Guide to Student Life 

Welcome to Scripps!
Interim President Amy Marcus-Newhall
I am delighted to welcome you to Scripps College for the 2015-2016 academic
year in my capacity as Interim President. Whether you are entering Scripps for the
first time or returning to continue your education, you join a vigorous community
of scholars who are dedicated to learning, teaching, researching, and creating
together.
At Scripps, we encourage you to take responsibility for your learning, involvements,
and actions. This handbook is a reference tool that provides you with information
necessary for you to make informed decisions about your collegiate experience. It
outlines the broad array of College organizations and resources, as well as policies
and procedures. This guide is designed to be of use to all Scripps students, but
particularly our new students, who I expect will have questions about academics,
living on campus, and getting involved.
Scripps’ expectations for you are high, and, in turn, we are committed to providing
a learning environment of the highest quality. We expect you to be full citizens
of the campus community and active learners in the classroom. Opportunities
abound for meeting new people, learning new things, and exploring your creative
talents and physical skills.
We look forward to your contributions to Scripps College and wish you
much success.
Incipit Vita Nova.
Amy Marcus-Newhall
Interim President
2 Table of Contents
About Scripps College
Mission Statement ................................................................................................. 3
The College ........................................................................................................... 3
The Founder ........................................................................................................... 3
La Semeuse ........................................................................................................... 3
The Principles of Community .............................................................................. 4
The Principles of Diversity .................................................................................. 4
Vision Statement ................................................................................................... 4
Academic Information
Faculty and Department Chairs ............................................................................ 5
Academic Adviser Information ............................................................................. 6
Libraries ............................................................................................................... 7
Other Academic Resources ................................................................................... 9
Information Technology ....................................................................................... 9
Writing Center ..................................................................................................... 11
Student Services and Campus Life
Central Services and Programs ........................................................................... 11
Online Communities ................................................................................................ 40
Campus Governance .......................................................................... 41
Scripps Associated Students Bylaws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2
Standards of Conduct and Judicial Hearing System ................................. 42
Code of Conduct and Non-Academic Policies .................................................... 49
Academic Policies and Hearing Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 7
Judicial Hearing System for Non-Academic Policy Violations .................. 101
Helpful Phone Numbers ........................................................................................ 116
Scripps College Directory …………………………………………………………………119
The Claremont Colleges Directory .......................................................................... 120
Appendices
A - Housing Information .................................................................................................121
B - Academic Calendar ...................................................................................................127
C - Scripps College Committees .....................................................................................128
D – Emergency-Disaster Preparedness Information .....................................................132
E - Information Technology Agreement ........................................................................134
G - Fire Safety Report, 2012 ...........................................................................................136
Index ........................................................................................................................ 138
3 ABOUT SCRIPPS COLLEGE
The Mission Statement
The mission of Scripps College is to educate women to develop fully their intellects
and talents through active participation in a community of scholars so that as graduates they
may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity,
and creativity.
About the College
Scripps emphasizes a challenging core curriculum based on interdisciplinary studies in
the humanities, combined with rigorous training in the disciplines as the best possible
foundation for any goals a student may pursue. The interdisciplinary emphasis of the
curriculum is a hallmark of a Scripps education. Because Scripps students learn to see the
connections not only among academic subjects, but also among the major areas of their own
lives, alumnae often remark that Scripps “prepared me for life.”
From its founding in 1926 as one of the few institutions in the West dedicated to
educating women for professional careers as well as personal growth, Scripps College has
championed the qualities of mind and spirit described by its founder, newspaper
entrepreneur and philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps. Scripps College believes that
having women at the core of its concerns provides the best environments for intellectually
ambitious students to learn from a distinguished teaching faculty and from each other.
The Founder
“The paramount obligation of a college is to develop in its students the ability to think
clearly and independently and the ability to live confidently, courageously, and hopefully.”
—Ellen Browning Scripps
One of the most remarkable “Scripps women” never attended Scripps – she founded it.
Born in 1836 and raised on a farm in Illinois, Ellen Browning Scripps was one of the first
female graduates of Knox College, Illinois, and one of the first women college students in
the United States. She began her professional life as a schoolteacher. At the age of 37, she
became a path-paving journalist and publisher, joining her brothers in Detroit, where they
founded the Detroit Evening News. A shrewd investor, she helped her brothers develop the
business into the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain and United Press International.
She celebrated her success with philanthropy, giving to improve the quality of life in
her community and in support of education. Already in her n i n e t i e s when Scripps and
The Claremont Colleges were being planned, her financial generosity laid the bricks and
mortar for the first buildings of Scripps College and secured the land on which the three
newest Claremont Colleges would be built – Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, and Pitzer.
The College Seal – La Semeuse
The seal of Scripps College, designed by sculptor Lee Lawrie, depicts La Semeuse –
she who sows. The image of the sower of “the good seed of thought, of action, of life” was
chosen by the faculty in the 1927–1928 academic year. They also selected the College
motto, Incipit Vita Nova—“new life begins here,” The esteemed Professor Hartley Burr
Alexander was largely responsible for the seal’s image and the motto. Before he arrived on
campus, he suggested Incipit Vita Nova, the first words of Dante’s New Life.
4 The Principles of Community
Scripps College is a community of scholars: faculty, students, and staff dedicated to the
education of women and the advancement of learning.
To further this community, Scripps seeks to attract a diverse student body and to build
a diverse faculty and staff. Scripps’ goal is to create a hospitable environment without
discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, culture, color, beliefs, physical
condition, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, or age. Scripps believes that each
member of our community contributes to the learning and teaching of all and, therefore,
seeks to balance individual freedoms with sensitivity to, and awareness of, the rights and
human dignity of others. Scripps recognizes the obligation to respond to the acts and effects
of discrimination and bigotry by building an academic community in which people learn to
respect and value one another for their differences.
Scripps believes that learning and teaching thrive in an environment conducive to
freedom of belief, inquiry, and speech, assuring expression of the broadest range of opinions
and beliefs. Scripps commits itself to maintaining that freedom, subject only to regulation
of time, place, and manner.
Recognizing that such expressions may offend, provoke, and disturb, Scripps affirms its
dedication to encourage rather than limit expression. At the same time, Scripps encourages
community members to show mutual respect and understanding and to employ reasoned
civil discourse. Scripps seeks, through its academic and community policies and practices,
through its actions and the services it provides to students, faculty, and staff, to secure the
widest appreciation for all groups and individuals, to combat discrimination and
misunderstanding, and to forge a better and more just society. Each member of the Scripps
community affirms, by her or his continuing participation in College life, acceptance of her
or his personal responsibility and obligation to the community in assuring that these
principles are upheld in all aspects of our lives together.
The Principles of Diversity
An understanding and appreciation of diverse peoples, cultures, and perspectives
informs the intellectual framework on which our institutional mission is based and is
critical to Scripps’ ability to maintain its position as a premier liberal arts college. The College is
committed to demonstrating that respect of differences among people is a prerequisite to
achieving institutional excellence.
Through its policies and its actions, Scripps strives to create an environment in which
acknowledging and engaging issues of culture, race, ethnicity, religion, belief, opinion,
economic class, age, gender, identity, sexuality, and physical ableness are inextricably part of
the experience of the campus community.
Vision Statement of Scripps College as an Inclusive Community
Ellen Browning Scripps’ vision for the College she founded was a stirring one: “to
develop in its students the ability to think clearly and independently and the ability to live
confidently, courageously, and hopefully.”
For Scripps College students in the 21st century, the education that fulfills this mission
must include establishing their own sense of values and guiding principles, as well as the
capacity to work with and learn from the variety of people, cultures, and viewpoints they
will encounter in the United States and in an emerging global society. The interaction of
each student’s own beliefs and values with those of fellow students, faculty, staff, and others
encountered here at Scripps forms the crucible in which the student’s education will be
tested. Offering a truly interactive and multifaceted community of teachers and learners is
5 the only way in which the College can meet its goal of offering the best liberal arts
education in America.
What will be different about a Scripps that is more diverse, more challenging, more
embracing? We know that it is not merely “adding” people of different backgrounds to the
College community. It will mean that virtually every conversation, every decision will
include multi-perspective thinking; it will mean that the underlying assumptions of every
question will be probed; it will mean that we will address topics such as identity, power,
indirect versus direct communication, empathy, and equity. Each of us at Scripps will
understand that there are a variety of “markers” of identity for all students, faculty, and staff.
There should be fewer occasions when students feel they are the “only” representative of a
group on campus, or in their class, or in a social club, or on a sports team. By making sure
there is a growing diversity not only drawn from different groups, but including those
representing differences within groups, we will begin to break down the idea that one’s
viewpoint is synonymous with one’s race, ethnicity, gender, neighborhood, religion, etc. We
must have more of many different kinds of students, faculty, and staff, so that all of us
concentrate more on what emerges from a truly vigorous debate, one that includes points of
view not heard before.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
The Scripps College Catalog is the best source of information regarding courses of study, academic
programs, academic advising, pre-professional advising, requirements for the Bachelor of Arts
degree, academic policies and procedures, admission, financial aid, honor societies, recognition of
academic achievement, costs and expenses, and so forth. The Scripps College Catalog is an annual
publication and can be accessed at the following Web address:
www.scrippscollege.edu/academics/catalog/index.php.
The Guide to Student Life and all registration materials will assist students with questions they may
have. Students who have additional questions, comments, or concerns are encouraged to contact
their faculty adviser, the Registrar’s Office, or the Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students offices.
Faculty and Department Chairs
Faculty members hold regular office hours during which they are available to students. Additionally,
professors are available by appointment if scheduled office hours do not meet a student’s academic
schedule. Professors may be contacted for appointments on an individual basis. Students may leave
messages for faculty through mailboxes, email, or voicemail, on their office doors, or with faculty
administrative assistants. The faculty administrative assistants keep a schedule of the office hours
of individual faculty members and can assist students if they are experiencing difficulty in
contacting a faculty member.
If a student has a question regarding a specific department, major, or course offering, the student
should contact the department chair. Department chairs are noted below.
ARTS
Art
Dance
Music
T. Kim-Trantran
Ronalee Brosterman
Hao Huang
LETTERS
Art History
Bruce Coats
6 Classics
English
French
German
Hispanic Studies
Italian
Philosophy
Religious Studies
David Roselli
John Peavoy/Aaron Matz
Eric Haskell
Marc Katz
Rita Alcala
Sabrina Ovan
Rivra Weinberg
Andrew Jacobs
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Anthropology
Economics
History
Politics & International Relations
Psychology
Lara Deeb
Roberto Pedace
Cindy Forster
Thomas Kim
Michael Spezio
NATURAL SCIENCES
Mathematics
Winston Ou
WRITING
Kimberly Drake
HUMANITIES INSTITUTE
Juliet Koss/Yuval Avnur
W.M. KECK SCIENCE CENTER
Interim Dean Marion Preest (SCR/CMC/PIT)
INTERDISCIPLINARY DEPARTMENTS/PROGRAMS
Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Piya Chatterjee
Humanities/Core
David Roselli
Humanities Program
Andrew Aisenberg
INTERCOLLEGIATE PROGRAMS
American Studies
Intercollegiate Dept. of Asian American Studies
Intercollegiate Dept. of Africana Studies
Intercollegiate Dept. of Chicano Studies
Intercollegiate Dept. of Media Studies
Intercollegiate Dept. of Neurosciences
Intercollegiate Women’s Studies
Joint Athletics Program
(SCR)
Kathleen Yep (PIT)
Sheila Walker (SCR)
Miguel Tinker Salas (PO)
Elizabeth Affuso (PIT)
Thomas Borowski (PIT)
Susan Castagnetto (SCR)
Michael Sutton (CMC)
Academic Adviser Information
There are numerous resources available to assist students in educational planning. At the center of
the academic advising program is the student’s faculty adviser, who is available to assist in defining
educational interests and goals and in developing the student’s course of study.
A faculty adviser is assigned to each entering student for the first and sophomore years. Students
are free to change advisers at any time and are encouraged to do so once a major has been decided
upon. (A change of adviser form is available in the Registrar’s Office.) Faculty advisers are not
always assigned to new students on the basis of expressed academic interests. Because no one
7 person can provide all the information about courses and curriculum that a new student is likely to
need, students are encouraged to ask questions of other faculty members and resource persons.
(Students interested in medical school and those interested in a major in music or engineering are
especially encouraged to see the faculty in these areas, because early planning is particularly
important.) A student, in consultation with the student’s adviser, should compile information from
many sources in planning a program.
A Scripps student is expected to assume responsibility for initiating all contact with an adviser for
information and advice about requirements, classes, low-grade notices, potential graduate programs,
and other academic matters.
Specifically, a student accepts the following advising responsibilities:
1. Read the catalog, current portal schedule of courses, and Guide to Student Life before meeting
with the adviser.
2. Initiate meeting with adviser during posted office hours at pre-registration/registration time to
discuss requirements, classes, and plan of study.
3. Contact adviser for registration clearance, declaration of major and minor forms, any academic
petition form, and add/drop slips in a timely fashion.
4. Know the office hours of adviser and adhere to them. If another time is necessary, contact
adviser for mutually agreeable appointment time.
5. Initiate and assume responsibility for any contact with adviser for information about
requirements, classes, graduate schools, etc.
6. Initiate contact with professor and/or adviser upon receipt of low-grade notice.
LIBRARIES
Scripps College
Ella Strong Denison Library, ext. 73941
The Denison Library of Scripps is a special collections library with a long history of
personalized service for students and faculty. Denison also offers a variety of comfortable
and quiet spaces for study and research. Among many distinguished collections is the
Macpherson collection of books by and about women. The Scripps College Archives
provides materials on the history of Scripps and includes the Ellen Browning Scripps
papers.
Faculty frequently schedule visits to the special collections and emphasize the use of
primary resources in class projects. Students are encouraged to examine and use special
collections materials. Ask the librarian for access to the Rare Book Room. Exhibits of rare
books and archives change twice a semester. The Slocum Award for Senior Book
Collections exhibit is on view each spring.
Several of Denison’s special collections have been digitized. To access these digital
resources, to search Blais for print collections, and to explore the online resources available
through the library, visit Denison’s website: http://scrippscollege.edu/offices/denison/
Denison Library*
Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. –midnight
Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday noon – 5 p.m.
Sunday noon – midnight
* Subject to slight changes that will be posted in the fall.
8 The Claremont Colleges Library
Honnold/Mudd Library, ext. 18150
Honnold/Mudd is nestled in the middle of The Claremont Colleges. It is bounded by
Dartmouth, Columbia, Eighth, and 10th. One can enter Honnold/Mudd at the north and
south entrances to the Honnold building or at the plaza level between Honnold and Mudd.
The library resources of The Claremont Colleges include nearly one million books in
print and close to 400,000 electronic books. The library has extensive holdings of journals,
magazines, and newspapers; currently the library provides online electronic access to
articles in more than 70,000 titles. From the library website (http://libraries.claremont.edu),
a student of The Claremont Colleges can connect to a wide variety of bibliographic, fulltext, and multimedia information. Through the Web, it is possible to search Blais, the online
catalog, or any of hundreds of databases and thousands of primary resources. A student’s
college ID card serves as the library card and is required to check out library materials and
to access online resources from off campus.
Honnold/Mudd Library*
Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Sunday 11 a.m. – 1 a.m.
* Hours subject to change.
Affiliated Libraries
The George G. Stone Center for Children’s Books, 740 North College Avenue, ext.
73670 emphasizes children’s literature.
The George G. Stone Center for Children’s Books*
Monday through Thursday 1 – 5 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. – noon
* Hours subject to change.
The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden Research Library, 1500 North College Avenue,
is a research library that specializes in biology, botany, and horticulture. Call (909) 6258767, ext. 236, for information. Hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.;
appointments are recommended.
Claremont School of Theology Library, 1325 North College Avenue, specializes in
religion, particularly biblical studies and theology. Call (909) 447-2589 for more information.
Claremont School of Theology Library*
Monday 8:30 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday 8:30 a.m. –10 p.m.
Friday 8:30 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Closed Sunday
* Hours subject to change. Special hours are posted for finals, vacation periods, and
holidays. Schedule updates are posted on the library homepage at www.cst.edu/library.
Off-Campus Libraries
9 California Polytechnic State University Library
California Institute of Technology Library
Claremont Public Library
CSU Fullerton Library
University of La Verne Wilson Library
Occidental College Library
UCLA Libraries General Information
UC Riverside Library
USC Doheny Library and General Information
(909) 869-3084
(626) 395-6405
(909) 621-4902
(714) 278-2633
(909) 593-3511, ext.4305
(326) 259-2500, ext.2640
(310) 825-8301
(951) 827-3220
(213) 740-2924
Other Academic Resources
• Bauer Center (Crocker Reading Room)
Located at CMC in Bauer Hall, this large study room contains tables, study carrels, and
comfortable chairs simply for the purpose of studying in a quiet place.
Bauer Center (Crocker Reading Room)
Monday through Thursday, 5 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Friday, 5 p.m. to midnight
Saturday, noon to midnight
Sunday, noon to 1 a.m.
• Browsing Rooms
Each residence hall at Scripps has a browsing room that is available 24 hours a day for
reading, studying, and relaxing.
• Lucian C. Marquis Library and Reading Room, Mead Hall, ext. 74311
For the convenience of students who wish to use a quiet, on-campus study room with
basic reference materials, a browsing library and study room have been established at Pitzer’s
campus in Mead Hall near the main entry. Reserve materials are also available.
Information Technology (IT) Resources
Scripps College has a combination of presentation classrooms and student and
residential computer labs to facilitate the use of technology on campus. The Local Area
Network (LAN) supports a wide variety of software and Internet applications to be used
for educational purposes and to carry out the legitimate business of the College. In addition
to online help guides provided on the Scripps website, students can request workshops from
the IT staff.
Students using the Scripps computing resources or any other Claremont or Internet
resource must do so in a manner consistent with the “Code of Conduct” (found in this
Guide to Student Life) and also be aware of the appropriate use guidelines that apply
specifically to the computer network. These rules specify what types of access are allowed,
priorities on lab systems, inappropriate behavior on the network, and other specific
regulations that govern appropriate use of the College resources. Current information on the
appropriate use guidelines and other policies for the Scripps network are posted in the student
lab and on the Scripps website. Failure to comply with any of the guidelines may be both a
criminal and a civil offense.
Student Computer Lab: Located on the second floor of Steele Hall, the lab is open to
Scripps students at all times, via card key access. The facility contains a mix of PC and Mac
computers that host a variety of applications and discipline-specific software. Scanners and a
color and laser printer are also available in the lab.
10 Macintosh Multimedia Technical Teaching Classroom: Located on the lower level of
Steele Hall in Room 5, this facility has 25 multimedia Macintosh systems and is used for
classes and workshops. It is also accessible by card reader for the art students to use as
overflow when there are no other events scheduled.
PC Technical Teaching Classroom: Located on the second floor of Steele Hall adjacent
to the Student Computer Lab, this facility has 25 Dell Pentium systems with flat-panel
display and is used for classes and workshops.
Smart Classrooms: All classrooms (except Baxter 108) on the Scripps campus include
equipment whereby faculty can schedule multimedia presentations. Each classroom has a
Dell computer, with the exception of Boone, which has a Mac. Additional resources are:
DVD player, CD-ROM, VCR with Worldwide VHS playback capability, and Internet access.
Computer Art Lab: The Computer Art Lab is located in Lang Art Center. It is available to
students enrolled in computer art and multimedia studio classes.
Residence Hall Computer Resources: Providing 24-hour computer access, each of the eight
residence halls is equipped with at least two Dell PCs, a Macintosh system, and a laser
printer for student use.
Computer Network Access in Residence Hall Rooms and Wireless on Campus: Scripps
College has both wired and wireless support within the residence halls. Ethernet ports in
every residence hall room are gigabit-capable high-speed connections.
The wireless network supports the latest 802.11n standard, as well as legacy
802.11a/b/g. You will need to supply an Ethernet cable (see below) if you wish to connect to
our wired network. In most cases, you will have immediate Internet access via the wireless
or wired connection. (Occasionally, settings from another type of connection may need to
be changed before you have Internet access.) User-friendly instruction sheets and IT staff
are available to assist you in the installation of our “networking” software, which will provide
you with Web, email, anti-virus and laser-printing services. Please visit
www.scrippscollege.edu/campus/it/residential-networking.php.
Scripps College will provide network connection support on student systems that meet
the following minimum requirements:
PC
Macintosh
Desktop or laptop ~ 4 GB RAM min. highly recommended
OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard
Windows 7
w/latest updates installed
Windows Vista Service Pack 2
OS X 10.5 Leopard w/ latest
installed
updates installed
Linux (minimal support)
Category 5/5e/6 Ethernet Cable – 15ft. min for wired connection*
802.11n capable wireless
* Available at Huntley Bookstore
For more information on wireless on campus, please visit
www.scrippscollege.edu/campus/it/wireless-connections.php.
Tutoring
See Tutoring Program in the “Student Services and Campus Life” section.
11 Writing Center
Located in Humanities 232, the Scripps Writing Center operates under the auspices of the
director of the Writing Center, the director of the Writing Program, and the Dean of Faculty
Office. It serves as an all-around writing resource where students can receive responses and
evaluation without fear. By the end of a session here, the student should feel more confident
about writing and the ability to generate ideas, revise a draft, or edit a paper on one’s own.
We offer students from all academic disciplines the opportunity to work on their
writing by engaging in discussions with a knowledgeable peer tutor. We welcome students
at any stage of the writing process, from a first-year student working on a first draft to a
senior finishing the thesis. We advocate a collaborative relationship between the tutor and
the student. While tutors do not proofread papers or revise assignments, the tutors do
formulate appropriate questions to prompt students to interpret writing assignments, to
reconsider ideas, to restructure their essays, and to reformulate the presentation and
language of a paper. The center is not intended for remediation or editing services, but
tutors can provide instruction in usage, grammar, and punctuation.
The Writing Center also features special seminars on a range of writing subjects. We
offer grammar cafés, casual clinics on students’ most pervasive and troublesome
mechanical and syntactical mistakes. We also have a series of workshops in the fall for
fellowship applicants. Further workshops provide students with information on such topics
as approaching the first paper, understanding the research process and research
documentation, writing essay examinations, and composing résumés and application letters.
Student Services and Campus Life
Central Services and Programs
The Office of Admission and the Admission Ambassador Team, ext. 18149
The Office of Admission staff relies heavily on student volunteers in its Admission
Ambassador Team to assist in recruiting future Scripps students. Student volunteers host
prospective students overnight, help with on-campus events, monitor admission-related
social media, sit on student panels and advisory boards, and serve in a variety of other ways.
Tour guide and senior interviewer positions are reserved for non-first year students, but volunteering is a great way to
learn about the Admission Office and prepare for these positions. For more information about
volunteering in the Office of Admission, please email Jessica Johnston, assistant director of
admission, at jessica.johnston@scrippscollege.edu.
The Office of Alumnae & Parent Engagement and The Scripps Fund, Balch Hall,
ext. 71542
The mission of the Office of Alumnae & Parent Engagement and The Scripps Fund is
to create opportunities for alumnae and parents to connect with the College in ways that are
meaningful, add value to the Scripps community and lead to increased engagement and giving.
The department organizes several marquee events for the College, including Family Weekend,
Reunion Weekend, Camp Scripps, Parent Orientation, and national New Family Welcome
Receptions. The group also oversees regional events around the country including the More
Inspiration/Opportunity series focused on career networking, and Ellen Browning Scripps
birthday celebrations recognizing the College’s rich philanthropic history. To learn more, go to
www.scrippscollege.edu/engage.
12 Art Programs and Facilities
Various cultural events take place on the 5C campuses. The following list includes
event locations and descriptions of what may be available throughout the year.
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery is located at 11th Street and Columbia Avenue,
immediately north of Baxter Hall on the Scripps College campus. The gallery presents
both historical and contemporary art in five exhibitions each year, including the Senior
Exhibition, planned and produced by seniors and open for two weeks through
Commencement. During exhibitions, the gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday,
from 1 to 5 p.m. The gallery has a rotating schedule of shows and openings. During the
year, the gallery offers several paid internships. For more information, visit the Ruth
Chandler Williamson Gallery or visit its Facebook page.
Clark Humanities Museum-Study Center is in the Humanities Building at Scripps
and offers miscellaneous exhibits. It is also open as a study area Monday through
Friday, 8:00 a.m. to12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Graduate Art Building is located at 10th Street and Columbia Avenue and exhibits the
works of Claremont Graduate University students in the MFA program. Hours are
Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Art openings are held Tuesday evenings.
Hours are subject to change.
Millard Sheets Art Center at Scripps is a complex that includes the Williamson Gallery
and the Lang Art Studios. Courses taught at Sheets include: mixed media, digital art,
digital video, photography, drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, book arts and
contemporary art theory. Emphasis is on contemporary fine art practices, and courses
can range from traditional studio practice to the latest computer software. Millard Sheets
Art Center includes Gallery 112, an exhibition space for student work.
Film series/movies are shown in various locations throughout the week. When a class
or group brings special films to campus, they usually open them to the general public.
Small concerts and recitals occur regularly and feature both students and faculty in
concert halls, living rooms, coffeehouses, outdoors, and elsewhere. Recital halls include
Boone Recital Hall, Bridges Music Hall, Balch Auditorium, Humanities Auditorium,
and Pattison Hall.
Student performances are produced throughout the year by such groups as the FiveCollege Theater Program, Without a Box, Claremont Shades, and Men/Women’s Blue
Student Services
Pomona College Museum of Art, on the N.E. corner of Bonita and College Avenue,
presents changing exhibitions of contemporary and historic art in all media. The museum
also offers personal, intimate access to works of art through the Collection Study
Room and the Native American Study Center. Open during exhibitions, Tuesday
through Sunday, 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.; closed Mondays.
The Museum hosts Art after Hours most Thursday evenings, with open hours until
11:00 p.m. and featuring a range of programs. For more information on collections,
exhibitions, and programs, see their website at www.pomona.edu/museum, or call
x18283.
13 and White, as well as the music department’s student recitals. Contact the Student
Activities and Residential Life Office (SARLO) for information about other groups.
Fitness, Health and Wellness
The Sallie Tiernan Field House is located at the east corner of Platt and Mills streets. The
Tiernan Field House (TFH) strives to provide high quality services, equipment, and
programming in a safe and enjoyable environment. The student-centered staff promotes a
broad variety of fitness, health, and wellness educational activities to meet the needs of the
diverse population of the Scripps Community. We are committed to fostering a lifetime
appreciation of being fit and embracing a healthy lifestyle which significantly impacts
overall student success and well-being.
Completed in 2008, the field house is a state-of-the art 24,000 square feet facility with three
multipurpose studios, a cardiovascular workout space, weight room, functional fitness
workout spaces, stretching porch, classroom/meeting spaces and kitchen. The facility also
includes a 25-meter swimming pool, sand volleyball court, and a multi-use recreational
field, Alumnae Field. The Tiernan Field House offers space for workshops, fitness, health
education and drop-in users such as; yoga, martial arts, aerobic, cardio-kickboxing, Pilates,
and dance.
Scripps, Harvey Mudd, and Claremont McKenna students have access to the field house,
alumnae field, and pool with their valid 5C college ID. Please visit the Tiernan Field House
website for the current building hours.
In addition, the Tiernan Field House provides many programs and services for Scripps
students’ to address their needs from a holistic wellness perspective, such as; FitScripps
Programs, Health and Health and Wellness Programs, Certification Courses and Other
Resources.
The FitScripps Programs are non-credit group fitness classes, and fitness center
orientation sessions; more specifically these include; fitness for beginners, HIITFit, indoor
cycling, kickboxing, Bosu® Total Body, FitCore, circuit training, TRX® suspension
training, yoga, Pilates, FitWalk/Run and Zumba®. Classes are open and free to Scripps
students. Sign up is not required, but classes have limits on the numbers of participants and
are available on a first-come, first-served basis.
The Health and Wellness Programs are student lead programs developed and
facilitated by Peer Health Educators who are trained to national standards. They provide
workshops, seminars, and interactive events to address health issues on campus,
including nutrition, alcohol, body image, stress, sexual health, and physical activity. We
offer individual wellness consultations from a Certified Health Education Specialist.
We collaborate with student groups, staff and faculty on campus to provide accurate
and comprehensive health and wellness information to complement the fitness services
at Tiernan Field House.
Fostering a learning environment that is supported by national standards and curricula,
the Tiernan Field House provides Certification Courses through the American Red
Cross for Lifeguarding, CPR, AED and First Aid, peer health educator training
following BACCHUS curricula (National Association of Student Personnel
14 Administrators) and preparatory certification course through the American Council on
Exercise for personal training.
The field house offers many Other Resources for Scripps students including; personal
trainers, who provide individual consultations, assessments and fitness programs; a
Green Bike program which provides day rental bikes, a semester bike loan program and
workshops; and fitness and recreational equipment for check-out.
• Athletics Program (CMS Athletics), Ducey Gym, ext. 72904
Scripps, Harvey Mudd, and Claremont McKenna form the tri-college NCAA
Department III Athletics program known as Claremont-Mudd-Scripps (CMS) Athletics.
The women’s teams (the Athenas) and the men’s teams (the Stags) are headquartered at the
soon to open Roberts Pavilion on the CMC campus. All teams are members of the Southern
California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC).The highly successful Athenas
athletic program includes softball, water polo, basketball, volleyball, soccer, cross-country,
swimming and diving, track and field, tennis, and lacrosse. A schedule of the Athenas’
game times and dates is available at cmsathletics.org.
• Claremont McKenna College
The CMS Fitness Center (a joint facility for Scripps, HMC, and CMC) is open each
day and is available for student use as a temporary location while the Roberts Pavilion is
being constructed. Hours are Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.
The fitness center houses numerous treadmills, upright and reclining bicycles, stair
machines, and a circuit workout. To use Wells Fitness Center, students must complete an
orientation session. Upon completion of this session, a student’s ID card will be activated
to use the center (that has a card key lock). For more information, contact Betsy Hipple at
ext. 7-8613 or Keri Sanchez at ext. 7-9069.
Axelrood Pool is located next to Roberts Pavilion and is usually open weekdays
between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. for workouts with a lifeguard on duty. Pool hours are posted.
This pool is primarily used for team practices and swimming meets/water polo games.
The track is located behind CMC’s Roberts Pavilion.
Practice fields are available only on a prearranged basis. Contact Adam Pruett at 78331 for more information.
• Harvey Mudd College
The Ronald and Maxine Linde Activities Center is located east of North Hall, south of
Foothill Boulevard on the Harvey Mudd College campus. The center is 24,610 square feet
in size and contains a full-length basketball court with six retractable hoops; the building is
also suitable for volleyball, badminton, and other events. The center has an aerobics workout
area, a fitness center area with a full range of conditioning equipment, shower and locker
facilities primarily for faculty and staff, a lounge area equipped with televisions, two large
multipurpose rooms, as well as vending machines, parking facilities, and bike racks. The
center is open to the students of Harvey Mudd College and Scripps College. Hours are 7
a.m. to 1 a.m.
5C Consortium Athletic Facilities
• Pitzer College
Peter and Gloria Gold Student Center is located at the eastern edge of Pitzer College.
The fitness room in this facility includes free weights, cardiovascular equipment, and
weight machines. This facility boasts a pool, multipurpose room, snack bar, large-screen
15 television, sand volleyball, outdoor basketball, and large athletic field.
The Pitzer Pool is located at the Gold Student Center. Hours are posted at the pool.
• Pomona College
Pomona College Rains Center includes a weight room; racquetball, squash, badminton,
and volleyball courts; a dance and aerobics studio; fitness, training, sauna and physical
therapy rooms; student, faculty, and team locker rooms; offices and classrooms; and a library
and conference room. Students may use these facilities only when classes or team practices
are not in session. Scripps, CMC, HMC, and CGU students must pay $60 per semester, $100
for two semesters, or $135 for an annual membership (available only at the beginning of the
school year) for the use of Rains Center.
Rains Center
Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday, noon to 8 p.m.
Sunday, noon to 10 p.m.
Pomona’s Haldeman Pool is east of the football field on Sixth Street. Hours are posted at
the pool.
Other Fitness Resources
• Tennis Courts: CMC has six courts located north of Roberts Pavilion on the east side of
Mills Avenue. During the second semester, there are 12 courts available at the Biszantz
Family Tennis Center, located south of Sixth Street. These courts are available to students
only during those hours when classes or tennis team practice/matches are not being held.
Pomona College has four tennis courts at Sixth Street and Mills Avenue, and five courts on
the south end of campus that border First Street.
• Track: A track is located next to the Rains Center at Pomona. It is open at all times,
seven days a week. Each school’s respective track teams have first priority. Please use
outside lanes for jogging.
Career Planning & Resources (CP&R), Malott Commons, ext. 18180,
http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/careerplanning/
Located next to Motley Coffeehouse in Seal Court, Career Planning & Resources (CP&R)
empowers students in creating their own post-graduation success by offering expert career
counseling, industry resources, and direct contacts for career exploration and professional
development.
CP&R supports students throughout their four years at Scripps in any number of ways,
including:
• Unlimited individual career counseling
• Choosing a major
• Considering graduate school
• Applying for research opportunities and fellowships
• Searching for jobs and internships
• Preparing a résumé and cover letter
• Interviewing and salary negotiation
• Exploring alternative options for after graduation
16 •
Student employment and part-time jobs
One of the goals of CP&R is to build networks and develop relationships to help
students and graduates transition into and advance in their careers. Because CP&R
partners closely with Parent and Alumnae Engagement, students benefit from direct
connections with alumnae, parents, and friends of the College who are willing to
share job/internship leads, industry experience, and insights on graduate programs.
Scripps College participates in the seven-college recruiting program, giving
students access to on-campus recruitment activities and job fairs across The
Claremont Colleges. Students have direct access to thousands of job and internship
listings online through ClaremontConnect, the Nationwide Internship Consortium
(NIC), the Liberal Arts Career Network (LACN), and Vault. CP&R also publishes
a student-written blog “Beyond the Elms” and an annual Career Services Guide.
More than 85% of students hold at least one internship before graduation; more
than one-third will hold three or more. Through CP&R, students have access to
thousands of internship listings across the country, including several with members
of the Scripps community. CP&R supports students through the entire application
process from research and exploration to resumes and interviews. Annually, CP&R
coordinates grant funding for summer internships and travel stipends for unpaid
internships during fall and spring semester.
Popular CP&R programming includes alumnae career panels, coffee chats, recruiter
information sessions, Resumania!, Life after Scripps, and the Emerging
Professionals Program, a seminar series that teaches transferable skills for success
in post-graduation employment.
Learn more about CP&R resources online or schedule an appointment with a
counselor. Stop by during drop-in hours Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. For information about working on campus, contact the student employment
coordinator at studentemployment@scrippscollege.edu.
Clubs and Organizations (CLORGs)
Student organizations at Scripps and The Claremont Colleges include a variety of
academic, social, political, and other interest groups. Clubs and organizations differ
from year to year as the needs and interests of the student body change. Students
interested in starting an organization at Scripps are required to meet with Student
Activities and Residential Life Office (SARLO) staff (unless they attend the
CLORG registration session held in the spring of each year), fill out an online form,
and turn in appropriate paperwork to both SARLO and the Scripps Associated
Students (SAS).
CLORGs granted official recognition are given the following privileges:
• Eligible to receive funding from Scripps Associated Students through the
allocated funding process (if registration is completed by the end of the prior
academic year).
• Participation in special events such as CLORGs Tea and the Turf Dinner
(when Scripps hosts).
17 • Eligible to obtain a Scripps mailbox for the CLORG
• A link on the clubs and organizations page on the Scripps College website.
(update link) http://www.scrippscollege.edu/life/clorgs
• Participation in workshops and educational sessions for CLORG leaders.
In order to receive official recognition as a club or organization at Scripps College,
a group of students must meet the following requirements:
• have a purpose/mission statement
• have a minimum of seven members, two of whom must be officers who are
Scripps students
• have guidelines (CLORGs will be provided with a template to assist them in
developing their own governing guidelines)
• Schedule monthly meetings each semester
• turn in fiscal accountability statements at the end of each semester
• Membership open to all Scripps students
For specific information about starting a five-college organization, contact the
ASPC
Business Office at Pomona, 909-607-2268.
Scripps College currently recognizes the following list of clubs and organizations.
For specific information about a particular organization, contact the Scripps
Associated
Students clubs and organizations chair, visit the Scripps College website, or contact
SARLO.
• Student Publications and Media
The Forum - CMC’s student newspaper
[In]Visible Magazine - Scripps Student Magazine
KSPC 88.7 FM – The Claremont Colleges’ Radio Station
La Semeuse - Scripps College Yearbook
The Other Side - Pitzer’s student newspaper
The Scripps Voice – Scripps’ student newspaper
The Student Life - Pomona’s student newspaper
• Partial Listing of Scripps College Clubs and Organizations
3C InterVarsity Christian Fellowship
Asian American Sponsor Program
Activities Team
Adoptees in Solidarity
Asian American Student Union
Babes and Blankets
Café Con Leche
Claremont FC Women's Soccer Club
Code Literacy @ Scripps
Empowering Education
Environmental Club
Family: Scripps College Queer-Allied Student Union
I AM THAT GIRL
Innovate@Scripps
Jewish Dialogue Group
18 Lxs Nopalerxs
Ocean Initiative Club
Outdoor Women Leaders
Scripps Climate Justice
Scripps College Change Magazine Branch
Scripps College Law Society
Scripps College Mock Trial
Scripps Economics Society
Scripps Garden Club
Scripps Live Arts
Scripps Psi Chi
Scripps Quest Scholars
Scripps Running and Fitness
Scripps Student Art Collective
Scripps Women in Finance Accounting and Consulting
Spotlite
The Student Investment Fund
Wanawake Weusi
• Partial Listing of Five-College Clubs and Organizations
5-C Asian American Advisory Board (Ad-Board)
Chiapas Support Committee
Choice USA
Claremont Colleges Republicans
Claremont Support for International Change (Claremont SIC)
Claremont Students for Israel
The Claremont Colleges Ballroom Dance Company
The Claremont Colleges Psyko Taiko
The Claremont Ekklesia
The Claremont Shades (acapella singing group)
Democrats of the Claremont Colleges (DCC)
Disability Illness Difference Alliance (DIDA)
Feminist Remix
Get on the Bus
Hillel (Jewish student organization)
Hui Laule’a (Hawaii club)
International Club (I-Club)
Mariachi Serrano de Claremont
Muslim Students Association (MSA)
On the Loose (OTL)
Without a Box (improvisational theater group)
Women’s Blue and White (women’s acapella singing group)
The Uprising College Ministry
*For a complete list of clubs and organizations, please visit the Student Activities
and
Residential Life Office (SARLO) or Pomona College’s CollegiateLink.
Dean of Faculty Office, Balch Hall 122, ext. 72822
The Dean of Faculty Office’s primary responsibilities are to advise on appointments
and promotions of academic personnel, nominate and appoint members of faculty
committees, and supervise and coordinate academic programs.
19 Dean of Students Office, Balch Hall 112, ext. 18277
The Dean of Students Office, under the leadership of the Vice President for Student
Affairs and Dean of Students, oversees co-curricular life and all Student Affairsdepartments at Scripps College. The Student Affairs staff focuses on the student experience
outside of the classroom. The Dean of Students Office can be particularly helpful in the
areas of personal and academic assistance, personal/medical leaves of absence, referrals to
other campus services and other educational concerns. The following areas/departments are
part of Student Affairs at Scripps: Tiernan Field House (East Campus); Residential Life
and Housing (Balch Hall 112 and Routt/Frankel Annex); Student Activities, New Student
Orientation, New Student Program (Student Affairs Annex, Routt Hall Courtyard); SCORE
(Scripps Communities of Resources and Empowerment(Routt/Frankel Annex)); Academic
Resources and Services including - tutoring and accommodations for students with
disabilities (Balch Hall 112 and Kimberly Hall 99 ); LASPA Center (Seal Court); Case
Management Office (Kimberly Hall 98); The Student Store and The Motley Coffeehouse
(Seal Court); campus governance and other co-curricular programs and publications (Seal
Court).
Dining Services at Malott Commons, ext. 72977
Scripps offers dining service in the Malott Commons, including non-vegetarian,
vegetarian, and vegan options. Dining Services makes accommodations for special dietary
needs, special functions, and pack-outs for events such as camping trips. Pack-outs for
personal student groups need prior approval and may not be provided during special
weekends, such as Commencement Weekend. Students may also eat in any of the dining
rooms on the five Claremont College campuses.
All students residing in the residence halls are required to subscribe to a meal plan.
