Restaurants/Food Service Companies At-a-Glance

Restaurants & Food Service Establishments
At-a-Glance Selling Guide
Restaurants/Food Service
Companies At-a-Glance
Success in the restaurant/food service
industry is all about getting the basics
right: food quality, great service, a
convenient location and appropriate
pricing. Technology has not been seen
as a vital part of the restaurant/food
service world. But this is changing. Today’s
owners and operators are leveraging
technology to better manage and market
their operations, increase inventory
efficiencies, improve cash flow and
revenues and improve their customer
experiences.
How Today’s Digital Technologies
Are Being Used
According to the US Dept. of
Commerce, total spending by all
food services companies in 2011
was $1.9 Billion, a 44% increase
over the year before.
Investments in traditional point-ofsale (POS) systems lead the way, but
restaurants also rely on back-office
systems, networking, security, and are
increasing their investments in the new
digital touchpoints that are shaping the
“intelligent restaurant” of tomorrow:
mobile POS, digital signs, digital security
and more.
What the solution does:
• I ncreases Revenues: Restaurants
continually battle erosion of the
customer base due to competition,
changes in customer demand/
demographics, lack of investment in
maintaining menu offerings, service
levels, décor, etc. This erosion can take
the form of outright loss of patrons and/
or reduced re-visit frequency. Solutions
such as mobile POS (for taking orders
at tableside), digital signs (to promote
offerings) and better management of
customer loyalty options are all seen as
ways to increase revenue.
• Enhances Operational Efficiency:
Restaurants typically have tight
operating margins and constantly seek
ways to maximize “total revenue per
patron visit”, reduce staff turnover
(to limit hiring/training costs and
potential quality of service issues) and
also manage the variable demand for
staff—to keep costly overtime under
control and prevent staff shortages
from impacting service levels. More
effective use of specialized modules in
today’s POS systems can help address
these issues as can overall integration
of systems, from the POS to the kitchen,
the back office and beyond.
• Minimizes Losses: Limiting losses due to
food spoilage, returned foods, employee
error and employee theft are a constant
battle for restaurants. POS systems help
address spoilage and other inventory
related issues. And today’s video
surveillance solutions make it possible
to monitor and verify instances of theft
or fraudulent safety claims. This footage
can also be used in training, to help
eliminate errors and inefficient practices.
The Market
According to the US Dept. of Commerce,
total spending by all food services
companies in 2011 was $1.9 Billion, a 44%
increase over the year before. Point-ofsale accounts for the largest portion of
technology spending (at 35%), followed by
back-office solutions (25%). Networking,
security, mobile/web and kitchen
technologies account for the rest.
Restaurants & Food Service Establishments
At-a-Glance Selling Guide
The typical lifecycle of a POS system is 4
years. The biggest driver for replacement
is the desire to take advantage of new
features.1
The National Restaurant Association’s
(NRA) 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast
indicates 54% of restaurants are planning
to invest more resources in consumerfacing technology, including smartphone
apps for ordering and viewing menus, and
mobile payment options. Various surveys
by the NRA have shown that customer
interest in these and similar capabilities is
high.
The Services Opportunity
As you explore sales of solutions, keep in
mind that there are numerous opportunities
for taking advantage of Intel technologies
to deliver ongoing services in the areas of
content development and management
(via Intel® Retail Client Manager) with the
ability to gather analytics on customer
demographics and business patterns (via
Intel® Audience Impression Metric (Intel®
AIM Suite)) and remote management and
maintenance (via Intel® Active Management
Technology).
Use Case Scenarios
No two businesses are ever exactly the
same—and that’s as true in the world of
restaurants/food service companies as it is
in any other industry. Still, there are certain
patterns and commonalities you will see
over and over in the dynamics of customer
engagement, efficiency needs, security,
workforce management, etc.
Here are some typical use-case scenarios
that may help you prepare for your
customer sales meetings.
Entry-level
Profile: Typically getting started with
a small system or upgrading an existing
system. An entry level user is likely to be
completely new to digital signage and/or
digital security with a neutral, indifferent
or possibly negative perception of its
value in their establishment. With this
customer, it is important to probe to
understand the different ways these
solutions can deliver value and educate
the customer on the different roles it can
play in his/her business.
Approach: POS systems are their entry
into technology applications. They may
need more education about why to use a
POS versus a basic, standalone electronic
cash register. Mobile POS should be
discussed, if for no other reason than
mobile POS can offer cost and flexibility
advantages.
Driving Factors: Simplicity, reliability and
cost.
Mainstream
Profile: Mainstream users will typically
have more familiarity with the value of a
POS system and may already be utilizing
digital signage/digital security (with
content management capabilities) but may
be unsure as to how to make it all work
together. Possibility of dissatisfaction with
existing DS solutions, perhaps because
the customer may not have achieved the
increase in sales or customer engagement
that was expected, or is frustrated
over ongoing maintenance or content
management issues.
Approach: In contrast to an entry-level
user, a mainstream sales prospect is likely
to get more quickly focused on how to
take advantage of specific features and
capabilities to streamline processes that
Restaurants & Food Service Establishments
At-a-Glance Selling Guide
are unique to their business, such as
inventory management and purchasing.
With this customer it is important to probe
to understand the underlying cause of the
problems as to why the customer is not
achieving his/her goals.
Driving Factors: Cost-benefit analysis,
reliable performance and simplicity.
High-end/Advanced Users
Profile: High-end or advanced users
will adopt a more strategic view of the
role that today’s digital solutions can
play in their restaurant. This business
will look beyond the POS and its role in
building a business and will want to take
a comprehensive look at issues such as
back office integration, multi-location
networking, support for enhanced/
personalized customer service, integration
with advanced systems such as digital
signage and security and, of course,
mobility.
Approach: This customer will likely be
looking to expand or evolve their digital
signage (with CMS) and digital security
and surveillance solutions. This could be
the result of a needed upgrade/update,
a business change or expansion or the
customer may be interested in some
specific feature or capability.
Driving Factors: Advanced users will
want to know that they are investing in a
flexible, scalable solution that can grow as
they grow.
As this is potentially an up-sell situation,
you will also want to take the opportunity
to position the new capabilities that the
customer may not be aware of, such as the
easy and effective campaign management
tools in Intel® RCM with Intel® AIM Suite
for audience metrics and analytics as
well as out-of-band remote management
capabilities via Intel® AMT.
For more information visit intel.com/retailsolutions
1Restaurant Tech Goes Full Spectrum, 15th Annual 2013, Hospitality Technology.
Requires activation and a system with a corporate network connection, an Intel® AMT-enabled chipset, network hardware and software. For notebooks, Intel AMT may be unavailable or
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information, visit Intel® Active Management Technology.
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