qualify for admission to the professional phase of the program
To qualify, students must have a GPA of 2.50 or higher and must have completed BIOL 108
or 286, BIOL 121, BIOL 122, BIOL 205, CHEM 114, and CHEM 214. A grade of C or better
after no more than 2 attempts is required in all qualifier courses.
2) Apply for the professional phase.
Applications for the professional phase of the program will be accepted in January of each
year. The professional phase of the DMOL program begins in May of each year.
While you are in the pre-professional phase of the programs at Ferris State University, your
academic advisor will be Ms. Linda Kuk or Ms. Natalia Carvalho-Pinto. You can contact Ms. Kuk
at 231.591.2478. Her office is VFS 210B. Ms. Carvalho-Pinto may be reached at 231.591.2295.
The pre-advisors schedule at least two advising sessions for pre-professional students each term
when you can get questions answered, have advising holds removed, and sign up for the science
classes you need the following term.
You can find information about Procedures for Admission to the Professional Phase for Quota
Programs and Qualifications and Applications for the Professional Sequence at
http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/colleges/alliedhe/Admission-to-the-Clinical-Programs.htm Links
from that site will lead you step-by-step through the qualification and application processes.
Due to scheduling, classroom and faculty limitations, enrollment in courses with DMOL prefixes
is limited to 24 students per academic year.
B.
Advanced Placement and Proficiency Exams
Ferris State University cooperates in both the Advanced Placement (AP) and College Level
Examination Program (CLEP) offered by the College Board. We encourage you to write these
examinations when you first enroll in the University.
Credit may also be granted for work completed through the United States Armed Forces
Institute. Credit may also be earned by taking and passing (a) proficiency examination(s).
Proficiency examinations in specific Molecular Diagnostics courses will be made available by
request only.
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C.
Essential Requirements
This list of essential (non-academic) functions of the DMOL program is provided to prospective
students so that you can assess your own health and your ability to complete the program successfully.
You must be able to participate in course work- on and off the university campus in ways that will not
endanger yourself, other students, faculty, patients, or others. When you enter the professional phase
of the program, you will be asked to sign a copy of this document as evidence that you can meet these
essential requirements. This signed document will be maintained in your advising file.
Ferris State University
Essential Requirements for the Molecular Diagnostics Program
Essential
Requirements
Essential
Observational
Requirements
Functions
Observe laboratory demonstrations in which body fluids and other biologicals
are tested for their biochemical hematological, immunological, and
microbiological characteristics.
Characterize the color, odor, clarity, and viscosity of body fluids, reagents, or
reaction products.
Use a binocular microscope to discriminate among fine structural and color
differences in microscopic specimens.
Read and comprehend text, numbers, and graphs displayed in print, on
instrument scales, or video monitors.
Observe biological samples and their labeling to assess the acceptability of
samples for analysis.
Observe and describe colonial morphology of bacteria.
Observe and quantitate the degree of agglutination or other antigen-antibody
reaction.
Essential
Intellectual
Requirements
Read and comprehend technical and professional materials such as textbooks,
professional journals, laboratory procedures, and instructional manuals.
Apply these intellectual skills: comprehension, measurement, mathematical
calculation, reasoning, integration, analysis, comparison, self-expression, and
criticism.
Exercise sufficient judgment to recognize and correct performance deviations.
Apply knowledge of related sciences, including biology, chemistry, physics, and
mathematics, to laboratory test procedures.
Apply knowledge to the interpretation of laboratory test results, including
correlation of results with diagnoses.
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Follow verbal and written instructions to perform assigned procedures
Essential
Communication correctly and independently.
Requirements
Effectively and sensitively communicate with patients and others identifying
and valuing cultural and religious differences.
Use appropriate terminology to instruct patients and others prior to specimen
collections, adjusting communication style to meet the needs of the patient and
situation.
Respect patients’ rights to privacy and confidentiality.
Communicate effectively and clearly with faculty, students, staff, and other
health care professionals verbally, in writing, and/or via graphical presentations.
Use facility guidelines and legal requirements concerning methods of sending
and receiving information, including test results and other patient information.
Independently prepare papers and laboratory reports, and take paper,
computerized, and practical examinations.
Essential
Behavioral
Requirements
Manage time in order to prioritize and complete professional and technical
tasks efficiently.
Employ intellect and exercise professional judgment effectively, seeking
clarification or assistance when needed.
Be able to provide professional and technical services under the stressful
conditions of the clinical laboratory, including (but not limited to): ambiguous
test ordering, ambivalent interpretations, emergent demands, and a distracting
environment.
Identify and operate within the scope of professional practice.
Be flexible and creative in adapting to professional and technical change.
Recognize potentially unpleasant and/or hazardous materials, equipment, and
situations, and proceed safely in order to minimize risk of injury to self and
others.
Support and promote the activities of fellow students, health care professionals,
and health care organizations.
Promote a team approach to learning, task completion, problem solving, and
patient care.
Perform honestly, compassionately, ethically, and responsibly, admitting errors
and taking corrective action where appropriate.
I have read the Essential Requirements for the Molecular Diagnostics program. To the best of
my knowledge, I will be able to perform these requirements upon completion of the program.
To enable me to meet these Essential Requirements, I request the following accommodations:
Date: __________________
Signature: _______________________________
Name (print):
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Ferris State University Molecular
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Student Handbook, 2015 – 2016 edition
D.
ADA Accommodations
Ferris State University maintains the Office of Disabilities Services to provide accommodations
for students with special needs. Disabilities Services is the campus office responsible for
determining and providing requested academic accommodations for students with disabilities.
A variety of support services is provided to students with documented mobility limitations,
learning disabilities, hearing and visual disabilities, attention deficit disorders, psychological
disabilities, and other types of disabilities. Their mission statement is:
“The mission of Disabilities Services is to serve and advocate for students with
disabilities, empowering them for self-reliance and independence while promoting
equal access to educational opportunities and programs. Information, reasonable
accommodation and counseling are offered to students. Professional development is
offered to faculty and staff. “
Disabilities Services is located within the Department of Educational Counseling and Disability
Services. The ECDS is located on the 3rd floor of the Starr building, STR 313. Counselors in the
ECDS are available by appointment or on a walk-in basis. Call 1-800-4-FERRIS (1-800-433-7747)
and ask for ext. 3057, or call (231) 591-3057.
