Epson ActionDesk 4000 User`s guide

IMPORTANT NOTICE
DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY
Epson America makes no representations or warranties, either express or implied, by or
with respect to anything in this manual, and shall not be liable for any implied warranties
of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpse or for any indirect, special or
consequential damages. Some states do not allow the exclusion of incidental or
consequential damages, so this exclusion may not apply to you.
COPYRIGHT NOTICE
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording. or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Epson
America, Inc. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of information
contained herein. Nor is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the
information contained herein. Further, this publication and features described herein are
subject to change without notice.
TRADEMARKS
Epson is a registered trademark of Seiko Epson Corporation.
Epson Connection is a service mark of Epson America, Inc.
General notice: Other product names used herein are for identication purposes only and
may be trademarks of their respective owners. Epson disclaims any and all rights in those
marks.
Copyright © 1993 by Epson America, Inc.
Torrance, California, USA
ii
11/93
Important Safety Instructions
1. Read all of these instructions and save them for later reference.
2. Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the computer.
3. Unplug the computer from the wall outlet before cleaning. Use a
damp cloth for cleaning; do not use liquid or aerosol cleaners.
4. Do not spill liquid of any kind on the computer.
5. Do not place the computer on an unstable cart, stand, or table.
6. Slots and openings in the cabinet and the back or bottom are
provided for ventilation; do not block or cover these openings. Do
not place the computer near or over a radiator or heat register.
7. Operate the computer using the type of power source indicated
on its label.
8. If you plan to operate the computer in Germany, observe the
following safety precaution:
To provide adequate short-circuit protection and over-current
protection for this computer, the building installation must be
protected by a 16 Amp circuit breaker.
Beim Anschluß des Computers an die Netzversorgung muß
sichergestellt werden, daß die Gebäudeinstallation mit einem
16 A Überstromschukschaber abgesichert ist.
9. Connect all equipment to properly grounded (earthed) power outlets.
If you are unable to insert the plug into an outlet, contact your
electrician to replace your outlet. Avoid using outlets on the same
circuit as photocopiers or air control systems that regularly switch
on and off.
10. Do not allow the computer’s power cord to become damaged or
frayed.
iii
11. If you use an extension cord with the computer, make sure the total
of the ampere ratings of the devices plugged into the extension cord
does not exceed the ampere rating for the extension cord. Also,
make sure the total of all products plugged into the wall outlet does
not exceed 15 amperes
12. Do not insert objects of any kind into this product through the
cabinet slots.
13. Except as specifically explained in this User’s Guide, do not attempt
to service the computer yourself. Refer all servicing to qualified
service personnel.
14. Unplug the computer from the wall outlet and refer servicing to
qualified service personnel under the following conditions:
A. When the power cord or plug is damaged.
B. If liquid has entered the computer.
C. If the computer does not operate normally when the operating
instructions are followed. Adjust only those controls that are
covered by the operating instructions. Improper adjustment of
other controls may result in damage and often requires
extensive work by a qualified technician to restore the
computer to normal operation.
D. If the computer has been dropped or the cabinet has been
damaged.
E. If the computer exhibits a distinct change in performance.
iv
Instructions Importantes de Sécurité
1. Lire complètement les instructions qui suivent et les conserver pour
références futures.
2. Bien suivre tous les avertissements et les instructions indiqués sur
l’ordinateur.
3. Débrancher l’ordinateur de toute sortie murale avant le nettoyage.
Utiliser un chiffon humide; ne jamais utiliser un nettoyeur liquide
ou une bonbonne aerosol.
4. Ne jamais renverser un liquide d’aucune sorte sur l’ordinateur.
5. Ne pas placer l’ordinateur sur un chariot, un support, ou une table
instable.
6. Les évents dans les meubles, à l’arrière et en dessous sont conçus pour
l’aération; on ne doit jamais les bloquer. Ne pas placer l’ordinateur
près d’une source de chaleur directe.
7. Le fonctionnement de l’ordinateur doit s’ effectuer conformément au
type de source d’alimentation indiquée sur l’etiquette.
8. Lorsqu’ on desire utiliser l’ordinateur en Allemagne, on doit observer
les normes séuritaires qui suivent:
Afin d’assurer une protection adequate à l’ordinateur contre
les court-circuits et le survoltage, l’installation de l’édifice doit
comprendre un disjoncteur de 16 amp.
9. On doit brancher tout l’équipement dans une sortie reliée à la masse.
Lorsqu’il est impossible d’inérer la fiche dans la prise, on doit
retenir les services d’un électricien ou remplacer la prise. Ne jamais
utiliser une prise sur le même circuit qu’un appareil à photocopie
ou un systeme de contrôle d’aération avec commutation
marche-arr&
10. S’assurer que le cordon d’alimentation de l’ordinateur n’est pas
effrité
V
11. Dans le cas où on utilise un cordon de rallonge avec l’ordinateur, on
doits’assurer que la valeur totale d’ampères branch& dans le
cordon n’excède en aucun temps les amp&es du cordon de
rallonge. La quantitè totale des appareils branch& dans la prise
murale ne doit jamais excéder 15 ampères.
12. Ne jamais inérer un objet de quelque sorte que ce soit dans les
cavités de cet appareil.
13. Sauf tel que spécifié dans la notice d’utilisation, on ne doit jamais
tenter d’effectuer une réparation de l’ordinateur. On doit référer le
service de cet appareil à un technicien qualifie.
14. Débrancher l’ordinateur de la prise murale et confier le service au
personnel de service qualifié selon les conditions qui suivent:
A. Lorsque le cordon d’alimentation ou la prise sont
endommagés.
B. Lorsqu’un liquide s’est infiltré dans l’ordinateur.
C. Lorsque l’ordinateur refuse de fonctionner normalement
méme en suivant les instructions. N’ajuster que les commandes
qui sont énuméres dans les instructions de fonctionnement.
Tout ajustement inadéquat de tout autre controle peut
provoquer un dommage et souvent néceessiter des riparations
éborhes par un techicien qualifié afin de remette l’appareil
en service.
D. Lorsqu’on a échappé l’ordinateur ou que I’on a endommagé
le boitier.
E. Lorsque l’ordinateur déontre un changement noté au niveau de
sa performance.
vi
FCC COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
FOR AMERICAN USERS
TIhis equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a class B digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FTC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio and
television reception. However, thereis no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause interference to radio and television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna
Increase the separate between the equipment and receiver
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected
Consult an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
WARNING
The connection of a non-shielded equipment interface cable to this equipment will
invalidate the FCC Certification of this device and may cause interference levels that
exceed the limits established by the FCC for this equipment. It is the responsibility of the
user to obtain and use a shielded equipment interface cable with this device. If this
equipment has more than one interface connector, do not leave cables connected to
unusedintexfaces.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the manufacturer could void the
user’s authority to operate the equipment.
FOR CANADIAN USERS
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B lmits for radio noise emissions from
digital apparatus as set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications
L.e present appareil num&ique n&net pas de bruits radioélectriques d+ssant la limites
applicable-s aux appareils numkriques de Classe B prescrites dans le réglement sur le
brouillage radioélecuique éldicaté par le Ministére des Communications du Canada.
Contents
lntroduction
Optional Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CacheMemory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VideoMemory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Math Coprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drives.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SVGA and IDE Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How toUseThisManual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conventions Used in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Get Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompuServe On-line Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
Setiing Up Your System
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unpacking Your Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Peripheral Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Mouse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..............
Connecting a Printer or Other Device
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.............
Connecting the Power Cord
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............
Turning On the Computer
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Turning Off the Computer
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-3
1-4
14
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-9
Chapter 1
vii
Chapter 2
Running SETUP and Installing Driveas *
Using SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Starting the SETUP Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Using the System Setup Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Checking System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Assigning Hard Disk Drive Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5
Using the Advanced System Setup Options . . . . . . . . . . 2 6
Setting the Boot Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Setting the Security and Anti-Virus Options . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Using the Virus Protection Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Using the Green PC Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
Viewing the System Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Exiting SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Post-SETUP Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Installing the IDE Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Installing Video Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18
Chapter 3
using Your Computer
Working Comfortably . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Energy Wisely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Your Green PC Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting and Removing Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping a Comman d or Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Processor Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4
lnstdling and Removing Optons
Removing the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locating the Internal Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory Modules (SIMMs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting SIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing SIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
viii
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
35
3-5
3-7
3-8
4-2
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-8
4-10
4-11
4-13
Installing an Option Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing an Option Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Video Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Video Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing External Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the External Cache Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading the Microprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Processor Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Heat Sink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post-installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5
4-14
4-19
4-19
4-20
4-22
4-23
4-25
4-26
4-28
4-29
Installing and Removing Drives
Installing a Hard Disk Drive in the Internal Drive Bay . . . . . . . 5-2
Removing the Mounting Frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Connecting the Hard Disk Drive Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Installing the Hard Disk Below the Mounting Bracket . . . . 5-8
Installing the Hard Disk On the Mounting Bracket . . . . . . 5-11
Removing a Hard Disk Drive From the Internal Drive Bay . . . . . 5-14
Installing a Drive in the Upper Extemal Drive Bay . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Connecting the Drive and Power Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
RemovingaDrivefromtheUpperDriveBay . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19
Reconnecting the Drive and Power Cables to the Diskette
Drive in the Lower Drive Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19
Post-installatim Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21
Chapter 6 Truubkshooiing
Identifying Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Computer Will Not Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Computer Does Not Respond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitor Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Disk Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-10
6-11
6-12
ix
Option Card Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mouse Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Cache Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-12
6-13
6-14
6-14
6-14
Appendix A Specifications
CPU and Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Massstorage.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SETUP Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Slot Power Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Video Resolutions and Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Disk Drive Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Option Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DMA Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System I/O Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tested Operating Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Options Available from Epson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
A-3
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-5
A-5
A-6
A-6
A-6
A-7
A-8
A-10
A-11
A-11
A-12
A-13
A-14
A-20
A-21
Glossary
Index
Epson International marketing Locations
Introduction
Your new Epson” computer offers the following features:
®
Intel 486SX, DX, or DX2 processor upgradable to faster,
more powerful processors, including the Pentium™
OverDrive™
Energy Star compliant, low-power standby mode for the
video and hard disk drive for standard configurations
High-speed, 32-bit local bus interfaces for both SVGA video
and IDE hard disk drives
4MB of internal memory, expandable to 64MB
System and video BIOS shadow RAM
8KB of internal processor cache, with support for 64KB,
128KB, or 256KB of external cache
1 MB of onboard video memory, expandable to 2MB
Math coprocessor built into the microprocessor on DX,
DX2, and Pentium OverDrive systems
Local bus video with True Color support, which lets your
monitor display up to 16.8 million colors
Built-in VGA port
Two built-in serial ports and one built-in parallel port
One built-in PS/2” compatible keyboard port and one
built-in PS/2 compatible mouse port
introduction 1
Three l6-bit, full-length and two 8-bit, half-length ISA
option slots (if your system has a DX, DX2, or Pentium
OverDrive processor, access to the bottom 16-bit slot may
be blocked by the heat sink/fan assembly)
Support for up to two externally accessible and two
internal storage devices (see Appendix A for power
restrictions)
Password security and anti-virus features.
Your system contains local bus interfaces for the video and IDE
controllers. These buses can transfer data at the full speed of
your processor rather than at the standard 8.33 MHZ ISA bus
speed, so your system can access the hard disk drive and
process video data far more quickly. The video local bus,
combined with the standard 1MB of on-board video memory,
provides fast video response in a range of resolutions and
colors. (See Appendix A for a list of supported resolutions.)
In standard configurations, this computer complies with the
United States Environmental Protection Agencys Energy Star
Program, which promotes the manufacture of energy-efficient
printers, computers, and monitors. Your computer’s
“Green PC” feature places the hard disk drive in a low-power
standby mode when the mouse or keyboard has been inactive
for a specified period of time. It also stops sending video
signals to your monitor.
Note
If you have an Energy Star compliant monitor, it also goes
into a low-power standby mode because it isn’t receiving
video signals from your computer. (Screens on
noncompliant monitors go blank, but do not enter a
low-power standby mode.)
2 Introduction
Your computer’s SETUP program lets you select different
timeout periods for the hard disk drive and video signals so
you can ensure that the standby feature fits the way you work.
Your system may have been configured for you. If so,
everything you need to get started is already in place. The
settings for your hardware configuration have been set to
ensure optimal system performance. The hard disk drive
already contains the MS-DOS@ operating system and
Microsoft’ Windows.” In addition, the drivers needed to take
advantage of your system’s local bus features and enhanced video
resolutions have been installed for you. Just connect your keyboard,
mouse, and monitor and you’re ready to go.
Optional Equipment
You can easily upgrade your computer by installing additional
memory and a wide variety of options, as described below.
(Installation instructions are provided in Chapters 4 and 5.)
System Memory
By adding lMB, ZMB, 4h4B, 8h4B, 16MB, or 32MB SIMMs
(single inline memory modules) to the main system board, you
can expand the computer’s memory up to 64MB.
Cache Memory
You can increase the cache memory to 64KB,128KB, or 256KB
by installing additional SRAM chips on your main system
board. Additional cache allows your system to access
frequently used data faster, improving the overall performance
of the system.
Introduction 3
Video Memory
You can add video memory chips to your system board to
increase the video memory to 2MB, which allows you to use
higher video resolutions with more colors.
Microprocessor
Your system supports the following microprocessors:
486SX/25
486sxm
486DX/33
486DX/50
486DX2/50
486DX2/66
Pentium OverDrive.
Math Coprocessor
If your system contains a DX, DX2, or Pentium OverDrive
microprocessor, a math coprocessor is built into the chip.
Drives
Your system can support up to four mass storage devices,
including hard disk drives, diskette drives, a tape drive, a
CD-ROM, or an optical drive. As your storage needs expand,
you can install additional drives. (See Appendix A for power
restrictions.)
4 Introductiun
SVGA and IDE Drivers
Your computer comes with special SVGA and IDE drivers for
the integrated local bus SVGA and IDE hard disk drive
interfaces. The IDE driver lets you use the high-speed, 32-bit
local bus IDE hard disk drive interface which dramatically
increases the speed of your computer as it reads from and
writes to your hard disk drive.
The SVGA drivers allow you to take advantage of the local bus
and extended VGA features such as high resolutions and
132column text mode when you run popular application
programs.
If your system was configured for you, these drivers have
already been installed. If you need to install them yourself, see
Chapter 2 for instructions on installing the IDE driver. Readme
files on your driver diskettes tell you how to install drivers for
specific applications.
How to Use This Manual
This manual contains the information you need to get the best
results from your computer. You don’t have to read everything
in this book; see the following chapter summanaries to find the the
sections you need.
Chapter 1 provides simple instructions for setting up your
system and connecting peripheral devices such as the monitor
and printer.
Chapter 2 describes how to run the SETUP program to
define your computer’s configuration. You may need to do
this the first time you use your computer. If you change the
configuration later, you will need to run it again. This chapter
also describes how to install the IDE driver that allows you to
take advantage of your hard disk drive’s local bus capabilities.
Introduction 5
Chapter 3 covers general operating procedures, such as
resetting the computer, using the password, and changing the
processor speed.
Chapter 4 describes how to remove and replace the computer’s
cover, change jumper settings, and install optional equipment
such as microprocessor upgrades, option cards, and memory
modules.
Chapter 5 explains how to install and remove disk drives.
Chapter 6 contains troubleshooting tips.
Appendix A lists the specifications of your computer and the
operating environments that have been tested on your system.
At the end of this manual you’ll find a Glossary, an Index, and
a list of international marketing locations.
Conventions Used in This Manual
This manual uses the following type conventions:
Example
Meaning
Enter
Keys ycu press on the keyboard
Ctrl C
Keys you press at the same time; hold down the
key marked Ctrl and press the letter C
C:\DOS
Text as it appears on the screen
I
DISKCOPY A: B:
Text that you type exactly as shown
I
COM1
Names of labeled hardware elements
6 Introduction
where to Get Help
If you purchased your computer outside the United States,
please contact your dealer or the marketing location nearest
you for customer support and service. international marketing
locations are listed at the back of this manual.
If you purchased your computer in the United States, Epson
provides the following support services through the Epson
Connection” at (800) 922-8911. (You can also contact Epson at
(310) 782-0770 and ask for the Epson Connection.)
Technical assistance with the installation, configuration,
and operation of Epson products
On-site Servicer referral
Assistance in locating your nearest Authorized Epson
Reseller or Service Center
Sales of Epson ribbons, supplies, parts, documentation, and
accessories for your Epson product
Customer Relations
Epson technical information library fax service-also
available directly by calling the toll number (310) 782-4214
Product literature with technical specifications on our
current and new products.
If you need help with any software you are using, see the
documentation that came with it or contact the manufacturer
for technical support.
Introduction 7
CompuServe On-line Support
The fastest way to access helpful tips, specifications, drivers,
application notes, tables for DIP switch or jumper settings, and
bulletins is through the Epson America Forum on
CompuServe.®
If you are not currently a member of CompuServe, you are
eligible for a free introductory membership as an owner of an
Epson product. This membership entitles you to:
An introductory $15 credit on CompuServe
Your own user ID and password
A complimentary subscription to CompuServe Magazine,
CompuServe’s monthly publication.
To take advantage of this offer, call (800) 848-8199 in the United
States and Canada and ask for representative #529. In other
countries, call (614) 529-1611 or your local CompuServe access
number.
If you are already a CompuServe member, simply type
GO EPSON at the menu prompt to reach the Epson America
Forum.
8 Introduction
Chapter 1
Setting Up Your System
This chapter briefly describes how to set up your computer. It
includes the following information:
Getting started
Connecting peripheral devices
Turning the computer on and off.
Getting Started
Follow the instructions below for choosing a location for your
new system and unpacking it.