Scripps offers two meal plan choices: 16 meals with $160 Board Plus dollars per semester or
12 meals with $120 Board Plus dollars per semester. Students and their guests may use their
Board Plus dollars at the following retail locations: the Hub at CMC, the Coop at Pomona,
Jay’s Place at HMC, the Motley Coffeehouse at Scripps, and the Grove House at Pitzer.
Board Plus dollars are allotted at the beginning of each semester, but do not carry over from
semester to semester.
Off-Campus Student and Guest Meal Prices are available for any dining hall.
Board-plan students can use their Claremont Cash or Board Plus dollars to pay for their
guest’s meal or the guest can purchase a Claremont Cash Card (declining balance account)
from the Connection (Honnold Library, First Floor South) for their guest. A Claremont
Cash deposit can be made at the Connection or online at
https://cards.cuc.claremont.edu/.
With the Claremont Cash Card, each meal is assigned a dollar value (see below for exact
prices). This dollar value will be deducted from the account balance according to what
meal is consumed. At the end of the academic year, Claremont Cash is retained for the
following year, but any unused Board Plus dollar balance will be forfeited. There are NO
REFUNDS OR CARRYOVERS ON BOARD PLUS DOLLARS. The meal prices are:
Meal
Guests(Cash)
Claremont
Board Plus
$10.25
$10.25
$4.00
Breakfast
Cash
$13.25
$13.25
$5.00
Lunch/Brunch
Dinner
$16.25
$16.25
$6.00
20 +Meal Cards: Students receive their permanent identification cards at the beginning of
the first semester at Scripps. These ID cards also serve as a meal card. ID cards are required
to gain entry into all dining halls, including those on the other campuses. When a student
enters a dining room, the student’s card is run through a computer that keeps a record of
how many meals the student has eaten that week. Every Sunday morning the computer is
reprogrammed to start the count again. Students are not permitted to eat the same meal
twice.
If a student loses an ID card or it is stolen, the student must report the lost card in
accordance with the Key Policy in the “Standards of Conduct and Judicial Hearing System”
section of the Guide to Student Life. A replacement card may be obtained at the Claremont
Card Office inside Connection at Honnold Library, First Floor South, (ext. 72273), for $10.
(The $15 is a Campus Dining Services fee separate from the Scripps administrative $25
lost card key fee.)
Dining Hall Hours: Hours are posted in the dining halls and are subject to change.
Shoes and shirts are required in all of the dining halls.
Malott Commons, ext. 72977*
Weekdays
Breakfast 7:30 – 9:30 a.m.
Continental 9:30 – 10 a.m.
Lunch 11:15 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Dinner 4:45 – 7 p.m.
Snack (Tuesday) 9:30 – 11:30 p.m.
Weekends
Brunch 10:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Dinner 5 – 6:30 p.m.
*Hours and prices subject to change.
Disabilities Support Services, Office of the Dean of Students, Balch Hall 112, ext.
18277
Academic Resources and Services, a department of Student Affairs, coordinates
services and reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students needing
accommodations must meet with the assistant dean for Academic Resources and Services to
discuss their disability and documentation guidelines. The assistant dean and the student
will work together to create a plan for reasonable accommodations based on the health
provider’s recommendations and a student intake interview. For more information go to:
http://www.scrippscollege.edu/academics/students-with-disabilities.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAMS
Medical Team
As part of the Scripps Emergency Operations Plan, an Emergency Medical Team, consisting of
students, staff, and faculty is available to assist performing triage and treatment for minor
injuries when appropriate. First Aid experience is preferred but not a requirement. First
Aid/CPR/AED certification is provided by the College to active members. The team trains two
or three times per semester (1.5 hours each time). Participation in training and drills is required.
Students interested in volunteering with the Emergency Medical Team should contact Cheryl
Pump at 621-8636 or cpump@scrippscollege.edu.
EmPOWER Center
The EmPOWER Center is the Sexual Assault Prevention and Support Center for The
21 Claremont Colleges (TCC). Dually reporting to the Vice President for Student Affairs of
Scripps College and the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs of Claremont
McKenna College. Rima Shah, inaugural Director of the EmPOWER Center will ensure
the center is an effective resource in helping TCC prevent sexual violence, dating violence,
domestic violence, and stalking. In addition the center’s resources will enhance the care
and support of TCC students impacted by such violence. The Director will work closely
with students and work collaboratively with each of the seven colleges to ensure a wellintegrated program where education, prevention, student support and training are seamless.
Facility Reservations, Student Activities and Residential Life Office, (909) 607-4307
If you are an event planner, you have access to a variety of facilities at Scripps College.
Campus facilities, including classrooms, auditoriums, lawns, gardens, residence hall spaces,
and courtyards must be reserved through the Virtual Event Management System (VEMS).
Reservations can be made beginning the first day of classes each semester, and events
cannot be booked after the last day of classes each semester. Requests for facilities should
be made as far in advance of the event as possible.
To reserve a space and start planning your event, please visit the VEMS website at
http://emsweb. claremont.edu/Scripps/. Instructions are posted on this website; for detailed
information click on the “Links” tab. To check for available space or for facilities
information (including capacity), click on the “Browse” tab.
Students planning an event with alcohol and using a Scripps facility must also meet with
the Student Activities Coordinator in the Student Activities and Residential Life Office
(SARLO) for approval and to discuss the forms, policies, and procedures involved. In
addition, students may also reserve the Motley Coffeehouse on the Motley Coffeehouse
website at www.motleycoffeehouse.com.
To reserve tables in Seal Court, please use VEMS. All requests must be made at least
48 hours in advance (excluding Saturday and Sunday). If you do not see Seal Court
available for the date you would like, please email the Malott Commons Office at
schavez@scrippscollege.edu at least 48 hours in advance. Students interested in reserving
the Hampton Room must call the Malott Commons Office at (909) 607-8508 or email the
Malott Commons staff at malottcommons@scrippscollege.edu.
Once you enter your facility request via VEMS, you will receive an email confirmation
of approval from the reservation scheduler. Your facility request is not approved until you
receive this confirmation. Please be sure to give a thorough description of your
event/tabling and provide other details such as whether you will have music, as these items
also must be approved.
If your event is canceled, be sure to cancel through VEMS. Additionally, contact any
resource services you obtained for the event to cancel directly with each department.
At times, back-to-back events are common; users may not ask the preceding group to
vacate the facility prior to the time reserved. Facility users are also responsible for
unlocking and relocking all facilities. Arrangements to obtain keys may be made through
the Registrar’s Office or Malott Commons Office, depending on the facility being used.
Fax Machines
The Scripps College Mail Services Center has a fax machine available to students. The
cost of using the fax machine is $1 per page paid in cash at the time of service. The MSC is
not able to send international faxes. You may receive a fax up to three pages without
charge; more than three pages is $1 per page. The MSC is open Monday through Friday
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Alane Caldwell at ext. 73708 or
Jonathan Magley at ext. 78174.
22 The Honnold/Mudd Library Copy Center also offers fax services. The charge to send or
receive a domestic fax is $1.
Office of Financial Aid, Steele Hall 212, ext .18275
The Office of Financial Aid administers federal, state, and Scripps financial aid, and has
information regarding scholarships, work-study awards, and loans. If you have been
awarded need-based financial aid, you may access your individual financial aid package in
your Financial Aid Portal
at https://myfinancialaid.scrippscollege.edu/NetPartnerStudent/Logon.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2
fNetPartnerStudent%2fDefault.aspx
Each fall, both new and continuing students who have been awarded Federal Work-Study
funding as a part of their financial aid packages will have the opportunity to apply for
employment positions on the Scripps campus and at several off-campus sites in and around
the five colleges. Federal Work-Study positions can be found in ClaremontConnect, the
College's central resource for employment and internship opportunities for students. To
access listings, visit https://scripps-csm.symplicity/com/students/ . For additional support in
finding and applying to on-campus Federal Work-Study positions, students are encouraged
to visit Career Planning & Resources in Seal Court as early as possible in the academic
year. Any questions about work-study jobs on campus may be directed to
studentemployment@scrippscollege.edu.
Contact the Office of Financial Aid for information about any of the various aid programs
and for application materials necessary to be considered for student financial assistance at
Scripps College. For listings of outside of scholarship opportunities, be sure to check out
the Office of Financial Aid website at www.scrippscolege.edu/financial-aid/index.php.
Food Shops at The Claremont Colleges
• The Coop Fountain, Smith Campus Center, 170 East Sixth Street, ext. 73293, is a
student-run food service located at the Smith Campus Center at Pomona College, offering
such favorites as burgers, sandwiches, salads, snack items, and the thickest hand-packed
milkshakes in town. The Coop accepts cash, checks, Claremont Cash, and Board Plus.
• The Coop Store, Smith Campus Center, 170 East Sixth Street, ext. 72264, is a student-run
store, located in the Smith Campus Center at Pomona College, offering Pomona logo items
and Sagehen sportswear. The store offers a wide variety of food and snack items, school
supplies, and sundries. Other services of the Coop Store include Claremont Cash deposits
and low-cost photocopying. The Coop Store accepts cash, credit cards ($5 minimum),
checks, and Claremont Cash. However, students may use their Board Plus accounts to
purchase food items only.
The Coop Store and Fountain
Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight
Friday 9 a.m. to 1:30 am
Saturday noon to 1:30 p.m.
Sunday noon to midnight
• The Grove House, ext. 73654, is a turn-of-the-century farmhouse on the Pitzer campus. It
serves healthy, natural, and homemade foods and houses a student gallery and the Women’s
Center.
23 • The Hub, ext.74082, next to McKenna Auditorium on the Claremont McKenna campus,
serves snack food; has video games, pool tables, and a big-screen TV; and provides Internet
access and entertainment.
• Jay’s Place, ext.70418, serves pizza and sandwiches and is located in the basement of the
Platt Campus Center on the Harvey Mudd campus. Hours are Sunday through Thursday, 7:30
p.m. to 1 a.m., and Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m. to 2 a.m.
• Motley Coffeehouse, ext.73967, Not just your local campus coffee shop, the Motley
Coffeehouse has been serving up tasty drinks and treats since 1974. It is a non-profit, nonpartisan organization collectively run by students. The Motley provides quality coffee and
food using products that come from sustainable and socially responsible sources. A fun
space to study, hang out, and let loose, the Motley provides live music every Sunday and
Thursday, as well as many great events. Be sure to check out the website at
www.motleycoffeehouse.com.
• The Sagehen Café, Smith Campus Center 170 East Sixth Street, ext. 72264, is a fullservice, sit-down café offering homemade soups, fresh salads, sandwiches, and pastas.
Sagehen Café also has a full-service coffee bar brewing Peets coffee and espresso drinks.
Cash, Visa, MasterCard, Claremont Cash, and Board Plus are gladly accepted. Catering is also
available. To view Sagehen Café’s menu, go to sagehencafe.com. For phone orders or
reservations, call ext. 78637.
• Hagelbarger’s, ext. 73297, is located in McManus Hall at Claremont Graduate University
and offers a breakfast menu in addition to a short-order grill. Please call for hours of
operation.
•
Honnold Café, ext. 78792, located inside the Honnold Mudd Library’s south entrance,
Honnold Café provides students with a warm relaxing environment in which to enjoy
gourmet coffee, lattes, and espresso based beverages, as well as delicious sandwiches,
hot food, pastries, wraps, two daily soups, salads, and a huge assortment of cold
beverages. We are open for your morning, afternoon and late night study sessions,
seven days a week.
Grounds Department Services, Grounds Department Building, just west of Keck
Science Building, ext. 18381
The Grounds Department is responsible for all exterior maintenance on campus.
Everything that is not under a roof is covered under this guideline. We always appreciate
reports on any broken sprinklers and any safety hazards noted on campus. Email
Grounds@scrippscollege.edu.
For your privacy, the Grounds staff is not permitted to work in interior courtyards prior
to 9 a.m. during the academic year, although emergencies may warrant early entrances.
Staff hours are Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. during the academic year.
The Grounds Department offers the following support for activities:
1. Do pre-event site cleaning and detailing
2. Turn off irrigation prior to activities
3. Mark approved reserved parking spaces
24 4. Place decorative plants in containers for stage or podium college sponsored events
5. Place, retrieve, and empty trash receptacles
6. Provide aluminum trashcans and hose for BBQs
7. Provide information on plant identification
8. Assist with placement of temporary signage for events
9. Supply wood for fireplaces
10. Remove bicycles that are illegally parked per Guide to Student Life bicycle parking
policy, as approved by DOS. Return of bikes requires proper identification of bike as well as
location it was last parked. The Grounds Department is not responsible for policy.
Individuals and organizations may request Grounds Department support for an event by
completing and submitting a Scripps College Event Registration Form & Contract available
at SARLO. Students are required to fill out necessary paperwork one week prior to any
event and two weeks prior to any event where alcohol will be served (a drawing of the
location of the perimeter fence, entry areas, and number and location of Campus Safety
personnel is required).
Art projects proposed for the square block contiguous to the Millard Sheets Art Center
require approval by the Art, Grounds, and Maintenance departments. Art projects on any
other area of the campus require the approval of the Treasurer’s Office and the Building and
Grounds Committee. An art installation policy may be requested from the Art Department.
Housing
See Student Activities and Residential Life Office in the “Scripps College
Services and Campus Life” section.
Insurance - Medical
All students at The Claremont Colleges are required to carry medical insurance. If a
student does not have insurance, the student may purchase insurance through The Claremont
Colleges Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP). For more information, contact the Dean of
Students Office, or check the Student Health Services website at
www.cuc.claremont.edu/shs. Students who participate in intercollegiate or club sports are
also required to carry medical insurance. http://www.renstudent.com/Students
International Students
International students must maintain full-time enrollment status to maintain their F-1
visa status. They also must report all changes in address (including residence hall room
changes) to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Current health insurance (either
through the College plan or independently) is also required. The Scripps designated
school official for communication with the DHS is the registrar. The registrar signs student
I-20 forms for them to leave and re-enter the United States, maintains communication such
as address changes with DHS through the SEVIS system, assists students in applying for
both curricular and post-completion practical training, maintains copies of health insurance
verification, and handles other required services for international students.
In addition, an intercollegiate international student center, International Place, provides
programs and services to international students, including a home-stay prior to fall classes,
information, referrals, and programs such as a weekly lunch discussion on global issues.
Internet Access
See Information Technology in the “Academic Information” section.
Internships
25 See Career Planning & Resources in the “Scripps College Services and Campus Life”
section.
LASPA Center
Research demonstrates that women leaders are under-represented in all fields of
business and government. Mobilizing the resource of a gifted and dedicated faculty and
staff, and leveraging the resource of a talented and motivated student body, LASPA Center
for Leadership (LASPA Center) is prepared to address the pressing need for women to
attain leadership positions within both the public and private sectors.
The LASPA Center for Leadership prepares Scripps students to exercise their skills,
knowledge and talents in order that they may proactively assist in the development and
implementation of solutions to the most vexing problems of the 21st Century. The
leadership of the LASPA Center includes Lisa Watson the inaugural Director and Lindsey
Martinovich, Assistant Director.
Laundry Machines
Claremont Cash-operated washers and dryers are located in each residence hall.
Current costs are $1 to wash and 50 cents to dry. Claremont Cash can be added to your student
ID card at the Card Center located in Honnold Library, First Floor South, (ext. 18327) or
online at Claremont Cash.
Mail Services Center, Seal Court, ext . 73708/78174
The MSC is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The MSC receives
intercampus mail, U.S. mail, FedEx, UPS, and any other messenger service. Students may
send inter-campus mail to students, faculty, and staff of The Claremont Colleges and
stamped U.S. and international mail through the MSC. Inter-campus mail is delivered free
of postage and should be addressed with the following information: “Campus Mail” written
in the upper-right-hand corner of the envelope and the recipient’s name, box number or
department, and the college. Postage is not available in MSC, and students must use the U.S.
Post Office to send packages over 13 oz.
CUC Connections at the Honnold Library has some student shipping options available.
Packages with prepaid labels that are being returned (textbooks, retail items, etc.) cannot be
sent through the MSC, but can be dropped off at CUC Connections in the Honnold Library.
All students, faculty, and staff have 24-hour access to the MSC during the school year.
After hours, students, faculty, and staff access the MSC with their ID card. All enrolled
students, including off-campus students, have personal mailboxes in the MSC located in
Seal Court. U.S. and campus mail is delivered daily, Monday through Friday, to individual
student mailboxes. Student paychecks are also distributed into individual student mailboxes.
If a student does not receive a check, the student should check with the immediate
supervisor and not with the MSC staff. If a student wishes to have a paycheck sent home,
the student may leave a self-addressed, stamped envelope with the MSC staff.
Students are issued a mailbox and given the combination. It is the student’s
responsibility to open the mailbox using the combination, as the MSC staff will not open it
for you. If you need assistance, instructions are posted on the wall above the mailboxes, or
you can speak to an MSC clerk.
When packages arrive, the MSC notifies students by email or text if they sign up for
that service. Students must present photo identification in order to retrieve a package.
Packages can be picked up during business hours and should be retrieved within 24 hours of
notification, if possible, due to limited storage space. Scripps College is not responsible for
26 forwarding or returning packages to students who have left the College for off-campus
study, for vacation, or permanently. When perishables are delivered, students are notified
by email or text to retrieve the delivery.
Students must notify the Registrar’s Office immediately if any on- or off-campus
address changes occur. During summer break, ONLY first-class mail is forwarded to a
student’s home address; this does not include magazines. Magazines and newspapers are
too bulky and cannot be held in the MSC. You should make arrangements with the
company to have subscriptions forwarded to your home. During winter and spring break,
only first-class mail is held until the student’s return.
Fax Machines
The Scripps College Mail Services Center has a fax machine available to
students. The cost of using the fax machine is $1 per page paid in cash at the time
of service. The MSC is not able to send international faxes. You may receive a fax
up to three pages without charge; more than three pages is $1 per page. The MSC is
open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please
contact Alane Caldwell at ext. 73708 or Jonathan Magley at ext. 78174.
Maintenance and Housekeeping, Service Building, ext. 72541,
Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. after business hours, ext. 72000
(Department of Campus Safety)
The Maintenance and Housekeeping staffs provide cleaning and repair services to keep
the College beautiful, clean, and safe. For a non-emergency situation, work order requests
may be submitted by email to a resident adviser (RA). For a daytime emergency, call
Campus Maintenance as soon as possible. For after-hours emergencies, contact the RA on
duty or the Department of Campus Safety, ext. 72000.
Malott Commons
The Malott Commons provides a single location for food preparation and dining, and
unifies student activities and services as it houses the Motley Coffeehouse, Career Planning
& Resources, Mail Services Center, Public Events and Community Programs, Scripps Store, and
Student Union. Additionally, the Hampton Room provides an expanded campus “living room
and dining room” for distinctive programs and events.
Off-Campus Study (aka Study Abroad and Global Education), Balch 136, ext. 18306
Study Abroad and Global Education Students interested in study abroad
opportunities, semester-long internships in Washington, D.C., Silicon Valley or
overseas, or considering the exchange with Spelman College in Atlanta, GA will
find information and assistance in the Study Abroad and Global Education (SAGE)
office (previously known as Off-Campus Study).
Sophomores, as well as first-year students who enjoy planning ahead, are advised
to attend one of the SAGE information sessions repeated weekly in the first two
months of each semester. These sessions provides an overview of the types of
programs available for students in any major, as well as details on planning,
applying, and preparing for one of the more than 100 Scripps approved semester
study away programs around the world. A global study program provides students
with the opportunity to explore their major or other academic interest from different
perspectives. Students wishing to perfect a second or third language can benefit
through course work, as well as daily interactions with native speakers. As a
27 member of a host community overseas, students learn firsthand about another
culture and challenge their intellectual and personal comfort zones. Some programs
offer unique opportunities for students to conduct independent research as
preparation for a senior thesis or participate in an internship to investigate a
possible career path.
Apply in fall of sophomore year to participate in fall of junior year, or in the spring
of sophomore year to participate the following spring. To learn more, drop by the
office in Balch 136 (behind the auditorium), or visit the website at
inside.scrippscollege.edu/sage/.
Orientation for New Students, ext. 74307
The New Student Orientation program helps ensure incoming students a smooth
transition to academic and student life at Scripps College. Under the direction of the
Orientation Advisory Committee (jointly chaired by the dean of faculty and the dean of
students), the orientation staff works during the spring semester and summer months to plan
orientation. New student coordinators are selected each spring semester, they reside on
campus during the summer months in preparation for the fall orientation. They also work
part time for the remainder of the year planning events and overseeing the program. Spring
Orientation is planned at the end of the fall semester and over winter break. For more
information and a listing of upcoming dates and events, please visit
www.scrippscollege.edu/students/orientation.
New Student Program, ext. 74307
The New Student Program is a yearlong, paid/volunteer program that is sponsored by
the Division of Student Affairs. The purpose of the program is to help all new students in
their adjustment to Scripps and in their transition to college life. Every new student is
assigned a peer mentor who is trained to be a resource, mentor, and friend. Peer mentors are
continuing students who are selected for their maturity, experience, and enthusiasm. Peer
mentors are hired each spring semester by Student Affairs and attend an intensive training
program prior to New Student Orientation. Each peer mentor serves on a team that is led
by a peer mentor team leader. In order to provide additional support for students, peer
mentors collaborate with other peer leaders such as the Office of Black Student Affairs,
Ujima Sponsors, the Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Sponsors, and the Asian American
Sponsor Program. Other resources include Queer, Questioning and Mentor Program,
Jewish Peer/Mentors, International Students Mentors, First Generation Program Mentors,
Core Mentors, and the Disability Illness Difference Alliance Mentors. For further
information and a listing of upcoming dates and activities, please visit
http://www.scrippscollege.edu/students/sarlo/new-student-program.php.
Office of the President, Balch Hall 131, ext. 18148
The president of the College is directly responsible for advancing the mission and goals
of the College, including the direction and coordination of all aspects of planning for the
College, formation and implementation of College-wide policies, encouragement of
communication among all constituencies of the College, and the strategic plan.
Public Events and Community Programs, Seal Court, ext. 78508; Baxter Hall 107, ext.
71870
The Office of Public Events and Community Programs oversees programming for
campus events, lectures, and gatherings both educational and social. The events staff
28 provides planning and logistical support for a wide range of community activities, and
publishes the Scripps College Events Digest email bulletin with information about
upcoming activities at Scripps and the 5Cs. Reservations for most non-residential campus
spaces are handled by this office, and event planners may apply for financial cosponsorships for qualifying events. The events staff assists the President’s Office with
coordinating Fall Convocation and Commencement activities, and provides technical and
logistical support for all events held in the Scripps College Performing Arts Center.
The office also administers a summer rental program through which classrooms,
residence halls, the Performing Arts Center, lawns, courtyards, and gardens are rented to
private clients for weddings, receptions, parties, performances, meetings, and conferences.
Additional information about event planning and management services, such as
reservations, co-sponsorship, rentals, and the Scripps College Events Digest, is available on
the Scripps College website.
Registrar’s Office, Balch Hall 121, ext. 18273
The Registrar’s Office provides services related to transcripts, enrollment verifications,
major declarations, transfer credit, change of adviser forms, course scheduling, and
registration. It serves as a clearinghouse of information for academic politics and
procedures. The Registrar’s Office maintains timely and accurate academic records and
adheres to federal regulations regarding disclosure of those records. The Registrar serves as
the Certifying Official for students receiving veteran’s benefits, and as the Primary
Designated School Official for international students. Students may make appointments to
discuss academic planning, or to clarify academic policy questions. For more information,
see the Scripps Catalog or visit http://inside.scrippscolleg.edu/registrar/.
Residential Life
Scripps College is committed to the principle that living and learning are not only
compatible—they are inseparable. As an academic residential community, the College
desires that students who live in the halls develop academically, socially, and culturally. This
developmental process takes place by students initiating the exchange of ideas, as well as
working together to maintain the delicate balance of community living and personal needs.
The College believes it is important that students learn to deal with situations by relating to
others maturely and responsibly. The College provides opportunities for students to develop a
sense of community and to participate in the enforcement of rules and guidelines that are
appropriate and beneficial for all residents.
Under the System of Responsibility, students and the administration agree to the following
principles:
1. Each student has an obligation, as a member of the Scripps residential community, to
maintain a cooperative and harmonious environment.
2. Each student has the right and responsibility to determine the student’s own general
pattern of living within the guidelines set by the College and with respect for the rights of
others.
Residential Life Staff: As a residential college, Scripps takes great care in organizing,
maintaining, and supervising residence hall life to ensure optimum enjoyment and safety for
the students and community of the College. The residential life staff consists of an associate
dean, area coordinators, and resident advisers. All of the hall directors and resident advisers
live on campus.
The Associate Dean of Campus Life is directly responsible for all aspects of housing
and residential life. Specific responsibilities include supervising, training, and selecting the
residential life staff; assigning rooms; facilitating community development; and problem
29 solving on daily issues in cooperation with various campus departments, and assumes oncall emergency duties as part of the College’s On-Call team.
The Assistant Director of Residential Life assist the Associate dean with the daily
operations of Residential Life. Specific responsibilities include: overseeing the
implementation and use of the residential life housing software including assigning rooms,
works directly with students on housing needs including room changes, assist with the
development of the new Living Learning Communities (LLCs), works with various
departments addressing daily issues involving the maintenance and upkeep of the
residential halls, and assumes on-call emergency duties as part of the College’s On-Call
team.
Area Coordinators directly supervise the resident advisers and assume on-call,
emergency duties. They hold office hours for students who would like to discuss personal
and residential concerns. They assist the Associate Dean with the development and
implementation of the residential life programs; as well as, residential life operations.
Resident Advisors (RAs) provide on-site management for the residence halls, assist
with administrative duties, and provide peer support to students. The RAs are trained in
emergency response, mediation, listening skills, and first aid. They coordinate with the
hall councils and actively promote community building through programming and
relationship development. The RAs provide resources and referrals for students with
personal, interpersonal, and academic problems.
Language assistants (German, French, Spanish, and Italian) oversee programming
aimed at the development of specific language corridors in the residence halls. The
language assistants also help the foreign language departments with teaching and
conversation classes.
2015-2016 Residential Life Staff
Clark RA
Clark RA
Toll RA
Toll RA
Browning RA
Browning RA
Christina Fox (Fall)
Mia Shackelford (Spring)
Chandra Dickey
Vivian Zhang
Chelci Houston-Burroughs
Nia Gillenwater
Ariana Turner
GSC 105
Dorsey RA
Dorsey RA
Frankel RA
Frankel RA
Rout/Sr. Routt Apt RA
Rout/Sr. Routt Apt RA
Off-Campus RA
Off-Campus RA
Jungels-Winkler RA
Jungels-Winkler RA
Kimberly RA
Wilbur RA
Anna Cechony
Nike Roman
Melissa Krassenstein
Emily Long
Lina Mihret
Allie Cruz
Kathryn Read-Fisher
Meli Montez
Tatissa Zunguze
Rachel Berner-Hayes
Xitlally Sanchez
Giselle Garcia
DOR 108
DOR 226
FRA105A
FRA305A
MRR105A
MRR305A
HMC
BPA
GJW122A
GJW222A
KIM 102
WIL 119
Professional Staff
Name
Office
GSC 219
TOL 115
TOL 231
BRN 109
BRN 214
Phone Number
30 Area Coordinator
Area Coordinator
Assistant Director
Associate Dean
Kim Hamon
Erica Little
Jill Langan
Samuel C. Haynes
MRR 91
MRR 90
MRR 92
Balch 112
909-607-8179
909-607-3354
909-607-3354
909-621-8277
For further information on staff and policies please visit Scripps Residential Life.
31 Scripps Communities of Resources and Empowerment (SCORE), Student Affairs Annex,
ext. 78869
The mission of Scripps Communities of Resources and Empowerment (SCORE) is to
provide organizational support and resources to empower student organizations so that they
may further promote social and political awareness, specifically with respect to issues of
class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sexual orientation. SCORE’s vision is to realize
fully developed and enriched communities that embrace interaction across difference and
understanding of our diverse, unique, and shared experiences.
Clubs and Organizations Affiliated with SCORE
Asian American Sponsor Program (AASP)
The Asian American Sponsor Program (AASP) is a student-run organization that provides
resources- in the form of programs, events and individual support- to Asian American firstyears and trains upper-term students to develop mentorship and facilitation skills. The
mission of AASP is to create a supportive network of students at Scripps and in the 5Cs
and to promote sustained dialogue and action on Asian American issues (intersected with
dynamics of gender, class, sexuality, ethnicity, ability, etc.) that affect our students.
Asian American Student Union (AASU)
The Asian American Student Union (AASU) is an organization for self-identified Asian
American (encompassing East, Southeast, South Asian, Middle Eastern and Mixed Race
populations), Pacific Islander, and Alaskan Native students at Scripps College. AASU
seeks to strengthen the Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) communities on campus
and at the other Claremont Colleges by providing a safe space for our members to explore
issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality. Our internal programming
encourages our members to develop closer relationships with each other and offer the
unique opportunity to learn from their peers. The office works in coalition with Asian
American organizations on the other campuses on social and political programs to build a
wider, more inclusive Asian American community. It also works in partnership with the
Intercollegiate Department of Asian American Studies to better fit the Asian American
Studies curriculum to student needs. We hope to love, encourage, support, and politicize
our membership. In looking forward, we also hope to develop closer and more productive
relationships with other students of color on Scripps' campus. We see this emphasis on
collaboration as a manifestation of our collective political commitment to cross-race, crossethnic struggles.
Café con Leche
We seek to provide a forum for the discussion of social, political and economic issues that
affect women, particularly those of Latina descent. We intend to raise awareness of
diversity and its implications in our immediate community and surrounding areas. The club
is dedicated to social justice by developing a critical lens through which we can analyze
ourselves and the world. We welcome all members of the Scripps community, regardless of
racial and cultural heritage to join us in our pursuits.
Family: Queer-Allied Student Union
Family strives to facilitate a safe space for Scripps students of all gender identities and
sexual orientations to come together and discuss, celebrate, support, and share issues and
experiences of intersectionality and identity. Students of all backgrounds and experiences
are highly encouraged and welcome to join Family spaces.
32 Wanawake Weusi
The membership of Wanawake Weusi consists of students of Scripps College that selfidentify as being of African American descent. Wanawake Weusi functions as a collective
to support student of African descent at Scripps College in educational, cultural, personal,
and spiritual endeavors. Wanawake Weusi believes that all students are equal in worth, yet
unique in what they bring to the world. As such, we shall strive to champion the rights of
disenfranchised students regardless of race, creed, or color. We shall strive to foster
empowerment of students of African descent by encouraging our members to be active,
engaged members of the Scripps College, 5C, and greater local, national, and international
communities while maintaining academic excellence.
The Student Union, Malott Commons
The Student Union, located above the Malott Dining Commons, is the home of Scripps
College’s student government, Scripps Associated Students (SAS). Students often use the
space to relax and to interact with their peers regarding various student-centered topics and
concerns. The Student Union offers a variety of resources, from art supplies to computers,
which are available for all Scripps students and CLORGS. The Student Union consists of
comfortable lounge areas, three conference rooms, and an office space for SAS. All Scripps
students may gain entry into the Student Union by means of their ID cards. The space is not
open to the faculty and staff or Scripps College, except by invitation. Scripps students
enjoy the Student Union and view it as one of the major student hubs. Scripps students may
reserve spaces through the Student Union Chair at studentunionchair@gmail.com.
Scripps Associated Students (SAS)
SAS operates a number of services for the student body and meets every Sunday in the
Student Union to discuss campus concerns, plan for events, and allocate funding to Scripps
CLORGs. In addition to other campus-wide events, the BeHeard Forums, which are
student-led community discussions on select topics, are held in the Student Union.
Scripps Store, Malott Commons, ext. 78733
Scripps Store is a non-profit student-run business which provides collegiate merchandise to
the Scripps College community, including students, parents, faculty, staff, trustees, and
alumnae. The goal is to enhance the community’s sense of school pride and unity through
the sale of merchandise. Merchandise selection occurs through student input and customer
feedback, in order to meet the needs of the entire community. Similar to the Motley
Coffeehouse, the student managers and employees have the opportunity to experience the
challenges and successes of running a small business. The store offers a wide range of
merchandise, from T-shirts and sweatshirts to other gift items. Visit the store online at
http://store.scrippscollege.edu.
Student Activities and Residential Life Office (SARLO), Frankel Routt Annex,
ext. 74307
The Student Activities and Residential Life Office (SARLO) is located in the
Frankel Routt Annex adjacent to SCORE, the Scripps Communities of Resources
and Empowerment. The SARLO staff collaborate with the seven colleges, Scripps
Associated Students, various student clubs and organizations, and other Scripps
offices to plan interesting and enjoyable campus events. SARLO’s mission is to
support the educational mission of the College by developing and
implementing various co-curricular programs.
33 SARLO offers a wide range of services that include event-planning assistance,
event registration, vehicle registration/reservation, club and organization
development, and leadership development. SARLO also provides:
• Games and DVDs: SARLO houses more than 400 movie titles and many games
available for borrowing including board games, Xbox and Wii.
• Discounted movie tickets: SARLO offers discounted tickets to movie cinemas,
including Edwards/Regal Cinema and Laemmle Theaters.
• Planning and registration for Scripps College events.
• Event sign-ups: Tickets for on and off campus SARLO, New Student Program
(NSP), A-Team, and other student programs are available through SARLO.
• Clubs and organizations registration forms: Meet with a SARLO staff member to
discuss starting a new club/organization.
• SARLO also offers a karaoke machine and CDs, a popcorn machine, supplies,
and digital cameras available for use at student events. The office also provides
personal safety devices for purchase.
Student Billing, Balch Hall 118, ext. 18259
The Student Billing Office works with students and families to ensure that billing is
properly administered and student bills are paid in a timely manner.
Telephone Information See also Telephone Customer Service Center in the Central
Services and Programs section.
Students who wish to activate the phone jack in their residence hall rooms may do so
by contacting the Dean of Students Office (see contact information below) and making
that request. All lines are equipped with direct dial and voicemail. There is no charge for
voicemail or call waiting. Students must provide their own phone equipment. For long
distance calling, students will need to have their own calling card. Please contact the Dean
of Students Office (ext. 18277) for more information about these services. For general
campus telephone information, visit the Claremont University Consortium telephone page
at www.cuc.claremont.edu/phone.
Dialing instructions for calls: Dial the last five digits, aka the extension, of the phone
number (example: if the number is 607-1234, the extension is 71234). To make a local offcampus call, dial “9” and then the desired number. To make a long distance call, dial “9”
and the 1-800 number on the calling card.
Treasurer’s Office, Balch Hall 107, ext. 18636
The administrative responsibilities of this office include: accounting, budgeting, student
billing, financial planning, investing, and managing the College’s buildings and grounds.
34 Tutoring Program, Academic Resources and Services, Dean of Students Office, Balch
112, ext. 18277
Tutoring Program and Math Spot
Academic Resources and Services offers a peer-based tutoring program that provides
one-on-one assistance to Scripps students. The program offers a network of qualified tutors
in a wide range of subjects at no extra cost to students. Additionally, students interested in
serving as tutors are encouraged to apply online. More information about the Scripps
Tutoring Program and all related forms can be found online at:
http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/studentaffairs/tutoring.
The Scripps Tutoring Program also offers Math Spot, a drop-in tutoring service for
students enrolled in Scripps math courses. Math Spot is available every Sunday, Tuesday,
and Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. in the CP&R Library (Seal Court). Hours and location are
subject to change.
Vending Machines
Vending machines offering a variety of snacks and beverages are available in the
residence halls and on the second floor of Steele Hall. Should a machine fail to work,
refunds are available from the Maintenance Department.
Work-Study and Student Employment
The Financial Aid Office provides all information related to work-study and student
employment. See Office of Financial Aid in the “Scripps College Services and Campus
Life” section.
CLAREMONT UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM
Central Services and Programs
The Claremont University Consortium provides central services to all of The Claremont
Colleges.
Services include: Honnold Library, Huntley Bookstore, Chicano/Latino Student Affairs,
Office of Black Student Affairs, Campus Safety, Office of the Chaplains, Student Health
Services, Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services, Health Education Outreach, and
ID Services.
The Department of Campus Safety, 150 East Eighth Street, ext. 72000 or 18170
The Department of Campus Safety is on duty 24 hours a day, year round, to help
provide safety and security for students, faculty, and staff. Campus Safety staff are
specifically trained and responsible for a full range of public safety services, including:
crime reports; apprehension and arrest of suspects; enforcement of all federal, state, and
local laws, as well as College policies and regulations; responding to calls about suspicious
persons and activity; medical emergencies and fire emergencies; traffic accidents, parking,
and traffic enforcement; safety hazards; escort services; lost and found; and a host of related
security services.
Campus Safety staff are actively involved in providing the community with
comprehensive programs promoting the prevention and reduction of crime. However, it must
be recognized that, ultimately, each individual is responsible for her/his own safety and
security.
35 Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Center (CLSA), 757 College Way, ext. 18044
The Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Center is located on the second floor of the
Tranquada Student Services Center. CLSA provides academic, leadership, cultural, and
personal support services. These include the New Student Retreat, Open House, Sponsor
Program, the César Chávez Commemoration, Latino Heritage celebration, Dia de la Familia
“Family Day”, Chicano Latino Graduation, Chispas online newsletter, monthly lunches,
academic advising, and personal and career development. CLSA is committed to the
achievement and success of Latino students at The Claremont Colleges. CLSA offers
programs throughout the year that give students the opportunity to enrich their cultural
identity, navigate the educational pipeline, and develop leadership experience. CLSA
encourages and supports social justice issues and responsibility. . CLSA offers services and
activities that celebrate the history, heritage, and culture of Chicanos and Latinos. The
professional staff of CLSA includes: María Aguiar Torres, Dean of Students; Tony Jimenez,
Assistant Dean of Students, and Ernestine Mendoza, administrative assistant.
Club Sports Office, Ducey Gym, CMC, ext. 74653
The Claremont Colleges have established two Club Sports Offices to assist club sports
teams in scheduling fields and facilities for practice and competition. To be eligible to use a
Claremont College field or facility or receive funding assistance from Scripps Associated
Students, a club sport must register with a Club Sports Office. The Claremont Colleges
Club Sports program administrators are available to direct and assist in the registration
process; maintain copies of all required records, forms, and waivers; and coordinate the
scheduling and use of fields and facilities. Individual club sports will continue to be
responsible for their own funding, membership, coaches/advisers, equipment, and
transportation.
For more information, contact the Recreational Sports Office at ext. 74653 or email
recreation@cms.claremont.edu
Copy Machines
Copy machines are located in each of the libraries at the five colleges. Claremont Cash
may now be used in any of the copy machines located in the libraries.
Health Education Outreach (HEO), 757 College Way, ext. 73602
Health Education Outreach (HEO) is dedicated to empowering students to make
intentional healthy lifestyle choices. We strive to create a supportive environment that
nourishes all dimensions of personal health and well-being for students of the Claremont
Colleges. At HEO, we provide relevant and appropriate health and wellness support and
resources, to help students play an active role in achieving, protecting, and sustaining their
health and wellness.
Come see our office to find complete free resources such as: HIV Testing, Pregnancy
Testing, Relaxation Room including full body massage chair, condoms and safer sex items,
and a lending library.
Professional staff includes a full time health educator to help navigate any health and
wellness needs, a part-time Registered Dietitian, and trained Peer Health Educators.
Huntley Bookstore, Eighth and Dartmouth, ext. 71502,
Computer Services, ext. 71625
Huntley Bookstore is the source for all textbooks for class use. Huntley Bookstore will
buy back books every day. In addition, the bookstore provides a broad selection of school,
office, and art supplies, as well as gifts, greeting cards, snack foods, and sundry items.
36 Other services include special-order service for items not in stock.
The Computer Department at Huntley Bookstore offers academic pricing on computer
products, including Apple and others. In addition, Huntley Bookstore is an authorized
computer repair service center for Apple.
Huntley Bookstore and Computer Services*
Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
* Look for extended hours during peak periods.
Textbooks and emblematic items may be purchased online at www.claremont.bkstr.com.
International Place (I-Place), ext. 74571
International Place is a multicultural and international student center serving The
Claremont Colleges. Students, faculty, staff, and members of the community work together
to increase international understanding and friendship through a variety of programs and
activities. International Place is located on the Claremont McKenna College campus and is
open 9:00 am. – 5:00 p.m. Students are welcome to drop by to relax over coffee or tea in
our lounge or to make appointments.