In order for Disabilities Services to determine a student's eligibility for services, all students
must complete the Intake Interview Form with the Educational Counselor for Students with
Disabilities and present appropriate documentation. Different disabilities require different
forms of documentation.
Both the university and the DMOL program is eager to help all students succeed. If you need
further information concerning Disabilities Services, contact their offices, Starr 313A,
231-591-3057 or visit the Disability Services web site.
E.
Classroom Rights and Responsibilities
If as a student you fail to fulfill your classroom responsibilities, your grade may be affected or
disciplinary action may result. If you believe the instructor has failed to fulfill her/his responsibility,
please first discuss your concerns with your instructor. Then you may use the CHP Student
Complaint Policy, which outlines procedures to get your concerns heard and problems resolved.
You can find the policy on the CHP website
As a student at Ferris your rights include:
To be treated as an adult
Be treated with respect
Know the instructor’s expectations for you in
the class
Know the grading scale
As a student at Ferris, your responsibilities include:
To attend class on a regular basis according to the
requirements set forth in the instructor’s
syllabus
To arrive on time and prepared for class
To wear appropriate clothing to class
Receive a written syllabus
To use appropriate language in class
Know all class policies (attendance, etc.) Know
the instructor’s office hours
To take responsibility for your own learning
To observe all academic honesty policies
Know all safety procedures
To respect all points of view
To respect others’ rights and feelings
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F.
Policy on use of Molecular Diagnostics laboratory computers
There are several computers in the Molecular Diagnostics lab. Some of these computers are
attached to bar code label printers for the Laboratory Information System. Most of the
computers are networked to a printer. Since access to computer labs may be limited in Grand
Rapids, there is increased student interest in using Molecular Diagnostics computers for class
assignments and other applications. Therefore, the following policies have been adopted for
computer use:
Molecular Diagnostics students who are not in scheduled classes may use available computers
during hours when the laboratory is open, if their use does not conflict with other users.
Do not save files onto the Molecular Diagnostics computers unless instructed to do so. If we find
files that we don’t recognize, we will delete them without notice. Each student has storage
space on the Novell network which you can use to store your work. Instructions on how to
access this space is available from MyFSU.
Molecular Diagnostics printers and paper are not available for student use, except for printing
work sheets and other information from assigned work/tests on Molecular Diagnostics
equipment.
Students must abide by the computer use policies and procedures if they choose to use these
facilities. All use of the Molecular Diagnostics computers must conform to the university’s
computer use guidelines, which are available here. Unauthorized and/or inappropriate use of
computers is prohibited. Such use includes, but is not limited to:
•
Damaging or altering records or programs.
•
Furnishing false information or invading the privacy of another user by using files, programs,
or data without permission.
•
Engaging in disruptive and annoying behavior.
•
Engaging in any unauthorized use of, or access to computer hardware, software, accounts or
passwords.
•
Downloading music or other MP3 files onto Molecular Diagnostics computers, or using these
computers to download files illegally.
•
Students needing computers for in-class assignments during scheduled classes have first
priority, including students needing access to the laboratory information system.
G.
Safety Policies
All Molecular Diagnostics students must complete a safety training module prior to working in the
laboratory. The Program Coordinator will maintain these safety training records. Training must be
repeated every 2 years. You may also be required to repeat training if safety violations occur.
1.
General Laboratory Safety
Safety is a critical part of laboratory training and professional laboratory work. You will be
provided extensive safety training and required to practice safe techniques throughout the
curriculum. The Molecular Diagnostics program maintains a safety manual in the laboratory. If
you have specific questions about safe practices, refer to this manual or ask your instructor.
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General policies are below.
•
Do not smoke, eat, drink, chew gum, or apply cosmetics in the laboratory.
•
Do not put fingers, pencils, or other objects in your mouth.
•
Do not store food in the laboratory, or in laboratory refrigerators or freezers.
•
Wash your hands with soap and water after handling patient specimens or cultures, and
before leaving the laboratory.
•
Never pipette by mouth. Use a mechanical pipette, or a glass pipette and rubber bulb.
•
If you are working with particularly hazardous specimens, work in the biological safety
cabinet.
•
Use a chemical fume hood when working with volatile, caustic or toxic chemicals. If your
work is likely to splash or spray, wear safety glasses, rubber gloves, and a protective apron.
•
Learn how to dispose of specimens, contaminated waste, glassware, and sharp objects. If
you need to dispose of an environmentally-damaging chemical, consult the Chemical Safety
Policy or ask an instructor what to do. To dispose of biologic hazards, consult the Medical
Waste Management Policy. Both policies are on the FSU Intranet and in the Molecular
Diagnostics Safety Manual.
•
If you spill or drop anything, it must be cleaned immediately. If you are at all unsure about
appropriate procedures, consult your instructor for guidance.
•
You are responsible for the proper handling, storage, and disposal of the samples and
cultures you are assigned to work on. Do not abandon your microbiological cultures.
•
Label all reagents and samples with the date, your initials, and contents. Unlabeled tubes will
be discarded. If something is going to be out of your sight long enough for an instructor to
wonder whose it is, label it or it will be discarded.
•
When you are finished with reagents and equipment, return them to where you found them,
unless instructed otherwise.
•
Wash all glassware before exiting the laboratory. Use lab tape to label glassware or reusable
plastic equipment rather than writing directly on the glass.
•
If you are handling hot glassware or other warm materials, use thermal gloves or hand
protectors.
•
Don’t take any biological or chemical materials or laboratory equipment out of the
laboratory without permission of your instructor.
•
Personal electronic equipment is not allowed in the laboratory.
•
Avoid sitting on any laboratory bench, or sitting with your feet propped up on the bench.
•
Be careful with the laboratory chairs; they have wheels and can slip out from under you.
