Amarra Vinyl 2.2 User Manual Table of Contents
Chapter 1Introduction.............................................................................................11
Chapter 2Quick Start.............................................................................................. 12
2.1
Before You Begin.......................................................................................................12
2.1.1
Mac System Requirements........................................................................ 12
2.1.2
Installation & Activation............................................................................. 12
2.1.3
Lost Your Activation Code?........................................................................ 12
2.2
Recording Your Records or Tapes With Amarra Vinyl..................................................13
2.2.1
Input Set Up............................................................................................... 13
2.2.2
Defining A Recording Path In Amarra Vinyl................................................ 15
2.2.3
Amarra Vinyl Input Set Up.......................................................................... 17
2.2.3Recording.................................................................................................. 18
2.3
Step By Step — Export Your Recording...................................................................20
2.3.1
How To Export Your Recording as Separate Files for Each Song............... 21
2.3.2
How To Export Your Recording as One Long File....................................... 24
2.3.3
Adding Exported Files or Folders To Your iTunes Library............................ 25
Chapter 3Basic Operation...................................................................................... 31
3.1
General Workflow & Explanation of Terms Used....................................................31
3.2
Project Layout............................................................................................................32
3.3
Starting a Project: Opening Files.............................................................................34
3.3.1
Opening Projects.......................................................................................................34
3.3.2
Opening Sound Files.................................................................................. 35
3.3.3
Adding Your First Sound File...................................................................... 35
3.4Waveforms.................................................................................................................35
3.5
Auditioning Sound....................................................................................................37
3.5.1Playback.................................................................................................... 37
3.5.2
Playback from the Edit Point...................................................................... 37
3.5.3
Playback from Playhead............................................................................. 38
Page 2
3.5.4
Random Play.............................................................................................. 38
3.5.5
Time Displays............................................................................................. 38
3.6
Navigating the Waveform Display...........................................................................38
3.6.1Scrolling..................................................................................................... 38
3.6.2Zooming.................................................................................................... 39
3.7Selections..................................................................................................................39
3.7.1
Selecting a Region..................................................................................... 39
3.7.2
Selecting Segments................................................................................... 40
3.8
Simple Editing...........................................................................................................41
3.8.1
The Fade Tool............................................................................................. 41
3.8.2
Deleting Part of a Sound File...................................................................... 43
3.8.3
Splitting a segment into new segments..................................................... 43
3.8.4
Manipulating Fades.................................................................................... 44
3.9
Track Marks: Defining Metadata...............................................................................45
3.9.2
Moving Track Marks.................................................................................. 45
3.9.3
Removing Track Marks............................................................................... 45
3.9.4
Inserting Track Marks Automatically.......................................................... 46
3.9.5Tracks........................................................................................................ 46
Chapter 4Advanced Editing................................................................................... 48
4.1
Fade Tool Options......................................................................................................48
4.1.1
Changing Fade Parameters........................................................................ 48
4.1.2
Changing the shape of the Fade................................................................ 49
4.1.3
Changing the Fade Duration...................................................................... 50
4.1.4
Changing the Fade Type............................................................................. 50
4.2
Drag & Drop...............................................................................................................51
4.2.1Resequencing............................................................................................ 51
4.2.2Drag–Overlay.............................................................................................. 53
4.2.3
Drag–Insert & Ripple.................................................................................. 53
4.2.3Drag–Replace............................................................................................. 53
4.3
4.3.1
Page 3
Text Mode..................................................................................................................54
Gain Adjustment........................................................................................ 54
4.4
Gain Overlay Mode...................................................................................................56
4.5
Project Sample Rate..................................................................................................58
Chapter 5 Recording Audio..................................................................................... 60
5.1
Four Steps to Recording...........................................................................................60
1
Open a new Project................................................................................... 60
2
Set Recording Parameters.......................................................................... 60
3
Record Enable Panels................................................................................. 60
4
Start your recording................................................................................... 60
5.2
Audio Recordings......................................................................................................61
5.2.1
Selecting external input(s).......................................................................... 61
5.2.2
New Soundfile Parameters......................................................................... 63
5.2.3
Track arming and enabling recording......................................................... 65
5.2.4
Initiating a recording.................................................................................. 65
5.2.6
Edit Recording........................................................................................... 66
5.3
Preset a Recording Duration....................................................................................67
Chapter 6 Meters.................................................................................................... 68
6.1
Meters Window.........................................................................................................68
Chapter 7Menus..................................................................................................... 70
7.1
7.1.1
The Amarra Vinyl Menu............................................................................................70
About Amarra Vinyl.................................................................................... 70