Programs for all students include a celebration of International Education Week in the
fall, a spring International Festival, study breaks, and other social and educational events
and trips to sites throughout California. Services for international students include
temporary home stays for new students, orientation programs, ongoing assistance, referrals
to community and college resources, career and immigration workshops, international
student advising, and academic support.
Visit I-Place at 390 E. Ninth Street or at iplace.claremont.edu. To contact I-Place
please call (909) 607-4571.
Lost and Found
Inquiries about lost articles and/or articles to be turned in should be directed to the
Department of Campus Safety at ext. 72000.
McAlister Center
See Office of the Chaplains, below.
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services (MCAPS), Student Services Center,
757 College Way, ext. 18202
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services has a staff of 7Llicensed
psychologists, 1 Marriage Family Therapist, 2 Post-Doctoral Therapists and 2
Psychological Interns who provide individual, couples and group therapy and preventive
educational services to help students develop emotionally and cope with the stresses of
college and life. Two psychiatric consultants are also available. Short-term individual,
couple, and group therapy is offered and provided confidentially. Workshops and groups
are offered on topics such as stress management, self-esteem, grief and bereavement,
eating disorders, learning disabilities, and intimate relationships. Students may be referred
to mental health professionals in the local community for longer term therapy or for
services not provided by MCAPS professionals. MCAPS is open Monday through Friday
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended evening hours on Tuesday. Further information is
available through their Claremont University Consortium page at
www.cuc.claremont.edu/monsour. .
37 Office of Black Student Affairs (OBSA), 139 East Seventh Street, ext. 73669,
fax ext. 18969
The Black Student Affairs office supports and enhances the entire wellbeing of
undergraduate and graduate students of African descent earning degrees at The Claremont
Colleges. We collaborate with faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni to ensure a
comprehensive consideration and creation of services that complement your stellar
education with culturally significant scholarship, programming, and events. Since BSA
honors our communities’ collective and individual diversity, we explore a breadth of black
life and culture with a wide range of opportunities. In addition to providing academic
services and career advising, we offer individual and small group consulting and
mentorship that advances your academic, professional, and personal
excellence. Professional development and leadership training also stand as a centerpiece of
Black Student Affair’s mission. Along with providing assistance and opportunities while
earning your degrees, we aim to support the realization of your highest aspirations.
Office of the Chaplains, McAlister Center, ext. 18685
The Interfaith Office of the Chaplains guides and nurtures students in the explorations,
observances, and questions of religious and spiritual life. The chaplains assist students in
making contact with members of their own community of belief, coordinate and oversee a
wide variety of worship services, activities, programs, interfaith events and pastoral
counseling.
Among the faiths participating at McAlister are the Buddhist, Catholic, Christian Science,
Hindu, Jewish, Latter-Day Saints, Muslim, PAGAN, Protestant, Unitarian, Zen, and other
communities. Social justice and service learning programs are organized by the chaplains’
community service and activities coordinator.
The McAlister Center for Religious Activities, located adjacent to Honnold/Mudd Library,
includes a chapel, fireside lounge, library, and the chaplains’ offices.
Weekly Services at McAlister Center:
Catholic Masses – 9:15 am and 4:30 pm Sundays: in Lounge
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Meeting – 4:30 pm Wednesdays: in
Lounge
Jewish Services – 5:30 pm Fridays followed by Shabbat Dinner
Jumu’ah Prayers – 1:15 pm Fridays: in Chapel
Meditation – 7:30am (Zen) and 8:00pm (Exploring Meditation) Wednesdays: in
Lounge
Protestant Services – 11:15 am Sundays: in Chapel
For more information, please visit http://www.cuc.claremont.edu/chaplains.
Parking Permits
See Automobile Registration Policy (4.06) in the “Standards of Conduct and Judicial
Hearing
System” section. For more information, please visit www.cuc.claremont.edu/cs/index.asp.
Peer Assistance
In addition to peer mentors and AASU sponsors, students can find additional peer
assistance and support by contacting the various offices and/or resource centers at The
38 Claremont Colleges. These include the Office of Black Student Affairs Sponsors,
International Place Sponsors, Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Center Sponsors, and the
Jewish Undergraduate Mentor for Hillel.
Queer Resource Center (QRC), Walton Commons, Pomona College, ext.71817
www.pomona.edu/administration/QRC
The Queer Resource Center of The Claremont Colleges is a seven-college organization
providing resources for students, faculty, and staff of all sexual orientations and genders. The
office is a safe space for all visitors to read, relax, or discuss. The QRC has a growing
multimedia library with items available to check out, and can provide links to local, state,
and national queer, allied, and related organizations. The QRC sponsors a variety of social,
educational, and political events each semester. In addition, the QRC hires a number of paid
student employees from the five colleges at the beginning of each semester. They plan
events, manage the budget, hold office hours, and participate in College-wide education.
For more information, please visit www.pomona.edu/administration/QRC.
Student Health Services, 757 College Way, ext. 18222, fax ext. 18472
High-quality medical care and professionalism are the hallmarks of Student Health
Services. As health care becomes more complex, patient care requires a team effort. We
encourage students to take an active role in their own health and to follow up for additional
care and testing as recommended. The staff of Student Health Services consists of
physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses who make every effort to provide excellent
medical attention in a caring and efficient manner. For more information, please visit
www.cuc .claremont.edu/shs.
Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. (while school is in session).
Extended hours are provided on Wednesdays until 7 p.m.
Requirements: All students, regardless of status (e.g. part-time, exchange, or transfer
students), are required to have a health history, physical exam, and immunization record on file
at Student Health Services.
Appointments: Appointments begin at 8:30 a.m. Appointments can be made by
telephone starting at
8 a.m. A $10 charge will be assessed for any missed appointments unless canceled two
hours in advance. Walk-in hours are: Monday through Friday, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. and 1 to 3
p.m. Walk-in patients are triaged to appropriate care and are charged $10 if seen by a
physician or nurse practitioner.
Urgent Care: NO APPOINTMENT CHARGE. Urgent care is available for serious
illness or trauma as determined by the triage nurse (e.g., bleeding, possible fracture).
Costs: There is no charge for regular appointments; walk-in visits are $10; and there is a
charge for supplies, lab tests, drugs, etc., as needed. Charges do not have to be paid for at the
time of service.
Services Available:
• Suturing (stitches) for cuts, trauma, and wound care
• X-ray (chest and extremities), electrocardiogram (EKG)
• Spirometry
• Audiogram (hearing test), vision screens
• Nebulizer treatment for asthma
• Immunizations, including meningococcal, HPV, and hepatitis-B series prevention
• Travel medicine and immunizations
• Physical exams for sports, DMV, study abroad, and job applications
• Smoking cessation
39 • Nutrition information; anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders information
• Lab tests for STDs: HIV, syphilis, 39laremont, gonorrhea, herpes, and HPV
• Quick tests for pregnancy, strep, mono, urinalysis, hemoglobin
• Pregnancy testing and referrals
• Women’s health services
• Contraceptive counseling
• Emergency contraceptive
• Referrals for all outside specialists, if needed
• Orthopedic treatment (slings, splints, neck braces, ace wraps, crutches)
• Treatment for common infections, diseases, and trauma
• Dispensary with limited medications and outside written prescriptions
Student Identification Cards
Student identification cards are issued to all newly enrolled students during the
orientation process. These ID cards serve as card keys for the residence halls and libraries.
The ID card is also used for access to the dining halls with your meal plan, purchases on
campus with your Board Plus account, purchases on and off campus with your Claremont
Cash account (voluntary debit card program), as well as for personal passes into five-college
parties and discounts at local attractions. All Scripps College laundry machines accept
Claremont Cash only. The ID card is intended to last through your career at the College.
Students who lose their ID cards are expected to report the loss to the Campus Maintenance
Office, CUC’s Connection, the Dean of Students Office, or a Residential Life staff member
immediately. Lost or stolen ID cards can also be suspended online at
cards.cuc.claremont.edu. Replacement ID cards cost $10 and may be retrieved at CUC’s
Connection in the Honnold-Mudd Library, 800 North Dartmouth Avenue (south entrance).
For more information, call the Connection at (909) 607-CARD (2273) or (909) 607-3969.
Telephone Customer Service Center, ext. 18297
The Telephone Repair/Trouble Hot Line Web address is www.cuc.claremont.edu/phone
and the Voicemail Hot Line extension is 73172. A request must be made through the Dean
of Students office for a voicemail box to be added to your extension.
Women’s Resources of The Claremont Colleges
• The Pitzer College Women’s Center (Grove House at Pitzer, ext. 73653) is a safe space
on the campus for all students, and specifically women-identified students. Located
upstairs in the Grove House, it has a library and is open to the community whenever the
Grove House is unlocked. The Feminist Coalition, an organization that promotes feminist
dialogue and action at Pitzer and in the larger community through educational, social, and
cultural programs, meets weekly at the center. All are welcome.
• The CMC’s Women’s Resource Center (Emett Student Center on the second floor)
offers a library that includes reference works and fiction related to women’s studies. The
center also organizes events.
• The Pomona Women’s Union (Upper Walker Lounge at Pomona, ext. 73999) offers a
library, study lounge, calendar of events, and space for group discussions, meetings and
workshops, lectures, film series, open mics, and poetry readings. Every Thursday at noon
there is a guest presentation followed by discussion; a buffet lunch is served. All are
welcome. Hours are Sunday through Thursday from 4 to 11 p.m. and Friday and Saturday
from noon to 7 p.m.
40 • Intercollegiate Feminist Center (IFC) for Teaching, Research and Engagement (Vita
Nova Hall, Scripps, ext. 18274 or 73250)
IFC sponsors women’s studies-related lectures, conferences, and events, as well as monthly
activist networking lunches for students involved in projects and campus organizations
related to women’s and gender issues and social justice. IFC maintains a lending library of
gender and women’s studies books, magazines, films, senior theses, and resources,
including information about graduate programs and internships. Each semester, IFC
publishes a brochure, available on the IFC website and from the registrar, describing all
women’s studies courses at The Claremont Colleges for the coming semester; listed
courses satisfy women’s studies course requirements. IFC also publishes a newsletter with
information about our work and campus events, faculty and student activities, opportunities,
etc., and maintains an email list to notify students of women’s studies-related events,
internships, and other opportunities. Hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. For more information and a list of library holdings, visit the IFC website at
http://iws.scrippscollege.edu. To join the IFC email and/or mailing lists, please contact
ecerecer@scrippscollege.edu.
Online Communities
Students are encouraged to apply the Scripps Principles of Community to the world of
online communities, chat rooms, online journals, blogs, and other postings to the Web. The
Internet provides both individual and public access to a wealth of information. It is a
powerful resource to be used with creativity, as well as caution. Here is important
information to assist students in making the right choice about whether (or NOT) to post
and when to post personal information about themselves or others online.
I.
No Privacy on the Web
Students sometimes mistakenly believe they can achieve some level of privacy on the
Web. They join online communities and chat rooms or simply post their thoughts in
journals on websites that are password protected or have limited membership. Other sites,
such as MySpace, are open for the entire world to join. Students sometimes think that by
using a nickname or pseudonym they are suddenly anonymous. True privacy or anonymity
does not exist. Even an assumed name is no protection, especially when accompanied by a
photograph or other personal information.
It is not uncommon for an outraged peer, parent, or other member of the community to
report what they see on the Web to a College official when it is offensive or presents an
inappropriate or inaccurate portrayal of an individual, an organization, or some aspect of
Scripps College. In addition, what is on the Web can be used as a means to cause harm or
embarrassment to another person.
II. Employers and Graduate Schools Actively Search Candidates’ Profiles
Employers and graduate schools are concerned about selecting the right individual for
a job or program. They seek mature individuals who will represent them well. In a highly
competitive market, employers and graduate schools are looking for ways to distinguish
candidates from one another. Most often they have received a large stack of well-written
resumes and applications from candidates with compelling academic records and references.
There has been an increase in the number of employers and graduate schools that
search the Internet for information on some or all of their applicants, including having a
member of their staff join various online communities. Some employers have even hired
41 current students for the purpose of mining information about applicants from online
college communities. Employers and schools are not obligated to tell you they are looking
online. A student may be a finalist for an internship, scholarship, job, graduate program, or
fellowship, and may be eliminated before the interview phase because of her online
postings and profile.
III. Caching = Catching
Caching is when you post something on the Internet and subsequently take it down,
and yet it remains accessible nonetheless. While Google, for example, has a mechanism for
removing items, it is not an easy process. Remember, cached material is caught material.
Don’t be “caught” by one mistake in judgment. Think twice about what you post about
yourself and others.
IV. Make Personal Safety a Priority
As we all know, predators use the Internet to find unsuspecting victims. Unfortunately, this
threat continues, and predators come in all ages and from all socio-economic classes. Some
may be enrolled at, or employed by, colleges and universities, and they have access to an
“.edu” address.
CAMPUS GOVERNANCE
Scripps Associated Students (SAS) and Hall Council
One of the advantages of attending a small college is the opportunity to effect change
through involvement in campus governance. There are two major bodies of student
government at Scripps: Scripps Associated Students and SAS Senate. SAS is the student
governing body of the entire college; students who have ideas for campus programs,
notions of how various policies might be changed, or dissatisfaction with any aspect of
campus life are encouraged to bring their concerns to an SAS officer or to attend a meeting.
The Hall Council is responsible for planning hall events, conducting hall meetings, and
formulating policies that meet the specific needs of the residence hall.
Scripps Associated Students Members for 2015- 2016
President:
Minjoo Kim
Vice President:
Anna Cechony
SAC:
Bekah Manikowski
JARC:
Morgan Weidner
CLORGs Chair:
Sneha Deo
Secretary:
Madison Welsh
Co-Treasurers:
Katherine Goree & Nia Gillenwater
Student Union Chair:
Mandeep Sandhu
Diversity & Inclusivity Chair: Pam Ng
Sustainability Chair:
Elizabeth Bedford
Media Relations Chair:
Samantha Richards
Dorm Activities Chair:
Grace Reckers
Campus Activities Chair:
Atika Gupta
5C Events Chair:
Jewels Tambone
Faculty Staff Relationship Chair: Tatissa Zunguze
Senior Class Representatives:
Grace Dahlstrom & Jennie Xu
42 Junior Class Representatives:
Isabella Levin & Meagan McIntyre
Sophomore Class Representative: Kelly Peng
Recent Graduate Trustee:
Tori Sepand
Scripps Associated Students Bylaws
Scripps Associated Students bylaws are updated early in the fall semester. Students are
encouraged to refer to the Scripps Associated Students website for the most recent version
of the bylaws.
Scripps College Standards of Conduct and Judicial Hearing System
General Policy Statements
1.10
Statement of Rights and Responsibilities
1.20
Statement on Academic Freedom
1.30
Statement on Co-curricular Involvement
2 .00 General Judicial Principle
2.10
The Relationship of Discipline to the Purpose of the College
2.20
Conditions for a Hearing
3 .00 Student Records and The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
3.10
Directory Information
3.20
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
3.30
Student Records
4 .00 Scripps Code of Conduct and Non-Academic Policies and Procedures
4.01
Code of Conduct
4.02
Advertising, Publicity, and Solicitation Policy
4.03
Animal Policy
4.04
The Claremont Colleges Policy on AIDS
4.05
Alcohol and Drug Policy
4.06
Automobile Registration Policy
4.07
Bicycle Registration and Parking Policy
4.08
Civil Law Enforcement on Campus Policy
4.09
Candles and Flammable Materials Policy
4.10
Communicating with Students and Families Policy
4.11
Confirmation of Enrollment Procedures
4.12
Cooking and Electrical Appliances Policy
4.13
Damages and Missing Property Policy
4.14
Demonstration Policy on the Claremont Colleges
4.15
Escort and Guest Policy
4.16
Evacuation Policy
4.17
Event Registration and Facility Use Procedures and Guidelines
4.18
Failure to Comply Policy
4.19
Firearms, Explosives, and Weapons Policy
4.20
Flowers on Campus Policy
4.21
Graffiti Wall Policy
4.22
Hall Obstruction Policy
4.23
Hall Constitutions
4.24
Hazing Policy
4.25
Health Policy
4.26
Information Technology Policy
Standards of Conduct
1 .00
43 5 .00
6 .00
7 .00
8 .00
4.27
Key Policy
4.28
Library Fine Policy
4.29
Lockout Policy
4.30
Missing Student Notification Policy
4.31
Persons and Property Policy
4.32
Quiet Hours Policy
4.33
Smoking Policy
4.34
Storage Policy
4.35
Student Identification Card Policy
4.36
Student Organization and Student Employment Offices Guidelines
4.37
Whistle Procedure and Policy
4.38
Prelude to the Scripps College Policy on Discrimination and Harassment
4.39
Scripps College Policy on Discrimination and Harassment
4.40
Scripps College Sexual Assault Policy
4.41
The Claremont Colleges Inter-campus Sexual Assault Policy
4.42
The Claremont Colleges Banning Policy
4.43
Reporting and Communication Protocol for Bias-related Incidents
4.44
Local, State, and Federal Law Adherence Policy
Academic Policies and Hearing Procedures
5.11
Policy on Grade Disputes
5.20
Academic Dishonesty and Definitions
5.30
Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty
5.40
Procedures of the Augmented Committee on Academic Review (CAR)
5.50
Committee On Study Abroad (COSA) Policies and Bylaws
Judicial Hearing System for Non-Academic Policy Violations
6.05
System of Responsibility
6.10
Summary of the Non-Academic Judicial Hearing Process
6.15
Filing a Charge for an Alleged Policy Violation
6.20
Student Conduct on Other Claremont Colleges
6.30
Types of Judicial Courses of Action
6.40
Student Procedural Protections
6.50
Hearing Process and Timeline
6.60
College Judicial Board
6.70
Judicial Appeals Board
6.80
Presidential Appeals Board
6.90
Student Grievance Committee Procedures
Sanctions
7.10
General Statement Regarding Sanctions
7.20
Limited and College-wide Sanctions
7.30
Explanation of Limited and College-wide Sanctions
Appeals Process
8.10
Grounds for an Appeal
8.20
Filing an Appeal
8.30
Appeal Process
NOTE: Judicial Board shall be referred to as “JB” throughout the remainder of this section.
44 1 .00
1 .10
1 .20
1 .30
2 .00
General Policy Statements
Statement of Rights and Responsibilities
Students, faculty, and administrative officials at Scripps College, as members of
the academic community, fulfill a purpose and a responsibility. The purpose is the
humane and critical examination of a wide range of issues and ideas that confront
society as a whole. The responsibility is to understand the spectrum of viewpoints
on an issue, and equally, to be actively involved in the solution of the problems.
The College must, therefore, provide an optimal learning environment, and all
members of the College community have a responsibility to provide and maintain an
atmosphere of free inquiry and expression. The relationship of the individual to this
community involves these principles:
•
The fundamental human rights of others;
•
The rights of others based upon the nature of the educational process; and
•
The rights of the institution.
Each member of the campus has the right to organize and maintain her own
personal life and behavior as long as it does not violate the law or agreements
voluntarily entered into and does not interfere with the rights of others or the
educational process.
Each member has the right to identify herself/himself as a member of the campus
but has a concurrent obligation not to speak or act on behalf of the institution
without authorization. Every member of the academic community shall enjoy the
rights of free speech, peaceful assembly, and the right of petition.
Statement on Academic Freedom
(Taken from the Scripps College Catalog
2012-2013)
Scripps College affirms the American Association of University Professors
“Statement on
Academic Freedom,” a portion of which follows:
The purpose of this statement is to promote public understanding and support of
academic freedom and tenure and agreement upon procedures to assure them in
colleges and universities. Institutions of higher education are conducted for the
common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the
institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and
its free exposition. Academic freedom is essential to these purposes and applies to
both teaching and research. Freedom in research is fundamental to the
advancement of truth. Academic freedom in its teaching aspect is fundamental for
the protection of the rights of the teacher in teaching and of the student to freedom
in learning. It carries with it duties correlative with rights.
A copy of the complete statement is available for perusal in the Dean of the
Faculty’s Office, and any questions may be directed there.
Statement on Co-curricular Involvement
As members of the academic community, students bring a variety of interests to the
campus. They shall be free to organize and join campus associations to promote their
common interests.
•
Freedom of Inquiry and Expression
•
Student Participation in Student Governments
•
Student Publications
•
Freedom of Association
General Judicial Principles
Students are expected to make themselves aware of and abide by the Scripps College
45 2 .10
2 .20
community standards of behavior as articulated in the Scripps College Code of
Conduct and related policy statements. Students accept the rights and
responsibilities of membership in the Scripps community when they are admitted to
the College; ignorance is not an acceptable justification for violating community
standards. Lack of intent or awareness of college standards will normally receive the
same consequences as deliberate violations. Because the functions of a college
depend upon honesty and integrity among its members, the College expects a higher
standard of conduct than the minimum required to avoid disciplinary action.
Likewise, while many of the College’s standards of conduct parallel the laws of
society in general, The College’s standards also may be set higher and more
stringently than those found elsewhere in society.
The Relationship of Discipline to the Purpose of the College
Scripps College is primarily an academic community. As such, the College seeks to
maintain an optimal learning environment. To achieve this objective, the College
exercises certain disciplinary and discretionary powers. It protects its educational
environment by establishing and maintaining standards of conduct for its students
as individuals and as groups. These standards reflect the very nature of an academic
residential community and the need to preserve an effective educational
environment.
Conditions for a Hearing
Definition of a Student is one who:
• is currently enrolled in classes;
• has completed the preceding semester and/or is enrolled for the next scheduled
semester;
• is officially representing the College during a period between regular
academic semesters; or
• is not officially enrolled for a particular semester but has a continuing
relationship with the College.
Definition of Student Organizations
An organization is a group that has satisfied the administrative procedures for
organization recognition and/or registration as prescribed, and that functions within
the College community in the capacity of a student organization.
Timeliness of Filing a Report
A matter will be reviewed only when a report has been filed within one year of the
discovery of the alleged violation unless a specific policy indicates a different time
frame in which an incident may be reviewed (e.g. the Scripps Policies and
Procedures regarding Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault).
Jurisdiction of the Hearing System
Generally the College’s jurisdiction and discipline shall be limited to conduct that
occurs on college premises or within The Claremont Colleges community, is
associated with college sponsored or related activities, or adversely affects the
College community and/or the pursuit of its objectives.
Status of a Student Pending a Judicial Hearing
Normally an accused student retains all privileges at the College and disciplinary
sanctions are not initiated until completion of an initial hearing or an appeal.
However, interim action may be initiated by the Title IX Coordinator, Dean of Students,
or her designee, whenever there is evidence that a student or organization poses a
substantial threat to the safety or well-being of members, to property of the College
46 3 .00
3 .10
3 .20
community or poses a continuing threat of disruption or interference to normal
college life or functions.
Student Records and The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA)
Directory Information
Scripps College may release or publish general information about students called
“directory information” without prior student consent if, after this notice of the
category of such information, students do not notify the College of their objections.
To restrict release for publication, a student must submit written notification to the
Registrar’s Office by the deadline to add courses specifying the information she
does not wish to be released or published.
Students should carefully consider restricting directory information as such
restrictions could affect verifications of enrollment, degrees, and majors requested
by prospective employers and others. Restriction of the information could become
detrimental to the best interests of the student.
The following categories of information about students are directory information
under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act and may be released or
published in appropriate publications.
Name
Campus Address: Scripps mailbox would be released as the mailing address.
Campus Email Address: Scripps College email address
Dates of attendance and enrollment status (full-time or parttime)
Classification (first-year, sophomore, and so forth)
Majors and/or Minors
Degrees, Certificates, Honors and Awards Received (including Dean’s List)
Date of Birth
Photo
Previous academic institutions attended
Activities and sports including height and weight of athletic team members
Permanent address and telephone numbers are not included in “directory
information.”
The College, normally through the Dean of Students, reserves the right to disclose nondirectory information if it determines that the information is necessary to protect the
health or safety of the student or of other individuals.
Student Rights under the Act
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) as amended
requires education institutions to notify their students each year of their rights
afforded by the act. The following is a statement of those rights.
The amended act provides for access by former and present Scripps students to their
educational records for inspection and review. The term “educational records” is
defined by the Act to include those records directly related to a student and
maintained by the college or by a party acting for the college. At Scripps, the
primary educational record contains the permanent academic record and is
maintained by the registrar. It includes each student’s transcripts, application
materials (including confidential statements whose access has been waived by the
student or made prior to January 1, 1975), petitions, leaves of absence or
47 withdrawal forms, and other documents related to her matriculation. To inspect and
review her academic record, a student must make a written request to the registrar.
The registrar will inspect the file for any records not open to student inspection (i.e.,
confidential statements) and arrange a time when the student may see her file. The
time between the student’s request and the registrar’s notification will be no longer
than 15 business days. The files are to be read in the Registrar’s Office unless a
student is not within commuting distance of the College, in which case the student
may request copies of specific documents she wishes to see. A copy of an
education record otherwise subject to review may be refused if a “hold” for nonpayment of financial obligations to the College exits. No copies of original
documents, or of source documents, which originate from and exist elsewhere,
including any high school transcripts or transcripts from other academic institutions,
will be made. The College asks the student to bear the cost of such copies, as
determined by the registrar
Educational records not open to student inspection
include:
• Parents’ financial statements;
• Confidential letters and recommendations written before January 1, 1975 or
access waived by the student;
• “ancillary records” not maintained as the official records of the College such
as faculty files;
• Law enforcement records that are confidential and used only for the purpose of
law enforcement; and
• Recognized professionals or paraprofessionals records. A student may,
however, request that a doctor of choice have access to the student’s medical
records. Students may waive any of their rights by submitting a written and signed
waiver to the registrar. A waiver may be made concerning:
• Types of educational records,
• Types of persons or institutions, or if the person is a student or a prospective
student, confidential letters and statements of recommendations concerning
admission, application for employment, or receipt of honorary awards that are
placed in the person’s education record after January 1, 1975.
• A student may request notification of the names of all individuals providing a
confidential letter or statement of recommendation. If a student decides to revoke a
waiver, it must be submitted in writing to the registrar, but revocation of waivers of
confidential recommendations may not be retroactive. In addition to the student,
certain specific people may have access to a student’s file. These people are:
• Individuals or organizations that have the written permission of the student
concerned;
• An individual employed at Scripps or at another of The Claremont Colleges in
an administrative, supervisory, faculty, or support staff position who has a
legitimate educational interest. Students may be assured that such access will be
held in strictest confidence by the College and that no one will have access to a
student’s medical records;
• Students serving on some College committees;
• Individuals or organizations with which Scripps College contracts for specific
services related to the legitimate educational interest of students, including the
National Student Clearinghouse;
• Appropriate employees of colleges or universities to which students apply
48 to enroll;
• Employees of government and educational agencies who have legal rights of
access; and
• In compliance with a legal subpoena.
For release of non-directory information to others, students must submit a written
consent for release of specific records to the registrar. Such a written statement
must note the date of the release, what records are to be released, to whom the
records are to be released, the duration of the release, when the record is to be
released, and the reason for release. No copies of original documents, or of source
documents, which originate from and exist elsewhere, including any high school
transcripts or transcripts from other academic institutions, will be made. The
registrar will provide such students with copies of the records released if they are
requested and if the student will bear the cost of making those copies.
3 .30
Hearing Procedures
Student inquiries as to the meaning or accuracy of their educational records should
be directed to the registrar. If a student believes any portion of her permanent
academic record is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s rights
under the act, the student will discuss it with the registrar, who will consult with the
dean of the faculty and the Dean of Students. If the deans and the registrar find the
file to be inaccurate, the registrar will amend the file. If not, the deans will ask the
registrar to inform the student of the College’s belief in its accuracy and of the
student’s right to an academic hearing.
All requests for a hearing shall be made in writing to the dean of the faculty who
will notify the chair of the Augmented Committee on Academic Review (CAR).The
chair will convene a hearing committee consisting of members of the Augmented
CAR and include at least one faculty member, one administrator, and one student. The
chair will also inform the student of the date, place, and time of the hearing. At the
hearing, the student may present evidence relevant to the issues and may be assisted
or represented by persons of choice, including an attorney. The hearing committee
will prepare a written report of its decision including a summary of the evidence
and the reasons for its decision and present it to the student within a reason- able
time after the hearing. If the file is found to be inaccurate, the report will instruct
the registrar to amend the file. If the file is found to be accurate, the report will
include a notice to the student of the right to submit a statement of objection to the
registrar for inclusion in the student’s permanent academic record. Thereafter, such
a statement will be released whenever the records in question are released. Copies
of the report will be sent to the dean of the faculty, the president, and the registrar.
The decision of the hearing committee is final. The student may appeal to the
president should the student feel that any part of the hearing procedure was unfair or
that the procedure or the decision are not in keeping with the provisions of the act.
Student Records
Confidential Personal/Conduct Records: The Dean of Students Office is
responsible for maintaining files that contain background information and official
documents relating to information about a student gained in confidence or in an
advising/counseling capacity by a dean or director. The files also contain
information relating to alleged student misconduct, judicial proceedings, and
student grievances. Information contained within the files is divulged on a strict
49 4 .00
4 .01
4 .02
“need-to-know” basis. In cases where the welfare of the student may be in jeopardy,
such information may be conveyed to faculty or professional people (e.g., Monsour
Counseling and Psychological Services or Student Health Services) for whom
disclosure of such information is necessary or appropriate. Such information,
normally, will not be provided without written consent of the student involved except
in response to a legal subpoena. The dean of the faculty, Dean of Students, and their
administrative staffs have access to the files for the purpose of conducting necessary
investigation of charges, administering disciplinary actions, and maintaining
institutional records.
Information regarding a decision from a judicial hearing where the student was found
responsible for a violation of college standards by any judicial process will be
maintained in the student’s personal/ conduct file for two years after the completion
of the degree or separation from the College. However, disciplinary sanctions
involving probation, suspension, expulsion, or revocation of admission or degree
will additionally result in permanent notification to the student’s academic record.
Educational Records: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
gives college students, at their request, the opportunity to inspect their education
records in the Registrar’s Office and assures them that information in these records is
available only to certain authorized individuals within the College and to no one else
without specific prior written student consent. Access to these files is guided by the
Act (see Section 3.20).
The permanent academic file of a student, retained in the Registrar’s Office, contains
the admission folder and the educational folder. These academic files are accessible
only to administrators and faculty at Scripps and the other Claremont Colleges who
have a legitimate educational interest, in response to a legal subpoena, or with
written consent of the student. Typical uses are for academic advising, reference
letters, and the collection of statistics.
Scripps College Rights to Students Records: Student personal/conduct and
educational records are not considered the property of the individual student but are
the working records of the College. Except for academic records, which are kept on
microfilm or electronic imaging indefinitely, the College reserves the right to
destroy student records.
It is the policy of Scripps College to comply fully with the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended from time to time, and the regulations
interpreting it, as well as with applicable state laws. To the extent that this statement or
any statement of the College does not accurately reflect such laws, they shall not be
deemed to be a statement of College policy.
Scripps College Code of Conduct and Non-Academic Policies and Procedures
Code of Conduct
In an attempt to maintain a cooperative and harmonious environment, it is important to
establish a basic understanding of all the obligations and responsibilities of every
member of the Scripps community. Therefore, students must abide by all Scripps and
The Claremont Colleges policies.
Advertising, Publicity, and Solicitation Policy
All publicity must be in accordance with the policies of The Claremont Colleges (see
respective student handbooks). For any event advertised on the Scripps campus:
•
Before it is copied, the original poster must be brought to SARLO, SCORE,
Dean of Students Office, or the Humanities Institute Office for approval. Flyers
50 4 .03
4 .05
SCRIPPS’ PROGRAM RELATING TO THE PREVENTION OF
Standards of Conduct
4 .04
without an approval stamp will be removed (exception: residential life flyers). Flyers
must state the name(s) of the sponsoring organizations/people, a contact name,
and email address. Advertising may contain no explicit or implicit reference to
alcohol or other drugs, and language should be sensitive to the wide array of
interests and backgrounds represented in the Scripps community.
•
Flyers may be placed on bulletin boards only – one poster per event per
bulletin board/posting location. Flyers are not permitted on the Elizabeth Monroe
Wood Memorial Steps (unless exception is granted through SARLO) or public area
windows, doors, and walls on campus. Entry doors to the residence halls are
reserved for residential life staff flyers only. Flyers taped to the ground are
prohibited.
•
Only blue masking tape is permitted
•
C halk-writings are prohibited.
•
Flyers other than event publicity (e.g., housing available, services, or goods) or
commercial offers and other solicitation from non-Claremont Colleges sources
must be approved through the Dean of Students Office prior to posting.
•
For publicity guidelines pertaining to elections, see the Election Guidelines in
the “Campus Governance” section.
Animal Policy
The keeping of animals, other than fish or birds that can humanely fit in a
contained enclosure no larger than 10 gallons within the student’s room, is
prohibited. If a student is found to have an animal, the student is charged $100 and
must remove the animal immediately. Failure to remove the animal will result in a
$25 per day additional fine. Additionally, the student is charged for any damages
caused by the animal or any services required to remove the animal. If the animal is
not removed immediately, further and more serious disciplinary action will result.
Students who wish to have a bird must submit a petition to the Associate Dean of
Students and SAS for approval.
The Claremont Colleges Policy on AIDS
The Claremont Colleges do not discriminate on the grounds that a student has or is
suspected to have AIDS, ARC, HIV, or a positive HTLV-III antibody test. This
policy applies to the admission process, academic life, and co-curricular life
including access to dining halls, athletic and recreational facilities, the student
centers, and living arrangements.
The Claremont Colleges offer medical and counseling assistance on HIV/AIDS at
Student Health Services and the Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services.
Please contact the Dean of Students Office for further information and counsel
regarding questions pertaining to HIV/AIDS.
Alcohol and Drug Policy
General Statement: The College places the responsibility for observing the State law
upon each individual and expects each student to govern oneself with standards of
good taste and ethical judgment common to educated persons. The College does
not condone violation of the state law concerning the use of alcoholic beverages
nor does it condone the use of alcoholic beverages under any circumstances when
such use impairs personal conduct, health, academic achievement, or the interests of
the Scripps community. Kegs are not permitted on campus unless pre-approved by
SARLO, see 4.18.
51 ILLEGAL POSSESSION, USE, AND DISTRIBUTION OF DRUGS
AND ALCOHOL BY STUDENTS
I.
II.
The Program
A. The program sets standards of conduct prohibiting all students from unlawfully
possessing, manufacturing, using or distributing drugs and alcohol on college
property or at any activities of The College. In addition, this program is designed to
address and eliminate occurrences of binge drinking (five or more drinks at a sitting
for men and four or more drinks at a sitting for women) and its consequences.
B. The program imposes disciplinary penalties on a student in the event of a
violation of these standards of conduct. The College also is cognizant of the fact
that alcohol or drug use may create health consequences that require immediate
medical attention and, in recognition thereof, has adopted a Safety First/Medical
Amnesty Policy. This program will be implemented consistent with and in
conjunction with the Safety First/Medical Amnesty Policy (see section V). The
determination of whether there has been a violation will be made in accordance
with The College’s procedures applicable to student discipline. When students visit
another Claremont College, they are responsible for observing the regulations of
both that college and Scripps.
1. Sanctions will be of varying degrees of severity and may include: warnings,
attendance in a substance abuse program, substance probation, community service, loss
of residential privileges (temporary or permanently), suspension, expulsion, and
referral to governmental authorities for prosecution.
2. The appropriate penalty shall be determined by taking into consideration all
relevant circumstances, and particular penalties will not be associated with any
particular violation.
C. Annually, The College will distribute via email the link to The Guide to Student
Life to each student and details regarding the program and policy will be discussed
during Hall meetings.
Local, State, and Federal Sanctions
Some local, state and federal laws establish severe penalties for the unlawful
possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. These sanctions, upon
conviction, range from a fine and probation to lengthy imprisonment. The following
are lists of topics covered by these laws and the websites where more details can be
found.
Claremont Municipal Code
http://www.ci.claremont.ca.us/municipal_code/index.htm
9.23.20
Drinking Alcohol in Public Places
California Codes
http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html
California Business and Professions Code
25602
Giving Alcohol to Intoxicated People
25604
Retail Establishments Serving Alcohol Must Be Licensed
25607
Limits on Alcohol Approved be Retail Licenses
25658
Limits on Alcohol Provision, Purchase, and Consumption to
Minors
25662
Public Possession of Alcohol by Those Under 21
25659
Confiscation of False Identification
25660.5
Furnishing False Identification
52 25661
Use of False Identification
California Vehicle Code
23136
Under 21 Driving Under the Influence
23137
Under 21 Refusing a Blood Alcohol Test
23139
License Suspension for Refusal of Blood Alcohol Test
23140
BAC Limit for a Driver Who is Under Age
23141
Alcohol Education Programs for Underage Offenders
23152
Driving Under the Influence
23160
Consequences for DUI Conviction
23195
Consequences for Owner of Vehicle Used in DUI
23196
Further Consequences for DUI Conviction
23220
Limits on Alcohol Use While Driving Off-Road
23221
Limits on Open Containers in Vehicles
23222
Consequences for Marijuana Use While Driving
23224
Limits of Under 21 Transporting
Alcohol
California Health and Safety Code
11153.5
Manufacture of Controlled Substances
11350
Possession of Narcotics
11351
Possession of Narcotics for Sale
11352
Transportation of Narcotics
11355
Sales of Narcotics
11357
Possession of Marijuana of Hashish
11358
Cultivation of Marijuana
11359
Sale of Marijuana
11360
Transportation of Marijuana
11364
Possession of Device for Consuming Narcotics
11365
Aiding the Use of Narcotics
11377
Consequences for Possession of a Controlled Substance
11378
Possession for Sale of Controlled Substances
11382
Aiding the Distribution of Controlled Substances
11383
Possession of Materials Intended to Manufacture Methamphetamine
Federal Code
http://www.4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/
Title 21, Chapter 13 Lists Laws Pertaining to Possession of Controlled Substances
and Illegal Trafficking
III.
Health Risk Associated with the Use of Illicit Drugs and the Abuse of Alcohol
A. The use of any mind or mood-altering substance, including alcohol, can lead to
psychological dependence, which is defined as a need or craving for the substance
and feelings of restlessness, tension or anxiety when the substance is not used. In
addition, with many substances, use can lead to physical tolerance, characterized by
the need for increasing amounts of the substance to achieve the same effect and/or
physical dependence, characterized by the onset of unpleasant or painful
physiological symptoms when the substance is no longer being used. As tolerance
and psychological or physical dependence develop, judgment becomes impaired
and people often do not realize they are losing control over the use of the substance
53 and that they need help.
B. Alcohol acts as a depressant to the central nervous system and can cause
serious short and long-term damage. Short-term effects include nausea, vomiting
and ulcers; more chronic abuse can lead to brain, liver, kidney and heart damage
and even eventual death. Ingesting a large amount of alcohol at one time, (five or
more drinks at a sitting for men, and four or more drinks at a sitting for women),
can lead to alcohol poisoning, coma and death. Drugs such as LSD, amphetamines,
marijuana, cocaine and alcohol alter emotions, cognition, perception, physiology
and behavior in a variety of ways; health paranoia and impaired judgment. In
particular, alcohol and/or drug use inhibits motor control, reaction time, and
judgment, impairing driving ability. Abuse of either or both alcohol or drugs
during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects, spontaneous abortion and still
births.
IV.
Assistance for Alcohol Abuse and/or Drug Use Problems
A. The Claremont Colleges are committed to education and counseling as the
primary focus of their substance abuse programs and will provide confidential
professional assistance for any students who want it. Students are urged to
seek information and help regarding substance abuse for themselves or their
friends. A variety of services, including counseling, educational materials,
campus A.A. meetings, and referrals are available at the following offices:
•
Dean of Students Office, x18277
•
Health Education Outreach Office, x73602
•
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services, x18202
•
Student Health Services, x18222
B. In particular, Health Education Outreach will provide ongoing, student-centered
education and prevention programs, including a peer education and training program,
health promotional materials and activities throughout the academic year.
C. To protect students’ privacy, information regarding a student during
participation in any related program is treated as confidential.
V.
Standard of Conduct Governing Alcoholic Beverages and Drugs
A. The state of California prohibits the use, possession, and purchase of alcohol by
individuals under the age of 21; and the use of alcohol in public by all people,
regardless of age. The alcoholic beverages rules for Scripps College are required by
law to be consistent with the California alcoholic beverage laws. The following
standards of conduct will govern the use of alcohol on the Scripps campus and at
Scripps sponsored events off campus.
1. Events involving drinking games and/or promoting binge drinking are
specifically forbidden.