•
Put your coat, hat, backpack, cell phone and other materials that you don’t need in your locker.
Bring only what you need for your laboratory session. This avoids crowding, and prevents
contamination of your belongings.
•
Keep drawers, cupboards, and pipette tip boxes closed as much as possible.
•
Clean the bench top where you are working before and after each laboratory session. Using
spray disinfectant, allow the solution to sit for 1 minute, then wipe with paper towels.
•
Report any accident or injury to an instructor, no matter how minor. If you need treatment at
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the Health Center, you will not be charged if you have followed proper procedures.
•
Note the location of the fire extinguishers, eye wash stations, safety showers, fire blankets,
first aid kits, and telephones in the lab.
•
Learn the procedures to follow in case of fire alarm, tornado warning, or other emergencies.
These are posted near the main door of each laboratory.
2.
Dress Code
A full-length, fastened, fluid-impermeable laboratory coat must be worn in the laboratory.
Students enrolled in the professional phase of the Molecular Diagnostics program must buy a
laboratory coat. If your coat becomes torn, badly stained, or otherwise damaged, we will dispose of
the coat and you will be required to purchase another. Store your lab coat on an assigned hook in
the Molecular Diagnostics laboratory entry-way. Your name should be written on your coat.
Students must also wear full-length pants and closed-toed, closed-heeled shoes in the laboratory.
Hair or jewelry must not interfere with work or dangle into specimens. Hats that are not religious
headgear are not allowed in the laboratory. Fingernails or jewelry that interfere with nitrile gloves
are not acceptable.
3.
Blood-borne Pathogens
Procedures for safe handling of potentially infectious materials are taught early in the first
laboratory courses and are reviewed in later courses. The Molecular Diagnostics program is
proud of our safety record, and will not allow you to compromise your own safety or the safety
of others using the laboratories.
4.
Hepatitis B Vaccination and Other Immunization Requirements
To participate in the laboratory and internship experiences in the Molecular Diagnostics
Program, you must provide proof of Hepatitis B vaccination or antibody titer. Paying for the
vaccine is your responsibility. It is available at the University's Health Center, a private
physician's office, or the health department. You may receive the vaccine from any source so
long as proof of having received the vaccine is provided to the College of Health Professions. If
you decline the vaccine you must sign a waiver acknowledging that you have been informed of
the vaccine, the risks associated with not having the vaccine, and that you understand that you
may change your decision and receive the vaccine.
Immunization for Hepatitis B is a very common requirement of clinical affiliates. If you fail to
obtain the required immunization, we may be unable to place you at a clinical site. This may
delay or even prevent your graduation. Some clinical affiliates require proof of immunity to
rubella, rubeola, varicella, influenza and other contagious diseases. You’ll be informed of these
requirements if they apply to you.
5.
Chemical Hygiene
According to Michigan law, everyone has the right to know of any hazardous materials with
which they may come in contact. Material Safety Data Sheets, with information on all chemicals
with which Molecular Diagnostics students may come in contact are located in the Molecular
Diagnostics laboratory. Procedures for safe handling of laboratory chemicals are reviewed in
courses. Most MSDS sheets should also be accessible online via the “Quick Links” on the FSU
home page. If you are uncertain how to handle or dispose of any chemical, refer to the MSDS
or ask an instructor.
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6.
Fire Safety
Each laboratory is equipped with a class BC fire extinguisher, fire blanket, and safety shower.
Every hallway and room in the Ferris and GRCC ATC buildings are equipped with fire alarms that
emit audible and visible signals.
If you find a fire, you should sound the alarm, and then proceed to the nearest exit via the safest
route. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR. If time permits, turn off the equipment you were using, turn
off the room lights, and close the door. If you are wearing gloves, you should remove and
discard them as you exit. If you cannot dispose of them correctly, fold them with the
contaminated sides INSIDE and put them in your lab coat pocket. Then dispose of them correctly
later.
If you pull a fire alarm in the VFS or GRCC ATC buildings, the Big Rapids or Grand Rapids Fire
Departments are summoned automatically. You can be arrested for falsely setting off a fire
alarm.
7.
Tornado/Severe Weather Safety and Emergency Communications
In the event of tornado or other severe weather, the alarm will be sounded from atop the
campus buildings. In the VFS and GRCC ATC buildings, proceed immediately to the nearest
hallway away from any windows. If you are the last person to leave a classroom or laboratory,
turn off the lights and close the door. Remain calm, and you will receive further information.
The university has implemented a number of ways to communicate in case of emergency. You
can sign up for City Watch, a free text messaging service that communicates with you in case of
terrorist attack, weather emergency or other incident. At the Big Rapids campus, there is an
outdoor broadcasting system that sends voice messages (LOUDLY) over the entire campus.
H.
Incidental Program Expenses
We try to keep your expenses as low as possible. You will need to purchase at least one lab
coat, a black indelible marker, and a scientific calculator. It may be helpful to have one that
can calculate descriptive statistics, such as mean and standard deviation.
Criminal background checks are required by clinical internship sites. For most clinical sites, this
will be performed at your own expense. In recent years, the cost has been about $35.
III.
Academic Policies
The Molecular Diagnostics program requires a combination of core curriculum and general education
requirements. Courses in the core curriculum must be passed with a C or higher in all cases. Students
may not repeat courses in the core curriculum more than one time, and once in the professional
phase of the program, students may only repeat one core curriculum course, one time, before being
dismissed from the program.
1.
College of Health Professions Core Courses
The CHP requires that every student earning a baccalaureate degree complete some of the CHP
core curriculum courses in order to graduate. The core curriculum courses required of all Molecular
Diagnostics students are:
COHP 100: Orientation to Medical Vocabulary
COHP 101: The U.S. Health Care System
(1 cr)
(3 cr)
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COHP 102: Safety Issues in Health Care
(1 cr)
*COHP 350: Healthcare Statistics
(3 cr)
*Check with your advisor if you have taken an alternate statistics course.
2.
Other Core Courses
The Molecular Diagnostics Program core courses also include:
DMOL courses 110, 210, 220, 221, 410, 411, 420, 421, 430, 431, 440, 441, 450, 451, 460,
491, and 499.