7.1.2Preferences................................................................................................ 70
7.1.3Services..................................................................................................... 70
7.1.4
Hide Amarra Vinyl...................................................................................... 71
7.1.5
Hide Others................................................................................................ 71
7.1.6
Show All.................................................................................................... 71
7.1.7
Quit Amarra Vinyl....................................................................................... 71
7.2
The File Menu............................................................................................................72
7.2.1
New Project............................................................................................... 72
7.2.2
Open Project.............................................................................................. 72
7.2.4
Open Sound File…...................................................................................... 73
7.2.5
Close Window........................................................................................... 73
Page 4
7.2.6
Close Project............................................................................................. 73
7.2.7
Save Project............................................................................................... 73
7.2.8
Save Project As…....................................................................................... 73
7.2.9
Save As Default Project............................................................................. 74
7.2.10Activation…................................................................................................ 74
7.2.11
Audio MIDI Setup….................................................................................... 74
7.2.12
Audio Device Preferences.......................................................................... 74
7.2.14
Reveal Sound in Finder.............................................................................. 75
7.2.15
Build Waveform......................................................................................... 75
7.2.16
Visit Sonic Studio Website......................................................................... 75
7.2.17
Visit Support Portal.................................................................................... 75
7.3
The Edit Menu........................................................................................................... 76
7.3.1
Undo (action)............................................................................................. 76
7.3.2
Redo (action).............................................................................................. 77
7.3.3Cut............................................................................................................. 77
7.3.4Copy.......................................................................................................... 77
7.3.5
Paste (Replace / Insert / Overlay)............................................................... 77
7.3.6
Select/Deselect All..................................................................................... 77
7.3.7
Delete Selection......................................................................................... 77
7.3.8
Clear Selection........................................................................................... 78
7.3.9
Delete Selection......................................................................................... 78
7.3.10
Clear Selection........................................................................................... 78
7.3.11
Create Crossfade/Create Segment ............................................................ 78
7.3.12
Create Crossfade from In Point/Create Segment from In & Out Point(s).... 78
7.3.13
Delete Crossfade....................................................................................... 79
7.3.14
Move Segments…...................................................................................... 79
7.3.15
Segment Gain…......................................................................................... 79
7.3.16
Reverse Polarity......................................................................................... 79
7.4.17
Nudge Segment Left/Right......................................................................... 79
7.3.18
Edit Segment Name................................................................................... 80
7.3.19
Editing Auto Tool Override......................................................................... 80
7.3.20
Auto Space All Segments/Tracks............................................................... 80
Page 5
7.4
The EDL Menu...........................................................................................................81
7.4.1
Show/Hide Text View................................................................................ 81
7.4.2
Show/Hide Gain Overlay............................................................................ 81
7.4.4
Create Gain Nodes..................................................................................... 82
7.4.5
Select Gain Nodes..................................................................................... 82
7.4.6Refresh...................................................................................................... 82
7.4.7
7.5
Standard/Large Track Size......................................................................... 82
The Play Menu...........................................................................................................83
7.5.1
Play From Selection................................................................................... 83
7.5.2
(Play) Selection.......................................................................................... 84
7.5.3
(Play) From Playhead.................................................................................. 84
7.5.4
Repeat Play................................................................................................ 84
7.5.5
Stop All...................................................................................................... 84
7.5.6
Mute Track................................................................................................. 84
7.5.8
Monitor Input............................................................................................. 84
7.5.9
Monitor Output.......................................................................................... 84
7.5.10
Record Arm................................................................................................ 84
7.5.12
Around Selection Center............................................................................ 85
7.5.13
Play from Selection.................................................................................... 85
7.5.14
Play to End of Selection............................................................................. 85
7.5.15
Move Playhead.......................................................................................... 86
7.5.16
Hide Playhead When Stopped.................................................................... 87
7.6
The Mark Menu.........................................................................................................87
7.6.1
Track Start Mark........................................................................................ 87
7.6.2
Track End Mark.......................................................................................... 87
7.6.3
Delete Mark............................................................................................... 87
7.6.4
Lock Marks from Selection........................................................................ 88
7.6.5
Unlock Marks from Selection..................................................................... 88
7.6.6
Lock All Marks........................................................................................... 88
7.6.7
Unlock All Marks........................................................................................ 88
7.6.8
Analog Black to Marks............................................................................... 88
Page 6
7.6.9
Edited Black to Marks................................................................................ 89
7.6.10
Edited Black to Start Marks....................................................................... 89
7.6.11
The Mark Contextual Menu....................................................................... 89
7.7.1
Set SRP..................................................................................................... 90
7.7.2
Set SRP with Text...................................................................................... 91