2. Alcoholic beverages may not be served on Scripps College property or at any
Scripps College event where persons under 21 years of age are present, unless
approval has been granted by the Student Activities and Residential Life Office of a
plan that assures compliance with the law.
3. Scripps College events are defined as any on-campus event. In addition, those
off-campus events that may be identified as being an activity of The College will
also be governed by state law and Scripps College standards of conduct.
4. Students under 21 years of age: The laws of the State of California specify that
54 students under the age of 21 may not consume, possess, distribute or sell alcohol.
These regulations apply in all locations and on all occasions.
5. Students over 21 years of age: Students over 21 years of age must obey
regulations that apply in the State of California, the City of Claremont, and the
College. Possession and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages by those persons 21
years of age or older is permitted in individual student rooms as long as a) the door
is closed b) there are eight or less people in the room c) the individual serving the
alcohol does not consume alcohol. Possession and/or consumption of alcoholic
beverages is prohibited in the hallways, lavatories, lounges, and other corridors or
public areas of the residence hall, including outdoor areas, except when and where
expressly authorized in writing by SARLO. Events involving alcohol in a space
with more than eight people must be registered with SARLO. For more
information regarding event registration for events involving alcohol, see 4 .18
Event Registration and Facility Use Procedures and Guidelines.
6. Orientation: From the beginning of leadership training for New Student
Orientation until 5:00 p.m. on the Saturday at the end of the first week of classes,
no alcoholic beverages may be served or consumed anywhere on campus.
B. Students are responsible for abiding by the California alcohol laws and these
Scripps College standards of conduct. Subject to and consistent with the College’s
Safety First/Medical Amnesty Policy, failure to abide by the law or standards of
conduct will result in disciplinary sanctions.
C. Drugs. As to the use of drugs, federal and state laws govern actions by all
members of the Scripps College community. As required by law, Scripps College
has established rules, regarding the possession and use of drugs, which are
consistent with the federal and state laws governing drug use:
1. It is unlawful to manufacture, possess, sell or use controlled substances.
Scripps College prohibits the use, possession, cultivation, sale, transfer, or
distribution of illicit drugs on campus. Scripps College recognizes its duty to
uphold local, state, and federal laws concerning illicit drugs and is under legal
and moral obligations to cooperate with law enforcement officers in the
performance of their duties pertaining to prohibited drugs. The College will not
provide sanctuary for violators of federal or state drug laws on or off campus.
Subject to and consistent with the College’s Safety First/Medical Amnesty
Policy, students found to be in violation of the prohibition against illicit drugs
are subject to penalties up to and including expulsion.
2. Education and Prevention: The College will promote educational programs
concerning the illegality and dangers of drug use and will participate actively in
the Five-College Alcohol and Drug Education Program. Students are
encouraged to use the counseling and medical services provided on a
confidential basis at the Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services and
Student Health Services when concerned about their own drug use or that of
their friends or acquaintances. The Deans of Students and Residential Life staff
members serve as advisers and will to refer concerned students to appropriate
resources.
Safety First/Medical Amnesty Policy
The health and safety of students is of primary importance. As socially
responsible members of the Scripps College community, students share the
55 responsibility for the welfare of fellow students. Students are asked to encourage
moderate and responsible behavior and to help seek medical treatment when there
is danger of alcohol poisoning, an alcohol-related injury, or other health situation
related to the ingestion of a controlled substance (an “Alcohol or Drug-related
Medical Emergency”). An Alcohol or Drug-related Medical Emergency is first
considered a health issue; therefore, the primary College response is a medical one.
Because an Alcohol or Drug-related Medical Emergency may be lifethreatening, and in order to reduce impediments to seeking help in a medical
emergency, Scripps College has adopted a policy of Safety First/Medical Amnesty
in which no (I)student seeking or receiving medical treatment from a medical
professional or (II) student or organization assisting another student in
obtaining medical treatment from a medical professional, will be subject to a
proceeding under Section 6.30 of the Guide to Student Life for (I) the possession,
use, or distribution of alcohol or (II) the possession or use of an illegal drug.
(This policy does not preclude disciplinary action regarding violations of other
Scripps College standards, such as violence, sexual harassment, or the distribution
of illegal drugs, nor does it prevent action by local and state authorities for
violations of applicable laws.)
Consistent with putting a student’s health first, the College will approach an
Alcohol or Drug-related Medical Emergency as a health risk, and may require
• follow-up such as meeting with a member of the Dean of Students staff; and/or
• Referral to and completion of alcohol or drug education/counseling.
If serious injury has occurred or if there are repeated incidents, possible
notification of parents or guardians may also result. Failure to comply with required
follow-up will normally result in disciplinary action.
In case of an emergency, contact Campus Safety and/or the on-call staff
member of the office of the Scripps College Dean of Students at (909) 607-2000,
and/or the RA on-call at (909)708-7603/4.
The Safety First/Medical Amnesty Policy was drafted by the 2011-2012 Scripps
College Alcohol Task Force and adopted on February 27, 2012, by the Scripps
College Senior Staff.
4.06
Automobile Registration Policy
Students operating automobiles on campus are expected to observe the vehicle
regulations issued by the Department of Campus Safety. Special attention is drawn to
the following requirements:
•
Every undergraduate student who plans to own or operate an automobile,
motorcycle, motor scooter, or motorbike on the campus of The Claremont Colleges
shall register at the beginning of the school year or within three days after the vehicle
is driven in Claremont. The registration fee is $50.00 per semester for all students.
•
Registration and Liability: The student is responsible for displaying the
College decal that is to be affixed to the appropriate place on the vehicle as directed
by the Department of Campus Safety. At the time of registration, the student must
furnish evidence of current liability insurance. The student in whose name a
vehicle is registered must be responsible, at all times, for any parking or driving
penalties or liability or damage claims arising in connection with the possession or
operation of the motor vehicle on campus.
•
For temporary use of a vehicle (two weeks or less), the student or guest is
obligated to secure a temporary parking permit, free of charge, from the Department
of Campus Safety immediately.
56 • Special Agreement Concerning Motorcycles, Motor Scooters, and Motor Bikes:
In addition to vehicle registration, a student desiring to operate and/or park a
motorcycle, motor scooter, or motorbike on the campuses of The Claremont
Colleges must sign a special agreement indicating that the student will drive only
on certain campus streets that are specifically designated by the Department of
Campus Safety for access to and exit from the campuses.
4 .07
Bicycle Registration and Parking Policy
All bikes that are used, stored, or parked on the Scripps College campus must be
registered with the College. Bikes may be registered at the Tiernan Field House.
There is no charge for this service and a sticker will be issued upon completion of
the registration form. Please bring your Scripps identification card.
See Tiernan Field House hours @ http://www.scrippscollege.edu/campus/tiernanfield-house/hours-of-operation.php
The registration stickers must be visibly placed on the bike at the back of the
seat shaft.
Example:
Scripps College
Registered
Bicycle
XXXXXX
In the event you wish to transfer your bike to another student or donate your bike to
the Tiernan Field House Bike Program, please stop by the Field House to make the
appropriate arrangements.
Unregistered bikes will have their locks or chains cut, at the owner’s expense, and
impounded. Impounded bicycles that remain unclaimed for a period of six months or
more will be donated to a worthy cause. The College takes no responsibility for
damage to or theft of your bike while on campus. Bikes may only be parked in bike
sheds and bike racks. It is most important that all handrails and all handicapped
access points be kept clear. Any bikes left in locations other than designated areas
will be removed at the owner’s expense.
Bikes impounded, for any reason, during the six month grace period maybe
recovered by contacting the Maintenance Department 909.607.1272.
4 .08
Civil Law Enforcement on Campus Policy
Community law enforcement officers have the right and responsibility to react to law
violations on the campuses of colleges and universities in the same way and under
the same constraints as in other parts of the community. By tradition and present
mutual understanding, the Department of Campus Safety will usually be informed
first of possible violations of law. They will deal with the immediate situation and,
if advisable, notify the appropriate law enforcement officers and cooperate with
them to investigate the possible offense. The College itself will hold students
responsible for violations of certain laws, for the College has the right to take
actions necessary for order and safety on the campus.
57 Candles and Flammable Material Policy
Possession or burning of flammable materials including, but not limited to, candles,
gasoline, paint, kerosene lamps, and incense, is hazardous to the health and safety of
residents and is prohibited inside residence halls. No fuel-powered motor vehicle or
associated parts are permitted within the residence halls for use, maintenance, repair,
or storage. Irresponsible use of permissible flammable materials (e.g., lighters) is
prohibited.
4 .10
Communicating with Students and Families Policy
Scripps College views its students as adults who are learning to make their own
decisions and take responsibility for their educational progress. In support of this
philosophy, the College communicates directly with students on all matters
affecting their college experience. Students are encouraged to regularly
communicate such matters to their families. At the student’s request, the College
will communicate directly with the family. In recognition of the concern for a
student’s well-being and the soundness of her educational experience, it is college
policy to communicate programs and activities held throughout the academic year to
families. In the case of a medical emergency, the College reserves the right to
contact the person(s) listed on the Emergency Contact Information Form after first
attempting to consult with the student.
4 .11
Confirmation of Enrollment Procedures
Returning to Campus in Continuous Enrollment You must confirm your intent
to enroll for the following semester by submitting a Confirmation of Enrollment via
the Scripps portal by deadlines posted by the registrar each semester. Failure to do
so by the dates stated will result in the forfeiture of your commitment fee (if you
signed a waiver, your security deposit). Students who do not submit their
Confirmation of Enrollment by the deadline will not be permitted to draw for
campus housing or preregister for classes.
Taking a Leave of Absence from Scripps
Leave of absence for up to two consecutive semesters is permitted for personal,
medical, financial, or other reasons. A student must formally notify the College via
the Intent to Take a Leave of Absence form (available in the Registrar’s Office) by
mid-March for the following fall semester, or by mid-November for the following
spring semester. Deadlines are posted by the registrar each semester. This
notification process must include meeting with the academic adviser, the Dean of
Students or her designee, the registrar, and the Office of Financial Aid. Failure to
complete this process by the posted dates may result in forfeiture of fees.
Students who plan to attend and transfer credit from another college are subject to
Scripps transfer credit policy. Students must confer with the registrar for any
questions regarding transfer credit policies and procedures. Students will not
receive credit from a study abroad program completed outside the purview of
Scripps Off-Campus Study.
Students wishing to extend a leave of absence beyond two semesters may do so
only under exceptional circumstances and via petition to the Committee on
Standards of Conduct
4 .09
58 Academic Review. Students on leave beyond four semesters are subject to
administrative withdrawal.
Campus email address, academic portal access, and campus mailbox are retained
during the leave of absence.
Returning to Scripps from a Leave of Absence or Off-Campus Study Program
A student returning from a leave of absence must formally notify the registrar of
her intent (via the Confirmation of Enrollment or in writing) by mid-March for the
following fall semester, or by mid-November for the following spring semester.
Deadlines are posted by the registrar each semester. Returning students who
confirm their enrollment plans by the posted deadlines will be eligible for Scripps
housing and preregistration. Failure to meet these deadlines may result in forfeiture
of fees, preregistration privileges, and housing.
Financial aid recipients should consult with the Office of Financial Aid to plan for
their return to Scripps, as financial aid deadlines may precede admission
notification deadlines.
Students who attended a college or university while on a leave are subject to
Scripps transfer credit policies. A student must be in good academic standing at all
institutions attended while on leave to be eligible to return to Scripps.
Withdrawing from Scripps
A student may voluntarily withdraw from Scripps by completing the Notice of
Withdrawal form available at the Registrar’s Office. Exit interviews with the Dean
of Students, the registrar, and the Office of Financial Aid are required to complete
this form. Students who do so by the posted deadlines are eligible for a refund of
their security deposit (minus deductions for any relevant charges).
Transcripts of students who withdraw by the last day to withdraw from courses
without academic penalty will reflect no enrollment for that semester. Transcripts
will show non-punitive grades of W in courses for students who withdraw after the
deadline to withdraw from classes.
Campus email address, academic portal access, and campus mailbox are inactivated
following withdrawal from the College.
Involuntary Medical Leaves of Absence
When a dean has reason to believe that the physical or mental condition of a
student is likely to result in psychological or physical harm to that student or other
individuals if that student attends classes or remains on campus, s/he shall seek
information regarding the condition of that student by consulting with members of
the College, medical and counseling staff, or any other persons who have treated the
student. If a dean concludes that physical or psychological harm to that student or
others may reasonably be expected, and if a member of the CUC medical or
counseling staff, or a physician, psychiatrist, or psychologist employed by that
student concurs, the dean may suspend the student’s enrollment and right to remain
on campus and place that student on a medical leave of absence. The dean may
notify that student’s parents or other responsible relatives of the actions that have
been taken and may divulge to them such information as is permitted by law. A
59 student who has been given a medical leave of absence at the student’s own request
or upon order of the Dean of Students may apply for re-admission by submitting to
the Dean of Students documents signed by licensed physicians or psychologists
attesting to their belief that the return of the student’s enrollment at Scripps College
will not endanger that student or others. The dean may then require that the student
be interviewed by a member of the Monsour Counseling and Psychological
Services or Student Health Services, and the student may be required to give written
authorization for the results of such an interview to be reported to the dean. Final
authority on such re-admission will rest with the Dean of Students.
4 .12
Cooking and Electrical Appliances Policy
Standards of health and safety make it necessary to require the use of power strips
only (with surge protectors and reset buttons), as the electrical circuits are not
designed to carry heavy loads, and to prohibit the use of extension cords, holiday
lights, hot plates, coffee percolators, corn poppers, rice cookers, halogen lamps,
electrical water coolers, space heaters, and all cooking appliances (including
microwaves and appliances with open heat sources and no thermostat control). Only
mini-fridges without a microwave and Microfridges are permitted in student rooms.
4 .13
Damages and Missing Property Policy
Scripps College holds its students fully responsible for any damages or losses of
property that occur in their living units by the students themselves or their guest(s).
If loss or damage occurs in a public area, and the responsible party cannot be
identified, the hall’s vandalism account is billed. Losses and/or damages should be
reported to the Campus Maintenance Office. Maintenance personnel will inspect the
loss and/or damage and submit to the responsible party an estimate of repair or
replacement and a response date after which the responsible party will be billed the
entire cost of restoration or replacement as adjusted by the director of maintenance.
Any grievances that might arise as a result of this process are to be brought before a
dean in the Dean of Students Office.
A student has the opportunity to request that furniture be removed from her room at
no charge by completing a Furniture Removal Request Form by the end of the
school year for the following academic year. A student may also complete a work
order request during that academic year, and the student will be charged $10 for
each piece of furniture that the student has removed. The student must keep the
furniture in the student’s room until maintenance personnel removes it. If a student
does not to follow this system and puts the student furniture in a location other than
the student’s room, the student is responsible for returning the furniture to the room
upon check-out. If it is missing at that time, the student will be held financially
responsible for replacing the furniture. Exception: There is no fee for furniture that
is removed as a result of undoubling or untripling an over occupied room during the
academic year.
4 .14
Demonstration Policy of The Claremont Colleges
The undergraduate Claremont Colleges—Pomona College, Scripps College, Claremont
McKenna College, Harvey Mudd College, Pitzer College—together with the
Claremont Graduate University, Keck Graduate Institute and Claremont University
Consortium (CUC) are all member institutions of The Claremont Colleges. Each of
these member institutions respects the rights of free speech and peaceful assembly
60 4 .15
Escort and Guest Policy
The escort policy was created by and adopted by the Scripps student body. Students
may have guests at any time. From the time guests enter the residence halls, they
must be escorted by a Scripps student who will take responsibility for the guests;
the student will leave only when another Scripps student assumes responsibility for
the guests. In the case that guests need to use the restroom, the Scripps escort’s
door must remain open until the guests return. For security reasons, students are
encouraged to not provide entry to individuals who are other student’s guests. Students
may have overnight guests with prior permission from all roommates/suite mates.
Standards of Conduct
and supports their exercise. However, when the exercise of speech and assembly
becomes disruptive or non- peaceful, and infringes upon the rights of others,
threatens property or public safety, or impedes the business of member Colleges or
CUC, the individual Colleges and CUC will act according to this policy.
Every institution in the consortium has instituted procedures for presenting and
peacefully resolving disagreements about policies. Officials at the individual
Claremont Colleges and CUC are willing to examine, discuss, and explain
institutional policies to any member of the Claremont Colleges community.
However, participation in a demonstration that is materially disruptive and nonpeaceful or involves the substantial disorder or invasion of the rights of others on
the property of any of the Claremont Colleges or of Claremont University
Consortium or their affiliated institutions is prohibited. Determination of when a
demonstration or action is non-peaceful or disruptive may be difficult, but the
Claremont Colleges individually and collectively subscribe to the general
guidelines listed below:
• Non-peaceful actions or demonstrations are those actions that endanger or
injure, or threaten to endanger or injure, any person or that damage or threaten to
damage property.
• Disruptive actions or demonstrations are those that restrict free movement on
any of the campuses, or interfere with, or impede access to, regular activities or
facilities of any of the
Colleges or CUC.
• If an officer or designee of an affected College or CUC informs individuals in a
given area that their collective actions are judged non-peaceful or disruptive and
that they should disperse, individuals remaining may be charged, on their home
campus, with a violation of this policy.
• Any individual acting in a non-peaceful or disruptive manner, whether he or she
is acting individually or within a group, may be charged on the basis of the
individual’s or group’s behavior with a violation of this policy.
• Ignorance of this policy or lack of intent to violate this policy is not an
acceptable justification for violating it. Lack of intent or lack of awareness of
the existence of College or Consortium policy will not excuse violations.
Charges will be brought at the home college of the accused.
• Any president on his or her home campus, or designee, or the chief executive
officer of CUC, or designee, on the property of CUC, is authorized to take
action against any individual violating this policy. Actions may include arrest,
or other legal action, or notice of disciplinary charges and handled through the
home College’s disciplinary procedures. The presidents and the chief executive
officer of CUC may delegate their authority to act.
61 Overnight guests are permitted to stay no more than four consecutive nights. In the
event that a student hosts a guest in excess of four consecutive nights, the College
reserves the right to deny guest privileges to the hosting student or to terminate the
hosting student’s occupancy. Any violation of this policy results in a judicial
hearing.
Responsibility Clause: The student hosting the guest is responsible and accountable,
including financially, for the conduct of the guest. Any infraction of the rules and
the cost of repairing any damage by the guest are assumed by the host student.
4 .16
Evacuation Policy
All students and their guests must exit the building when a fire alarm sounds.
Individuals who remain in the building will be charged $150. See “Responsibility
Clause” in the Guest and Escort Policy for further information.
4 .17
Event Registration and Facility Use Procedures and Guidelines
Communication and Cancellation: Anyone involved in registering an event must
maintain open communication with the Dean of Students staff members. As
problems emerge, they must be discussed and dealt with immediately. Cancellation
of an event may result from violation of these guidelines and/or disruption
requiring security or police action. Please note events may not be registered during
reading days and final examinations.
Event registration for events not involving
alcohol:
• A person registering a non-alcohol related event must register their event
through the Virtual Event Management System (VEMS) website at http://emsweb.
claremont.edu/Scripps/, where it will be approved by the appropriate departments.
Instructions are posted on this website; for detailed information click on the
“Links” tab.
To check for available space or for facilities information (including capacity), click
on the “Browse” tab.
• Reservations can be made beginning the first day of classes each semester, and
events cannot be booked after the last day of classes each semester. Requests for
facilities should be made as far in advance of the event as possible.
• Once you enter your facility request via VEMS, you will receive an email
confirmation of approval from the reservation scheduler. Your facility request is not
approved until you receive this confirmation. Please be sure to give a thorough
description of your event/tabling and provide other details such as whether you
will have music, as these items also must be approved.
• If your event is canceled, be sure to cancel through VEMS. Additionally,
contact any resource services you obtained for the event to cancel directly with
each department.
• At times, back-to-back events are common; users may not ask the preceding
group to vacate the facility prior to the time reserved. Facility users are also
responsible for unlocking and relocking all facilities. Arrangements to obtain keys
may be made through the Public Events’ Office or Malott Commons Office,
depending on the facility being used.
• There must be at least one Campus Safety Officer for an event with more than 75
62 people. For every additional 75 people or portion thereof, an additional security
officer is required. For events drawing over 500, special arrangements should be
made with SARLO. Payment for security officers will be required at the time the
event is registered.
• If planning to use the Department of Campus Safety, arrangements must be made
through SARLO at least 2 weeks prior to the event.
• The person registering the event must develop a plan for their use of security
officers and submit it to SARLO including a site layout. The registrant must meet
with the security officers 15 minutes prior to the start of the event to discuss the
plan, to form a working alliance, and to develop informal security networks to keep
order at the party, with backup as necessary from security officers. The primary
responsibility to keep the party under control lies with the students and not with the
security officers. Security officers should be instructed to patrol the party and to
work with the students to ensure a safe and peaceful environment, and they should be
instructed to take appropriate action if a disruption occurs.
Standards of Conduct
Event registration for events involving
alcohol:
• Events involving alcohol in a space with more than eight people may not be
held in a student room and must be registered. The event must be planned and
registered at least two weeks in advance. Registration is complete when all
appropriate forms are submitted with information and has been approved by
SARLO staff. A person registering an event involving alcohol must register
their event through the VEMS website at http://emsweb.claremont.edu/Scripps/.
• The VEMS form r e q u i r e s an estimated maximum number of guests; the
number of guests at the event may not exceed this number.
• The person registering the event must develop and provide a satisfactory method
to verify that guests who are being served alcohol are 21 years of age or over.
Guidelines Specific to the Serving of Alcohol:
• At least one Scripps student who is at least 21 years of age must register the
event through VEMS and assumes full responsibility for the event, will be
present for the duration of the event, and will not consume any alcohol.
Although not required, it is strongly recommended that additional students
assume responsibility.
• All servers must be hired from the approved servers list available through
SARLO and may not consume alcoholic beverages for the duration of the event.
Alcoholic beverages may not be served to persons who appear intoxicated.
State law makes it clear that individuals who serve more alcohol to already
intoxicated people can be held liable if that person suffers injury or danger
resulting from her or his impaired state. The server, and not the individual
being served, must consistently measure all drinks.
• Beer and wine are the only alcoholic beverages that may be served at
registered events. Beer includes all fermented beverages with an alcohol
content of up to 6%. Wine includes champagne and other sparkling wines with
an alcohol content of up to 14%.
• The amount of alcohol allowed at an event will be determined by a Dean of
Students staff member and will be based on the number of guests over 21
attending the event.
• Students may not use Scripps College funds to purchase alcoholic beverages,
nor may any Scripps organization collect money for this purpose and alcohol
63 may not be sold.
• Supplies of alcoholic beverages may not be replenished after the event has
commenced.
Security:
• There must be at least one security officer for an event with more than 75
people. For every additional 75 people or portion thereof, an additional security
officer is required. For events drawing over 500, special arrangements should be
made with SARLO. The number of security officers will be based on the
estimated maximum number of guests. Payment for security officers will be
required at the time the event is registered.
• If planning to use the Department of Campus Safety, arrangements must be made
through SARLO at least 2 weeks prior to the event. Party hosts are encouraged
to hire staff from the Department of Campus Safety.
• The student registering the event must develop a plan for the student use of
security officers and submit it to SARLO. The student must meet with the
security officers 15 minutes prior to the start of the event to discuss the plan, to
form a working alliance, and to develop informal security networks to keep order
at the party, with backup as necessary from security officers. The primary
responsibility to keep the party under control lies with the students and not
with the security officers. Security officers should be instructed to patrol the
party and to work with the students to ensure a safe and peaceful environment,
and they should be instructed to take appropriate action if a disruption occurs.
• Security officers may not consume any alcoholic beverages while they are on duty.
Barbeque Policy
Student-hosted barbecues may be held on Jaqua Quadrangle East, specifically
the open lawn immediately south of the Rose Garden between Toll Hall and
Browning/Dorsey Halls. For the safety of the students and the campus,
barbecues are prohibited in all other locations on the Scripps campus.
•
Event registration must completed through VEMS website at
http://embweb.claremont.edu/Scripps/ where it will be removed by the
appropriate departments.
• The Maintenance Department will provide the grill.
• Students must purchase self-lighting charcoal for use. The use of lighter fluid
and propane grills are not permitted.
• The Grounds Department will provide the student registering the event with a
hose and a means to dispose of the charcoals.
• Barbecues and self-lighting charcoal may not be stored in the residence halls or
individual student rooms.
• The students are responsible for cleaning up after the barbecue, including the
grill and leaving the premises as they found it. Should the area not be properly
cleaned, the student who registered the event will be responsible for a $250 .00
fine.
• All barbecues must conclude by 10:00p.m. in order for Maintenance
Department to pick up the clean barbecue.
Compliance:
Please note that strict adherence to these policies and regulations regarding
personal conduct and alcoholic beverages is required. Students found in violation of
these policies will be requested to pour out all alcohol and the event will be ended
immediately. Any person or organization who fails to do so may be subject to
64 additional judicial board charges and/or outside legal action.
Other event related information:
Admittance to Five-College Parties:
• Only individuals who possess a valid five-college ID or official Guest
Pass and picture ID will be admitted. Students must follow protocol of each
host institution on how to obtain a guest pass, which may require processing
prior to the event date.
• Once a student’s age has been verified as over 21, he or she must receive a
wristband to signal they are of legal drinking age. Students must follow
protocol of each host institution on how to obtain a wristband, which may
require processing prior to the event date.
•
•
Scripps students are limited to one guest pass per event on campus event
and must follow the protocol established for each party to obtain a guest
pass. In order to do so, Scripps students will be required to show proof
of their Scripps affiliation, their guest must be present, and have a valid
form of ID, and must receive said guest pass before the beginning of the
party.
4 .18
Failure to Comply Policy
Students failing to comply with any policies, sanctions or verbal instructions
from Dean of Students staff members may be subject to judicial action.
4 .19
Firearms, Explosives and Weapons Policies
Possession, use or transportation of firearms or “deadly weapons” is prohibited on the
campuses of The Claremont Colleges. The storage or transportation of such
weapons by students or staff on campus or in automobiles parked on or frequenting
the campus is prohibited. Violation of this policy will result in confiscation of the
weapon and may result in judicial action by the College. The term “deadly
weapon,” includes, but is not limited to: a blackjack, slingshot, billy club, sand club,
metal knuckles, dagger, switch blade knife, pistol, bee bee gun, revolver or other
Standards of Conduct
Students hosting the party are responsible for preventing non-students,
including college or food service staff, from attending unless the non-students
are guests of a Scripps student. Names and/or descriptions of non-students
should be written down and reported to SARLO.
• A security guard will be on duty at the entrance at all times to check IDs, prevent
alcohol from being taken into the party, and turn people away if necessary.
Guests and Guest Passes:
• The student hosting the guest is responsible for the guest’s legal and orderly
behavior.
•
If the band wishes to bring guests, it must provide the sponsoring students a list
of guests (names, addresses, telephone numbers and ages) at the time the
agreement or contract for services is signed (10 guests maximum) and
arrangements must be made with SALO and Campus Safety.
•
If the party involves a large group of students from a non-Claremont College, the
College SAS guidelines apply.
•
Scripps students are limited to two guest passes per event and may be
obtained from SARLO. The student will be required to show proof of her Scripps
affiliation.
65 firearm, any knife with a blade longer than five inches, any razor with an unguarded
blade, any metal pipe or bar, or other object used or intended to be used as a weapon.
4 .20
Flowers on Campus Policy
The flowers on campus may be cut in the following areas: the rose garden between
Browning and Toll, all pansy and daisy beds, camellias at the north end of the Music
and Dance Buildings, and the roses at the north end of the Old Lang Art Building.
Flowers in Margaret Fowler Garden or the camellias near Denison Library may not
be cut or picked.
4 .21
Graffiti Wall Policy
Only the senior class may sign the Graffiti Wall (between Toll and Browning).
Signing must take place according to the guidelines available in the Dean of Students
Office. The senior class co-representatives coordinate the signing of the Graffiti
Wall.
4 .22
Hall Obstruction Policy
Hall obstructions are considered a safety hazard by the Claremont Fire Marshal.
Therefore, personal belongings may not be left in the hallways. Obstructers will
receive two verbal warnings by a hall council or residential life staff member for the
first offense. Each subsequent offense will result in immediate judicial action.
4 .23
Hall Constitutions
Students must adhere to all additional rules stated in each hall’s
constitution.
4 .24
Hazing Policy
Hazing, as defined by California Education Code sections 32050 and 32051, is not
permitted at Scripps College. No individual, recognized student organization, club,
team, or any other Scripps-affiliated student group shall plan, engage in, or
condone hazing activities, on or off the Scripps campus.
DEFINITION OF HAZING
Education Code section 32050 states:
“ . . . ‘hazing’ includes any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student
organization or any pastime or amusement engaged in with respect to such an
organization which causes, or is likely to cause, bodily danger, physical harm, or
personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any
student or other person attending any...college, University, or other education
institution in this state; but the term ‘hazing’ does not include customary athletic
events or other similar contests or competitions.”
Education Code section 32051 states:
“No student, or other person in attendance at any...private...educational institution, shall
conspire to engage in hazing, participate in hazing, or commit any act that causes or is
likely to cause bodily danger, physical harm, or personal degradation or disgrace
resulting in physical or mental harm to any fellow student or person attending the
institution. The violation of this section is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not
less than one hundred dollars ($100), nor more than five thousand dollars ($5,000), or
imprisonment in the county jail for not more than one year, or both.”
CONSEQUENCES OF A VIOLATION
Scripps College expects its students to conduct themselves in socially responsible
66 4 .25
Health Policy
Upon recommendation of Student Health Services or a physician, a student who
contracts a contagious disease may be expected to relocate to a contained location
until her disease is no longer a threat to others in the community. If a room is not
available at the time, the student is expected to make arrangements to stay off
campus until she is given permission to return to campus. The Dean of Students
Office will work with the student to make the transition as smooth as possible.
4 .26
Information Technology Policy
The Claremont Colleges Policy Regarding Appropriate Use of Campus Computing and
Network Resources
An overall guiding mission of The Claremont Colleges is education in an environment
where the free exchange of ideas is encouraged and protected. The Claremont
Colleges make available computing and network facilities (CNF) resources for use
by the Colleges’ students, faculty and staff. These services are provided for
educational purposes and to carry out the legitimate business of the Colleges. The
Colleges and members of the college communities are expected to observe Federal,
Standards of Conduct
and respectful ways. Thus, participation in hazing, either as an individual or as
part of any student organization, may result in disciplinary action up to and
including expulsion, permanent loss of organizational recognition, or loss of
eligibility to remain a member of any club, team, or other Scripps-affiliated student
group. Consent, implied or expressed, is not a defense to any complaint or charge
alleging a hazing violation.
Regular college disciplinary procedures will be applied to individual students and
clubs or organizations for their participation in hazing activities. The athletic
department shall handle consequences pertaining to teams. Institutional action may
proceed whether or not a police investigation is undertaken or a criminal charge
for hazing is filed by the District Attorney’s Office.
APPLICATIONS
Scripps hazing policy is not intended to prohibit student recruitment or new (or
continuing) member activities that are positive and educational in nature, designed
to instill a group ethos or unit. Its intent is to deter those behaviors that cause or are
likely to cause harm to another student.
Some examples of hazing activities or events include:
Activities which require individuals to violate federal, state or local laws; contradict
a person’s moral or religious beliefs; or violate the rules and regulations of Scripps
College. Any form of coerced physical activity or exercise. Ingesting any liquid or
solid matter, edible or non-edible. Kidnapping new members.
Marking or branding or tattooing or piercing of a new member.
Scavenger hunts and pranks that promote theft, vandalism, or destruction of
property. All-night work or study sessions that interfere with academics.
Embarrassing clothing and/or doing embarrassing actions.
Sleep deprivation.
Grilling of individuals/groups with questions of any kind.
Personal errands and chores run by new members for initiated members.
Requiring new members to live together.
Questions should be directed to SARLO at (909) 607-4703 or DOS (909) 621-8277.
*Appreciation is given to Stanford University for permission to borrow liberally from
its hazing policy.
67 State and local laws that govern computer and telecommunications use, as well as
the Colleges’ regulations and policies. You must not use campus computing or
networking resources or personal computing resources accessed through campus
network facilities to collect, store or distribute information or materials, or to
participate in activities that are in violation of federal, state or local laws or other
Colleges policies or guidelines. These include, but are not limited to, policies and
guidelines regarding intellectual property and sexual or other forms of harassment.
Computing and network facilities resources users are required to use these resources
within the Colleges’ standards of conduct. Individuals with expert knowledge of
information systems or who make extensive use of these facilities, or with a position
of trust regarding these facilities will be held accountable to a higher standard.
Responsible, considerate, and ethical behavior expected by the Colleges extends to
the use of computing and network facilities resources, and networks throughout the
world to which electronic access has been provided. These CNF resources include
but are not limited to:
• Computers and associated peripheral devices;
• Campus video cable;
• Classroom presentation systems;
• Voice messaging equipment;
• Data networking equipment systems, including remote and wireless access;
•
Computer software;
• Electronically stored institutional data and messages;
• All other similar resources owned, controlled, and/or operated by the Colleges; and
• Services to maintain these resources.
SECURITY Passwords and Codes
Individuals entrusted with or that inadvertently discover logins and passwords are expected
to guard them responsibly. These passwords are not to be shared with others. The same
policy applies to door codes for restricted-access rooms/areas. Those who need logins or
door codes can make a formal request to the administrator of those codes/passwords.
Passwords may be used for the purpose of security, but the use of the password does not
affect The Claremont Colleges ownership of electronic information.
File confidentiality
Your documents, files and electronic mail stored on a College-owned networked
computer or server is normally accessible only by you. However, any file or document
placed on a College-owned computer or network is subject to access pursuant to this
Policy, and thus, should not be regarded as private or confidential. The system
managers at both CINE (Claremont Intercollegiate Network Effort) and within the
individual campus IT organizations have the ability to monitor traffic and directly
view any file as it moves across the network, and they must occasionally do so to
manage campus network resources. In short, files may be monitored without notice in
the ordinary course of business to ensure the smooth operation of the network. All staff
members working in information technology have clear guidelines that prohibit
violations of privacy and confidentiality and, in the normal course of their work they
do not view the contents of user files or e-mail. However, you should be aware that
authorized College personnel will take appropriate steps to investigate when there is a
suspicion of inappropriate use of campus computing or networking resources. This
may include monitoring network traffic, its contents, and examining files on any
computer system connected to the network.
68 You should also know that all files on shared (i.e., networked) systems, including e-mail
servers, are backed up periodically on schedules determined by each College. Backup
tapes are preserved for lengths of time also determined by individual College operating
procedures. These tapes can be used to restore files that you have deleted accidentally.
This means that the files on the tapes are also available to someone else with reason
and authority to retrieve them.
Network monitoring
Troubleshooting on the campus network, as well as planning for enhancements, requires
the collection of detailed data on network traffic. CINE regularly runs monitoring
software that records and reports on the data that is transported across the campus
networks. The reports include the origin and destination addresses, and other
characteristics of files, including the URLs of the websites that are contacted. This
data is accessed and used only by authorized IT staff members responsible for
network performance, operations and planning. You should also be aware that many
Web host machines on the Internet collect and log information about you and your
identity when you visit their sites. This information may include, but is not
limited to, information about the computer you are using, its address, and your email address.
Many educational and business activities at the Colleges require network access to
resources on the Internet. To ensure adequate bandwidth to these sites for the
Colleges’ primary educational and business purposes, CINE and campus IT staff
may restrict the amount of traffic to particular sites and the amount of traffic of
specific types.
From time to time these network monitoring activities may allow systems managers
to identify individuals whose activities downgrade the performance of the campus
network or a segment of the network, or which appear to violate the general
guidelines for appropriate use of campus computing and network resources. In such
instances, a CINE staff member or a member of your own College’s IT staff may ask
you to cease these activities. If you continue such activities, or if they include illegal
activities, appropriate College authorities may be notified. In extreme cases, network
privileges may be revoked on an interim basis pending resolution of the issue. The
individual campuses determine specific corrective or disciplinary actions.
Ownership
The Colleges retain absolute ownership rights of the CNF resources. Such resources are
not owned by a department or by any individual. CNF resources leased, licensed, or
purchased under research contracts or grants, are administered under the terms of this
Policy for as long as they remain within the lawful possession or control of the Colleges.
CNF resources provided to on-campus residences are also owned, operated and provided
by the Colleges.
Access to Resources
Access to CNF resources is a privilege, which is allowed only to the Colleges’ authorized
personnel and students. All users must understand and abide by the responsibilities that
come with the privilege of use. Such responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the
following:
1. You must understand and comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws.
2. You must not intentionally seek information about, browse, copy, or modify non-public
files belonging to other people, whether at a Claremont College or elsewhere. You
must not attempt to “sniff” or eavesdrop on data on the network that are not intended
for you.
69 3. You are authorized to use only computer resources and information to which you
have legitimately been granted access. Sharing your passwords with others is
expressly forbidden. Any attempt to gain unauthorized access to any computer system,
resource or information is expressly forbidden. If you encounter or observe a gap in
system or network security, immediately report the gap to the manager of that system.
4. Each College’s Policy on Harassment applies as equally to electronic displays and
communications as to the more traditional (e.g., oral and written) means of display and
communication.
5. Messages, sentiments, and declarations sent as electronic mail or postings must meet the
same standards for distribution or display as physical (paper) documents would on
college property.
6. Unsolicited mailings and unauthorized mass mailings from campus networks or
computing resources (i.e.”spam”) are prohibited. Each campus may have specific
policies regarding the use of existing group mailing lists (e.g., all-students or all-faculty).
Contact your campus IT organization for details regarding these policies.
7. Spoofing, or attempts to spoof or falsify e-mail, network or other information used
to identify the source, destination or other information about a communication, data or
information is prohibited.
8. You must not degrade computing or network performance in any way that could
prevent others from meeting their educational or College business goals. You must not
prevent others from using shared resources by running unattended processes, by playing
games or by “locking” systems without permission from the appropriate system manager.
9. You must conform to laws and Colleges policies regarding protection of intellectual
property, including laws and policies regarding copyright, patents, and trademarks.
When the content and distribution of an electronic communication would exceed fair
use as defined by the federal Copyright Act of 1976, users of campus computing or
networking resources shall secure appropriate permission to distribute protected
material in any form, including text, photographic images, audio, video, graphic
illustrations, and computer software.
10. You must not use campus computing or networking resources or personal computing
resources accessed through campus network facilities to collect, store or distribute
information or materials, or to participate in activities that are in violation of federal,
state or local laws.
11. You must not use campus computing or networking resources or personal computing
resources accessed through campus network facilities to collect, store or distribute
information or materials in violation of other Colleges policies or guidelines. These
include, but are not limited to, policies and guidelines regarding intellectual property
and sexual or other forms of harassment.
12. You must not create or willfully disseminate computer viruses, worms, or other
software intended to degrade system or network security. You must take reasonable steps
to prevent your system from being used as a vehicle for such actions. This includes
installing system and software patches as well as anti- virus signatures files.
13. Use of CNF resources for advertising, selling, and soliciting for commercial purposes
or for personal gain is prohibited without the prior written consent of the Colleges.
Faculty, students or staff who have questions about the legitimacy of a particular use
should discuss it with the appropriate members of the IT staff on their home campus.
14. The disclosure of individually identifiable non-directory information to nonuniversity personnel is protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of
1974 (FERPA). The disclosure of financial or personnel records that are owned by the
Colleges without permission or to unauthorized persons is not permitted and may be
prosecuted under California Penal Code 502.
70 15. Willful or unauthorized misuse or disclosure of information owned by the Colleges
will also constitute just cause for disciplinary action, including dismissal from school
and/or termination of employment regardless of whether criminal or civil penalties are
imposed. It is also expected that any user will report suspected abuses of CNF resources.
Failure to do so may subject the individual to loss of CNF access and/or the
disciplinary action referred to above. The respective Information Technology
organization of one of the Claremont Colleges may immediately suspend service to an
individual or computer found to be significantly degrading the usability of the network
or other computer systems. Inappropriate use will be referred to the appropriate College
authority to take action, which may result in dismissal from school and/or termination of
employment.
Note: The provisions of this Policy apply to the institutions comprising The
Claremont Colleges, including the Claremont University Consortium.
Electronic Recording Policy
Recording of classroom activities by any electronic means, by students, other faculty,
university administrators, or others, requires written permission of the instructor.
All students in a class must be informed if permission has been given for a class to
be recorded. Accessibility to lectures or other materials by persons with disabilities
will be accommodated as required by applicable policies and laws.
Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws
Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one
or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the
Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code).These rights include the right to
reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or
uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an
infringement. Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In
general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either
actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than
$30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000
per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For
details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.Willful copyright infringement
can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of
up to $250,000 per offense. For more information, please see the Web site of the U.S.
Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov, especially their FAQ’s at
www.copyright.gov/help/faq
Copyright Infringement Notifications
Scripps College does not routinely monitor its computer network to detect the
infringement of copyright protected material such as music, movies, television
programs, games, software and books. The College receives copyright infringement
notifications of various kinds from the owners of the copyright protected material that
has allegedly been infringed. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), 17
U.S.C. § 512, provides copyright owners or their representatives with a statutory
procedure for notifying entities that provide online services or network access, or
facilities for that purpose (known as service providers), of infringing activities by their
subscribers or account holders. Scripps College is a Service Provider within the
definition provided by § 512 (k) of the DMCA.
Response to DMCA Notices
Receipt of a DMCA notice indicates that the Claremont Colleges policy on “Appropriate
71 Use of Campus Computing and Network Resources,” see
http://www.scrippscollege.edu/ campus/it/policy/policy-appropriate-use.php,
may have been violated by the user at the IP address identified in the DMCA
notice. The College respects the rights of ownership for all intellectual or
entertainment property protected by copyright and explicitly prohibits the
illegal sharing of copyright protected material. Be forewarned, while Scripps
College generally addresses copyright violations with a “three strikes”
procedure, a copyright owner is under no obligation to do the same. In addition
to sending complaints to Scripps College, copyright owners may take direct
and immediate legal action against alleged infringers, and subpoena the
college for the identity of the individual associated with the IP address.
The existence and imposition of university sanctions do not protect members of the
campus community from any legal action by external entities or the university itself.
Standards of Conduct
Procedures
First Notification
The first time a DMCA notification is received that a computer on the Scripps College
network is associated with the downloading or distribution of copyrighted materials, an
email is sent to the user associated with that computer. The email will include the Scripps
College Copyright Violation Notice along with a copy of the received DMCA notice. The
Dean of Students office is also copied on the notification. The user has 48 hours to respond
and either demonstrate that the notification was not warranted (by showing, for instance,
that the materials were not copyrighted, or that the use qualified for a legal exception) or
indicate that the material in question has been removed and no more unauthorized
downloading or distribution will take place. If any notification is shown to be unwarranted,
no record of it is kept. If the user does not respond within 48 hours and/or if unauthorized
use of copyrighted materials continues, network access is suspended (the user’s network
connection is disabled) until the situation is resolved. Email and other accounts will
continue to be accessible from the Scripps Computer Lab and Residential Hall Computer
room systems only.
Second Notification
On the second notification, the user’s network access will be suspended
immediately, and an email is again sent to the user associated with IP address in
the DMCA notice. The email will include the Scripps College Copyright
Violation Notice along with a copy of the received DMCA notice. The Dean of
Students office is also copied on the notification. The user is required to submit
a signed certification page that states that the user understands copyright issues
and the ramifications of a subsequent offense or to demonstrate that the
notification was unwarranted. Network access will be restored no sooner than
four business days and is contingent upon receipt of both the certification page
and a $500 service reconnection fee.
Third Notification
If a third notification is received, network access shall be suspended immediately. The user
is again informed by email, including a copy of the DMCA notice. The Dean of
Students office is also copied on the notification. Network access is not restored, if at all,
until the case is adjudicated by the College Judicial Board. The College Judicial Board
can impose whatever sanctions—including termination of network access; probation,
suspension, expulsion — as deemed appropriate. If network privileges are to be restored,
you can be charged a service reconnection fee of up to $1000.
72 Response to Preservation Notices
In April, 2008, the Claremont Colleges, including Scripps, began to receive a new form
of e-mail from RIAA commonly referred to as a “preservation letter.” A preservation
letter is notice to the College asking us to preserve specific records that could be
useful in a subsequent court case by an RIAA member against a person accused of
copyright infringement who has used an IP address on the College’s network. If Scripps
College receives a “preservation letter,” which requests the holding of basic contact
information for the individual, we will act to preserve the information and notify the user
of our doing so. The College will not however release any information unless served
with a proper subpoena.
Response to Settlement Letters
In February 2007 the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) introduced a
new strategy for dealing with copyright infringement. The new RIAA strategy includes
sending a “settlement letter” to Colleges. RIAA sends an e-mail to the College claiming
that one of our user’s is violating the record companies’ copyrights by uploading and
downloading copyrighted recordings. The e-mail to the College also states that if a
settlement is not reached with the person at the IP address, a lawsuit will be filed and a
subpoena will be served on the College requesting information to identify the person at
the IP address associated with the alleged copyright infringement. The College preserves
records associated with the IP address in anticipation that a John Doe complaint may be
filed and subpoena issued. The email to the College comes with a pdf file attached that
contains a pre-lawsuit settlement letter that RIAA requests the College to forward to the
user at the IP address associated with the alleged infringement. The RIAA settlement
letter offers the person at the IP address the opportunity to settle out of court.
Settlements under this program have been reported to be in the $3,000-$7,500 range.
If a user receives a settlement letter, it is the user’s responsibility to decide how to
respond to the RIAA. The user may want to seek legal counsel before making a
decision. When Scripps College receives an RIAA settlement letter it will forward that
letter to the user at IP address the RIAA has identified in the accompanying e-mail to
the College. The College’s procedures for addressing violations of the Appropriate Use
of Campus Computing and Network Resources are followed as a result of receipt of a
settlement letter e-mail. The College does NOT release the name of a user upon receipt
of a settlement letter e-mail. The College only provides identifying information about
an IP address to a copyright owner in response to a valid subpoena.
4 .27
Key Policy
Duplicating and Lending: All keys and card keys remain the property of the College
and may not be duplicated by residents. Residents are not permitted to loan, sell, or
transfer a college key or key card to any person for the purpose of allowing that person
to access college facilities. Any student who abuses this policy may have universal
access revoked.
Loss of Key/Card key: A lost key and/or card key must be reported to the Campus
Maintenance Office or Dean of Students staff member immediately. A re-key costs
$100 plus the cost of replacing other keys assigned to that lock; however the final
charge of re-keying a room or office key is determined by the locksmith. The lost card
key fee is $25.00 and is assessed even if the student finds the card. Any student who
fails to return keys checked out in the student’s name by the end of the academic year
will be charged the lock replacement fee.
73 Library Fine Policy
Procedures to be followed to transfer unpaid library fines to the Student Accounts:
1. The Libraries will mail an Over Due Book Notice within 2 days of the due
date for return of the book. The Over Due Book Notice will be modified to
read:
These books must be renewed or returned within 10 days or your student
account will be charged $100 per book. You may renew them yourself
through Blais, or phone a Circulation Dept. If you self-renew it is
important to CHECK EACH BOOK’S NEW DUE DATE! (909) 6218372 Honnold/Mudd Circulation”
NOTE: Blais software enhancements are scheduled for implementation
this summer that will enable the Libraries to forward a reminder notice
in advance of the due date.
2.
At the close of 10 days, the student will receive a follow up Bill Notice
that will be modified to read:
Bill Notice: The items listed have reached the billing date without
being returned or renewed. CHARGES ARE NOW DUE on these
items. This bill may be paid at the Library until the 25th of the month.
After that date, Library fines totaling $100 or more will be forwarded
to your student account. Library check-out privileges have been
suspended until the library fine has been paid. Please contact
Honnold/Mudd Circulation concerning renewals or payments. Thank
you. (909) 621-8372
3.
On the 25th of each month the Library will prepare a detail billing of
all accounts that total $100 or more in the aggregate and will forward
the report to the appropriate College Student Account Office. The
Student Account Office will record the library fines on the student
account and make payment directly to the Library. The Library agrees
to withhold check-out privileges until the Student Account Office
notifies the Library in writing by email that the fine has been paid. If
the book is returned instead after the fine has been placed on the student
account, the Library will notify the Student Account Office in writing
by email that the book has been returned. The Library will refund to
the College $90 of the $100 fine which will be credited directly to the
students account.
4.
For the convenience of students, the Library will collect fines on
weekends (Friday after 6:00 p.m. and Saturday) on behalf of the Student
Accounts Office. Payments will be forwarded on the first business day
directly to Student Account Office for credit directly to the student’s
account.
5.
By May 1 of each year the Libraries will forward to each College Dean
of Students and Student Account Office a list of those senior students
who have outstanding library fines. Students with delinquent accounts
will be subject to those policies of the College in which they are enrolled
regarding participation in graduation, transcript release, etc.
4 .29
Lockout Policy
Students are allowed two free lockouts per year, after that all key services will cost
$25 and will be billed to the respective student account at the end of each semester. In the
instance that a Department of Campus Safety officer provides the key service, the
Standards of Conduct
4 .28
74 student may choose to pay the officer by check upon services rendered. The following
is a breakdown of the hours of the day, whom to call, and when.
Weekdays:
Time
Contact
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Maintenance Office
5:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Residential Life Staff
Midnight – 8:00 a.m. Dept. of Campus Safety
Weekends:
Time
8:00 a.m. – Midnight
Midnight – 8:00 a.m.
Phone
ext. 72541
909-708-7603/4
ext. 72000
Contact
Phone
Residential Life Staff 909-708-7603/4
Dept. of Campus Safety ext. 72000
4 .30
Missing Student Notification Policy
Students who reside in on-campus housing are encouraged to identify a person to
be contacted if it is determined that the student has been missing for more than 24
hours, and to register that person’s emergency contact information, confidentially,
with the Dean of Students Office and the Department of Campus Safety. If a student
is determined to have been missing for 24 hours, the College and/or Department of
Campus Safety will, within 24 hours, notify the appropriate law enforcement
agency, and, if the missing student is under 18 years of age, and not an emancipated
individual, the College and/or Department will also notify a custodial parent or
guardian. If a member of the College community believes that a student who
resides in on-campus housing is missing, it should be reported to the On-Call Dean,
and/or the Department of Campus Safety so that appropriate action can be taken.
4 .31
Persons and Property Policy
Persons: Students shall not threaten or endanger the safety and/or well-being of
others. Students shall not attack or physically injure any member of any collegeowned or jointly-owned facility or member of an affiliated institution or their
authorized guests when such guests are on college-owned property.
Individual Property: Students may not possess, deface, or destroy any
objects/property not belonging to them without consent of the owner.
College Property: Propping doors, using windows, fire escapes, and French doors
or balconies as entrances or exits, and standing on roofs and ledges is prohibited
except in the case of an emergency. Outdoor antennas, painting individual rooms or
common areas, and waterbeds are not permitted. Skating on campus is only
permitted on concrete walkways.
4 .32
Quiet Hours Policy
Noise will be kept to a minimum at all times. Disorderly conduct, unreasonable noise, or
behavior that results in unreasonable annoyance is prohibited. Quiet hours will be in
effect from 11:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and 1:00 a.m. to 10:00
a.m. Friday and Saturday. At 8:00 a.m. on the Sunday before finals begin (not referring
to spring semester, seniors finals week), quiet hours will extend to 22 hours and
continue through the end of the semester.
4 .33 Smoking Policy
No smoking is allowed within 25ft of any campus building, student bedrooms, or in
public areas in the residence halls, that includes, but is not limited to, browsing rooms,
75 4 .34
4 .35
4.36
living rooms, hallways, stairwells, lounges, kitchenettes, interior courtyards, or balconies.
Storage Policy
Student storage is available in the basement of each residence hall (Frankel and Routt
share storage in the basement of Routt) during the academic year and may be used at a
student’s own risk. At the end of each academic year, students are responsible for
removing all their items from storage. The College empties and cleans the storage areas
over the summer and takes no responsibility for any items left behind from the academic
year.
Student Identification Card Policy
Every student is issued an official photo-ID card upon entrance to the College. This card
is evidence of the student’s enrollment at the College. An ID card may be required for
admission to certain facilities or events that are limited to Scripps College or Claremont
Colleges students. Students are required to show a valid ID card or other appropriate
identification if requested to do so by a Department of Campus Safety Officer or other
college official acting in his or her official capacity. The ID card also acts as a card key to
the residence halls, a meal card and a library card for Denison and Honnold/Mudd
Libraries.
Student Organization and Student Employment Offices Guidelines
General Expectations
Security and wellness for our students is important to Scripps College.
Please help us maintain a safe environment by following some simple, but
important guidelines when utilizing department public spaces and student
organization and student employment offices:
● Keep your office door locked and valuables secured when unattended.
Do not loan office keys to anyone and immediately report any lost or
stolen keys to the department director
● While general upkeep, maintenance, and custodial service is provided,
student organizations and employees are expected to maintain clean
working spaces at all times and do their part to support the general
upkeep and organization of public/common areas. If you notice
cleaning supplies are low or need to be replaced, please send notify
department staff.
● The kitchen space and refrigerator are a common space for use.
Students are to be respectful of cleaning sinks, stoves, and counter tops
after use and items stored in the refrigerator is the property of its owner.
Courtesy, respect and a commitment to safe space is expected at all
times as in common areas. Please be respectful of and responsive to
others in the space, particularly in shared spaces.
● Scripps does not assume any liability for loss, theft, or damage to
personal property, or to personal injury incurred while using its
facilities.
● If you notice someone or something suspicious happening in the space,
contact Campus Safety at 909-607-2000.
Alcohol, Drugs and Smoking
• Smoking, Illegal Drugs, and Alcoholic Beverages are NOT allowed
in public/common areas, student organization offices, or student
employment offices (See Guide to Student Life Alcohol Policy
4.05, specifically section V. Standard of Conduct Governing
Alcoholic Beverages and Drugs).
Office/Shared Space
76 ●
Space around campus is limited; the use of organizational space and
offices is a privilege. Damage to organization or employment spaces or
furniture is unacceptable. This includes non-malicious damage such as
that done to walls by putting up posters or through the use of nails,
adhesives or tape. Blue painters tape may be used. Any damage
should be reported to the department director.
● Painting of office spaces is prohibited without formal permission from
the department and Scripps maintenance.
● Organizations will be held responsible for any damage to their office
unless:
● The damage has been noted at the beginning of the semester and
confirmed by Scripps Maintenance
● The damage is normal wear and tear as determined by Scripps
maintenance.
● The damage is the result of a maintenance problem that has been
properly reported.
Student organizations or individuals may be held responsible for damage.
These charges will be based on the Residential Life charges and pay
structure.
Key Use and Access
● Key access is a privilege and can be revoked at any time at the
discretion of the College, Student Affairs and/or the department
director.
Office Supplies
● All office space supplies and equipment (printer, copier, computer) are
provided for organizational or work-related projects only. Please ask
for permission from office staff to use materials for other matters.
● All supplies and materials are intended for use in the space and should
not be removed, “checked-out” or borrowed.
Accountability
The guidelines and policies above are in place to maintain a sense of
community for student organizations and student employees. It is
important that students with access to these spaces maintain these
guidelines and policies as a part of their appointment as a student
organization leader and/or student employee.
● Violations of the guidelines and policies listed above and included in
the code of conduct while using student organization and/or student
employee offices and/or public/common areas can lead to the
organization, employee and/or an individual student being held
responsible for financial restitution, damage charges, organization
probation, after business hour access, and/or loss of office space and
privileges.
● Organizations and students found in violation of Student Life policies
within Student Organization and/or Student Employment Offices or
Departmental public/common areas are potentially subject to the
campus judicial process.
77 4.37
Whistle Procedures and Policy
All students are encouraged to carry a whistle at all times; new students are issued
whistles upon arrival at Scripps. Whistles should only be blown to indicate danger.
A $50.00 fine may be levied for blowing a whistle inappropriately. Whistle drills
will be held on a periodic basis to enable the community to practice the use of
whistles in emergency situations.
Anyone who hears a whistle should call the Department of Campus Safety (ext.
72000) immediately. The dispatcher should be given both the location of the caller
and the location where the whistle was blown. After calling the Department of
Campus Safety, if the area appears safe, students are encouraged to proceed, in a
group, to the location where the whistle was blown. If the individual in danger is
unable to continue blowing her whistle, students are encouraged to blow their
whistles to attract security personnel to the scene; however, whistles should only be
blown if the victim is in view.
4.38
Sexual Misconduct, Harassment, and Discrimination (Prelude to Policy)
As a women’s college, Scripps College is acutely aware of the increased concern
about and awareness of sexual misconduct at colleges and universities. The
College is committed to providing effective education, support, investigative
procedures, and policies to Scripps students and other community members in order
to respond to and remedy instances of sexual misconduct or other harassing
behavior.
In 1994, the College adopted the Policy on Discrimination and Harassment set forth
in Section 4.39 below which includes procedures for the reporting and investigation
of allegations of sexual harassment. The College also adopted the Sexual Assault
Policy set forth below in Section 4.40 which defines sexual assault and provides
guidance and resources for community members who have been the victim of a
sexual assault. The College is in the process of revising these policies in
consultation with a Title IX Policy Review Task Force comprised of faculty, staff,
and students. These revisions are designed to reflect (i) developments in this area
under Title IX and the Violence Against Women Act, (ii) the fact that sexual
misconduct has become the predominate form of sexual harassment occurring at
colleges and universities, and (iii) the results of collaboration among the Claremont
Colleges in the investigation of cross-campus cases of sexual misconduct or other
harassing behavior.
Identification of Resources
Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators – The president has appointed the
following Title IX coordinator and two deputy coordinators for the College:
Title IX Coordinator:
Jennifer Berklas
Director of Human Resources
Office of Human Resources
Vita Nova Hall 120
(909) 607-7976
JBerklas@scrippscollege.edu
Deputy Title IX Coordinator:
Gretchen Edwalds-Gilbert
78 Associate Dean of Faculty
Balch Hall 134
(909) 607-7068
gedwalds@kecksci.claremont.edu
Deputy Title IX Coordinator:
Sonia De La Torre-Iniguez
Assistant Dean of Students
Dean of Students Office
Balch Hall
(909) 621-8277
sdelator@scrippscollege.edu
The Title IX Coordinators will be responsible for coordinating (i) the College’s
educational and training programs related to Title IX and sexual misconduct, (ii)
the College’s receipt and investigation of complaints of sexual misconduct or other
harassing behavior, and (iii) the College’s monitoring, compliance, and reporting
activities. Until the final revisions of the College’s Policy on Harassment and
Discrimination are completed, the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators
will serve as Sexual Harassment Grievance Officers under Section 4.39 below.
Scripps students who believe they have been subjected to sexual misconduct, sexual
harassment, or other discriminatory behavior, or who has witnessed such behavior,
should contact the Title IX Coordinator or one of the Deputy Coordinators.
Additional Resources:
Campus and community resources: resources that provide assistance to survivors of
sexual offenses are available on the Scripps campus, through the CUC Central
Services and from the community. They include:
Scripps College Student Affairs On-Call Staff, ext. 18170 /ext. 72000, (909) 6218170 /(909) 607-2000, are available 24 hours a day for emergencies and can be
contacted by calling the Department of Campus Safety and requesting to speak with
the Scripps on-call staff person.
Department of Campus Safety ext. 18170/ ext. 72000 or
(909) 621-8170/(909) 607-2000
Claremont Police Department (909) 399-5411
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services ext. 18202 or (909) 621-8202
Student Health Services ext. 18222 or (909) 621-8222
Project Sister (909) 626-HELP LA Rape Hotline (310) 392-8381
Scripps Advocates (909) 214-2138 The Scripps Advocates will be Scripps students
trained in providing support and information to survivors of sexual assault by hotline
from 8 pm to 8 am each night while classes are in session.
Cross-Campus Investigations
79 A number of the sexual misconduct instances occurring at The Claremont Colleges, and
many of the instances experienced by Scripps students, involve students from a
Claremont College other than Scripps. In such instances, the home college of the
alleged perpetrator has primary responsibility for conducting the investigation and any
judicial hearings associated with the case in accordance with the home college’s
policies and procedures. The Claremont Colleges have collaborated with respect to
certain practices and procedures in order to ensure consistent and fair treatment of all
parties involved in such cases.
Composition of Investigation Teams – The Claremont Colleges have coordinated
training of those who may be called upon to serve as investigators in a sexual
misconduct or other harassment case. The investigator pool members from all of the
Colleges have been trained using the same materials and instructors. A trained Scripps
investigator will be part of the investigation team in any case in which another
Claremont College is leading the investigation of allegations of sexual misconduct or
harassment made by a Scripps student. The Scripps investigator will participate in all
aspects of the investigation, including witness interviews, review of documents or other
tangible evidence, and the reporting of findings related to such investigation.
Common Definitions -- The Claremont Colleges also have agreed to use a set of
common definitions related to sexual misconduct and other harassing behavior in order
to facilitate consistency in cross-campus investigations. Pursuant to the commitment of
the Claremont Colleges to use common definitions, the definitions set forth below will
be incorporated into the Scripps Policy on Discrimination and Harassment as part of the
upcoming revisions to the policy.
Unlawful Harassment Defined
1.
Unlawful Harassment in General
Unlawful harassment is conduct that creates an intimidating, offensive, or hostile
working or academic environment, or that interferes with work or academic
performance based on a person’s protected status, including race, color, national
origin, ancestry, sex (which includes harassment based on gender, pregnancy,
childbirth, or related medical conditions), sexual orientation, gender identity and
expression, age, religion, physical or mental disability, medical condition, marital
status, veteran status, family care leave status, or other status protected by
antidiscrimination and anti-harassment statutes, such as Titles VII or IX of the Civil
Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Age Discrimination in
Employment Act, and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. Such
harassment can be physical, verbal, or visual. Harassment can be committed by
employers, coworkers, fellow students, and third parties. Generally, statements
and/or conduct legitimately and reasonably related to the College’s mission of
education do not constitute harassment.
To count as harassment under this policy, such conduct must:
• be based upon one or more of the categories mentioned above;
• be offensive to the individual complaining of harassment and offensive to a
reasonable person; and
• be so persistent, repetitive, pervasive, or severe that it has the purpose or
effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s academic or
professional performance or creating an intimidating, abusive or hostile
educational, employment or living environment at the College.
Harassment may also occur when submission to conduct described above is made
either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment,
80 education, living environment at the College, or participation in a College activity.
2.
Sexual Harassment
One form of unlawful harassment is sexual harassment. Sexual harassment may be
either “quid pro quo” harassment, that is sexual advances or requests for sexual favors
where submission is made an explicit or implicit term or condition of an individual’s
employment or education or where submission or rejection is used as the basis for
making employment or educational decisions affecting an individual; or
“environmental ” harassment, where the individual is subjected to a hostile or
intimidating environment, in which verbal or physical conduct, because of its severity
and/or persistence, is likely to interfere with an individual’s work or education, or to
affect adversely an individual’s living conditions. Occasional compliments that are
generally accepted as not offensive or other generally accepted social behavior, on the
other hand, do not constitute sexual harassment.
Examples of sexual harassment may include such conduct as:
a.
Physical assault or other unwelcome touching;
b. Direct or implied threats that submission to sexual advances will be a condition of
employment, work status, promotion, grades, or letters of recommendations;
c.
Direct propositions of a sexual nature;
d. Subtle pressure for sexual activity, an element of which may be repeated
requests for private meetings without an academic and employment purpose;
e. A pattern of conduct that would discomfort or humiliate, or both, a reasonable
person at whom the conduct was directed that includes one or more of the
following: (1) unnecessary touching, patting, hugging, or brushing against a
person’s body; (2) remarks of a sexual nature about a person’s clothing or body,
whether or not intended to be complimentary; (3) remarks about sexual activity or
speculations about previous sexual experience; or (4) other comments of a sexual
nature, including sexually explicit statements, questions, jokes or anecdotes;
f. Certain visual displays of sexually-oriented images outside the educational context;
g. Letters, notes or electronic mail containing comments, words or images as described in
(e) above.
Sexual harassment includes harassment of women by men, of men by women, and
same gender gender-based harassment. Sexual misconduct offenses are specific forms
of sexual harassment and are strictly prohibited by the College. Due to the unique
nature of sexual misconduct the College has a separate Sexual Misconduct Policy which
is outlined below.
Sexual Misconduct
A. The expectations of our community regarding sexual consent can be summarized as
follows: In order for individuals to engage in sexual activity of any type with each other,
there must be clear, knowing and voluntary consent prior to and during sexual activity.
Consent is sexual permission.
Sexual misconduct is a specific form of sexual harassment and is prohibited by the
College. Sexual misconduct is defined as:
1. Non-­‐Consensual Sexual Contact (or attempts to commit same)
Non-­‐Consensual Sexual Contact is:
• any
intentional sexual touching,
• however
slight,
any object,
• with
81 •
•
by a person upon a person,
that is without consent and/or by force*
Sexual contact includes: Intentional contact with the breasts, buttock, groin, or genitals,
or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another touch you or
themselves with or on any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual
manner, though not involving contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals,
mouth or other orifice.
*The use of force is not “worse” than the subjective experience of violation of someone
who has sex without consent. However, the use of physical force constitutes a
stand-­‐alone non-­‐sexual offense and in cases involving force the Respondent will face
additional charges for the assaultive behavior.
2. Non-­‐Consensual Sexual Intercourse (or attempts to commit same)
Non-­‐Consensual Sexual Intercourse is:
• any sexual intercourse however slight,
any object,
• with
a person upon a person,
• by
is without consent and/or by force.
• that
Intercourse includes:
vaginal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger, anal
penetration by a penis, object, tongue, or finger, and oral copulation (mouth to genital
contact or genital to mouth contact), no matter how slight the penetration or contact.
3. Other Conduct when Gender-Based: The following alleged conduct will be
addressed through the Grievance Procedures outlined in this Guide when the conduct is
gender-based.
a. Dating violence (as defined by the Violence Against Women Act) is violence
committed by a person
i. who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with
the victim; and
ii. where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a
consideration of (1) the length of the relationship, (2) the type of the relationship,
and (3) the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the
relationship
b. Domestic violence (as defined by the Violence Against Women Act) is the use of
physical, sexual or emotional abuse or threats to control another person who is a
current or former spouse or other intimate partner. It includes felony or
misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the
victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person
who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a
person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family
violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person
against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the
domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.
4.
Sexual Exploitation: Sexual Exploitation is a form of sexual misconduct which
occurs when a person takes non-­‐consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for
his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one
being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual
82 misconduct offenses. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:
a. Invasion of sexual privacy;
b. Prostituting another person;
c. Non-­‐consensual video or audio-­‐taping of sexual activity;
d. Going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting your friends hide in the
closet to watch you having consensual sex);
e. Engaging in voyeurism;
f. Knowingly transmitting a sexually transmitted infection, a sexually transmitted
disease, or HIV to another person;
g. Exposing one’s genitals in non-­‐consensual circumstances; inducing another to
expose their genitals;
h. Sexually-­‐based stalking.
5. Sexual Assault: “Sexual assault” (as defined by the Violence Against Women Act)
means an offense classified as a forcible or nonforcible sex offense under the uniform
crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Generally, a sexual
assault has been committed when an individual engages in sexual activity without the
explicit consent of the other individual involved. Sexual activity is any touching of a
sexual or other intimate part of a person for the purpose of gratifying sexual desire of
either party. This includes coerced touching of the actor by the victim as well as the
touching of the victim by the actor, whether directly or through clothing.
B. Consent: Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary. Consent is active, not passive. Silence,
in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Consent can be given by words or actions,
as long as those words or actions create mutually understandable and clear permission
regarding willingness to engage in (and the conditions of) sexual activity. In order to give
effective consent, one must be of legal age and have the capacity to give consent. The legal
age of consent in the state of California is 18 years.
1. Consent to any one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to any other
form(s) of sexual activity.
2. A previous relationship or prior consent does not imply consent to future sexual acts.
3. Consent can be withdrawn. Thus, even if a person agreed to sexual interaction or
continued sexual interaction, that person has the right to change their mind,
irrespective of how much sexual interaction may have already taken place.
4. Force and Coercion: Consent obtained through force is not consent. Force is the
use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual
access. Force includes the use of threats, intimidation (implied threats) and/or
coercion to produce consent. Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity
(“Have sex with me or I’ll hit you. Okay, don’t hit me; I’ll do what you want.”).
Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure
used to get consent. When someone makes it clear that they do not want sex, that
they want to stop, or that they do not want to go past a certain point of sexual
interaction, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive.
NOTE: There is no requirement that a party resists a sexual advance or request,
but resistance is a clear demonstration of non-­‐consent. The presence of force,
however, is not demonstrated by the absence of resistance.
5. Capacity/Incapacitation: Incapacitation is a state where someone cannot make
rational, reasonable decisions because they lack the capacity to give knowing
consent (e.g., to understand the “who, what, when, where, why or how” of their
sexual interaction). Sexual activity with someone who one should have known to be
83 -­‐-­‐ or based on the circumstances should reasonably have known to be -­‐-­‐ mentally or
physically incapacitated (i.e. by alcohol or other drug use, unconsciousness, asleep,
or blacked out), constitutes a violation of this policy.
a. Incapacitation due to alcohol or other drugs: Because alcohol or other drug
use can place an individual’s capacity to consent in question, sober sex is less
likely to raise such questions. Being under the influence of alcohol or other
drugs does not in and of itself indicate incapacitation. When alcohol or other
drugs, including date rape drugs (such as Rohypnol, Ketamine, GHB, etc.), are
involved, a person will be considered unable to give valid consent if they cannot
fully understand the details of a sexual interaction (the who, what, when, where,
why, or how) because they lack the capacity to reasonably understand the
situation. Administering a date rape drug to another individual is a violation of
this policy. More information on these drugs can be found at
http://www.911rape.org/.
b. Incapacitation due to other reasons: This policy also covers a person whose
incapacity results from mental or physical disabilities, sleep, unconsciousness,
or involuntary physical restraint.
4.39
Scripps College Policy on Discrimination and Harassment
As a community dedicated to the education of women and the advancement of learning,
Scripps College seeks to maintain an environment in which individuals can live, learn
and work free from discrimination and harassment of any kind. The College regards
such behavior as inimical to its educational purposes and to the respect for individuals
that it holds to be essential in all aspects of its institutional life. Members of the Scripps
community, that is defined as all individuals permanently or temporarily employed by,
studying at or officially connected with the College, should be aware that the College is
strongly opposed to all forms of discrimination and harassment and that such behavior
is prohibited by College policy and, in some instances, by civil laws.
Discrimination of any kind limits the access of all members of the community to the
full life of the College. Harassment is defined as verbal, written, or physical conduct
that has the intent or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s education,
work, or residential life at Scripps. Such harassment specifically includes that which is
based on race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, sexual orientation, or disability.
I . Sexual Harassment
A. Definition of Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that is illegal under the
California Fair Employment and Housing Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 for employees, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 for
students. Scripps College accepts the definition of sexual harassment as stated in
the guidelines of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission:
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or
physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when (a)
submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or
condition of any individual’s employment or education; (b) submission to or
rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or
84 educational decisions affecting such individual; or (c) such conduct has the purpose
or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or educational
performance or of creating an intimidating, hostile or demeaning employment or
educational environment.
Because of the potential complications arising from the existing power differentials,
Scripps College discourages romantic relationships between faculty and students,
faculty and support staff, support staff and students and supervisors and their
immediate subordinates (see Policy on Consenting Relationships below).
B. General Principles
1. It is the policy of the College to prohibit any form of sexual harassment and to
impose appropriate sanctions against anyone who engages in sexual harassment.
2. It is the policy of the College to make sure that any person who believes s/he has
been sexually harassed can come forward to make a complaint without fear of
reprisal. Such retaliation is unlawful. Any attempt to take reprisal against a person
making a complaint of sexual harassment shall be treated as a separate count of
harassment.
3. It is the policy of the College to take all complaints of sexual harassment
seriously and to deal with them expeditiously, confidentially and fairly.
4. It is the policy of the College that the sanctions against proven sexual harassment
may range from reprimand to expulsion from the College or dismissal from
employment.
5. In the event that harassing conduct occurs by persons not associated with the
College, it remains the policy of the College to encourage any person who believes
s/he has been harassed to come forward to make a complaint. Although the College
cannot be responsible for or control all conduct of persons not associated with the
College, the College will take appropriate action to prevent or deal with such
conduct.
C. Procedures for Making and Handling Complaints of Sexual Harassment
1.The president shall appoint a member of the faculty or staff to be the Sexual
Harassment Grievance Officer (SHGO).The duties of the SHGO shall be (a) to
provide information concerning sexual harassment and the College’s policy on
sexual harassment to all persons employed by, studying at or officially connected
with the College, and to make public the names of the alternate SHGOs as provided
under #3 below; (b) to facilitate informal mediation of sexual harassment
complaints where appropriate; (c) to receive formal charges of sexual harassment
and to inform both the accuser and the accused of their rights under College policy;
(d) to mediate cases of sexual harassment with other Claremont institutions as
necessary; and (e) to maintain confidential records as described below.
2. Any person who believes he or she has been sexually harassed shall take his or
her complaint to the SHGO within 120 days of the date of the latest instance of the
alleged harassment, exclusive of semester breaks or College holidays.
3. A list of three additional persons shall be made public by the SHGO (a member
of the faculty, a member of the support staff and a member of the Dean of Students
staff members) who may act as alternates for the SHGO if the complainant so
chooses. These individuals shall be instructed by the SHGO as to their
responsibilities and duties at the time they are so designated and shall be fully
empowered to act as the SHGO throughout a case if the complainant so chooses.
85 4. If the complainant wishes to explore the definition of sexual harassment as it
applies to the complainant’s situation, without initiating action with the SHGO or
with one of the alternate SHGOs, the complainant may do so by discussing the
nature of the complaint without naming the accused. The complainant should
understand that when an individual is named the College is obliged by law to see
that the complaint is acted upon in one of the ways described below, and is further
obligated to inform the accused of the complaint. The College shall maintain a
record of the complaint, a summary of the investigation undertaken by the College,
and a statement of action taken (if any) whether the complainant elected to proceed
to a formal hearing.
D. Informal Procedures
1. If both parties agree, the complaint may be handled informally by any means the
SHGO may suggest and to which the parties agree (such as mediation by an
agreed-upon third party).
2. The informal proceedings shall commence immediately and be completed within
15 working days of the date of the complaint. This time frame is exclusive of
semester breaks and/or College holidays that may extend the time allowed for
completing the informal procedures.
3. In the event there is a resolution that involves, in the opinion of the SHGO, an
admission of significant wrongdoing, then the SHGO will prepare a written
statement of the case and the agreed resolution, including the proposed sanction.
The SHGO will discuss this statement with the president, and upon the agreement
of the president, the statement will be signed by the complainant, the accused and
the president. Copies of this statement will be kept in the files of the complainant
and in the personnel or educational file of any accused person who is an employee
or student of the College. Such statement shall be considered a settlement
agreement and shall prevent any party from reopening the case. In case of
exoneration, no records beyond those stated in C4 above will be kept.
4. The SHGO may decline to provide means for an informal resolution of a
complaint if he or she believes the complaint may subsequently be subject to a
criminal charge.
5. The College may investigate charges of sexual harassment and take appropriate
action, even if the alleged harassed student declines to proceed with an informal or
formal hearing. In such instances, the College shall not abrogate the rights of due
process specified under E6 below.
E. Formal Procedure
1. At any point prior to or during the informal proceeding, either party may request
that the case go forward to a formal hearing, either by a JB or by the president, as
provided below. Such requests must normally be made in writing to the SHGO
within 120 days of the latest instance of the alleged harassment or within 30 days
after the suspension of the informal proceedings.
2. The Judicial Board (JB) shall consist of two students, two staff persons, and two
faculty members chosen as follows: Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure
Committee (APT) shall nominate six faculty members from the list of regular,
86 continuing faculty members past their first review. First, the complainant and then
the accused shall each strike two names. Service on this JB may not be refused.
3. The JB shall convene within five working days of its formation and complete its
investigation, including the formal hearing, within 15 working days of its first
meeting. This time frame is exclusive of semester breaks and/or College holidays
and may be extended for good cause.
4. The JB shall investigate the facts of the case to the best of its ability and shall
have the right to call witnesses, hire investigators, or other relevant professionals
and, with the approval of the president, to use legal counsel appointed by the
College. If the JB finds that sexual harassment has occurred, it shall recommend an
appropriate sanction against the perpetrator. At the time of setting the sanction, and
only then, the JB shall be informed of past complaints, if any, that are recorded in
the personnel or educational file of the accused or in the records of the SHGO,
except those from which he or she has been exonerated. This sanction shall be
reviewed by, and then imposed by, an administrative panel consisting of the Dean
of Students, the dean of the faculty and the personnel officer, that shall have the
power to modify the recommendation of the JB. Expulsion from the College or
dismissal from employment shall be imposed only in the case of gross misconduct
that is, clearly intentional, abusive and/or coercive acts that significantly harm
another person, or the repetition of serious acts of misconduct for which an
individual has previously been formally charged and been found to have committed.
5. Within seven working days of the completion of its investigation, the JB shall
prepare a written report detailing its findings and its recommendation concerning
the sanction, if any, for the administrative panel and the president of the College.
This report shall be available to both parties. Four votes are required for a finding
of sexual harassment. If the JB divides on the nature of the sanction, the sanction
will be decided by the administrative panel.
6. It is the policy of the College to allow for due process to all parties from the
point at which a formal procedure is instituted, that shall be defined as including
the right to timely access to all information in the possession of the College
relevant to the case, the right to call witnesses, the right of the accused to confront
the complainant in a formal proceeding, the right to be represented by legal or other
counsel and the right to object to proffered evidence that is irrelevant, based on
hearsay or is otherwise unreliable.
7. A verbatim record of the hearing shall be made and transcripts furnished upon
request to the complainant and accused.
8. The person found to have engaged in sexual harassment (i.e. the accused) or the
complainant may appeal to the president the finding and/or the sanction imposed.
An appeal must be submitted directly to the president within ten working days of
the date that notice of the final determination was issued to the complainant and the
accused. An appeal must be based on the following: significant new evidence;
procedural error, including the misapplication of policy or legal standards; the
harshness of the sanction; or the perception of bias.
Written notice of the appeal decision shall be provided to both parties within five
working days of the date upon which the president received the appeal. This time
frame is exclusive of semester breaks and/or College holidays and may be extended
for good cause.
9. If both parties agree and the president consents, the case may be heard directly
by the president, bypassing the JB designated above. In doing so, no right of due
process is waived except that of appeal to the president. Written notice of the
determination by the president shall be provided to both parties within 15 working
87 days. This time frame is exclusive of semester breaks and/or College holidays and
may be extended for good cause.
F. Additional Information
Further information regarding the provisions of the California Fair Employment
and Housing Act, including a list of outside agencies for those seeking external
remedies, is available upon request.
G. Consenting Relationships
1. The College strongly discourages and considers inappropriate consenting sexual
relationships between individuals associated with the College, in the case where
one of whom exercises institutional authority over the other.
2. Where such relationships involve the active and immediate exercise of authority,
as in the case of a faculty member and a student currently studying under the
faculty member or a staff member and an immediate subordinate, the College has
the right to take disciplinary action.
3. In the case of a sexual relationship in which the parties believe that the
restrictions of the preceding points do not apply, it is the obligation of the
individual in authority to take all necessary steps to remove himself or herself from
professional actions affecting the other individual. Failure to do so may result in
disciplinary action. These requirements also apply where a sexual relationship
occurred in the past.
II. Scripps College Policy on Discrimination and Harassment Other Than Sexual
Harassment
Discrimination and harassment of any kind is unacceptable at Scripps and is in conflict
with the educational policies and interests of the College, and in some instances, with
civil laws. Harassment is defined as verbal or physical conduct that has the intent or
effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s education, work or residential
life at Scripps. Such harassment specifically includes harassment on the basis of race,
color, sex, religion, age, national origin, sexual orientation, or physical disability.
Any member of the Scripps community who believes he or she has been so harassed is
encouraged to take the matter to an appropriate officer of the College. The College
officer shall attempt to resolve this matter within the time frame specified for the
Informal Procedures for sexual harassment instances. If this attempt to resolve the
matter informally is not successful, or if the complainant requests formal investigation,
or in a case of persistent behavior that may require formal disciplinary action on the
part of the College, the relevant procedures and time frame specified for conducting
formal hearings for sexual harassment instances will be used. In these procedures as
well as in those covering sexual harassment described above, the College expects that
persons required to act in a judicial capacity will observe strict confidentiality.
4 .40
Scripps College Sexual Assault Policy
Scripps College takes a strong stand on the issue of sexual assault. As a women’s
college, we feel it is important to demonstrate our concern for women’s safety and
women’s lives by promoting awareness and understanding of the issues surrounding
sexual assault, while providing progressive policy, information, and support services
for our students.
