June 29, 2010 Agenda

BOARD OF GOVERNORS
REGULAR MEETING
June 29, 2010; 1 p.m.
S103B, Kelowna Campus
AGENDA
OPEN SESSION
Attachment
1
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Recommended Motion
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the June 29, 2010, OC Board open
session meeting agenda is approved”.
2
DECLARATION OF CONFLICT
3
CONSENT AGENDA
Recommended Motion
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Consent Agenda be approved as
presented”.
3.1
MINUTES – May 18, 2010
A
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
WRITTEN REPORTS
President’s Report (J. Hamilton)
Education Council Report (R. Gee)
B
C
4
BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES
5.
5.1
PRESENTATIONS
Students – SIFE Presentation (J. Hamilton)
6
6.1
NEW BUSINESS/RESOLUTIONS
Strategic Plan (Final Report) (J. Hamilton)
Recommended Motion:
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Board of Governors approve
the revised Strategic Plan 2010-2015 and Key Directions as
presented”.
6.2
Key Performance Indicators (S. Koehle)
Approximate
Time
.
Under
separate
cover by
email
D
OC Board of Governors
Open Session Meeting AGENDA
S103B, Kelowna Campus, June 29, 2010
6.3
Accountability Plan and Report (S. Koehle)
Recommended Motion:
E
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Board of Governors approve
the Accountability Plan and Report 2009-2013 as
presented”.
6.4
Education Council (R. Gee)
Program Approvals
Recommended Motion:
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of
Governors approve the revision to the Computer Information
Systems Diploma, as recommended by Education Council and
as presented here”
7
7.1
7.2
7.3
VERBAL REPORTS
Board Chair Report (L. Kayfish)
President’s Report (J. Hamilton)
Student Report from ACCC (P. Bourbeau)
8
TOPICS FOR NEXT MEETING
9
OTHER BUSINESS
10
FOR THE GOOD OF THE INSTITUTION
11
DATE OF NEXT MEETING October 26, 2010, Kelowna Campus
12
ADJOURNMENT
F
.
.
OC Board of Governors
Open Session Meeting AGENDA
S103B, Kelowna Campus, June 29, 2010
Consent Agenda Resolutions
Attachment A
Item 3.1
Recommended Motion
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the May 18, 2010, open session minutes be
approved.”
June 29, 2010
Item 3.1 – Attachment A
MINUTES OF REGULAR MEETING OF THE
OKANAGAN COLLEGE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Open Session
Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 10:45 a.m.
Room S103B, Kelowna Campus
Members Present:
M. Conlin
B. Cooke
R. Gee
J. Hamilton (President)
B. Hughes
P. Johnson
L. Kayfish (Chair)
Y. Pinder (Vice Chair)
L. Rozniak
T. Styffe
L. Swite
Regrets:
P. Bourbeau
J. Lister
A. Nelson
Board Secretary:
L. Le Gallee
Vice Presidents:
B. Eby
A. Hay
S. Koehle
Directors:
A. Coyle
Observers:
L. Grahame, OC Admin. Association
Regrets:
C. Athay, Student, Salmon Arm
J. Gabanowicz, Student, Kelowna
C. McRobb, BCGEU Vocational
J. Petersen, Student, Penticton
T. Walters, OCFA
Guests:
H. Schneider, G. Dickson, A. March (10:45-11:15 a.m.)
There being a quorum present, the Chair called the meeting to order at 10:50 a.m.
1.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Motion: B. Cooke/Y. Pinder
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the May 18, 2010, OC Board open session meeting agenda is
approved”
CARRIED
2.
DECLARATION OF CONFLICT
No conflicts were declared.
3
CONSENT AGENDA
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
BOARD MEETING – Open Session
10:45 a.m., May 18, 2010, Kelowna Campus
Page 2 of 4
Motion: T. Styffe/B. Hughes
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Consent Agenda be approved as presented”.
CARRIED
Items Approved:
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the March 30, 2010, Open Session minutes are approved.”
4.
BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES
5.
5.1
PRESENTATIONS/DELEGATIONS
Regional Dean- Central Okanagan (H. Schneider)
H. Schneider, G. Dickinson (RAC, Chair), and A. March joined the meeting.
Points covered included:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Regional Advisory Committee now has 21 members;
There are several new members representative of IHA, CORD, District of West Kelowna; the
RAC is hoping to increase alumni participation;
The College has hit a milestone – there are more students in 2010 than in 2005;
There have been improvements in Facilities in Kelowna; the Acland Road trades facility opens on
May 21st;
Arts and Foundation program FTEs have increased substantially due to a number of reasons:
quality arts program; when the economy shows a decline, enrolments increase as people
upgrade; age demographics also play a role (in university transfer programs);
Challenges faced by the Dean’s office include: facilities renewal; trades students are still off
campus; the technology sector is going to continue to grow; as the Central Okanagan continues
to grow, there will be challenges meeting the needs; parking is still an issue. There has been a
transportation study done, this may lead to some changes in the transit system.
The President recognized the contributions made to the Campus by the Regional Dean’s office. The
Centre for Learning was largely a project H. Schneider contributed greatly to.
Guests left at 11:15 a.m.
6.
6.1
6.1.1
NEW BUSINESS/RESOLUTIONS
Education Council Submission (R. Gee)
Program Approvals
Motion: R. Gee/Y. Pinder
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the revisions to the
Early Childhood Education Diploma, as recommended by Education Council and as presented
here”
CARRIED
Motion R. Gee/M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the new program:
Advanced Certificate in Communication, as recommended by Education Council and as presented
here”
CARRIED
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
BOARD MEETING – Open Session
10:45 a.m., May 18, 2010, Kelowna Campus
Page 3 of 4
Motion R. Gee/M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the revisions to the
ABE Transfer Credit Policy and the Transfer Credit Policy, as recommended by Education Council
and as presented here”
The Board was assured that the College is not lowering standards in order to make this change. 50% is a
pass.
The Registrar’s office is tasked with ensuring the calendar notation will state that even though the course
receives transfer credit this does not guarantee admission.
This change does not apply to vocational programs; they still need 70%.
CARRIED
Motion R. Gee/M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approves the revision to the
mathematics entrance requirements, reflecting the new secondary mathematics courses, for the
following programs: Trades Technology Teacher Education (TTTE); Aircraft Maintenance Engineer
(AME) M – License; Audio Engineering and Music Production; Home Inspection; Pharmacy
Technician; Residential Building Drafting Technician; Special Needs Worker; Education Assistant,
and Hearing Assistant Programs, as recommended by Education Council and as presented”.
CARRIED
Motion: R. Gee/M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the revisions to the
Media and Cultural Studies Program, as recommended by Education Council and as presented
here”
CARRIED
Motion R. Gee/ M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the new program
Human Kinetics Diploma Pathway to the Bachelor of Business Administration, as recommended
by Education Council and as presented here”
This is a bridge/pathway the Business department has developed to accommodate HKD students who
want to continue in the business program; it is possible to take this in Penticton through Distance
Education.
CARRIED
Motion: R. Gee/M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the revisions to the
Network and Telecommunications Engineering Technology Diploma, as recommended by
Education Council and as presented here”
This change was necessitated due to the fact the accreditation body stated calculus is needed instead of
the math that was listed.
This change should not impact enrolment, the entrance requirements remain the same.
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
BOARD MEETING – Open Session
10:45 a.m., May 18, 2010, Kelowna Campus
Page 4 of 4
CARRIED
Motion: R. Gee/M. Conlin
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Okanagan College Board of Governors approve the revisions to the
Bachelor of Computer Information Systems Degree, as recommended by Education Council and
as presented here”
CARRIED
Students will have to attend Kelowna for the second- fourth years of the program.
In other business, Education Council has scheduled a meeting to approve graduands next Friday.
6.2
6.2.1
Finance and Audit Committee (B. Cooke)
Audited Financial Statements – Report from In Camera
The audited financial reports were tabled and approved at the morning In Camera meeting. This was a
very clean, good audit representing an accurate picture of the College to March 31, 2010. The
Committee meeting was attended by the Auditor General’s office.
7.
7.1
VERBAL REPORTS
Board Chair Report (L. Kayfish)
Recent events included:
• Reception last night that was attended by broad representation from the community;
• The Chair attended the SIFE National Competition in Calgary last week. This was a great
opportunity to show the students how they are supported by the administration at the College;
• June is convocation month;
• The Chair will be attending ACCC in early June; followed by a MBCC meeting in Vancouver June
14th.
7.2
President’s Report (J. Hamilton)
The President also attended the SIFE National Competition. Okanagan College’s students ranked with
Ryerson and Memorial for the top business schools across Canada.
Members were directed to contact him if they have questions with regard to his written report.
He recently met with the students who have put together the hockey team; they are working on a
succession plan so the team can continue.
8.
TOPICS FOR NEXT MEETING
9.
OTHER BUSINESS
10.
FOR THE GOOD OF THE INSTITUTION
The Chair, T. Styffe and L. Swite are golfing in the Foundation Golf Tournament on May 27th.
The Chair thanked the Vice Chair for attending some events in his place in the last couple of months.
11.