ENGL 321 or 323
COMM 105, 121, or 221,
MATH through MATH 115 or 117
BIOL 300, 373, 375, and 475
CHEM 324
Computer competency. Most students are well prepared and do not need to satisfy computer
competency with coursework. A summary of required competencies follows.
a) Word processing/introductory desktop publishing (Word, OpenOffice):
Enter and edit text
Copy and move blocks of text
Change text format and style, set margins, line spacing and tabs
Check spelling, grammar, and word usage
Create a header and footer
Insert date, time, and page number
Add columns and tables to a document
Print a document
Name, save, and retrieve a document
b)
Spreadsheet/graphing (Excel, GraphPad)
Enter data into an existing spreadsheet
Create a spreadsheet with rows, columns and headings Create/copy
formulas and functions to perform calculations
Create a graph or chart from spreadsheet data
Insert a spreadsheet into a word processing document Print a document
Name, save, and retrieve a document
c)
Database (such as Access or RedCap)
Sort a database by specific fields, add and delete records
Create a database with multiple fields and records
Create custom layouts including columnar reports
Insert database fields into word processing document Print document
Name, save, and retrieve a document
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d)
B.
Networking
Connect/log on to a file server, retrieve a program or document, save a
document to a specified location
Share files with others on a network Connect to the internet or an online
service
Use electronic mail (compose a message, send it, retrieve a message, read
and respond to a message)
Assess and use resources on the Internet
General Education Requirements for Graduation
Ferris State University requires additional courses, in specific categories, towards the completion of a
Bachelor’s Degree in Science. Current General Education requirements and a link (top left) to tables
detailing courses that meet specific categories of General Education can be found here:
http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/academics/gened/gened.html
1.
Communication
ENGL 150, ENGL 250, ENGL 311 and COMM 221 are required for Molecular Diagnostics majors.
2.
Quantitative Skills
MATH 115 or equivalent and/or an ACT Math sub score of 24.The Molecular Diagnostics degree also
requires COHP 350 or an equivalent Statistics course.
3.
Scientific Understanding
The Molecular Diagnostics degree requires more than the University minimum for Scientific
Understanding. Met automatically.
4.
Cultural Enrichment
At least 3 courses must be taken, with one at the 300-level or higher. Molecular Diagnostics students
must take Biomedical Ethics (PHIL 320), which fulfills this requirement in part. HIST-251, Racism and
Science is also suggested as a valuable (but not required) course in this category as well as satisfying a
Global Consciousness requirement.
5.
Social Awareness
At least 3 foundation courses in social awareness must be completed in at least two subject areas.
One must address race, ethnicity, or gender, and one must be 200-level or higher. Many
Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology courses meet this requirement.
6.
Global Consciousness
One course addressing Global Consciousness is required. Note that many of these courses also satisfy
categories 4 and/or 5 above. Foreign languages also satisfy this requirement.
Your advisor will help you to be sure that you choose courses that meet the various requirements for
graduation. Pay careful attention to these requirements when you plan your schedule each semester.
It is your responsibility to meet all degree requirements. MyDegree is a very useful tool for
monitoring your progress so you should become familiar with its use. Courses that meet the above
requirements may change; refer to the official list:
http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/academics/gened/courses/
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C.
Academic Advising
You must meet with your advisor at least once per semester, before you can register for the next
semester. Bring any questions or concerns that you have when you meet with your advisor. If you
can’t meet with your advisor during his/her office hours, work with them to schedule an alternative
time.
When you meet, your advisor will review your progress toward graduation and help you choose a
schedule that will meet your needs. If you need to make scheduling changes during a semester, please
contact your advisor. Dropping a course can postpone your graduation and impact your financial aid.
1.
Pre-professional students
Pre-Molecular Diagnostics students will be assigned a College of Health Professions advisor until they
are admitted to the Molecular Diagnostics Program.
2.
Professional Sequence students
Once in the professional sequence, you will be assigned an advisor from amongst the program faculty.
D.
Progression in the Molecular Diagnostics Program
1.
Grading Scale
All courses with the CLLS and DMOL prefix use the
standard grading scale. Each course syllabus will
include information about exactly HOW your grade
for that course will be earned (what % comes from
exams, what % from online assignments, etc.) If you
have any questions, see your instructor.
2.
Progression Policy
In recognition of the need to maintain acceptable
standards for professional curriculum performance,
as well as academic achievement, the following
academic progression requirements shall apply to all
students enrolled in the Molecular Diagnostics
programs.
Grade
% score
Grade points
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
93+
90.00-92.99
87.00-89.99
83.00-86.99
80.00-82.99
77.00-79.99
73.00-76.99
70.00-72.99
67.00-69.99
63.00-66.99
60.00-62.99
<60.00
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0
1.7
1.3
1.0
0.7
0.0
a) Students must complete all Core curriculum courses with a C or better after no
more than 2 attempts. A student in good academic standing has priority over a
student who must repeat the course.
b) A minimum GPA of 2.50 must be maintained at all times
c) The professional phase of the program must be completed in 5 years
d) No student will be allowed to begin an internship or graduate from the program
with a less than 2.50 GPA or less than C grade in any Core course.
E.
Graduation Audit
When you visit your advisor to discuss registration for your last semester on campus, you will
need to ensure you have met all the requirements for graduation. This is easily done by using
MyDegree to monitor your academic progress. You will also be required to complete an on-line
application for graduation.
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F.
Attendance Policies
Each instructor will include in the course syllabus information about his or her attendance policy.