Choosing a Location
When you are ready to set up your system, choose a safe,
convenient location that provides the following:
A flat, hard surface. Surfaces like beds and carpets attract
static electricity, which can erase data on your disks,
damage the computer’s circuitry, and prevent proper
ventilation.
Moderate environmental conditions. Select a cool, dry area
and protect your computer from extremes in temperature,
humidity, dust, and smoke. Avoid direct sunlight or other
sources of heat.
Good air circulation. Leave several inches of space around
the computer so air can move freely.
Setting Up Your System
1-1
No electromagnetic interference. Do not place your system
too close to any electrical device, such as a telephone or
television, which generates an electromagnetic field.
Appropriate power source. Connect all your equipment
with the appropriate power cords for the power source in
your area.
Unpacking Your Computer
When you unpack your system components, make sure you
have these items:
Your system may also include Epson’s PS/2 compatible mouse
and may come with the operating system and software already
installed on a hard disk drive.
If you purchased any optional equipment that wasn’t installed
at the factory-such as option cards, memory modules, a hard
disk, or a diskette drive--install these options before you
connect your computer. See Chapters 4 and 5 for instructions.
1-2
Setting Up Your System
Connecting Peripheral Devices
Use the illustration below to locate the ports on the back of
your system as you connect the keyboard, monitor, printer, and
other devices.
Your system also includes a removable panel above the mouse
and keyboard ports if you want to install a game port
connector to the game port interface on the system board.
Connecting a Keyboard
To connect a keyboard, hold the cable connector so the arrow
on the connector faces up. Insert it into the port marked K/B.
Setting Up Your System
1-3
Connecting a Mouse
If you have a PS/2 compatible mouse, connect it to the
computer’s built-in mouse port by inserting the connector into
the port marked MOUSE.
caution
Although the connectors and ports for the mouse and
keyboard are physically identical, they cannot be used
interchangeably. Be sure to plug the mouse connector into
the MOUSE port, or you may damage your system.
If your system has not already been configured, you may need
to install a mouse driver. See your mouse manual for
instructions. (If you are using Windows, the Windows
installation program installed a mouse driver for Windows
applications.)
Connecting a Monitor
YOU Can connect your VGA or SVGA monitor to the computer’s
built-in VGA port as described below.
1. Place your monitor on top of or near the computer. Turn the
monitor and computer around so the backs are facing you.
2. There should be two cables provided with your monitor: the
monitor cable (to connect it to the computer) and the power
cable (to connect it to the power source). On most monitors,
the monitor cable is permanently attached to the monitor. If
your monitor does not have an attached cable, connect the
cable to it now.
3. Examine the connector on the monitor cable and line it up
with the VGA port on the computer. Then insert the
connector into the port.
1-4
Setting Up Your System
Caution
To avoid damaging the connector, be careful not to bend
the pins when you insert it.
4. If the connector has retaining screws, tighten them.
5. Plug the monitor’s power cord into the power inlet on the
back of the monitor.
6. Plug the other end of the power cord into a grounded
electrical outlet or into the power outlet on the back of the
computer.
Caution
Before you plug the monitor's power cord into the back
of your computer, make sure the monitor's power
requirements do not exceed 1 Amp.
Connecting a Printer or Other Device
Your computer has one bidirectional parallel and two serial
ports. To connect a printer or other peripheral device, follow
the appropriate instructions below.
Using the parallel port
Follow these steps to connect a parallel printer to your
computer:
1. Place the printer next to the computer so that the backs are
facing you.
2. Align the connector end of the printer cable with the
PARALLEL port and plug it in. If the connector has retaining
screws, tighten them.
Setting Up Your System
1-5
3. Connect the other end of the cable to the printer. To secure
the cable, squeeze the clips at each side of the printer port
and push them into place.
4. Plug the printer’s power cord into a grounded electrical
outlet.
Using the serial ports
If you have a printer, a modem, or other device with a serial
interface, you can connect it to one of the serial (RS-232C) ports
on the back of the computer. Make sure you have a cable
compatible with a DB-9P connector.
To connect a serial device, insert the connector into one of the
ports marked COMl and COM2. If you are connecting only one
serial device, use the COMl port.
Connecting the Power Cord
Follow these steps to connect the computer’s power cord:
1. Plug the power cord into the power inlet on the back of the
computer.
Warning
To avoid an electric shock, be sure to plug the cord into
the computer before plugging it into the wall outlet.
2. Plug the other end of the power cord into a grounded
electrical outlet.
1-6
Setting Up Your System
Always wait at least 20 seconds after you turn off the
power before you turn it on again to prevent possible
damage to the computer’s electrical circuitry.
Do not leave a beverage near your system. Spilled liquid
can damage the circuitry of your equipment.
Follow these steps to turn on your system:
1. Turn your computer around so the front panel faces you.
Place your monitor, printer, and other devices in a
convenient arrangement.
2. If there is a protective card in the diskette drive, remove it.
3. Turn on the monitor, printer, and any other devices
connected to the computer.
4. Turn on the computer by pressing the power button on the
right side of the front panel.
The power indicator lights up, then the screen displays the
BIOS version number and copyright information. The
computer performs its power-on diagnostics, which are a
series of checks to make sure everything is working
correctly. During diagnostics, you see a message telling you
to press F2 to run the SETUP program. (Chapter 2 describes
starting and using SETUP.)
when the computer completes its testing, it displays a screen
describing the system’s configuration. If necessary, press
the Pause button on the keyboard to view the
configuration screen. Then press any key to continue the
startup process.
1-8
Setting Up Your System
5. If necessary, use the controls on your monitor to adjust the
brightness and contrast until you can easily see the
characters on the screen. If your monitor has horizontal and
vertical hold controls, you may need to use them to
stabilize the display.
if your system is configured to automatically load a program
(such as Windows or a word processing program), you see
the first menu or screen display of that program. If not, you
may see the operating system prompt, such as c : \ > or
A:\ >.
If there is no operating system installed on your computer,
you see an error message. Ignore the message for now; once
you install the operating system, you will not see this
message.
Now you need to run the SETUP program to make sure your
computer is configured properly- First turn off the computer, as
described below, then see Chapter 2 for instructions. When you
finish running SETUP, be sure to see “Post-SETUP Procedures”
on page 2-16 for guidelines on what you need to do next.
Turning Off the Computer
Whenever you turn off your system, follow these steps:
1. Save your data and exit any application program you are
using.
2. Check the hard disk drive light and the diskette drive light(s)
to make sure they are not on. Do not turn off the computer
if a drive light is on, because you can damage the drive or
lose data.
3. Remove any diskette(s) from the diskette drive(s).
Setting Up Your System
1-9
4. Press the power button to turn off the computer.
5. Turn off the monitor, printer, and any other peripheral
devices.
1-10
Setting Up Your System
Chapter 2
Running SETUP and lnstalling Drivers
Your computer has a configuration program, SETUP, contained
within the BIOS chip on the system board. This program allows
you to change the settings for your hardware configuration.
The computer also comes with several drivers and utilities on
diskette. These drivers and utilities let you take advantage of
some of the advanced features of your system, like the local bus
hard disk drive interface and the local bus SVGA capabilities of
the built-in video interface.
This chapter describes using SETUP and installing the local bus
IDE driver. If you want information about installing video
drivers or utilities, see the Readme files included on the
diskettes that came with your system.
Using SETUP
You may need to run the SETUP program the first time you use
your computer. If your system came unconfigured, you need to
define how it is set up. If your system was configured for you,
you may want to check the settings or adjust the date and time.
You also may need to run SETUP again later if you change
your configuration.
SETUP lets you verify or change the following:
System settings such as date, time, diskette drives, and type
of video display
Automatic or manual selection of hard disk drives
Automatic or manual selection of advanced hardware
features for optimizing system performance
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-1
System booting options
Security password and anti-virus features
Green PC options, such as the time intervals before the
system and the hard disk drive go into low-power standby
mode.
SETUP also allows you to see summary information about your
system.
The SETUP program and the factory default options for your
computer are stored in the computer’s ROM BIOS (read-only
memory, basic input/output system). The configuration
information you enter is stored in an area of memory called
CMOS RAM. This memory is backed up by a battery, so it is
not erased when you turn off or reset the computer.
Starting the SETUP Program
When you start your computer, it performs some power-on
diagnostics. During these diagnostics, you may see the
following message:
Press <F2> to enter SETUP
Press F2 to run SETUP. This message is only on the screen for a
few seconds. If you missed it, restart your computer and try
again. (If you want, you can disable this message in SETUP.)
If, during power-on diagnostics, the system detects an error in
your system configuration, you hear two beeps and see an
error message followed by this message:
Press <Fl> to resume, <F2> to Setup
Press F2 to run SETUP.
2-2
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Using the System Setup Option
When you select this option, you see the System Setup screen.
From this screen, you can set the system time and date, define
your video display type, check system memory, and define the
diskette drives.
Move the cursor to the value you want to change. Then
increase or decrease the value until you see the one you want.
Setting the time and date
The real-time clock in your computer continuously tracks the
date and time-even when the computer is turned off. Once
you set the system Time and system Date options, you
should not need to change them, unless you adjust the time for
daylight savings or a different time zone. (The computer
automatically changes the date for leap years.)
Setting the video display type
The Video System option allows you to define the type of
display you are using. If you have connected a VGA or SVGA
monitor to the computer’s built-in VGA port, select EGA/VGA.
If you connected a monitor that doesn’t support VGA to a
video adapter card installed in your system, select either the
CGA 80 x 25 or the Monochrome option. If you installed a
video adapter card, make sure you disable the on-board SVGA
controller by setting jumpers J36 and J37 to the Off position.
(See Chapter 4 for information on jumper settings.)
Checking System Memory
Your computer comes with 4MB of RAM on a SIMM. MS-DOS
and application programs that run under MS-DOS use the first
64OKB of memory. The memory above 1MB is extended
memory.
2-4
Running SETUP and installing Drivers
When you boot your system, the system BIOS updates the
memory size automatically. You see the memory configuration
displayed in the System Memory and Extended Memory
fields on this SETUP screen.
You cannot change these values; if they are not what you
expect them to be, check your jumper settings. Also, check that
the SIMM(s) are securely seated in their sockets. (See
Chapter 4.)
Setting the diskette drive(s)
On your system, diskette drive A is the 3.5-inch, highdensity
drive installed in the lower drive bay. You may also have
another drive of a different size or capacity; this is drive B.
Check the settings for both drives and correct them if necessary.
Assigning Hard Disk Drive Types
The Fixed Disk Setup option defines the types of hard
disk drives you have installed in your system. When you select
this option, you see the Fixed Disk Setup screen. From this
screen, select Fixed Disk 0 Control or Fixed Disk 1
Control.
Your computer comes with a hard disk auto-sensing feature.
Press Enter when the Autotype Fixed Disk option is
highlighted. The system detects the type of hard disk drive and
fills in the remaining fields on the screen.
If you are using an older drive or a preformatted drive, it may
not support the auto-sensing feature. If you press Enter when
the Autotype Fixed Disk option is highlighted and the
drive parameters do not match your drive, check Appendix A
to see if your drive’s parameters are included in the hard disk
drive table. If not, you need to define your own drive type or
reformat the disk. See the next section for instructions on how
to define your own drive type.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-5
Defining your own drive type
If the parameters for your hard disk do not match the
parameters detected by the auto-sensing feature, or if you want
to use your drive with parameters other than the defaults, you
can define your own drive type. (See Appendix A for a list of
predefined hard disk drive types and their parameters.)
To define your own drive type, follow these steps:
1. Move the cursor to Type and select User.
2. Type the values in each field that are appropriate for your
hard disk drive. Press Tab or and to move the cursor to
the next field.
3. When you leave SETUP, make sure you save your changes.
Note
If you are going to install NetWare
286, version 22, you
must enable the System shadow option. See page 2-7.
Using the Advanced System Setup Options
When you select the Advanced System Setup option from
the Main Menu, you see the Advanced System Setup screen.
From this screen, you can select options that allow you to
configure the computer’s cache memory and shadow memory,
and define the advanced chipset.
Note
Your system can automatically configure the Advanced
System Setup options for you. To avoid configuration
problems, you should let the system configure these options.
2-6
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Configuning cache memory
The system can configure your Memory Cache options or
you can manually set them. If you have installed external
cache, enabling cache memory improves system performance,
especially in large data retrieval and processing environments.
If you choose to configure the cache memory yourself (rather
than let the system configure it for you), you can define the
burst wait states and two non-cacheable areas of memory.
However, it’s a good idea to let the system automatically
configure this feature.
Configuring memory shadow
The system can configure the Memory Shadow options or
you can manually enable shadowing for your system and video
memory as well as for specific blocks of ROM.
Your computer can access RAM faster than ROM. The options
on this screen allow your system to copy the contents of its
system and/or video ROM into RAM. When you use
shadowing, your system can perform certain operations faster,
providing a significant increase in performance.
Note
For the best system performance, always set the System
shadow and the Video shadow optionsto Enabled.
If you enable shadowing for specific blocks, the ROM located in
this block is copied to the shadow area.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-7
Configuring chipset registers
The system can automatically set your Advanced Chipset
Control options or you can manually set them to change the
values in the chipset registers and optimize your system’s
performance. getting these values correctly increases your
system performance; however, setting these values incorrectly
may cause your system to malfunction or shut down. Be sure to
set the Auto Configuration option to Enabled to let
the system automatically configure these options to avoid
problems.
Setting the Boot Options
When you select Boot Options from the Main Menu, you
see the Boot Options screen. Options on this screen allow you
to define the boot sequence and determine what information
you see when you start your system.
The Disk drive boot sequence optiondetermines the
order in which the computer checks the drives for an operating
system when you turn it on or reset it. The following table
describes the available options.
Disk drive boot sequence options
select
TO
A: then C:
Load operating system from drive A. If it isn’t
there, loads it from drive C.
C: than A:
Load operating system from drive C. if it isn’t
there, loads it from drive A.
c: only
2-8
I Load operating system from drive C.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
I
I
If you set the Disk drive boot sequence option to
C: only, you can disable the Floppy seek option so the
system doesn’t access the diskette drive during the startup
procedure. Disabling this option decreases the time needed to
start the system.
The other options on this screen determine what you see when
your system starts.
The Display SETUP prompt during POST option
allows you to disable the message Press <F2> to enter
SETUP that you see during power-on diagnostics. You may
want to disable this prompt to prevent unauthorized users
from seeing the SETUP prompt. Even when the message is
disabled, however, you can still start SETUP by pressing F2
during power-on diagnostics.
The Pause on POST errors option allows you to disable
the error message, followed by the message Press <F1> t o
resume, <F2> to Setup that you see when the system
identifies a configuration error. If you disable this option, the
system ignores configuration errors it finds during power-on
diagnostics and starts as it normally would. It’s a good idea to
keep this option enabled.
By disabling the system summary screen at boot
option, you can disable the system summary screen that you
see when you start the system. If you disable this option, your
system starts more quickly. You can see the same screen by
selecting the System Summary option from the SETUP Main
Menu. (See page 2-14).
Running SETUP and InstaIling Drivers
2-9
Settlng the Security and Anti-Virus Options.
When you select the Security and Anti-Virus option
from the Main Menu, you see the Security and Anti&Virus
screen. The password options on this screen let you define both
a Supervisor and a User password. You can also specify
whether a password is required when you start the system.
The virus protection options on this screen allow you to write
protect the boot sector on your hard disk drive and display
prompts reminding you to periodically run a virus detection
program and back up your hard disk drive. A Diskette
Access option allows you to restrict diskette access at either
the User or Supervisor password level.
Entering or changing a password
You can define both User and Supervisor password levels for
this system. If this system will be used by more than one
person, you may want to set a Supervisor password for
yourself and a User password for others you don’t want to
have complete access to the system. For instance, you may
want to restrict access to the diskette drives or the virus
protection features on this system.
If you enable the Password on boot option, you must
enter the Supervisor or User password each time you turn on
the system. If you do not enable this option, but you’ve defined
passwords, you must enter the password each time you start
SETUP. If both a Supervisor password and a User password are
enabled, SETUP displays options for setting the User password
only to users who logged on with a User password.
2-10
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
To specify a User password, you must first specify a Supervisor
password. Follow these steps to enter or change a Supervisor
password:
1. Select the Set Supervisor Password option and press
Enter.
2. You see a Set Supervisor Password window. Type the
password you want to use, then press Enter. You can define
a password of up to eight characters.
3. Type the same password a second time and press Enter. You
see a message that your changes have been saved.
4. Press the spacebar. The Supervisor Password In
option now displays Enabled.
To set a User password, select the Set User Password
option and follow the steps above.
Deleting passwords
To delete your passwords, follow these steps:
1. Set the Password on boot option to Disabled.
2. Delete the User password by pressing Enter for both the
password field and the confirmation field. Don’t type any
characters in these fields.
3. Then delete the Supervisor password the same way.
Note
You must delete the User password before SETUP will allow
you to access the Supervisor password.
If you have forgotten your password, see “Password Problems”
in Chapter 6.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-11
Using the Virus Protection Features
Several options on the Security and Anti-Virus screen allow
you to define system protection features.
The Diskette Access option allows you to restrict access
to your diskette drives based on the password levels you have
defined. This prevents unauthorized users from accessing the
drives and possibly introducing a virus to your system. You
can restrict diskette access only if passwords are enabled and
you have enabled the Password on boot option.
If you select Supervisor for this option, you can access the
diskette drives only if you enter the Supervisor password when
you start your system. Someone who starts the system with a
User password, however, will see an error message when he or
she tries to access the diskette drive. If you select User for
the Diskette Access option, you can access the diskette
drives whether you enter the Supervisor or User password
when you start the system.
