MA in Victorian Studies Handbook 2014/15

School of English
MA in Victorian Studies
Handbook
2014-15
www.le.ac.uk/english
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Table of Contents
Welcome to the MA in Victorian Studies ...................................................................................................................4
Induction.....................................................................................................................................................................5
For International Students......................................................................................................................................5
Centre Details .............................................................................................................................................................5
Departmental Communications .............................................................................................................................5
Staff List and Key Contacts .....................................................................................................................................6
Student Communications and Personal Details .....................................................................................................7
Research Seminar Series.........................................................................................................................................7
Learn at Leicester .......................................................................................................................................................8
University Library....................................................................................................................................................8
IT Services ...............................................................................................................................................................8
Student Learning Development..............................................................................................................................9
Students’ Union Education Unit (ED)......................................................................................................................9
Languages at Leicester............................................................................................................................................9
English Language Teaching Unit (ELTU) ................................................................................................................10
Other University Facilities.........................................................................................................................................10
University Bookshop .............................................................................................................................................10
Other Important University Services ....................................................................................................................10
University Regulations ..............................................................................................................................................11
Student Responsibilities .......................................................................................................................................11
Neglect of Academic Obligations..........................................................................................................................11
Recording Lectures and Teaching Sessions ..........................................................................................................11
Course Details ...........................................................................................................................................................12
Programme and Module Specifications ...............................................................................................................12
Dissertation Preparation ......................................................................................................................................12
Attendance Requirements (if applicable) .............................................................................................................13
Teaching Timetable ..............................................................................................................................................14
Schedule of Year's Activities .................................................................................................................................14
Schedules and Reading Lists .................................................................................................................................16
Coursework Submission .......................................................................................................................................43
Penalties for late submission of work ..................................................................................................................43
Change of Course/Module ...................................................................................................................................43
Marking and Assessment Practices ..........................................................................................................................43
Feedback and the Return of Work from Staff ......................................................................................................43
Progression and Classification of Awards .............................................................................................................44
Referencing and Academic Integrity ........................................................................................................................44
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Plagiarism and collusion .......................................................................................................................................46
Penalties ...............................................................................................................................................................46
Avoiding Plagiarism and Poor Academic Practice ................................................................................................46
Notification of Ill Health and Other Mitigating Circumstances ................................................................................47
Personal Support for Students .................................................................................................................................47
Departmental Student Support Arrangements ....................................................................................................47
Equal Opportunities ..............................................................................................................................................47
University Student Support Arrangements ..........................................................................................................47
Careers and Employability ........................................................................................................................................49
Career Development Service ................................................................................................................................49
Personal Development Planning ..........................................................................................................................50
Feedback from Students ...........................................................................................................................................51
Student Feedback Questionnaires .......................................................................................................................51
Student-Staff Committees ....................................................................................................................................51
Societies ....................................................................................................................................................................51
Safety and Security ...................................................................................................................................................52
Personal Belongings..................................................................................................................................................52
Complaints and Academic Appeals Procedures .......................................................................................................53
Tutors........................................................................................................................................................................53
Marking Criteria ........................................................................................................................................................55
EN7001 Bibliography Presentation.......................................................................................................................55
EN7001 Written Exercise ......................................................................................................................................56
Coursework ...........................................................................................................................................................57
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Welcome to the MA in Victorian Studies
Welcome to the Victorian Studies Centre at Leicester. Our Centre is the longest-established Centre for the study
of Victorian literature, history and culture in Britain. It has been central to the development of the Victorian
Studies discipline globally, and we are delighted to welcome you to be a part of its work. The MA brings
together a unique group of students from diverse academic and cultural backgrounds. Your experience and
range of perspectives enrich both the course, and the experience of your peers and tutors. Everyone has a
worthwhile contribution to make and student input plays a key part in making the year an intellectually
invigorating and rewarding one for all concerned. We very much hope that you will participate fully, not only in
your seminar groups, but also in the Spring Seminar series run by the Centre, and that you will make the most of
all the opportunities open to you at Leicester.
As you know, the MA in Victorian Studies is an interdisciplinary course which is taught by members of the School
of English, together with members of the School of Historical Studies, the Centre for English Local History, the
Centre for Urban History and the Department of History of Art and Film. Members of staff are all concerned to
make this year stimulating, enjoyable and rewarding, and are here to help you. Please do feel free to contact us
whenever you need to.
This handbook contains important information about the course and University: the course structure, module
outlines, reading lists, marking criteria, staff details, personal tutors, facts about the library and computing
facilities, and more. Please read the handbook carefully and keep it safe – you’ll need to refer to it throughout
the course.
On behalf of all the tutors on the MA, may we wish you an enjoyable and successful year.
Professor Gail Marshall and Dr Holly Furneaux
Course Directors
September 2014
Information contained within this Handbook was correct as at 30 September 2014, but changes may
exceptionally have to be made in the light of unforeseen circumstances.
Please note that this Handbook is valid for academic year 2014-15 only; a new Handbook is produced each
year.
This Handbook is available via the School website.
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Induction
An induction session will be held 11.00am to 1.00pm on Wednesday 1 October: this session will include students
in the School of English, the School of Modern Languages and the Department of the History of Art and Film. At
2.00pm Dr Julian North will lead an introduction to taught postgraduate study in the School, and Professor Gail
Marshall will meet with MA Victorian Studies students separately at 3.00pm.
For International Students
International students are encouraged to attend the University's International Student Welcome Programme
(www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/welfare/international-student-support/iswp) prior to the beginning of term.
International Student Support also provide ongoing support and advice for International students
(www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/welfare/international-student-support).
Students who are non-native English speakers and/or who are not familiar with UK Higher Education are strongly
advised to attend the English Language Teaching Unit's in-sessional programme Academic English for
Postgraduates and Staff (www2.le.ac.uk/offices/eltu/insessional/el2000). These classes are provided free of
charge for postgraduates and are designed to develop students' English-language and study skills.
Centre Details
A brief history of the Centre may be found here: www2.le.ac.uk/departments/victorian/about
The Centre is located in the Attenborough Tower, primarily on floors 13, 14, and 15. The School Office is Att
1514. Campus maps are available at: www2.le.ac.uk/maps.
Information on Centre research interests can be found via the staff list at:
www2.le.ac.uk/departments/victorian/people.
Departmental Communications
Pigeonholes for postgraduate students are located on the sixteenth floor. Noticeboards containing information
relevant to postgraduates are also located on the sixteenth floor. Staff pigeonholes are located on the fifteenth
floor, in Att 1514.
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Staff List and Key Contacts
The School’s complete staff list may be found online at: www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people.
The following table provides key contact information:
Professor Gail Marshall
Dr Holly Furneaux
Course Director (S1)
Course Director, Careers Tutor (S2)
+44 (0)116 252 2638
+44 (0)116 252 2742
Attenborough 1313
Attenborough 1511
gm181@le.ac.uk
hf35@le.ac.uk
Dr Julian North
Dr Victoria Stewart
Senior Tutor for PGT (S1)
Senior Tutor for PGT (S2)
+44 (0)116 252 2776
+44 (0)116 252 2634
Attenborough 1308
Attenborough 1314
jrn8@le.ac.uk
vas6@le.ac.uk
Professor Julie Coleman
Mr Simon Poole
Head of School
Programme Administrator
+44 (0)116 252 2635
+44 (0)116 252 2622
Attenborough 1401
Attenborough 1514
jmc21@le.ac.uk
englishma@le.ac.uk
Dr Richa Dwor
Mrs Carol Arlett
Careers Tutor (S1)
Departmental Safety Officer
+44 (0)116 252 5337
+44 (0)116 252 2792
Attenborough 1512
Attenborough 1403
rgd5@le.ac.uk
cja26@le.ac.uk
Professor Gail Marshall (S1) and Dr Holly Furneaux (S2), Directors of the MA in Victorian Studies, are available for
consultation about matters academic and pastoral at the times advertised on the doors of their rooms. In
emergencies, they can be contacted at other times.
In addition, all students are allocated a personal tutor, whom they are invited to consult about personal and
academic difficulties met during the course. Your personal tutor will offer confidential advice and support on a
range of matters, from official dealings with the University, College or School (this includes advice on issues
relating to modules on which your personal tutor also teaches; as personal tutor their role is to provide you with
support, not discipline) to guidance on how to proceed in the event of a failure. It is in your interests to ensure
that your personal tutor is kept informed about anything that might affect your ability to fulfil your assignment
and attendance obligations. Your personal tutor will be able to put you in touch with a range of specialist
advisers within the university, qualified to give financial, medical and welfare advice.
For administrative matters, the Programme Administration team are available in Att 1514 from 9.00am to
5.00pm, Monday to Friday.
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Student Communications and Personal Details
The University keeps a record of your personal details such as your full name, addresses i.e. home address and
term-time address, telephone numbers, personal email address and your emergency contact details. It is
important to keep your details up to date as this will help you to receive information about your studies and
exams and also ensure that official documents are provided to you with the correct name details.
You can check and update your details by logging-in to MyStudentRecord http://mystudentrecord.le.ac.uk using
your University username and password. Click on the My Details tab and you will then be able to review and
change your personal details.
It is important that you check your University email account frequently to ensure that you do not miss any
important communication from the University.
The Philip Collins Seminar Room
The Philip Collins Seminar Room, named for the founding professor of the Victorian Studies Centre, is located on
the thirteenth floor of the Attenborough tower and houses a collection of publications of interest to
Victorian/nineteenth-century scholars. (Please note that this room is used for teaching for much of the week
during term time; if you wish to consult these materials, please liaise with the Programme Administration team
in Attenborough 1514 to find a suitable time.)
Research Seminar Series
The School hosts a number of research seminar series during the year; postgraduate students are very welcome
to attend these seminars.
School of English Research Seminar
The School of English Research Seminar runs on Wednesdays 1.00-2.00pm throughout first and second
semesters. Members of staff will speak on their current research and invite questions and discussion. All are
welcome. Please see email and noticeboards for further details or contact Dr Emma Parker on ep27@le.ac.uk.
Leicester Linguistics Seminar
The Leicester Linguistics Seminars are held on alternate Mondays from 5.15-6.15pm. The talks, many given by
scholars from outside the University of Leicester, cover a diverse range of topics in language and linguistics.
Victorian Studies Spring Seminar Series
The Victorian Studies Spring Seminar series takes place on Wednesday evenings in Att 1315, the Phillip Collins
Seminar Room. The dates for 2015 are to be confirmed.
Early Modern Seminar
Seminars start at 5.15pm on Thursdays. Please see noticeboards for updates.
Modern Literature Seminar Series
These seminars will take place at 4.00-6.00pm on Wednesday 22 October (Ogden Lewis Seminar Suite 1) and
Wednesday 12 November (Ogden Lewis Seminar Suite 3).
22 October 2014
Dr Elizabeth Barry (University of Warwick), ‘I’ve Been Waiting for It All My Life:
Contingency and Old Age in the Work of Proust and Beckett’
12 November 2014
Dr Dave Gunning (University of Birmingham), ‘Reading and Writers in V.S. Naipaul’s
Essays’
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Learn at Leicester
Whatever your subject or level of study, there are many, many different ways in which you can access academic
advice and support. The Learn at Leicester webpage provides you with further details of this support, together
with direct links to a wide range of resources and services to help you:
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Make the most of the Library
Develop your IT skills
Manage your own learning
Improve your English language
Get independent advice about your course
Manage your student information
You can access all of this by visiting: www.le.ac.uk/learnatleicester
University Library
The Library is your gateway to high quality information relevant to your studies. Using it effectively contributes
directly to your success.
The Library provides you with:
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access to a huge range of specialist information resources including a print collection of over 1 million
items and a Digital Library of over 400,000 eBooks and 20,000 electronic journals which you can use
from anywhere on the Web;
help in finding and using information; online, face to face and by telephone;
individual and group study space, including the Graduate School Reading Room exclusively for
postgraduate students;
PCs, netbooks and wireless networking for your laptop;
services for distance learners and researchers.
The Library is a shared resource for all members of the University. Please respect it and observe the Library
regulations available at www.le.ac.uk/library/about.
To get started, visit www.le.ac.uk/library.
Contact: David Wilson Library
+44 (0)116 252 2043 | library@le.ac.uk
IT Services
Whilst studying at the University you will have a University IT account and email address. There are hundreds of
University PCs available with Office 2010 and many specialist programs to help you with your studies.
Visit go.le.ac.uk/it4students for more information about:
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Student email: access your email and calendar anywhere, including on your smartphone or other mobile
device;
Printing: print, copy or scan on campus; pay by topping up your print and copy account;
IT Help: visit the Help Zone in the Library, phone 0116 252 2253, email ithelp@le.ac.uk or attend a
training course;
Wifi: free access to eduroam wifi on campus, in halls or at other universities;
PCs on campus: there are over 900 PCs available, with 350 located in the David Wilson Library (including
24/7 access during exam periods). Download the map to find a Student PC area on campus from:
go.le.ac.uk/pcareas;
Files: store files on your Personal Z: drive, which is backed up and available anywhere;
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Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment: support and information for all your courses;
Leicester Digital Library: access to journals, databases and electronic books online;
Mobile app: download the University mobile app to find a University PC available near you or access
Blackboard Mobile Learn.
More information can be found at go.le.ac.uk/it4students
For a list of computer user areas, see:
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/itservices/resources/cs/2ls/pcareas/pdfs/PCAreaList.pdf
Available IT Services training includes:
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Word 2010 – Long Document Essentials: learn about useful, time-saving features.
PowerPoint 2010 for Academic Posters: create and format an A1 or A0 poster in PowerPoint.
PowerPoint 2010 for Presentations: learn to use PowerPoint to create visual aids for presentations.
Student Learning Development
Studying for a degree is a stimulating, challenging and rewarding experience. In order to make the most of this
experience, the University of Leicester provides a wide range of resources and services to support and enhance
your academic development in areas such as essay-writing, critical thinking, independent learning and timemanagement. The Student Learning Development Team is here to help you develop the skills and abilities you
need in order to succeed in your studies. To find out more about how we can help you develop your academic
skills and abilities, visit our website: www.le.ac.uk/succeedinyourstudies.
Students’ Union Education Unit (ED)
Education help and advice is provided by the Students’ Union for all students.
If you would find it helpful to talk to someone outside of your department, we offer a confidential and impartial
service to help and advise you about where to go and what to do. If you wish to come and talk to us about your
personal circumstances or academic worries, for example, exams or putting together an academic appeal, we
will provide a professional and friendly service.
You will find the Education Unit staff in the Students’ Union Building on the first floor within the West Wing.
Opening hours are 10.00 am to 4.00 pm, online chat facilities are available (visit our website for further details),
you can either pop in or book an appointment by contacting us on the details below:
Contact: Students’ Union Education Unit (ED), Students’ Union (First Floor)
+44 (0)116 223 1132/1228 | educationsu@le.ac.uk
Languages at Leicester
Learning a language will enhance your career prospects and broaden your cultural and professional horizons. We
offer classes in Arabic, Arabic for Readers, British Sign Language, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italian,
Japanese, Latin, Polish, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.
Our languages courses are taught by expert native tutors, using communicative and dynamic approaches.
Courses range from beginners to advanced level and take place during evenings and on Wednesday afternoons.
There also intensive ‘fast track’ courses on Saturday mornings.