DATE OF NEXT MEETING
June 29, 2010, Kelowna Campus
12.
ADJOURNMENT
The meeting adjourned at 11:50 a.m.
Open Session– June 29, 2010
Item 3.2.1 – Attachment B
President’s Report
to the Okanagan College Board of Governors
June 2010
Student Success ƒ
ƒ
In a series of three ceremonies on Friday June 4 and Saturday June 5, Okanagan College honoured more than
1,150 students receiving credentials; degrees, diplomas, associate degrees, certificates and trades
qualifications. Graduates from the Vernon campus will be recognized in a ceremony in Vernon on June 28. The
Kelowna campus will host Summer Convocation for vocational and continuing studies graduates on June 29.
SIFE Okanagan was honoured recently when they received with the Spirit of Kelowna award from Kelowna
Mayor Sharon Shepherd.
Promoting and Recruiting
ƒ
On June 5, we hosted the Convocation Dinner, at which we recognized Honorary Fellows Peter Haubrich,
President and Founder of the Okanagan Research & Innovation Council, and Gray Monk Estate Winery owners
Trudy and George Heiss, as well as Dorothy Tinning who will be named Honorary Fellow during the College’s
Summer Convocation on June 29 and the recipient of the 2010 Distinguished Service Award, former Regional
Dean of the Shuswap Revelstoke region, Lynda Wilson.
ƒ On May 27, Okanagan College hosted a mini-Experience Okanagan College event for Kelowna Secondary
School students. Grade 10, 11 and 12 teachers selected sample College classes and brought over students in
blocks to attend classes and experience a College lecture. Eighteen of our faculty members gave their time for
lectures, and 19 teachers and approximately 400 students attended from KSS.
ƒ Continuing Studies are, again, running summer Camps in a variety of interest areas for students entering grades
2 through 9. The purpose of these camps is to offer fun and educational programs to pique interest and
enthusiasm among K-12 students.
ƒ The 2010-11 calendar is now online and is the first truly dynamic calendar at Okanagan College. The project,
has been a collaboration between the Registrar’s Office and IT Services. Students can now click on each
course in a program outline and view the course description including prerequisites etc. Additional features will
be added over the summer including a Program Search feature by campus, credential, subject etc. as well as
the ability to display program information from the Calendar directly on department websites. ƒ A new web service from the Education Advising team is proving to be a bonus for students looking for additional
information about Okanagan College. Two weeks ago the Ask An Advisor webpage was set up to provide quick
service for current and prospective students looking for answers outside of regular operating hours.
President’s Report to the Board – June 2010 pg. 1 ƒ
At a recent Revelstoke farmer’s market, Okanagan College’s Carol Fitchett and Claudette Kendel spent time
promoting Okanagan College, answering questions from the general public and giving out information about
upcoming courses and programs. Cultural and Social Diversity ƒ
The Tim Horton’s franchise from Salmon Arm and Sicamous won the Corporate Division Award at the Disability
Resource Network of BC’s annual conference, in Vancouver. Currently, this franchise employs 15 people with
disabilities, six of whom are Okanagan College students. The award was presented by Okanagan College ASE
Coordinator, Salmon Arm Campus, Robyn Rossworn.
Employee Development ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Ed Benoit has been selected as the interim Regional Dean for the Central Okanagan, while Heather Schneider
covers the position of Dean, Science, Technology and Health. Ed has spent the past three years at the
Penticton Campus as the Campus and Continuing Studies Manager for the South Okanagan and Similkameen
region.
As a follow-up to the “Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is” fitness challenge, the people at Campus Rec are
now organizing the “Spring into Summer” Fitness Challenge for college employees. I recently attended the ACCC conference in Niagara Falls, Ontario, with Lance, Phillippe and a number of other
Okanagan College colleagues. A full 2 ½ days of keynote speakers, sessions and networking all centred on the
theme Transforming Communities Through Learning. Our own Joanna Campbell was part of an extremely wellreceived panel discussion about the challenges facing President and Board Assistants. Four Regions of Equal Value ƒ
Last week, Andrew Hay, Bob Eby, Allan Coyle and I travelled to Nelson. BC to meet with Selkirk College and
College of the Rockies, in support of the Memorandum of Understanding we have with them (and TRU and
UBCO) to collaborate to provide an integrated range of post secondary learning opportunities within the
Southern Interior region of BC.
Quality in Teaching and Learning ƒ
ƒ
Residential Construction students, led by instructor Ken Radalet, are working with partners from the Canadian
Home Builders’ Association of the Central Okanagan, Melcor Developments and Distinctive Developments to
build a home in Black Mountain. Students from the program were joined by dignitaries, partners and the media
on May 18th to launch this Home for Learning project in Kelowna.
While in Ontario for ACCC, I took the opportunity to visit Durham College, with whom we recently signed “The
College Sustainable Building Consortium.” (Other partners on that agreement are Lethbridge College and Nova
Scotia Community College). This was a chance to see both their Oshawa and Whitby campuses including
some of their newest buildings, constructed to the LEED gold standard.
Aboriginal Communities
ƒ
James Coble organized a Traditional Okanagan Smudge Ceremony, led by Westbank First Nation Elder
Delphine Derickson at the KLO campus on Friday June 18 to honour Okanagan College employee, Ethan
Baptiste, killed in a car accident on June 8th.
Facilities ƒ
Lance and I were delighted to cut the ribbon on our newest trades training facility on Acland Road in Kelowna on
Friday May 21st. We were joined by John Haller, Dean of Trades & Apprenticeship, students, neighbours and
partners as well as MLA Norm Letnick, and Deputy Mayor Kevin Craig. The 9,890 square-foot space has been
leased for three years to accommodate growth in trades programming. Nearly all of the College’s plumbing
programs will be delivered at Acland Road, which will free up space for additional programming at the Penno
Road facility. The new space includes a mock house for students to work on, two shops, two classrooms and
two offices. President’s Report to the Board – June 2010 pg. 2 Open Session - Consent Agenda
Item 3.2.2 - Attachment C
Report from R. Gee, Chair, Education Council
June 2010
Since my last report, Education Council met on June 3. The agenda included many new and
revised courses, as well as a program revision, a policy revision (not requiring Board approval),
approval of graduates, and election of chair and vice-chair.
The Operations Subcommittee met on May 28 to approve graduates. There will be another
meeting (probably) on June 25 to approve gradates for the June 29 convocation.
One of the Education Council subcommittees has been working hard at making suggestions to
improve the Okanagan College calendar. Many of these suggestions have been implemented.
You can see the results at http://okanagan.bc.ca/calendar.
Education Council approved the following candidates for graduation.
Program
Automotive Collision Repair/Painting and Refinishing
# of students
15
The new vice-chair of Education Council is Michelle Nicholson, a member of the Business
Administration department, representing the Central Okanagan.
The new chair of Education Council is the old chair, Rick Gee, a member of the Computer
Science department, representing Science and Technology.
May 28 Operations Committee – Approved the following candidates for graduation.
Note that this was the first graduating class for three of the programs listed.
Program
# of students
Advanced Culinary Arts diploma
3
Associate of Arts degree
54
Associate of Science degree
9
Bachelor of Business Administration (Honours) degree
8
Bachelor of Business Administration degree
95
Bachelor of Computer Information Systems degree
1
Business Administration certificate
1
Business Administration diploma
99
Business Administration Post-Diploma certificate
3
Business Studies certificate
4
Carpentry Joinery Pre-apprenticeship certificate (Kelowna)
9
Civil Engineering Technology diploma
10
Commercial Aviation diploma
11
Computer Information Systems diploma
9
Criminal and Social Justice diploma
14
Early Childhood Education diploma
7
Open Session - Consent Agenda
Item 3.2.2 - Attachment C
Electronic Engineering Technology diploma
4
General Studies diploma
8
Home Support/Resident Care Attendant certificate (Penticton)
15
Home Support/Resident Care Attendant certificate (Vernon)
28
Human Kinetics diploma (first graduating class)
10
Legal Administration certificate (BCcampus)
1
Media and Cultural Studies diploma (first graduating class)
4
Network and Telecommunications Engineering Technology diploma
9
Office Management certificate
1
Trades Technology Teacher Education
9
Water Quality and Environmental Engineering Technology diploma
2
Writing and Publishing diploma (first graduating class)
2
Total Candidates for Graduation
430
The Operations committee also approved the following awards:
•
•
•
•
•
Governor General’s Silver Academic Medal for the graduate who has successfully
completed a baccalaureate program on a full-time basis with the highest graduating
grade average – Lisa Carmen Marie Plamondon (BBA, 94.84%)
Governor General’s Collegiate Bronze Academic Medal for the graduate who has
successfully completed an associate degree or diploma program on a full-time basis with
the highest graduating grade average – Sarah Melody Gibson (WQEET, 94.79%).
Okanagan College Academic Medals for the students, full-time or part-time, graduating
from a baccalaureate degree program with the highest graduating grade average in their
program - Lisa Carmen Marie Plamondon (BBA, 94.84%) and Robert Grmek (BCIS,
92.55%).
Associate of Science Medal for the graduand with the highest graduating grade average
in the Associate of Science degree program – Andrew Michael John (88.26%).