Note
To use passwords for diskette drive access, you must enable
the Par sword on boot option. If you select a password
level for Diskette Access, but leave the Password
on boot option disabled, you see an error message
whenever you try to access your diskette drive.
You can also protect your system by selecting W r i t e
protect for the Fixed disk boot sector o p t i o n .
When this option is enabled, the system displays an error
message when a program tries to write to the boot sector of
your hard disk drive. To use a legitimate program (such as the
MS-DOS FORMAT command) you must disable the write
protect option.
2-12
Running SETUP and Installing Drives
Two additional options on this screen allow. you to define time
intervals for the system to display a prompt asking you
whether you have performed your scheduled virus check or
your scheduled backup for your hard disk drive’. You can
disable these prompts or have them display Daily, Weekly,
or Monthly. If you respond that you have not performed
these functions, however, the system still starts normally.
Using the Green PC Features
The Green PC options allow you to define how the
energy-saving features of this Energy Star compliant system
will work for you. The options on the Green PC Features screen
allow you to disable the energy-saving feature or set time-out
periods to put the system and hard disk drive in a low-energy
standby mode.
The Inactivity Timer1 option sets the time-out period
for video signals to your monitor. When the mouse or
keyboard has been inactive for the time period you select here,
your computer stops sending video signals to your monitor. If
your monitor is also Energy Star compliant, it goes into a
low-power standby mode because it isn’t receiving video
signals from your computer. Screens on monitors that aren’t
Energy Star compliant will go blank when your system is in
standby mode.
If you select a time period for the Lockout Timer as well as
the Inactivity Timer1 option, the system Won’t accept
your keyboard input for the specified period of time after your
system has returned to an active mode. This allows time for
your monitor to return to full power also.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-13
The Fixed Disk Timeout option determines the time-out
period for your hard disk drive. The hard disk drive goes into a
low-power standby mode when the mouse and keyboard have
been inactive for the period of time you’ve indicated.
Note
Some hard disk drives do not support a low-power standby
mode. Also, the delay caused by the hard disk drive
returning to active mode may cause errors in some
applications. If you have problems, you may want to disable
the Fixed Disk Timeout option.
Viewing the System Summary
When you select the System summary option from the Main
Menu, the SETUP program displays a summary of the
configuration settings for your system.
This summary screen is the same one you see when you start
your system. You can choose not to have the system display
this screen so that system startup is faster. See page 2-8 for
information on disabling this option.
2-14
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Exiting SETUP
When you leave SETUP, you can save your settings, or exit
SETUP without saving your settings. You can also return all
values to the factory defaults.
To leave SETUP, press Esc from any SETUP screen. From the
SETUP Main Menu, you can perform the following functions:
Load ROM
Default Values
Loads the factory default settings
stored in ROM back into CMOS.
If you change your system
configuration using the SETUP
program and then have problems,
you can load ROM values to boot
the system and start over.
Load Values
from CMOS
Loads the current values stored in
CMOS for all SETUP options. This
ignores any changes you have
made through SETUP.
Save Values to
Saves the changes you have made
to your configuration to CMOS.
CMOS
Press Esc to leave SETUP and restart your computer.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-15
After you run SETUP for the first time, you may need to install
the operating system on your computer (if it is not already
installed). See your operating system manual for instructions.
Once you have installed your operating system, install any
software you plan to use. See your application program
manuals for instructions.
Note
If you plan to install IDE or video drivers for Windows
applications, you must install Windows before you can
install the drivers.
Installing the IDE Driver
If you want to take advantage of the high-speed performance
available through your system’s local bus interface for the hard
disk drive, you must install the IDE (integrated drive
electronics) driver included on the Drivers diskettes.
If your system was configured for you, this driver and the
SVGA drivers have been installed for you.
Before you install the IDE driver, make sure you back up your
hard disk drive. Then use the installation program on the
Drivers diskette 1 to install the driver.
Note
Make sure you use the installation program to install the
IDE driver. If you simply copy the driver files, the driver
won’t work correctly.
2-16
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Follow these steps to install the IDE driver:
1. Insert the Drivers diskette 1 in drive A.
2. Log onto the IDE subdirectory on drive A.
3. Type the following and press Enter:
INSTALL
4. Follow the instructions on the screen to install the IDE driver
on your hard disk. This installation program changes your
system’s CONFIGSYS file so the system loads the IDE
driver as part of its startup procedure. If you select the IDE
driver for Windows, this program also modifies the
SYSTEM.INI file for Windows.
Note
You should always install the IDE driver for DOS. If you
are using Windows, make sure you also install the IDE
driver for Windows. Windows must be installed before
you install the driver for Windows.
After installing the driver, the system reboots.
Note
Not all hard disk drives can take advantage of the local bus
IDE interface. To take advantage of this feature, your hard
disk drive must support a 32-bit data path that utilizes
double-word I/O. To find out whether your hard drive
utilizes double-word I/O, see the hardware specifications
for the drive or contact the vendor of the drive and request a
product specification.
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
2-17
Installing Video Drivers
For instructions on installing video drivers, see the Readme
files included on the Drivers diskettes.
2-18
Running SETUP and Installing Drivers
Chapter 3
Using Your Computer
This chapter briefly describes the following operations:
Working comfortably
Using energy wisely
Using your Green PC features
Inserting and removing diskettes
Stopping a command or program
Resetting the computer
Using the password
Changing the processor speed.
Working Comfortably
This section provides some tips for creating a comfortable work
environment.
Use good posture. Keep your elbows, hips, and knees bent
at approximately 90 degree angles and keep your wrists as
close to horizontal as possible.
Vary your posture often and take frequent breaks. Stand
up, stretch, and move around.
Use a good chair. Make sure your chair supports your
lower back. A chair with padded armrests lets you rest
your arms as you work.
Using Your Computer
3-1
Keep your copy stand at the same eye level as your screen.
This reduces eye and neck strain. Also, rest your eyes
occasionally by closing them or focusing on a fixed spot in
the distance.
Be gentle with your keyboard. Too much force creates
tension in your hands. Also, make sure your work surface
has enough room for you to move the mouse or other
pointing device freely.
Use good lighting that isn’t too bright. Try to keep bright
light sources out of your field of vision when you are
looking at the screen.
Place your monitor directly in front of you and sit about an
arm’s length away from it. The top of the screen should be
slightly below your eye level so you look down at the
screen. Position the monitor so that no light is reflected
from the screen.
Using Energy Wisely
By purchasing this low-power, Energy Star compliant
computer, you join a growing number of users concerned about
conserving energy. Here are a few additional tips you can use
to be even more energy-wise:
If your printer and monitor aren’t Energy Star compliant,
turn them off when you’re not using them.
Use the print preview option on your software before you
print something. You’ll be able to catch formatting errors
before you commit them to paper.
3-2
Using Your Computer
If you have an electronic mail system available to you, send
E-mail rather than memos. Not only is this faster, but you’ll
save paper and storage space too.
Use recycled paper whenever you can.
Using Your Green PC Features
Your computer places the system, the hard disk drive, or both
into a low-power standby mode when the keyboard or mouse
has been inactive for the time periods you select in SETUP. See
Chapter 2 for information on setting these values.
When your system is in standby mode, the NumLock light on
your keyboard flashes and your screen is blank. Press any key
or move the mouse to resume activity.
If the hard disk drive is in standby mode, it doesn’t return to
active mode until you access it. You’ll hear it start again. It will
take a second or two to reach its operating speed and read or
write to the disk. The hard disk drive access light turns on
when the system begins accessing the disk.
Note
Some hard disk drives do not support a low-power standby
mode. Also, the delay caused by the hard disk drive
returning to active mode may cause errors in some
applications. If you have problems, you may want to disable
the standby mode for the hard disk drive.
Using Your Computer
3-3
Inserting and Removing Diskettes
To insert a diskette into a 3.5-inch drive, hold the diskette with
the label facing up and the shutter leading into the drive, as
shown in the following illustration. Slide the diskette into the
drive until it clicks into place.
To insert a diskette into a 5.25-inch drive, hold the diskette with
the label facing up and the read/write slot leading into the
drive. When the disk is completely in the drive, turn down the
latch to secure the diskette in the drive.
When you want to remove the diskette, make sure the drive
light is off; then press the release button or turn the latch.
Remove the diskette and store it properly.
caution
Never remove a diskette, reset the computer, or turn it off
while a diskette drive light is on. You could lose data. Also,
remove all diskettes before you turn off the computer.
3-4
Using Your Computer
Stopping a Command or Program
You may sometimes need to stop a command or program while
it is running. If you have entered a DOS or application program
command that you want to stop, try one of the following:
Press Pause
Press Ctrl C
Press Ctrl Break.
If these methods do not work, you may need to reset the
computer as described below. Do not turn off the computer to
exit a program or stop a command unless you have to, because
the computer erases any data you did not save.
Resetting the Computer
Occasionally, you may want to clear the computer’s memory
without turning it off. You can do this by resetting the
computer.
For example, if an error occurs and the computer does not
respond to your keyboard entries, you can reset it to reload
your operating system and try again. However, resetting erases
any data in memory that you have not saved; so reset only if
necessary.
Caution
Do not reset the computer to exit a program. Some programs
classify and store new data when you exit them. If you reset
the computer without properly exiting a program, you may
lose data.
Using Your Computer
3-5
If you set the Disk drive boot sequence. in SETUP to
C: only (see Chapter 2), the operating system must be on
the hard disk when you reset the computer. If you selected the
other options, the operating system must be either on the hard
disk or on a diskette in drive A. If you do not have a hard disk,
insert the operating system diskette in drive A. If you are using
DOS, press Ctrl Alt and Del to reset the system.
You can also press the RESET button located on the front right
side of your computer. (See the following illustration.) The
screen displays nothing for a moment and then the computer
reloads the operating system.
If resetting the computer does not correct the problem, you
probably need to turn it off and on again. Remove any
diskette(s) from the diskette drive(s). Turn off the computer
and wait 20 seconds. If your operating system is not on the
hard disk drive, insert a bootable diskette (one that contains the
necessary portions of the operating system) in drive A. Then
turn on the computer.
3-6
Using Your Computer
Using a Password
Using SETUP, you can define both a Supervisor level password
and a User level password. You can also specify whether a
password is required when you start the system. This
password can also control who has access to the diskette drives.
If you enabled the Password on boot option in SETUP,
you must enter the Supervisor or User password every time
you turn on or reset the computer. If you enter a password but
disable the Password on boot option, you must enter the
password when you start SETUP.
If you set the Diskette Access option to Supervisor, you
can access a diskette drive only if you entered the Supervisor
password when you started your system. If you entered a User
password when you started the system but the Diskette
Access option is set to Supervisor, you see an error message
when you access the diskette drive.
When you need to enter your password, you’ll see the prompt,
E n t e r password :. As you type your password, you see a
rectangle for each character you type. When you press Enter,
the computer loads the operating system (or starts SETUP).
If you don’t enter the correct password the first time you type
it, you can try two more times. If you haven’t entered the
correct password on the third try, the computer locks up to
prevent unauthorized access. You see the message:
System Disabled1
You must either turn off the computer or press the RESET
button to start over. In this situation, you cannot reset the
computer by pressing Ctrl Alt and Del.
Using Your Computer
3-7
Note
If you want to delete your password, you must run the
SETUP program and follow the Istructions for deleting a
password in Chapter 2.
If you do not remember your password, see “Password
Problems” in Chapter 6.
Changing the Processor Speed
Your computer’s processor can operate at two speeds: fast (the
speed of your microprocessor) or slow (8 MHz). The slow
speed is available to provide compatibility with older
application programs.
When your computer is operating at fast speed, the SPEED light
on the front panel is on. When the computer is operating at
slow speed, the light is off.
You should use fast speed for almost everything you do
because your programs will work faster. However, certain
application programs have specific timing requirements and
can run only at the slower speed. See your software manual to
determine if this is the case.
Some copy-protected programs require the computer to run at
slow speed while accessing the program on a diskette. These
programs also usually require you to leave a key disk-the
diskette that contains the copy protection-in the diskette
drive. If you use a copy-protected program, you can change the
speed to slow to access the diskette and return it to fast speed
when you are finished.
3-8
Using Your Computer
You can change the processor speed temporarily by entering
one of the following commands from the numeric keypad on
your keyboard:
To select slow speed, press Ctrl Alt and then press the -key
on the numeric keypad. This turns off the speed light.
To select fast speed, press Ctrl Alt and then press + on the
numeric keypad. The speed light comes on.
Note
You can use the commands listed above while you are
running a program. However, if the program uses one of
these commands for another function, you cannot use it to
change the processor speed.
The speed setting remains in effect until you do one of the
following
Reset your computer
Turn off your computer
Change the speed with another keyboard command
Change the jumper setting of J22 (as described in
chapter 4).
Using Your Computer
3-9
Chapter 4
Installing and Removing Options
You can enhance the performance of your computer by adding
optional equipment such as system, video, or cache memory
modules, option cards, or a microprocessor upgrade.
This chapter first describes how to remove your computer’s
cover to install options and how to replace the cover when you
are finished. It then describes the following:
Locating the internal components
Changing the jumper settings
Installing and removing SIMMs (single inline memory
modules)
Installing and removing option cards
Adding video memory
Installing external cache
Installing microprocessor upgrades.
Caution
Never install options or change jumper settings when the
computer is turned on or the power cable is connected to the
computer.
Once you have installed your options, see “Post-installation
Procedures” on page 4-29.
Installing and Removing Options
4-1
Removing the Cover
You need to remove the computer’s cover to install any of the
options described in this chapter or to install or remove a disk
drive (as described in Chapter 5).
Follow these steps to remove the cover:
1. Turn off the computer and then any peripheral devices
(including the monitor and printer).
2. Disconnect the computer’s power cable from the electrical
outlet and from the back panel. Also disconnect any other
cables that are connected to the computer, including the
keyboard cable.
3. If the monitor is on top of the computer, lift it off and set it
to one side.
4. Turn the computer around so the back panel is facing you.
5. Remove the three screws securing the back panel.
4-2
Installing and Removing Options
6. Grasp the sides of the cover and lift it straight up, as shown
below:
7. Set the cover aside.
8. Ground yourself to the computer by touching the metal
surface of the back panel.
Warning
Be sure to ground yourself by touching the back panel of the
computer every time you remove the cover. If you are not
properly grounded, you could generate an electric shock
that could damage a component when you touch it.
Installing and Removing Options
4-3
Replacing the Cover
When you are ready to replace the computer’s cover, follow
these steps:
1. Make sure all the internal components are installed
Properly.
2. Check all cable connections, especially those that might have
been loosened during your work.
3. Make sure all cables are out of the way so they do not catch
on the cover.
4. Insert the front of the cover between the front bezel and the
chassis of the computer and guide it straight down. (See the
illustration on page 4-3.)
5. Replace the three cover retaining screws.
6. Reconnect the computer to the monitor, printer, keyboard,
and any other peripheral devices you have. Then reconnect
the power cable to the back of the computer and to an
electrical outlet.
4-4
Installing and Removing Options
Locating the Internal Components
As you follow the instructions in this chapter, refer to the
illustration below to locate the different components inside
your computer.
Installing and Removing Options
4-5
Changing the Jumper Settings
The main system board in your computer has a number of
jumpers that control certain functions. These jumpers are preset
at the factory to default positions. See the illustration below to
locate the jumpers on the system board.
Note
You may need to change the jumpers shown here. Other
jumpers on the system board are for service purposes only.
4-6
Installing and Removing Options
Use the information in the following tables to change jumper
settings, if necessary.
Jumper
number
Jumper
setting
Function
J5
1-2*
2-3
Assigns PARALLEL port as LPT1
Assigns PARALLEL port as LPT2
J6
1-2*
2-3
Assigns COM1 serial port as COM1
Assigns COM1 serial port as COM3**
J7
1 - 2*
2-3
Assigns COM2 serial port as COM2
Assigns COM2 serial port as COM4**
J8
1-2*
2-3
Enables diskette drive controller
Disables diskette drive controller
J 1 4t
Off *
On
VGA IRQ9 disable
VGA IRQ9 enable
J16
1-2 ***
Selects a CPU clock speed of 33 MM (486SX/33,
486DX/33,486DX2/66, and Pentium OverDrive)
Selects a CPU clock speed of 50 MM (DX/50)
Selects a CPU clock speed of 25 MM (486SX/25,
486DX2/50)
3-4
5-6
J22
O f f*
On
Selects fast speed
Selects 8 MM speed
J34
2 - 3*
3-4
Selects normal system board battery operation
Discharges CMOS memory (resets SETUP to defautts)
1-2*
2-3
Enables the IDE hard disk drive controller
Disables the IDE hard disk drive controller
J35
++
* Factory setting
**
***
t
You can use MS-DOS to automatically reassign parallel and serial ports.
Check your MS-DOS manual for more information.
Setting depends on CPU
Do not change this jumper setting.
tt If you have trouble changing the setting of jumper J35. remove the option
card connector board. Remove the two screws that secure the board to
the chassis, then Iii the board straight up and out of the socket.
Installing and Removing Options
4-7
External cache jumper settings’
l
cache size
J25
J26
J27
J28
64KB
1-2
1-2
off
2-3
128KB
2-3
1-2
1-2
1-2
256KB
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-3
If you have no external cache installed. the position of these jumpers does
not matter.
Processor type jumper settings
Processor
J17
J19
486DX/DX2, or Pentium OverDrive
1-2, 3-4
1-2
486SX
2-3
off
SVCA jumper function
J36
J37
Enable on-board SVGA
On’
On’
Disable on-board SVGA
Off
off
SVGA jumper settings
* Factory settings
Setting the Jumper
If you need to change any jumper settings, follow these steps:
1. Refer to the illustration on page 4-6 to locate the jumpers.
2. If there are any option cards installed in your computer, you
need to remove them to access the jumpers. See page 4-19.