DMOL faculty do not allow students to make up labs that they miss for any reason. You MUST
come to lab, and you must be on time, and ready to go with the materials and supplies you need. If
you miss a lab, you lose the points for that session.
a)
The College of Health Professions attendance policy
Class attendance in the College of Health Professions is a privilege and is expected. The right to attend
class is gained through programmatic admission after successful completion of a selective
admissions process. Through attendance, students acquire knowledge and skills related to
profession-specific procedures, are introduced and socialized into the professional environment in
which they will function, and develop into individuals who understand and model the professional
behaviors that will be expected of them in the workplace. Because of the complex and critical
nature of professional education provided by the faculty of the College, students are not at liberty
to choose whether to attend class meetings. In the event a student is unable to attend a lecture,
laboratory, or clinical experience, the student is expected to notify the instructor (the clinical
instructor should also be notified in clinical courses) in as timely a fashion as possible as specified
by the instructor. At the next scheduled class meeting, the student is expected to provide written
documentation of the reason for the absence. If the student does not provide adequate
documentation in a timely manner, the instructor reserves the right to apply the appropriate
actions.
These actions can range from receiving no grade for missed assignments to stopping the progression of
a student through the program. The actions applied will be class specific and applied equitably and
diligently by the instructor to all enrolled in the course. The actions imposed will also be consistent
with the respective programmatic attendance policies that will be included in the course syllabi
and reviewed at the beginning of the course.
G.
Cancellation of Classes
Molecular Diagnostics (DMOL) classes will generally only be canceled in cases of University
Closure. Ferris State has a very efficient system for alerting students of emergency situations,
including closures. Refer to this page for more information. It is strongly recommended that you
participate. Any other class schedule changes (e.g., field trips) will be communicated to you via
Blackboard and/ or email by your instructor.
H.
Affective Objectives
In addition to knowledge and skills, the labs that will employ you will expect you to demonstrate a
professional attitude in your work. As part of your education on campus and in the clinical experience,
you will be evaluated on your professional attitude. During each semester of your laboratory courses,
and again during your clinical experience, you will be evaluated using the DMOL programs Attitude
Evaluation Form. A copy of the form is appended to the end of this handbook (pages 34-36)
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I.
Disruptive Behavior Policy
The College of Health Professions updated its Disruptive Student Behavior Policy in June 2009. Here is
the updated policy:
The College of Health Professions strives to maintain a positive learning environment and educational
opportunity for all students. Consequently, patterns of behavior which obstruct or disrupt the learning
environment of the classroom or other educational facilities will be addressed.
1. The instructor is in charge of the course. This includes assignments, due dates, methods and
standards or grading, and policies regarding attendance, tardiness, late assignments, outside
conferences, etc.
2. The instructor is in charge of the classroom. This includes the times and extent to which they allow
questions or discussion, the level of respect with which they and other students are to be treated,
and the specific behaviors they will allow within their classes. Open discussion of an honest opinion
about the subject of a course is encouraged, but the manner in which the class is conducted is a
decision of the instructor.
3. An instructor is entitled to maintain order in his/her class and has an obligation to other students to
do so. Toward that end, an instructor is authorized and expected to inform a student that his/her
behavior is disrupting a class and to instruct the student to stop that behavior. If the student
persists, the instructor is authorized to direct the student to leave the class. If the student fails to
comply with a directive to leave the class, the instructor may call Public Safety to assist with the
student’s removal.
4. If a student persists in a pattern or recurrent disruptive behavior, then the student may be subject
to administrative action up to and including an involuntary withdrawal from the course, following
administrative review by the Allied Health Sciences Dean’s Office and/or University disciplinary
proceedings. (University disciplinary procedures are delineated in the “Code of Student Community
Standards.” Available on-line at
http://www.ferris.edu/HTMLS/administration/studentaffairs/studenthandbook/
5. Disruptive behavior cannot be sanctioned by a lowered course grade (e.g., from a B to a C) except
insofar as quality of classroom participation has been incorporated into the instructor’s grading
policy for all students. (Note: Academic misconduct, which is covered by other regulations, can be a
legitimate basis for lowering a grade or failing the student.)
6. Students as well as employees are bound by the University’s policy against harassment, in any form.
Harassment will not be tolerated. (Policy available at:
http://www.ferris.edu/htmls/administration/adminandfinance/Human/forms/HRPPs/EmployeeDign
ity.pdf
7. The office of the student’s dean will be notified of any serious pattern or instance of disruptive
behavior.
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1.
University Academic Honesty Policy
The University encourages a mature attitude toward learning and sound academic morale, and
discourages illegitimate aids in examinations, laboratory work and homework assignments. Cheating,
plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty including the acquisition, without permission, of
tests and other academic material belonging to a member of the University community, and the sale
and/or distribution of such material are in violation of University policy and subject to disciplinary
action.
"Cheating" includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes,
tests, or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the
instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; or
(3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of
the University faculty or staff.
"Plagiarism" includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published
or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the
unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of
term papers or other academic materials.
A student who has been found to be in violation of academic misconduct may receive a failing grade in
the course and any of the disciplinary sanctions outlined in the Board of Trustees policy of student
responsibilities, including suspension or dismissal from the University.
2.
College of Health Professions’ Academic Honesty Policy
Cheating is defined as using or attempting to use, giving or attempting to give, obtaining or attempting
to obtain products or prepared materials, information about a quiz or examination, or copies of work
that a student is assigned to do alone and not in collaboration with others. Plagiarism (copying) of
written work is also considered an infraction of this policy.
Students are required to present their own work except under circumstances where the instructor has
requested or approved the joint efforts of a group of students.
The penalty for a first offense of willful cheating will be a grade of zero for the assignment. Cheating
on a quiz or examination may mean failure of the course. The student may appeal any decision to the
Program Director or Department Head.
3.
Grade Change Appeal Procedure
The assignment of grades is a faculty responsibility. If a student disagrees with an assigned grade there
is an appeal process. The student should first contact the instructor of the course. If there is still
disagreement the student should contact the department head that offered the course. Final appeal
rests with the dean’s office that offered the course.
4.
Ferris State Policy on Student Complaints
When a student has an issue with a grade, internship or other student/faculty issue, it is the
responsibility of the student to use a progressive procedure to resolve the issue. This policy provides a
step-by-step means of resolving student/faculty issues. Individual programs may have other specific
steps for resolving student/faculty issues.
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5.