Contact: Languages@Leicester
+44(0)116 252 2662 | lalenquiries@le.ac.uk | www.le.ac.uk/ml/lal
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English Language Teaching Unit (ELTU)
The English Language Teaching Unit provides the following in-sessional courses for postgraduate students who
wish to improve their English language skills:
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EL7000 Academic English for Postgraduates and Staff
EL7040 Academic Grammar
EL7050 Academic Listening
EL7060 Academic Speaking
If you are new to Higher Education in the UK, we would recommend EL7030 Academic Writing Lectures, a series
of four one-hour lectures in which the essentials of academic writing in a UK university are discussed.
Find out more at: www2.le.ac.uk/offices/eltu/insessional
Other University Facilities
University Bookshop
The Bookshop is owned by the University and is located on the ground floor of the David Wilson Library.
All prescribed and recommended texts are stocked, so that students can rely on the Bookshop for the books that
they need in the course of their studies. We also sell a wide range of paperbacks and books of general interest.
Books not in stock can be quickly provided to order. The Bookshop has a range of deals in the Autumn term
which are exclusively for students.
Greetings cards, a wide range of stationery items and University of Leicester branded merchandise and clothing
are always available.
The opening hours are:
Monday to Friday
9.00 a.m. - 5.30 p.m. (5.00 p.m. in vacations)
Saturday
10.00 a.m. - 2.00 p.m.
Contact: University Bookshop, David Wilson Library
+44 (0)116 229 7440 | bookshop@le.ac.uk
Twitter: @LeicUniBookshop | Facebook: www.facebook.com/UoLBookshop
Other Important University Services
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English Language Training Unit (ELTU) www2.le.ac.uk/offices/eltu
Languages at Leicester www2.le.ac.uk/departments/modern-languages/lal
Victoria Park Health Centre www.victoriaparkhealthcentre.co.uk
University Chaplaincy and Prayer rooms for students www2.le.ac.uk/institution/chaplaincy
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University Regulations
Senate Regulations (www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations) contain rules and other important information about being
an undergraduate or taught postgraduate student at the University of Leicester. The Regulations are part of the
formal contract between you and the University; you will have confirmed when completing registration that you
will comply with procedures defined in the University’s Regulations.
The Quick Guide to Student Responsibilities (www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations/responsibilities) summarises some
of your most important responsibilities as a student at Leicester, as defined in detail in the Regulations. These
responsibilities relate to:
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attendance
submission of work by set deadlines
term time employment (full-time students – Home/EU and International)
illness or other circumstances impacting upon studies
maintaining your personal details
the additional responsibilities of international students
Failure to adhere to student responsibilities can have serious consequences and may lead to the termination of
your studies.
Student Responsibilities
The University expects its students to behave responsibly and with consideration to others at all times. The
University’s expectations about student behaviour are described in:
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the Student Charter
the Regulations governing Student Discipline
the Student Code of Social Responsibility
the Code of Practice governing Freedom of Speech
the University’s regulatory statement concerning Harassment and Discrimination
These can be found at www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulations
Neglect of Academic Obligations
You are expected to attend all learning and teaching events which are timetabled for you. These include
lectures, tutorials or practical classes. You are also expected to submit work within the deadlines notified to
you. Persistent failure to attend taught sessions or to submit work, without good cause, will be considered to be
a neglect of academic obligations. Departmental procedures for dealing with neglect are set out within the
University’s disciplinary regulations (see www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation11 Part Five/section ‘Neglect of
academic obligations’). In the most serious of cases of neglect the University has the right to terminate a
student’s course.
Recording Lectures and Teaching Sessions
The University recognises that there are occasions when students may wish to record lectures to support their
learning. Where a student believes that there are good academic reasons to request permission to record a
lecture a University policy applies (see www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/quality/recordinglectures). The policy seeks
to protect the intellectual and privacy rights of both staff and students and take account of the relevant
legislation concerning data protection and copyright issues.
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Course Details
For information on normal and maximum periods of registration, please see Senate Regulation 2, paragraphs
2.20 to 2.29.
Programme and Module Specifications
View the programme and module specifications for your course via www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation
In the programme specification you will find a summary of the aims of your course of study and its learning
outcomes, alongside details of its teaching and learning methods and means of assessment. The programme
specification also identifies the core modules that make up the course and any choice of optional modules. Each
module has its own specification that formally records that module’s aims, teaching and learning methods,
assessment components and their percentage weighting.
Dissertation Preparation
Proposals
On the last Wednesday of the summer term students are required to submit a brief proposal (500 words)
outlining their dissertation topic, together with a bibliography.
The Presentation
The dissertation proposal presentation – though compulsory – does not form part of your final assessment.
Before the official presentation session, students meet together without staff present to discuss any concerns
about subject matter and presentational detail (see below). The purpose of this session is to help students
assess together the scope and nature of each other’s chosen topic, as well as to begin planning for the research
necessary to complete the dissertation. Presentations are expected to be of a professional standard (including,
for instance, the use of audio-visual equipment, such as PowerPoint).
Proposals for the dissertation are then presented to tutors at a special seminar in the summer term. All tutors
from the MA attend this second session and will be able to offer both specific advice as well as new perspectives
on more general areas. There are certain formal requirements for the oral presentation of the dissertation
proposal:
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The presentation should not be any longer than five minutes.
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Ideally, the presentation should address two or three issues relating to the topic that has been chosen.
Additionally, students should consider what might be their next steps in preparing for the dissertation,
as well as what problems they perhaps envisage (it is a good idea, for instance, to designate certain
areas for which specific help is needed and which might be supplied by a range of tutors from across the
MA).
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The aim of the presentation is to open up various issues and problems that can be discussed during the
proposals session rather than to offer a series of closed answers.
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Presentations are expected to be of a professional standard (including, for instance, the use of audiovisual equipment, such as PowerPoint).
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Please notify your Programme Administrator of any audio-visual equipment you will require for the prepresentation meeting and for the main presentations meeting. If you require a laptop computer for a
PowerPoint presentation, please also let her know the drive you require (cd, floppy or USB port).
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The Written Proposal
Following the presentations students submit a written proposal which should be no more than 500 words
excluding a bibliography. Please put your names on these proposals and either place them in the postbox on
Att. floor 16, email them to englishma@le.ac.uk, or post them in to the School Office (Att. 1514).
The key questions a proposal should address are what, why and how?
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What is the topic? What questions will I be asking about this topic as I undertake research? You may, if
you wish, include a list of research questions in your proposal.
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Why am I writing it; that is, why is this topic interesting and significant?
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How am I going to do it? Which texts will I use? How will it be structured?
A bibliography should be attached to the proposal featuring key primary and secondary sources.
Supervision
Supervisors will be allocated after the presentations and the submission of written proposals, and candidates are
then invited to plan a course of research and supervision with the designated member of staff. This is an
independent project but at every stage, from conception through composition and revision to final submission,
staff are available to offer support and feedback. With the help of the supervisor’s advice and guidance,
students plan, develop, revise and improve their work through a series of drafts. They are provided with up to
five hours of one-to-one supervision and must meet with their supervisor on a formal basis on at least three
occasions during the process of writing the dissertation (between May and September). Students who do not
attend supervisions will be reported for academic neglect. (In exceptional cases, students may make alternative
arrangements for supervision (e.g. via email), but must then keep a record of all communications with their
supervisor.)
In addition, students are expected to spend 445 hours on private study. Supervisors may read and offer
feedback on all of the rough draft but no more than one third of the final draft. The final date for the submission
of draft work to supervisors is 1 September (except by special arrangement). After supervisions, students are
required to submit a short summary of the meeting (of no more than one page of A4) to their supervisor as an
aid to self-reflection and a record of progress.
By the end of July students are required to complete and submit to the School Office (Att.1514) a report on
progress of their dissertation.
Attendance Requirements (if applicable)
Attendance is an essential requirement for success in your studies. The University’s expectations about
attendance are defined in Senate Regulation 4: governing student obligations (see www.le.ac.uk/senateregulation4). Full-time students must reside in Leicester, or within easy commuting distance of the city, for the
duration of each semester. You should attend all lectures, seminars, practical sessions and other formal classes
specified in your course timetable, unless you have been officially advised that attendance at a particular session
is not compulsory or you have received formal approval for absence.
In addition to other attendance monitoring practices, departments will monitor international student
attendance at two ‘checkpoints’ during each academic year, typically at a compulsory learning and teaching
session appearing in course or examination timetables. Students will not normally be notified of checkpoint
dates in advance. If you are an international student and you fail to meet attendance and/or checkpoint
requirements this may result in the termination of your course and the subsequent reporting of this to UK Visas
and Immigration (UKVI), in line with University sponsor obligations.
Tutors will keep a record of students’ attendance at seminars; where modules are team-taught, module
convenors will monitor attendance across the semester.
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Teaching Timetable
You will be notified of any timetable alterations by email/Blackboard; please check your University email
account frequently.
Schedule of Year's Activities
SEMESTER 1 (Autumn Term)
Core Module I – Victorian Society
Wednesdays, 2.00pm to 4.00pm
Attenborough room 1315 (13th floor) unless indicated otherwise.
Week 1
1 Oct 2014
11am
2pm
Induction event (University Film Theatre and various venues)
All tutors
5pm
Introduction to the School and course (Bennett LT10 and Att
212), to be followed by the
School of English Postgraduate Reception (Belvoir City Annexe,
Charles Wilson building)
2
8 Oct
1. Demographic Revolution: Growth, movement, dislocation
James Moore
3
15 Oct
2. Industrial Revolution: Birth of the modern world
James Moore
4
22 Oct
3. Radicals and Liberals: New people; new society
James Moore
5
29 Oct
4. The Poor: Are always with us?
James Moore
6
5 Nov
5. Governance and Social Regulation
James Moore
7
12 Nov
6. The Invention of Modern Sport: Mens sana in corpore sano
James Moore
8
19 Nov
7. Religion and Modernity: A Religious Revival
James Moore
9
26 Nov
8. Science and Faith: Darwin and Religion
James Moore
10
3 Dec
10 Dec
9. The British Empire and Imperialism: Imperial State
James Moore
James Moore
11
10. Family Life
Bibliography, Research Methods and Writing Skills module
Wednesdays 10.00am–12.00noon commencing 8 October 2014
See separate
timetable
Options: see separate timetable
Core module essay 1 (5,000 words) due:
Return date:
12.00noon Wednesday 21 January 2015
Wednesday 11 February 2015
Option module essay (Autumn Term) (4,000 words) due:
Return date:
12.00noon Wednesday 28 January 2015
Wednesday 18 February 2015
SEMESTER 2 (Spring Term)
Core Module II – Approaches to Victorian Literature and Culture
Wednesdays, 2.00pm to 4.00pm
Attenborough room 1315 (13th floor) unless indicated otherwise.
Week 13
21 Jan
An Author: OSCAR WILDE
Prose
SCHOOL OF ENGLISH/VICTORIAN STUDIES CENTRE
Gowan Dawson
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14
28 Jan
Drama
Gail Marshall
15
4 Feb
Fiction
16
11 Feb
Jonathan Taylor
Holly Furneaux
17
18 Feb
18
25 Feb
The Decade of Sensation: The Moonstone
Gail Marshall
19
4 Mar
Poetry of the mid-Century: Christina Rossetti
Felicity James
20
11 Mar
21
18 Mar
22
25 Mar
A Period: VICTORIAN LITERATURE AT MID-CENTURY
Class, Gender and Identity: John Halifax Gentleman
Fiction and Politics: Felix Holt
A Theme: THE VICTORIANS AND THE PAST
The Uses of the Past
The Victorian Historical Novel
Felicity James
Gowan Dawson
Holly Furneaux
Curating the Victorians
Gail Marshall,
Richa Dwor and
MAVS team
Options: see separate
timetable
Option module essay (Spring Term) (4,000 words) due:
Return date:
Core module essay 2 (5,000 words) due:
Return date:
12.00noon Wednesday 6 May 2015
Thursday 28 May 2015
12.00noon Wednesday 27 May 2015
Wednesday 17 June 2015
SEMESTER 2 (Summer Term)
Week 23 6 May
24
13 May
27
3 June
10.00am12.00noon
10.00am12.00noon
12.30pm
Dissertation Proposals preparation meeting
Dissertation Proposals presentations
End of Course lunch and Questionnaire Feedback
session (venue to be advised)
Dissertation topics – written proposals to be submitted by:
Report on progress of dissertation:
Dissertations (FT & PT2) due:
FT & PT2
Students only
All Tutors
All Tutors
12.00noon Wednesday 24 June 2015
12.00noon Wednesday 5 August 2015
12.00noon Tuesday 15 September 2015
Please note that options taken from outside of this MA course may have different submission schedules.
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Schedules and Reading Lists
EN7001 Bibliography, Research Methods, and Writing Skills for Postgraduates
The module is compulsory for all new postgraduates in the School of English and in the Victorian Studies Centre.
It meets on Wednesday mornings from 10.00am to 12.00noon, unless otherwise specified, beginning on 8
October 2014. See www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation for assessment details.
Wk
Date
Venue
Topic
Tutor
2
8 October
DW Lib SR
INTRODUCTION and RESEARCH IN LEICESTER
Dr J North,
Introduction to the module and information about
the assessment; Research in the School of English
and the Leicester University Library Archive.
Dr E Parker,
ELECTRONIC SOURCES OF INFORMATION I: Search
strategies and online catalogues
Ms Catherine Taylor
(Library)
3
15 October
DW IT R2
Dr R Dwor
Dr K Loveman
10-11 Introduction to using electronic sources at
Leicester. This first hour is voluntary and is suitable
for those who are new to Leicester or want to
refresh their knowledge.
11-12 Using electronic sources at MA level
This hour is not voluntary and everyone should
attend.
4
22 October
FJ L66
ACADEMIC WRITING AND REFERENCING
Dr J North
5
29 October
KE 101
USING SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES
Dr Simon Dixon, Ms
Caroline Sampson
(Library)
6
5 November
FJ L66
ENGAGING WITH CRITICS: Writing a critical review
Prof. Gowan Dawson
7
12 November
8
19 November
SPECIALIST SESSIONS:
th
DW IT R2
HISTORICAL SOURCES, 19 CENTURY
th
PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS AND 19 -CENTURY
PERIODICALS ONLINE
Ms Catherine Taylor
(Library), Dr J Moore
FJ L66
CREATIVE WRITING
Mr N Everett
TBA
MODERN LITERATURE
Dr E Parker
DW IT R2
MANAGING REFERENCES AND CITATIONS: Handson session
Ms Catherine Taylor
(Library)
NB Attendance at either hour this week is
voluntary
10-11 This hour introduces you to REFWORKS: a
way of managing your references and citations.
11-12 This hour is a drop-in for anyone who has
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questions about electronic searches. Can’t find the
articles/books you are looking for? Come along to
this hour!
9
10
26 November
3 December
BEN LT4
KE 101
PRESENTATION SKILLS and PREPARING YOUR
BIBLIOGRAPHY PRESENTATION
Dr B Parsons
YOUR MA DISSERTATION
Dr J North
Dr K Loveman
(and an opportunity to ask any questions you have
about the assessments for EN7001)
11
STUDENT BIBLIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS:
10 December
DW Lib SR
I. Research and MA English Studies
Dr K Loveman and tba.
PHY LTC
II. MA Victorian Studies
Dr J North, and Prof. G
Marshall
FJ SW SR1
III. MA Modern Literature
Dr C Fowler, Mr Nick
Everett
Assessment deadlines:
1. Students will submit two copies of their bibliography and deliver their presentation in the last seminar of
the module on 10 December 2014 (see timetable).
2. The critical review can be submitted via Turnitin at any point before the final deadline which is at 12.00
noon on Monday 12 January, 2015. The expected return date will be Monday 2 February 2015.