4-8
Installing and Removing Options
3. A jumper’s setting is determined by where the jumper is
placed on the pins. Use the following table to identify the
pin settings for 2-pin, 3-pin, and 4-pin jumpers. To identify
pin 1, look at the system board under the jumper. A
triangle is traced on the board at pin 1.
To move a jumper from one position to another, use
needle-nose pliers or tweezers to pull it off its pins and
gently move it to the desired position.
Caution
Be careful not to bend the jumper pins or damage any
components on the main system board.
4. Replace any option cards you removed. See page 4-14 for
instructions.
installing and Removing Options
4-9
Installing Memory Modules (SIMMS)
Your computer comes with 4MB of memory on a SIMM. By
installing additional SIMMs, you can increase the amount of
memory in your computer up to 64MB.
There are two SIMM sockets on the main system board, and
each can contain one memory module. You can install 1MB,
2MB, 4MB, 8MB, 16MB, and 32MB SIMMs.
The following table shows the possible SIMM configurations.
(When the front of the computer is facing you, BANK 0 is on
the right. An x in the table below indicates that no SIMM is
installed.)
SlMM configurations
4-10
BANK0
BANK 1
Total memory
4MB
X
4MB
4MB
1MB
5MB
4MB
2MB
6MB
4MB
4MB
8MB
8MB
X
8MB
8MB
1MB
9MB
8MB
2MB
10MB
4MB
8MB
12MB
8MB
4MB
12MB
8MB
8MB
16MB
16MB
X
16MB
16MB
1MB
17MB
16MB
2MB
18MB
16MB
4MB
20MB
Installing and Removing Options
SlMM configurations (continued)
BANK0
BANK 1
Total memory
16MB
8MB
24MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
X
32MB
32MB
1MB
33MB
32MB
2MB
34MB
32MB
4MB
36MB
32MB
8MB
40MB
16MB
32MB
48MB
32MB
16MB
48MB
32MB
32MB
64MB
Use only tin-plated, 32-bit or 36-bit, 72-pin, fast-page mode
SIMMs that operate at an access speed of 80ns (nanoseconds)
or faster. Be sure all the SIMMs operate at the same speed.
Inserting SIMMs
Make sure the computer is turned off and then follow these
steps to install SIMMs:
1. Make sure the front of the computer is facing you.
2. Refer to the illustration on page 4-5 to locate the SIMM
sockets on the right side of the system board.
3. Remove any option cards that may be blocking your access
to the SIMM sockets. (See page 4-19 for instructions.)
Installing and Removing Options
4-11
4. Position the SIMM at an angle over the empty SIMM socket,
as shown below.
5. Push the SIMM into the socket until it is seated firmly in the
slot. Then tilt it upright, as shown below, guiding the hole
at each end of the SIMM over the retaining post at each end
of the SIMM socket. If it does not go in smoothly, do not
force it; pull it all the way out and try again.
4-12
Installing and Removing Options
6. Replace any option cards you removed. (See page 4-14 for
instructions.)
Removing SlMMs
If you need to remove SIMMs from your computer (to install
different ones, for example), make sure the computer is turned
off and then follow the steps below:
1. Make sure the front of the computer is facing you.
2. Use the illustration on page 4-5 to locate the SIMM sockets on
the right of the system board.
3. Remove any option cards that may be blocking your access
to the SIMM sockets. (See page 4-19 for instructions.)
4. Use your fingers or a small screwdriver to carefully pull
away the metal tabs that secure the SIMM at each end, as
shown below.
Installing and Removing Options
4-13
5. As you pull away the tabs, the SIMM falls to the side.
Remove it from the socket.
6. If necessary, follow the same procedure to remove the other
SIMM.
7. If you are inserting different SIMMs, follow the instructions
on page 4-11 to install them.
8. Replace any option cards you removed, as described below.
Installing an Option Card
This section explains how to install option cards in your
computer. Your computer has three 16-bit, full-length slots and
two B-bit, half-length slots to accommodate a total of five
option cards.
4-14
Installing and Removing Options
As you install option cards, keep these general guidelines in
mind.
Usually it does not matter which slot an option card
occupies as long as the card fits in the slot. For example,
you can place some 8-bit cards in a M-bit slot. When you
select the slot you want to use, make sure no components
are touching or obstructing other cards or cables.
If you have a DX/50, DX2, or Pentium OverDrive processor
installed, you cannot install an option card in the bottom
16-bit slot when a heat sink or heat sink/fan assembly is
mounted on the processor.
When you unpack the option card, be careful not to touch
any of the components on the circuit board or the
gold-edged connectors. If you need to set it down before
you install it, place it gently on top of its original packing
material with the component side facing up. Keep the
packing materials in case you remove the card later.
Before you install the card, adjust any switches or jumpers
on the card, if necessary. (See the option card instructions.)
Also, see if you need to change any jumper settings on the
system board. For example, if you install a SCSI hard disk
drive, you may need to change jumper J35 to disable the
IDE hard disk drive controller. See page 4-6 for more
information on jumpers.
Caution
Make sure the power requirements for the option cards you
install do not exceed the power supply limitations. See your
option card manual(s) for the power requirements. Then
check Appendix A for the option slot power limits.
Installing and Removing Options
4-15
Refer to the illustrations below and follow these steps to install
an option card:
1. If you are using a l6-bit option slot, go on to step 2. If you
are using an 8-bit slot near the power supply, you need to
move the power supply before you can remove the metal
slot cover.
Remove the three screws securing the power supply to the
computer, as shown below. Be careful not to disconnect any
of the cables. Slide the power supply away from the slots
until you can remove the slot covers easily.
4-16
Installing and Removing Options
2. Remove the retaining screw securing the option slot cover
to the computer, as shown below. (Keep the screw to secure
the option card to the computer.)
3. Slide out the slot cover and set it aside. (Store it in a safe
place in case you remove the option card later.)
Installing and Removing Options
4-17
4. Hold the card along the top comers and guide it into the
connector, as shown below. (If you are installing a
full-length card, insert the front edge of the card into the
corresponding guide inside the computer’s front panel.)
Once the connectors reach the slot, push the card in firmly
(but carefully) to insert it fully. You should feel the card fit
into place. If it does not go in smoothly, do not force it; pull
the card all the way out and try again.
5. Secure the end of the card to the computer with the retaining
screw.
6. If you had to move the power supply, make sure you replace
it and secure it again with the three retaining screws.
4-18
Installing and Removing Options
Removing an Option Card
You may need to remove an option card to access components
on the main system board-to change a jumper setting, for
example. You may also want to remove a card if you no longer
need it. Refer to the option card illustration on page 4-18 and
follow these steps:
1. Remove the retaining screw securing the option card to the
computer. Then pull the card straight out of the slot.
2. Set the card aside with the component side facing up.
3. If you are not replacing an option card, replace the option
slot cover and retaining screw.
Adding video Memory
Your computer comes with 1MB of video memory. You can
increase your video memory to 2MB by installing two video
DRAM, 256KB x 16-bit, 40-pin, ZIP (Zig-zag Inline Package)
chips. This is useful for running graphics-intensive applications
or for supporting high resolutions with many colors.
The following table lists the video DRAM ZIP chips you can
install on the main system board.
Supported video ZIP chips
Manufacturer
Part number
Fujitsu
MB8 14260A-70/80 ns
MICRON
MT4C16256Z-70/80 ns
Mitsubishi
M5M4426OAL-80 ns
NEC
UPD424260V-70/80 ns
Samsung
KM416C256JZ-70/80 ns
Installing and Removing Option.s
4-19
Installing the video Chips
You need two ZIPS to install the optional memory. For the
memory to work properly, you must install one chip in each of
the empty video memory sockets on the system board. Follow
these steps:
1. Locate the video memory chip sockets on the main system
board, shown on page 4-5. The chip sockets are labeled U2
and U3.
2. If there is an option card in your way, remove it. See
page 4-19 for instructions.
Caution
To avoid generating static electricity and damaging the
memory chips, ground yourself by touching the metal
surface on the inside of the computer’s back panel. Then
remain as stationary as possible while you install them.
3. Remove the memory chips from their package and inspect
each one. All the pins should be straight.
If any of the pins are bent or crooked, straighten them gently
with your fingers or with small tweezers to align them with
the other pins. Be careful when you do this; the pins are
fragile and can break off easily.
4-20
Installing and Removing Options
4. Position one of the ZIP chips over the first empty socket (U2)
as shown below, aligning pin 1 on the chip (identified by
the notch on the top of the chip) with pin 1 on the system
board.
5. Gently press the chip halfway into the socket (to make sure
it is correctly aligned). If the chip does not go in smoothly,
remove it and try again.
6. When the chip is properly positioned, push down firmly on
both ends of the chip to make sure it is well-seated.
7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 to install the other chip in socket U3.
8. Replace any option cards you removed. See page 4-14 for
instructions.
9. Now run SETUP as described in Chapter 2 so that your
system recognizes the increased memory.
Installing and Removing Options
4-21
Installing External Cache
You can install 64KB, 128KB, or 256KB of external cache on
your system.
To install 64KB of external cache, use eight SRAM, 28-pin,
8 x 8, 20ns DIP chips, and one 8 x 8, 20ns tag chip
To install 128KB of external cache, use four SRAM, 28-pin,
32 x 8, 20ns DIP chips, and one 8 x 8, 20ns tag chip
To install 256KB of external cache, use eight SRAM, 28-pin,
32 x 8, 20ns DIP chips, and one 32 x 8, 20ns tag chip
To install any cache on a 486DX/50 system, make sure the
tag chip is a 15ns chip.
For the cache memory to work properly, you must install chips
in the following configuration (each bank contains four cache
memory sockets):
Cache memory configurations
BANK0
BANK1
U29,30,31,32
Tag SRAM
U36
Total cache
8Kx8
8Kx8
8Kx8
64KB
32Kx8
X
8Kx8
128K8
32Kx8
32Kx8
32Kx8
256KB
U20,21,22,23
4-22
Installing and Removing Options
Installing the External Cache Chips
Follow these steps to install the external cache chips:
1. Locate the external cache memory sockets on the main system
board, shown on page 4-5.
2. If there is an option card in your way, remove it. See
page 4-19 for instructions.
Caution
To avoid generating static electricity and damaging the
cache chips, ground yourself by touching the metal
surface on the inside of the computer’s back panel. Then
remain as stationary as possible while you install them.
3. Remove the cache chips from their package and inspect
them. The pins should point inward at slightly less than a
90° angle.
If any of the pins are bent or crooked, straighten them gently
with your fingers or with small tweezers to align them with
the other pins. Be careful when you do this; the pins are
fragile and can break off easily.
Installing and Removing Options
4-23
Position one of the cache chips over the first socket as shown
below, aligning the pins on the chip with the holes in the
socket. Make sure the small notch on the end of, the chip is
aligned with the corresponding notch on the socket.
5. Gently press the chip halfway into the socket (to make sure
it is correctly aligned). If the chip goes in at an angle,
remove it and try again.
6. When the chip is properly positioned, push down firmly on
both ends of the chip to make sure it is well-seated.
7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 for each of the remaining chips.
8. Change jumpers J25, J26, J27, and J28, as described on
page 4-8, to match to the amount of cache you installed.
9. Replace any option cards you removed. See page 4-14.
10. Run SETUP to enable the External Cache option and
check that the System shadow and Video shadow
options are enabled. You select these options from the
Advanced System Setup menu. Make sure you save your
settings as you leave SETUP (see Chapter 2).
When the computer restarts, it displays the amount of external
cache you have installed on the system.
4-24
Installing and Removing Options
Upgrading the Microprocessor
You can upgrade your computer by replacing the
microprocessor with a faster one. The following table lists the
components you can use to upgrade the microprocessor in
your system.
Microprocessor upgrade components
Part
Manufacturer
486SX/33 processor
Intel
486DX/33 processor
Intel
486DX/50 processor
Intel
486DX2/50 processor
Intel
486DX2/66 processor
Intel
Pentium OverDrive processor
Intel
Heat sink’
Tennmax Trading Corp.
Heat sink/fan assembly”
Tennmax Trading Corp.
For me DX/33 processor
For DX/50, DX2/50, DX2/66 and Pentium OverDrive processors
To upgrade your microprocessor, you will perform these steps.
See the page in parentheses for instructions.
Replace the existing processor chip (see page 426).
Install the new microprocessor and heat sink or heat
sink/fan assembly, if necessary (see page 426).
If necessary, change the settings of jumpers J16, J17, and J19
(see page 4-6), and connect the fan to connector J12.
Installing and Removing Options
4-25
Replacing the Processor Chip
Follow these steps to replace the processor chip:
1. Use the illustration on page 4-5 to locate the microprocessor
on the system board. The microprocessor chip may be
inserted in a ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket.
caution
Make sure you ground yourself by touching the metal
surface on the inside of the computer’s back panel before
you touch the processor chip. Then remain as stationary
as possible while you install it. Do not touch the pins on
the processor chip. Handle the microprocessor only by
the edges of its case.
2. Open the ZIF socket by lifting up the ZIF handle. The handle
rests under a plastic tab. Press the handle down and away
from the tab; then rotate the handle to the released position.
This releases the chip from the socket. The illustration on
the next page shows this handle in the released position.
If your microprocessor isn’t inserted in the ZIF socket with a
handle, use a chip puller or a small, flat-head screwdriver
to remove the chip. Carefully wedge the tip of the
screwdriver between the processor chip and the socket.
Gently turn the screwdriver until the chip begins to
separate from the socket. Move the screwdriver to another
side of the processor chip and again turn it until the chip
separates from the socket. Keep doing this until you can lift
the processor chip straight up from the socket.
3. Gently pull the processor chip straight up and set it aside.
4-26
Installing and Removing Options
Note
The 486SX/25 microprocessor may be soldered onto an
adapter board that is seated in the socket. Remove the
adapter board as described above.
4. Remove the replacement chip from its package and inspect
the pins. If they are bent, do not install the processor chip.
Contact your vendor for a new microprocessor.
5. Position the processor chip over the socket, aligning the
notched edge of the chip (marked with a dot) with pin 1 on
the socket, as shown below.
Note
If you install the processor chip in the wrong orientation,
you may damage the chip and void your warranty.
6. Make sure the pins in the processor chip are directly over the
holes in the socket. Then gently push the microprocessor
straight into the socket, pressing evenly on all sides.
Installing and Removing Options
4-27
If you are installing a 486 chip rather than a Pentium
OverDrive processor, you’ll see an extra row of holes
around the outside of the socket. The 486 chip will not fit
into the outside row of holes.
7. If your system has a ZIF socket, secure the processor chip by
pressing the ZIF handle back to the closed position.
8. If you are upgrading from a 486SX processor to a DX, DX2,
or Pentium OverDrive processor, you need to change the
jumper settings of J17 and Jl9. If you are upgrading to a
CPU with a different clock speed, you may need to change
the setting of jumper J16. See the tables on pages 4-7 and
4-8 for the correct jumper settings.
9. If you are upgrading to a DX/33, DX/50, DX2, or Pentium
OverDrive processor, you must install a heat sink or a heat
sink/fan assembly. Follow the instructions included with
the heat sink.
10. Run SETUP as described in Chapter 2 to update your
computer’s configuration with the new microprocessor.
Installing a Heat Sink
If you are installing a DX/33, DX/50, DX2, or Pentium
OverDrive processor, you must install a heat sink on the
processor chip. Follow the instructions included with the heat
sink.
If the heat sink has an embedded fan, connect the fan connector
into J12 on the system board. The casing for the fan connector
has a small triangle over pin 1. A triangle also identifies pin 1
on the system board. Align pin 1 on the connector with pm 1 on
the system board.
4-28
Installing and Removing Options
Post-installation Procedures
After you install or remove options such as memory modules
or a microprocessor, you must run SETUP to update the
computer’s configuration. See Chapter 2 for instructions.
Additionally, you may need to add some commands to your
configuration files. See your operating system manual and the
manual that came with your optional equipment.
Installing and Removing Options
4-29
Chapter 5
Installing and Removing Drives
This chapter describes how to install and remove optional
drives in your computer. You can use these instructions to
install a variety of devices, including hard disk drives, a
diskette drive, a tape drive, a CD-ROM, or an optical drive.
Although your drive may look different from the ones
illustrated here, you should be able to install it the same way.
Your computer can hold up to four mass storage devices. You
can install one or two hard disk drives in the internal hard disk
drive bays. In the upper externally accessible bay, you can
install a second diskette drive, a tape drive, or a CD-ROM
drive.
To install or remove a drive, first remove the computer’s cover
as described in Chapter 4. Then follow the appropriate
instructions in this chapter to install and remove drives:
Installing a hard disk drive in the internal drive bay
Removing a hard disk drive from the internal drive bay
Installing a drive in the upper externally accessible drive
bay
Removing a drive from the upper drive bay
Reconnecting drive and power cables to the diskette drive
in the lower drive bay
Post-installation procedures.
Some of the steps in this chapter may not apply for the drive
you are installing. See the documentation that came with your
drive for more information.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-1
Installing a Hard Disk Drive in the Internal Drive Bay
Your computer may have a hard disk drive already installed in
the internal drive bay. If not, you can install a 1-inch high by
3½-inch wide drive in this bay.
This section includes steps for the following procedures:
Removing the mounting frames from the hard disk drive
(if necessary)
Connecting the hard disk drive cables
Installing the hard disk drive under the mounting bracket
installing the hard disk drive above the mounting bracket.
Note
Be sure to check the jumper settings on the hard disk drive
before you install it. Also, you may need to know the drive
parameters if the hard disk drive autosensing feature in
SETUP is unable to correctly identify your drive. See the
documentation that came with your drive for this
information.