88 Standards of Conduct
Scripps College wishes to provide a safe learning environment, conducive to the
learning process for all of its students and, therefore, will absolutely not tolerate any
kind of sexual interaction accomplished by force or intimidation. The College
recognizes that any kind of forced sexual interaction harms the victim/survivor both
physically and psychologically. When such an act occurs it degrades the
victim/survivor, our campus community, and society at large.
Assault is actual or threatened physical contact with a person’s body without the
person’s consent.
Sexual assault is an assault that includes actual or threatened contact with a person’s
genitals and/or breasts, and/or attempts to disrobe a person fully or partially. Rape is
sexual assault in which an object (usually, but not always, a penis) is forced into a
bodily orifice, e.g., it may be genital, anal, or oral. The victim/survivor does not
provoke rape; rape is a crime of violence that is intended, and usually planned, by the
assailant. The primary motive is not sexual gratification, but rather, to dominate,
humiliate and/or injure. The definition of rape does not depend upon the relationship, or
lack thereof, between assailant and victim/survivor. Current figures show 60% of rapes
are committed by acquaintances or relatives.
“Consent” is defined as agreement that an individual is willing to engage in an activity.
At any point, an individual may indicate in a verbal or non-verbal manner that he or she
does not want sexual contact to go any further. An individual has the right to say that
sexual conduct should stop at any time regardless of how much sexual conduct has
already occurred, even if he or she had agreed earlier to more sexual contact. Sexual
interaction with individuals, who are unable to give consent because of alcohol,
controlled substances, or unconsciousness, is sexual interaction without consent.
As part of The Claremont Colleges community, Scripps College is committed to
working with the other Claremont Colleges toward serious and responsible address of
the complex and often misconstrued issue of sexual assault. This is necessary in order
to assure our most complete efforts are in action. Any Scripps student who is sexually
assaulted by a member of The Claremont Colleges community is encouraged to seek
legal advice regarding filing of criminal charges. In addition, the student may file
judicial action against a student at his/her home college, see below: Student Conduct on
the other Claremont Colleges, 6.20.
I. What to do if you are assaulted
A. Get to a safe place.
B. Call the Department of Campus Safety, ext. 72000, (or the Claremont Police,
399-5411) and PROJECT SISTER 24-hour crisis hotline at (909) 626-HELP
IMMEDIATELY! C. If you want, call a friend, RA, the Dean of Students Office, or
someone you trust to come and be with you. The Monsour Counseling and
Psychological Services also has a staff person on call 24 hours per day for
emergencies, available upon request through the Department of Campus Safety, ext.
72000.
II. Information important to a student who has been assaulted
A. To help preserve evidence, do not douche, bathe, shower, change clothing, or
remove anything from the location of the assault.
B. The immediate concern is your safety and well-being. You have the right to
confidentiality, to have a person of your choice accompany you, to have unbiased
information about your options, to seek counsel, and to make your own decisions.
89 C. In order to prosecute a rape charge, it is extremely important to obtain a rape
exam within 72 hours of the assault. Even if you are unsure, it is advisable to obtain
a rape exam so that the option to prosecute within the legal system remains open.
PROJECT SISTER can meet you at the nearest hospital emergency room and can
advise and support you through the experience.
D. Victims of threatened or actual sexual assault may experience one or more
common, but highly stressful reactions. These include self-blame, unremitting
anxiety, recurrent nightmares, and depression. Any of these reactions may continue
for some time after the assault. Regardless of how recently the assault occurred or
of how severe the reaction, discussing the experience with a trained professional
can be extremely helpful.
PROJECT SISTER Sexual Assault Crisis Services (626-4357) include a rape
survivors support group, short-term counseling, and referrals for long-term
counseling as well as supportive staff and dependable information. Monsour
Counseling and Psychological Services (ext. 18202) and Student Health Services
(ext. 18222) can also be consulted for counseling or medical examination. Strict
confidentiality will be maintained.
4.41
The Claremont Colleges Inter-campus Sexual Assault Policy
If the alleged perpetrator is an employee or student from one of The Claremont
Colleges or the Claremont University Consortium, Scripps College will take steps to
stop the conduct and remedy its affects. However, the investigation and grievance
procedures for addressing the conduct will be those of the alleged perpetrator’s home
institution. For more information or help in accessing the grievance procedures at the
alleged perpetrator’s home institution contact the Scripps College Title IX Coordinator,
or a member of the Dean of Students Office.
A. Educational Programs: The Claremont Colleges provide ongoing educational
programs for students, faculty, and staff in order to promote awareness about rape,
sexual harassment, and other sexual offenses. These programs are designed to heighten
community awareness and present sexual offense. Programs may vary from college to
college. In order to promote a safe campus environment, individuals who may be in
violation of college policies on sexual offenses should be informed about their conduct.
They may not be aware that their behavior is sexually offensive, threatening or hurtful.
Education may remedy their behavior.
B. Campus and community resources: resources that provide assistance to survivors of
sexual offenses are available on each campus, through the Central Services and from
the community. They include:
Department of Campus Safety ext. 18170 or 72000
Claremont Police Department (909) 399-5411
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services ext. 18202
Student Health Services ext. 18222
Project Sister (909) 626-HELP LA Rape Hotline (310) 392-8381
4.42 The Claremont Colleges Banning Policy
POLICY ON BANNING DISRUPTIVE PERSONS FROM THE
CAMPUSES OF THE CLAREMONT COLLEGES
90 Background
The Claremont Colleges are composed of seven institutions of higher education,
including: The Claremont Graduate University, Claremont McKenna College, Harvey
Mudd College, the Keck Graduate Institute, Pitzer College, Pomona College, and
Scripps College. For the purpose of this policy, the Claremont University Consortium
shall also be considered part of The Claremont Colleges, as well as any property owned
or rented by The Claremont Colleges which is located away from the home campuses.
As institutions of higher education, The Claremont Colleges share a common purpose
of providing an educational experience that is, among other things, safe from harm,
fosters personal growth, and is intellectually enlightening. The need to protect
individual institutions and The Claremont Colleges from harm to its community
members and assets is therefore a very high priority. Balanced against this priority is
the need to protect free speech and academic freedom.
The Claremont Colleges must comply with all legal requirements of the United States
and the State of California when taking steps to protect community members and assets.
Policy
In the event of a threat to the safety or well-being of an individual, group, or member
institution of The Claremont Colleges, each institution reserves the right to prohibit
disruptive or potentially dangerous persons from their campuses. The Claremont
Colleges further agree to consult with each other about such individuals and, with
permission, extend the ban to cover any or all of the member institutions and their
functions.
The authority for this policy emanates from each institution’s right to control its own
property, and authority for coordination between The Claremont Colleges occurs
through agreement among the Presidents of the Colleges.
Under normal circumstances, the Deans of Students, the Director of Campus Safety, or
the Vice President for Student Affairs of The Claremont University Consortium shall be
the designated officials who are responsible for the banning of disruptive or potentially
dangerous persons from campus. Other designated officials may be expected to carry
out these duties, as determined by the President(s) of the institution(s).
The designated official who is assigned to review any potentially disruptive or
dangerous situation may exercise emergency power, including issuing an immediate
ban, to respond to a threat. These actions shall be reasonable and narrowly tailored to
the fit the event.
The designated official may also issue a ban as the result of an investigation, with the
opportunity for all parties to be heard, and the results of which lead the official to
conclude that illegal activity, disruption, or the threat of harm to others or property has
or may have occurred. The official may also ban an individual if there is reason to
suspect that illegal activity, disruption, or the threat of harm to others or property is
increasingly likely to occur in the future.
91 Bans to one or more of The Claremont Colleges may be temporary or permanent, and
shall clearly indicate their length and scope to the person who has been banned. This
policy does not preclude The Claremont Colleges from taking criminal, civil, or
restraining action against individuals.
The following procedures provide guidelines to be used by the designated official to
ban an individual from the campus, property, or function of the college or colleges.
These procedures do not apply to faculty or staff.
Procedures Governing Individuals With or Without a Relationship to The Claremont
Colleges
(1) Regarding Individuals with No Direct Connection to The Claremont Colleges:
This set of procedures applies to individuals who: have never been a student of The
Claremont Colleges; do not have a spouse or partner who is an employee or volunteer
at The Claremont Colleges; and are not parents or guardians of a current or former
student of The Claremont Colleges.
Each designated official has the authority to issue a ban on behalf of one or more of
The Claremont Colleges. A ban of this type is communicated to all other Student Deans,
and a copy of the ban letter shall be sent to the Director of Campus Safety.
(2) Regarding Individuals with a Connection to One of The Claremont Colleges or the
Claremont University Consortium:
This set of procedures applies to: alumni; former students who are not currently
enrolled; spouses or partners of an employee, part-time employee, or volunteer; those
performing volunteer work; and parents or guardians of current or former students.
The designated official initiating the ban shall send a message to all other Deans of
Students to determine if there is any objection to banning the individual in question.
Any Dean raising an objection may choose not to have his/her campus covered by the
ban. If no concerns are raised within 48 hours, the initiating official may apply the ban
to cover all The Claremont Colleges’ properties.
(3) Regarding Current Students:
This set of procedures applies to any student who is currently enrolled at one of The
Claremont Colleges, including when the Colleges are in or out of session.
It is within the authority of the banning campuses and CUC to make this decision
without regard to judicial proceedings at the home campus.
(a)How the Ban of a Current Student Applies to Colleges:
Unless otherwise specified, the banned student shall be permitted to attend
classes and use relevant academic resources on campus but suspended from all
other activities.
(b) How the Ban of a Current Student Applies to the Claremont University Consortium:
92 Depending upon the circumstances of the individual student, the VP for Student
Affairs shall determine, in consultation with individual CUC services and the Dean
of Students at the college at which the student is enrolled, the scope and extent of
the ban from CUC services and property. The student shall normally be permitted
to make appointments at CUC offices and services as needed. For “drop in
services” that a student might utilize (i.e.. OBSA, CLSA, Chaplains, etc.), the VP
for Student Affairs shall decide, based on the circumstances giving rise to the ban,
whether drop-in privileges shall continue or if the banned student shall be required
to schedule appointments.
Generally, banned students shall be permitted to use Honnold Library and the
Huntley Bookstore, although CUC reserves the right to limit and/or suspend
privileges where circumstances warrant such action. Circumstances under which a
student might be restricted from bookstore and/or library usage include, but are not
limited to, students who appear to pose a threat to the health, safety or welfare of
other patrons and/or theft from the facility.
Requests for Review, Modification, or Removal of a Ban
A person banned from one or more of The Claremont Colleges may request that the
banning party discuss the nature of the ban, modify the ban, or withdraw the ban. It is the
responsibility of the banned person to contact the official who first initiated the ban to
request a conversation about the ban within 5 business days. It is also the responsibility of
the banned person to bring any substantive changes to the attention of the banning official
in order to request reconsideration. For current students who have been banned, the home
campus Dean of Students should review the ban policy and appeals process with the
student.
Changes to any ban will be communicated to the other designated officials for their
consideration relevant to the person’s status on their respective campuses.
Effective Date and Application of this Policy to New Institutions
Should additional institutions formally join The Claremont Colleges, this policy shall
automatically apply to those institutions upon incorporation, including their property in
Claremont and elsewhere.
Date of Approval by the Council of The Claremont Colleges: April 2011
4 .43
Reporting and Communication Protocol for Bias-related Incidents
In case of emergency, please call ext 72000 to be connected with the Department of
Campus Safety or 911 (or 9-911 from a campus extension) to be connected with the
Claremont Police Department If you witness or experience conduct that discriminates,
stereotypes, excludes, harasses or harms anyone in our community based on their
identity (such as race, color, ethnicity, national origin, sex, gender identity or
expression, sexual orientation, disability, age or religion) please report it to the College.
1. In person. Following is a list of offices and resources that exist to support
students, staff and faculty. You may contact any of these units confidentially to report
an incident of bias, intolerance or discrimination.
2. By phone. Calling one of the below resources will document your call and
93 forward your message on to the appropriate office/staff member for follow-up. If you
believe you have experienced a hate crime, you may report it directly to the
Department of Campus Safety (on-campus) at 909-607-2000 (ext 72000 on campus) or
the Claremont Police (off-campus) at 909-399-5411. Even if you report it to DCS or CPD,
we would appreciate a report to the College’s bias incident reporting system for
statistical and follow-up purposes.
If you are not sure you have experienced a hate crime and would like to discuss the
incident, please contact a resource below. Staff from these offices will offer support and
begin to discuss next steps with callers.
SCRIPPS REPORTING AREAS
Dean of Students Office
ext.18277 / (909) 621-8277
SCORE (Scripps Communities of Resources and Empowerment)
ext.78869 / (909) 607-8869
SARLO (Student Activities and Residence Life Office)
ext.74307 / (909) 607-4307
Dean of Faculty Office
ext.72822 / (909) 607-2822
Human Resources
ext.77908 / (909) 607-7908
Department of Campus Safety
(909) 607-2000
Claremont Police Department
(399) 5411 Emergencies: Dial 9-1-1 (9-911 from campus extensions)
ADDITIONAL REPORTING AREAS
Office of Black Student Affairs
ext.73369 / (909) 607-3369
139 E. 7th Street
Chicano/Latino Student Affairs
ext.18044 / (909) 621-8044
757 College Way
Queer Resource Center
ext.71817 / (909) 607-1817
Walton Commons, Pomona
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services
ext.18202 / (909) 621-8202
Standards of Conduct
Residential Life
Speak with your Hall Director, Resident Advisor (RA) or Peer Mentor
(See names and numbers in the Guide to Student Life under the
Residential Life section.)
94 757 College Way
Student Health Services
ext.18222 / (909) 621-8222
757 College Way
International Place
ext.74571 / (909) 607-4571
Office of the Chaplains
ext.18685 / (909) 621-8685
McAlister Center
Statement of Purpose:
This Communications Protocol, which has been adopted by each of the members
of The Claremont Colleges, is intended to provide a framework for inter-collegiate
responses to bias related incidents.
Bias related incidents are expressions of hostility against another person (or group)
because of that person’s (or group’s) race, color, religion, ancestry, age, national
origin, disability, gender or sexual orientation, or because the perpetrator perceives
that the other person (or group) has one or more of those characteristics. As used in
this Protocol, the term “bias related incident” is limited to conduct that violates one
or more of The Claremont Colleges’ disciplinary codes and which is not protected
by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution or by analogous
provisions of state law. A hate crime is an especially severe form of bias related
incident, and such crimes fall far beyond the bounds of constitutional protection.
However, the category of bias related incidents extends beyond hate crimes and other
actions that would constitute criminal offenses under relevant penal codes.
In the event that a bias related incident occurs on one of the campuses and/or on
Claremont University Consortium (CUC) premises, this Protocol shall govern
communication among the Claremont colleges’ chief student-affairs and
administrative officers.
California Law Regarding Hate Crimes:
California law prohibits hate crimes. Section 422.6 of the California Penal Code
defines a hate crime as follows:
a. “Hate crime” means a criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of one
or more of the following actual or perceived characteristics of the victim:
1. Disability
2. Gender
3. Nationality
4. Race or ethnicity
5. Religion
6. Sexual orientation
7. Association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or
perceived characteristics
b. “Hate crime” includes, but is not limited to, a violation of Penal Code Section 422.6
California Penal Code § 422.6 provides the following:
a. No person, whether or not acting under color of law, shall by force or threat of
95 force, willfully injure, intimidate, interfere with, oppress, or threaten any other person
in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him or her by
the Constitution or laws of this state or by the Constitution or laws of the United
States in whole or in part because of one or more of the actual or perceived
characteristics of the victim listed in subdivision (a) of Section 422.55.
b. No person, whether or not acting under color of law, shall knowingly deface,
damage, or destroy the real or personal property of any other person for the purpose
of intimidating or interfering with the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or
privilege secured to the other person by the Constitution or laws of this state or by
the Constitution or laws of the United States, in whole or in part because of one or
more of the actual or perceived characteristics of the victim listed in subdivision (a)
of Section 422.55.
c. Any person convicted of violating subdivision (a) or (b) shall be punished by
imprisonment in a county jail not to exceed one year, or by a fine not to exceed five
thousand dollars ($5,000), or by both the above imprisonment and fine, and the court
shall order the defendant to perform a minimum of community service, not to
exceed 400 hours, to be performed over a period not to exceed 350 days, during a
time other than his or her hours of employment or school attendance. However, no
person may be convicted of violating subdivision (a) based upon speech alone,
except upon a showing that the speech itself threatened violence against a specific
person or group of persons and that the defendant had the apparent ability to carry
out the threat.
d. Conduct that violates this and any other provision of law, including, but not
limited to, an offense described in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11410) of
Chapter 3 of Title 1 of Part 4, may be charged under all applicable provisions.
However, an act or omission punishable in different ways by this section and other
provisions of law shall not be punished under more than one provision, and the
penalty to be imposed shall be determined as set forth in Section 654.
Procedure for Responding To Bias Related Incidents
1. Any person, including faculty, staff, students and visitors to the colleges,
observing an incident or evidence of possible bias incident and/or hate crime
shall notify college staff and/or campus safety before taking any action (such as
disposing or removing evidence, altering scene, etc.).
2. College staff and/or campus safety shall follow protocol of college where the
incident occurred and with student(s) immediately involved in notifying
appropriate on-call staff.
3. Campus safety and the on-call dean(s) will consult on bias related incidents that
may rise to the level of a crime. If either suspects that a crime may have been
committed, Campus Safety shall notify Claremont Police Department.
4. Campus Safety and/or College personnel shall document the incident or
evidence by appropriate means, e.g.: photograph(s), incident reports, statements
from witnesses, etc.
5. The Dean of Students shall preserve the evidence or copies of same. In
incidents of a criminal nature or where otherwise deemed appropriate, campus
safety shall also maintain records of the incident.
6. Communication among the colleges will pass from the chief student affairs
officer or the chief administrative officer of the institution where the incident
occurred to the chief student affairs officers on other campuses and chief
administrative officer at CUC.
96 In the event that the chief student affairs or administrative officer is unavailable,
she or he will have designated a second in command to whom the
communication will be directed. The second in command is then responsible
for both implementing the below protocol and informing the chief student
affairs or administrative officer as quickly as possible.
The communication between offices should be:
o Provide a brief description of the incident;
o List any information about initial steps that have been taken to
address the incident;
o Provide instructions about how to report information about the
incident; and
o Conclude with a standard paragraph on steps community members
should take in the event they see a bias related incident
7. Each school and CUC shall create and/or follow an established internal policy
to communicate information regarding the incident. A campus might choose to
include one or more of the following:
a. Notification procedures for personnel responsible for handling the incident are in
place, including communications officers
b. Email/and or Web dissemination of the notification to all faculty, staff and students;
c. Paper mail dissemination of the notification to all faculty, staff, and students;
d. Posting of notices in locations on the campus in areas in which members of that
campus are most likely to read them;
e. Utilizing Ras, proctors, college councils or senates, and other student leaders
in ways consistent with their position description and responsibilities;
f. Notifying any other appropriate college-specific body at that institution that
may be charged with handling matters of this nature—President’s Advisory
Committee on Diversity and Inclusivity at Scripps, IRT at Pomona, Emergency
Operations Committee(s) (EOC) of college, etc.
g. Utilizing informational sessions for community members to receive information
in person, ask questions, and generally discuss incident.
8. Each institution will insure that residence life staff members are instructed
about response protocols for such incidents
9. Each institution will provide information to its community about reporting protocols.
10. CUC will insure that Campus safety officers and dispatchers are instructed about
response protocols for such incidents.
11. The chief student affairs and administrative officer will keep a log of incident
communications originating from his/her institution. The log shall include a
description of each incident, and the institutional and/or police response to the
incident. This log may be kept in the format appropriate to the campus culture (paper,
Web-based, etc.) The log will be made available to students, faculty and/or staff
upon request.
Policy 4.38 was drafted and adopted by the Student Affairs Committee of The
Claremont Colleges, PASA (Pan-African Student Association), Scripps College
Wanawake Weusi, Hillel Student Board, Pitzer Black Student Union (BSU) in
spring 2005, and was adopted by the Council of The Claremont Colleges
(6/2/05)
7.
4 .44
Local, State, and Federal Law Adherence Policy
All students must adhere to local, state and
federal laws.
97 5 .0
Academic Policies and Hearing Procedures
Academic regulations, including those related to class attendance, academic
probation, dismissal and suspension may be found in “Academic Policies and
Procedures” section of the Scripps College Catalog 2013-2014.
5 .01
By action of the Academic Dean’s Committee, the policies governing
academic dishonesty and grade disputes in cross-registration situations are as
follows:
5 .011 A student charged with academic dishonesty in a course taken outside the home
college shall be tried according to the procedures for handling such cases in the
home institution. Faculty members are obliged to accept the decision of the
student’s college and may not impose a penalty should the appropriate hearing
panel fail to find guilt. Any student grievance concerning a grade given by an
instructor as a result of such a hearing decision will also be handled according
to the rules of the student’s home college.
5 .012
5 .10
All other grievances concerning grades are handled by the procedures of
the college sponsoring the course.
Policy on Grade Disputes
The presumption in the administration of grades at Scripps is that the professor alone
is qualified to evaluate the quality of the academic work of the student in her or his
course.
When a student has grounds for believing that, apart from questions of the academic
quality of an individual piece of work, a particular final grade was assigned by the
professor in an arbitrary or discriminatory manner or that crucial evidence was not
taken into account, the following procedure is available:
1. The student must first discuss the matter with the professor.
2. If the outcome of that discussion is not satisfactory, the student should consult
with the Dean of Students.
3. If there appear to be grounds for further investigation of the situation, the Dean of
Students will consult with the dean of the faculty. The academic dean will then
contact the professor involved in an effort to bring the issue to a satisfactory
solution.
4. If, following these discussions, the claims of the student and professor are still unreconciled, the dean of the faculty will arrange for and participate in a group
meeting including the Dean of Students, the professor, and the student.
5. If no satisfactory solution results from this informal meeting, the student will
be advised to petition the Committee on Academic Review, which will meet
with the student and the professor individually.
6. Should the Committee on Academic Review wish to consider the case further, it
determines its own procedures according to each case. If the committee decides
that a grade change is warranted, it will establish procedures for determining the
new grade. Procedures could include working with the faculty member on an
appropriate change or reassessing the student’s work overall through the
semester. In no case will the committee be involved in reevaluating individual
papers or examinations. Any issue on disputed grades will usually be settled
during the following semester, but in no case later than one year from the time
the disputed grade was assigned. The committee decision is final, and the
98 student and professor will be notified by mail. The committee, at its own
discretion, may accede to a faculty member’s wish that the committee consult
colleagues in the discipline.
5 .20
Academic Dishonesty and Definitions
Scripps College, in keeping with the System of Responsibility, expects each student
to uphold the highest principles of integrity. Cheating and/or plagiarism seriously
undermine the basis of trust in the Scripps community and corrupt the student’s
intellectual and personal development. It is not tolerated at Scripps and may result in
one or more penalties including suspension or expulsion. The Scripps College
Catalog, 2013-2014, has information on academic policies, procedures, and
requirements. Other questions may be referred to a faculty adviser, the registrar, or the
Dean of Students staff.
5 .21
Plagiarism
Definition – “Plagiarize: to take [ideas, writings, etc.] from [another] and pass them
off as one’s own” (Webster’s New World Dictionary, 1990, p. 449). If one is in doubt
about acknowledging a source, consult an instructor. One should err, if at all, on the
side of generosity toward the source. Having received the System of Responsibility
(refer to section 6.05) and Code of Conduct (refer to section 4.01), students are
assumed to understand what constitutes cheating and plagiarism. Students who
did not receive or lost these materials shall request them. Additionally, any doubts
or uncertainty should be handled in advance of submitting a paper, project, test, etc.
Plagiarism includes:
1. Quoting the exact words of one’s source without putting them in quotation
marks and naming the source in the text or in an endnote or footnote. Or,
when paraphrasing a source, failing to acknowledge one’s source. The
exception is for ordinary factual data that is regarded as common property.
2. Acquisition of a term paper or other assignments from any source and the
subsequent presentation of those materials as the student’s own work.
Submitting another student’s papers, assignments, or exams as one’s own.
3. The submission of material subjected to editorial revision by another person
that results in substantive changes in content or changes that will materially and
positively alter the grade.
5 .22
Other Academic Dishonesty Violations
1. Any use of external assistance during an examination unless expressly
permitted by the faculty member.
2. Changing answers after an exam has been returned and/or any behavior that
defeats the intent of an exam or other class work.
3. Taking a course, portion of a course, or exam for another student or allowing
another individual to take a course, a portion of a course or exam in one’s stead.
4. Obtaining for oneself or providing for another person a solution to homework, a
project or other assignments, or a copy of an exam or exam key without the
knowledge and express consent of the instructor.
5. Using an essay, term paper, or other project in more than one course without
permission of each instructor or handing in similar work in more than one
course unless the faculty members are fully informed and give their approval.
6. Unauthorized collaboration on a project, homework or other assignments.
Collaboration between students will be considered unauthorized unless
99 7.
8.
9.
10.
expressly part of the assignment in question or expressly permitted by the
faculty member.
Attempting to benefit from the work of another student or attempting to hinder
the work of another student.
Falsification, alteration or misrepresentation of official or unofficial records or
documents including but not limited to, academic transcripts, academic
documentation, letters of recommendation, and admissions application issues.
Submitting material for lab assignments, class projects, or other assignments
that is wholly or partially falsified, invented, or otherwise does not represent
work accomplished or
undertaken by the student.
Any other act that gains or is intended to gain an unfair academic advantage.
5 .30
Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty
5 .31
Faculty Procedures
5 .311
As soon as a faculty member recognizes a student’s academic dishonesty:
The faculty member is expected to take action appropriate to the evidence. The faculty
member will call the Dean of Students to determine if any previous reports of
proven academic dishonesty are on file. This conversation will be oral only; no
written record will be kept in the student’s file.
5 .312
If this is the student’s first charge in their college career:
1. The faculty member has one week to arrange and meet with the student to
discuss the matter. If the faculty member’s evidence of the charge is
confirmed, the faculty member has the option to ask her to rewrite the
paper or retake the test. Notification of this decision must be sent in writing
to the Dean of Students within three working days and a copy sent to the
student.
If a student admits to deliberate academic dishonesty, the faculty member should
take any or all of the following steps (including #1 above) depending upon the
severity of the matter:
• Give an “F” on the assignment
• Give an “F” in the course
• Refer the case to the Augmented Committee on Academic Review (This
should be done in the case of a first offense only when the faculty
member believes the violation to be serious enough that suspension or
expulsion may be indicated.)
3. If the student denies academic dishonesty, the faculty member will notify the Dean
of Students. The Dean of Students will bring the charges before the
Augmented Committee on Academic Review who will hear the case and make
a judgment as to guilt or innocence. If the student is found guilty, the Augmented
Committee on Academic Review may decide on a penalty or refer the penalty
decision to the faculty member involved.
5 .313
If the student has previously been charged and found guilty:
The faculty member must refer the student’s case in writing to the Augmented
100 Committee on Academic Review within five working days and take the following
step(s):
• Give an “F” on the assignment and/or
• Give an “F” in the course
NOTE: Written notification of all charges for which a student is found
guilty will be placed in her student record.
5 .314
At the end of a semester, when no timely meeting is possible:
The faculty member should notify the student by certified mail return receipt requested,
and send it postmarked within the time frames listed under 5.312 and 5.313.The faculty
member will include a statement of the charges and the action she or he has taken.
5 .40
Procedures of the Augmented Committee on Academic Review
1. Voting members of the Augmented Committee on Academic Review will
include the regular faculty and student members of the Committee on Academic
Review (CAR) plus the chair of the Academic Policies Subcommittee of the
Faculty Executive Committee, who will chair this committee, and the VPJ; nonvoting, ex-officio members include the Dean of Students and registrar.
2. If the faculty member bringing the charges of academic dishonesty is normally
a member of the Augmented CAR or is unable to serve, the dean of the faculty
will appoint a replacement.
3. In the event that one of the student members of the Augmented CAR is
charged in a case of academic dishonesty, the student member is ineligible to
serve, and the dean of student appoints a replacement. In the event that any
student member of the Augmented CAR is unable to serve, the Dean of
Students will appoint a replacement.
4. The Augmented CAR must meet on any case within ten working days (or, if
between semesters, as soon as the Committee can be convened) of the time the
case was referred to it by a faculty member, unless the student(s) charged
requests a delay for appropriate reasons—appropriateness will be determined
by the Dean of Students or the incident occurs at the end of semester. During
college breaks, this time line is suspended, but it is expected that the committee
shall convene as soon as possible with reasonable efforts to secure faculty and
student representation.
The faculty member will be asked to produce evidence; both the student and the
faculty member may be asked to appear. All evidence and proceedings will be
confidential.
• The Augmented CAR will determine whether or not the student has
committed the offense.
• The Augmented CAR will determine what, if any, penalty is appropriate. One
or more of the following penalties may be imposed depending on the severity of
the violation:
a) Recommendation of an “F” on the
assignment
b) Recommendation of an “F” in the course
c) Special academic probation (most likely involving extraordinary documented
circumstances)
d) Suspension
e) Expulsion
f) Revocation of degree or admission
101 g) Any other sanctions the committee develops to address the violation
NOTE: Penalties “b-f” listed above will be recorded on the permanent academic
record (Transcript).
5. Any transaction involving the Augmented CAR will be communicated to the
student and the faculty member initiating the charge and will be posted in
summary to the College Community through campus email, excluding details
that might lead to identification of the individual(s) involved.
6. If the Augmented CAR finds the student not guilty, no record of these events will
be kept in the student’s file.
5 .50
Committee On Study Abroad (COSA) Please refer to the Scripps College Catalog
6 .00
Judicial Hearing System for Non-Academic Violations
6 .05
System of Responsibility
The Scripps System of Responsibility assumes that each student is a responsible
member of the community in academic and social matters. The System of
Responsibility is based on the implicit trust that each individual will uphold the
Code of Conduct. If a student is negligent in fulfilling obligations to the community,
the JBs have been empowered by the community to consider the problem and find
the best possible solution.
Because the functions of the College depend on honesty and integrity among its
members, the College expects from its students a higher standard of conduct than
the minimum required to avoid disciplinary action. While many of the College’s
standards and policies parallel the laws of society in general, the College’s policies
set a higher standard than those found elsewhere in society.
The judicial hearing system is composed of various bodies to review cases
involving alleged non-academic policy violations. Students are expected to make
themselves aware of and abide by the Scripps College policies and community
standards of behavior as stated in the Guide to Student Life, the Scripps College
Catalog 2012-2013 and in related policy statements. Students accept rights and
responsibilities of membership in the Scripps community when they are admitted to
the College. Ignorance is not an acceptable justification for violating community
standards. Lack of intent or awareness of college policy will not be accepted as
excuses for violations and will normally receive the same consequences as
deliberate violations.
6 .10
Summary of the Non-Academic Judicial Hearing Process*
• A written report involving alleged violation(s) of the Scripps College Student
Code of Conduct, residential life policies, or any other written policy in the
College community is received by a Scripps Associated Student (SAS) proctor,
SAS vice president for judicial (VPS) or Dean of Students staff member.
• A Dean of Students staff member will review the report to determine the
proper course of action. The Dean of Students staff member may automatically
refer the case to the College Judicial Board or invite the student in for an
administrative review. If the student is desires to conclude the factual inquiry
through Administrative Review rather than a College Judicial Board hearing,
she must accept the findings and conclusions of the Dean of Students hearing
officer regarding the alleged violation and waive her right to a College Judicial
Board hearing.
• The chair of the appropriate hearing board will inform both the student(s) being
102 accused and the person(s) filing the charge as to the course of action that will
be taken, and the student(s) being accused of a violation(s) will be notified of
the charge(s) being brought against her.
• The decision of the hearing board will be presented to the accused student(s) in
writing.
• Both the student(s) being accused and the person(s) filing the charge(s) have a
right to file an appeal.
*NOTE: This information summarizes extensive materials from the Code of
Conduct. Readers should note that this summary is not authoritative in speaking to
issues of the review process.
6 .15
Filing a Charge for an Alleged Policy Violation
1. If a student has a complaint regarding another Scripps student involving the
violation of Scripps College Code of Conduct or any College policy, the
student has the right to pursue the issue through the judicial system. The
student should discuss the situation with her Resident Advisor or Proctor to
determine options and a course of action. Depending on the severity and type
of the alleged violation, the student may proceed by filing a written charge with
the student’s proctor, the VPJ or a Dean of Students staff member in order to
begin the judicial process. See below: Types of Judicial Courses of Action,
6 .30.
2. A matter will be reviewed only when a written charge has been filed within
one year of discovery of the alleged violation. In cases of sexual assault and/or
sexual harassment by another student, charges may be brought forward as long
as both parties are enrolled at Scripps College within one-hundred twenty days
from the date of the latest instance of the alleged harassment, exclusive of
semester breaks or College holidays.
3. In order to file a charge against a non-Scripps, Claremont Colleges student, the
student should meet with a Dean of Students staff member. See below:
Student Conduct on other Claremont Colleges, 6.20.
6 .20
Student Conduct on other Claremont Colleges
Scripps students are responsible for their off-campus behavior as indicated in the
following statement regarding intercollegiate disciplinary authority submitted by the
Administration Council: When students are on the campus of another Claremont
College, they are expected to respect the regulations of that College, as well as those
of their own College. If a student of another College violates the regulations of the
host College, judicial action may be brought against that student at his/her home
College. The names of any students concerned, along with all pertinent information,
will be sent to the Dean of Students of the College involved. A representative from
the host College will be invited to attend the judicial proceedings as a non-voting
participant/observer. As a temporary protective measure, the administration of the
host College may, at its own discretion, prohibit a student from coming onto its
campus until judicial action at the student’s home College is complete. Such a
prohibition shall be communicated to the student through the home College at the
request of the host College.
Each student shall be accountable for knowing what the regulations pertaining to
her may be as far as she participates in the life of other Claremont Colleges.
103 6 .30
Types of Judicial Courses of Action
Mediation
This course of action is available for disputes and conflicts that can be resolved by
negotiation and is not intended for use in situations for which negotiations would be
inappropriate (e.g., adjudication of misconduct, application of college policy). The
following criterion needs to be met for a student dispute to be resolved through
mediation.
1. The dispute involves behavior that is observable.
2. There is promise of a mutually satisfactory outcome.
This process is conducted by an acceptable impartial third party (i.e., Hall Director or
Resident Advisor) who assists the parties in forming a mutual resolution.
Administrative Review (For Non-Academic Policy Violations)
The administrative review is completed if the Dean of Students staff member
reviewing the case believes that an individual meeting is appropriate to the alleged
violation(s).The student will meet with a Dean of Students staff member (a.k.a.
hearing officer) to discuss the alleged incident and violation(s). If the student
accepts the findings and conclusions of the hearing officer regarding the alleged
violation, an Administrative Review Waiver form is signed by the accused
student(s) and the hearing officer, and sanctions are assessed. Students who accept
conclusion of the factual inquiry through Administrative Review retain the right
to appeal to the Judicial Appeals Board. The sole basis for any such appeal is the
appropriateness of the sanction imposed by the Administrative Review hearing
officer.
College Judicial Board (For Non-Academic Policy Violations)
This board adjudicates cases where any non-academic policy is violated. This board is
comprised of ten voting members (VPJ who serves as chair of the board, seven
proctors and two faculty members) and is advised by a Dean of Students staff
member. The sanctions that a College JB can assess are: warnings, restitution, loss of
on-campus or other Scripps-owned housing, transfer to another residence hall,
community service, disciplinary probation, suspended suspension, recommended,
or required counseling sessions, letter of reprimand, suspension, expulsion, revocation
of admission or degree, and other measures as deemed necessary. Suspended
suspension, suspension, revocation of admission or degree, or expulsion may come
only in the form of a recommendation to the president of the College.
Judicial Appeals Board (For College Judicial Board and Administrative Review
Appeals)
This board serves as the appellate body for cases heard by the College JB or
through the Administrative Review process. The Judicial Appeals Board is
comprised of ten voting members (VPJ who serves as chair of the board, seven hall
presidents and two faculty members) and is advised by a Dean of Students staff
member.
Presidential Appeals Board (For Judicial Appeals Board and Augmented CAR
Appeals)
This board serves as the appellate body for cases heard by Judicial Appeals Board or
Augmented CAR. The Judicial Appeals Board is comprised of 5 voting members
(the President of the College, the Academic Dean, a faculty member, a Dean of
Students staff member, and the President of SAS who serves as chair).
104 6 .40
Standards of Conduct
Student Procedural Protections
Definitions
“The Accused” is the person or designated representative of a student
organization or group who has allegedly violated a policy or policies. A policy
violation is alleged until a student’s case has been heard and due process is served.
The accused is not responsible for violation of policies until the charges being
brought against the accused have been proven true by the complainant. A fair and
impartial hearing of the incident(s) will be held, and each case will be considered
individually in order to render a decision for the education of the student, the
maintenance of individual responsibility, and the preservation of the community.
“The Complainant” is the person or the designated representative of a student
organization or group bringing charges against the accused. This person must be a
current student, faculty, or staff member. She/ he carries the responsibility for
proving that the accused did violate policy as charged and for finding all witnesses
and information that support his/her case against the accused.
Both the accused and the complainant are granted the following procedural
protections for any case adjudicated by the judicial boards. Procedures shall be
completed as stated.
1. The accused will receive written notification of the charges that specifies the
nature of the alleged violation(s), the name(s) of the person(s) bringing forth
the charge and the basis for the charge including the date and place where the
incident(s) allegedly occurred.
2. Either party may review information and/or evidence on file prior to the hearing.
A request for such a review should be directed to the chair of the appropriate
hearing board.
3. Either party may request the dismissal, for stated reasons, of any member of the
board (up to six members) on grounds of prejudice. The reason must be
approved by a majority vote of the board.
4. Either party may have any number of witnesses whose testimony may be
presented at the hearing on their behalf. If the witness(es) cannot appear in
person, a written and signed documentation of their testimony may be presented
during the hearing. Names of witnesses or documentation from witnesses must be
submitted to the chair of the board no later than 48 hours prior to the hearing.
During the hearing, both the accused and complainant have the right to review a
witness’ verbal and written testimony.
5. The chair of the board will inform the accused, in writing, of all witnesses that
will appear against her at least 24 hours prior to the hearing.
6. Either party may have one adviser at the hearing who is a member of The
Claremont Colleges community. The adviser may not be a licensed or
practicing attorney unless either a civil litigation or criminal charge is pending
that arises out of the facts at issue in the hearing. The adviser may support the
parties involved but may not speak on behalf of the accused or the complainant.
Advisers are expected to review all hearing procedures as stated in the Guide to
Student Life prior to the hearing.
7. All hearings will be closed unless otherwise requested by the accused. The chair
will notify all parties of the status of the hearing at least 24 hours prior to the
hearing. The number of persons attending the review may be limited and is
determined by the board.
8. Both parties are assured confidentiality in a closed hearing and in all records.
9. The accused will be given the opportunity to be present at the hearing, to
105 10.
11.
12.
13.
15.
6 .50
confront and question witnesses, to inspect all evidence presented, to present
witnesses and evidence, and to include in closing statements her
recommendations of outcomes for the case should she be found responsible for
violation of any of the Scripps College policies. If the accused declines to give
testimony, this will not be construed as an admission of guilt. However, the
accused retains the right to question witnesses, present witnesses on the
accused’s behalf, and submit documentary evidence. If the accused provides
testimony, the accused is subject to examination on credibility and on all matters
relevant to the charges and to other testimony provided.
The Judicial Board reserves the right to conduct a hearing without the
presence of the accused. Failure to appear does not necessarily constitute
grounds for an appeal. The accused is encouraged to submit a statement to the
chair of the hearing board if the accused chooses not to attend.
The accused may not be subjected to a hearing of an incident(s) where an
alleged policy violation occurred if the accused has already been charged and
reviewed for that same incident and violation (e.g., double jeopardy).
A student’s conduct record is maintained in the Dean of Students Office as a
confidential student file. As a primary document in such files, distribution of
the written summary is limited to the accused, the personnel associated with
the board who heard the case and the personnel responsible for implementation
of sanctions. The complainant will receive a copy of the written decision.
Both parties retain the opportunity to appeal the initial decision to the
appropriate board within ten days of the receipt of the written decision.