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HS7499 Victorian Society
Module Convenor: Dr James Moore, School of History (jm68@la.ac.uk)
Introduction
In this module we will study the Victorians by getting as close as we can to their own view of themselves. Our
thinking, therefore, will engage with nineteenth-century ideas and feelings. In that sense Victorian Society will
resemble a literature module. But we will also endeavour to see those ideas and feelings in their time and place.
In that sense Victorian Society will resemble a history module. Throughout, the meaning of ‘Victorian’ will
stretch beyond Queen Victoria’s reign. We will be concerned with what historians call ‘the long nineteenth
century’ – 1790 to 1914.
Subject Coverage and Module Outcomes
At the end of this module you will have been introduced to the Victorians. You will have studied classic works
and read a number of other histories. You will have had the opportunity to lead a seminar on a subject of your
choice. You will have written one substantial essay, and participated in a number of discussions about history
and the uses of history. There should be various ‘learning outcomes’ to do with all this – including your
improved ability to read, write, present, discuss, argue, interpret, and think. Most importantly, you will have
come to a view of who the Victorians were and how they lived. The strength and coherence of your view will be
tested in the essay question.
Essay questions (Choose One)
•
What were the most important social changes in Britain during the Victorian period?
•
How important is social class in understanding the culture of Victorian Britain?
•
Was the development of the British Empire the inevitable consequence of Britain’s rapid industrial and
economic growth?
•
To what extent did Victorian scientific theories and discoveries change attitudes towards religious
practises and belief?
•
How far can Britain be considered a democracy in 1901?
Core works
Suggested reading before the module begins:
Peter Cain and A G Hopkins, British Imperialism 1688-1914 (1994)
Robert Colls, Identity of England (2002)
E.J. Hobsbawm, Age of Empire 1875-1901 (1987)
K.T. Hoppen, The Mid-Victorian Generation, 1846-1886 (1998)
Tristram Hunt, Building Jerusalem: The Rise and Fall of the Victorian City (2004)
Matthew Sweet, Inventing the Victorians (2001)
Frank Trentman, Free Trade Nation. Commerce, Consumption and Civil Society in Modern Britain (2009)
10 core questions for our first meeting
At our first meeting we’ll be discussing the following questions. Come prepared with the answers.
•
How many Victorians were there in 1837 and 1901?
•
What were the main reasons for the rise in population?
•
Where did most of them live?
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•
Why did most of them die?
•
What were the three major occupational groups, in 1841? In 1901?
•
What were Britain’s three leading exports in the 1840s? in the 1890s?
•
What, constitutionally speaking, was Victoria queen of?
•
Who, in your view, was her greatest prime minister? Why him?
•
What was the difference between the Conservatives and Liberals?
•
Did the Victorians live in a democracy? Did they want to?
MA IN VICTORIAN STUDIES
Primary texts and background
Each of the ten seminars is devoted to a different theme, and the first three seminars are designed to give you
an overview of the social, economic and political context of the period. You are expected to come to each
seminar having read the primary text and some other works. I have chosen the primary texts for their
availability as well as for their importance. All are available in paperback and most are available at second hand
bookshops and on the Net. I’d like you to use the other texts to contextualize the primary text – in other words,
to provide background and to assist your understanding. You will find a good spread of primary and secondary
works in the syllabus but you are not expected to read all of them, or even all the words in the works you do
read. What you are expected to do is to read the primary texts very carefully and then pack in as much meaning
and background by reading beyond and around. You may find the book list useful in a similar way when you
start your dissertation.
Presentations
Everyone will make a short, ten minute presentation over the course of the module explaining the significance of
the primary text to the Victorians, and to us. In these presentations you are encouraged to teach your
colleagues, rather than just read from a paper. After it, you will write me a brief two page report reflecting on
the experience.
Field visit
It is hoped that we will be able to make a Saturday day trip to a site or city associated with the Victorians, which
you’ll be expected to attend.
1. DEMOGRAPHIC REVOLUTION
Growth, movement, dislocation
“It is an obvious truth . . . that population must be kept down to the level of the means
of subsistence”
(T. Malthus, Essay on the Principle of Population, 1798)
Primary text:
Thomas Malthus, Essay on the Principle of Population (1798: Norton Critical Edition, 1976
or 2003)
Additional reading:
M. Anderson. ‘Households, families and individuals: 1851 Census’, Continuity and Change,
3, 1988
William Cobbett, Rural Rides (1830)
Philip Davis, The Victorians, Oxford English Literary History, vol xiii (2002) ch 1
David Feldman, ‘Migration’, in M. Daunton, ed., Cambridge Urban History of Britain (2000)
vol iii 1840-1950
C. Holmes, John Bull’s Island: Immigration and British Society, 1871-1971
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J. Long, 'Rural-Urban Migration and Socioeconomic Mobility in Victorian Britain'. Journal of
Economic History, 65:1 (2005), 1-35
G. Howells, 'Emigration and the New Poor Law: the Norfolk emigration fever of 1836'.
Rural History 11, 2 (2000) 145-64
John Langton, ‘Urban Growth and Economic Change’ in P. Clark, ed Cambridge Urban
History of Britain (2000) vol ii 1540-1840
C.F.G. Masterman, The Condition of England (1909)
Patrick Parrinder, Nation and the Novel (2006) ch 9 ‘Dickens and the Fiction of the City’
K.D.M Snell, Annals of the Labouring Poor. Social change and agrarian England (1987)
Humphrey Southall and David Gilbert, ‘A good time to wed?’ Marriage and economic
distress in England and Wales 1839-1914 Economic History Review, x/ix I, 1996, fig i and
section v
Rosemary Sweet, The English Town 1680-1840 (1999)
Naomi Williams & Graham Mooney, ‘Infant Mortality in the Age of the Great Cities 18401910’, Continuity and Change, 9, 1994
E.A. Wrigley & R.S. Scholefield, Population History of Britain, 1541-1871 (1981)
Zhongwei Zhao, ‘The demographic transition in Victorian England and Changes in English
Kinship Networks’, Continuity and Change, 11, August 1996
Ireland
P.L. Curtis, Apes and Angels: The Irish in Victorian Caricature (1971)
R. Swift & S. Gilley, The Irish in Britain, 1815-1939 (1989)
R. Swift & S. Gilley, The Irish in the Victorian City (1985)
H. Heinrick, A Survey of the Irish in England (1872: reprinted 1990)
D. MacRaild, Irish migrants in modern Britain 1750-1922 (1999)
A. O’Dowd, Spalpeens and tattie hokers : history and folklore of the Irish migratory
agricultural worker in Ireland and Britain (1991)
Scotland
I. Adams, The Making of Urban Scotland (1978)
T.M. Devine, Clanship to Crofter’s War: the social transformation of the Scottish Highlands
(1994)
James Hunter, Making of the Crofting Community (1976)
Alexander MacKenzie, History of the Highland Clearances (1883)
Civic Histories:
Victorian town histories often give a wonderfully detailed account of the ‘rise’, or, to put it
another way, the redevelopment and expansion, of their place during the industrial
revolution. One marvellous example from the many is:
Philip Sulley, History of Ancient and Modern Birkenhead (1907)
2. INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
Birth of the modern world
“The history of the proletariat in England begins with the second half of the last century,
with the invention of the steam engine and of machinery for working cotton”
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(F. Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England)
Primary text:
Arnold Toynbee, Lectures on the Industrial Revolution of the 18th century in England (1884
– various editions)
Additional reading:
T. S. Ashton, The Industrial Revolution 1760-1830 (1948)
M. Berg, The Age of Manufactures 1700-1820. Industry, innovation and work in Britain
(1994)
Maxine Berg & Pat Hudson, ‘Rehabilitating the Industrial Revolution’, Economic History
Review, 45, 1992
Robert Breach, British Economy and Society 1870-1980. Documents, Descriptions, Statistics
(1972)
David Cannadine, ‘The Present and the Past in the English Industrial Revolution 18801980’, Past & Present, 103, 1984
P. Chapple, The Industrialization of Britain 1780-1914 (1999)
S. Checkland, The rise of Industrial Society in England, 1815-1885 (1964)
D.C. Coleman, Myth, History and the Industrial Revolution (1992)
Martin Daunton, Progress and Poverty 1700-1850 (1995)
P. Deane, The First Industrial Revolution (1979)
David Edgerton, Science, Technology and British Industrial ‘Decline’ 1870-1970 (1996)
F. Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England (1844)
M. Fores, ‘The Myth of a British Industrial Revolution’, History, 66, 1981
R. K. Fleischman, Cotton Workers of South East Lancashire 1780-1850 (1985)
M.W. Flinn, Origins of the Industrial Revolution (1966)
R. M. Hartwell, The Industrial Revolution in England (1972)
R.M. Hartwell, ed., The Causes of the Industrial Revolution in England (1967)
E.J. Hobsbawm & R.M. Hartwell, ‘Standard of Living Debate’, Economic History Review, xvi,
1963
E. H. Hunt, British Labour History 1815-1914 (1981)
S. King & G. Timmins, Making Sense of the Industrial Revolution (2001)
Peter Kriedte & Hans Medick, Industrialization Before Industrialization (1981)
D.S. Landes, The Unbound Prometheus (1969)
P. Mathias, The First Industrial Nation (1983)
P. Maw, Transport and the Industrial City (2013)
Kenneth Morgan, Slavery, Atlantic Trade and the British Economy 1660-1800 (2000)
A.E. Musson, ‘The British Industrial Revolution’, History, 67, 1982
W.D. Rubinstein & M.J. Daunton, Debate. ‘Gentlemanly Capitalism and British Industry
1820-1914’, Past and Present, 132, August 1991
Raphael Samuel, ‘Workshop of the World’, History Workshop Journal, 3, 1977
Brian Simon, Henry Simon of Manchester 1835-1899 (1997)
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E.P. Thompson. ‘Time, Work Discipline and Industrial Capitalism’, Past and Present, 38,
1967
W. Hamish Fraser, The Coming of the Mass Market, 1850-1914 (1981)
Women’s Work:
Sally Alexander, ‘Women’s Work 1820-50’, in E. Whitelegg, ed., The Changing Experience
of Women (1982)
Maxine Berg, ‘What difference did women’s work mean to the Industrial Revolution?’
History Workshop Journal, 35. 1993
Harriet Bradley, Men’s Work; Women’s Work (1989)
Sandra Burman, ed Fit Work for Women (1979)
S.P. Dobbs, The Clothing Workers of Great Britain (1928)
T.J. Edelstein, ‘The Visual Iconography of the Seamstress’, Victorian Studies, 23, 1980
Angela John, Unequal Opportunities. Women’s Employment 1800-1918 (1986)
Jane Lewis, Labour and Love. Women’s experience of home and family 1850-1940 (1986)
Jenny Morris, Women Workers and the Sweated Trades (1986)
Elizabeth Roberts, Women’s Work 1840-1940 (1988)
Louise Tilly & Joan Scott, Women, Work and Family (1978)
The Affluent:
M. Berg, ed., Consumers and Luxury: Consumer Culture in Europe, 1650-1850 (1999)
G. Crossick, ed The Lower Middle Class in Victorian Britain (1977)
L. Davidoff, The Best Circles: Society, Etiquette and the Season (1974)
Francois Guizot, History of Civilization in Europe (1846)
Simon Gunn, The Public Culture of the Victorian Middle Class (2000)
A. Kidd & D. Nicholls, eds., Gender, Civic Culture and Consumerism: middle-class identity in
Britain, 1800-1940 (1999)
L. Davidoff and C. Hall, Family Fortunes. Men and Women of the English Middle Class
1780-1850 (1987)
A. Kidd & D. Nicholls, eds., The Making of the British Middle Class? Studies of Regional and
Cultural Diversity Since the 18th Century (1998)
Paul Langford, Public Life and the Propertied Englishman 1689-1798 (1992)
W. Hamish Fraser, The Coming of the Mass Market, 1850-1914 (1981)
Krista Lysack, 'Goblin Markets: Victorian Women Shoppers at Liberty's Oriental Bazaar'.
Nineteenth-Century Contexts, 27:2 (2005)
R.J. Morris, Men, Women and Property in England, 1780-1870: A Social and Economic
History of Family Strategies amongst the Leeds Middle Class (Cambridge, 2005)
Patrick Parrinder, Nation and Novel, ch 11 ‘Puritan and Provincial’
W.D. Rubinstein, ‘Education and the Social Origins of British Elites 1880-1970’, Past and
Present, 112, 1986
W.M. Thackerary, The Book of Snobs, or, The Snobs of England, by one of themselves
(1846) - with an introduction by John Sutherland
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F.M.L. Thompson, English Landed Society in the Nineteenth Century (1963)
A. Vickery, The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England (1998)
The Working-Classes: J.M. Baernreither, English Associations of Working Men (1889)
Hugh Beynon & Terry Austrin, Masters and Servants (1996)
K.E. Carpenter, ed., Friendly Societies. Seven Pamphlets 1798-1839 (1972) - Articles of
Town Porters’ Friendly Society, instituted 1688 (1833) and Articles of a Friendly Society
held at the house of John Bamford, Barton Notts (1807)
Robert Colls, ‘When We Lived in Communities. Working Class Culture and its Critics’, in
Colls & Rodger, ed., Cities of Ideas. Civil Society and Urban Governance 1800-2000 (2004)
Robert Colls, The Pitmen of the Northern Coalfield (1987)
Robert Colls, The Collier’s Rant. Song and Culture in the Industrial Village (1977)
Richard Fynes, The Miners of Northumberland and Durham. A History of their social and
political progress (1873)
J. Garrard, Democratisation in Britain: Elites, Civil Society and Reform since 1800 (2002).
Lawrence Goldman, Dons and Workers. Oxford and Adult Education since 1850 (1995)
P. Gurney, ‘The Middle Class Embrace’: Language, Representation and contest over
Cooperative forms in Britain 1860-1914, Victorian Studies, 37, 1994
P. Gurney, Cooperative Culture and the Politics of Consumption 1870-1930 (1996)
Brian Harrison, Drink and the Victorians: The Temperance Question in England, 1815-1872
(1971)
J.F.C. Harrison, Learning and Living 1790-1960.
A study in the history of the English adult education movement (1961)
Alun Howkins, ‘The English Farm Labourer in the 19c’, in B. Short, ed., The English Rural
Community (1992)
George Howell, Trade Unionism. New and Old (1891)
Johnson, Paul A., 'Conspicuous consumption and working-class culture in late-Victorian
and Edwardian Britain'. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th ser., 38 (1988), 2742
Robert Moore, Pitmen, Preachers and Politics (1974)
R.J. Morris, ‘Clubs Societies and Associations’, in F.M.L. Thompson, ed., Cambridge Social
History of Britain 1750-1950 (1990) vol iii
Beatrice Potter, The Co-operative Movement in Great Britain (1891)
Jonathan Rose, Intellectual Life of the British Working Class (2001)
Dave Russell, Popular Music in England 1840-1914 (1987)
Beatrice Webb, ‘The Failure of the Labour Commission’, Nineteenth Century, July 1894
Short Loan X22599
Stephen Yeo, New Views of Cooperation (1988)
Stephen Yeo, Who Was J.T.W. Mitchell? (1995)
3. RADICALS AND LIBERALS
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New people; new society
“But, ours is, altogether, a system of monopolies, created by taxation and paper money,
from which
monopolies are inseparable”.
(William Cobbett, Rural Rides)
“The struggle between liberty and authority is the most conspicuous feature in the
portions of history with which we are earliest familiar”.