Before you can install a hard disk drive, you need to remove
any option cards that may be blocking your access to the hard
disk drive area. Once you have installed the drive, replace any
option cards you removed. See Chapter 4 for instructions.
5-2
Installing and Removing Drives
If there are mounting frames attached to your hard disk drive,
remove them before you install the drive. Follow these steps:
1. On your drive, there may be a plastic guiderail and metal
grounding plate attached to one of the mounting frames. If
so, remove the screws securing them to the mounting
frame and remove the guiderail and grounding plate.
2. Then remove the two screws securing each mounting frame
to the drive and remove the frames.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-3
Connecting the Hard Disk Drive Cables
To connect the hard disk drive to the computer, you need to
connect two cables: the hard disk drive ribbon cable and a
power supply cable.
The hard disk drive ribbon cable is attached to your system
board. If you need to remove it for any reason, see “Connecting
the drive cable to the system board,” below, for instructions on
reconnecting the cable to the system board. Otherwise, see
page 5-6 for instructions on connecting the ribbon cable and
power supply cable to the drive.
You should connect both the hard disk drive ribbon cable and
the power supply cable to the drive before you secure it with
the mounting bracket. You will not be able to attach them once
the bracket is in place.
Connecting the drive cuble to the system board
If you need to connect the hard disk drive ribbon cable to the
system board, follow the steps below. (If the hard disk drive
ribbon cable is already attached to the system board, see
“connecting the drive and power cables to the drive” on
page 5-6.)
1. Locate the hard disk drive ribbon cable; it is a flat cable with
a connector on each end and an additional connector on the
ribbon cable. All the connectors on this cable look the same.
5-4
Installing and Removing Drives
2. Locate the hard disk drive connector on the system board.
3. Position the system board connector end of the cable so that
the red wire aligns with pin 1 of the connector on the
system board. There is a “1” printed on the system board to
identify pin 1.
4. Make sure the holes in the cable connector fit over the pins
in the system board connector; then push in the cable
connector.
Caution
If you do not correctly align the holes with the pins, you
could severely damage your system board when you push
in the cable connector.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-5
Connecting the drive and power cables to the drive
Follow the steps below to connect the hard disk drive ribbon
cable and a power supply cable to the drive:
1. Locate the hard disk drive connector on the end of the hard
disk drive ribbon cable.
2. Locate pin 1 on the drive connector. If you do not see it on
the connector casing, turn the drive over so you can see the
drive’s circuit board, as shown below. There is a “1” or “2”
printed on the board to identify the side of the connector
containing pin 1.
3. Position the connector on the cable so that the red wire
aligns with pin 1 on the drive.
4. Make sure the holes in the cable connector fit over all the
pins; then push in the connector.
5-6
Installing and Removing Drives
5. Locate one of the power supply cables that lead from the
power supply. (They have multi-colored wires and a plastic
connector on the end.)
6. Position the power supply cable connector so that its
notched corners line up with the notched corners of the
power supply connector on the hard disk drive.
7. Make sure the holes fit over all the pins and then push in the
connector.
Caution
If you do not align the cable connector correctly, you could
severely damage your hard disk drive when you push it in.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-7
Installing the Hard Disk Below the Mounting Bracket
If you have a 1-inch tall hard disk drive, you can install it below
the hard disk drive mounting bracket. Refer to the illustrations
below and follow these steps:
1. Remove the screw securing the mounting bracket to the base
of the computer, as shown below.
2. Slide the mounting bracket toward the diskette drive bays,
as shown above, until the slots clear the tabs.
3. Lift the mounting bracket out of the computer and set it
aside.
5-8
Installing and Removing Drives
4. Align the hard disk drive so the cables lead toward the
diskette drive bays and the four screw holes on the base of
the drive are above the four pegs, as shown below.
5. Gently lower the drive over the pegs. When the pegs are
inserted in the mounting holes on the base of the hard disk
drive, the drive will not move from side to side.
Note
If the drive isn’t seated correctly on the pegs, you may
not be able to close the cover all the way.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-9
6. Lower the mounting bracket over the hard disk drive,
making sure that the slots in the mounting bracket fit over
the tabs on the base of the computer.
7. Slide the bracket toward the side of the computer, as shown
below, until the tabs hold the bracket in place.
8. Secure the mounting bracket with the screw.
5-10
Installing and Removing Drives
Installing the Hard Disk On the Mounting Bracket
You can install a hard disk drive on top of the mounting
bracket rather than under it. Refer to the illustration of the
mounting bracket on page 5-8 and the one below while following
these steps:
1. Remove the screw securing the mounting bracket to the base
of the computer and slide the mounting bracket toward the
diskette drive bays until the slots clear the tabs. (See the
illustration on page 5-8.)
2. Lift the mounting bracket out of the computer.
3. Turn the hard disk drive over and locate the four mounting
holes on the drive.
4. Position the bracket on the hard disk drive, aligning the
holes in the bracket with the holes on the drive.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-11
5. Secure the bracket to the drive with four screws.
If you plan to install two hard disk drives make sure
additional option cards do not exceed the power supply
limitations. See Appendix A.
Also, use flat-head screws to secure a second drive to the
mounting bracket. You can purchase flat-head screws at
any hardware store; request this size: #6-32UNC x 8
FH,M,+.
Set the jumpers on both hard disk drives to indicate
which is the master and which is the slave drive. See the
documentation that came with your drive for
instructions.
6. Turn the drive and the mounting bracket over, then slide
the slots in the mounting bracket under the tabs at the base
of the computer until the tabs hold the bracket in place.
5-12
Installing and Removing Drives
7. Secure the mounting bracket with the retaining screw.
Note
If the drive does not fit within the internal bay, you can
move the mounting frame toward the diskette drive
bays and align only one set of the slots on the mounting
bracket with the tabs on the computer. In this case, insert
the retaining screw in the front slot on the mounting
bracket as shown below.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-13
Removing a Hard Disk Drive From the Internal
Drive Bay
To remove a hard disk drive, reverse the installation steps
outlined above. Then disconnect the hard disk drive ribbon
cable and the Rower supply cable from the back of the drive.
When you disconnect the cables, grasp the connectors and pull
them straight out so you do not bend the pins; do not pull on
the cables. Use the screws to again secure the hard disk drive
mounting bracket to the base of the computer.
Installing a Drive in the Upper External Drive Bay
Your system comes with a 3.5-inch diskette drive installed in
the lower externally accessible drive bay. You can also install a
diskette drive, a CD-ROM, a tape drive, or optical drive in the
upper externally accessible drive bay.
If you are installing a diskette drive or a tape drive with a
standard 5.25-inch diskette drive connector, you can connect it
using the diskette drive cable that came with your system.
Before you install a drive in the upper drive bay, remove the
cover. Once you have the drive installed, replace the cover,
following the instructions in Chapter 4.
5-14
Installing and Removing Drives
Follow these steps to install a drive in the upper drive bay:
1. Remove the faceplate from the bay by pushing it forward, as
shown below.
Keep the faceplate in a safe place in case you remove a drive
later (or you are installing a drive that you don’t need to
access).
2. Remove any brackets or mounting frames from the drive.
See page 5-3 for instructions.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-15
3. Slide the drive into the bay until it is flush with the front of
the computer.
4. Align the slots at the side of the drive bay with the mounting
holes in the drive. Then secure both sides of the drive to the
drive bay using the retaining screws.
5-16
Installing and Removing Drives
Connecting the Drive and Power Cables
To connect the drive to the computer, you need to connect both
the drive ribbon cable and a power supply cable. Follow the
steps below.
1. If you are installing a diskette drive, locate the diskette drive
ribbon cable. (The connector in the middle of the cable is
already connected to the system board.)
2. If you are installing a drive with a card-edge connector make
sure you align the key-way (the plastic divider) with the
gap in the drive connector, as shown below.
If you are installing a 3.5-inch diskette drive with a header
connector in the bottom slot, see page 5-19 for instructions
on connecting the cable.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-17
3. Locate one of the power supply cables that lead from the
power supply. (They have multi-colored wires and a plastic
connector on the end.)
4. Align the notched corners of the power supply cable
connector with the notched corners of the drive’s power
supply connector (such as the one shown below). Make
sure the holes fit over all the pins and then push in the
Connector.
Caution
If you do not align the cable connectors correctly, you could
severely damage your drive when you push them in.
If you installed a diskette drive in the upper bay, it is drive B;
the lower drive is A. You can change the drive assignments
through your operating system or you can purchase a different
diskette drive ribbon cable.
5-18
Installing and Removing Drives
Removing a Drive from the Upper Drive Bay
To remove a drive from the upper drive bay, follow these steps:
1. Remove both the ribbon cable connector and the power
cable connector from the drive.
2. Remove the screws securing the drive.
3. Reach behind the drive and gently push it to the front of the
bay; then pull it out of the slot.
4. Once you have removed the drive, replace the faceplate by
inserting one side of the plate, then gently guiding the
other side into place. You will hear it snap into place.
Reconnecting the Drive and Power Cables to the
Diskette Drive in the lower Drive Bay
If for any reason you had to disconnect the drive and power
cables from the diskette drive mounted in the lower drive bay,
refer to the illustration below while you follow these steps to
reconnect the cables:
1. Locate the connector on the diskette drive ribbon cable.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-19
2. Identify pin 1 on the drive and align the connector so that
the red wire is at pin 1, as shown below. Push in the
connector.
3. Locate the multicolored power supply cable with the small
connector. This cable is attached to the system board rather
than the power supply.
4. Position the power supply cable connector so that the holes
fit over all the pins. The red wire on the cable aligns with
pin 1 identified at the power connector on the circuit board
of the drive. Push in the connector.
Caution
If you do not align the cable connector correctly, you could
severely damage your hard disk drive when you push it in.
5-20
Installing and Removing Drives
Post-installation Procedures
After you install or remove your drive(s) and replace the cover
on your computer, you need to run SETUP to define the correct
configuration for your newly installed drive. See Chapter 2 for
instructions.
Installing and Removing Drives
5-21
If you have any problems as you set up and use your
computer, refer to this chapter. You can correct most problems
by adjusting a cable connection, repeating a software
procedure, or resetting the computer.
The troubleshooting suggestions in this chapter are organized
in general categories, such as “The computer will not start.”
Within each category, a more specific problem is described
with possible solutions.
If the suggestions here do not solve the problem, contact your
Authorized Epson Servicer.
Identifying Your System
When you request technical assistance, be ready to provide the
serial number of your computer, its system BIOS version
number, its configuration (including the type of disk drives,
monitor, and option cards), and the names and version
numbers of any software programs you are using.
Troubleshooting 6-1
Use these guidelines to locate information about your system:
Serial number:
Look on the back panel of the
computer to find the serial number.
System BIOS version:
Restart your system. You’ll see the
system BIOS version number
displayed on the screen when your
system performs power-on
diagnostics.
System
configuration
Start SETUP and select the System
Summary option to see your
system’s configuration.
MS-DOS version:
At the MS-DOS prompt, type VER
and press Enter to see the MS-DOS
version number.
Software versions:
In Windows applications, select
“About” from the Help menu. As
your software application starts, it
usually displays a version number
on the banner screen. Also, you can
check your software manual.
CONFIG.SYS:
At the MS-DOS prompt, type
TYPE CONFIG.SYS and press
Enter to see a listing of your
CONFIG.SYS file, which contains
system configuration commands.
AUTOEXECBAT:
At the MS-DOS prompt, type
TYPE AUTOEXBC.BAT and press
Enter to see a listing of your
AUTOEXEC.BAT, which contains
system startup commands.
6-2 Troubleshooting
The Computer Will Not Start
The power light is on, but the computer does not start.
Make sure the boot options in SETUP are set to access drive A.
Then place a bootable diskette in drive A and turn on the
computer again.
Caution
If you turn off the computer, always wait at least 20 seconds
before turning it back on. This prevents damages to the
computer's electrical circuitry.
Also, your IDE driver may not be installed correctly. Start the
system from a bootable diskette in drive A; then reinstall the
IDE driver. Also make sure the hard disk drive type is
identified correctly in SETUP.
The computer does not start and the power light is not /it.
Make sure the power cord is securely connected to both the AC
inlet on the back panel and an electrical outlet.
The power cord is securely connected, but the computer
still does not start.
Check the electrical outlet for power. Turn off your computer
and unplug the power cord. Plug a lamp into the outlet and
turn it on.
You installed or removed system components, and now
your computer does not stat.
Check to make sure you have reconnected all the internal and
external cables correctly.
Troubles hooting 6-3
You may have installed option cards that exceed the system’s
power requirements. Check the power requirements in
Appendix A.
You may have installed a SIMM incorrectly. If the system
doesn’t detect memory, it won’t start. Check that your SIMM(s)
are securely installed in their sockets.
If you replace the microprocessor, make sure the new processor
chip is installed correctly. Also make sure the jumpers are set
correctly and pin 1 on the chip is connected with pin 1 on the
system board. If you did not align the chip correctly, the system
won’t start. See Chapter 4.
The Computer Does Not Respond
The computer locks up.
Wait a few moments; if your computer does not respond after a
reasonable length of time, press Ctrl Alt Del. If that doesn’t
work, press the RESET button.
You may have installed memory using SIMMs that work at the
wrong speed. Install the correct SIMMs (see Chapter 4).
Your system may have over-heated. If you are using a DX/33
processor, make sure you have an adequate heat sink installed
on the chip. If you are using a DX/50, DX2/50, DX2/66, or
Pentium OverDrive processor, you need a heat sink and a fan.
You reset the computer, but it sill does not respond.
Try turning the computer off, wait 20 seconds, and turn it on
again.
6-4 Troubleshooting
Your computer suddenly stops operating.
You may have overloaded the power supply. See your option
card manual(s) for the power requirements for your option
card(s). Then check Appendix A to see if you have exceeded
the option slot power limits.
Keyboard Problems
The screen displays a keyboard error message when you
turn on or reset the computer.
Make sure the keyboard is securely connected to the keyboard
port and not the mouse port. Although these ports look alike,
they cannot be used interchangeably.
Nothing happens when you type on the keyboard.
The Lockout Timer may be set in SETUP. This option
inactivates the keyboard for a specified period of time after the
system returns to an active mode from a low-power standby
mode. This delay gives Energy Star compliant monitors the
time they need to return to an active mode. Wait a few seconds
and try again.
See ‘The Computer Does Not Respond,” above.
The cursor keys on the numeric keypad do not work
Property.
If the Num Lock light in the upper right comer of the keyboard
is lit, press NumLock to turn off the function.
Troubleshooting 6-5
Monitor Problems
There is no display on the screen.
Check that the monitor’s power switch is on and that its power
light is on.
Also, the computer may be in low-power standby mode. When
you press a mouse button or a key on the keyboard, see if the
monitor displays an image.
The power light is on, but you still do not see anything on
the screen.
Press a mouse button or a key on the keyboard to see if the
computer is in low-power standby mode. Also, check the
brightness and contrast controls.
If you still do not see anything on the screen, make sure the
monitor is securely connected to the computer.
If you are running an application program, see if you need to
set up the program for the type of monitor and display adapter
you have. Also make sure you are using the appropriate
monitor and display adapter for your software.
The power switch is on but the power tight is not on.
If the monitor is Energy Star compliant, it may be in low-power
standby mode. Press a mouse button or a key on the keyboard
to activate the monitor.
Turn off the monitor’s power, wait five seconds, and turn it
back on.
If the light still does not come on, check the electrical outlet for
power. Turn off your monitor and unplug it from the outlet.
Then plug a lamp into the wall outlet and turn it on. If the light
turns on, your monitor may be faulty.
6-6 Troubleshooting
Diskette Problems
You see a diskette error message.
Reinsert the diskette, making sure you insert it all the way. If
the drive has a latch, turn it down to secure the diskette.
Also, check to see that you have inserted the right type of
diskette in the drive. For example, make sure you are not
inserting a high-density diskette in a double-density drive.
If reinserting the diskette does not solve the problem, insert the
diskette in another diskette drive of the same type. If you can
read the diskette in a different drive, your drive may be faulty.
The diskette is the right type, but you still see an error.
Check that the diskette is not writeprotected, preventing the
drive from writing to the diskette.
Make sure the diskette is formatted. See your operating system
documentation for instructions on formatting diskettes.
The system may have the Diskette Access option in
SETUP enabled. If you entered a User level password when
you started the system, but this option is set to a Supervisor
level, you see an error when you access the drive.
You may have a defective diskette. Try copying the files from
the bad diskette to a new diskette.
Something is wrong with the data in the files.
If you are using MS-DOS, run CHKDSX to repair the files. You
may also be able to use special utilities or diagnostics to solve
this problem.
Troubleshooting 6-7
Diskette Drive Problems
A newly-installed diskette drive is not working properly.
Make sure you have installed the drive correctly and check all
the cable connections.
You see a diskette drive error when you start your computer.
Run the SETUP program and configure your system for the
correct type of diskette drive.
The diskette drive is making loud or unusual noises.
Contact your Authorized Epson Servicer.
Hard Disk Drive Problems
A newly-installed hard disk drive is not working property or
its performance is not what you expect.
Make sure you have installed the drive correctly and check all
cable connections. Also, check the jumper settings on your
drive.
Check that you have installed the IDE driver on your hard disk
(see Chapter 2). To take advantage of the local bus IDE
interface, your hard disk drive must support a 32-bit data path
that uses double-word I/O. Also make sure your CONFIG.SYS
file is loading the IDE driver when you start your system.
Some hard disk drives do not support the Energy Star features
on your system. You may need to disable these features in
SETUP.
6-8 Troubleshooting
You see a hard disk drive error when you start your system.