President’s Awards for Diploma Programs to the two graduands who have completed an
associate degree or diploma on a full-time basis with the highest graduating grade
average – Reid Darren Shillington (BUAD, 94.63%) and Julianne Christy Daase (AA,
93.45%). Note that the recipient of the Governor General’s Collegiate Bronze Medal is
excluded.
Open Session– June 29, 2010
Item 6.2 – Attachment D
Submission of Information from Senior Staff to the Board of Governors Report Title: KPI Report to the Board Date: June 21, 2010 Background Information: In November of 2008, the Board approved a set of draft Key Performance Indicators. These KPIs are intended to provide an overview of the College’s progress and performance as measured against a number of benchmarks and baseline levels. The attached “Key Performance Indicators Report” provides an update for the Board’s review, using the most up‐to‐date information available. Action Required: For information and review. Comments from the President: Report prepared and supported by: Jan O’Brien (supported by Allan Coyle and Steve Koehle) Information could include: • Purpose • History • Other relevant information • For consultation • For information • For approval (including resolution) Key Performance Indicators Report
Presented to Okanagan College Board of Governors
June 29, 2010
Draft 6.2
Executive Summary
A draft set of 23 key performance indicators (KPIs) was approved by the Board in November
2008. The KPIs fall into three categories: student, employee, and organizational indicators.
Almost half of these are student indicators. Three of these KPIs do not yet have a data source
available and are not reported on here.
A comprehensive review of the multiple data sources that inform our key performance indicator
results this year reflects the continued pattern of overall institutional success. Most student
related indicators remained stable in the reporting period with high satisfaction with quality (93
per cent) and high goal achievement (86 per cent). Employee survey results show a statistically
significant increase in those who would recommend Okanagan College as an employer. Several
new items were added to the 2009 employee survey, and the results will now form the baseline
for future comparison. In terms of organizational effectiveness, space utilization rates continue to
improve for all four campuses. Overall and aboriginal enrolments continue to exceed targeted
levels.
Students
Overall student satisfaction remains high, with 89% of students indicating they would
recommend OC to others and 93% expressing satisfaction with the quality of their education.
Student satisfaction with the quality of their education has remained stable for the last four years,
ranging between 93 and 96 per cent, and close to the provincial average. The proportion of
students who would recommend Okanagan College has increased by 2% per cent from 2009 to
89 per cent in 2010. The percentage of international students who would recommend the college
went from 79 to 90 per cent in the same period. Student satisfaction with transfer experience is a
provincial, system-level measure. Over 83 per cent of Okanagan College students were satisfied
with their transfer in 2009, up from 81 per cent the year before. The percentage of students
satisfied with facilities went from 86 to 90 per cent this year over last. About three quarters of
aboriginal college students indicated that they feel their culture is respected and valued. The
proportion of students who felt they achieved their educational goal decreased from 91 to 86 per
cent (a statistically significant decrease). However, there is no statistically significant difference
in the percentage of aboriginal students who felt they achieved their most important objective (90
per cent in 2008 and 88 per cent in 2009). Fewer students were employed in jobs related to their
training in the Okanagan in 2009 over 2008 and against the province in 2009 (for all students and
aboriginal students).
Employees
There are five employee KPIs, two of which have comparative data. Ninety-six per cent of
employees feel they know how to do their job, the same percentage in 2007 and 2009. The
percentage of employees who would recommend the college as an employer increased
significantly from 2007 to 2009 from 77 to 82 per cent.
ii Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Institution
Okanagan College produced 5, 019 full-time equivalent students in programs funded by ALMD,
with a target of 4,801 ministry-funded seats, or a utilization rate of 105%. All campuses
improved their space utilization numbers from 2008 to 2009. Aboriginal FTE and headcount
numbers have both increased from 2006 with 321 and 857 respectively in 2006 and 509 and
1140 in 2009. Only a few students study abroad, and these are all currently from business
administration. Okanagan College received 50 per cent of the students from our region who
immediately transitioned to post secondary education in the academic year 2007-08 (most recent
data). The Okanagan College Region has seen a 6 per cent increase in the immediate-entry
transition rate since 2001-02.
iii Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Contents Executive Summary .................................................................................................................... ii Background ................................................................................................................................. 1 Student KPIs ............................................................................................................................... 2 KPI 4 ....................................................................................................................................... 2 KPI 3. ...................................................................................................................................... 4 KPI 15 ..................................................................................................................................... 4 KPI 21 ..................................................................................................................................... 5 KPI 1 ....................................................................................................................................... 6 KPI 18 ..................................................................................................................................... 6 KPI 2 ....................................................................................................................................... 7 KPI 19 ..................................................................................................................................... 8 Employee KPIs ........................................................................................................................... 9 KPI 7 ................................................................................................................................... 9 KPI 8 ................................................................................................................................... 9 KPI 9 ................................................................................................................................... 9 KPI 11 . .............................................................................................................................. 9 KPI 16 ............................................................................................................................... 9 Organizational Effectiveness KPIs ........................................................................................... 10 KPI 12 ................................................................................................................................... 10 KPI 13 ................................................................................................................................... 11 KPI 20 ................................................................................................................................... 11 KPI 23 ................................................................................................................................... 12 KPI 14 ................................................................................................................................... 12 Appendix 1: Other Measures of Interest .............................................................................. 13 Appendix 2: Glossary ........................................................................................................... 17 iv Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Background
In May 2008, a committee was formed with a mandate to develop a set of KPIs for the college.
In November 2008, a draft set of 23 KPIs was approved by the Board of Governors. With time
and experience, this set is expected to be refined to approximately 10 KPIs in the future. These
KPIs cover student success, employee satisfaction, and institutional effectiveness. Three KPIs do
not yet have subscribed data sources and we are not yet able to track these:
KPI 5
KPI 10
KPI 16
Rank of College (Benchmark survey on student engagement)
Rank of College (Benchmark survey on employee engagement)
Sustainability (Benchmark survey on organizational sustainability)
A determination of an appropriate instrument for the above three KPIs is to be completed
following review of the alternatives.
For the other 20 measures, there are data available. Some come from internal sources, such as
student and employee surveys. These provide internal baseline comparisons. Others are sourced
from external data sets, such as the provincial student outcomes surveys, and these allow for
benchmarking against provincial comparators. Since the establishment of institutional KPIs in
2008, we have two or more years of data for most of the indicators. Where available, data for
previous years are included for informational purposes. A glossary is available in Appendix 2.
1
Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Studen
nt KPIs
Almost half
h (10) of th
he indicators address stuudent satisfaaction and suuccess. Thesee indicators also
include separate
s
item
ms for aborigginal and inteernational stuudents. The following chharts show thhe
data overr four years compared
c
too the provinccial average, where appliicable. Note response daata
from BG
GS and APPS
SO are too feew for Aboriiginal reporting.
KPI 4 Stud
dents sattisfied with
w overall quality of
educ
cation
source: DACSO
100%
80%
60%
40%
95%
94%
95%
95%
%
95%
%
95%
94%
93%
20%
0%
2008
2007
2006
Provin
nce
2009
9
OC
Stude
ent satissfied witth the ovverall qu
uality of their education
n 100%
sourrce: BGS
80%
60%
98%
97%
98%
96%
%
96%
%
96%
40%
20%
0%
20
007
2
Provincce
2008
OC
Key Performance Indicators Report
R
| Okannagan Collegge
2009
Students ssatisfied
d with ovverall qu
uality off ed
ducation
n
source: APPSSO
100%
90%
80%
70%
98%
93%
60%
50%
93%
89%
40%
95%
94%
%
96%
%
94%
95%
95%
%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2006
2007
2008
P
Province
2
2009
OC
C
KPIs 6 and
a 22 Studen
nts who would rrecomme
end OC
source: SSS
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
84%
90%
70
0%
2007
79%
2
2008
All Students
87%
79%
2009
89%
90%
2010
0
Internattional Studentss
3
Key Performance Indicators Report
R
| Okannagan Collegge
2010
KPI 3 Studen
nts satis
sfied witth their transfer
t
r experie
ence
(All)
sou
urce: DACSO
O
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
89%
87%
86%
06
200
8
85%
81%
%
81%
2007
2008
P
Province
OC
C
KPI 15 Student satisffaction w
with facilities
source: SSS
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
83%
90
0%
86%
90%
2007
20
008
2009
2010
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87
7%
83%
2009
KPI 21 Aborig
ginal stu
udents who
w feel their cu
ulture is
respec
cted and
d valued
d at OC
source
e: AASS
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
5
65%
67
7%
2008
20
009
Key Performance Indicators Report
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The folloowing KPIs indicate
i
studdent success.