CHP Tobacco Use Policy
In response to student and faculty concerns, CHP adopted a policy on tobacco use in April 2010. The
policy states:
To promote the health and comfort of faculty, staff, students and visitors in the College of Health
Professions, the use of tobacco-related products is strictly prohibited. This policy pertains to the use of
chewing tobacco, spitting containers, cigarettes, cigars, and all other tobacco or non-tobacco smoking
paraphernalia including non-tobacco cigarettes and other non-tobacco smoking inhalation delivery
systems.
It is the responsibility of the CHP faculty, staff, students and visitors to adhere to this policy.
IV.
Clinical Experience
A.
Affiliates
The Molecular Diagnostics program sends students to a number of affiliated laboratories throughout
Michigan and beyond. Each laboratory offers a wide menu of laboratory testing, and uses modern
instrumentation. Experienced laboratorians teach student interns how to collect specimens, organize a
workload, assess specimen quality, maintain and calibrate instruments, run procedures, validate test
results, report results, and consult with physicians and nurses. Although no two sites are exactly alike,
each provides a high-quality internship experience. The CHP has current agreements with the
laboratories listed below:
The Molecular Diagnostics program has written agreements only with the facilities listed above and
cannot send a student to a facility with which it is not affiliated. The laboratories have the right to
accept or reject any student. Every effort will be made to place every eligible student in a clinical site
once all other coursework has been completed. Students are welcome to suggest additional
laboratories to the Clinical Coordinator as affiliates, but should be aware that completing a new
affiliation agreement takes about one year and is not possible in all cases.
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B.
Assignment to Clinical Experience
1.
Eligibility
To be eligible for clinical experience, you must first satisfactorily complete all prerequisites including
earning a C or better in the courses with a CLLS and DMOL prefix other than the internship. You should
have a minimum 2.50 GPA. Please note that internship sites frequently review several applicants and
that GPAs > 3.0 are highly encouraged. In addition, you must meet the non-academic requirements
outlined in part C below.
2.
Criminal background check
Before each student can attend an affiliated laboratory it will be necessary to undergo a criminal
background check, sometimes AT THE STUDENT’S EXPENSE. This is an accreditation requirement for
the clinical laboratories. If there is something in your background that might make a clinical laboratory
refuse to accept you for internship, then you should consider enrolling in another educational
program. Details concerning the process for undergoing a criminal background check change regularly.
If you have questions about this process, contact the Clinical Coordinator.
3.
Interview and selection process
About one semester before you are assigned to a clinical site, you will be asked to interview at one or
several of the sites listed above. Your cover letters, resumes, unofficial transcripts as well as letters of
recommendation will be required by the site for review. Most interviews will require you to travel to
the site, where you will be given a tour of the laboratory, and will meet with the person in charge of
clinical experiences and possibly additional clinical instructors.
You are eligible for clinical placement only once you have taken the required courses and earned
satisfactory grades. When you have met those requirements, we will help you find a place. Your
behavior, grades, and interviewing skills will also affect your clinical placement. If you don’t meet the
affiliated laboratory’s requirements (you fail to bring a resume, you dress for the interview
unprofessionally, or you behave inappropriately), the affiliated laboratories can refuse to accept you
as an intern.
The clinical coordinator will assign each student to a site based upon both the student's and site's
preferences. We do our best to give each student his/her first choice, but keep in mind that this is not
always possible.
After you are assigned to a site, you will get more specific information from them including a start
date, hours when you are expected to be at the laboratory, where to park, dress code, and other
workplace policies specific to that internship site.
You should build a resume that highlights your coursework, technical skills, and all work experience.
Bring several copies to the interview to leave with the clinical education instructor and possible
additional laboratory members. The Career Services Office is available to help you build a professional
resume and hone interviewing skills.
C.
Clinical Experience Requirements
1.
2.
Criminal Background Check (see above)
TB Test
The clinical affiliates require documentation of a negative test for tuberculosis within the past
calendar year. If you have received BCG vaccine, or if you have a positive screening test for TB, you will
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need to submit a report from a chest X-ray or other documentation that you do not have active
tuberculosis. TB testing can be performed at the Birkam Health Center, at the Mecosta County Health
Department, or at your physician’s office. The local health department is slightly cheaper than the
Birkam Health Center.
3.
Hepatitis B vaccination
In order to participate in clinical experience, you will need to provide either proof of hepatitis
vaccination or demonstrate a titer of anti-HBs. You probably got the vaccination as a child. However,
you can get the vaccine for protection from hepatitis B at the Birkam Health Center. The charge there
is generally less than you would pay at your doctor’s office. But you can get the vaccine from
anywhere, as long as you can provide written proof of having received it. It’s up to you to pay for the
vaccine.
If you decline the vaccine, you will be required to sign a waiver acknowledging having been informed
about the vaccine, the risks associated with NOT being vaccinated, and that you understand that you
can change your decision at any time and be vaccinated. If you do not get the vaccine, we may require
you to re-sign the waiver form each year you are in the program.
Our affiliated clinical laboratories want you to be vaccinated against hepatitis B, or to show proof of
antibody titer before you begin your clinical experience. If you sign the waiver declining the
vaccination, you may risk your eligibility for a site assignment.
4.
Health Insurance
You should provide your own health insurance during the clinical experience, at your own expense. If
you are injured during your clinical experience, the site will provide emergency care if needed, at your
expense. Ferris State University provides liability insurance for students during the clinical experience.
5.
Other requirements
A few affiliates require proof of other immunity, such as to rubella, influenza, and/or varicella. Your
clinical coordinator will let you know when you are assigned to your site if there are any additional
requirements that you need to meet.
D.
Clinical Experience Policies
1.
Attendance
Your clinical experience will consist of a 480 hours total. Usually this means 8 hour days and 40
hours/week for one 12 week term. Please be aware that internships should be completed during the
Summer semester and a delayed start may require registration in the fall and added expense to the
student. Do not plan to take vacation or other time off between your final on-campus semester and
your internship. Exact times of starting and ending your shift will vary among the affiliates, and may
even vary between laboratory sections. You will always be working under the supervision of a qualified
instructor.