Run SETUP and check that your system is auto-sensing the
correct drive type. If auto-sensing is enabled and SETUP
displays information that does not match your drive, you may
need to define your own drive type. See Chapter 2.
If you’ve loaded the IDE driver, edit your CONFIG.SYS file so
that the command line for your IDE driver is after any memory
or disk management utility commands. Save your changes,
then restart your system.
Make sure the jumpers on the system board are set correctly.
Jumper J35 enables or disables the IDE hard disk drive
controller. See Chapter 4 for jumper information.
Make sure the jumpers on the hard disk drive are set correctly.
See the documentation that came with the drive for more
information.
You are unable to store data on the hard disk drive.
If the hard disk drive has been in low-power standby mode,
make sure the drive has had time to achieve its full operating
speed before you try to write data to it.
If your drive was not configured, make sure you have
partitioned and formatted it correctly for your operating
system. See your operating system manual for instructions.
Also, make sure your hard disk drive has been physically
formatted by the manufacturer. (All Epson-supplied drives are
physically formatted at the factory.) If it has not been physically
formatted, use the format utility that came with the drive to
format it before you partition it or install the operating system.
Note that a physical format is different from software-based
formatting commands, such as the MS-DOS FORMAT
command.
Troubles shooting 6-9
You have been using your hard disk drive successfully for
some time but notice a reduction in performance.
The data on the disk may have become fragment& back up all
your data and use a disk compaction utility to reorganize the
files on your disk.
Check that your IDE driver is installed correctly (see
Chapter 2). Make sure your CONFIG.SYS has not been
altered and that it loads the IDE driver.
If you cannot access data on your hard disk or you are seeing
read/write errors, the disk may have a physical problem.
Contact your Authorized Epson Servicer.
Password Problems
You have forgotten your password.
You must discharge your CMOS memory. To do this, you
need to change the setting of jumper J34 to position 3-4. See
Chapter 4 for details on changing the jumper setting.
After you have changed J34, restart your system, leave it on for
a few seconds, then turn it off again. This resets the SETUP
values to their factory defaults. both the Supervisor and the
User passwords are disabled.
Set J34 back to position 2-3. Then turn the computer on again.
Use SETUP to set a new password, if you want one.
6-10 Troubleshooting
Software Problems
Windows won’t Start after you installed the IDE driver.
Reinstall the IDE driver, making sure you load the driver for
DOS as well as for Windows.
The application program does not start.
Check that you are following the correct procedure for starting
the program and that it is installed correctly. If you do not have
a hard disk, make sure the correct diskette is in the diskette
drive. If you need help, contact your software manufacturer.
The application program is having trouble reading a key
disk.
You may be running an application that requires a slower
processor speed. You need to change the speed switch jumper,
J22. See Chapter 4 for information on changing the jumper..
The application program is having trouble reading from or
writing to the hard disk drive.
If you have enabledthe Fixed Disk Timeout option in
SETUP, your application may be timing out during the few
second delay when the hard disk drive returns to its operating
speed after being in standby mode. Disable this option in
SETUP.
Your application has locked the computer, making it
unresponsive to keyboard commands.
Reset the computer and try again. If resetting the computer
does not help, turn it off, wait 20 seconds, then turn it on again.
Troubleshooting 6-11
®
®
Some software, like OS/2, UNIX, or NetWare 3.11, needs a
minimum of 8MB to 16MB of RAM to work correctly. Check
your software documentation for the minimum memory
requirements. If necessary, add additional memory using the
instructions in Chapter 4.
Printer Problems
The printer does not work at all.
Check that the printer has power and is properly connected to
the computer. Also make sure your printer has paper in it.
The printer prints garbled information.
Check the printer manual for the printer’s correct DIP switch or
control panel settings.
Also, make sure you have the proper drivers installed for your
printer and make sure you’ve selected the correct printer
within your software application.
Option Card Problems
A newly installed option card is not working correctly.
Make sure the option card is installed correctly and is
well-seated in its slot. Run the SETUP program to update your
computer’s configuration after you install the card. Also,
perform setup procedures for any software you are using with
the option card.
See the documentation that came with the option card to set
any necessary DIP switches or jumpers on the card.
6-12 Troubleshooting
The computer may also have some jumpers that must be set for
the option card to work properly. See Chapter 4 for system
jumper information.
Your system may need to operate at the slower processor speed
to access the device. Try reducing the processor speed (see
chapter 3).
Make sure you install option cards that meet the system’s
power requirements. See Appendix A.
Make sure the option card is not touching any other card. Also
make sure the card isn’t touching the CPU or any fan or heat
sink you have attached to the CPU.
If a fan or heat sink is attached to the CPU, don’t install an
option card in the lowest 16-bit option slot.
An external device connected to the option card is not
working correctly.
Make sure you are using the proper cable to securely connect
the device to the card.
Memory Module Problems
The memory count displayed by the power-on diagnostics
program is incorrect.
You may have installed the SIMMs incorrectly. They may be
the wrong type or speed, or they may not be inserted all the
way. See Chapter 4 for information on installing SIMMs.
If you have installed a gold-plated SIMM in the sockets, the
socket may have corroded slightly. Remove the SIMM and
clean the gold-plated connection; then reinstall the SIMM.
Troubleshooting 6-13
Mouse Problems
Your mouse isn’t working property or you see auxiliary
device error message.
Make sure the mouse cable is securely connected to the MOUSE
port and not the keyboard (K/B) port. Also make sure you
installed the mouse driver correctly (if necessary). See the
documentation that came with your mouse for instructions.
(Windows automatically installs a mouse driver when you
install the program.)
Controller Problems
You see a controller error for the drive controllers or the I/O
port controllers when you start your system.
The indicated controller on your system board may be faulty.
If you have an option card with a controller that will work with
your device, you can install it and change the jumper settings
on the system board to disable the built-in controller. You can
then continue to use your system until it is convenient for you
to have it serviced.
External Cache Problems
The amount of cache displayed by the power-on
diagnostics program is incorrect.
You may have installed the external cache chips incorrectly.
They may be the wrong type, or they may not be inserted all
the way. Also, make sure the tag chip you’ve installed is 20ns
for all microprocessors except the 486DX/50. For this
processor, the tag chip must be 15ns.
6-14 Troubleshooting
Also, you may not have changed the SETUP program or the
jumpers to recognize the new cache. Make sure you have set
the External cache option to Enabled and set both the
System shadow and the Video shadow optionsto
Enabled.
See Chapter 4 for instructions on changing the jumper settings
or information on installing external cache; see Chapter 2 for
instructions on using the SETUP program.
Troubleshooting 6-15
Appendix A
Specifications
CPU and Memory
32-bit CPU
Intel 486SX, DX, or DX2 processor
upgradable to faster, more powerful
processors, including the Pentium
OverDrive
Green PC
energy saver
Energy Star compliant, low-power
standby mode (using less than 30 Watts)
for the hard disk drive and the video
signals the computer sends to the monitor;
time periods selectable in SETUP
System speed
Fast and slow speeds available as
described in the table below; speed
selection through keyboard commands or
jumper setting
speed CPU
local bus
ISA bus
speed
setting
speed
speed
Fast*
25/33/50
MM
25/33/50
MM
8.33 MHz
slow
8MHz
25/33/50
MHz
8.33 MHz
* DX2/50 and DX2/66 systems run internally at 50 and
66 MHz. but run externally at 25 and 33 MM. The
local bus speed for these systems 25 and 33MHz.
Specifications A-1
Memory
4MB RAM standard on a SIMM;
expandable to 64MB using 1MB, 2MB,
4MB, 8MB, 16MB, and 32MB SIMMs;
SIMMs must be tin-plated, 72-pin, 32-bit
or 36-bit, fast-page mode type with access
speed of 80ns or faster
ROM
128KB Phoenix@ system BIOS, video BIOS,
and SETUP code located in EPROM on
main system board
video RAM
1MB DRAM on main system board;
expandable to 2MB using two ZIP chips
Shadow RAM
Supports shadowing of system and video
BIOS ROM into RAM
Memory
relocation
Supports relocation of 256KB of memory
from AOOO0h to BFFFFh and D0000h to
EFFFFh to extended memory
Cache
8KB of internal cache; supports 64KB,
128KB, or 256KB of external cache using
28-pin, 8 x 8, 20ns DIP chips or 28-pin,
32 x 8, 20ns DIP chips
Math
coprocessor
Math coprocessor built into the
microprocessor for DX, DX2, and systems
upgraded to a Pentium OverDrive
processor.
Clock/
calendar
Contained in the 82C491 system controller
chip along with 64 bytes of CMOS RAM
backed up by a soldered NiCad
rechargeable battery
A-2 Specifications
Controllers
Video
Cirrus Logic GD5428 high speed super
VGA local bus controller with True Color
support
Diskette
Controller on main system board supports
up to two diskette drives or one diskette
drive and one tape drive
Hard disk
High-speed, 32-bit local bus IDE interface
on main system board supports up to two
IDE hard disk drives with built-in
controller; BIOS provides hard disk
auto-sensing function
®
Interfaces
Monitor
VGA interface for fixed or multi-frequency
monitor built into system board;
low-power standby mode for Energy Star
compliant monitors; 15-pin, D-shell
connector
Parallel
One standard 8-bit parallel bidirectional
interface built into main system board;
25-pin, D-shell connector
Serial
Two RS-232C, programmable,
asynchronous interfaces built into main
system board; 9-pin, D-shell connectors
Keyboard
PS/2 compatible keyboard interface built
into main system board; 6-pin, mini DIN
connector
Mouse
PS/2 compatible mouse interface built into
main system board; 6-pin mini DIN
connector
Optional
Optional IO-pin game port interface on
system board; can control joy-stick
functions with the addition of a port
connector
game port
Option slots
Three 16-bit, full-length and two 8-bit,
half-length I/O expansion slots, ISA
compatible, 8.33 MHz bus speed; on
DX/50, DX2, or Pentium OverDrive
systems, one l&bit slot is unavailable
because of the CPU heat sink/fan assembly
Speaker
Internal
Mass storage
Internal mounts:
Two 3½-inch wide, one-inch drives; with
three or more option cards installed, the
power supply only supports one internal
drive
Externally accessible mounts:
One 3½-inch wide, third-height drive and
one 5¼-inch wide, half-height drive
Diskette drives
3.5-inch diskette drive, 720KB or 1.44MB
storage capacity
5.25-inch diskette drive, 360KB or 1.2MB
storage capacity
Hard disk
drives
A-4 Specifications
3½-inch form factor hard disk drive(s), up
to half-height size
Other devices
Half-height tape drive, CD-ROM, optical
drive, or other storage device; 5¼-inch or
3½-inch with mounting frames
Keyboard
Detachable, two-position height; 101 or
102 sculpted keys; country-dependent
main typewriter keyboard;
numeric/cursor control keypad; four-key
cursor control keypad; 12 function keys
SETUP Program
Stored in ROM; accessible by pressing F2
during boot
System
security
User and supervisor level passwords
(8 characters) available for system boot or
diskette access
Virus
protection
Write protection feature for the hard disk
drive boot sector; periodic reminder
message for running virus detection utility
Physical Characteristics
Width
15.6 inches (396 mm)
Depth
14.5 inches (368 mm)
Height
4.1 inches (104 mm)
Weght
15 lb (6.8 kg), without drives or keyboard
Specifications A-5
Power Supply
Type
65 Watt, UL listed, fan-cooled
Input ranges
100-240 VAC
Maximum
outputs
+5 VDC at 7.5 Amps, -5 VDC at 0.1 Amps,
+12 VDC at 2.0 Amps, -12 VDC at
0.2 Amps
Frequency
50/60 Hz
Cables
Two to main system board; four to mass
storage devices
Option Slot Power Limits
Maximun current
+5 Volts
-5 volts
+12 volts
-12 volts
For all slots*
3.3 Amps
0.1 Amps
1.0 Amps
0.1 Amps
* Based on a system containing one hard disk drive and one diskette drive.
Environmental Requirements
Operating
Non-operating
range
storage range
Temperature
41° to 90° F
(5° to 32° C)
-4° to 140° F
(-20° to 60° C)
-4° to 140° F
(-20° to 60° C)
Humidity
(non-condensing)
20% to 90%
10%to90%
10% to 90%
Altitude
-330 to 9,900 ft
(-100 to
3,000 m)
-330 to 39,600 ft
(-100 to
12,000 m)
-330 to 39,600 ft
(-100 to
12,000 m)
condition
A-6 Specifications
Environmental requirements (continued)
Condition
range
Operating
Non-operating
range
Storage range
Maximum wet
bulb
68° F (20° C)
104° F(40° C)
134° F (57° C)
Accoustical noise
46.2 dB
N/A
N/A
Video Resolutions and Colors
Resolution
Color
Vertical
Frequencies
(HZ)
Remarks
256
60/72
8 bits/pixel
32K/64K
60
16 bits/pixel
16.8M (True
Color)
60
24 bits/pixel
16
56/60/72
4 bit planes
1
256
56/60/72
8 bit/pixel
1
16
43.5/60/70/72
4 bit planes*
1
256
43.5/60/70/72
8 bit/pixel*
2
64K
43.5
16 bits/
pixel”
16
43.5
4 bit planes”
256
43.5
8 bits/pixel”
Memory
Requirements
(MB)
640x480
800x600
1024x768
1280 x 1024
2
* Non-interlaced and interlaced
** Interlaced
Specifications A-7
Hard Disk Drive Types
This computer comes with a hard disk auto-sensing feature.
When you press Enter with the cursor positioned on the
Autotype Placed Disk option in SETUP, the system detects
the type of hard disk drive you have installed and fills in the
drive information using values in the following table.
Hard disk drive types
A-8 Specifications
Hard disk drive types (continued)
Specifications A-9
Drive Option Information
l
Select 1 or none for the precomp value. lf neither of these options are
available, select the maximum available precomp value.
A-10 Specifications
DMA Assignments
Specifications A-11
A-12 Specifications
System I/O Address Map
Specifications A-13
A-14 Specification
Specifications A-15
A-16 Specifications
Speaker connector pin assignments (J21)
Specifications A - 1 7
A-18 Specification
Specifications A-19
SIMM socket pin assignments (continued)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
17
A5
35
PD2
53
Signal
DlO
71
18
A6
36
DPO
54
D26
72
Pin Signal
NC
Ground
Active low logic
Tested Operating Environments
Although your system will run most software applications,
the following operating environments have been tested for
compatibility with your system.
Microsoft MS-DOS 3.1 to 5.0,6.0, and 6.20
®
®
Novell DR DOS 6.0
Novell NetWare* 2.2,3.12, and 4.01
Novell NetWare Lite 1.1
IBM® OS/221
SCO UNIX release 3.2, version 4.2
SC0 Open Desk top 3.0
Microsoft Windows 3.0 and 3.1
Microsoft Windows for WorkGroups 3.11
Microsoft Windows NT 3.1
®
l
Certified as Workstation; tested as File server
Your system has also received Novell’s ‘Yes, NetWare tested
and approved” certification as a workstation. As new
environments become available, these also will be tested.
A-20 Specifications
Options Available from Epson
Many options for enhancing and supplementing this product
are available from Epson, including the following:
Monitors
14" VGA monochrome and color monitors
14" Extended color VGA monitor
17" and 20” Professional Series monitors
Keyboards
101 or 102 USA
102 International language
Mouse
6-pin PS/2-type mouse
Mass storage devices
5.25 and 3.5-inch diskette drives
Hard disk drives from 80 to 340MB
Tape backup drives
Upgrade kits
4MB, 8MB, and 16MB SIMM memory expansion kits
486SX, DX, DX2, and Pentium OverDrive processor
upgrade kits
Printers
9-pin and 24-pin dot matrix printers
Laser printers
Ink jet printers
Software
Microsoft Windows
MS-DOS
OS/2
Specifications A-21
Glossary
Access speed
The time it takes for a device, such as memory or a disk drive,
to return data. For example, your computer’s SIMMs return
data requested by the microprocessor at an access speed of
70ns.
Address
The location where information is stored in a computer’s
memory.
AUTOEXEC.BAT file
The batch file your computer runs automatically whenever you
load MS-DOS. It configures the installed system devices and
sets various user preferences. See also Batch file.
Base memory
see Conventional memory.
Batch file
A file that executes commands automatically. Batch files are
text files with the filename extension .BAT. When you type the
filename, the operating system sequentially executes the
commands in that file.
BIOS
Basic Input/Output System. Routines in ROM (Read Only
Memory) that handle the transfer of information among
various hardware components, and between the hardware and
your operating system.
Glossary 1
Boot
The process a computer performs to check its components and
then load the operating system into memory.
Bus
A wire or group of wires that sends information between
components in the computer. The speed of a bus increases by
the number and width of the channels the bus uses to move
data.
Cache
A high-speed memory buffer that stores frequently used data
where your microprocessor can access it faster. Your computer
includes 8KB of internal cache expandable to 256KB with
external cache chips. See also External cache and lnternal cache.
CMOS
Complementary Metal&de Semiconductor. A low-power
silicon chip used for RAM and switching applications that is
backed up by a battery.
Conventional memory
The memory in the computer below 1MB that is available to
MS-DOS and application programs-usually 64OKB. Also
called base memory or main memory.
Coprocessor
See Math coprocessor.
Copy-protected program
A program containing a software “lock” that prevents it from
being copied. See also Key disk
2 Glossary
CPU
Central Processing Unit. The primary device that interprets
instructions, performs tasks, keeps track of stored data, and
controls input and output operations. See also Microprocessor.
Device driver
A file containing instructions that allow your computer to
recognize and communicate with a device. The device may be a
printer, monitor, or other type of device.
Display adapter card
A circuit board that controls the way a monitor displays text
and graphics, normally installed in an option slot. Also called
video card. This computer does not support optional display
adapter cards. (A VGA display adapter is built into your
computer’s main system board.)