Pending action on charges or an appeal, the status of the accused student shall
not be altered, denied the right to be present on campus nor denied the right to
attend classes, except where there is evidence that a student or organization
poses a substantial threat to the safety or well-being of members of the Scripps
community, to property within the College community or when a student or
organization poses continuing threat of disruption or interference to normal
college life or functions. Such interim action may be taken by the Dean of
Students or her designee.
Either party may submit a written request to the chair of the board for
exceptions to any of the established hearing procedures at least 48 hours prior
to the hearing. The exceptions must be approved by a majority vote of the
appropriate board.
Hearing Process and Timeline
All of the student procedural protections listed in Section 6.40 must be followed. In
addition, the following procedural guidelines apply to judicial board hearings.
1. A written report by the complainant(s) is submitted to the Dean of Students
Office within one year of the date of the alleged violation. The report will be
addressed through mediation, administrative review or a college judicial board
hearing as listed in Section 6.30.The report of the alleged violation(s) shall be
submitted to the chair of the appropriate hearing board (i.e. VPJ or Dean of
Students staff member).
2. The chair of the appropriate board will review the report(s) to determine if
there is sufficient information to proceed with the hearing process. A board
also may rule on the appropriateness of the hearing of a particular case and
may refer to other hearing parties such as a hearing officer.
3. The chair and the adviser to the board will decide if immediate action is required.
Pending a hearing, such remedies may be imposed by the Dean of Students or
106 4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
her designee. She may choose to:
•
remove a student from on-campus housing
•
Temporarily relocate a student to another residence hall space
•
Not allow a student to attend classes
•
deny a student access to campus
•
condition a student’s residence, attendance in classes, or access to campus in
appropriate ways
The Dean of Students, or her designee, may impose a summary suspension
(see below: Sanctions, 7 .0), or may impose other remedies as deemed
appropriate. Such remedies will be in effect until the hearing and/or appeals
process is completed and the case closed.
After submitting the violations, the board will hold the hearing as soon as
possible, except in cases where summary suspension has been imposed. In cases
involving summary suspension, the case will be heard by the College JB within
48 hours after the charges are received by the chair. The written
documentation for all charges should include a description of the charges, a
description of the incident(s), and the policy or policies that were allegedly
violated. However, a board may meet no later than the last day of classes of the
semester. If a case is brought to the board with insufficient time to be heard in
the semester, the case will be heard in the following semester. The decision to
continue the hearing must be made jointly by the chair and the adviser to the
board.
The accused will receive written notice of the misconduct charges that specifies
the nature of the alleged violation(s), the name(s) of the person(s) bringing forth
the charge, and the basis for the charge including the date and place where the
incident(s) allegedly occurred. The chair must hand-deliver written notification
of the charges within 48 hours upon receipt of the written charges. If the
accused is away from campus, a signed, dated, and witnessed notice must be
delivered to the student’s room or mailbox.
The accused and complainant will receive written notice of the date, time, and
location of any scheduled hearing at least five days before the hearing. This
notice must be hand-delivered to the person, or a signed, dated, and witnessed
notice may be delivered to the student’s room or mailbox. The chair shall also
notify board members and witness(es) of the hearing date.
Either party may have one adviser at the hearing who is a member of The
Claremont Colleges community. The adviser may not be a licensed or
practicing attorney unless either a civil litigation or criminal charge is pending
that arises out of the facts at issue in the hearing. The accused or complainant
must submit the name of the accused’s adviser, if any, in writing to the chair of
the board at least 48 hours prior to the hearing. The adviser may support the
parties involved but may not speak on behalf of the accused or the complainant.
Advisers are expected to review all hearing procedures as stated in the Guide
to Student Life prior to the hearing. Advisers may not be witnesses.
Either party may have any number of witnesses whose testimony may be presented
at the hearing on their behalf. The accused and complainant shall submit the names
of all witnesses to appear, in writing, to the chair of the appropriate board at least
forty-eight hours before the hearing. The chair of the board is responsible for
requesting the presence of any witnesses, but cannot guarantee the witness(es) will
attend. If the witness(es) cannot appear in person, a written and signed
documentation of their testimony may be presented during the hearing. During the
hearing, both the accused and complainant have the right to review a witness’ verbal
107 and written testimony.
9. The accused and complainant may request the hearing to be rescheduled. Requests
must be directed, in writing, to the chair of the appropriate board with a statement
of grounds for the request at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled hearing. This
request will be considered, and if granted, the board will notify the accused,
complainant, and all witnesses of any changes.
10. The board may, for good cause, postpone a hearing and must notify the accused,
complainant, and witnesses of the new date. It is the responsibility of both
parties to notify their adviser of the change.
11. All hearings will be closed unless otherwise requested by the accused. A
written request to open the hearing to the public must be submitted to the chair
of the appropriate board at least 48 hours before the hearing. The chair will
notify all parties of the status of the hearing at least 24 hours prior to the
hearing. The number of persons attending the review may be limited and is
determined by the board. However, the board may close an open hearing if the
audience prevents the board from conducting the hearing in a quiet and orderly
manner.
12. The accused and complainant may request the dismissal, for stated reasons, of
any member of the board (up to six members) on grounds of prejudice. The
reason must be approved by a majority vote of the board and will be based on
that member’s ability to be fair and objective in the hearing.
13. The chair of the board has the authority to require members of the Scripps College
student body to appear at a hearing. Students who fail to appear are subject to
judicial action. The board has authority to request that members of the other
Claremont Colleges appear but cannot mandate a non-Scripps community
member to attend the hearing.
14. The board may rule by a majority vote on the admissibility of evidence, the
removal of disruptive individuals, the closing of open hearings, and other
procedural policies.
15. If the accused fails to appear after written notice, the case will be heard with
the accused in absentia. No hearing shall be conducted without the complainant
present.
16. The board members may find an individual who substantially disrupts the
hearing proceedings in contempt of court and, if after fair warning the
disruption persists, the board may have that individual removed from the
hearing. Disruptions will be dealt with at the discretion of the board.
17. The chair of the board may call a recess during the hearing for any reason and at any
time.
18. The accused and the complainant must submit a written request to the chair of
the board for any exceptions to any of the established hearing procedures at
least forty-eight hours prior to the hearing. The exceptions must be approved
by a majority vote of the board who will provide notification of the changes to
all parties at least 24 hours prior to the hearing.
During the Hearing
1. In a pre-hearing meeting, called by the chair of the board, the board members and
judicial board adviser will review the documentary information concerning the
incident (including any documents submitted by the accused, complainant or
their witnesses prior to the hearing), formulate questions, and prepare for the
hearing. Only board members and the adviser are present during this meeting.
108 2. During the hearing, everyone in the room will introduce themselves and
indicate their role in the hearing (e.g., Joan Brown, chair; Sally Green, the
accused student). If witnesses enter the room later, the chair must insure they
state their names and roles in the hearing.
3. The format for the hearing involves, but is not limited to, the following:
•
The chair of the board will state why the hearing is being held and the
charges being brought against the accused.
•
The complainant will provide testimony and documentary information.
•
The board may ask the complainant questions.
•
The accused may ask the complainant questions.
•
The complainant may call witnesses who may be questioned by the board,
accused and complainant. The board has the right to remove any witness from
the hearing prior to and once their testimony has been heard.
•
The accused will provide testimony and documentary information.
•
The board may ask the accused questions.
•
The complainant may ask the accused questions.
•
The accused may call witnesses who may be questioned by the board,
accused, and complainant.
•
The board, accused, or complainant may recall any witnesses as deemed necessary.
•
The complainant may make a brief closing statement including
recommendations of sanctions. No new information may be introduced at
this time.
•
The accused may make a brief closing statement. No new information
may be introduced at this time.
4. The board may ask questions at any time during the process.
5. The board may question or recall any witnesses and has the power to exclude
witnesses from hearing the testimony of other witnesses. The accused or
complainant may also recall any witnesses within reason, as deemed by the
board.
6. Witnesses are present only during their own testimony. All parties must bear in
mind that any disruption of the proceedings or failure to adhere to the rulings of
the panel may result in removal from the hearing.
7. Each witness will tell the board what she/he knows about the incident being
reviewed. Witnesses will limit their testimony to information relevant to case. They
may not speak on behalf of the accused or complainant. A witness may not serve
as the adviser for the accused or complainant.
8. Prior to and after a witness has given his/her testimony, she/he is expected to
refrain from discussing the hearing and incidents with others.
9. After closing statements are made, the board will review all the information
presented at the hearing in a closed session and make a decision; the board will
meet daily until a decision is reached. A majority vote is necessary to find the
accused responsible. If the accused is found responsible, sanctions will be
assessed by a consensus decision.
10. Any discussion prior to, during or after the hearing leading to the decision by
the board is confidential.
11. The accused and complainant will be notified in writing of the decision within 48
hours of the decision.
12. A written summary of the proceedings will be given to the accused within
seven days of the date that the decision was made unless an exception is made
with the approval of all parties. A copy of the summary must be submitted to the
Dean of Students Office on the day (or the closest business day) that the written
109 summary is given to the accused. Summary and decision letters will be held in
the Dean of Students Office in case an appeal is filed.
13. A judicial record of the matter will be maintained in a confidential student file
by the dean of the College if she does not successfully complete her degree. In
cases where College-wide sanctions are assessed, as defined in 7.20
documentation of relevant case material (e.g., decision documentation) will
become a part of the accused student’s permanent academic record.
14. The decision may be appealed within ten days of the delivery of the initial
written summary of the board’s decision.
15. If the accused fails to complete her sanction(s) as prescribed, the board will
review the case that may result in further disciplinary action. The accused will
be notified before her case is reviewed.
6 .60
College Judicial Board Scope
1. The College JB will meet when a written report referred by the complainant, a
member of the Dean of Students staff, any member of the Scripps community, or
any outside authority as deemed appropriate by the board, is received regarding
alleged violation(s) of any Scripps College policies. The report of the alleged
violation(s) is submitted to the chair of the board (i.e., VPJ or a Dean of
Students staff member).
2. The College JB will hear cases involving, but not limited to: alleged violations of
the Code of Conduct, cases involving sexual assault, threats to the safety of the
community, illegal drugs, and cases involving failure to complete sanction(s).
3. Sanctions may be assessed and may include but are not limited to: warnings,
restitution, loss of on-campus or other Scripps-owned housing, transfer to
another residence hall, community service, disciplinary probation, suspended
suspension, recommended or required counseling sessions, letter of reprimand,
suspension, expulsion, revocation of admission or degree, and other measures
as deemed necessary. Suspended suspension, suspension, revocation of
admission or degree, or expulsion may come only in the form of a
recommendation to the president of the College.
Composition
1. The voting members of the board shall be: the seven proctors (or their proxies),
the VPJ (who serves as a voting member and the chair of the board), and two
faculty members. A Dean of Students staff member will serve as non-voting
member and adviser.
2. Each student member of the board may have as a proxy, except the chair, another
member of the student’s hall council. Proxies may be called upon to serve on
the board to constitute a quorum.
6 .70
Judicial Appeals Board
Scope
The Judicial Appeals Board will meet when necessary to consider appeals involving
cases heard by the College JB or Administrative Review. See Section 8 .0
“Appeals Process” for more information on appeals.
Composition
1. The voting members of the board shall be: the eight hall presidents (or their
proxies), the VPL (who serves as a voting member and the chair of the board), and
two faculty members. A Dean of Students staff member will serve as non-voting
member and adviser.
110 2. Each student member of the board may have as a proxy, except the chair, another
member of the student’s hall council. Proxies may be called upon to serve on
the board to constitute a quorum.
6 .80
Presidential Appeals Board
Scope
The Presidential Appeals Board will meet when necessary to consider appeals
involving cases heard by the Judicial Appeals Board or Augmented CAR. See
Section 8.0 “Appeals process” for more information on appeals.
Composition
1. The Presidential Appeals Board shall be composed of the president of the
College, the academic dean, a faculty member, a Dean of Students staff member,
and the president of SAS, who serves as the chair.
2. Proxies may be called upon to serve on the board to constitute a
quorum.
General comments pertaining to composition on each of the boards
1. The voting members of the board may disqualify any of its own members for
particular case on grounds of prejudice.
2. The board must have a quorum of 50% plus one of its voting members present to
consider any case.
3. If the chair of the board is absent or disqualified, the other board members
will elect a chair from the remaining members of the board. This is determined
by a majority vote of the board with the exception of the chair.
Process for Recommending Suspension, Expulsion or Revocation of
Admission or Degree
1. A board may recommend suspension or expulsion to the president of the
College by a two-thirds majority vote.
2. Under suspended suspension the student is not suspended but will be suspended
automatically if the student commits another serious offense.
3. Under suspension, the student is removed from the College for a designated
period of time, and may be permitted to return without any application and may
be required to present evidence of the student’s ability to integrate into the
College community.
4. Under expulsion, the student is permanently removed from the College. An
expulsion is recorded permanently on the student’s academic record and
transcript at Scripps.
6 .90
Student Grievance Committee Procedures
The SAS and the President’s Advisory Council have established a Student Grievance
Committee to give the student an opportunity to air or resolve any grievances
concerning discrimination or other type of injustice that the student cannot solve by
the student’s own means or other college procedures.
Composition
1. The Grievance Committee will consist of a subcommittee of the College JB. Its
members will include two students, two faculty members and the Dean of
Students, who will chair the committee and vote in case of a tie. Students and
faculty members will be chosen at the time of a grievance by lot from the
appropriate bodies.
2. The committee will be headed by the Dean of Students. If the charge is against
the dean, the student should go to the VPJ who will then chair the Grievance
111 Committee.
Procedure
1. The student who has a grievance will first meet with the Dean of Students to
identify the problem. The dean may suggest a course of action or alternate
channels for solving the problem. The student is urged to seek all informal
means of settling the matter.
2. If the matter is not resolved, the student shall present the student’s grievance to
the Student Grievance Committee in writing and in person. The written
grievance will be submitted by the end of the semester following the one in
which the grievance was suffered.
3. The committee may seek relevant information from other involved parties to
determine the validity of the grievance. Minutes will record the discussion and
the decision and will be filed in the Dean of Students Office. The decision will
take the form of written recommendations to the parties involved, and if
necessary, to the appropriate officer of the College. (Written notification in the
form of recommendations will be sent to the student with a copy to the
president of the College.) Penalties may include expulsion and suspension.
4. The committee will follow through on its recommendations, if appropriate.
Every effort will be made to reconcile the parties involved.
Privacy
The student’s name may be withheld under a variety of circumstances where it
would not be necessary to reveal her name. If there is an opposing party, however,
he/she may be informed of the student’s name in order to properly defend
himself/herself against the complaint or if the complaint is serious enough to
warrant such an action. The student shall be informed of this possibility and will be
given the option of dropping the complaint before the student’s name is disclosed.
7 .0
7 .10
Sanctions
General Statement Regarding Sanctions
Sanctions for violations of the College’s policies are assessed appropriately for the
cited violation. Sanctions will be considered in light of students’ entire conduct
records at the college and will be designed to hold students accountable for their
actions and the resulting or potential consequences of such actions, to promote the
educational well-being of students, and to protect the educational environment of
the College and the safety of the community. Failure to comply with the terms of
any imposed sanctions may be considered an additional violation. All emergencies
or other sudden conflicts preventing the student from completing her sanction(s)
must be cleared by the chair of the board and are subject to approval.
Sanctions are divided into two categories – Limited and College-wide Sanctions –
and are clearly defined below in 7 .20 and 7 .30.
7 .20
Limited and College-wide Sanctions
1. Limited Sanctions include all sanctions that affect a student’s status in a
specific academic unit or organizational unit (e.g., housing, student
organization). Sanctions assigned for academic dishonesty are done so in
cases heard by the Augmented Committee on Academic Review.
2. College-wide Sanctions are those sanctions that affect a student’s ability to
continue the student’s relationship with the entire college and include:
• Expulsion from the College
112 •
•
•
•
•
•
7 .30
Suspension from the College
Summary Suspension
Suspended Suspension
Revocation of Admission
Revocation of Degree
Removal of student organization recognition
Explanation of Limited and College-wide Sanctions
For explanation of Academic Sanctions, refer to: Academic Dishonesty, 5.0, and
the Scripps College Catalog 2012-2013.
College-wide Disciplinary Sanctions
1. Expulsion – Expulsion from the College is permanent termination of student
status. A permanent notation will appear on the student’s transcripts. The
student will be excluded from all classes, seminars, and programs; will not be
allowed to participate in any college-sponsored activity; and will not be allowed
on college premises.
2. Suspension – Suspension from the College is termination of student status for a
specified but limited period of time. A permanent notation will be made on the
student’s transcript indicating the period of suspension. During the period of
suspension, the student will be excluded from all classes, seminars, and
programs; will not be allowed to participate in college-sponsored activity; and
will not be allowed on college premises. Violation of the conditions of
suspension, college policies, or regulations during the period of suspension may
be cause for further disciplinary action, usually in the form of expulsion from
the College. Normally after the suspension, the student will be on disciplinary
probation for a specified length of time.
3. Suspended Suspension – Under suspended suspension, the student is not
suspended but will be suspended automatically if the student commits another
serious offense.
4. Summary Suspension – The Dean of Students or her designee has the power to
impose summary suspension for any action that she considers severe enough to
warrant such emergency action. She may impose summary suspension after a
charge has been filed with Augmented JB.
• After summary suspension has been imposed, a hearing on the charge will
be heard by the Augmented JB within forty-eight (48) hours of the charge
being made, unless otherwise requested by the defendant.
• The Augmented JB will notify the accused and the president of the College
immediately upon reaching a decision.
5. Revocation of Admission – Revocation of admission involves the student’s
loss of admitted status to the College. The student may not continue enrollment
or enroll for future semesters. Normally, revocation of admission precludes the
student from the opportunity to apply to or be admitted to the College in the
future.
6. Revocation of Degree – Revocation of Degree involves the student’s loss of
the right to claim the degree as earned. Posting of the degree will be removed
from the student’s transcript, and a permanent notation will be made on the
transcript indicating the revocation, the degree involved, and the date of the
action.
113 7. Organizational Sanctions – Organizational sanctions are applicable to all
residential and non-residential organizations, clubs, and similarly organized
groups that are responsible for compliance with all College policies. Upon
determination that the group has encouraged violations or did not take
reasonable steps to prevent violations of College policies, the group may be
subjected to permanent or temporary removal of recognition.
Limited Disciplinary Sanctions
1. Warning – Warning is a written reprimand for violations of specified College
policies or regulations including notice to the student that continued or repeated
violations may be cause for further disciplinary action, normally in the form of
disciplinary probation.
2. Restitution –Restitution is reimbursement for a) damage to College property, b)
misappropriation of College property, funds or services, or c) minor damage to
the property of individuals or groups within the College community. Such
reimbursement may take the form of monetary payment or appropriate service
to repair or otherwise compensate for damages. Restitution may be assigned
for major damage but may be deferred to other appropriate processes.
3. Disciplinary Probation – Disciplinary probation consists of a strong formal
warning that further violations during a specific period will not be considered
individually, but in light of the student’s past action. Academic probation, resulting
from a judicial hearing, requires a student to complete the student’s studies for a
specific period without further academic violation under the conditions outlined by
the board.
4 Organizational Sanctions – Organizational sanctions are applicable to all
residential and non-residential organizations, clubs, and similarly organized
groups, that are responsible for compliance with all College policies. Upon
determination that the group has encouraged violations or did not take
reasonable steps to prevent violations of College policies, the group may be
subjected to social probation, denial or limited use of College resources and
facilities, or other appropriate sanctions.
5. Other sanctions – Other sanctions may be imposed instead of or in addition
to those specified in the preceding list. Examples include, but are not limited to,
housing reassignment or removal, on-campus driving restrictions, prohibition of
leadership opportunities, fines, community service, research projects, seminar or
class attendance, or other educational experiences as deemed appropriate.
NOTE: If the board assigns the accused a community service or a work project
as a sanction, the accused must complete the assigned work project herself.
Outstanding fines may be charged to a student account at the end of the
academic year as determined by the Dean of Students Office.
8 .0
Appeals Process
Following an initial review, the accused and/or the complainant may file a written
appeal within ten days of the date that the initial decision was received.
8 .10
Grounds for an Appeal
Appeals must state:
• New evidence, of which the appellant was not aware of during the original
hearing and is potentially sufficient to alter the decision, has become available.
• The sanction imposed is excessive or inappropriate (nature of
114 sanction)
• The board failed to provide the student with due process and failed to follow
College policies and procedures while reviewing the cited behavior (due process)
• An unreasonable amount of bias existed in the decision-making
process
Exception: All administrative review decisions may be appealed on grounds of
inappropriate sanctions only.
8 .20
Filing an Appeal
The written appeal must include the specific grounds for the appeal, supporting
complainant wishes to include. Appeals should be filed as follows:
Case heard by:
File appeal to:
College JB
VPL*
Administrative Review
VPL*
Judicial Appeals Board
COSA
COSA for Appeal
Faculty Executive Committee
Augmented CAR
SAS president*
*or her designee, or Registrar’s Office during College breaks.
The appellant should be aware that initially all appeals are documentary reviews in
which no oral testimony is taken. In many cases appeals are determined solely on the
merits of the documents submitted and never proceed to oral hearing. Appellate
documents, therefore, should be as complete as possible.
8.30
Appeal Process
1. All appeals must be presented to the chair of the appropriate appellate hearing
board within ten days after notification of the decision was received or the
witnessed date of delivery of the notice. All appeals must be in written form and
signed by the complainant or accused.
2. Upon receipt of the written appeal, the board will review the appeal and
determine if grounds for the appeal exist.
3. If the board determines that grounds exist, the chair of the board will notify
the other principal party to the original charge (complainant or accused) and
provide reasonable opportunity to respond in writing.
4. The board will hear the case in a timely manner. An individual who served as a
member of the board that originally heard the case may not serve on the appeals
board for the same case. The said board member shall designate a proxy who
has been trained in the judicial process and notify the chair of the board of the
proxy.
5. After receiving all appellate documents, the board will convene and review the
submitted appellate documents, the written decision from the initial review, and
supporting documents relevant to the initial review decision. The board may
request additional statements from the chair, adviser, the accused, the
complainant, or witnesses of the initial hearing board.
6. The board will grant or deny the appeal. If the appeal is granted, the board will
determine a course of action that may include upholding the initial decision in
its entirety, modifying sanctions of the initial decision, referring the case back
to the initial hearing board for further hearing, or convening an appellate
hearing. The board’s decision requires a majority vote.
115 7. The board will issue a written decision to all principle parties of the initial hearing.
8. All decisions in which appellate bodies uphold, modify, or grant an appellate
hearing are final and binding upon all parties. Decisions referred back to initial
panels and that are affirmed by those panels without modification are likewise
final.
9. The rights of the complainant and the accused will remain the same as in the
College JB with the exception of the right to a public hearing.
10. A written summary of the board’s decision will be provided to the appealing
party and the chair of the original hearing board within seven days of the
decision.
116 Helpful Phone Numbers
(All phone numbers are in the 909 area code unless otherwise indicated.)
To reach the 911 emergency dispatcher from a campus phone, one must dial 9-911.
However, the tracer will give the caller’s location as the five-college central Telephone
Office, unless the caller has time to explain otherwise. This is why individuals are strongly
encouraged to dial the Department of Campus Safety at ext. 72000 in an emergency.
The Department of Campus Safety will contact the appropriate emergency agency while
sending campus safety personnel to the location immediately.
Fire
ext .72000, 607-2000
Police
ext .72000, 607-2000
Paramedic
ext .72000, 607-2000
Claremont Police Department (non-emergencies)
399-5411
Auto Repair Shops
Jiffy Lube – 2880 N. Garey Ave., Pomona
American Automotive – 2080 W. Foothill Blvd., Upland
596-6899
981-9707
Banks
Bank of America – 339 Yale Ave., Claremont
Chase – 400 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
California Bank & Trust – 102 N. Yale Ave., Claremont
Wells Fargo – 203 Yale Ave., Claremont
865-2424
624-9001
624-9091
398-1140
Bike Shops
Jax Bicycle Center – 217 W. 1st St., Claremont
Competitive Edge Cyclery – 65 E. Foothill Blvd., Upland
REI – 12218 Foothill Blvd., Rancho Cucamonga
621-5827
985-2453
646-8360
Book Stores
Barnes and Noble – 5183 Montclair Plaza Lane, Montclair
399-1966
Computers and Computer Repair
Computer Solutions – 2420 W. Arrow Route, Claremont
482-4600
Crisis Hotlines
California HIV/Aids Service referrals
Alcoholics Anonymous
Al-Anon
Cocaine Anonymous
House of Ruth – 599 N. Main Street, Pomona
House of Ruth 24 hr. Emergency Hotline
Narcotics Anonymous
Rape Hotline (Project Sister)
HELPline
Crisis/Suicide
intervention
800-367-2437
825-4700
824-1516
951-359-3895
623-4364
877-988-5559
800-863-2962
626-4357
117 951-686-4357
Discount Stores
Costco – 9404 Central Ave, Montclair
K-Mart – 2530 S. Euclid, Ontario
Big Lots – 1284 W. Foothill Blvd., Upland
Target – 9052 Central Ave, Montclair
Wal Mart – 1540 Foothill Blvd., Upland
575-5004
983-2291
949-1321
624-5717
920-4021
Government and the Law
Claremont Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Information Center, –
205 Yale Avenue, Claremont
624-1681
Claremont City Hall
399-5460
Pomona Legal Service Program
800-433-6251
Pomona Courthouse South
620-3001
Grocery Stores
Stater Brothers – 1055 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont
Sprouts Farmers Market – 835 W Foothill Blvd, Claremont
Trader Joes – 475 Foothill Blvd, Claremont,
Vons Supermarket – 550 E. Baseline Rd., Claremont
Wolfe’s Market – 160 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont
624-0619
267-1049
625-8784
621-4644
626-8508
Hospitals and Clinics
Family Planning Associates Medical Group –
5050 San Bernardino Street, Montclair
626-2463
Kaiser Permanente – 9961 Sierra Ave., Fontana
427-5000
Kaiser Permanente – 250 W. San Jose, Claremont
909-398-2142
Planned Parenthood – 918 W. Foothill Blvd. # A, Upland
985-0065
Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Ctr – 1787 N. Garey Ave., Pomona 865-9500
San Antonio Community Hospital – 999 San Bernardino Rd
985-2811
San Antonio Community Lab – 7777 Milliken Ave., Rancho Cucamonga 948-8040
Urgent Care: Pomona Valley – 1601 Monte Vista, Ste. 190, Claremont 865-9977
Mail Services
Claremont Post Office – 140 Harvard Ave., Claremont
UPS Store – 310 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
The Village Postmark – 112 Harvard Ave., Claremont
Newspapers
Claremont Courier – 111 S. College Ave., Claremont
Inland Valley Daily Bulletin – 2041 E. 4th St., Ontario
Los Angeles Times (call for subscription)
New York Times (call for subscription)
Office/School Supplies
Office Depot Inc. – 5391 Moreno St., Montclair
Staples The Office Superstore – 300 S. Mountain Ave., Upland
Optometry
Claremont Optometry
625-7161
621-2112
626-1999
621-4761
987-6397
800-528-4637
800-631-2500
624-6895
981-9039
625-7861
118 Lens Crafters – 2148 E. Montclair Plaza Ln., Montclair
Lens Crafters – 9337 Monte Vista Ave., Montclair
Prescriptions
Hendricks – 137 Harvard Ave., Claremont
Kaiser Permanente – 250 W. San Jose, Claremont
CVS Pharmacy – 775 E. Foothill Blvd, Pomona
Walgreens, 1241 W. Foothill Blvd, (open 24 hours) Upland
399-5662
621-1136
624-1611
866-342-2806
621-6708
985-5391
Printers/Copy Service
Claremont Heights Postal Center – 2058 N. Mills Ave., Claremont 626-7624
FedEx Kinkos – 960 N. Mountain Ave., Upland
981-9850
Staples – 300 S Mountain Ave., Upland
981-9039
Transportation
Airlines & Airports
Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
Ontario International Airport (ONT)
Alaska
American
Continental
Delta
Northwest
Southwest
United
USAirways
Airport Transportation Service
Express Shuttle
Super Shuttle
Bus Service
Greyhound Bus Lines – Claremont Station
Taxi Service
Yellow Cab Co.
Train Service
Amtrak – Route Information and Reservation
Metro Link
310-646-5252
909-937-2700
800-426-0333
800-433-7300
800-525-0280
800-221-1212
800-225-2525
800-435-9792
800-241-6522
800-864-8331
800-427-7483
800-258-3826
624-4564
622-1313
800-872-7245
800-371-5465
Travel Agencies
Travel Xpress-Carlson Wagonlit – 368 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Clmt.
625-4771
119 Scripps College Directory (Extensions – with 621-, 607-)
Admission Office, Balch Hall
18149
Alumnae Office, Balch Hall
72699
Asian American Student Union, Kimberly 92 & 95
72980
Cafe Con Leche, SCORE Office, Frankel Routt Courtyard
Career Planning & Resources, Malott Commons 1st Floor
18180
Clark Humanities Museum, 981 N. Amherst, Humanities Bldg.
73606
Communication and Marketing, Steele 211
18280
Conferences and Special Events Office
18187
Dean of Faculty’s Office, Balch Hall 122
72822
Dean of Students Office, Balch Hall 112
18277
Denison Library, 1090 N. Columbia
18973
Dining Services, Malott Commons
72977
European Union Center, 385 E. 9th Ste. 115
78102
Facility Reservations, Registrar’s Office, Balch Hall 121
18089
Family, SCORE Office, Frankel Routt Courtyard
77838
Financial Aid Office, Steele Hall 2nd Floor
18275
Human Resource Office, 385 E. 9th Ste. 120
77908
Humanities Institute, Steele 103
18327
Intercollegiate Dept. of Asian American Studies, 647 N. College Way
79508
Intercollegiate Dept. of Africana Studies 647 N. College Way
73070
Intercollegiate Dept. of Chicano Studies, 647 N. College Way
73221
Intercollegiate Women’s Studies Teaching and Research Center, 385 E. 9th St.
18274
W.M. Keck Science Center, 925 N. Mills Ave
18298
Mail Services Center, Malott Commons 1st Floor
(correct)
Maintenance and Housekeeping, 406 Platt Ave.
72541, after hours 72000
Millard Sheets Art Center, 250 Platt Ave.
72973
Motley Coffeehouse, Malott Commons 1st Floor
73967
Music Building, 921 N. Amherst
73266
Off-Campus Studies, Balch Hall 136
18306
Office of Assessment and Institutional Research, Vita Nova 132
73884
Emergency Preparedness Committee
18211
Performing Arts Center, 231 E.10th St
79158
President’s Office, Balch Hall 129
18148
Registrar’s Office, Balch Hall 121
72981
Resident Advisor Cell Phones
909-708-7603
909-708-7604
Richardson Dance Studio, 921 N. Amherst Ave.
72934
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, 11th and Columbia Ave.
73397, 73517
Scripps Communities of Resources and Empowerment (SCORE)
78869
Scripps Store
78733
Student Accounts, Balch Hall 119
18259
Student Activities and Res. Life Off. (SARLO), Malott Commons 2nd Floor
74307
Treasurer’s Office, Balch Hall 107
18211
Wanawake Weusi, 1030 Dartmouth
77837
Sally Tiernan Field House
78810
120 Claremont Colleges Directory
Athletics Facilities
Appendices
Ducey Gym
72904
Frank B. Wells Fitness Center, Ducey Gym
73138
Pitzer Gold Center, north end of Pitzer College
73900
Pomona Rains Center
18016
Scripps Exercise Room, next to Senior Routt Apartments
73379
Scripps Pool
73562
CMC Axelrood Pool, Ducey Gym
73562
Pomona Haldeman Pool, east of the football field on 6th St.
18583
Tennis Courts are located on the Pomona and CMC campuses
Tracks are located on the CMC, Pomona, Pitzer campuses
Bernard Biological Field Station, Thille 108
Field Manager
621-5425
Bridges Auditorium Box Office
18032
Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Center, 757 College Way
18044
Claremont Card Center (Student ID), 919 N. Columbia Ave.
72273
Claremont School of Theology, 1325 N. College Ave.
626-3521
Department of Campus Safety, Pendleton Business Bldg., 150 E. Eighth St.
72000
18170
Dining Halls (five-college)
Claremont McKenna - Collins
78253
Harvey Mudd - Platt
72675
Pitzer - McConnell
72788
Pomona - Frary Hall 73076, Frank Hall 72240, Oldenborg Hall
78073
Health Education Outreach (HEO), 757 College Way
73602
Honnold/Mudd Library Complex, 8th & Dartmouth
18150
Huntley Bookstore, 8th St. & Dartmouth Ave.
607-1502
Information Desk
71502
Textbooks - Sales Floor
73783
Computers - Sales Floor
71625
Information Technology, Basement of Pendleton
18053
International Place (I-Place), Claremont McKenna Campus
74571
McAlister Center for Religious Activities, 919 N. Columbia Ave.
Chaplains, Office of the
18685
Community Service/Volunteer Center
18822
Hillel
18685
Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services, 757 College Way 18202
Office of Black Student Affairs (OBSA), 139 E. 7th St.
18248
PE/Athletic faculty assigned to SCR
Charles Griffiths, Athletics – Ducey Gym
79338
Betsy Hipple, Athletics – Ducey Gym
78613
Gretchen Rush, Athletics – Biszantz Tennis Center
74237
Keri Sanchez, Athletics – Center Court D
79069
Queer Resource Center, Pomona College, Walton Commons.
71817
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave.
625-8767
Snack Shops
121 The Coop, Walker Lounge, Pomona College
72264
The Grove House, Pitzer College
73654
The Hub, Claremont McKenna College
74082
Motley Coffeehouse, Malott Commons, Scripps College
73967
Hagelbarger’s, McManus Hall at Claremont Graduate University
73297
Student Accounts
Student Health Services, 757 College Way
18222
Telephone Office, 330 E. 8th Street
18599
Voicemail Hot Line
73172
The Women’s Center, Grove House at Pitzer
73654
Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, Pitzer College
213-821-5615
Appendix A - Housing I nformation
Housing Options
Scripps offers a variety of housing options. Students may live on campus in the
traditional residence halls or Senior Routt Apartments; petition to live off-campus in an
unaffiliated house/apartment; or on another Claremont College campus by participating in a
5-College Living Exchange.
On-Campus Options Residence Halls
There are nine residence halls at Scripps College - Clark, Toll, Browning, Dorsey,
Frankel, Routt, Jungles-Winkler, Kimberly and Wilbur hall. The number of residents in each
hall ranges from 20 to 100. Each hall is governed by a hall council made up of eleven
officers who are elected by the residents of the hall. Students living in the residence halls are
required to purchase a meal plan.
Senior Routt Apartments
For women who would like the experience of being more independent and the ability to
cook their own meals, Scripps offers four furnished, on-campus apartments. These
apartments consist of four bedrooms, kitchen facilities, and a common area. The cost to live
in the apartments is the same cost one pays to live in normal residence hall rooms. Priority
for these apartments is given to groups of senior women who apply. Information and
applications will be available at the time of Hall Draw in the spring.
Alternate Housing Options
On rare occasions when there is a “planned” over enrollment of students, the college may
offer a limited number of alternative housing options. For more information please contact
the Dean of Students Office, (ext. 18277).
Off-Campus Options
Off-Campus Petitions
Students may petition to live off-campus anytime during the year, although petitions are
typically granted in the spring for the following academic year. Students are officially
granted off-campus status when they receive written notification. The number of off-campus
petitions granted is limited, and priority is given to upper-class women. Off-campus status is
only granted for one academic year at a time, therefore students should not sign a lease with
more than a one-year rental agreement. If students would like to live off-campus after the
current academic year, they need to reapply in the spring. No student is guaranteed off-
122 campus status for the following academic year.
Unaffiliated house/apartment
Students who are granted off-campus status may live anywhere they choose. Students
who need to find an off-campus residence are encouraged to look in the Claremont Courier,
contact the Real Estate Office (909) 607-2609, or obtain local rental magazines at the
Claremont Chamber of Commerce.
Claremont Colleges Campus Options
Five-College Living Exchange
Students interested in living at Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, Pitzer, or Pomona
may participate in a Five-College Living Exchange. The exchange provides an opportunity
for Scripps students to live on another campus while their “exchange student” lives at
Scripps. More information will be available in the Hall/Room Draw booklet distributed in
the spring.
Assignments
Each spring, students choose their rooms for the following academic year during the
Hall Draw lottery system. Hall Draw is organized by the hall director/residence life
coordinator in conjunction with the student living representatives and members of the
residential life staff. More information will be available in the Hall Draw booklet
distributed in February.
NOTE: Students must sign and return their Confirmation of Enrollment form to the
Registrar’s Office by the specified deadline in order to participate in the Draw.
Residence Halls Agreement 2015-2016 Academic Year
I. Period of Agreement
This agreement shall be in effect during the 2013-2014 academic year, beginning Thursday,
August
29, 2013, at 8:00 am and ending Saturday, May 17, 2014, at noon (for graduates only:
Monday, May 19, 2014, at 12:00 pm). The residence halls are closed to students beginning
Saturday, December 21, 2013, at 12:00 PM, and re-open Sunday, January 19, 2014, at 10:00 AM
(for new students: Saturday January 18, 2014, at 8:00 AM). During this period students must find
alternate housing.
II. Termination
A. This agreement acknowledges that living in the residence halls is a privilege.
This agreement may be terminated upon written approval from Scripps College.
The student shall be entitled to a prorated refund of board charges (no refund of
room charges or fees) for any such period paid beyond the effective Collegeapproved termination date, provided the student has completed the established
checkout procedure and paid any outstanding amounts owed to the College. If a
student vacates the student’s residence before the end of an academic semester and
continues to be registered, the student is held liable for rent for the remainder of the
contract term. All decisions regarding exceptions to the Residence Halls Agreement
are made by the Dean of Students Office.
B. The College may terminate this agreement for any one or more of the following
reasons:
1. Indications that the student’s behavior could result in harm to oneself
or others. a. Emotional Distress
123 The College may elect to evict if, at any time, a student is
determined to be emotionally unfit to live in College housing. In
all such cases, determination shall be made by the Dean of Students
Office. In cases of serious emotional crisis or incidents of alcohol
overdose, substance abuse, bulimia, anorexia, emotional
breakdown or other similar behavior, the student may be required
to have a behavioral contract in order to continue to live in the
Scripps residence halls and/or be subject to follow-up conduct
action. Students who have attempted suicide, threatened suicide,
commented about attempting suicide, or written suicide notes may
be required to receive permission to remain in the Scripps
residence halls from the Dean of Students Office. This permission
will normally be based on an assessment and recommendation from
a qualified psychological or medical practitioner.
2. Failure of the student to pay fees due in a timely manner (after receiving
written notice).
3. Failure of the student to maintain full-time enrollment status with the
College.
4. Violation of the housing contract or policies stated in the Guide to
Student Life. a. Unauthorized or Illegal Use of Assignment
The College may elect to evict if, at any time, a student uses the
premises for an unauthorized illegal purpose or violates the terms of
the Residence Halls Agreement. The College’s decision to evict
under this provision shall be made jointly by the Dean of Students
and associate Dean of Students. An eviction under this provision
shall be referred to judicial action for possible further and
independent disciplinary action.
b. Continual disruption/Unacceptable
behavior
Residents responsible for excessive noise and/or disruptive
behavior w continually disrupt the environment may be subject
to eviction as well as further disciplinary action.
III. The College Shall:
A. Provide the student with an assigned space in the residence halls. The room may
be either single, double, triple, or quadruple occupancy.
B. Provide each student with a single bed, mattress, dresser, study desk, desk chair,
bookshelf, and wastebasket.
C. Furnish meals in campus dining halls in accordance with the student’s choice of
meal plan when the College is in session. All residential students are required to be on
the meal plan, with the exception of students medically excused by the Dean of Students
Office and students residing in the four person Senior Routt Apartments.
D. Provide cleaning service and maintenance for common areas of the residence halls
(lounges, hallways, bathrooms and shower rooms).
IV. The Student Shall:
A. Be enrolled as a full-time student during the period of the agreement unless
alternative arrangements have been approved by the Dean of Students Office.
B. Pay all room and board charges in accordance with the dates and amounts set
forth by Business Affairs.
C. Pay a $350.00 security deposit by the date specified by the Admission Office.
D. Not change, alter, or modify the room, suite, or apartment, its furnishings or
124 fixtures without the prior approval of the director of campus maintenance and the
Dean of Students Office.