KPI 1 Stud
dents wh
ho achie
eve theirr educattional go
oal
(All)
sou
urce: DACSO
O
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
88%
83%
9
90%
89%
91%
%
89%
88
8%
86%
30%
20%
10%
0%
06
200
2007
2009
2008
Prrovince
OC
C
KPI 18 Stud
dents who
w
ach
hieve th
heir edu
ucation
nal
goal (Aborigi
(
inal)
sou
urce: DACSO
O
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
90%
89%
8
80%
71%
30%
20%
91%
90%
%
91%
88%
10%
0%
200
06
2007
Prrovince
6
2008
OC
C
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2009
KPI 2 Stu
udents employe
e
ed in job
bs related to their
training (Alll)
sou
urce: DACSO
O
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
68%
7
76%
71%
57%
87
7%
74%
%
70%
71%
20%
10%
0%
06
200
2007
2008
Prrovince
2009
OC
C
Stu
udents employed
d in jobss related
d to theiir training
so
ource: APPSO
120%
100%
80%
60%
95%
40%
94
4%
95%
%
94%
94%
94%
91%
%
95%
93%
%
95%
20%
0%
2007
2006
2008
P
Province
2
2009
OC
C
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2010
Stu
udents e
employed
d in jobss related
d to theiir training
s
source: BGS
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
80%
80%
89%
81%
86%
79%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2007
2008
P
Province
009
20
OC
C
KPI 19 Stu
udents e
employed in jobs
s related
d to their
training
g (Aborig
ginal)
sou
urce: DACSO
O
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
75%
72%
79%
74%
73%
71%
20%
10%
0%
2007
2008
Prrovince
8
OC
C
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009
20
Employee KPIs
The next five KPIs seek to measure employee satisfaction. Each of these indicators’ data is from
the internal employee survey. Note that two of the questions have two years of data while three
questions were asked only in 2009.
KPI 7 Employees who would recommend OC as an employer. KPI 8 Employees who feel they know how to do their job. KPI 9 Employees who feel they are achieving their goals. KPI 11 Employees who feel their region is valued. KPI 16 Employee satisfaction with facilities. Employee Satisfaction
source: ESS 150%
100%
50%
79%
96%
82%
0%
0%
96%
68%
0%
0%
2007
2009
KPI 7 Recommend OC
KPI 8 Know how to do job
KPI 9 Achieving goals
KPI 11 Region is valued
KPI 16 Satisfaction with facilities
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Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
71%
65%
Organiizational Effective
eness KP
PIs
The last five
f KPIs illlustrate organnizational efffectiveness..
KPI 12 FTE U
Utilizatio
on
9,000 8,000 693 6,488 6,6
7,000 5,827 5,209 6,000 5,000 4,350 4
4,268 4,020 4,160 8,095 7,5
527 8 7,198
6,873 5,019 4,801 4,6
697 4,600 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 ‐
007
20
2008
OC ALMD FTEE
ALMD Target
2009
OC TTotal FTE
2010
Total Target
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KPI 13 Space U
Utilizatio
on
MD, Revelstoke
e included in 2
2008 Salmon A
Arm
source: ALM
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
65%
30%
70%
7
68%
75%
71%
60%
76%
%
80%
75%
64%
60%
50%
48
8%
20%
71%
56%
49%
10%
0%
Kelow
wna
Vernon
2006
Penticton
2007
2008
Salmo
on Arm
2009
KPI 20 Aborriginal FTEs and
d Headc
count
source: for FY CDW Octt 2009, 2008
1200
1000
800
600
1140
891
85
57
400
623
200
321
370
462
509
0
2006
20
007
FT
TE
11
2008
2009
9
Headco
ount
Key Performance Indicators Report
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KPI 23 Num
mber of O
OC stude
ents stud
dying ab
broad
source: Fall d
demographicss
16
14
12
10
8
6
14
14
2
2008
2009
10
4
7
2
0
2007
2006
KPI 14 Share off
(a) Okanagan Reg
gion Immediate Transitioners, Who
o Enrolled in
n Okanagan Post-Secon
ndary
stitutions:
Ins
(b) Okanagan Reg
gion Graduates
PSI Entry Year
Numberr of Grade 12 Grads
that Tra
ansition to PSE
Immediiately
(a) % To
T OC of Transitions
% To UBC O of Tra
ansitions
d Class (Ye
ear
HS Grad
previous to PSI en
ntry)
(b) % To
T OC of Gr
rad Class
% To UBC of Grad
d Class
006
2005/20
2006
6/2007
20
007/2008
2008/2009
1305
46.7
7%
24.7%
1572
4
47.8%
24.9%
1637
49.5%
23.9%
16
674
47.7
7%
23.1
1%
630
3,6
16.8
8%
8.9%
4051
18.6%
1
9.7%
3898
20.8%
10.0%
4,0
015
19.9
9%
9.6
6%
Note:
1 17 do nott have data sources
s
attacched to them
m.
KPIs 5, 10,
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Appen
ndix 1:
Other Measures
M
of Intere
est
Interprovvincial Stand
dards Examinnations (Redd Seal) Resuults for Tradees Journeym
men
2008 Ok
kanagan College Studentts
Count off StudentID
Trade
Autom
motive Painterr - 1
Autom
motive Refinis
shing Prep Te
echnician - 1
Autom
motive Service
e Technician
n-4
Carpe
enter - 4
Electrrician - 4
Heavy
y Duty Equipm
ment Technic
cian - 4
Motorr Vehicle Body
y Repairer - 3
Plumb
ber - 4
Sheett Metal Worke
er - 4
Grand Total
T
Total
8
13
63
111
97
14
13
33
12
364
2008 Interprovvincial Sttandards Examinattion Resu
ults
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Auto Paint
AST
Colliision
Okan
nagan College
133
Caarpenter
Nation
nal
Electrician
Pro
ovincial Key Performance Indicators Report
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| Okannagan Collegge
Heavy Dutyy
Okanagan College
2009/10 Accountability Framework Performance Measure Results1
Performance measure
2008/09
Actual
Reporting year
2009/10
2009/10
Target
Actual
2009/10
Target assessment
Student spaces2
Total student spaces
4,697
4,801
5,019
Achieved 5% above
target
Nursing and other allied
health programs
481
405
529
Exceeded 31%
above target
939
984
1,120
Exceeded 14%
above target
1,616
under review
2,053
Not assessed
1,010
Exceeded
5.3%
Exceeded
Developmental
Credentials awarded3
Number
Aboriginal student headcount4
Number
856
Percent
4.7%
Student satisfaction with education5
%
Former diploma, associate
degree and certificate students
Baccalaureate graduates
95.5
%
≥ previous
year
+/0.9%
%
+/-
≥
90%
93.1%
0.9%
Achieved
≥
90%
96.4%
2.7%
Exceeded
Former diploma, certificate, and associate degree students' assessment of skill development5
%
+/%
+/80.7
Substantially
Skill development (avg. %)
1.9%
≥
85%
79.0% 1.7%
%
achieved
74.0
2.4%
77.1% 2.1%
Written communication
%
77.4
2.3%
74.3% 2.2%
Oral communication
%
82.2
1.7%
81.2% 1.6%
Group collaboration
%
86.0
Critical analysis
1.6%
83.4% 1.4%
%
78.8
1.9%
77.5% 1.7%
Problem resolution
%
81.6
Learn on your own
1.8%
78.7% 1.6%
%
84.8
Reading and comprehension
1.6%
80.9% 1.5%
%
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Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Baccalaureate graduates' assessment of skill development5
%
+/-
87.1%
5.0%
Written communication
85.2%
5.4%
Oral communication
86.9%
5.2%
Group collaboration
89.2%
4.6%
Critical analysis
85.5%
5.2%
Problem resolution
88.0%
4.9%
Learn on your own
92.8%
3.9%
Reading and comprehension
81.9%
5.7%
%
+/-
Skill development (avg. %)
%
+/-
NA
NA
≥
85.0%
Student assessment of the quality of instruction5
%
+/Former diploma, associate
degree and certificate students6
Baccalaureate graduates
Achieved
84.0%
1.6%
≥
90%
93.5%
1.2%
Achieved
NA
NA
≥
90%
97.6%
2.2%
Exceeded
Student assessment of usefulness of knowledge and skills in performing job5
%
+/%
+/Former diploma, associate
degree and certificate students7
Baccalaureate graduates
79.7%
2.1%
≥
90%
84.9%
2.0%
Substantially
achieved
NA
NA
≥
90%
91.8%
4.6%
Achieved
%
+/-
%
+/-
7.1%
1.3%
≤
12.5%
9.2%
1.5%
Exceeded
NA
NA
≤
12.5%
8.5%
4.2%
Achieved
Unemployment rate5,8
Former diploma, associate
degree and certificate students7
Baccalaureate graduates
Target assessment scale
Exceeded
Achieved
Substantially achieved
Not achieved
Description
More than 10% above target
Up to 10% above target
Up to 10% below target
More than 10% below target
Notes:
TBD - for measures where results are still to be received, the fields have been labeled as "To Be Determined".
NA - Prior data not available.
1
There have been a number of changes to the performance measures for the 2009/10 reporting cycle. Please
consult the standards manual for a description of each measure. See
http://www.aved.gov.bc.ca/framework/documents/standards_manual.pdf.
2
Results from the 2008/09 reporting year are based on data from the 2008/09 fiscal year; results from the 2009/10
reporting year are based on data from the 2009/10 fiscal year.
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Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
3
Annual performance is measured using a rolling three-year average of the most recent academic years, e.g., the
results for the 2009/10 reporting year are a three-year average of the 2006/07, 2007/08 and 2008/09 academic years.