Expanded memory
Memory that specially written MS-DOS programs can use
when an expanded memory manager program maps that
memory into an accessible area.
Extended memory
Memory above 1MB that is accessed by 386 or 486
microprocessors when they are operating in protected or
virtual mode. This memory is available to OS/2 programs, but
is available to MS-DOS only if an extended memory manager
program is installed. See also Expanded memory.
External cache
Optional cache chips you can install on the system board to
increase cache memory.
Glossary 3
IDE
Integrated Drive Electronics. A type of hard disk drive interface
in which the controller is on the drive instead of 0n a controller
card. Your computer includes an interface on the main system
board for up to two IDE hard disk drives.
lnternal cache
Cache memory built into your microprocessor. Your computer
includes 8KB of internal cache.
Jumper
A small moveable plug that connects two pins on a device’s
circuit board. Jumpers alter the operation of a particular
function.
Key disk
A diskette containing a copy-protected program that must
remain in a diskette drive while you use the program. See also
Copy-protected program.
Kilobyte (KB)
A unit used to measure storage space in a computer’s memory
or on a disk. One kilobyte equals 1024 bytes.
Local bus
An internal bus that controls the connections from the
microprocessor to the VGA and IDE interfaces on this
computer. Local bus provides increased performance and
speed. See also Bus.
4 Glossary
Main system board
The circuit board inside your computer containing the circuitry
and components your computer needs to operate.
Math coprocessor
A device that enables the computer to process mathematical
calculations faster by using floating point numbers instead of
whole numbers.
Megabyte (MB)
A unit used to measure storage space in a computer’s memory
or on a disk. One megabyte equals 1024KB (kilobytes).
Megahertz (MHZ)
A unit used to measure oscillation frequency, such as that of a
computer’s internal clock. A megahertz is one million cycles
per second.
Memory module
A small circuit board, commonly called a SIMM (single inline
memory module), that contains surface-mounted memory
chips. You can add memory modules to the main system board
to expand your computer’s memory.
Microprocessor
A small CPU on one semiconductor chip. See also CPU.
Numeric keypad
The number and cursor control keys grouped together on the
right side of the keyboard. The operation of the dual-use keys
on the numeric keypad is controlled by the NumLock key.
Glossary 5
Parallel
An interface that transmits data simultaneously over separate
wires in a cable. See also Serial.
Pathname
The directory name(s) you specify to locate a file. For example,
the pathname for the file SALES, stored in the subdirectory
BUSINESS, is \BUSINESS\SALES.
Pentium OverDrive
The Pentium OverDrive microprocessor incorporates the latest
in Pentium technology, including a 64-bit data path, one 8KB
internal cache for read-only code, and a second 8KB internal
cache for read-write data, and the ability to execute instructions
in parallel.
Power-on diagnostics
Tests stored in a computer’s ROM that the computer runs to
check its internal circuitry, peripheral device configuration, and
operating status each time you turn it on or reset it.
Processor speed
The speed at which the computer’s processor can execute
commands, usually expressed in megahertz (MHz), such as
33 MHz. See also Megahertz.
Random Access Memory. The area of the computer’s memory
used to run programs and store data while you work. All data
in RAM is erased when you turn off or reset the computer.
6 Glossary
Read/write head
The physical device inside a disk or tape drive that reads data
from and writes data to the magnetic surface of the disk or tape.
Real-time clock
A clock inside the computer that keeps track of the time and
date, even when the computer is turned off, by using power
from a backup battery.
Refresh rate
The frequency with which a monitor can redraw a screen
image. The faster the refresh rate, the less the screen will
flicker.
Reset
To restart a computer without turning it off. You can reset your
computer by pressing Ctrl Alt Del. Resetting erases all data
stored in RAM and reloads your operating system.
ROM
Read Only Memory. Memory that can only be read and cannot
be modified. ROM retains its contents even when you turn off
the computer by using power from a backup battery.
Roof directory
The main directory in a hierarchical disk directory structure.
All other directories are subdirectories of the root directory.
RS-232C
A standard type of serial communication. You can connect an
RS-232C device to either of the computer’s RS-232C serial ports.
Glossary 7
Serial
The type of communication that transmits data from a serial
interface to a serial device over a single wire. See also Parallel.
ShadowRAM
The feature in your computer that copies the contents of the
system, video, and external BIOS ROMs into the RAM area of
memory to speed up processing.
SIMM
See Memory module.
subdirectory
In a hierarchical disk directory structure, a group of files in a
directory within another directory or the root directory.
SVGA
Super VGA (Video Graphics Array). In addition to supporting
standard VGA modes, your computer’s built-in SVGA
controller supports resolutions up to 1280 x 1024 in 16 colors on
a compatible monitor. If you upgrade the video memory to
2MB, the SVGA controller supports this resolution in 256 colors.
True color
A VGA feature that supports 24-bit-per-pixel color, which
enables your VGA interface to display 16.8 million colors. The
screen image looks more like a photograph than a traditional
computer image.
8 Glossary
VESA
Video Electronic Standards Association. The standards set for a
common hardware and software interface to super VGA video
adapters; provides simplified software application access to
VGA products.
VGA
Video Graphics Array. A high-resolution display adapter that
provides a variety of video modes.
Video card
See Display adapter card.
Write-protect
To protect the data on a diskette from being changed by setting
the write-protect switch on a 3.5-inch diskette or by placing a
write-protect tab over the notch on a 5.25-inch diskette. You
cannot change data on a write-protected diskette.
ZIF socket
Zero Insertion Force. The type of socket on your system board
that holds the microprocessor. With this type of socket, it is
easy to remove and install processor chips.
ZIP chip
Zig-zag Inline Package. The type of optional video memory
chip you can install on the system board. On this type of chip,
the pins alternate in a zig-zag pattern rather than symetrically.
Glossary 9
Index
A
AC outlet, 1-3
Advanced Chipset Control option,
2-8
Advanced System Setup options,
2-6-7
Application programs
compatibility, A-20
copy protected, 3-8
installing, 2-16
problems, 6-11
requiring slow speed, 3-8
running under MS-DOS 2-4
stopping, 3-5
Auto-sensing, 2-5, 6-9, A-3
AUTOEXEC.BAT file, 6-2
Autotype Fixed Disk option, 2-5
B
Back panel, 1-3,4-2
Banks
cache, 4-22,4-24
SIMM socket, 4-10
Base memory, 2-4
Battery, 2-2.4-7, A-2
BIOS, Intro-1, 2-1-2,2-5,4-5,6-1-2,
A-2, A-12
Boot options, 2-8-9,3-6,6-3
Booting system, 2-2,2-5, 2-15
Brightness, 1-9,6-6
Buttons
diskette release, 3-4
Pause, 1-8,3-5
power, 1-7-8
RESET, 1-7,3-6,6-1
C
Cable
diskette drive, S-17-20
hard disk drive, 5-2-7,5-14,5-18
monitor, 1-3-4
power supply, 5-4, 5-6-7,5-17-19
printer, 1-5
serial device, 1-6
Cache memory
banks, 4-22,4-24
configuration, 4-22
configuring 2-7
external, Intro-l, Intro-3,2-7,45,48,
422-24, 6-14-15, A-2
installing, 4-22-24
internal, Intro-1, A-2
jumpers, 4-8,4-22-24
location, 4-5
problems with, 6-14
setting in SETUP, 4-24
sockets, 4-5,4-21-22
upgrades, Intro-3
Card, see Option cards
CD-ROM, Intro-4, 5-1,5-14, A-5
Chipset registers, 2-8
CHKDSK command, 6-7
Clock speed, processor, 4-7, A-1
Clock, rea1-time, 2-4, A-2
CMOS RAM, 2-2-3,2-15,4-7, A-2
Colors, Intro-1-2, Intro-4, 4-19, A-3,
A-7
Command prompt, 1-9
COMn port, see Serial ports
CompuServe on-line support, Intro-8
CONFIG.SYS, 2-17, 6-2, 6-8-9
Index 1
Configuration
cache, 4-22
cache memory, 2-7
changing 2-1-2,2-15
drive, 2-5,5-21
files, 4-29,6-2,6-10
SIMM, 2-4,4-10
connecting
drive cables, 5-4,5-6,5-17-20
keyboard, 1-3
monitor, 1-4-5
mouse, 1-4
power cord, 1-6
printer, 1-5-6
Connector
diskette drive, 5-17-18, A-16
hard disk drive, 5-5-7, A-16
keyboard, 1-3, A-15
monitor, I-3-5, A-15
mouse, 1-4, A-15
option card riser board, A-17
option slot, A-18-19
optional game port, A-17
pin assignments, A-14-19
printer, 1-5-6, A-14
serial device, 1-6, A-15
speaker, A-17
VGA port, 1-3,1-5, A-15
Connector board, option card, see
Option card connector board
Contrast.1-9,6-6
Control Pane1 settings, 6-12
Controller
diskette drive, 4-7, A-3
had disk drive, 4-7, A-3
parallel port, A-3
problems, 6-14
SVGA, Intro-2, A-3
Conventional memory, 2-4
conventions, manual, Intro-6
2
Index
Coprocessor, math, Intro-1, Intro-4
A-2
Cover
removing 4-2-3
replacing, 4-4
CPU, see Processors
CTRL ALT +, 3-9
CTRL ALT -, 3-9
CTRL ALT DEL, 3-6-7,6-4
CTRL BREAK, 3-5
CTRL C, 3-5
Cursor, 2-3
Customer support, Intro-7-8
D
Data, losing, 3-5
Date, setting, 2-4
DB-9P connector, 1-6
Default settings, 2-15
Depth, computer, A-5
Diagnostics, power-on 1-8,6-13
Disk compaction utility, 6-10
Diskette drive
accessing, 2-9-10, 3-7
bays, 1-7,4-5,5-1, 5-14-16,5-19
boot sequence, 2-8, 3-6
cable, 5-17-20
caution, 5-18
configuration, 2-5,5-21,6-8
connector, 5-17-18, A-16
controller, 4-7, A-3
errors, 2-10, 6-8
faulty, 6-7
installing. 5-1-22
jumper, 4-7
latch, 3-4,6-7
light, 1-7, 3-4
power cable, 5-17-19,6-8
problems, 6-8
protective card, 1-8
Diskette Drive
removing, 5-19
restricting access, 2-10,3-7,6-7, A-5
types, 2-5, 5-2, A-4
Diskette(s)
access, controlling, 2-10, 3-7, 6-7, A-5
defective, 6-7
formatted, 6-7
inserting 3-4
key, 3-8, 6-11
label, 3-4
problems, 2-10, 6-7
release button 3-4
removing 1-9, 3-4
shutter, 3-4
type, 6-7
write-protected, 6-7
Display adapters, 2-4, 6-6
Display option SETUP, 2-4
DMA assignments, A-11
DOS, see MS-DOS
Double-word I/O, 2-17, 6-8
DRAM video chips
installing, 4-19
type, 4-19, A-2
Drivers
local bus IDE, Intro-3, Intro-S, 2-1,
2-16-17, 6-3, 6-8-11
mouse, 1-4, 6-14
pm-configured, Intro-3-4, 2-16
printer, 6-12
SVGA, Intro-3, Intro-5, 2-1,2-16,2-18
Windows, 1-4, 2-16-17, 6-14
Drives, see Diskette drive or Hard
disk drive
E
EGA/VGA, 2-4
Electric shock, 1-6, 4-3
Electrical
circuitry, 1-8, 6-3
outlet, 1-5-6, 6-3
Electromagnetic interference, 1-2
Energy Star
description, Intro-3, 3-3
monitors, Intro-2, 2-13,3-2,6-5-6,
A-1, A-3
problems, 6-5-6, 6-9,6-1 1
settings, 2-2, 2-13-14
Energy, conserving, 3-2
Environmental conditions, 1-1
Epson America Forum,
CompuServe, Intro8
Epson Connection, Intro-7
Ergonomic tips, 3-1
Errors
disabling messages, 2-9
diskette drive, 2-10, 6-7-8
hard disk drive, 6-9
keyboard, 6-5
read/write, 6-10
Extended
memory, 2-4-5, A-12
VGA, Intro-5, 2-18; see also SVGA
External cache, Intro-1, Intro-3, 2-7,
4-5,4-8,4-22-24, 6-14-15, A-2
External device problems, 6-13
F
Faceplate
removing 5-15
replacing, 5-19
Factory default settings, 2-15
Fast processor speed, 3-8-9, A-1
Files
AUTOEXEC.BAT, 6-2
CONFIG.SYS, 2-17, 6-2, 6-8-9
repairing 6-7
SYSTEM.INI, 2-17
Fixed Disk Setup option, 2-5
Fixed Disk Timeout option, 2-14
Formatting
diskettes, 6-7
hard disk drive, 6-9
Index 3
Frequency, power supply, Ad
FuI1-length option slots, A-4
Function keys, SETUP, 2-3
G
Game port, optional, A-4, A-17
Green PC, Intro-1-3,2-2,2-13-14,
3-3, 6-5--6, 6-9, 6-11, A-1, A-3
Grounding
plate, 5-3
yourself, 4-3, 4-20, 4-26
Guiderail 5-3
H
Half-length option slots, A-4
Hard disk drive
access light, 1-7
auto-sensing, 2-5--6,& 9, A-3
bays, 4-5,5-1-2,5-13--14
boot sequence, 2-8
cable, 5-2-7, 5-14, 5-18
configuration, 2-5--6, 5-21
connecting cables, 5-4, 5-6
connector, 5-5-7, A-16
controller, 4-7, A-3
double-word I/O, 2-17, 6-8
errors, 6-9
formatting, 6-9
installing, Intro-4, 5-1-22
jumpers, 5-2,5-12, 6-8
light, 1-7
local bus, Intro-1-2,2-1,2-16-17,68,
A-1, A-3
master, 5-12
parameters, 2-5-6, A-10
physical format, 6-9
power cable, 5-6-7
power requirements, 5-12
preformatted, 2-5
problems, 6-8
removing 5-14, 5-19
SETUP options, 2-5, 2-14
slave, 5-12
4 Index
Hard disk drive
standby mode, Intro-1-3,2-2,
2-13-14, 3-3 ,6-9, 6-11, A-1
time-out, Intro-3, 2-13-14
types, 2-5, 5-2
user-defined, 2-6
Hardware interrupts, A-11
Heat sink
installing, 4-28
limitations, A-4
Height, computer, A-5
Help screen SETUP, 2-3
Help, where to get, Intro-7
High-speed video memory, A-3
Humidity, A-6
I
I/O
address map, A-13-14
double word, 2-17, 6-8
expansion slots, A-4
problems, 6-14
IDE hard disk drive
controller, 4-7, A-3
driver, Intro-3, Intro-5, 2-1, 2-16-17,
6-3, 6-8--11
interface, 2-17
local bus, Intro-1-2,2-1,2-16-17,6-3,
6-8, A-1, A-3
Indicator lights
diskette drive, 3-4
power, 1-7, 6-3, 6-6
speed, 1-7, 3-8
Inlet, power, 1-5--6, 6-3
Input ranges, power supply, A-6
Interference, electromagnetic, 1-2
Internal cache, intro-1, A-2; see also
Cache memory
Internal components, 4-5
International marketing locations,
Intro-7
J
Jumpers
cache, 4-8, 4-22-24
changing settings, 4-6-9
diskette drive controller, 4-7
hard disk drive, 5-2, 5-12, 6-8
location, 4-5--6
parallel port, 4-7
processor type settings, 4-8
serial ports, 4-7
K
K/B port, Intro-1, 1-3, A-3, A-15
Key disk, 3-8, 6-11
Keyboard
available options, A-21
checking connections, 6-5
Connecting 1-3
connector, 1-3, A-15
errors, 6-5
num lock, 6-5
pin assignments, A-15
port, Intro-1, 13, A-3, A-15
problems, 6-5