We expect you to have no absences. You may be absent due to illness. In this case, you MUST conform
to the laboratory’s procedures for reporting your absence. A death in your family or severe weather
that closes roads are other valid reasons for absence. Again, you must follow the lab’s procedures for
reporting your absence. You will not get time off for job interviews or for medical or dental
appointments other than true emergencies.
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2.
Service Work Policy
During the clinical experience you will not be substituted for regular laboratory staff. You may be
scheduled to perform procedures, run instruments, or man a work station after you have successfully
completed all the objectives for that area. However, you will still be working under the supervision of a
clinical instructor.
If you are employed by the clinical site in addition to your official "internship hours", you must be
compensated for your work, and you must follow the normal employment policies of the institution.
While you are working, you are NOT covered by Ferris State University liability insurance.
3.
Outside employment policy
In addition to the 40 hours/week you will spend at your internship site, you will still need to review
theory and will have formal homework assignments to complete. Any outside employment must not
prevent you from completing your assigned work. If you perform below expectations for any reason,
you may be removed from the clinical site. Please note that internship sites are NOT obligated to offer
or provide employment for you after your internship with them has been completed. This would
depend solely upon their current workload needs, their relationship with you, as well as other factors.
That being said, many internship sites do hire our recently graduated interns.
4.
Client Rights policy
Your clinical experience may be the first time that you come into contact at a professional level with
actual patients and clients of the laboratory. The population that you will be serving is likely to be
more diverse than the students at Ferris State University or the population of your hometown.
We expect you to remember that each person with whom you interact as part of your responsibilities
has inherent worth as a human being. You are expected to honor each person’s dignity, and to respect
their rights to privacy and their rights to their own religious and political beliefs. Each patient or client
also has the right to be informed about what is being done to him or her, and the right to expect his or
her laboratory test results will remain confidential.
Each laboratory will have a policy that covers client rights, and your responsibilities to protect those
rights. We encourage you to become familiar with and to observe these policies.
E.
How you will be evaluated at the Clinical Site
1.
Your skills
You will be evaluated by assigned instructors at the clinical site. Ferris State University provides specific
objectives and check sheets for each laboratory area. These outline the specific tasks you should
achieve, with estimated levels of competence for a successful student. You’ll be able to access a copy
of these via Ferris Connect, so you can track your progress. You will be able to monitor your progress
every time you log on to Ferris Connect.
2.
Your knowledge
During your internship, you will be registered for DMOL 460, 491 and 499. These courses coincide with
your internship experience and will test and measure both your theoretical and practical knowledge of
Molecular Diagnostics.
Some affiliated labs will also give you an exam or quizzes, covering the same objectives. Their
questions are likely to be directed toward THEIR instrumentation and THEIR procedures. It's a good
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idea to ask at the beginning of each clinical rotation whether the instructor will be giving you quizzes
or exams beyond those from Ferris State University.
Many labs also will assign "homework," which is designed to help you review your theoretical
knowledge. Nobody remembers everything. If the clinical instructors want you to hand in this material,
you will be expected to do so on time, just as you would on campus. You may or may not have time
during your laboratory shift to work on these assignments.
3.
Your professional behaviors
At least once during your time at the affiliate, the instructors will evaluate you on your professional
behaviors and attitudes, using the form on pages 34-36.
4.
Policy concerning National Certification Examinations
When you complete your Ferris State University program in Molecular Diagnostics and have clocked
one year of experience in a molecular-biology-related laboratory, you will become eligible for the
national certification examination administered by the Board of Certification of the American Society
for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Successfully completing this national certification examination will
demonstrate to current and future employers that you have the knowledge required to function
successfully as a molecular biology scientist (MB) and you will earn the MB(ASCP)CM credential.
Although you are not required to take a national certification examination as part of graduation
requirements or as part of any course in the Molecular Diagnostics program, you are encouraged to
maintain your study on a regular basis until you take and pass this exam at your earliest possible
convenience. Many recent Molecular Diagnostics graduates have passed the exam and reported
professional advantages from achieving the certification.
Information about this examination, including eligibility requirements and application procedures, is
found at the BOC Website: http://www.ascp.org/BOC
The Clinical Coordinator of the Molecular Diagnostics program will discuss applying for the national
certification examination with you as part of your preparation for clinical experience. It is your
responsibility to acquire the current application forms from the ASCP BOC, to complete them, and
once admitted, schedule your examination with PearsonVue testing.
If you get married or if your name changes for any other reason during the program or after
graduation, PLEASE let the Program Coordinator know what your new name is. When he/she gets
requests to approve applications from someone he/she doesn’t recognize, it is difficult to know how to
respond. Also, you will need 2 separate, non-expired pieces of identification (one must be a driver's
license or state ID, PLUS either a signed social security card or passport) to take your exam, and the
name on your application materials and identification must match exactly.
The certification process requires that you submit an official transcript stating that you have
completed your educational program. It is your responsibility to apply to have an official transcript
sent from Ferris State University. You must send a transcript that indicates that you have completed all
requirements for your degree. See MyFSU for procedures concerning applying for transcripts, as well
as charges assessed.
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F.
Who does what at the Clinical Site?
1.
Student Responsibilities at the Clinical Site
Do your best to learn all you can while you're there. Here's a partial list of what you need to do to
succeed:
a)
b)
c)
d)
Adhere to the policies and regulations of the hospital and clinical laboratory.
Adhere to the attendance policy.
Adhere to the dress code of the clinical affiliate.
Arrive prepared to begin your clinical responsibilities on or before the time
required by the affiliate.
e) Acquaint yourself with where reference materials, reagents, and supplies are
located in each area of the laboratory.
f) Review material from on-campus courses while in each corresponding clinical
rotation.
g) Complete all assignments (including assigned homework) in time specified by
the clinical instructors.
h) Read and follow all procedure manuals and policies of the organization.
i) Ask appropriate questions.
j) Conduct yourself in a professional manner.
k) Follow the appropriate organizational structure if a problem arises, as outlined
in the DMOL Student Handbook.
l) Read and take the responsibility for completing the objectives for each clinical
course.
2.