Revisions are incorporated once a year based on October 2009 CDW data and January 2010 RUCBC data. The
formula for the credentials target is currently under review. In the interim, the 2009/10 result has not been assessed.
4
Results from the 2008/09 reporting year are based on data from the 2007/08 academic year; results from the
2009/10 reporting year are based on data from the 2008/09 academic year.
5
Results from the 2008/09 reporting year are based on 2008 survey data; results from the 2009/10 reporting year are
based on 2009 survey data. For all survey results, if the result plus or minus the margin of error includes the target,
the measure is assessed as achieved. In all cases, the survey result and the margin of error are used to determine
the target assessment.
6
The 2009/10 Diploma, Associate Degree and Certificate (DACSO) survey results are calculated using a new method
which includes the three response categories "Very good, Good and Adequate". The 2008/09 results are shaded
because they were calculated on a different basis and should not be compared with the 2009/10 results.
7
The 2009/10 Diploma, Associate Degree and Certificate (DACSO) survey results include graduates only. The
2008/09 results are shaded because they were calculated on a different basis and should not be compared with the
2009/10 results.
8
Target is the unemployment rate for those aged 18 to 29 with high school credentials or less for the Interior region.
16
Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Appendix 2:
Glossary
Definitions
DACSO
APPSO
BGS
CDW
SSS
ESS
AASS
Diploma, Associate Degree, Certificate Student Outcomes Survey, data
available November
Apprentice Student Outcomes Survey, data available November
Baccalaureate Graduate Outcomes Survey, data available March
Central Data Warehouse - data may change with updates, data
available December
Student Satisfaction Survey, data available June
Employee Satisfaction Survey data available every two years
Aboriginal Access and Satisfaction Survey data available January
17
Key Performance Indicators Report | Okanagan College
Open Session– June 29, 2010
Item 6.3 – Attachment E
Submission of Information from Senior Staff to the Board of Governors Report Title: Accountability Plan and Report 200‐2013 Date: June 21, 2010 Background Information: Each year, post‐secondary institutions in British Columbia are required to submit an “Accountability Plan & Report” to the Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development. These submissions are reviewed at the Ministry level and are posted on a provincial website. In addition, they are to be posted on the websites of the individual institutions. As a result, they provide an instrument for communicating with both government and the public. This year, submissions are due on July 15. Board approval is required prior to submission to ALMD. Information could include: • Purpose • History • Other relevant information Action Required: • For consultation • For information • For approval (including resolution) Comments from the President: Report prepared and supported by: Recommended Motion:
“BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Board of Governors approve
the Accountability Plan and Report 2009-2013, as presented”
I support this recommendation. Allan Coyle, Jan O’Brien, Steve Koehle Okanagan College transforms lives and communities
Accountability
Plan and Report
2009-10 to 2012-13
T
F
A
R
D
Map
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
N
ARMSTRONG
LAKE COUNTRY
WEST KELOWNA
KELOWNA
PEACHLAND
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
MAJOR CAMPUSES
PRINCETON
OTHER LOCATIONS
HEDLEY
OLIVER
KEREMEOS
Page 2
OSOYOOS
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Table of Contents
Map of Region. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Letter from Board Chair and President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Institutional Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 8
Planning and Operational Context. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 + 10
Okanagan College Goals and Objectives .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 - 16
Accountability Measure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 + 18
Capital Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Accountability Framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Summary Financial Report 2008/09. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Page 3
Letter from the Board Chair and the President
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
The Hon. Moira Stilwell
Minister of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development
Dear Minister Stilwell,
This review of Okanagan College’s performance in 2009-2010 and the summary of our plans for 2010-11
and beyond should communicate the many accomplishments of Okanagan College and our role in helping
your Ministry and the Province meet its objectives in the realm of post-secondary education.
As British Columbia and the country emerges from the economic challenges of 2008 and 2009, the
importance of investment in post-secondary education and training is evident. As economies are reshaped,
the skill sets of our young people and those changing careers need to follow suit. Ensuring those people have
access to relevant training and education close to home has to be a priority.
With the support of the provincial government and the communities we serve, Okanagan College has created
that access. A look at our enrolments over the past five years provides a telling indicator of the appetite and
need for such access: student enrolment numbers, on a full-time equivalent basis, have grown more than 60
per cent since 2005-06 at Okanagan College. In 2009-10, more than 20,000 individuals participated in
education and training at our campuses and centres: that’s the equivalent of about one in every 20 people in
our College region who attended an Okanagan College program or course.
There is significant alignment between our institution’s objectives and goals and those of the Ministry. The
attached document summarizes where they come together and how we have performed in relation to key
accountability measures. Student success is at the heart of our key directions, and our service, facility and
education improvements are aimed at supporting and enhancing that success.
In the past year, our participation in an array of community, regional, national and international initiatives has
grown. We have connected with a growing number of colleague institutions across the country and around the
world and have participated in a host of provincial and national programs. Importantly, our students have been
a significant contributor to that growing profile
In our first report to you as Minister in 2009, we expressed a wish that our next report – this one - would
paint a similar picture of success for Okanagan College and our students. We hope you’ll agree that it
succeeds on that count.
Sincerely,
Page 4
Lance Kayfish,
Chair, Okanagan College Board of Governors
Jim Hamilton,
President, Okanagan College Board of Governors
Institutional Overview
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College continued its growth and development in 2009-2010, as
it expanded programs and created additional access for students throughout
the region.
The College has been the largest contributor to growth in post-secondary
education in the Okanagan region over the past five years, serving approximately
60 per cent more full-time equivalent students in 2009-10 than in 2005-06.
The College’s four major campuses – at Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna and
Penticton - are now supplemented by a host of other training facilities within the
region, which is home to approximately 397,160 people (8.9 per cent of the
province’s population.)
Rapid growth in trades and apprenticeship programming means that Okanagan
College is now B.C.’s second-largest trades training facility.
Okanagan College’s annual budget of $88 million supports more than 1,000
staff, making the institution one of the largest employers within the region.
Several issues or trends affect the Okanagan, Similkameen, Shuswap and
Revelstoke regions that impact or have implications for the College and its
development in the years ahead:
Net Change in Immediate-Entry Transition Rates
byy Region
(Grade 12 Grads of 2001/02
g
/ vs. 2007/08)
7/
19
Regions Showing Net Increase
0.0%
2.0%
4.0%
6.0%
6.2%
Okanagan
g
Regions
with Net Decrease
8.0%
-4.0%
Thompson Rivers
4.0%
Selkirk
-2.8%
Fraser Valley
%
-2.7%
C il
Capilano
3.3%
Kwantlen
Camos n
Camosun
2 9%
2.9%
Rockies
2.9%
-1.9%
Malaspina
Douglas
North Island
2.2%
New Caledonia
-1.8%
1.0%
Vancouver/Langara
0.5%
-0.4%
Northwest
Northern Lights
0.04%
-5.0%
-4.0%
-3.0%
-2.0%
-1.0%
0.0%
•
the region has one of the oldest populations in Canada, with approximately 20 per cent of the population older than 65 in 2009 (compared to B.C.’s 14.7 per cent). That proportion of plus-65 citizens is expected to grow to 23.6 per cent by 2019 (B.C.’s is estimated to grow to 18.6 per cent).
•
although improving, the rate of immediate transition from K-12 to
post-secondary among students within the Okanagan College region is still below the provincial average: 41.7 per cent in 2007-08, vs. 52.2 per cent provincially.
Page 5
Institutional Overview cont.
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
• There have been improvements in the employment situation within the Thompson-Okanagan region – the unemployment rate has dropped from 10 per cent in May 2009 to 9.2 in May 2010.
•
Provincial forecasts for economic growth within the region call for real GDP to expand by 4.3 per cent in 2010 which exceeds the long-term average annual growth rate. The forecast is based on projections of a moderate increase in accommodation services, resumed growth in softwood lumber production and modest growth in employment.
• A slump in tourism activity that affected the regional economy in
2008-2009 is expected to reverse itself in 2010, with room revenues forecast to increase by 12.2 per cent in 2010.
Page 6
Institutional Overview cont.
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College’s development has been guided by a Strategic Plan, an
Education Plan and a Master Capital Plan, which serve to inform annual budget
and operating plans. The Strategic Plan is currently under review, with a revisit
of the College’s Mission, Vision, Values and Key Directions. The Education Plan
is also under review and development, with both the Strategic and Education
Plans for the coming five to 10 years expected to be reviewed and adopted by
the Board of Governors by Fall 2010.
lMission
Okanagan College transforms lives and communities. We educate, train and support
our students to excel in the workplace, to succeed in further education and to become
lifelong learners.
l Vision
We are the college of first choice: a college which students are proud to attend,
where employees are proud to work, and whose graduates are highly valued in
the workplace and at other post-secondary institutions. Our vibrant campus life
supports an excellent education for our local, national and international students.
We promote the free exchange of ideas and the development and application of
critical thinking skills. Our goal is to develop global citizenship in our community
of informed learners.
As leaders in the economic, cultural and intellectual growth of our communities
we work collaboratively with all our partners to anticipate and meet education
and labour market needs.
l Values
Student success
Student success is our first priority.