PS/2 compatible, Intro-1, 1-3, A-3,
A-15
specifications, A-3
Keypad, numeric, 3-9, 6-5
Keys, SETUP function, 2-3
L
Local bus
hard disk drive, Intro-1-2, 2-1,
2-16-17, 6-3, 6-8, A-1, A-3
IDE driver, Intro-3, Intro-5, 2-1,
2-16-17, 6-3, 6-8-11
IDE hard disk interface, A-3
speed, A-1
video, Intro-1-2, Intro-5, 2-1, A-1, A-3
Location, choosing 1-1
Lockout timer option, 2-13, 6-5
Low processor speed, 3-8-9, 6-11,
6-13, A-1
Low-level format, 6-9
Low-power standby mode,
Intro-1-3,2-2,2-13-14,3-3,6-%,
6-9, 6-11, A-1, A-3
L.PTn, see Parallel port
M
Main system board, see System board
Manual conventions, intro-6
Mass storage, Intro-2, Intro-4, 5-1,
A-4-5
Master hard disk drive, 5-12
Math coprocessor, Intro-1, Intro-4,
A-2
Memory
banks, 4-10-11
base, 2-4
cache, see Cache memory
clearing/ 3-5
CMOS RAM, 2-2, A-2
configuration 4-10-11
conventional, 2-4
extended, 2-4-5, A-12
installing, Intro-3, 4-10-12
insufficient, 6-12
modules, see SlMMs
problems, 6-13
RAM, Intro-1, Intro-3, 2-4, 2-7,
6-12, A-2
relocation, 2-8, A-2
removing 413-14
ROM, 2-2-3, 2-7 2-15, A-2
SIMMs, see SlMMs
size, 2-5
standard, A-2
system, Intro-1, Intro-3, 1-8, 2-4-5,
2-7, 4-10-12, A-2
video, see Video memory
Index
5
Memory shadow, configuring, 2-7
Messages, error, 1-9, 2-10, 6-5,
6-7-10, 6-14
Microprocessor, see Processors
Modem, 1-6
Monitor
available options, A-21
brightness, 1-9, 6-6
cables, 1-3-4
connecting 1-4-5
connector, 1-3-5, A-15
contrast, 1-9, 6-6
Energy Star compliant, Intro-2, 2-13,
3-2, 6-5-6, A-1, A-3
power cord, 1-4-5, 6-6
power requirements, 1-5
power switch, 6-6
problems, 6-6
SVGA, 1-4-5
turning off, 1-10, 4-2
turning On, 1-8
VGA port, Intro-1, 1-3--4, 2-4
Mouse
connecting, 1-4
connector, 1-4
driver, 1-4, 6-14
pin assignments, A-15
port, Intro-1, 1-346-14
PS/2 compatible, Intro-1-2, 1-4, A-4,
A-15
specifications, A-4
MS-DOS, Intro-3, 2-4, 4-7
N
NetWare, 2-6, A-20
Num lock, 6-5
Numeric coprocessor, Intro-1,
Intro--4, A-2
Numeric keypad, 3-9, 6-5
6 Index
O
On-line support, CompuServe,
Intro-8
Operating range, A-6
Operating system
diskette, 3-6, 6-3
installing, 1-9, 2-16
MS-DOS, 2-4, 4-7
pre-configured, Intro-3
prompt, 1-9
reloading, 3-5
version number, 6-2
Optical drives, Intro-4, 5-1, 5-14, A-5
Option card connector board
installing 4-7
locating, 4-5
pin assignments, A-17
option cards
&bit, Intro-2, 4-14, 4-16
16-bit, Intro-2, 4-14, 4-16
connector board 4-5, 4-7
DIP switches, 6-12
installing, Intro-3, 4-14, 4-16, 4-18
power requirements, 4-15, 6-4-5, 6-13
problems, 6-12
removing 4-8, 4-19
Option slots
cover, 4-16
description, Intro-2
length, A-4
pin assignments, A-18
power limits, 4-15, 6-5
Optional equipment, 1-2, 4-1
Outlet, electrical, 1-5--6, 6-3
OverDrive, Pentium, See Pentium
OverDrive
P
Parallel port
connecting 1-5-6
controller, A-3
description, Intro-1
location 1-3
pin assignments, A-14
reassigning, 4-7
Password
defining, 2-10
deleting, 2-11, 3-8
feature, Intro-2
on boot option 2-10--12
option, 2-11--12, 3-7
problems, 6-10
Supervisor, 2-10--12, 3-7,6-7, A-5
User, 2-10--12, 3-7,6-7, A-5
using, 3-7--8
Pause button, 1-8, 3-5
Pentium OverDrive
heat sink/fan, 4-15, 4-25, 4-28, 6-4,
A-4
jumper, 47-8
support, Intro-1-2, Intro-4 A-1-2,
A-4, A-21
Physical format, hard disk, 6-9
Port
keyboard, lntro-1, 1-3, A-3, A-15
location, 1-3
mouse, Intro-1, 1-3--4, 6-14, A-15
parallel, Intro-1, 1-3, 1-5--6, 4-7, A-3,
A-14
serial, Intro-1, 1-3, 1-5--6, 4-7, A-3,
A-15
VGA, Intro-1, 1-3-4, 2-4, A-15
Post-installation procedures, 4-29
Power
button 1-7-8
inlet, AC, 1-5-6, 6-3
light, 1-7, 6-3, 6-6
Power cable
computer, 1-5-7, 4-2,4-4
diskette drive, 5-17--19, 6-8
hard disk drive, 5--6--7
monitor, 1-4--5, 6-6
Power requirements
monitor, 1-5
option cards, 4-15, 6-4--5, 6-13
with two hard disk drives, 5-12
Power supply
cables, 5-4, 5-6--7, 5-17--19
connector pin assignments, A-15
frequency, A-6
input ranges, A-6
limitations, 4-15, 5-12, 6-4--5, 6-13
location, 4-5
maximum output, A-6
removing, 4-16
type, A-6
Power-on diagnostics, 1-8, 6-13
Pre-configured systems, Intro-3-4,
2-1
Precautions, iii-viii, 1-1-2, 4-1
Printer
cable, 1-5
checking connections, 6-12
connecting, 1-5-6
drivers, 6-12
problems, 6-12
turning off, 1-10, 4-2
turning on, 1-8
Processor speed
changing, 3-8-9, A-1
fast, 3-8-9, A-1
keyboard command, 3-9
normal, 4-7
problems, 6-11
relation to local bus speed, A-1
slow, 3-8-9, 6-11, 6-13, A-1
Index 7
Processors
clock speed, 4-7
jumpers, 4-8
replacing 4-26-27
socket, 4-25
specifications, A-1
speed, 3-8, 4-7, A-1
supported, Intro-4
upgrading 4-25
PS/2 compatible, Intro-1, 1-3, A-3,
A-15
R
RAM, Intro-1, Intro-3, 2-4, 2-7, 6-12,
A-2
Read/write
errors, 6-10
slot, 3-4
Readme files, Intro-5,2-1, 2-18
Real-time clock, 2-4, A-2
RESET button, 1-7, 3-6, 6-1
Resolutions, see Video resolutions
ROM, 2-2-3, 2-7, 2-15, A-2
RS-232C pork, A-3, see also Serial
ports
S
safety instructions, iii-viii 1-1-2, 4-1
screen colors and resolutions,
Intro-2, Intro-4, 4-19, A-3, A-7
Security and anti-virus options, 2-10
Serial number, 6-1-2
Serial ports
connecting, 1-4-6
connector, 1-6, A-15
controller, A-3
description, Intro-1
jumpers, 4-7
location, 1-3
pin assignments, A-15
reassigning 4-7
8 Index
SETUP program
Autotype fixed disk, 2-5
boot options, 2-8
cache memory, 2-7.
changing values, 2-4
chipset registers, 2-8
date and time function, 2-4
disabling prompt, 2-9
display type, 2-4
drive configuration, 2-5-6
exiting, 2-15
factory default settings, 2-15
fixed disk, 2-5
function keys, 2-3
hard disk drive, 2-5
help screen 2-3
Main Menu, 2-3
memory shadow, 2-7
restoring default values, 2-3
running 2-1-18
saving settings, 2-15
shadow options, 2-7
starting, 2-2-3
system information, 2-4-5
system memory, 2-4
system summary, 2-14
user-defined, 2-4
Shadowing
BIOS ROM, 2-7
memory, Intro-1, A-2
video ROM, 2-7
SIMMs
adding Intro-3
banks, 4-10-11
configuration, 2-4, 4-10-11
gold-plated, 6-13
incorrect type, 6-4
installing, Intro-3, 4-10-12
location 4-5
pin assignments, A-19
positioning, 4-12
SIMMs
removing 4-13-14
sockets, 2-5, 4-5, 4-10-14, 6-13
tin-plated 4-11
type, 4-11, A-2
Slave hard disk drive, 5-12
Slot cover, 4-16
Slots, option, see Option slots
Slow processor speed, 3-8--9, 6-11,
6-13, A-1
Sockets
cache, 4-5, 4-22-23
microprocessor, 4-5, 4-25-26
optional video memory, 4-5
SIMM, 4-5, 4-10-14, 6-13
video, 4-5, 4-19, 4-21
ZIF, 4-26-27
ZIP, 4-19-21, A-2
Software, see Application programs
Speaker, A-4, A-17
Speed, see Processor speed
Speed light, 1-7, 3-8
SRAM chips, Intro-3, 4-22
Standby mode, Intro-1-32-2,
2-13-14, 3-3, 6-5-6, 6-9, 6-11, A-1,
A-3
Sk tic electricity, 1-1
Stopping a command or program,
3-5
Storage devices, Intro-2, Intro-4, 5-1,
5-14, A45
Supervisor password, 2-10--12, 3-7,
6-7, A-5
SVGA
connector, 1-3-5
controller, A-3
drivers, Intro-3, Intro-5,2-1, 2-16,
2-18
interface, A-3
jumper settings, 4-8
local bus, Intro-1-2,2-1, A-1, A-3
monitor, 1-4
System
BIOS, Intro-1, 2-1-2, 2-5,4-5, 6-1-2,
A-2, A-12
board, 4-5, 4-7, 4-10, 5-5
configuration, 245,2-15,6-1
I/O address map, A-13-14
identifying 6-1
memory, Intro-1, Intro-3, 1-8, 2-4,
2-7, A-1-2, A-12
memory map, A-12
optimizing performance, 2-8, 4-1
shadowing, 2-6
speed, 3-8, A-1
startup information, 2-9, 6-2
startup password, 2-10-12, 3-7
summary, 2-9, 2-14
virus protection A-5
System Setup option, 2-4-5
System Summary option, 2-14
SYSTEM.INI, 2-17
T
Tag SRAM, 4-22
Tape drive, Intro-4, 5-1, 5-14, A-3,
A-5
Technical support, Intro-7
Temperature, A-6
Time, setting, 2-4
Timeout periods
hard disk drive, Intro-3, 2-14
monitor, Intro-3, 2-13
Timing requirements, 3-8
Translation mode, hard disk drives,
A-10
Troubleshooting, 6-1-16
True Color support, Intro-1, A-3
Turning off computer, 1-9, 4-2
Turning on computer, 1-7
Index
9
U
W
User password, 2-10-12, 3-7,6-7, A-5
User-defined hard disk drive, 2-6
Utility, disk compaction, 6-10
Weight, computer, A-5
Width, computer, A-5
Windows
mouse driver, 1-4, 6-14
pre-configured, Intro-3
video drivers, 2-16-17
Work environment, comfortable, 3-1
Write-protection, 6-7
V
VGA port, Intro-1, 1-3-4, 2-4
Video
BIOS, 6-2, A-2
card option. 2-4
chips, 4-19, A-2
colors, Intro-1-2, Intro-4, 4-19, A-3,
A-7
controller, A-3
display type, 2-4
drivers, Intro-3, Intro-5, 2-1, 2-16,
2-18
local bus, Intro-1-2, Intro-5, 2-1,
A-1, A-3
readme files, Intro-5,2-1, 2-18
resolutions, A-3
ROM, 2-7
sockets, 4-5,4-20-21
standby mode, Intro-1-3, 2-2,
2-13--14, 3-3, 6-5--6, A-1, A-3
time-out, Intro-3,2-13
Video memory
adding, Intro-4, 4-19-21
configuration, 4-19, A-12
installing, 4-20-21
location, 4-5
on system board, Intro-1
RAM, 2-7
sockets, 4-5,4-19
type, 4-19, A-2
ZIP chips, 4-20-21, A-2
Virus protection options, 2-10, 2-12,
A-5
10 Index
Z
ZIF socket, 4-26-27
ZIP chips, 419-21, A-2
Epson America (USA)
Epson America, Inc.
20770 Madrona Avenue
Torrance, CA 90509-2842
Tel: (310) 782-0770
Fax: (310) 782-5051
Epson Direct
P.O. Box 2858
20770 Madrona Avenue
Torrance,CA90509-1111
Tel: (800) 374-7300
Epson America (International)
E
Latin America
Miami, FL, USA
Tel: (305) 265-0092
Fax: (305) 265-0097
Mexico, S.A. De C.V.
E
Mexico, D.F., Mexico
Tel: (525) 395-9897
Fax: (525) 395-9499
Epson Argentina, S.A.
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel: (541) 322-7487
Fax: (541) 322-4637
Epson Do Brasil
Sao Paulo, SP Brazil
Tel: (5511) 813-3044
Fax: (5511) 210-9290
Epson Chile, S. A.
Santiago, Chile
Tel: (562) 232-8966
Fax: (562) 233-3197
Epson Venezuela, S. A.
Caracas, Venezuela
Tel: (582) 241-0433
Fax: (582) 241-6515
Epson Costa Rica, S.A.
San Jose, Costa Rica
Tel: (506) 34-6666
Fax: (506) 25-6709
Epson Canada Limited
Willowdale, Ontario, Canada
800-GO-EPSON [(800) 463-7766]
Tel: (416) 498-9955
Fax: (416) 498-4574
Epson International Marketing locations
Epson Deutschland GmbH
Zulpicher StraBe 6,
4000 Dusseldorf 11
Germany
Phone: 211-56030
Telex: 41-8584786
Telex: 42-610657
Epson lberica, S.A.
Avda. de Roma 18-26
08290 Cerdanyola de1 valles
08036 Barcelona, Spain
Phone: 3-582-15-00
Fax: 3-582-15-55
Telex: 50129
Epson Italia s.p.a.
V.le F.lli Casiraghi, 427
20099 Sesto S. Giovanni
Milano, Italy
Phone: 2-262331
Fax: 2-2440641 or 2-2440750
Telex: 315132
Epson Hong Kong Ltd.
25/F., Harbour Centre,
Epson Australia Pty. Ltd.
17 Rodborough Road
Frenchs Forest, N.S.W. 2086
Australia
25 Harbour Road
Wanchai, Hong Kong
Phone: 831-4600
Fax: 572-5792
Telex: 65542 EPSCO HX
Epson Electronics Trading Ltd.
Taiwan Branch
1OF, No. 287, Nanking E. Road,
Sec. 3, Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C.
Phone: 886-2-717-7360
Free phone: 886-080-211172
Fax: 886-2-712-9164
Telex: 785-24444
Epson (U.K.) Ltd.
Business Management Dept. (PC)
Campus 100, Maylands Avenue
Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire,
HP2 7EZ, UK
Phone: 0442 61144
Free phone: linkline O800 289622
Fax: 0422 227227
Telex: 51-824767
Epson France S.A.
BP. 320, 68 Bis Rue Marjolin
92305 Levallois-Perret Cedex
France
Phone: 33-1-4737-3333
Phone:2-452-0666
Fax: 2-451-0251
Telex: n-75052
Epson Singapore Pte. Ltd.
Oub Centre, Singapore 0104
Phone: 533-0477
Telex: 87-39536
Distributors
South America
SISCO
Sao Paulo, SP Brazil
Tel: (5511) 574-8877
Fax: (5511) 572-1306
Siser Ltda .
La Paz, Bolivia
Tel: (591-2) 34-32-45
Fax: (591-2) 35-92-68
Exhibit Computer
Bogota, Colombia
Tel: (571) 218-2700
Fax: (571) 218-5370
McSiiver, S. A.
Bogota, Colombia
Tel: (571) 230-1014
Fax: (571) 230-9205
UPEN Computer Systems
Bogota, Colombia
Tel: (571) 257-7800
C.I.L.D.S.E.
Quito, Ecuador
Tel: (593) 2-54-3418
Fax: (593) 2-55-4780
Ace Computers & Electronics
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: (592) 25-65-48
Fax: (592) 26-39-67
A.J. Vierci & CLA
Asuncion, Paraguay
Tel: (595) 21-449-220
Fax: (595) 21-449-234
Alvimer S.R.L. Trading Inc.
Ciudad Del Este, Paraguay
Tel: (595) 61-60234
Fax: (595) 61-60566
Infocenter
Asuncion, Paraguay
Tel: (595) 214-98762
Fax: (595) 214-49514
Control De Procesos lnformaticos
Lima, Peru
Tel: (5114) 328-384
Fax: (5114) 355-017
Peru Mercantil, S.A.
Lima, Peru
Tel: (5114) 62-2566
Fax: (5114) 61-8256
Intetfase S.A.
Montevideo, UN
y
Tel: (598) 249-4600
Fax: (598) 249-3040
Caribbean
Caribbean Computer Systems, Ltd.
Bridgetown, Barbados
Tel: (809) 429-7050
Fax: (809) 427-6089
Tel: (809) 427-5854
Fax: (809) 436-9870
North Atlantic Data Systems
Hamilton, Bermuda
Tel: (809) 295-7111
Fax: (809) 292-3834
The Computer Center
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (809) 328-0304
Fax: (809) 328-0307
Columbus Limited
Grand Cayman, West Indies, B.W.1
Tel: (809) 949-8039
Fax: (809) 949-7537
Compusupplies, Ltd.
Tel: (809) 925-8382
Fax: (809) 925-8115
WTG / APTEC Systems Limited
Kingston Jamaica
Tel: (809) 929-9250
Fax: (809) 929-8296
Boolchand Pessomal N.V.
Curacao, Netherlands Antilles
Tel: (599) 961-7545
Fax: (599) 961-7876
Computer
Hato Rey,
Tel: (809)
Fax: (809)
Micro Internacional, S.A.
Santo Domingo, Republica Dominicana
Tel: (809) 533-7096
Fax: (809) 535-3218
Gallery
Puerto Rico
753-0500
753-0552
IMCON Limited
Castries, St. Lucia, west Indies
Tel: (809) 452-6130
Fax: (809) 452-3883
Da Costas Limited
Bridgetown, Barbados
Kingston, Jamaica
Complete Computer Systems
Port-of-Spain Trinidad
Tel: (809) 625-1204
Fax: (809) 623-5426
Central America
Equipos Electronicos Valdez y Cia
San Salvador, El Salvador
Tel: (503) 23-73-43
Fax: (503) 2453-82
PS2000
Guatemala, Guatemala
Servicio Integral De Computacion S.A.
CODASA
Tel: (502-2) 31-11-70
Fax: (502-2) 32-52-22
Tel: (504) 33-5685
Fax: (504) 58-0255
Micro-Tee
Managua, Nicaragua
Tel: (505-2) 66-27-15
Fax: (505-2) 66-27-58
Sonitel, C.A.
Panama, Republica De Panama
Tel: (507) 63-98-00
Fax: (507) 63-98-15
Guatemala, Guatemala
Tel: (502-2) 32-57-44
Fax: (502-2) 31-24-49
Tegucigalpa, Honduras