(J. S. Mill, On Liberty)
Primary text:
J. S. Mill, On Liberty (1859)
Additional reading:
Owen Ashton, W.E. Adams: Chartist, Radical and Journalist 1832-1906 (1990)
Owen Ashton et al, The Chartist Legacy (1999)
John Bateman, The Great Landowners of Great Britain and Ireland (1883)
Walter Bagehot, The English Constitution (1867)
Isaiah Berlin, Four Essays on Liberty (1968)
Eugenio F. Biagini, ‘Liberalism and Direct Democracy’, in Biagin, ed., Citizenship and
Community. Liberals Radicals and Collective Identities 1865-1931 (1996)
J.C.D. Clark, English Society 1688-1832 (1987): ch.6 ‘The End of the Ancien Regime 18001832’
William Cobbett, Rural Rides (1830)
Martin Pugh, ‘Limits of Liberalism. Liberals and Women’s Suffrage 1867-1914’, in Biagini,
ibid
E. Biagini, Liberty, Retrenchment and Reform: Popular Liberalism in the Age of Gladstone:
1860-80 (1992)
Lucy Brown, Victorian News and Newspapers (1985)
David Cannadine, The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy (1990) chs.1,12
David Cannadine, Class in Britain (1999)
Malcolm Chase, Chartism (2007)
Robert Colls, ‘After Bagehot. Rethinking the Constitution ’, Political Quarterly, 78, 4, 2007
P. Corrigan and D. Sayer, The Great Arch. English State Formation as Cultural Revolution
(1985)
Philip Davis, The Victorians, op cit, ‘High Realism’ ch 9
A Dicey, Lectures on the relation between law and public opinion in England during the 19th
century (1914)
John Gray, Liberalism (1986)
C. Hall et al, Defining the Victorian Nation, Class, Race Gender and the Reform Act of 1867
(2000)
Brian Harrison, Separate Spheres. The opposition to women’s suffrage in Britain (1978)
F. J. Hayek, Road to Serfdom (1946)
L.T. Hobhouse, Liberalism (1911)
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Patricia Hollis, Pressure from Without in Early Victorian England (1974)
E.J. Hobsbawm, Labouring Men: Studies in the History of Labour (1964)
K Lunn, Social History of British Labour 1870-1970 (1999)
N. McCord, The Anti-Corn Law League (1956)
J. S. Mill and Harriet Taylor Mill, Enfranchisement of Women (1851)
J. S. Mill, The Subjection of Women (1869)
P. Pickering & A. Tyrrell, The People’s Bread: A History of the Anti-Corn Law League (2000)
John Skorupski, Why Read Mill Today? (2006)
L. Stone & J.C.F. Stone, An Open Elite? England 1540-1880 (1986)
Dorothy Thompson, The Chartists (1984)
E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class (1963)
J. Ward, Chartism (1973)
J. Vernon (ed.), Re-Reading the Constitution (1996)
Women
P Bartlett, Votes for Women 1860-1928 (1998)
Lady Bell, At the Works (1907) chs viii, ix
Sue Bruley, Women in Britain since 1900 (1999)
Julia Bush, Women against the Vote. Female anti-Suffragism in Britain (2007)
Barbara Caine, Victorian Feminists (1992)
M.L. Davies, Life as We Have Known It (1931)
Michael Diamond, Victorian Sensation (2003)
Bram Dijkstra, Idols of Perversity. Fantasies of feminine evil in fin-de-siècle Culture (1988)
R J Evans, The Feminists 1840-1920 (1977)
Millicent Garrett Fawcett, ‘The Emancipation of Women’, Fortnightly Review, 50, 1891
Francis Finnegan, Poverty and Prostitution. A study of prostitutes in York (1979)
Roger Fulford, Votes For Women (1957)
Patricia Hollis, Women in Public 1850-1900. Documents of the Victorian Women’s
Movement (1979)
Patricia Hollis, Ladies Elect. Women in English Local Government 1865-1914 (1987)
Ellen Jordan, The Women’s Movement in 19c Britain (1999)
Jane Lewis, ed Women’s Source Library vol v Arguments for and against women’s suffrage
1864-1896 (2001)
Simon Morgan, A Victorian Woman’s Place. Public Culture in the 19th Century (2007)
Ornella Moscucci, The Science of Woman. Gynaecology and Gender in England 1800-1929
(1990)
Lynn Pykett, ‘Women Writing Woman’, in Joanne Shattock, ed., Women and Literature in
Britain 1800-1900 (2001)
Barry Reay, Watching Hannah. Sexuality, Horror and Bodily Deformation (2002)
Jane Rendall, Equal or Different? Women’s Politics 1860-1914 (1987)
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John Ruskin, Sesame and Lilies, two lectures delivered at Manchester in 1864: ‘Of King’s
Treasures’, ‘Of Queen’s Gardens’
Richard Mudie-Smith, Sweated Industries. Being a handbook of the Daily News Exhibition
(1906)
Valerie Steele, Fashion and Eroticism. Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to
the Jazz Age (1985)
Leigh Summers, Bound to Please. A History of the Victorian Corset (2001)
Barbara Taylor, Eve and the New Jerusalem (1983)
Melanie Tebbutt, Women’s Talk? A social history of ‘gossip’ in working-class
neighbourhoods 1880-1960 (1995)
Judith Walkowitz, Prostitution and Victorian Society (1980)
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929)
Leicester women
Shirley Aucott, Susanna Watts 1768-1842 (2004), Elizabeth Heyrick 1769-1831 (2007),
Women of Courage. Lives in Leicester 1780-1925 (2008)
D McDonald, Clara Collett 1860-1948 (2004)
S Burnage, Women in Leicestershire Hosiery 1745-1905 (MA thesis 1985)
J Herbert, Women in Leicestershire Secular Society 1870-1914 (MA thesis 1997)
4. THE POOR
Are always with us?
“Mind and body are sapped by the undermining influences ceaselessly at work”.
(Jack London, The People of the Abyss 1903)
Primary texts:
Henry Mayhew, London Labour & the London Poor (1849)
Flora Thompson, Lark Rise to Candleford (1948)
Parliamentary:
Children’s Employment Commission. First Report of Commissioners, Mines. Parliamentary
Papers 1842 (IUP series)
Children’s Employment, vol.6, pp1-8, 24, 37, 44, 106
Report by E. Chadwick to the Poor Law Commissioners. An Enquiry into the Sanitary
Condition of the Labouring Population of Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers 1842 (IUP
series: Health, General, vol.3, pp.129-528). Also edition by Flinn
Additional reading:
R M Hartwell, Long Debate on Poverty. Essays on Industrialization and the ‘Condition of
England’ (1972)
Gertrude Himmelfarb, The Idea of Poverty: England in the Early Industrial Age (1984)
T. Hitchcock, P. King, P. Sharpe, Chronicling Poverty. The voices and strategies of the
English poor 1640-1840 (1997)
Brian Inglis, Poverty and the Industrial Revolution (1971)
Institute of Economic Affairs, Charles Murray and the Underclass, ed. Ruth Lister (1996)
Gareth Stedman Jones, Outcast London. A Study in the relationship between classes in
Victorian Society (1971)
Peter Keating, Into Unknown England 1866-1913. Selections from the social explorers
(1976)
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Ross McKibbin, ‘The social psychology of unemployment in inter-war Britain’, in The
Ideologies of Class. Social Relations in Britain 1880-1950 (1990)
Simon Morgan, A Victorian Women’s Place. Public Culture in the 19th century (2007)
D.C. Pedder, The Secret of Rural Depopulation. Fabian Tracts (1904)
F K Prochaska, Women and Philanthropy in 19th century England (1980)
Raphael Samuel, ‘Headington roughs’ in Samuel, Village Life and Labour (1975)
Nigel Scotland, Squires in the Slums. Settlements and Missions in late Victorian Britain
(2007)
Robert Roberts, The Classic Slum. Salford life in the first quarter of the century (1971)
Jacob A. Riis, How the Other Half Lives 1890 (Penguin)
Richard Rodger, Housing in Urban Britain (1989)
Social Science and ‘social control’:
Peter Bailey, Leisure and Class in Victorian England. Rational recreation and the contest for
control 1830-85 (1978)
Michael Banton, ed., Darwinism and the Study of Society (1961)
J.W. Burrow, Evolution and Society. A study of Victorian social theory (1966)
Chris Baldick, The Social Mission of English Literature 1848-1932 (1983)
A.P. Donajgrodzki, Social Control in 19c Britain (1977)
D. Englander & R. O’Day, eds., Retrieved Riches. Social Investigation in Britain 1840-1914
(1998)
M. Foucault, Discipline and Punish. The Birth of the Prison (1977)
Greta Jones, Social Darwinism and English Thought (1980)
P. Joyce, The Rule of Freedom. Liberalism and the Modern City (2003)
M. Lacey & M. Farner, The State and Social Investigation in Britain and US (1993)
Rosaleen Love, Darwin and Social Darwinism (1982)
Daniel Pick, Faces of Degeneration. A European Disorder 1848-1918 (1989) Introduction,
chs.3, 6, 7
Mary Poovey, Making a Social Body: English Cultural Formation, 1830-1860 (1995)
J.A. Yelling, Slums and Slum Clearance in Victorian London (1986).
Eileen Janes Yeo, The Contest for Social Science (1996)
The Poor Laws:
Mark Blaug, ‘The Myth of the Old Poor Law and the Making of the New’, Journal of
Economic History, 23, 2 (1963)
David Englander, Poverty and Poor Law Reform in 19c Britain (1998)
U Henriques, How Cruel Was the Victorian Poor Law? Historical Journal, 11, 2, 1968
Lynn Lees Hollen, The Solidarities of Strangers. The English Poor Laws and the People
1700-1948 (1998)
Alan Kidd, State, Society and the Poor in 19c England (1999)
J.D. Marshall, The Old Poor Law 1795-1834. Studies in Economic History (1973)
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S King, Poverty and Welfare in England 1700-1850 (2000)
T May, The Victorian Workhouse (2005)
Michael E. Rose, The Relief of Poverty 1834-1914. Studies in Economic History (1971)
The poor in Victorian art:
John Barrell, The Dark Side of the Landscape. The Rural Poor in English Painting 1730-1840
(1980)
Mary Cowling, The Artist as Anthropologist. The representation of type and character in
Victorian art (1989)
John Ruskin, Political Economy of Art (1857)
John Ruskin, Modern Painters (1860)
Julian Treuherz, ed Hard Times. Social Realism in Victorian Art (1987)
Julian Treuherz, Victorian Painting (1993)
Christopher Wood, Victorian Panorama. Paintings of Victorian Life (1976)
5. GOVERNANCE AND SOCIAL REGULATION
“The high prosperity in respect to employment and wages, and various and abundant
food, have afforded to the labouring classes no exemptions from attacks of epidemic
disease, which have been as frequent and as fatal in periods of commercial and
manufacturing prosperity as in any others..”
(E. Chadwick, Report...from the Poor Law Commissioners on an Inquiry into the Sanitary Conditions of the
Labouring Population of Great Britain 1842)
Primary text:
E. Chadwick, Report...from the Poor Law Commissioners on an Inquiry into the Sanitary Conditions of the Labouring
Population of Great Britain 1842
Contextual:
W. Ashworth, The Genesis of Modern British Town Planning (1954)
M. Bannon, The Emergence of Irish Planning, 1880-1920 (1985)
A. Briggs, The Victorian City (1963)
D. Cannadine (ed), Patricians, Power and Politics in Nineteenth Century Towns (1982)
Robert Colls and Richard Rodger (eds), Cities of Ideas, Civil Society and Urban Governance
in Britain 1800-2000 (2004)
G. Cherry, Urban Change and Planning. A History of Urban Development in Britain since
1750 (1972)
B. Clapp, An Environmental History of Britain since the Industrial Revolution (1994)
H. Conway, People's Parks: The Design and Development of Victorian Parks in Britain
(1991)
H.J. Dyos and M. Wolff (eds.), The Victorian City images and reality (1978)
B. Edwards, ‘Urban Reform in Glasgow, 1850-1910, and the Views of Local Architects,’
Planning History, 13 (1, 1991)
Malcolm Elliott, Victorian Leicester (1979)
N. Evans, ‘The Welsh Victorian City: the middle class and civic and national consciousness
in Cardiff, 1850-1914’, Welsh History Review, 12 (1985)
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N. Evans, ‘Urbanisation, Elite Attitudes and Philanthropy. Cardiff, 1850-1914’,
International Review of Social History, 27 (1982)
A. Fletcher, ‘The Role of Landowners, Entrepreneurs, and Railways in the Development of
the North Wales Coast during the 19th Century,’ Welsh Historical Review 16 (December,
1993)
D. Fraser, Power and Authority in the Victorian city (1979).
R. Gray and D. Loftus, ‘Industrial regulation, urban space and boundaries of the workplace:
mid-Victorian Nottingham’, Urban History 26, (1999)
W. H. Greenleaf, The British Political Tradition: The Rise of Collectivism (1983)
E. P. Hennock, Fit and Proper Persons (1973)
K. Hill, Culture and Class in English Public Museums 1850-1914 (2005)
Tristram Hunt, Building Jerusalem: The Rise and Fall of the Victorian City (2004)
P. Joyce, The Rule of Freedom. Liberalism and the Modern City (2003)
P Joyce, Work, Society and Politics. The Culture of the Factory in Later Victorian England
(1980)
J. Kellett, The Impact of Railways on Victorian Cities (1969)
W.C. Lubenow, The Politics of Government Growth, Early Attitudes Toward State
Intervention 1833-1848 (1971)
J. Moore and R. Rodger, ‘Who Really Ran the Cities?’, in R. Roth (ed.) Who Ran the Cities:
Elite and Urban Power Structures in Europe, 1700-2000 (2007)
J. Moore and J. Smith (eds.), Corruption in Urban Politics and Society (2007)
R.J Morris, Class Sect and Party: the Making of the British Middle Class: Leeds 1820-1850
(1990)
R. J Morris and Richard Rodger (eds), The Victorian City, 1820-1914 (1993)
A. Offer, Property and Politics, 1870-1914 (1981)
D. J. Olsen, The Growth of Victorian London (1976)
D. Owen, The Government of Victorian London, 1855-1889 (1982)
R. Morris and R. Trainor, Urban Governance, Britain and Beyond since 1750 (2000)
G. Pearson, Hooligan: A History of Respectable Fears (1983)
C. Emsley, Crime and Society in England, 1750-1900 (2005)
J. Smith, ‘Urban Elites c.1830-1930 and Urban History’, Urban History, 27, 2 (2000)
A. Sutcliffe (ed.), British Town Planning: the Formative Years (Leicester 1981)
A. Sutcliffe, Toward the Planned City. Germany, Britain, the United States and France,
1780-1914 (1981)
P. Waller, Town, City and Nation: England 1850-1914 (1983)
J. Whitehand, ‘The Makers of British Towns: Architects, Builders and Property Owners, c.
1850-1939,’ Journal of Historical Geography 18 (1992)
A. Wohl, Endangered Lives. Public Health in Victorian Britain (1983)
A. Wohl, The Eternal Slum. Housing and Social Policy in Victorian London (1977)
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J. Wolff, and J. Seed, The Culture of Capital: Art, Power and the Nineteenth-Century Middle
Class (1988)
R. Woods and J. Woodward (eds.), Urban Disease and Mortality in Nineteenth-Century
England (1984)
K. Young, and P. Garside. Metropolitan London: Politics and Urban Change, 1837-1981
(1982)
6. THE INVENTION OF MODERN SPORT
Mens sana in corpore sano
“Lead me now my Creator in the days of my youth in all things that lead toward a true
Christian manliness”.
(Membership pledge of Boys’ Brigade, founded Glasgow 1883.)