Learning centred
Learning is at the centre of everything we do. We respect the diverse ways in
which our students and employees learn.
Ethical behaviour
We value a culture where employees and students act ethically, conduct
themselves with integrity and fairness, and practice open communication.
Respect for each other
We cultivate a respectful, integrated and co-operative learning community and
value the contributions each of us makes and the support we provide to each
other.
Equity and accessibility
We encourage an equitable and accessible environment, which promotes,
involves and reflects our diverse communities.
Page 7
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Institutional Overview cont.
Respect for Aboriginal culture, tradition
and individuals
We embrace Aboriginal history and tradition and actively encourage participation
and involvement by Aboriginal people and communities.
Okanagan College’s Key Directions
The institution’s key directions draw from the vision, mission and values of the organization
and help focus and inform planning, budget and activities. Underpinning Okanagan College’s
key directions is the College’s focus on being a learning organization. While that shapes
what the organization does and how it behaves, student success is at the heart of our key
directions.
Page 8
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Planning and Operational Context
Regional Economy, Labour Force, Skills Shortage
& Changing Demographics
Similar to the rest of the province and most parts of Canada, the Okanagan
College region is emerging from the effects of the recession, with signs of
activity and renewed economic vitality.
Unemployment rates are down, for instance, in the Thompson Okanagan region:
Service Canada reports a 9.2. per cent unemployment rate in May 2010, down
from 10 per cent in the same period last year.
• Housing starts are up in most communities within the College region. In
Kelowna, housing starts in April 2010 (as reported by CMHC) were 249 –
comparable to the pre-recession 2008 levels and up 346 per cent from the
same month in 2009. Similarly, Vernon reported 53 housing starts in April
2010, up from 17 a year previous (312 per cent increase). Salmon Arm
reported 9 in April 2010, up from two in the same month a year earlier.
Penticton reported a rebound to 89 housing starts in April, 2010 – up from 12
in April, 2009 (a 742 per cent increase).
• Business bankruptcies fell in 2009 from their 2008 levels – 66 were
reported in the Thompson Okanagan Development Region in 2009, down from
89 in 2008. Consumer bankruptcies, however, rose from 1,018 in 2008 to
1,573 in 2009.
• The number of business incorporations in the Thompson Okanagan region fell
in 2009, from 2008 levels: from 3,124 in ’08 to 2,375 in ’09.
• Real estate activity has quickened in the region – the Okanagan Mainline
Real Estate Board reports a year-to-date improvement in housing sales (to April
30, 2010) of 43.6 per cent over the same period the previous year, while the
South Okanagan Real Estate Association shows an increase of 53.9 per cent.
Average house prices climbed 10.4 per cent in the Okanagan Mainline region
and eight per cent in the South Okanagan.
Page 9
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Planning and Operational Context cont.
• Major projects continue to spur employment and activity in the Okanagan
College region, from the College’s own projects (the $28-million Centre
of Excellence in Sustainable Building Technologies and RenewableEnergy
Conservation – due for completion in March 2011 – and the $1 million
addition to the Trades Training facility in Salmon Arm), to highway
improvement projects (Highway 97 between Summerland and Peachland, and
between Vernon and Armstrong, Highway 33 widening), to a host of major
projects referenced in the province’s inventory. Those include the re-opening
of the Copper Mountain Mine in Princeton ($366 million, completion in
summer 2011), to the Mica Dam upgrades (approx. $880 million, starting
in 2010). Major residential projects throughout the region are starting to
resurface.
The population of the College region is expected to grow by approximately 29
per cent by 2036, at annual rates that range between 0.6 per cent and 1.2
per cent annually. BC Stats projects that by the end of the forecast period
(2036), the Okanagan region will have almost eight dependents for every 10
people of working age – and most of those dependents will be seniors.
One of the interesting projections from the work of B.C. Statistics is that the
number of 18-29 year olds will be higher through every year until 2036 than
it is currently. The growth in this cohort will occur until about 2014 and in the
last 10 years (2026-2036) of the projection. BC Stats is also forecasting a
significant increase in the population of young adults in the Okanagan College
region in post-secondary cohort (those aged 18 to 29) over the course of
the projection.
Of significant interest to Okanagan College is the projected decrease in the
Grade 12 population in the seven school districts that comprise the College
region (SDs 19, 22, 23, 53, 58, 67 and 83). The 2010 estimate of the
Grade 12 enrolment is 4,917 – that is forecast to drop to 4,230 by 2019:
a decrease of approximately 14 per cent in nine years. The region with the
largest projected decease is School District 83 (North Okanagan Shuswap),
with 918 Grade 12 students in 2010, declining to 676 in 2019: a 26.4 per
cent decrease.
Okanagan College has made service to Aboriginal communities and people
a key direction and has seen a dramatic increase in the number of Aboriginal
students registered at the College. The College has introduced several
programs that are offered on-reserve, and a growing array of services and
facilities at its campuses meet the needs of Aboriginal learners. More of the
Aboriginal people in the Okanagan College region are in the 15-24 year old
cohort (7.6 per cent of the total 16,825 regional Aboriginal population. than
is the provincial average (6.5 per cent). There are 25 Reserves within the
Okanagan College region.
Page 10
Okanagan
College
Table of Contents
Goals & Objectives
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College Goals & Objectives:
The Institutional Accountability Plan addresses a multi-year planning horizon. The
Plan, therefore, reflects both long-term and short-term institutional goals and
requirements:
a) Long-Term: “Key Directions” (see Page 7)
Flowing directly from the Mission, Vision, and Values of Okanagan College, our
Key Directions are general statements that provide long-term strategic guidance
for all our initiatives and operating plans. They are reviewed annually, with
major revision undertaken approximately every five years to reflect changes in
our internal and external environments. Such a review is underway now and is
slated for completion before fall 2010.
b) Short-Term: “College-Wide Goals” and
“Operational Imperatives”
The shorter- and medium term priorities for Okanagan College are described by
our College Wide Goals and Operational Imperatives. For 2010-11 those goals
and objectives are:
College-Wide Goals 2010-11
STUDENTS
Student success is the central key direction for Okanagan College. An important indicator of our effectiveness in this area is our success in retaining students and helping them achieve their educational objectives.
Our two goals in this area for 2010-­11 are:
1. Work together to increase student retention rates at an institutional level by two per cent year over year.
2. Work together to increase the proportion of Aboriginal students who
achieve their educational goals by two per cent.
EMPLOYEES
Okanagan College’s success depends upon engaged, committed and satisfied employees. The employee survey provides important feedback. Our goal for 2010­-11 is:
3. Work together to address our top two actionable issues as identified in the 2009 employee survey.
COMMUNITIES
Our graduates and former students are our best connection to the communities we serve. Engaged and supportive alumni can better serve as
institutional advocates, ambassadors and advisors. Our goal for 2010-­11 is:
4. Work together to increase the number of alumni and other former students who participate in college activities, events and groups, or who contribute to the college and its goals in other ways.
Page 1
Page 11
Okanagan College
Goals & Objectives cont.
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Operational Imperatives 2010/11
1. Balance the 2010-11 Budget
2. Ensure the Centre of Excellence project remains on target for completion College
Achievements
(Under
Goals
and
Objectives
banner)
and remains within budget
3.Of
the
15
accountability
measures
targets
set
out
by
the
Ministry,
Okanagan
College
Implement the College Violence Prevention and Crisis Management Plan
4.has
exceeded
seven,
achieved
six,
and
substantially
achieved
two.
None
have
been
Initiate and complete the five-year review of the Institutional Strategic Plan
underachieved.
5.Five
Strategic
Objectives
Summary
Continue Implmentation of the Green Sustainability Plan
College
Achievements
(Under
Goals
and
Objectives
banner)
6.
Meet FTE targets
Of
the
15
accountability
measures
targets
set
out
by
the
Ministry,
Okanagan
College
has
exceeded
seven,
achieved
six,
and
substantially
achieved
two.
None
have
been
Objective
Okanagan College Accountability
Okanagan College
underachieved.
FIVE
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES SUMMARY
Achievement
Five
Strategic
Objectives
Summary
Capacity
Student spaces total
Achieved: 8% above target
Objective
Capacity
Access
Quality
Relevance
Efficiency
Okanagan College
Accountability
Okanagan College
Health
spaces
Exceeded: 31% above
Achievement target
Developmental spaces
Student spaces
total
Achieved: 8% above
target 14% above
Credentials
awarded
Exceeded:
Health spaces
Exceeded: 31% target
above target
Developmental spaces
Exceeded: 14% Target
above target
not assessed.
Credentials
awarded
Target not assessed.