7.7.3
Lock SRPs from Selection.......................................................................... 91
7.7.4
Unlock SRPs from Selection...................................................................... 91
7.7.5
Clear Selected SRPs.................................................................................. 91
7.7.17
Drop Edit Point at Playhead....................................................................... 91
7.7.6
Edit Point to Playhead................................................................................ 91
7.7.7
Move Edit Point to….................................................................................. 91
7.7.8
Edit Point to Next Peak.............................................................................. 92
7.7.9
Select Start to Edit Point............................................................................ 92
7.7.12
Select Edit Point to End............................................................................. 92
7.7.11
Selection from Selected Segments............................................................ 92
7.7.12
Select Segment to End.............................................................................. 92
7.7.25
Select Segment to Start............................................................................. 93
7.7.26
Select Segments from Selection................................................................ 93
7.8 The View Menu..........................................................................................................93
7.8.1
Move Forward/Backwards/Select Next/Previous Segment....................... 94
7.8.2 Zoom In/Out.............................................................................................. 94
7.8.3
Zoom In Around In/Out Point..................................................................... 94
7.8.4
Zoom In/Out around Edit Point.................................................................. 94
7.8.5
Zoom In/Out around Playhead................................................................... 94
7.8.6 Zoom to Previous/Next.............................................................................. 94
7.8.7 Zoom around Playhead.............................................................................. 95
7.8.8
Zoom around Selection Center.................................................................. 95
7.8.9
Zoom to Selection Start/End...................................................................... 95
7.8.10
Zoom to Selection...................................................................................... 95
7.8.11
Zoom to Entire Project/Track...................................................................... 96
7.9 The Windows Menu..................................................................................................96
7.9.1Meters....................................................................................................... 96
Page 7
7.9.2Equalizer.................................................................................................... 96
7.9.3
Export Sound File....................................................................................... 96
7.9.5 The Preferences Window......................................................................... 100
7.9.6 The Help Menu........................................................................................ 105
Chapter 8NoNOISE II: DeClick & DeCrackle....................................................... 106
8.2.3
Basic Manual DeClick & DeCrackle.......................................................... 106
8.2.3.1
Interpolation Algorithms.......................................................................... 107
8.2.3.4
Using DeClick and DeCrackle................................................................... 108
Chapter 9Broadband DeNoise..............................................................................111
9.1Overview...................................................................................................................111
9.2
The Noise Estimate................................................................................................. 112
9.2.1
Noise Estimates....................................................................................... 112
9.2.3
Where to take an Estimate....................................................................... 113
9.3
User Interface Overview......................................................................................... 114
9.3.1
Take Est [1] ............................................................................................. 114
9.3.2
Open Est [2] ............................................................................................ 114
9.3.3
NoNoise [3] ............................................................................................. 114
9.3.4
Bypass [4]................................................................................................ 114
9.4
DeNoise Window Parameters................................................................................ 114
9.4.1
Thresh (Threshold [5]............................................................................... 114
9.4.2
Atten (Attenuation) [6]............................................................................. 115
Chapter 10 Sonic EQ..............................................................................................116
10.1
Sonic EQ Pre–processor......................................................................................... 116
10.1.1Overview................................................................................................. 116
10.1.2Operation................................................................................................. 116
Appendix 1 Best Practices & Maintenance......................................................... 127
A1.1Introduction.............................................................................................................127
A1.2
Source Material Considerations.............................................................................127
A1.4
Hardware Considerations & Routine Maintenance..............................................128
File Systems................................................................................................................ 128
Storage Systems......................................................................................................... 128
Page 8
Permissions129
3rd Party Configuration Management......................................................................... 129
Appendix 2 Keyboard Shortcuts......................................................................... 131
Windows Shortcuts......................................................................................................................131
File & Project Shortcuts................................................................................................................131
Playback Shortcuts.......................................................................................................................131
Editing Shortcuts..........................................................................................................................131
Viewing Shortcuts.........................................................................................................................132
Track Prep 133
System133
Appendix 3 Contextual Menus............................................................................ 134
Control–Click.................................................................................................................................134
In the Waveform —...................................................................................................... 134
With Gain Overlay on —............................................................................................... 135
In the Track Bar —........................................................................................................ 135
In the waveform display —.......................................................................................... 135
On a Track mark —...................................................................................................... 135
Amarra Vinyl 2.2 User Manual Index.................................................................... 137
Page 9
About This Manual
This manual, as well as the software described in it, is furnished under license and may only be used or copied in accordance
with the terms of such license. The information in this manual is furnished for informational use only, is subject to change
without notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by Sonic Studio, LLC. Sonic Studio, LLC assumes no responsibility
or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this book.