Clinical Instructors’ Activities
Here's what you may reasonably expect the clinical instructors to do while you're there:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
Orient you to that laboratory section(s).
Explain policies.
Show where manuals, supplies, and reagents are kept.
Explain recording and reporting of test procedures.
Orient you to the laboratory information system.
f) Develop a daily rotation schedule.
g) Evaluate you in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains.
h) Answer appropriate questions. Direct you to possible sources of
information if a question cannot be answered.
i)
Give you basic instructions until you can do the procedures on your own
under supervision.
j) Assist you in developing a professional attitude.
k) Instruct you at the bench in regard to quality assurance, routine
maintenance and troubleshooting, and correlation of laboratory data.
l)
Communicate any problems, no matter how minor they may be, to the
appropriate individual.
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3.
Clinical Education Coordinator
One person at each site is designated as the clinical coordinator. He or she will maintain records of
your performance, resolve problems if and when they arise, and generally provide guidance while
you're at the clinical site. Here's what you can reasonably expect that individual to do:
a) Interview students.
b) Schedule physicals, orientation, and/or other necessary arrangements for
beginning clinical experience.
c) Oversee clinical experience - meet with instructors and students regularly.
d) Keep files of grades and all documentation as to how grades were derived.
Enter grades into Ferris Connect in a timely manner.
e) Contact appropriate on-campus Education Coordinator concerning all
problems, no matter how minor.
f) Establish policies for handling problems with students.
g) Establish absentee policy with FSU approval.
h) Attend clinical adjunct faculty meetings.
i) Attend adjunct faculty meetings.
j) Assure adherence to the service work policy.
G.
Communication with Ferris State University
We don't forget you while you're on your clinical experience! You're paying tuition to Ferris State
University, and you're getting academic credit for the work you do. For another thing, we're interested
in how you're doing while you're out there!
The Molecular Diagnostics Clinical Coordinator or the faculty member teaching DMOL 491 will call or
send e-mail about once a week. Ferris Connect is also available for email, on-line chatting and
announcements using the bulletin board. On the telephone, we try to communicate with the Clinical
Education Coordinator, the instructor you're working with, and with you. This way, we get ideas of
how you're doing from several perspectives.
We will also attempt to visit each student at least once during your clinical experience, probably
toward the middle of the time that you are at the laboratory. While we're there, we like to see what's
new at each site, talk to the Clinical Education Coordinator, as many instructors as possible, and you!
Usually these are enjoyable trips.
If necessary, we will visit on an emergency basis. If we have to remove you from your clinical
experience, we will need to meet with everyone involved, including you. Your rights will be protected.
Please be aware that this occurs most often due to performance or behavioral issues on the part of the
student.
Don't worry; if you behave yourself and make a good effort, your clinical experience will be a great
capstone to your Ferris State University education. Many clinical sites will be eager to hire students
who do a good job while they're there. Your clinical instructors may also become valuable references
for future job applications. We all want you to succeed, and we'll do what we can to get you to be a
great FSU graduate and Molecular Diagnostics Scientist.
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Ferris State University Molecular Diagnostics Program Student Evaluation Form
Student: _________________________ Laboratory: ____________________ Date: ___________
Completed by Faculty: ________________________
Signature: ________________________
Reviewed by Student: ________________________
Signature: ________________________
Directions: Choose the number that best describes the student’s behavior in class or in your section of
the laboratory. Use the “comment” spaces to describe the student’s behavior. If you cannot rate the
student in a particular category, write NA.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Unacceptable performance: Student has difficulty performing in the laboratory or class, making
consistent errors, displaying a difficult attitude, or both.
Inconsistent competence: Student requires constant, detailed supervision and instruction in
order to perform in the laboratory or class.
Minimal Competence: Student can perform in the laboratory or class, with instructor available to
assist when problems occur.
Competence: Student performs in laboratory or class with proficiency; checks unexpected or
abnormal results; takes into account significant variables that affect test results; and anticipates
problems in early stages taking positive steps to prevent errors.
I. Attendance and reliability
Arrives on time and is ready to begin working
Begins working promptly
Schedules breaks appropriately
Prepares to finish at end of lab or shift
Follows procedure for reporting absences
Follows procedure for making up missed work
4
3
2
1
NA
4
3
2
1
NA
Comments on this student’s attendance and reliability:
II.Initiative
Performs assigned tasks
Looks for ways to help with routine work
Comments on this student’s initiative:
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III.
Interest in molecular science
Completes reading and other assignments
Displays interest in working in this area
Is alert and attentive to work performed
Asks relevant questions, as needed
Participates in continuing education, as available
4
3
2
1
NA
4
3
2
1
NA
4
3
2
1
NA
Comments on this student’s interest in molecular science:
IV.
Responsibility
Prepares in advance to work in the laboratory
Replenishes supplies and reagents as needed
Maintains a neat and clean work area
Checks for specimen identification and appropriateness
before testing
Maintains equipment according to protocols
Stores reagents and supplies when finished
Comments on this student’s responsibility:
V.
Work Habits and Professional Performance
Performs at a consistent and acceptable pace
Organizes work in terms of priority
Maintains composure under stress
Respects confidentiality of test results
Documents work appropriately
Applies safety training to work habits
Adapts to change with minimal difficulty
Comments on this student’s work habits and professional performance:
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VI.
Professional Relationships
Works well as a team member
Helps others willingly
Presents results for review before reporting (when
assigned to do so)
4
3
2
1
NA
4
3
2
1
NA
3
2
1
NA
Communicates well with patients and clients
Communicates well with physicians and other health
professionals
Comments on this student’s professional relationships:
VII.
Judgment and Decision Making
Identifies problems and works with supervisors toward
solutions
Takes appropriate action when difficulties are
encountered
Demonstrates increasing decisiveness as experience is
gained
Notes abnormal or discrepant results and takes action
before reporting
Comments on this student’s judgment and decision making:
VIII.
Integrity
Admits errors when they occur
Follows procedures and policies of the laboratory
Pays attention to detail
Accepts constructive criticism
Applies constructive criticism toward improving
performance
4
Comments on this student’s integrity
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