Access
Number of students who are Aboriginal
Exceeded: 18% above
Number of students
who
Aboriginal
Exceeded: 18% target
above target
Per cent
ofare
student
who are Aboriginal
Per cent of student who are Aboriginal
Exceeded: 13% Exceeded:
above target
13% above
Student satisfaction with education
target
Diploma, Associate
Degree, Certificate
Quality
Student satisfaction
with education
graduates >% Diploma, Associate Degree,Achieved:
93.1%Achieved: 93.1%
Certificate
Exceeded: 96.4%
Baccalaureategraduates
graduates>%
>90%
Exceeded: 96.4%
Student assessment
of the quality
of
Baccalaureate
graduates
>90%
instruction
Student assessment of the quality of
Achieved: 93.5%
Diploma, Associate
Degree, Certificate
instruction
Exceeded: 97.6%
93.5%
graduates >90%
Diploma, Associate Degree,Achieved:
Certificate
Exceeded: 97.6%
Baccalaureategraduates
graduates>90%
>90%
Substantially achieved
Student assessment
of skill development
Baccalaureate
graduates >90%
(several measure)
Substantially achieved
(several
Diploma, Associate
Degree, Certificate
Student assessment
of skill development
Achieved
(several measure
graduates >85%
Diploma, Associate Degree,measures)
Certificate
Achieved (several measures)
Baccalaureate graduates
graduates >85%
>85%
Student assessment
of the usefulness
of >85%
Baccalaureate
graduates
knowledge
skills inassessment
performing job
Relevance andStudent
of the usefulness of
Diploma, Associate
Degree,
Certificate
knowledge and skills
in performing job
graduates >90%
84.9%achieved:
Diploma, Associate Degree,Substantially
Certificate achieved:
Substantially
Baccalaureategraduates
graduates>90%
>90%
Achieved: 91.8%84.9%
Unemployment rate
Baccalaureate graduates >90%
Achieved: 91.8%
Diploma, Associate
Degree,rate
Certificate Exceeded: 9.2%
Unemployment
graduates <=12.5%
Diploma, Associate Degree, Certificate
Exceeded: 9.2%
Baccalaureategraduates
graduates<=12.5%
<= 12.5%
Achieved: 8.5%
Contribute to system
level accountability
Baccalaureate
graduates <= 12.5%
Achieved: 8.5%
See Accountability
Framework Performance Measure Results, Pg. 17
Efficiency
Contribute to system
level accountability
Target assessment
scale
Description
Exceeded
More than 10% above target
Target assessment scale
Description
Achieved
Up to 10% above target
Exceeded
More than 10% above target
Substantially achieved
Up to 10% below target
Achieved
Up to 10% above target
Not achieved
More than 10% below target
Substantially achieved
Up to 10% below target
Not achieved
More than 10% below target
2009‐2010
was
a
year
of
successes
and
achievements
for
Okanagan
College
students
and
for
the
institution
itself.
Many
of
those
successes
address
directly
the
objectives
and
goals
described
by
the
Ministry
of
Advanced
Education
and
Labour
Market
development,
as
described
in
the
chart
above.
Alignment of Operational Imperatives with Ministry/
System Objectives & Performance Measures:
Of the 15 accountability measures targets set out by the Ministry, Okanagan
College has exceeded seven, achieved six, and substantially achieved two.
None have been underachieved.
Page 12
Okanagan College
Goals & Objectives cont.
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
2009-2010 was a year of successes and achievements for Okanagan College
students and for the institution itself. Many of those successes address directly
the objectives and goals described by the Ministry of Advanced Education and
Labour Market Development (ACMD), as described in the chart on the previous
page. Other significant achievements include (organized on the basis of
Okanagan College’s Key Directions for 2009-2010)
A. FOUR REGIONS OF EQUAL VALUE
• Meeting or exceeding enrolment targets; (ALMD and ITA Combined – see charts and explanation below).
FTEs
Central Okanagan
North Okanagan
2005-06
2009-10
Change
3499
5422
55%
595
942
58%
South Okanagan
417
816
95%
Shuswap-Revelstoke
381
626
64%
172
290
69%
5065
8095
60%
Distance Education
Okanagan College
•
•
20,770 individuals received education or training at Okanagan College in 2009-2010. Enrolment in each of Okanagan College’s regions and at each of our campuses increased in 2009-2010
Increasing access to and choices in post-secondary education throughout the Okanagan College region, with the introduction of new programs (Environmental Studies, HVAC, GeoThermal, for example)
Page 13
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
SIFE Okanagan’s Green Team won first place in
the country after presenting to a panel of industry
experts on a variety of community-minded
sustainable projects that included partnerships with
the Kelowna and Vernon Chamber of Commerce
and Glenmore Elementary.
Okanagan College
Goals & Objectives cont.
B. STUDENT SUCCESS
• Number of credentials awarded by Okanagan College in 2009-10
increased by 27 per cent over the previous year (2,053 in 09-10,
up from 1,616)
• Increase in student assessment of the quality of instruction (93.5 per cent in 2009-2010, up from 84 per cent in 2008-09 among former diploma, associate degree and certificate students), and in the assessment of the usefulness of knowledge and skills in performing jobs (84.9 per cent in 2009-10, up from 79.7 in 2008-09)
• First reported survey of baccalaureate graduates from Okanagan College showed 97.6 per cent of grads reporting satisfaction with the quality of instruction and 91.8 per cent reporting satisfaction with usefulness of knowledge and skills in performing job.
• Exceeded targets for overall student satisfaction with education (93.1 per cent among former diploma, associate degree and certificate students, and 96.4 per cent among baccalaureate graduates)
• Supported Business Administration, Trades, Arts and Technologies students as they distinguished themselves at regional, national and international competitions. Okanagan College administration was recognized by the national Students in Free Enterprise organization for the Most Supportive Administration.
C. ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES
• Signed a Memorandum of Affiliation with En’Owkin Centre, which is an Indigenous cultural, educational and creative arts institution in Penticton, that offers university/college transfer diplomas and certificate programs.
The MOA will serve to enhance the institutions’ working relationship, creating a Joint Affiliation Committee, which will research, advise and develop new courses, programs and resources for learners.
• Increased the number of Aboriginal students attending Okanagan College by 18 per cent from 856 students to 1,010. That is a significant increase from 2007-08, when Okanagan College registered 513
Aboriginal students.
• Offered five Aboriginal Gateway to the Trades Programs in Chase, in Kelowna and in Vernon
• Opened new Aboriginal Gathering Place in Salmon Arm in
September 2009.
• Hosted First Nations potluck for Band members, Elders and students at the Vernon Campus.
• The Aboriginal Centre on the Kelowna campus was expanded.
• Hosted the first Aboriginal “Pow Wow” in the history of the institution and drew participants from throughout the Okanagan-Shuswap.
Page 14
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College
Goals & Objectives cont.
D. PROMOTING AND RECRUITING
• Continued second year of a student transition program co-ordinator position as a partnership between Okanagan College and the seven school districts that comprise the College region. Implemented funding arrangements for a third year.
• Continued development and implementation of programs to familiarize applicants with Okanagan College programs and services before the start of school (Jump Start).
• Increased number of applicants to Okanagan College for Fall 2009. These were 18 per cent higher than in the previous year.
• Applications and enrolments in winter semester continued to increase as well: January 2010 enrolment statistics show approximately 5.7 per cent more students attending the College’s campuses than in January 2009.
• Created new “Become a Student Portal” on the Okanagan College website, making it easier for prospective students to find answers to frequently-
asked questions; reorganized important admission and policy information in easier-to-access formats; and made it easier to connect with College personnel to get personal attention.
New $28 Million Centre for Learning
E. FACILITIES
• Opened the new five-storey, 70,000 square foot, $28-million Centre for Learning on the Kelowna Campus, built to LEED Gold standards (undergoing certification) and brought approximately 100 staff back onto campus from temporary locations and rented facilities, opened 24 new classrooms with 685 instructional seats.
• Construction commenced and is proceeding on-time and on-budget for the new $28-million Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Technologies and Renewable Energy Conservation on our Penticton campus. The facility will house approximately 800 students and a variety of programs that will be new to Okanagan College, including HVAC,
Geothermal and the Applied Conservation Technician program, with the latter being developed jointly with the En’Owkin Centre.
• By the end of 2009-2010, $1.45 million of the $5 million fundraising goal had been realized for the Centre of Excellence in Penticton.
• Work has commenced on the $1 million expansion of the Salmon Arm Trades Training facility. The expansion will house an additional 144 students and add 2,783 square feet of shop and classroom space.
• Little Scholars Child Daycare Centre on the Kelowna campus was opened in August 2009
• Opened a new leased trades training facility at Ackland Road location in Kelowna in January 2010.
• Completed renovation of the Kelowna campus library facility to improve student learning and library spaces; six group study areas have been incorporated and the learning commons spaces have been increased to 78 from 51. The Learning Centre has been relocated into the renovated Library space.
Page 15
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College
Goals & Objectives cont.
F. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL DIVERSITY
• Worked with School District 23, OSTEC and Science World to host Science World in conjunction with Okanagan College’s Career Fair.
• Hosted a traditional Pow Wow at the Kelowna Campus, September, 2009.
• Worked with Kelowna Community Resources Society and a host of other cultural organizations to develop an “OK to say” protocol focused on responding to racism within the Central Okanagan.
• Worked with Kelowna Community Resources to host a Diversity Health Fair (the first in the region) at the Kelowna Campus of Okanagan College
• Hosted a first-ever Women in Trades Conference at the Kelowna Campus in the fall of 2009 – keynote address by Kevin Evans of the ITA.
G. EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT/QUALITY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING
• Identified and supported the further development of the Institute for Leadership in Learning and Teaching – series of workshops for all staff held at each campus.
• Under the aegis of the ILLT, implemented program of peer observation for instructional staff.
• Appointed the College’s first Publisher in Residence (Robert MacDonald) and the third Entrepreneur in Residence (Doug Manning)
• Undertook second employee survey, and established working group to identify priorities for further development within the College.
81 per cent of those responding said they were satisfied with their employment at the College. 89.1 per cent agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that they were proud to work at Okanagan College.
Page 16
Table ofMeasures
Contents
Accountability
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College
2009/10 Accountability Framework Performance Measure Results1
Performance measure
Student spaces
Reporting year
2009/10
2009/10
Target
Actual
2008/09
Actual
2009/10
Target assessment
2
Total student spaces
4,697
4,801
5,019
Achieved 5% above
target
Nursing and other allied
health programs
481
405
529
Exceeded 31%
above target
939
984
1,120
Exceeded 14%
above target
1,616
under review
2,053
Not assessed
1,010
Exceeded
5.3%
Exceeded
Developmental
Credentials awarded
3
Number
Aboriginal student headcount
4
Number
856
Percent
4.7%
Student satisfaction with education
Former diploma, associate
degree and certificate students
≥ previous
year
5
%
+/-
95.5%
0.9%
Baccalaureate graduates
%
+/-
≥
90%
93.1%
0.9%
Achieved
≥
90%
96.4%
2.7%
Exceeded
5
Former diploma, certificate, and associate degree students' assessment of skill development
%
+/%
+/Substantially
Skill development (avg. %)
80.7% 1.9%
≥
85%
79.0% 1.7%
achieved
Written communication
74.0% 2.4%
77.1% 2.1%
Oral communication
77.4%
2.3%
74.3%
2.2%
Group collaboration
82.2%
1.7%
81.2%
1.6%
Critical analysis
86.0%
1.6%
83.4%
1.4%
Problem resolution
78.8%
1.9%
77.5%
1.7%
Learn on your own
81.6%
1.8%
78.7%
1.6%
Reading and comprehension
84.8%
1.6%
80.9%
1.5%
Baccalaureate graduates' assessment of skill development
Skill development (avg. %)
Written1communication
Key Performance
%
+/-
NA
NA
5
%
+/-
87.1%
5.0%
85.2%
Indicators Report | Okanagan College
5.4%
≥
85.0%
4
Oral communication
86.9%
5.2%
Group collaboration
89.2%
4.6%
Critical analysis
85.5%
5.2%
Problem resolution
88.0%
4.9%
Learn on your own
92.8%
3.9%
Reading and comprehension
81.9%
5.7%
Achieved
Continued on next page….
Student assessment of the quality of instruction
%
+/-
Page 1
Former diploma, associate
6
degree and certificate students
Baccalaureate graduates
5
%
+/-
84.0%
1.6%
≥
90%
93.5%
1.2%
Achieved
NA
NA
≥
90%
97.6%
2.2%
Exceeded
Page 17
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Oral communication
86.9%
5.2%
Group collaboration
89.2%
4.6%
Critical analysis
85.5%
5.2%
88.0% 4.9%
Table
of Contents
Accountability
Measures
cont.
Problem resolution
Learn on your own
Reading and comprehension
92.8%
3.9%
81.9%
5.7%
Continued on next page….
Student assessment of the quality of instruction
%
+/Former diploma, associate
6
degree and certificate students
Baccalaureate graduates
5
%
+/-
84.0%
1.6%
≥
90%
93.5%
1.2%
Achieved
NA
NA
≥
90%
97.6%
2.2%
Exceeded
Student assessment of usefulness of knowledge and skills in performing job
%
+/%
+/Former diploma, associate
7
degree and certificate students
Baccalaureate graduates
Unemployment rate
5
79.7%
2.1%
≥
90%
84.9%
2.0%
Substantially
achieved
NA
NA
≥
90%
91.8%
4.6%
Achieved
%
+/-
%
+/-
7.1%
1.3%
≤
12.5%
9.2%
1.5%
Exceeded
NA
NA
≤
12.5%
8.5%
4.2%
Achieved
5,8
Former diploma, associate
7
degree and certificate students
Baccalaureate graduates
Notes:
TBD - for measures where results are still to be received, the fields have been labeled as "To Be Determined".
NA - Prior data not available.
1
There have been a number of changes to the performance measures for the 2009/10 reporting cycle. Please
consult the standards manual for a description of each measure. See
http://www.aved.gov.bc.ca/framework/documents/standards_manual.pdf.
2
Results from the 2008/09 reporting year are based on data from the 2008/09 fiscal year; results from the 2009/10
reporting year are based on data from the 2009/10 fiscal year.
Annual performance is measured using a rolling three-year average of the most recent academic years, e.g., the
4results for the 2009/10 reporting year are a three-year average of the 2006/07, 2007/08 and 2008/09 academic years.
Results from
2008/09 reporting
yearbased
are based
on data2009
fromCDW
the 2007/08
year; RUCBC
results from
theThe
Revisions
are the
incorporated
once a year
on October
data andacademic
January 2010
data.
2009/10
reporting year are based on data from the 2008/09 academic year.
5formula for the credentials target is currently under review. In the interim, the 2009/10 result has not been assessed.
4 Results from the 2008/09 reporting year are based on 2008 survey data; results from the 2009/10 reporting year are
Results
2008/09
year are
basedifon
from
the
academic
year;
results
fromthe
thetarget,
based
on from
2009the
survey
data.reporting
For all survey
results,
thedata
result
plus
or2007/08
minus the
margin of
error
includes
2009/10
reporting
year areasbased
on data
from
the 2008/09
academic
year.
the
measure
is assessed
achieved.
In all
cases,
the survey
result and
the margin of error are used to determine
5
Results
from
the 2008/09
reportingIndicators
year are based
on 2008
survey data;
results from the 2009/10 reporting year are
Key
Performance
Report
| Okanagan
College
the
target1
assessment.
based on52009 survey data. For all survey results, if the result plus or minus the margin of error includes the target,
the measure is assessed as achieved. In all cases, the survey result and the margin of error are used to determine
the target assessment.
3
6
The 2009/10 Diploma, Associate Degree and Certificate (DACSO) survey results are calculated using a new method
which includes the three response categories "Very good, Good and Adequate". The 2008/09 results are shaded
6because they were calculated on a different basis and should not be compared with the 2009/10 results.
The 2009/10 Diploma, Associate Degree and Certificate (DACSO) survey results are calculated using a new method
which includes the three response categories "Very good, Good and Adequate". The 2008/09 results are shaded
7
The 2009/10 Diploma, Associate Degree and Certificate (DACSO) survey results include graduates only. The
because they were calculated on a different basis and should not be compared with the 2009/10 results.
2008/09 results are shaded because they were calculated on a different basis and should not be compared with the
72009/10 results.
The 2009/10 Diploma, Associate Degree and Certificate (DACSO) survey results include graduates only. The
2008/09 results are shaded because they were calculated on a different basis and should not be compared with the
8
2009/10
results.
Target is
the unemployment rate for those aged 18 to 29 with high school credentials or less for the Interior region.
Target assessment scale
Description
8
Target is the unemployment rate for those aged 18 to 29 with high school credentials or less for the Interior region.
Exceeded
More than 10% above target
Achieved
Up
to 10% above target
Target assessment scale
Description
Substantially
achieved
Up
to than
10% 10%
belowabove
targettarget
Exceeded
More
Not
achieved
More
below
target
Achieved
Up to than
10% 10%
above
target
Substantially achieved
Not achieved
Page 18
1
Up to 10% below target
More than 10% below target
Capital Projects
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Projects Underway:
Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Technologies and Renewable Energy
Conservation – completion March 2011
Salmon Arm Trades Training Facility – Completion August 2010
Projects in Early Planning Stages:
Kelowna Trades Expansion
Page 19
Accountability Framework
Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Okanagan College
Accountability Framework Performance Targets: 2010/11 - 2012/13
Performance measure
Student spaces
Total student spaces
2010/11
2011/12
TBD
Nursing and other allied health programs
TBD
Developmental programs
TBD
Credentials awarded
Number
Aboriginal student headcount
Number
Percent
Student satisfaction with education
Former diploma, associate degree and certificate students
2012/13
TBD
1,010
≥ previous year
5.3%
≥ previous year
≥ 90%
Former diploma, certificate, and associate degree students' assessment of skill development
≥ 85%
Skill development (avg. %)
Student assessment of the quality of instruction
≥ 90%
Former diploma, associate degree and certificate students
Unemployment rate
≤ unemployment rate for individuals with high
school credentials or less
Student assessment of usefulness of knowledge and skills in performing job
≥ 90%
Former diploma, associate degree and certificate students
Former diploma, associate degree and certificate students
Notes:
TBD - to be determined
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Okanagan College
2009/10 - 2012/13
Accountability Plan and Report
Summary Financial Report 2008/09
Audited Financial Statements
can be found at:
www.okanagan.bc.ca/administration/financecorporate-services/financial-services/Financial_
Statements.html
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