Primary text:
Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown’s Schooldays (1857)
George and Weedon Grossmith, Diary of a Nobody (1892)
Additional reading:
Joanna Bourke, Dismembering the Male. Men’s Bodies, Britain and the Great War (1996)
Bob Bushaway, By Rite. Custom, Ceremony and Community in England 1700-1880 (1982)
John Chandos, Boys Together. English Public Schools 1800-64 (1985)
Tony Collins, A Social History of Rugby Union (2009)
Mike Cronin et al, The GAA. A People’s History (2009)
Mike Cronin, ‘Projecting the Nation through Sport and Culture’, Journal of Contemporary
History, 38, 2003
Hugh Cunningham, Leisure in the Industrial Revolution (1980)
Clifford Geertz, ‘Deep Play’. Notes on the Balinese Cockfight, in Geertz, The Interpretation
of Cultures (1973)
Ramachandra Guha, Corner of a Foreign Field. The Indian History of a British Sport
(Bombay 2002)
Ian Dyck, William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture (1992)
Mark Girouard, The Return to Camelot, Chivalry and the English Gentleman (1981)
Edmund Gosse, Father and Son (1907)
Richard Holt, Sport and the British (1990)
Richard Holt, ‘The Batsman as Hero’, in Holt et al, European Heroes, Myths, Identity, Sport
(1996)
Mike Huggins, The Victorians and Sport (2004)
Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher (1879) and The Gamekeeper at Home (1878)
J Lowerson and J Myerscough, Time to Spare in Victorian England (1977)
John Lowerson, Sport and the Middle Class 1870-1914 (1993)
R.W. Malcolmson, Popular Recreations in English Society 1700-1850 (1973)
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J.A. Mangan & James Walvin, Manliness and Morality: Middle class masculinity in Britain
and America 1800-1940 (1987)
K. McCrone, ‘Sport at the late Victorian Girls Public School, Journal of British Studies, 23,
Spring 1984
Leigh Summers, Bound to Please. History of the Victorian Corset (2001) and John Johnson
Collection Digital Collection of Printed Ephemera, Bodleian Library, online – women’s
corsets and sports wear
John Tosh, A Man’s Place. Masculinity and the Middle Class Home (1999)
Malcolm Tozer, Manliness. Revolution of a Victorian ideal (1978)
T Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class (1918. 1970) with Introduction by C Wright Mills
Allen Warren, ‘Sir Robert Baden-Powell, the Scout movement and citizen training in Great
Britain 1900-1920’, English Historical Review, cl, 1986
Schooling:
British Educational Theory in the 19th century (1993), various authors
Robert Colls, ‘Oh Happy English Children!’ Coal, Class and Education in the North East’,
Past and Present, 73, Nov 1976
Robert Colls, A J Heesom, B Duffy, ‘Debate: Coal, Class and Education in the North East’,
Past and Present, 90, Feb 1981
A M Davies, The Barnsley School Board 1871-1903 (1965)
B Edwards, Burston School Strike (1974)
J A Mangan, Athleticism in the Victorian and Edwardian Public School (1981)
Brian Simon, ‘David Reader’s Alternative System’, in R Colls and R Rodger, eds Cities of
Ideas. Civil Society and Urban Governance in Britain 1800-2000 (2004)
Brian Simon, Education and the Labour Movement 1870-1920 (1965)
Brian Simon, The Victorian Public School (1975)
G D Taylor, School Boards in Nottingham, Derby and Birmingham 1870-1933 (1992)
7. RELIGION AND MODERNITY
A Religious Revival
“Then the pilgrims desired with trembling to go forward, only they prayed their guide to
strike a light...”
(John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress 1678-84)
Primary text:
John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678-84)
Additional reading:
David Thompson, Nonconformity in the Nineteenth Century (1972)
Herman Ausubel, ‘General Booth’s Scheme of Salvation’, American History Review, 56, 3,
1951
C E Elliott Binns, Religion in the Victorian Era (1936)
Edmund Calamy’s Account of the Ministers and Others Ejected and Silenced 1660-62, ed A
G Matthews (Oxford 1934) &
Walker Revised, Being a Revision of John Walker’s Sufferings of the Clergy during the
Grand Rebellion 1642-60, ed A G Matthews (Oxford 1948)
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John Coffey, ‘Democracy and Popular Religion. Moody and Sankey’s Mission to Britain
1873-75’, in Biagini, ed., Citizenship and Community (1996)
Robert Colls, The Pitmen of the Northern Coalfield (1987) part two
Robert Currie, Methodism Divided (1968)
Robert Currie, Alan Gilbert, Lee Horsley, Churches and Churchgoers. Patterns of Church
Growth in the British Isles since 1700 (1977)
Philip Davis, The Victorians, op cit ch 3 ‘Religion’
J.F.C. Harrison, The Second Coming. Popular Millenarianism 1780-1850 (1979)
David Hempton, ‘Religious Life in Industrial Britain 1830-1914’, in S. Gilley & W.J. Shiels,
eds., A History of Religion in Britain (1994)
Boyd Hilton, Age of Atonement. Influence of Evangelicalism on Social and economic
Thought 1795-1865 (1988)
Dominic Janes, Victorian reformation. The fight over idolatory in the Church of England
1840-60 (2009)
Paul Jennings, The Public House in Bradford 1770-1970 (1995)
John Kent, Holding the Fort. Studies in Victorian Revivalism (1978)
Robert Lee, The Church of England and the Durham Coalfield 1810-1926 (2007)
Robert Lee, Rural Society and the Anglican Clergy 1815-1914 (2006)
Donald M. MacRaild, Culture, Conflict and Migration. The Irish in Victorian Cumbria (1998)
chs. 4, 5, 6
J. McKinnon, Recollections of D.L. Moody and his work in Britain (1905)
Hugh Mcleod, Class and Religion in the late Victorian City (1974)
Hugh McLeod, Religion and the Working Class in 19th Century Britain (1984)
Geoffrey Milburn & Margaret Batty, eds., Workaday Preachers (1995) chs. by Turner,
Milburn, Rose, Graham, Field, Colls, and Banks
D.L. Moody, Moody’s Great Sermons (1899)
Jim Obelkerich, Lyndal Roper, Raphael Samuel, eds., Disciplines of Faith (1987) chs by
Malmgreen, Abelore, Turner, Hill, Yeo, Scribner and Obelkevich
James Obelkevich, ‘Religion’, in F.M.L. Thompson, ed., Cambridge Social History of Britain
1750-1950, vol iii, Social Agencies and Institutions
Gerald Parsons, Religion in Victorian Britain (1988) 4 vols
G. Rosell, ed., Commending the Faith. The Preaching of D.L. Moody (1999)
Roger Sharrock, Pilgrim’s Progress. A Casebook (1976)
Samuel Smiles, Self Help (1858: Oxford World’s Classics, 2002)
K.D.M. Snell, Rival Jerusalems (2000)
E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class 1968 (Penguin) chs.2, 11
Deborah M Valenze, Prophetic Sons and Daughters. Female preaching and popular
religion in industrial England (1985)
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David Vincent, Bread, Knowledge and Freedom. 19c working class autobiography (1981)
chs.3,6
Pamela Walker, Pulling the Devil’s Kingdom Down. The Salvation Army in Victorian Britain
(2001)
Julia Stuart Werner, The Primitive Methodist Connexion (1984)
John Wilson, Memories of a Labour Leader. The autobiography of John Wilson JP, MP
(1910)
Stephen Yeo, ‘A New Life, Religion and Socialism in Britain,’ History Workshop Journal, 4,
1977
8. SCIENCE AND FAITH
Darwin and Religion
“I see no good reason why the views given in this volume should shock the religious
feelings of anyone”
(Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species, 1859)
Primary texts:
Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species (1859), ch.15
The Quarterly Review, cviii, July 1860: debate between T H Huxley and Samuel
Wilberforce, The Bishop of Oxford, on Origin of Species, meeting of the British Association
at Oxford, 30 June 1860
The Athenaeum, 30 June, 7 July, 14 July 1860
Jackson’s Oxford Journal, 7 July 1860
Additional reading:
Peter Bowler, The eclipse of Darwinism: anti-Darwinian evolution theories in the decades
around 1900 (1983)
M Bulmer, ‘The theory of Natural Selection of Alfred Russell Wallace’, Notes and Records
of the Royal Society, 59, 2, May 2005
W.F. Cannon, 'The problem of miracles in the 1830s'. Victorian Studies, 4:1 (1960)
Owen Chadwick, The Victorian Church (1970) two vols
Philip Davis, The Victorians, op cit, ch 2 ‘Nature’
Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion (2007)
B. Dolan 'Representing novelty : Charles Babbage, Charles Lyell, and experiments in early
Victorian geology'. History of Science, 36:3 (1998), 299-327
J. Durant, Darwinism and divinity: essays on evolution and religious belief (1985)
P Elliott, ‘Erasmus Darwin, H Spencer and the Origins of an Evolutionary Worldview 17701850’, Isis, 94, 1, March 2003
S.J. Gould, The Lying Stones of Marrakech (2000)
R.J. Helmstadter, ed., Victorian faith in crisis: essays on continuity and change in
nineteenth century religious belief (1990)
Leo Henkin, Darwinism in the English novel 1860-1910: the impact of evolution on
Victorian fiction (1963 reprint)
T H Huxley, ‘On the reception of Origin of Species’, in D C Goodman, ed Science and
Religious Belief. A selection of primary sources (1973)
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E. Jay, Faith and Doubt in Victorian Britain (1986)
H M Jones and I B Cohen, eds Science before Darwin (1963)
T.S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1970)
Timothy Larsen, Crisis of Doubt. Honest Faith in 19th Century England (2008)
E.J. Larson, Evolution’s Workshop: God and Science on the Galapagos Islands (2002)
Bernard Lightman ed Victorian Science in Context (1997)
Roy MacLeod, The Creed of Science in Victorian England (1997)
J R Moore, The Post Darwinian Controversies (1979)
R. Preece, 'Darwinism, Christianity, and the Great Vivisection Debate'. Journal of the
History of Ideas, 64:3 (2003)
E. Royle, The Infidel Tradition: from Paine to Bradlaugh (1976)
N. Rupke, The Great Chain of History: William Buckland and the English School of Geology
(1983)
M Ruse, Charles Darwin (2008)
William Tuckwell, Reminiscences of Oxford (1900) – on the Huxley-Wilberforce debate
Samuel Wilberforce, Essays contributed to the Quarterly Review (1874)
R. Yeo, 'Science and intellectual authority in mid-nineteenth-century Britain: Robert
Chambers and Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation'. Victorian Studies, 28 (1984)
Sciences of the Mind: Phrenology, Mesmerism, Animal Magnetism and Spiritualism:
N. Brown, ed., The Victorian Supernatural (2004)
James P. Browne, Phrenology, and its application to education, insanity, and prison
discipline (1869)
George Combe, A system of phrenology (1836)
George Combe, The constitution of man: considered in relation to external objects (reprint,
1970). (Sold more copies that Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in the nineteenth century)
Roger Cooter, The cultural meaning of popular science : phrenology and the organization
of consent in nineteenth-century (1984)
Charles Gibbon, The life of George Combe: author of "The constitution of man (reprint
1970)
David De Giustino, Conquest of mind: phrenology and Victorian social thought (1975)
L.S. Hearnshaw, A short history of British psychology, 1840-1940 (1964)
J.S. Hodgson, Considerations on phrenology : in connexion with an intellectual, moral, and
religious education (1839)
F. Kaplan, ‘”The mesmeric mania’: the early Victorians and animal magnetism’, Journal of
the History of Ideas, 35 (1974)
J. Oppenheim, The Other World: Spiritualism and Psychical Research in England, 18501914 (1985)
R. Thomson, eds., British psychologists of the nineteenth century (1993)
D. Turnbull, Phrenology, the first science of man (1982)
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J. Van Wyhe, Phrenology and the origins of Victorian scientific naturalism (2004)
A. Winter, Mesmerized: Powers of Mind in Victorian Britain (1998)
For an excellent website on phrenology by John Van Wyhe, including digitised copies of
texts such as Combe’s Constitution of Man, see: http://pages.britishlibrary.net/phrenology
9. THE BRITISH EMPIRE AND IMPERIALISM
Imperial State
“Kim could lie like an Oriental”
(Rudyard Kipling, Kim 1901)
Primary text:
Rudyard Kipling, Kim (1901)
Additional reading:
Kingsley Amis, Rudyard Kipling (1975)
Roger Anstey, Atlantic Slave Trade and British Abolition 1760-1810 (1975)
C A Bayly, Birth of the Modern World 1780-1914. Global connections and comparisons
(2005)
Duncan Bell, The Idea of Greater Britain 1860-1900 (2007)
Alison Blunt, Travel, Gender and Imperialism. Mary Kingsley and West Africa (1994)
P.J. Cain & A.G. Hopkins, British Imperialism (1993) vol I ‘Innovation and Expansion’ 16881914
David Cannadine, ‘The Empire Strikes Back’, Past and Present, 147, May 1995
David Cannadine, Ornamentalism (2001)
G Chakravarty, The Indian Mutiny in the British Imagination (2005)
Annie Coombes, Reinventing Africa: museums, material culture and popular imagination in
Victorian and Edwardian England (1994)
Ian Copland, The Princes of India in the Endgame of Empire 1917-1947 (1997)
John Darwin, ‘Imperialism and the Victorians’, English Historical Review, cxii, June 1997
Anna Davin, ‘Imperialism and the Cult of Motherhood,’ History Workshop Journal, 5, 1978
Clive Dewey, Anglo Indian Attitudes. The Mind of the Indian Civil Service (1993)
John Fage, A History of Africa (2001)
J G Farrell, The Siege of Krishnapur (London 1973)
Simon Gikandi, Maps of Englishness (1999)
Catherine Hall, Civilizing Subjects. Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 183067 (2002)
J.A. Hobson, Imperialism (1902)
Mary Kingsley, Travels in West Africa (1897)
Hermann Kulke & Dietmar Rothermund, A History of India (1997)
Krishan Kumar, The Making of English National Identity (1993)
Adam Kuper, The Invention of Primitive Society (1988)
Phillipa Levine, Gender and Empire (2007)
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Mike Lynch, The British Empire (2005)
J.M. MacKenzie, Propaganda and Empire (1985)
Peter Mandler, ‘Race and Nation in Mid Victorian Thought’, in Collini et al, eds., History,
Religion and Culture British Intellectual History 1750-1950 (2000)
L.T. Merrill, ‘The English Campaign for the Abolition of the Slave Trade’, Journal of Negro
History, 30, Oct 1945
C Midgley, Women Against Slavery, British Campaigns 1780-1870 (1992)
J.S. Mill, signed ‘D’, ‘The Negro Question’, Fraser’s Magazine x/l January 1850 Short Loan
X22607
W Forbes-Mitchell, Reminiscences of the Great Mutiny 1857-59 (1894)
P Morgan and S Hawkins, eds, Black Experience and the Empire (2006)
J.R. Oldfield, Popular Politics and British Anti Slavery (1995)
Ian Ousby, The Englishman’s England. Taste, travel, and the rise of tourism (1990)
A Offer, ‘The British Empire 1870-1914. A Waste of Money?’ Economic History Review, xlvi,
2, 1993
Parliamentary: Report of the Jamaica Royal Commission, Parliamentary Papers 1866 (IUP
series: Colonies. West Indies. vol.4, pp.499-539
Patrick Parrinder, Nation and Novel, ch 10 ‘Home and Abroad’
Andrew Porter, Oxford History of the British Empire. The 19th Century (1999)
Bernard Porter, The Absent Minded Imperialists. Empire, Society and Culture in Britain
(2004)
Jonah Raskin, The Mythology of Imperialism (1971)
R. Robinson & J. Gallagher, Africa and the Victorians (1961)
Edward Said, Orientalism (1978)
Simon Smith, British Imperialism 1750-1970 (1998)
B. Tylor, Primitive Culture (1871)
James Walvin, Slavery and British Society 1776-1846 (1982)
James Walvin, Fruits of Empire. Exotic produce and British taste 1660-1800 (1997)
Sidney Webb, ‘Socialism True and False’; ‘A Policy of National Efficiency’, ‘Fabian Policy’;
‘Difficulties of Individualism, Fabian Tracts (1894-1901)
Kathleen Wilson, The Sense of the People. Politics, culture and imperialism in England