E. Abide by all residence hall policies and procedures as identified in the Guide to
Student Life. Violations may become basis for administrative and/or disciplinary
action up to and including expulsion from the College. The Guide to Student Life
section on residence hall policies and procedures is considered part of this
agreement.
F. Be financially responsible for damages that occur in their room, suite, or
residence hall. Such cost shall be established at the College’s reasonable
discretion, and payment of such costs shall be made by the student within 15 days
of written notice from the College or be deducted from their damage deposit. In
the event the cause of any loss or damage to the residence hall, its common areas,
furnishings or fixtures cannot be determined after reasonable investigation by
the College, the cost of such loss or damage shall be prorated to each student
assigned to the residence hall (or suite, where appropriate) regardless of whether
such student was present in the residence hall at the time of such loss or damage.
G. Be responsible for familiarizing all personal guests with Scripps’ policies and
assume full responsibility for any violation thereof or damage to property.
H. Leave the room and/or suite in a clean and orderly condition, which includes
retrieving any stored college-owned furniture, when that student moves, or at the
termination of this agreement.
I. Evacuate all the residence hall spaces in the event of an emergency.
J. Be entitled to a refund of their $350.00 security deposit, less any damages
charged against their deposit, upon graduation or withdrawal from the College.
Exceptions to this must be approved by the Dean of Students Office and Business
Affairs.
V. It is Further Agreed That:
A. Authorized College personnel may enter the student’s room for cleaning,
maintenance, or repairs, for purposes of maintaining compliance with health and
safety regulations, and in the case of an emergency or building evacuation. All
other entries will be in compliance with State of California and federal laws.
B. While all reasonable precautions will be taken to safeguard the personal property
of students, the College assumes no responsibility and provides no insurance or
financial protection for the student’s personal property.
C. Unless given prior authorization by the Dean of Students staff member
responsible for housing, the student will not enter the residence halls when they are
closed.
Consolidation
Occupants may be required to change rooms or residence halls for the benefit of the College.
Scripps College reserves the right, in the event of a vacancy, to consolidate student spaces.
Search of Rooms
A search of a student room by college staff may be authorized only by the Dean of
Students Office. Such authorization will be issued in writing indicating the reason for the
search and the objects or information sought. Except in emergency circumstances, an
occupied residence hall room will not be searched without prior notification of the resident,
with the opportunity for the student to be present at the time of the search if she chooses. If
the search is conducted without the student being present, the student will receive
notification that the search did occur and the reason for it. The College cannot prevent nor
prohibit the search of student rooms on college premises by law enforcement officers acting
in the performance of their duties.
125 The College is not liable for the loss of, or damage to, personal property for any cause
not arising directly from the negligent acts of college employees acting within the scope
of their duties. Private insurance is advised.
Maintenance and Inspection Access
The College reserves the right to enter any room at any reasonable time, including
vacation periods, for the purpose of inspection, maintenance, or repair. Additionally, the
College reserves the right to enter any room in cases of emergency without providing
written notice to students for the purpose of making repairs.
Individual room checks are conducted once a year. Staff checks each room to ensure that
the room meets up to fire code and college standards; a health and safety check evaluation
form will be left in each room to explain any hazards that need to be addressed. Students are
expected to correct the hazard, and those who do not comply with College and fire code
standards are expected to correct the hazard and may be subject to judicial action.
Residence Hall Procedures
Check-in Procedures
1. Each room will be cleaned and furnished by the maintenance and housekeeping staffs
to prepare for occupancy.
2. All Room Condition Report (RCR) forms will be completed prior to the day of
check-in by a member of the residential life or maintenance staffs. Upon arrival,
each student receives a copy of the RCR and a room key from a member of the
residential life staff. Students take a copy of the RCR form to their room and makes
additions/corrections to it so that it reflects the condition of their room upon
checking-in. The RCR must be returned to the Dean of Students Office within 72
hours with any corrections after the student assesses the room. In the case of
roommates, all students in the room will be responsible for community living space,
such as walls, lighting, carpeting, and bathrooms. Each resident’s RCR should reflect
the condition of the community space and each resident’s own living space. A copy
of the RCR will serve as a permanent record of the condition of each room.
Room Change and Mid-Year Check-out Procedure
1. Should a student wish to check out prior to the end of the academic year because the
student is moving to another room or is vacating her room for the remainder of the
year, a member of the residential life staff will be responsible for collecting the
student’s room key.
2. Upon checking out, the residential life staff member will check the room against
the RCR form and will note differences, if any. If there are any damages, lack of
cleanliness, or a failure to check out properly, the residential life staff member will
indicate this on the RCR. If the room is in need of repair, the Maintenance Office
will assess the cost of the damage and/or missing furniture and will notify Student
Accounts Office as to the amount the student(s) should be charged at a later date.
The residential life staff member and resident will sign the RCR.
3. The residential life staff member will give a copy of the signed RCR to the
resident. The original copy, the resident’s room key, and any work requests will be
given to the Maintenance Office.
4. The Maintenance Office will check the room for damages and general repairs.
5. If a student is changing rooms/halls, the student must also check-in with a member of
the residential life staff in the student’s new hall according to the check-in
procedures listed above.
NOTE: There is a two-week moratorium on room changes at the beginning of each semester.
126 End of the Year Check-Out
EVERY student is required to check out of the student’s room at the end of the school
year. Prior to the beginning of finals week, all students are required to attend a mandatory
hall meeting where information about check out is presented. At this meeting, a student
secures an appointment time to check-out. Check outs are conducted by members of the
Maintenance, Housekeeping, and Residential Life staffs.
NOTE: A full description of the check-out procedures will be provided prior to the end of
the year.
Rooms and Furnishings
All rooms are furnished with a bed, study desk and chair, dresser, bookshelf, and
wastebasket. When a student vacates a room, all items must be returned to the room unless
the furniture was removed through a Furniture Removal Request. The student is
responsible for all missing items and damaged furniture (see Policy 4 .13).Any damages or
missing furniture in the room at the time of check out will result in a fine for the occupant(s)
of the room. The following is a list of charges for damages and missing furniture. The
charges are general guidelines and may change depending on individual circumstances as
assessed by a member of the Maintenance Office staff member.
RESIDENCE HALL DAMAGE CHARGES LIST
$15 Bed pad
$150 Mattress
$200 Bookcase (small)
$250 Bookcase (large)
$70 Bulletin board/White board
TBD Wall/Ceiling repair/repaint
$300 Carpet (replacement)
$85 No sag spring
$300 Chest of drawers
$100 Closet doors (re-hang)
TBD Missing Closet Doors
$25 Recycling Bin
$250 Coffee Table
$125 Re-key room (ResHall)
$500 Couch
$150 Repaint/Refinish Door
$400 Desk
$225 Desk chair
$12 Screens (each)
5
$250 End table
$250
Student reading chair
$400 Entertainment Center
$25 Wastebasket
$115 Lamp
$70 Lamp shade
Loft/Bed frame
$500
TBD=To Be Determined
Prices are subject to change without notice. Billing and other overhead costs may be added
to charges.
Appendices
Residents are responsible for all items marked on their RCR at check in (items may be
added or removed only by submitting a work order request to the Maintenance Office
through a residential life staff member). Scripps College is not responsible for any items
left in the basement over the summer. Scripps College does not provide summer storage.
Residence Hall Use During Vacations
During the semester break in late December and January, ALL residence halls and
on-campus apartments are closed. During fall and spring break residence halls remain open.
Food service is available at one of the colleges during fall and Thanksgiving break, but not
during spring break.
Summer Housing
127 Summer housing is not guaranteed and is subject to availability. Please contact the
Summer Conferences and Special Events Office, located in Vita Nova Hall 126, ext. 18187
or 71870.
Appendix B - ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2014 – 2015
(dates subject to change)
Fall 2014 Semester
Thursday
August 28
Residence halls open at 8 a.m. for new students
Thurs.Mon.
Sunday
August 28 -September
1
August 31
Orientation and Registration
Tuesday
September 2
Residence halls open at 10 a.m. for continuing
students
Classes begin
Monday
September 15
Last day to add classes
Wednesday
October 8
Low Grade Reports due in Registrar’s Office
Mon.-Tues.
October 20-21
Fall Break
Thursday
October 23
Last day to drop classes without academic penalty
Tues. – Fri.
November 18-21
Preregistration for spring semester
Thurs-Fri.
November 27-28
Thanksgiving recess
Wednesday
December 10
Last day of classes for first semester
Thurs.- Fri.
December 11-12
*Reading days
Mon.-Fri.
December 15-19
Final examinations
Saturday
December 20
Residence halls close at noon
Monday
December 29
All grades due in the Registrar’s Office by noon
*Thursday and Friday of the last week of classes each semester are designated as Reading
Days. Classes are suspended, but professors may hold study sessions, critique sessions, or
reviews. No new material may be introduced at these sessions and no exams may be given on
Reading Days except to second-semester seniors.
Spring 2015
Semester
Saturday
January 17
Residence halls open at 8 a.m. for new students
Sat.-Mon.
January 17-19
Orientation and Registration for new students
Sunday
January 18
Residence halls open at 10 a.m. for continuing students
128 Tuesday
January 20
Second semester classes begin
Monday
February 2
Last day to add classes
Wednesday
March 4
Low Grade Reports due in the Registrar’s Office
Thursday
March 12
Last day to drop classes without academic penalty
Mon.-Fri.
March 16-20
Spring Break
Friday
March 27
César Chavez Holiday- Colleges Closed
Tues.Thurs.
Wednesday
April 21-23
Preregistration for fall semester
May 6
Last day of classes at Scripps (May1 – HM; May 6 – CM, PZ, & PO)
Thursday
May 7
Capstone Day
Thurs.-Fri.
May 7-8
*Reading days
Friday
May 8
Senior grades due in the Registrar’s Office by noon
Mon.-Fri.
May 11-15
Final examinations and end of spring semester
Saturday
May 16
Commencement begins at 5:00 p.m.
Saturday
May 16
Residence halls close at noon (non-graduates)
Monday
May 18
Residence halls close at noon for graduating seniors
Thursday
May 21
All other grades due in the Registrar’s Office by noon
Tuesday
September 1
Fall 2015 classes begin
*Thursday and Friday of the last week of classes each semester are designated as Reading
Days. Classes are suspended, but professors may hold study sessions, critique sessions, or
reviews. No new material may be introduced at these sessions and no exams may be given on
Reading Days except to second-semester seniors.
Appendix C - Scripps C ollege Committees
Board of Trustees, Chair: Mark Herron
Board of Trustees Committees
Appendices
In accordance with the bylaws of the College, each of the following five
committees of the Board of Trustees has two student members, one alternate
student member, and two faculty members. Students and faculty members are
selected annually by their respective constituencies. These representatives will
serve from July 1 to June 30. Most committees meet four times per year, and
meetings are usually held on the Scripps campus. Committee members, including
alternates, are also expected to attend those meetings that are held at the annual
Board of Trustees retreat. Transportation and lodging arrangements are made and
paid for by the College. Early in the fall semester, senior staff liaisons to board
committees will meet with student committee members to orient them to their
129 positions and provide a schedule of meetings and other committee materials.
Student committee members are required to submit a report and/or notes from the
meetings to SAS and post these materials on the SAS bulletin board and website.
Buildings and Grounds Committee (B&G)
The committee is chaired by a trustee and staffed by the chief financial officer of
the College. The committee concerns itself with the design, utility, and condition of
the College’s buildings, grounds, and utilities, and with the amount and adequacy
of funds devoted to their maintenance and repair. It is also responsible for:
developing the campus master plan; approving the design of new campus facilities;
planning for the periodic refurbishment of campus facilities; overseeing the status
of current major repairs and renovations; reviewing the five-year projection of
recurring maintenance; and monitoring ADA compliance. It oversees the status of
the capital construction, additions and renovations, and related real estate
acquisitions, transfers, and sales. In its work, B&G articulates closely with the
Finance Committee on funding capital projects, and the Institutional Advancement
Committee on naming opportunities and other gift strategies. Student members are
elected through SAS in the spring.
Educational Policy Committee (EPC)
The committee is chaired by a trustee and staffed by the vice president and dean of
faculty. The responsibility of this committee is to ensure that the educational
program is consistent with the College’s mission, that academic personnel and the
academic budget reflect academic priorities, that faculty personnel policies and
procedures are equitable, and that the quality of academic activities is evaluated. To
meet this responsibility the committee regularly reviews such issues as: how to
attract and retain the best faculty; reinforcing learning with new technologies;
criteria for promotion and tenure; faculty development programs; issues of
diversity relating to faculty and the curriculum; addition, deletion, or reduction of
academic programs; and faculty evaluation procedures.
Upon the recommendation of the president of the College, the EPC takes action on
personnel recommendations of the Faculty Committee on Appointments,
Promotions and Tenure. With the exception of the vice president and dean of
faculty and the associate dean of faculty, the faculty, student, and non-trustee
committee members shall not be present at committee meetings when matters
involving faculty welfare, appointments, reappointments, promotion, dismissals,
changes in salary, or leaves of absences are being considered, nor be entitled to
vote on them. The recommendations of the committee shall be presented to the
Board of Trustees for action. Student members are elected through SAS in the
spring.
Finance Committee (FC)
The committee is chaired by a trustee and staffed by the chief financial officer of
the College. The Finance Committee oversees all aspects of the College’s financial
operations, including the development of the annual operating budget, the capital
expenditures budget, and cash flow forecasts. The committee recommends the
policies under which the College may incur debt, and monitors adherence to such
policies. The committee can recommend but not approve borrowings. In addition,
the committee, working with staff, develops a ten year long-range plan and informs
130 the Board about the financial impact of various policy decisions. This committee
works with other board committees such as Buildings and Grounds, Institutional
Advancement, and Investment to develop a comprehensive view of the financial
resources of the College. Student members are elected through SAS in the spring.
Institutional Advancement Committee (IAC)
The committee is chaired by a trustee and staffed by the vice president for
institutional advancement. Along with alumnae and parent volunteer chairs of key
fundraising committees, this committee works to educate the Board and the College
constituencies (including alumnae, parents, students, friends, corporations, and
foundations) as to the role fundraising plays in the life of the College and the
importance of the constituencies’ participation not only in fundraising, but also in
efforts to fulfill the mission of the College. Its responsibilities include providing
financial support to the College; personally encouraging others’ gifts to Scripps;
ensuring that fundraising objectives align clearly with the key objectives of the
College; setting fundraising goals and priorities; advising staff regarding
fundraising strategies; and monitoring the operations and results of the College’s
institutional advancement program, including budget, staff, schedule, and use of
counsel. With other board committees, it works to clarify current and long-range
priorities of the College and sets policies for fundraising in support of those
priorities. The IAC works with the Audit, Finance, and Investment Committees to
achieve and maintain financial equilibrium to enable the smooth functioning of the
College and to ensure the long-term financial stability of the College. Student
members are elected through SAS in the spring.
President’s Advisory Committee on Diversity and Inclusivity (PACDI)
The President’s Advisory Committee on Diversity and Inclusivity consists of
committed faculty, students, staff, and alumnae who are appointed to the committee
by the president of Scripps College to advise the president on issues of diversity
and inclusivity. The mission of PACDI is to promote a diverse and inclusive
community. See: http://www.scrippscollege.edu/about/diversity/index.php
Student Affairs Committee (SAC)
The committee is chaired by a trustee and is staffed by the vice president and Dean
of Students. The Student Affairs Committee has as its central tasks representing
students’ interests in the Board’s policy-making activities and supporting adequate
resources for student affairs programs of the College. The committee meets with
the vice president and Dean of Students to discuss issues relating to the
improvement of the quality and enrichment of the students’ collegiate experience.
These include career planning, counseling, academic advising, issues of attrition
and retention, issues of diversity, athletics and recreation, drug and alcohol policies,
residential life, student governance, issues raised by SAS, and clubs and
organizations. The committee receives periodic reports on recruitment, admission,
and financial aid from the vice president for enrollment. The Scripps Associated
Students president serves as an ex-officio, non-voting member. Student members
are elected through SAS in the spring.
Institutional Committees
SAS members and/or other students represent the student body on the following
131 institutional committees:
Alumnae Association/Alumnae Leadership Council
President: Trustee Libby DeMeo ’95
Committee on Study Abroad
Chair: Professor Dalton Krauss
The Committee on Study Abroad (COSA) meets 4 to 5 times per semester and is
responsible for setting policies related to off-campus study and for reviewing
applications and student petitions.
Emergency Readiness Committee
Chairs: Cheryl Pump and Josh Reeder
The Scripps College Emergency Readiness Committee exists to help prepare all
members of the College community for a major emergency or disaster through
participation in training and drills. To learn more about it visit:
http://www.scrippscollege.edu/emergency/index.php
Faculty Executive Committee
Chair: Professor David Andrews
The Faculty Executive Committee (FEC) addresses academic policy issues and solicits
input from the student body. To obtain further information, contact the Dean of
Faculty’s Office.
Food Service Committee
Chairs: Tom Adkins
Orientation Advisory Board
Chairs: Dean of Students Charlotte Johnson and Dean of Faculty Amy Marcus-Newhall
Senior Class Gift Executive Committee
TBA
Traffic Appeals Board
Five-College Student Committees
CC members and/or other students represent Scripps on the following five-college student
committees:
Five-College Budget Committee
Five-College Student Affairs Committee
Senate of The Claremont Colleges Consortium
Appendices
Scripps College Safety Committee
Chair: Director of Human Resources Jennifer Berklas
The Safety Committee of Scripps College meets as needed, but at least once each
semester to consider reports and take action regarding physical safety on our campus.
Crosswalks, emergency phones, signs, and general campus safety matters are examples of
the type of work done. Should you encounter anything on campus which you feel is safety
related, please contact a member of the committee.
132 Appendix D - Emergency/ Disaster Preparedness Information
HOW TO PREPARE PERSONALLY
1. Keep the following items easily accessible in your room: bottled water, personal first
aid kit, radio with good batteries, flashlight with spare batteries, comfortable shoes,
plastic bags for toilet and sanitation purposes, emergency rations, extra pair of
eyeglasses, essential medications.
2. Know all evacuation routes and exits as well as your evacuation site.
3. Organize your room in such a way to avoid hazards (e.g. don’t sleep directly beneath
windows, bookshelves, or picture frames).
4. To receive Scripps Alerts, register with the college’s emergency mass notification
system at: http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/emergency/scripps-alert-emergencycontact-information.
5. Participate in all emergency drills.
6. Attend all meetings regarding emergency procedures.
EARTHQUAKE
What to expect in the event of an earthquake
1. Everything shakes and rattles.
2. There is a lot of noise (bang and/or rumble).
3. Things will fall and break (such as ceiling tiles, bookcases, computers, etc.)
4. The motion may be severe (if you are standing you may be thrown to the ground).
What to do during the earthquake
1. REMAIN CALM; stay where you are until the shaking stops
2. If indoors, DROP down onto your hands and knees (before the earthquake knocks you
down).
This position protects you from falling but allows you to still move if necessary.
3. COVER your head and neck (and your entire body if possible) under a sturdy table
or desk. If there is no shelter nearby, only then should you get down near an
interior wall (or next to low-lying furniture that won’t fall on you), and cover
your head and neck with your arms and hands.
4. HOLD ON to your shelter (or to your head and neck) until the shaking stops. Be
prepared to move with your shelter if the shaking shifts it around. Stay where you
are until the shaking stops. Do not run outside.
5. Stay away from windows and objects that may fall.
6. Do not use elevators.
7. If outdoors, stay in an open area away from buildings, trees, street lights and utility
wires. Do not enter buildings.
What to do after an earthquake
1. AFTER THE SHAKING STOPS, if you are in your residence hall, proceed to the
designated evacuation site and check in with your RA. Wait to receive further
instructions from your RA. If you are in a classroom follow the instructions from
your professor. If outdoors, proceed to the nearest evacuation site and check in
with the department monitor for that site.
2. If you require first aid, let your RA (or designate) know.
3. Help calm and provide assistance to others.
LOCKDOWN
1. Once you receive notification by phone, email and/or text message OR Scripps
133 2.
3.
4.
5.
personnel, proceed to the nearest safe room (if you know the location) or go to
the closest room that can be locked.
Lock the door. Move furniture to barricade the door if possible.
Shut the curtains/blinds covering the windows.
Turn off the lights.
Sit/crouch down in areas that are out of sight from doors and windows.
6. Switch your cell phone to vibrate.
7. Don’t open the door for anybody! Remain quiet and calm until campus safety
or police arrive and/or you are notified by phone, email, or text message.
In the Event of a Disaster
1. Once it is safe to evacuate the building, proceed to your designated evacuation
site (or the nearest evacuation site if not in your residence hall) and check in with
your RA, professor or department monitor. Remain there until given further
instructions by your RA or a college official.
2. If you are on another campus, check in with an official from that college. Remain
at that college until a college official informs you that it is safe to return to
Scripps.
3. Assist emergency staff as needed.
4. Cooperate with the college and local officials in command of emergency
procedures.
Fire Safety Rules
When fire or smoke is detected in a building, sound the alarm, evacuate the building
and call the Department of Campus Safety (ext. 72000) to report the emergency.
State and local fire laws require the following:
1. One approved fire drill per semester coordinated by the Readiness Emergency
Committee and the residential life staff. Students who fail to evacuate the residence
halls during a fire drill may be subject to a fine of $150.
2. Corridors and exiting doors must be free of obstructions at all times.
3. Lighted candles or open flames in the residence hall are not permitted. Excessive
amounts of combustibles (such as paper products and textiles attached to walls and
ceilings or hung as room dividers) are considered fire hazards and are not permitted.
Excessive amounts of combustible wall or ceiling decorations and the overloading of
electrical outlets are prohibited.
4. Corridor decorations and signs must be made from non-flammable materials or
treated with an approved flame-retardant solution.
5. Holiday trees and tree branches must be treated with an approved flame-retardant
solution.
6. Students who smoke or have guests who smoke must always provide ashtrays for
their rooms. Wastebaskets may not be used as ashtrays.
7. Flammable liquids may not be used or stored in any residence hall.
8. Cooking in student rooms is not permitted.
9. If a residence hall fails to evacuate all of its residents, (i.e., a resident sleeps
through the fire drill or does not hear the alarm), the residence hall will continue to
have fire drills until the residents work together (i.e., door-knocking) to successfully
evacuate the building.
134 Appendix E - Information Technology Agreement
Scripps Computer Network Student Agreement
Before using the Scripps Computer Network for the first time, you must be aware and
agree to abide by the rules and standards that dictate appropriate use of the computing
resources on campus. Whether you are using the Scripps Network resources in the student
computer labs or in your own room, the rules governing appropriate use of computing at
Scripps and those of the other Claremont Colleges still apply.
It is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with all of the rules that govern appropriate
conduct on the Network you are using. Realizing that in addition to Claremont and Scripps
College specific guidelines, there are additional rules that may apply to systems on the
Internet that you intend to use.
These policies include the Claremont Colleges Appropriate Network Use Policy at
http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/it/appropriate-use-of-campus-computing-and-networkresources and the Scripps Web Policy at http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/it/computer-labrules-and-regulations . Plus, there are additional policies that apply specifically to the
computing resources at Scripps College, the Claremont College, and other institutions and
sites on the Internet. It is the user’s responsibility to become informed about the various
policies associated with using either local or Internet resources and to adhere to those
policies regulating the service.
Among the regulations listed in the guidelines is that no one else is permitted to use your
Scripps Network Account. This, like other violations of the Scripps College Network, will
result in immediate disciplinary action whereby your privileges on the Scripps Network
may be revoked and subject to other penalties or legal action. In addition, since you have
full Internet access from the Scripps Network, it is important to remember that you are
prohibited from accessing or attempting to access any computer system that you do not
specifically have authorization to use.
If you are interested in connecting your PC or MAC to the Scripps Network from your
residence hall, please obtain instructions, which can be found online at:
http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/it/web-based-scripps-networking-installation
IMPORTANT: All students are required to notify Scripps College IT within one week of
placing any Internet provider or file/print sharing device on the Network. Examples include but
are not limited to Chat, FTP site, Web Server, Windows or MAC with Print and/or File Sharing
enabled. Failure to register your computer can result in immediate disconnection from the
Network.
I, (print student name):
have read the above introduction to the Scripps Network and
agree to abide by these and the other rules that apply to appropriate use of Network
resources at Scripps College.
Signature on file.
Student Copy
Information Technology (IT) Resources
Scripps College has a combination of presentation classrooms and student and
residential computer labs to facilitate the use of technology on campus. The Local Area
135 Network (LAN) supports a wide variety of software and Internet applications to be used
for educational purposes and to carry out the legitimate business of the college. In addition
to online help guides provided on the Scripps website, students can request workshops from
the IT staff.
Students using the Scripps computing resources or any other Claremont or Internet
resource must do so in a manner consistent with the “Code of Conduct” (found in this
Guide to Student Life) and also be aware of the appropriate use guidelines that apply
specifically to the computer network. These rules specify what types of access are allowed,
priorities on lab systems, inappropriate behavior on the network, and other specific
regulations that govern appropriate use of the College resources. Current information on the
appropriate use guidelines and other policies for the Scripps network are posted in the student
lab and on the Scripps website. Failure to comply with any of the guidelines may be both a
criminal and a civil offense.
Student Computer Lab: Located on the second floor of Steele Hall, the lab is open to
Scripps students at all times, via card key access. The facility contains a mix of PC and Mac
computers that host a variety of applications and discipline-specific software. Scanners and a
color and laser printer are also available in the lab.
Macintosh Multimedia Technical Teaching Classroom: Located on the lower level of
Steele Hall in Room 5, this facility has 25 multimedia Macintosh systems and is used for
classes and workshops. It is also accessible by card reader for the art students to use as
overflow when there are no other events scheduled.
PC Technical Teaching Classroom: Located on the second floor of Steele Hall adjacent
to the Student Computer Lab, this facility has 25 Dell Pentium systems and is used for
classes and workshops
Smart Classrooms: All classrooms (except Baxter 108) on the Scripps campus include a
computer, projector and audio visual peripherals for faculty to use in
teaching.
Computer Art Lab: The Computer Art Lab is located in Lang Art Center. It is available to
students enrolled in computer art and multimedia studio classes.
Residence Hall Computer Resources: Providing 24-hour computer access, each of the eight
residence halls is equipped with at least two Dell PCs, a Macintosh system, and a laser
printer for student use.
Computer Network Access in Residence Hall Rooms and Wireless on Campus: Scripps
College has both wired and wireless support within the residence halls. Ethernet ports in
every residence hall room are gigabit-capable high-speed connections. The wireless
network supports the latest 802.11n standard as well as legacy 802.11a/b/g.
User-friendly instruction sheets and IT staff are available to assist you in the installation of
our “networking” software, which will provide you with Web, email, anti-virus and laserprinting services. Please visit http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/it/web-based-scrippsnetworking-installation .
Scripps College will provide network connection support on student systems that meet
the following minimum requirements:
PC
Macintosh
Desktop or laptop ~ 4 GB RAM min.
Windows 7 Service Pack 1 installed
OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion w/latest
updates installed
136 OS X 10.7.5 Lion w/ latest updates
installed
OS X 10.6.8 Lion w/ latest updates
installed
Category 5/5e/6 Ethernet Cable – 15ft. min for wired connection (provided by student) ~
Available at Huntley Bookstore
Windows Vista Service Pack 2 installed
FMI on Wireless please visit http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/it/wireless-lan-information.
APPENDIX G 2011 Fire Safety Report
(Contains statistics for 2011)
Introduction:
The Higher Education Opportunity Act requires all institutions of higher education that maintain
on-campus housing to publish an annual Fire Safety Report. This report contains the information
required by the HEOA for Scripps College including, our fire safety practices and a fire log with
statistics regarding on-campus fires. The annual Fire Safety Report is available by October 1 to all
students, prospective students, faculty, and staff. An email notice of its availability is sent to all
current students and employees each fall.
On-Campus Housing Fire Safety Information/Policies
Fire Emergency Procedures:
• If you see fire or smell smoke, activate the closest fire alarm.
• Evacuate to your designated evacuation area (as discussed with your Resident Advisor
during your first hall meeting) and report to your Building Monitor or Resident Advisor
• Report the location of the fire to Campus Safety at (909) 607-2000 or ext. 72000.
• All persons within a building are required to evacuate when an alarm has sounded. Persons
who do not evacuate present a danger to themselves and a liability to the college and will be
referred to the college judicial process.
Fire Alarm Systems:
The purpose of our fire alarm system is to signal the need for the evacuation of a building and to
notify Campus Safety automatically. False alarms and tampering with fire safety equipment is
unlawful. The penal code provides that any person who sets off a false alarm is guilty of a
misdemeanor punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment.
Fire Safety Equipment:
Students who tamper with fire-fighting or safety equipment (including fire extinguishers and
smoke detectors) are subject to a fine of $100, expenses for necessary repairs of equipment,
and/or judicial action.
Fire Sprinkler Systems:
Fire sprinklers are in many buildings and smoke detectors are in each residence hall.
Halogen Light Policy:
Due to documented fire dangers of halogen lighting, Scripps prohibits the use of halogen lamps.
Desk, table, or floor lamps that contain a halogen light bulb are not permitted on campus.
137 Open Flames:
Due to the danger presented by open flames, candles or any other flame may not be used on
campus unless they are used as part of a campus event and approved by the Dean of Students
Office.
Barbecue areas are designated by Grounds and the regulations surrounding the use of barbecues
on campus can be found in the Guide to Student Life. No grills of any kind (gas, electric,
charcoal, etc.) may be used outside of these designated areas. Personal grills may not be stored
in the residence halls.
Explosives:
The State law, as well as Scripps College policy, prohibits bringing firecrackers or explosive
materials of any kind onto any part of the campus or into the buildings. This includes combustibles
in containers such as gasoline cans. Furthermore, gasoline-powered scooters and motorcycles
cannot be stored in individual rooms or elsewhere in residence halls at any time. Vehicles found to
be stored in unauthorized areas will be towed and stored at the owner’s expense.
Fire Safety Education:
The resident advisors receive fire prevention and response training each semester. The training
consists of a classroom instruction followed by hands on application of fire extinguishers. In
addition, evacuation drills are conducted each semester to test the resident advisor’s ability to
facilitate evacuation in the event of an emergency. All residential students are also trained as to
the College’s evacuation procedures during their first residence hall meeting.
On-Campus Housing Fire Safety Systems:
Scripps College complies with all local, state and national fire regulations. All of Scripps'
residential buildings have fire alarms and manual fire extinguishers. Evacuation drills of all
residential buildings are conducted each semester. Fire safety systems are routinely
inspected and monitored as mandated by the County of Los Angeles. A log of these
inspections is maintained by the Facilities Department.
138 Index
Index
Academic Advisor .....................................................................................................................................................6
Academic Calendar ................................................................... 117
Academic Dishonesty and Definitions ....................................................... 89
Academic Freedom .................................................................................... 39
Academic Policies and Hearing Procedures ............................................... 88
Activities Office ......................................................................................... 27
Administrative Review ............................................................................... 94
Admission Office and Admission Ambassador Program .......................... 10
Advertising, Publicity, and Solicitation Policy .......................................... 44
AIDS, Claremont Colleges Policy on ........................................................ 45
Alcohol and Drug Policy ............................................................................ 45
Alumnae Association/Alumnae Council .................................................. 120
Alumnae Office and Parent Engagement & The Scripps Fund .................. 10
Animal Policy ............................................................................................. 44
Appeals Process. ....................................................................................... 104
Art Programs and Facilities ........................................................................ 11
Asian American Sponsor Program ............................................................. 26
Asian American Student Union .................................................................. 26
Athletics Program and Sport Facilities ....................................................... 12
Augmented Committee on Academic Review, Procedures of the ............. 91
Automobile Registration Policy ................................................................. 49
Banning Policy, the CC’s ............................................................................ 81
Barbeque Policy ......................................................................................... 57
Bias-related Incident Reporting ................................................................. 84
Bicycle Registration and Parking Policy .................................................... 50
Black Student Affairs (OBSA), Office of .................................................. 32
Board of Trustees Committees ................................................................. 119
Browsing Rooms .......................................................................................... 8
Budget Committee (Finance) ................................................................... 119
Buildings and Grounds Committee .......................................................... 119
Bylaws of Scripps Associated Students ..................................................... 36
Cafe Con Leche .......................................................................................... 26
Campus Governance. .................................................................................. 36
Campus Safety ........................................................................................... 30
Campus Telephone Directory ................................................................... 109
Candles and Flammable Material Policy ................................................... 51
Career Planning & Resources .................................................................... 14
Chaplains, Office of the ............................................................................. 32
Check-in Procedures, Residence Hall ...................................................... 115
Check-out Procedures, End of Year ......................................................... 115
Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Center ...................................................... 30
139 Civil Law Enforcement on Campus Policy ................................................ 50
Claremont Colleges Directory .................................................................. 110
Claremont Colleges Inter-campus Sexual Assault Policy Statement,
Definitions and Procedures for Students .................................................... 81
Club Sports Office ...................................................................................... 30
Clubs and Organizations ...................................................................... 15, 26
Code of Conduct and Non-Academic Policies ........................................... 44
College Judicial Board ................................................................................ 99
College-Wide Sanctions ............................................................................ 101
Committee on Study Abroad .................................................................... 120
Committee on Study Abroad (COSA) Policies and Bylaws ....................... 92
Communicating with Students and Families Policy .................................. 51
Communication Protocol for Bias-related Incidents .................................. 84
Confirmation of Enrollment Procedures .................................................... 51
Consolidation of Student Spaces .............................................................. 114
Cooking and Electrical Appliances Policy .................................................. 53
Copy Machines ........................................................................................... 30
Damages and Missing Property Policy ...................................................... 53
Dean of Faculty Office ............................................................................... 16
Dean of Students Office ............................................................................. 16
Demonstration Policy of The Claremont Colleges .................................... 53
Department Chairs ........................................................................................ 5
Dining Hall Hours ...................................................................................... 17
Dining Services .......................................................................................... 17
Disabilities, Students With ......................................................................... 18
Disaster Preparedness Information ........................................................... 122
Discrimination and Harassment, Scripps College Policy on ...................... 75
Discrimination and Harassment Other Than Sexual Harassment,
Scripps College Policy on ....................................................................... 79
Emergency Readiness Committee ............................................................ 121
Educational Policy Committee ................................................................. 119
End of the Year Check Out ...................................................................... 115
Escort and Guest Policy ............................................................................. 54
Evacuation Policy ........................................................................................ 54
Event Registration and Facility Use Procedures and Guidelines ................ 48
Facility Reservations .................................................................................. 55
Faculty and Department Chairs .................................................................... 5
Faculty Executive Committee .................................................................. 121
Failure to Comply Policy ........................................................................... 58
Family ........................................................................................................ 26
FAX Machines ........................................................................................... 19
Financial Aid Office ................................................................................... 19
Finance Committee ................................................................................... 119
Fire Safety Report ..................................................................................... 128
140 Firearms, Explosives, and Weapons Policies ............................................. 58
Five-College Budget Committee .............................................................. 121
Five-College Living Exchange.................................................................. 111
Five-College Student Committees ........................................................... 121
Flowers on Campus Policy ......................................................................... 58
Food Service Committee .......................................................................... 121
Food Shops of The Claremont Colleges .................................................... 19
General Policy Statements .......................................................................... 39
Grade Disputes, Policy ................................................................................ 88
Graffiti Wall Policy ..................................................................................... 58
Grounds Department Services ..................................................................... 20
Hall Constitution ......................................................................................... 58
Hall Obstruction Policy ............................................................................... 58
Hall/Room Draw ....................................................................................... 112
Hazing Policy .............................................................................................. 58
Health Education Outreach ......................................................................... 31
Health Policy ............................................................................................... 59
Health Services ............................................................................................ 33
Hearing Process and Procedures Timeline .................................................. 40
Helpful Phone Numbers ........................................................................... 106
Housing Options ....................................................................................... 111
Huntley Bookstore ..................................................................................... 31
Identification Card Policy, Student ............................................................ 67
Identification Cards, Student ...................................................................... 34
Information Technology Agreement ........................................................ 124
Information Technology Policy ................................................................. 60
Information Technology Resources ............................................................. 9
Institutional Advancement Committee ..................................................... 120
Institutional Committees .......................................................................... 120
Insurance - Medical .................................................................................... 21
International Place (I-Place) ....................................................................... 31
International Students ................................................................................. 21
Internet Access ........................................................................................... 22
Internships .................................................................................................. 22
Judicial Appeals Board ............................................................................. 100
Judicial Hearing System for Non-academic Policy Violations .................. 92
Key Policy .................................................................................................. 65
Laundry Machines ...................................................................................... 22
La Semeuse .................................................................................................. 3
Libraries ....................................................................................................... 7
Library Fine Policy .................................................................................... 65
Limited Disciplinary Sanctions ................................................................ 102
Local, State, and Federal Law Adherence Policy ....................................... 88
Lockout Policy ............................................................................................ 66
141 Lost and Found ............................................................................................ 31
Mail Services ............................................................................................... 22
Maintenance and Housekeeping.................................................................. 22
McAlister ..................................................................................................... 31
Medical Services ......................................................................................... 33
Mission Statement ......................................................................................... 2
Missing Student Notification Policy ........................................................... 66
Motley Coffeehouse ..................................................................................... 2
New Student Program ................................................................................ 23
OBSA (Office of Black Student Activities) ................................................ 32
Off-Campus Petitions ............................................................................... 112
Off-Campus Study ..................................................................................... 23
On-Line Communities, Chat Rooms, and Posting to the Web ................... 35
Orientation Advisory Board ..................................................................... 121
Orientation for New Students ..................................................................... 23
Parking Permits ........................................................................................... 32
Peer Assistance ............................................................................................ 33
Peer Mentors (New Student Program) ........................................................ 23
Persons and Property Policy ........................................................................ 67
Plagiarism .................................................................................................... 89
Policy on Grade Disputes ............................................................................ 88
President, Office of the................................................................................ 24
Presidential Appeals Board ....................................................................... 100
Principles of Community .............................................................................. 3
Principles of Diversity ................................................................................... 3
Procedures of the Augmented Committee on Academic Review ................. 3
Public Events and Community Programs…………………………………..
Publications, Student ................................................................................... 15
Queer Resource Center................................................................................ 33
Quiet Hours Policy ...................................................................................... 67
Registrar’s Office ........................................................................................ 24
Reporting and Communication Protocol for Bias Related Incidents ......... 84
Residence Hall Damage Charges List ....................................................... 116
Residence Halls Agreement ...................................................................... 112
Residential Life ........................................................................................... 24
Residential Life Staff .................................................................................. 25
Room Change and Mid-Year Check-out Procedure ................................. 115
Safety Committee ...................................................................................... 121
Safety First/Medical Amnesty Policy ......................................................... 49
Sanctions, Limited and College-wide ....................................................... 101
SARLO (Student Activities and Residential Life Office) ........................... 27
Scripps Associated Students (SAS) ............................................................ 36
Scripps College Directory ......................................................................... 106
Scripps Communities of Resources and Empowerment (SCORE) ............. 25
142 Scripps Program Relating to the Prevention of Illegal Possession, Use, and
Distribution of Drugs and Alcohol by Students ........................................ 45
Scripps Store ............................................................................................... 27
Search of Rooms ....................................................................................... 114
Senate of The Claremont Colleges Consortium ........................................ 126
Senior Class Gift Committee .................................................................... 121
Senior Routt Apartments ........................................................................... 111
Sexual Assault Policy .................................................................................. 79
Sexual Assault Policy, Inter-campus ........................................................... 81
Sexual Harassment ...................................................................................... 76
Smoking Policy ........................................................................................... 67
Staff Photos .....................................................................................................
Standards of Conduct and Judicial Hearing System ................................... 37
Storage Policy ............................................................................................ 67
Student Affairs Committee ....................................................................... 120
Student Billing ............................................................................................ 28
Student Grievance Committee Procedures ................................................ 101
Student Health Services (SHS) ................................................................... 33
Student Organization and Student Employment Office Guidelines............ 68
Student Records and The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act ........ 40
Summer Housing ....................................................................................... 116
System of Responsibility ............................................................................ 92
Telephone Customer Service Center .......................................................... 34
Telephone Information ................................................................................ 28
Title IX Coordinator .................................................................................... 70
Traffic Appeals Board ............................................................................... 121
Treasurer’s Office ....................................................................................... 28
Tutoring Program ........................................................................................ 29
Vending Machines ...................................................................................... 29
Wanawake Weusi ........................................................................................ 26
Whistle Procedures and Policy .................................................................... 69
Women’s Resources .................................................................................... 34
Work-Study and Student Employment ....................................................... 29
Writing Center ............................................................................................. 10