1715-85 (1995)
Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery (1964)
R.A. Stafford, Scientist of empire: Sir Robert Murchison, scientific exploration and Victorian
imperialism (1989)
10. FAMILY LIFE
“…always when he went with Miriam, and it grew rather late, he knew his mother was
fretting and getting angry about him – why, he could not understand”
(D H Lawrence, Sons and Lovers 1913)
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Primary text:
D. H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers (1913)
Contextual:
Jane Lewis, Labour and Love. Women’s experience of home and family 1850-1940 (1986)
Lawrence:
J. Chambers, D.H. Lawrence. A personal record by E.T. (1935)
Paul Delaney, D.H. Lawrence’s Nightmare. The writer and his circle in the years of the
Great War (1979)
David Ellis, D.H. Lawrence, Dying Game 1922-1930 (1998)
Frieda Lawrence, ‘Not I but the Wind…’ (1935)
Kate Millett, Sexual Politics [section on Lawrence] (1977)
Mark Kinkead Weekes, D H Lawrence. Triumph to Exile 1912-20 (1996)
Robert Wohl, The Generation of 1914 (1980)
John Worthen. D H Lawrence. The Early Years 1885-1912 (1991)
Additional Reading: P Bartlett, Votes for Women 1860-1928 (1998)
Lady Bell, At the Works (1907) chs viii, ix
Maxine Berg, ‘The first women economic historians’, Economic History Review, x/v, 1992
Sue Bruley, Women in Britain since 1900 (1999)
Julia Bush, Women against the Vote. Female anti-Suffragism in Britain (2007)
Barbara Caine, Victorian Feminists (1992)
John Carey, The Intellectuals and the Masses. Pride and Prejudice among the Literary
Intelligentsia 1880-1939 (1992)
M.L. Davies, Life as We Have Known It (1931)
Bram Dijkstra, Idols of Perversity. Fantasies of feminine evil in fin-de-siècle Culture (1988)
R J Evans, The Feminists 1840-1920 (1977)
Millicent Garrett Fawcett, ‘The Emancipation of Women’, Fortnightly Review, 50, 1891
Francis Finnegan, Poverty and Prostitution. A study of prostitutes in York (1979)
Roger Fulford, Votes For Women (1957)
J. Giles, The Parlour and the Suburb, Domestic Identities, Class, Femininity and Modernity
(2004)
Patricia Hollis, Women in Public 1850-1900. Documents of the Victorian Women’s
Movement (1979)
Patricia Hollis, Ladies Elect. Women in English Local Government 1865-1914 (1987)
Ellen Jordan, The Women’s Movement in 19c Britain (1999)
Jane Lewis, ed Women’s Source Library vol v Arguments for and against women’s suffrage
1864-1896 (2001)
Simon Morgan, A Victorian Woman’s Place. Public Culture in the 19th Century (2007)
Ornella Moscucci, The Science of Woman. Gynaecology and Gender in England 1800-1929
(1990)
Lynn Pykett, ‘Women Writing Woman’, in Joanne Shattock, ed., Women and Literature in
Britain 1800-1900 (2001)
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Barry Reay, Watching Hannah. Sexuality, Horror and Bodily Deformation (2002)
Jane Rendall, Equal or Different? Women’s Politics 1860-1914 (1987)
John Ruskin, Sesame and Lilies, two lectures delivered at Manchester in 1864: ‘Of King’s
Treasures’, ‘Of Queen’s Gardens’
Richard Mudie-Smith, Sweated Industries. Being a handbook of the Daily News Exhibition
(1906)
Valerie Steele, Fashion and Eroticism. Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to
the Jazz Age (1985)
Leigh Summers, Bound to Please. A History of the Victorian Corset (2001)
Melanie Tebbutt, Women’s Talk? A social history of ‘gossip’ in working-class
neighbourhoods 1880-1960 (1995)
Flora Thompson, Lark Rise to Candleford (1948)
Amanda Vickery, ‘Golden Age to Separate Spheres’, Historical Journal, 36, 2, 1993
Judith Walkowitz, Prostitution and Victorian Society (1980)
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929)
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EN7021 Approaches to Victorian Literature and Culture
The module takes three different approaches to the study of Victorian literature and culture. The first is to look
at the oeuvre of a particular author (Oscar Wilde), considering the development of his ideas and literary
techniques across their career, and examining his writing in different genres. The second is to focus on a
particular portion of the Victorian age (the mid-Victorian period), attempting to understand how literary texts
produced in that historical ‘moment’ engaged both with contemporary events and with each other. The third is
to consider a particular theme in Victorian literature and culture (the Victorians and the past), tracking this
concern in writing (and the visual arts) across the entire period, and examining how the theme is dealt with in
radically different ways in a variety of genres. The final session, Curating the Victorians, continues our thinking
about how the past is represented, and allows us to reflect on the ways in which the Victorians are presented to
different audiences today, in museums, art galleries, literary and historical tours etc.
(i) AN AUTHOR: OSCAR WILDE (3 seminars)
1. Prose ~ ‘The Critic as Artist’ (Parts I & II) and ‘The Soul of Man Under Socialism’
2. Drama ~ A Woman of No Importance and other plays
3. Fiction ~ The Picture of Dorian Gray, ‘The Happy Prince’ and ‘The Selfish Giant’
GD
GM
JT
(You might also find it useful to read J.-K. Huysmans, Against Nature [A Rebours], Penguin Classic, trans. Robert
Baldick)
Primary text: Oscar Wilde: The Major Works, ed. Isobel Murray, (Oxford: World’s Classics, 2000)
Please note that this collection does NOT include ‘A Woman of No Importance’, ‘The Soul of Man Under
Socialism’ or ‘The Selfish Giant’. These three texts are included in the Wordsworth edition of The Collected
Works of Wilde.
Additional reading:
Bruce Bashford, ‘When Critics Disagree: Recent Approaches to Oscar Wilde’, Victorian Literature and Culture 30
(2002), 613–25.
Ed Cohen, Talk on the Wilde Side: Toward a Genealogy of a Discourse on Male Sexualities, (New York: Routledge,
1993).
Lawrence Danson, Wilde’s Intentions: The Artist in His Criticism, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997).
Regenia Gagnier, Idylls of the Marketplace: Oscar Wilde and the Victorian public, (Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1987).
Josephine M. Guy and Ian Small, Oscar Wilde’s Profession: Writing and the Culture Industry in the Late
Nineteenth Century, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).
Merlin Holland, ed., The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde, (London: Fourth Estate, 2000).
Joel H. Kaplan and Sheila Stowell, Theatre and Fashion from Oscar Wilde to the Suffragettes (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 1994).
Jerusha McCormack, ed., Wilde the Irishman, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998).
Kerry Powell, Oscar Wilde and the Theatre of the 1890s (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990).
Peter Raby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Oscar Wilde, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).
John Sloan, Authors in Context: Oscar Wilde, (Oxford: World’s Classics, 2003).
Ian Small, Conditions for Criticism: Authority, Knowledge, and Literature in the Late Nineteenth Century, (Oxford:
Clarendon Press, 1991).
Philip E. Smith II and Michael S. Helfand, eds., Oscar Wilde’s Oxford Notebooks: A Portrait of Mind in the Making
(New York: Oxford University Press, 1989).
(ii) A LITERARY PERIOD: VICTORIAN LITERATURE AT MID-CENTURY (4 seminars)
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These seminars will consider the literature of the 1850s and 60s – novels, poetry and non-fictional prose –
against the background of political and social change in the period – a period which witnessed the emergence of
the ‘Woman Question’, changes in legal rights and education and employment opportunities for women, the
second great Reform Bill of 1867, as well as challenges to orthodox religion and the impact of contemporary
science. We will be discussing the validity of this approach and also the usefulness of choosing a decade as a
means of understanding Victorian writing.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Class, Gender and Identity: John Halifax Gentleman
Fiction and Politics: Felix Holt
The Decade of Sensation: The Moonstone
Poetry of the mid-Century: Christina Rossetti
HF
FJ
GM
FJ
Primary Texts:
Dinah Craik, John Halifax: Gentleman (Gloucestershire: Nonsuch, 2005). This is readily available, but you are
welcome to use a different edition.
George Eliot, Felix Holt (Penguin or World’s Classics)
Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone (World’s Classics, Broadview or any available edition)
Christina Rossetti, Poems and Prose, ed. Simon Humphries, Oxford World’s Classics (Oxford: Oxford University
Press, 2008)
Contextual:
John Ruskin, ‘Of Queen’s Gardens’, in Sesame and Lilies (1864). Any edition.
J.S. Mill, ‘The Subjection of Women’ in A. Rossi, ed. Essays on Sex Equality (Chicago).
Tennyson, Enoch Arden (1864).
Additional Reading:
Gillian Beer, George Eliot (1986).
Patrick Brantlinger, ‘What is Sensational about the Sensation Novel?’, Nineteenth-Century Fiction 37, 1982.
K. Burlinson, Christina Rossetti (1998).
A. Chapman, The Afterlife of Christina Rossetti (2000).
Kate Flint, The Woman Reader: 1833-1914 (1993).
Robin Gilmour, The Ideal of the Gentleman in the Victorian Novel, (London: Allen and Unwin, 1981).
A.H. Harrison, Christina Rossetti in Context (1998).
Winifred Hughes, The Maniac in the Cellar (1980).
Angela Leighton, Victorian Women Poets. Writing against the Heart (1992).
Emma Liggins and Daniel Duffy, eds., Feminist Readings of Victorian Popular Texts: Divergent Femininities (2001).
Jan Marsh, Christina Rossetti: A Literary Biography (1994).
Sally Mitchell, The Fallen Angel: Chastity, Class and Women’s Reading 1835-1880 (1981).
[Margaret Oliphant], ‘Sensation Novels’, Blackwood’s Magazine May 1862, 564-84.
Philip O'Neill, Wilkie Collins : women, property and propriety (1988).
Norman Page, ed., Wilkie Collins, the Critical Heritage (1974).
Catherine Peters, The King of Inventors : a life of Wilkie Collins (1992).
Lyn Pykett, The Sensation Novel (1994).
Elaine Showalter, A Literature of Their Own (1977).
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-------------, The Female Malady: Women, Madness and English Culture 1830-1980 (1987).
Sally Shuttleworth, ‘Demonic Mothers: Ideologies of Bourgeois Motherhood in the Mid-Victorian Era’ in Linda
Shires, ed., Rewriting the Victorians (1992).
Jenny Taylor, In the Secret Theatre of Home (1988).
Nicole D. Thompson, ed. Victorian Women Writers and the Woman Question (1999).
Deborah Wynne, The Sensation Novel and the Victorian Family Magazine (2001).
Arlene Young, Culture, Class and Gender in the Victorian Novel: Gentlemen, Gents and Working Women,
(Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999).
(iii) A THEME: THE VICTORIANS AND THE PAST (3 seminars)
8. The Uses of the Past ~ Pugin, Contrasts; Carlyle, ‘On History’ and extracts from Past and Present;
Browning, ‘Love Among the Ruins’; Rossetti, ‘The Burden of Nineveh’; Ruskin, ‘The Nature of Gothic. GD
9. The Victorian Historical Novel ~ Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities; Carlyle, ‘On History’, extracts Carlyle,
The French Revolution.
HF
10. Curating the Victorians ~ essays from Nicola Watson, ed., Literary Tourism and
GM, RD and
Nineteenth Century Culture, materials presented by the group.
MAVS team
Primary Texts:
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin or Oxford).
Thomas Carlyle, Selected Writings, ed. Alan Shelston, (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971). This edition is now out
of print but you may still be able to pick up a second-hand copy. If not, the Carlyle texts will be included in a
photocopied pack.
Alfred Lord Tennyson, Selected Poems, ed. Aidan Day, (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1991).
Essays from Nicola Watson, ed., Literary Tourism and Nineteenth Century Culture (Basingstoke, Palgrave, 2009).
Task for week 10: Visit a site, or participate in an event, which curates the Victorians in some way (e.g. author
home museum, ‘living history’ museum, art gallery, Victorian walking tour . . .). Think about the narratives
presented and how audiences are engaged. You might want to consider the following questions: What is
interesting about the way in which the period is presented? Are there any significant areas of emphasis or
omissions? How are visitors/participants responding? Draw your thoughts together into a five minute
presentation, which will be given in week 10. PowerPoint and facilities to make photocopies in advance will be
available, should you wish to show any material.
Additional reading:
Peter J. Bowler, The Invention of Progress: The Victorians and the Past, (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1989).
J.B. Bullen, The Myth of the Renaissance in Nineteenth-Century Writing, (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1994).
Alice Chandler, A Dream of Order: The Medieval Ideal in Nineteenth-Century English Literature, (London:
Routledge and K. Paul, 1971).
Raymond Chapman, The Sense of the Past in Victorian Literature, (London: Croom Helm, 1986).
A. Dwight Culler, The Victorian Mirror of History, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986).
Avrom Fleishman, The English Historical Novel: Walter Scott to Virginia Woolf, (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press,
1971).
Hilary Fraser, The Victorians and Renaissance Italy, (Oxford: Blackwell, 1992).
Simon Grimble, Landscape, Writing and 'the Condition of England' - 1878-1917, Ruskin to Modernism, (New York:
Edwin Mellen Press, 2004).
Jennifer A. Palmgren, Beyond Arthurian Romances: The Reach of Victorian Medievalism, (London: Palgrave,
2005).
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John D. Rosenberg, Elegy for an Age: The Presence of the Past in Victorian Literature, (London: Anthem Press,
2005).
Andrew Sanders, The Victorian Historical Novel 1840-1880, (London: Macmillan, 1978).
Option Modules
Preparatory reading lists for these option modules, along with brief module descriptions, were circulated during
the summer vacation period. Further details of these modules may be found at
www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation.
Semester One
Module
Tutor
Day/Time
Dates
Venue
EN7126: Women in
Literature, Culture
and Society, 18501900
Dr Claire Brock
THU 12:00-14:00
16, 30 Oct, 13, 27 Nov, 11 Dec
tbc
EN7128: The Brontës Dr Julian North
THU 10:00-12 :00
9, 23 Oct, 6, 20 Nov, 4 Dec
tbc
Professor Keith Snell Please contact tutor for Please contact tutor for details
Please contact
tutor for
details
Module
Tutor
Day/Time
Dates
Venue
EN7122 Charles
Dickens
Dr Holly Furneaux
THU 11:00-13:00
29 Jan, 12, 26 Feb, 12, 26 Mar
tbc
EN7124 Evolution
and Entropy
Dr Gowan Dawson
MON 10.00-12.00
26 Jan, 9, 23 Feb, 9, 23 Mar
Att 1413
EN7127 Literature
and Culture in 1859
Prof. Gail Marshall
MON 11:00-13:00
26 Jan, 9, 23 Feb, 9, 23 Mar
Att 1313
EN7222 The English
Country House in
Literature
Dr Julian North
TUE 16:00-18:00
27 Jan, 3, 10, 17, 24 Feb, 3, 10,
17, 24 Mar, 5 May
tbc
EN7234 Narrative:
Theories, Texts and
Practices
Dr Ruth Page
THU 15:00-17:00
29 Jan, 12 Feb, 5, 12, 26 Mar
tbc
HS7110:
Understanding
English and Welsh
Communities and
Cultures, 1800-2000
details
Semester Two
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Coursework Submission
Please see the Referencing and Academic Integrity section for details of coursework submission.
Penalties for late submission of work
You should make sure that you submit your assignments by their due date to avoid any marks being deducted
for lateness. Penalties for late submission of coursework follow the University scheme defined in Regulations
governing the assessment of taught programmes (see www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation7 or
www.le.ac.uk/sas/assessments/late-submission).
If you do need to submit a piece of work after the submission deadline, you will need to take it to the reception
desk in Att 1514; you must complete and sign a ‘Late Submission of Assessed Work’ form to accompany any late
work.
Change of Course/Module
Discuss your options with your personal tutor, or another appropriate member of staff in your department, if
you are considering a change of course or module. Changes of course or module require approval by your
department and the University’s Registry and will only be allowed in certain circumstances.
See www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/transfercourse or www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/transfermodule for details of the
procedures involved and deadlines that apply.
Marking and Assessment Practices
Student anonymity will be preserved during the marking of all formal examinations. Summative coursework (i.e.
coursework that contributes to your module mark or grade) will be marked anonymously unless there are sound
educational reasons for not doing so, or the type of assessment makes marking impractical.
The External Examiner for this programme is: Dr James Mussell, Associate Professor in Victorian Literature,
University of Leeds. Please note that students are not permitted to initiate direct contact with External
Examiners (see Regulation 7.36).
Feedback and the Return of Work from Staff
The Department complies with the University’s policy for the return of marked coursework (see
www.le.ac.uk/sas/quality/student-feedback/return-of-marked-work for details of the full policy:
General principles:
•
•
Feedback and provisional grading on coursework will be returned within 21 days of the submission date
for campus-based programmes; 28 days for distance learning and approved programmes.
In exceptional circumstances where this is not possible, you will be notified in advance of the expected
return date and the reasons for the longer turn-round time and where possible staff will provide some
interim feedback: for example in the form of generic feedback to the class regarding common errors and
potential areas for improvement
All work is marked by two markers. Please see the end of this Handbook for our Marking Criteria.
Students will receive a written report and an agreed grade for each assessed essay and dissertation.
Other feedback will include verbal feedback from seminar tutors.
You are encouraged to discuss your assessment feedback with your personal tutor, if you have any questions or
concerns.
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Progression and Classification of Awards
The University’s system for the classification of awards and the rules of progression are defined in the
Regulations governing taught postgraduate programmes of study (www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation6).
Alternatively, refer to the Student and Academic Services website for information about degree classification
and progression: www.le.ac.uk/sas/assessments/pgt-progressionaward
Any specific progression requirements for your course are stated in its programme specification (see
http://www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation)
Should you fail to achieve a pass mark (50%) in a module, you will be entitled to re-sit or re-submit any of the
failed components of assessment associated with that module, on one occasion only. Please note, however,
that the number of credits of taught modules that you are entitled to re-sit or re-submit is half of the credit
value of the taught component of the programme (i.e. up to 60 taught credits if you are undertaking a 60-credit
dissertation). One resubmission of the dissertation will normally be allowed. For further details, please refer to
Senate Regulation 6: Regulations governing taught postgraduate programmes of study.
Please see also your Study Skills Guide.
Referencing and Academic Integrity
Your coursework must meet each of the following conditions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
You should agree your essay question with the module tutor before commencing to write.
The School of English recommends the MHRA referencing system (www.style.mhra.org.uk), but if you
are familiar with an alternative system, such as MLA or Harvard, you may use this instead. (Please note
on your work the name of the alternative referencing system.) Please consult an appropriate style guide
to ensure you are using your chosen system correctly.
Your essay should be within the stated word limit. Word limits include footnotes and appendices but
exclude bibliographies.
Your essay must be word-processed (or typed). If, exceptionally, you have been given permission to
submit it in hand-written form, you MUST write legibly.
Make sure that you put your student number and module title in the header of your essay, as well as on
the cover sheet. Do not put your name on either.
Your essay should be on one side of the paper only and in double-line spacing. There must be a wide
margin on the left-hand side of the page.
The pages must be numbered.
Two copies of assessed work should be submitted in hard copy with a cover sheet completed and fixed
to the front of each. Note that there are different cover sheets for essays, creative writing and reflective
commentaries for creative writing modules. Ensure that you attach the correct cover sheet to your
work. Cover sheets are available on Blackboard and in a box on top of the postgraduate pigeonholes on
Attenborough floor 16.
Firmly fasten the pages of each copy together. Please do not submit your work in folders.
It is ESSENTIAL for you to keep a copy of your work.
All submitted course work should be placed in the School’s postgraduate postbox on Attenborough floor
16 landing, except for dissertations which should be handed in to the School office (Attenborough 1514).
You may submit coursework essays by post, as long as these are sent by Recorded Delivery and arrive in
the School Office by the stated deadline; you should allow 24 hours for mail to be forwarded by the
University’s central post room to the School.
If your piece of work does not meet all the School’s requirements, it will not be accepted as examinable
material.
Work submitted for assessment which does not meet the requirements of the examiners in respect of
presentation (including grammar, spelling and punctuation) will be referred back for amendment.
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Candidates who have not passed their coursework will not be permitted to proceed to the dissertation,
or, in the case of part-time students, will not be permitted to enter the second year of the course.
Essays and exercises are double marked. Work is usually marked within 21 days of submission. Work which is
submitted late, for any reason, falls outside of this schedule.
In addition, for dissertations:
•
•
•
•
Supervisors may read all of the rough draft, commenting on issues of argument, sources, structure,
presentation and grammar, but may read no more than one third of the final draft.
Dissertations should not be more than 15,000 words in length (25,000 words for the MAES 90-credit
version) including notes, but excluding the bibliography. This limit may only be exceeded by prior
permission of the supervisor.
Put your student number, not your name, on the dissertation.
Front cover (cardboard) of dissertation should bear same details as title page, i.e.
DISSERTATION TITLE
MA in Victorian Studies
University of Leicester
2015
CANDIDATE NUMBER (NOT NAME)
•
•
•
•
Students are required to submit three copies of their dissertation, word-processed and soft bound (also
called 'perfect bound'), by 15 September* of the year in which they submit their proposal, with a
completed Postgraduate Assessment Feedback: Written Work cover sheet placed in (but not bound into)
each copy.
We recommend that dissertations be bound by the University’s Print Services (website
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/printservices; drop-off and collection service via the Bookshop), who require one
day for binding or three days for printing/copying and binding. Enquiries to 0116 252 2851 or
printservices@le.ac.uk. You are free to select your own choice of colour for the cover.
Dissertations should be handed in at the School Office (Att.1514) and also submitted electronically on
Turnitin.
It may not be possible for dissertations submitted after 15 September* to be considered by the next
Board of Examiners. Thus, failure to submit by the deadline may mean the award of the degree, and the
opportunity to graduate, will be delayed.
* Or by the following Tuesday, where 15 September falls on a weekend or a Monday.
Turnitin plagiarism software is used in the School of English. In addition to two paper copies, you are also
required to submit each essay electronically via the Turnitin plagiarism-detection database on Blackboard:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Log on to Blackboard
Click on to your course title
Click on 'Assignments'
Click on 'View/Complete' for the relevant assignment
Fill in your name and the title of the essay
Click on 'Browse' and select the essay as you would an attachment to an email (the software accepts the
following file types: Word, Text, Postscript, PDF, HTML, and RTF)
Click 'Open' (this will return you to the Turnitin page)
Click 'Submit'
You will be sent an email to confirm that you have submitted your essay successfully. You will not be able to see
the originality report.
If you have any concerns about plagiarism you should talk to your supervisor, seminar tutor or personal tutor
about it.
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The University views academic integrity as one of the foundations of academic development. A key part of this is
the acknowledgement of the work of others. You must always be sure that you credit ideas, data, information,
quotations and illustrations to their original author. Not to do so is plagiarism: the repetition or paraphrasing of
someone else’s work without proper acknowledgement.
The University expects students to conduct their studies with exemplary standards of academic honesty and will
penalise students who submit work, or parts of work, that have been:
•
plagiarised;
•
completed with others for individual assessment (collusion);
•
previously submitted for assessment, including self-plagiarism;
•
prepared by others;
•
supplied to another for copying.
Plagiarism and collusion
Plagiarism is used as a general term to describe taking and using another’s thoughts and writings as one’s own.
Examples of forms of plagiarism include:
•
the verbatim (word for word) copying of another’s work without appropriate and correctly presented
acknowledgement;
•
the close paraphrasing of another’s work by simply changing a few words or altering the order of
presentation, without appropriate and correctly presented acknowledgement;
•
unacknowledged quotation of phrases from another’s work;
•
the deliberate and detailed presentation of another’s concept as one’s own;
•
reproduction of a student’s own work when it has been previously submitted and marked but is
presented as original material (self-plagiarism).
Any student who prepares or produces work with others and then submits it for assessment as if it were the
product of his/her individual efforts (collusion) will be penalised. Unless specifically instructed otherwise, all
work you submit for assessment should be your own and should not have been previously submitted for
assessment either at Leicester or elsewhere.
See also www.le.ac.uk/sas/assessments/plagiarism
Penalties
The University regards plagiarism and collusion as very serious offences and so they are subject to strict
penalties. The penalties that departments are authorised to apply are defined in the Regulations governing
student discipline (see www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation11 , paragraphs 11.63 to 11.78).
Avoiding Plagiarism and Poor Academic Practice
Check the Learning Development website for guidance on how to avoid plagiarism
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/study/plagiarism-tutorial
If you are in any doubt about what constitutes good practice, ask your personal/academic tutors for advice or
make an appointment with Learning Development for individual advice. You can book an appointment online by
visiting: www.le.ac.uk/succeedinyourstudies
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Notification of Ill Health and Other Mitigating Circumstances
The University recognises that students may suffer from a sudden illness or other serious event or set of
circumstances which adversely affects their ability to complete an assessment or the results they obtain for an
assessment. In such cases the mitigating circumstances regulations and procedures may be applied. These
regulations are designed to ensure the fair and consistent treatment of all students.
You must keep your department(s) informed at all times of any personal circumstances that may impact upon
your ability to study or undertake assessments. Tell your department(s) about any such circumstances at the
time they occur and supply supporting documentation (e.g. a medical certificate) as soon as possible and no
later than the relevant deadline. Normally, the deadline for submission of a mitigating circumstances claim will
be no later than five working days after the assessment(s) deadline(s) to which it relates.
See www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations/mitigation for full details of the mitigating circumstances regulations and
procedures, including the University’s definition of a mitigating circumstance.
Personal Support for Students
Departmental Student Support Arrangements
From discussion of academic progress, to friendly advice on personal matters; personal tutors are there to
provide support, advice and guidance on an individual level. Common topics for discussion may include course
changes, study progress, module choices, exam results, career opportunities or more personal problems such as
accommodation or financial difficulties. The Department’s personal tutor system operates in accordance with
the Code of Practice on Personal Support for Students: www.le.ac.uk/sas/quality/personaltutor
Your personal tutor will offer confidential advice and support on a range of matters, from official dealings with
the University, College or School (this includes advice on issues relating to modules on which your personal tutor
also teaches; as personal tutor their role is to provide you with support, not discipline) to guidance on how to
proceed in the event of a failure. It is in your interests to ensure that your personal tutor is kept informed about
anything that might affect your ability to fulfil your assignment and attendance obligations. Your personal tutor
will be able to put you in touch with a range of specialist advisers within the university, qualified to give
financial, medical and welfare advice.
The writing of references for potential employers is generally done by your personal tutor. Please do remember
to ask your personal tutor, though, before giving his or her name as a referee. It would also help your tutor if
you could provide an up-to-date curriculum vitae, and specific details about the position applied for.
Equal Opportunities
The School Equal Opportunities Officer is Dr Jonathan Taylor.
The School AcessAbility officer is Mr Simon Poole.
If you have any concerns related to equal opportunities (ethnicity, gender, disability, etc.), these may be raised
at a regular Postgraduate Student-Staff Committee meeting.
University Student Support Arrangements
AccessAbility Centre
The Centre offers a range of services to all students who have specific learning difficulties, such as dyslexia,
disabilities or long-term conditions. Staff offer one to one support, assessment of dyslexia, the co-ordination of
alternative examination arrangements and assistance with applications for the Disabled Students' Allowance.
The open access Centre acts as a resource base for students and staff and is a relaxed place for students to work.
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Its computers are equipped with specialised software for screen enlargement; essay planning and speech output
software is on the University network. The Centre has some specialised equipment (CCTV, enlarged keyboard,
and chairs) and some for loan (chairs, laptops and digital recorders).Low-level photocopying and printing
facilities are also available. The Centre welcomes self-referrals as well as referrals from academic staff.
Contact: AccessAbility Centre, David Wilson Library
Tel/minicom: +44 (0)116 252 5002 | Fax: +44 (0)116 252 5513 | accessable@le.ac.uk
www.le.ac.uk/accessability
Student Welfare Centre
The Student Welfare Centre offers wide ranging practical support, advice, and information for students.
Financial advice is offered, with information on budgeting and funding. Specialised staff can advocate over late
loans and other financial issues. Students can apply for hardship grants and loans through the Service; and
obtain assistance with applications to charities and trusts.
For international students, the Student Welfare Service organises various Welcome programmes throughout the
year. Expert immigration advice is available; students are strongly advised to renew their visas through the
scheme provided by Student Welfare. Specialised Officers also support students who experience financial or
personal problems. A specialist officer can provide information over housing contracts and can assist students
over disputes with neighbours/housemates.
Contact: Student Welfare Service, Percy Gee Building (First Floor).
Tel: +44 (0)116 223 1185 | Fax: 0116 223 1196 | welfare@le.ac.uk
www.le.ac.uk/welfare
Counselling and Wellbeing Service
This Service offers a range of expertise and support for the psychological aspects of health and wellbeing in the
context of your academic journey.
Services on offer include:
Student Counselling Support
Time-limited, free and confidential counselling on a one-to-one or group basis, as appropriate, addressing both
academic-related and personal issues.
For information see our website: www.le.ac.uk/counselling
Contact: Student Counselling Service
+44 (0)116 2231780 | counselling@le.ac.uk
Student Mental Wellbeing Support
Practical and emotional one-to-one and group support to students managing mental health issues at the
University.
Contact: Student Support (mental wellbeing)
+44 (0)116 252 2283 | mentalwellbeing@le.ac.uk
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/student-support-mental-wellbeing
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Student Healthy Living Service
The Student Healthy Living Service strives to help students enjoy a balanced life; the service helps individuals to
identify an approach to life which can improve their wellbeing, enhance study and reach their full potential. The
service is committed to the delivery of health and wellbeing activities that support students in developing life
skills. As well as supporting academic achievement, these skills are transferable and should prove beneficial
through the transition from University to the demands of employment and graduate careers. The Student
Healthy Living Service works closely with the Victoria Park Health Centre and also provides direction to
appropriate health care services. More information can be found on the Healthy Living Service website.
Contact: Student Healthy Living Service
+(0)116 223 1268 | healthyliving@le.ac.uk
go.le.ac.uk/healthyliving
These services are located at: 161 Welford Road, Leicester LE2 6BF
Health Care and Registering with a Doctor
Illness can affect any one of us at any time and for this reason the University strongly advises you to register
with a doctor in Leicester. The Victoria Park Health Centre (www.victoriaparkhealthcentre.co.uk), formally the
Freemen’s Common Health Centre, has expertise in student health and has provided medical care to the
University’s students for many years. The Health Centre is located conveniently close to the main-campus and
registration is free.
If when you come to University you are already under the care of a ‘specialised team’, have a known medical
condition including mental health or waiting for an appointment it is still advisable to register at the Victoria
Park Health Centre. Soon after arrival, make an appointment to discuss with one of the doctors who will then be
in a better position to communicate with the relevant doctors and help you to manage your condition to avoid
any unnecessary disruption to your studies. Please take with you information from your current doctor or
consultant which includes diagnosis, current management, including medication (provide a certified English
translation if the original is not in English). This is essential for international students as some conditions may be
managed differently in this country, particularly in relation to medication which may be licensed differently and
may need changing to something which is available to prescribe in this country.
More information about registering with a doctor and other health and well-being services can be found at:
http://www2.le.ac.uk/students/info/new/postgrad/health
Careers and Employability
Career Development Service
You need a first-class education; that’s a given. But you also need an edge, an advantage, a head-start in the
competitive graduate recruitment world. Based in the Students’ Union, the Career Development Service is here
to guide and support you from your arrival at Leicester through to graduation and beyond.
We want you to follow your passion. So whether you want to make a difference in the voluntary sector, reach
the top in high-flying business or be the next big thing in media, there are specially designed programmes and
activities here at Leicester that can support you in getting the skills, experiences and exposure you need.
Your development is a journey, and starting early is key. When you arrive at Leicester you’ll already be
registered on MyCareers (https://mycareers.le.ac.uk/home.html), our career management system. This is the
gateway to:
•
Booking one-to-one appointments with our career consultants for support with career planning, job
hunting, CVs and applications, and mock interviews;
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Booking workshops, such as mock assessment centres and psychometric testing;
Invitations to employer events;
Finding all the opportunities available exclusively for Leicester students such as paid internships,
volunteering, and enterprise and business start-up activities.
If you are looking for part time work whilst studying, make sure you sign up to Unitemps, based next to the
Career Development Service for opportunities on campus and in the local area.
Come and visit us in the Students’ Union and log onto your MyCareers account to get started. We’re here to
support you throughout your time at university so make the most of the services we offer, to make the most of
you.
Contact: Career Development Service, Level 0, Students’ Union, Percy Gee Building
0116 252 2004 | careershelp@le.ac.uk |www.le.ac.uk/careers
@uolcds | fb.com/uolcds
The School organises occasional events in collaboration with Martin Coffey of the Careers Service. Details are
circulated via email and via the postgraduate noticeboards as appropriate.
The School Senior Tutors for Careers and Employability are Dr Richa Dwor (S1) and Professor Martin Dzelzainis
(S2).
Personal Development Planning
Personal Development Planning (PDP) is designed to enable you to think about, and plan for, your own personal,
academic and career development. Throughout your degree you will be encouraged to reflect on your progress
and achievements, and to identify areas you wish to develop and improve on. PDP will help you to:
•
•
•
recognise the skills and abilities you are developing;
identify areas for improvement and development; and
think about how you can improve your employability and career prospects
To find out more about how the Department supports PDP, chat with your personal tutor. In addition, Learning
Development provides some more general information about what PDP is, and how you can engage with it:
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/personal-development-planning-pdp.
PDP is a structured and academically supported process intended to help students reflect on their academic,
personal and career development. During your course of study you will be given the opportunity to reflect on
your progress over the year, to identify your own strengths and areas of development, and to plan for your
future success.
The three key elements of Personal Development Planning (PDP) are:
Academic Development -- how can I improve my academic performance?
Personal Growth -- what can I do to get the most from my time at University?
Employability and Career Planning -- where do I want to be when I complete my course, and what can I do
to get help from there?
At Leicester, PDP is closely linked with the Personal Tutor programme. All MA students will be asked to complete
a progress review form, which is then used as a basis for discussion in meetings with their personal tutors each
semester. It is hoped that by introducing postgraduate students to PDP at the outset of their degrees, they will
come to consider this act of self-assessment as an integral part of their studies and their reflections on the
progress they are making at university. English School staff will assist students in their self-assessment of their
own academic, personal and career development, and in the formulation of research- and employability-related
strategies based on this process of self-appraisal. You should make an appointment to see your personal tutor
at least once a semester. He or she will be happy to discuss your progress on the course and to direct you
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towards appropriate resources and support. Postgraduate PDP forms, samples of which are included in the
appendices to this Handbook, have been designed as an aid to reflection and may be used to provide a focus for
discussion with your personal tutor. While PDP is optional, students are expected to have a formal meeting with
their Personal Tutor at least once a semester.
Further details about the PDP programme at Leicester are available at
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/careers/ld/resources/pdp, or, if you would like to discuss PDP further, please contact the
Course Director.
Feedback from Students
Student Feedback Questionnaires
Students are asked to complete a course questionnaire at the conclusion of the taught section of their course (at
the end of the spring term or beginning of the summer term).
The School uses questionnaire feedback within the process of reviewing individual modules and the course as a
whole.
The Course Director will respond to feedback verbally (where appropriate) at the end-of-course meeting and will
communicate actions taken via Blackboard.
Student-Staff Committees
The School Postgraduate Student-Staff Committee meets three times each year.
Representatives are drawn from each of the School’s MA programmes and also from the English Research (PhD)
programme. Volunteers are sought at the beginning of each academic year; the Students’ Union will circulate
details about Course Rep elections.
In 2014/15, the Postgraduate Staff-Student Committee will meet:
1.00pm, Wednesday 22 October 2014, in Att 1315
1.00pm, Thursday 4 March 2015, in Att 1315
1.00pm, Wednesday 13 May 2015, in Att 1315.
If you would like to raise an issue at a PGSSC meeting, please contact your course representative. (Details are
listed on Blackboard.)
Minutes of each meeting are posted on Blackboard; they are also forwarded to the School Meeting, the
Students’ Union Education Unit and to the College Academic Committee.
The University’s Code of Practice on the Work of Student-Staff Committees may be downloaded here:
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/quality/codes/documents/sscommittees.pdf
Societies
SPELL is the social and academic society for postgraduates in the School of English. We exist to nurture a lively
postgraduate community within the department, acting as the social hub for both MA and PhD students. The
society aims to support postgraduate students throughout their studies, whether that’s simply by offering a
chance to make new friends and catch up with old ones, or through the development of research skills and
interests at a workshop or Postgraduate Forum. Throughout the year we coordinate formal and informal events
to bring postgraduates together, from casual socialising in the pub and/or afternoon tea to academic workshops.
Regular events include an annual welcome reception, the Postgraduate Forum, Café Spell and a theatre trip, in
addition to special events such as the Shakespeare workshop, creative writing workshop and the summer picnic
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held over the past year. We also maintain links with other societies across the College, such as the New History
Lab.
The SPELL Committee is focused on reaching out to all postgraduates in the School of English and hope to run
activities that everyone can enjoy. Please get in touch with any member of the committee if you have any
suggestions/ ideas for the future. We look forward to meeting you in October.
The new membership year will begin at our welcome reception at the beginning of term.
If you would like to join the Society, please see the SPELL web pages on the School of English site
(www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/studentresources/societiesandcommittees) or join our Facebook Group
page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/208586385844425.
Safety and Security
The School Safety Officer is Mrs Carol Arlett.
Emergency Numbers
To summon the fire brigade, police, or ambulance from an internal phone:
dial 888
If there is no reply:
dial 9 then 999
From an external phone / payphone:
dial 999
Attenborough Building
The Attenborough Building is open from 8.00am to 6.00pm, Monday to Friday.
The fire alarm is tested once a week, usually on Thursday at 9.45am. If the alarm sounds at another time, please
exit the building via the stairs. Do not collect personal belongings. Follow any instructions issued by the fire
wardens. The assembly point is the area in front of the Mathematics Building.
Paternoster
In order to prevent the Paternoster from malfunctioning, students are asked to observe strictly the safety
instructions posted in each car.
Student IT Cards
If you need to order a replacement Student ID Card, please visit
http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/studentrecord/access.
Personal Belongings
Your personal belongings are not covered by the University’s insurance. You are therefore advised to check
whether your parents’ or family policies provide adequate protection. If not, private insurance arrangements
should be made.
A lost property service operates from the Security Lodge, which is situated at the far end of the Fielding Johnson
Building on Wyggeston Drive, University entrance No. 1.
Bicycles may be brought onto the main campus but must be placed in the cycle racks provided, and appropriate
security measures taken to help to prevent theft and damage. For advice on preventing cycle theft and details of
the University’s Coded Cycle Scheme visit:
www.le.ac.uk/estates/facilities_&_services/security/CodedCycleScheme.html
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Complaints and Academic Appeals Procedures
The University has robust systems in place governing the quality and standards of its degree programmes and
your experience as a student here. We are confident that, like the vast majority of students here, you will enjoy
and be satisfied with your course. In most instances your department will be able to resolve any issues that do
occur but we recognise that this will not always be possible. For this reason, the University has official
procedures that allow eligible cases to be formally reviewed.
Information about these procedures, including the relevant forms, can be found on the Student and Academic
Services website: see www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/regulations/appeals-complaints. These pages should be read
in conjunction with the University’s Regulations governing student appeals (www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation10)
and Regulations governing student complaints (www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation12).
Tutors
CLAIRE BROCK BA (Cardiff) MA (Cardiff) PhD (Warwick)
Room 1512, Attenborough Tower, 252 2533, cb178@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/clairebrock/profile
RICHA DWOR BA (British Columbia) MA PhD (Nottingham)
Room 1512, Attenborough Tower, 252 5337, rgd5@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/dr-richa-dwor
GOWAN DAWSON BA (East Anglia) MA (Nottingham) PhD (Sheffield)
Room 1413, Attenborough Tower, 252 2779, gd31@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/gowandawson
HOLLY FURNEAUX BA MA PhD (London)
Room 1511, Attenborough Tower, 252 2742, hf35@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/hollyfurneaux
FELICITY JAMES MA MSt DPhil (Oxford) FHEA
Room 1507, Attenborough Tower, 252 2199, fj21@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/felicityjames
GAIL MARSHALL BA (Durham) MA (Leeds) PhD (Cambridge)
Room 1313, Attenborough Tower, 252 2638, gm181@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/gailmarshall
JAMES MOORE PhD (Manchester)
School of Historical Studies
Room 105, 6 Salisbury Road, 229 7531, jm68@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/history/people/jmoore
JULIAN NORTH BA DPhil (Oxford)
Room 1308, Attenborough Tower, 252 2776, jrn8@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/juliannorth
RUTH PAGE BA, PhD (Birmingham)
Room 1509, Attenborough Tower, 252 1286, rep22@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/ruthpage
KEITH SNELL MA (Cambridge) PhD (Cambridge)
Centre for English Local History
Room 20, Marc Fitch House, Salisbury Road, 252 2763, kdm@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/historical/people/ksnell
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JONATHAN TAYLOR BA (Warwick) MA (Warwick) PhD (Loughborough)
Room 1513, Attenborough Tower, 252 2778, jt265@le.ac.uk
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/dr-jonathan-taylor
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Marking Criteria
EN7001 Bibliography Presentation
Fail
Pass
Merit
Distinction
Use of academic
referencing
conventions
Minor errors in the
majority of entries/
major systematic
errors
Minor errors in the
minority of
entries/minor
systematic errors
Minor errors in a
small minority of
entries
Virtually faultless
Range of sources
Limited
Satisfactory
Evidence of breadth
Very wide
Relevance and
appropriateness of
sources
The minority of items The majority of items A very large majority All items very
relevant and
relevant and
of items relevant and relevant and
appropriate
appropriate
appropriate
appropriate
Rationale and
procedures for
selection
Unsatisfactory
rationale and
procedures
Clarity of
presentation
Lacking in coherence Satisfactory
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Satisfactory rationale Very good rationale, Sophisticated and
and procedures
thorough procedures clear rationale, very
thorough procedures
Coherent
Lucid
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EN7001 Written Exercise
Mark
Criteria
Distinction:
70+
Excellent coverage of relevant materials
Sophisticated analysis of concepts and arguments
Marked independence of thinking
Excellent organization and illustration of materials
Excellent range of reference to the appropriate materials
Clear academic writing in a discriminating register
Near-faultless presentation in accordance with the appropriate academic conventions.
Merit:
60–69
Thorough coverage of relevant materials
A very good standard of analysis of concepts and arguments
Substantial evidence of independent thinking
Very clear and effective organization and illustration of materials
Wide range of reference to the appropriate materials
Clear academic writing in an appropriate register
Very good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions with evidence of
careful proofreading and correction.
Pass:
50–59
Fair coverage of relevant materials, but with some gaps
Evidence of critical analysis of concepts and arguments
Some evidence of independent thinking
Sound organization and illustration of materials
A fair range of reference to the appropriate materials, but with some significant omissions
Writing in an academic register with satisfactory levels of precision and clarity
Good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions, but evidence of
insufficiently thorough proof-reading and of some shortcomings in referencing, bibliography,
citation and matters of style.
Fail:
below 50
Significant oversights in the coverage of relevant materials
Little critical analysis of concepts and arguments
Little evidence of independent thinking
Weakly conceived, with a lack of clarity and purpose in the organization and illustration of the
materials
Writing in an inappropriate register, with lack of clarity and precision
Inaccurate presentation, evidence of weak or inconsistent use of academic conventions, poor
proof-reading and serious problems with referencing, bibliography, citation, formatting or style.
N.B. Work of whatever level with this kind of inaccurate presentation will be referred for
correction.
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Coursework
Mark
Criteria
Distinction:
70+
Comprehensive coverage of relevant issues
Independent and effective research
Sophisticated analysis of texts and concepts
Marked independence of thinking
Excellent organization and illustration of arguments
Excellent range of reference to the appropriate primary and secondary sources
Clear and lucid academic writing in a discriminating register
Near-faultless presentation in accordance with the appropriate academic conventions.
Thorough coverage of relevant issues
Substantial evidence of effective research
A very good standard of analysis of texts and concepts
Substantial evidence of independent thinking
Very clear and effective organization and illustration of arguments
Wide range of reference to the appropriate primary and secondary sources
Clear academic writing in an appropriate register
Very good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions with evidence of
careful proofreading and correction.
Fair coverage of relevant issues, but with some gaps
Evidence of research
Evidence of critical analysis of texts and concepts
Some evidence of independent thinking
Sound organization and illustration of arguments
A fair range of reference to the appropriate primary and secondary sources, but with some
significant omissions
Writing in an academic register with satisfactory levels of precision and clarity
Good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions, but evidence of
insufficiently thorough proof-reading and of some shortcomings in referencing, bibliography,
citation and matters of style.
Merit:
60–69
Pass:
50–59
Fail:
below 50
Significant oversights in the coverage of relevant issues
Very little evidence of research
Little critical analysis of texts and concepts
Little evidence of independent thinking
Weakly conceived, with a lack of clarity and purpose in the organization and illustration of the
argument
A limited range of reference to primary and secondary sources
Writing in an inappropriate register, with lack of clarity and precision
Inaccurate presentation, evidence of weak or inconsistent use of academic conventions, poor
proof-reading and serious problems with referencing, bibliography, citation, formatting or style.
N.B. Work of whatever level with this kind of inaccurate presentation will be referred for
correction.
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