Except as permitted by such license, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted,
in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Sonic
Studio, LLC.
Notice of Liability
The author and publisher have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information herein. However, the information
contained in this document is provided without warranty, either express or implied. Neither the authors, Sonic Studio, LLC,
nor its dealers or distributors will be held liable for any damages to be caused either directly or indirectly by the instructions
contained in this book, or by the software or hardware products described herein.
SONIC STUDIO, LLC MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, REGARDING THE APPLE SOFTWARE.
SONIC STUDIO, LLC DOES NOT WARRANT, GUARANTEE, OR MAKE ANY REPRESENTATIONS REGARDING THE USE OR THE
RESULTS OF THE USE OF THE SONIC STUDIO, LLC SOFTWARE IN TERMS OF ITS CORRECTNESS, ACCURACY, RELIABILITY,
CURRENTNESS, OR OTHERWISE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE RESULTS AND PERFORMANCE OF THE SONIC STUDIO
SOFTWARE IS ASSUMED BY YOU. THE EXCLUSION OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES IS NOT PERMITTED BY SOME STATES. THE
ABOVE EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
IN NO EVENT WILL SONIC STUDIO, LLC, ITS DIRECTORS, OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES, OR AGENTS BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR
ANY CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR INDIRECT DAMAGES (INCLUDING DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS PROFITS,
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF BUSINESS INFORMATION, AND THE LIKE) ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO
USE THE SONIC STUDIO SOFTWARE EVEN IF SONIC STUDIO HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
BECAUSE SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOWTHE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL
DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
Notice of Rights
©2009-2014 Sonic Studio, LLC — All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system
or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the publisher.
Sonic Studio, Amarra Vinyl, SSE, Broadband DeNoise native, NoNOISE, Manual DeClick II, DeClick, DeCrackle, A Type, B Type, C
Type, D Type, E Type and the Sonic Studio logo are trademarks of Sonic Studio, LLC. All other company or product names are
either trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Page 10
Chapter 1..............................................................Introduction
Amarra Vinyl is an easy to operate, task-specific tool for recording and restoration of audio on
your Apple computer. Amarra Vinyl is ideal for:
• Recording vinyl, tape, or any analog audio source
• Analysis of audio clicks, distortion, hum, hiss
• Restoring your precious recordings using Sonic’s award wining NoNOISE™ restoration
technology
• Edit your material and define Tracks transitionsr
• Export your Tracks with album, artist and track info for use in other applications such
as iTunes®.
Amarra Vinyl allows you to record, audition, repair, edit and mark audio with metadata (album
name, artist name, track name) from a variety of sources, then export them as AIFF or WAV files.
The Amarra Vinyl workflow is:
• Record your analog source up to 192 kHz rates, depending on your Analog-to-Digital
converter’s (ADC) sample rate suppor
• Editing - ‘Top and tail’ audio
• Track definition for export: Album, Artist, Track Name (Metadata tag)
• Optional analysis and restoration
• Export
Amarra Vinyl supports the complete workflow for archiving and audio restoration. Amarra Vinyl
runs on any Intel based Apple Macintosh with 10.6.8 or newer.
Scope of this User Manual
This User Manual describes the functionality of Sonic Studio’s Amarra Vinyl audio recording and
restoration application.
Notes Overview
These notes add more information or reinforce concepts about a particular topic
or subject.
Learn Overview
The learn notes are meant to provide ‘how to’ or specifics about a topic or subject.
Page 11
Chapter 2............................................................... Quick Start
2.1
Before You Begin
2.1.1
Mac System Requirements
At a minimum, Amarra Vinyl requires the following:
• Apple Macintosh Intel Mac
• 1024 x 960 pixel or larger display
• 4 GB RAM minimum, 8 GB or more preferred
• OS 10.6.8 or newer
• Internet connection for licensing
• Optional Core Audio Input/Output interface - USB, FireWire, Thunderbolt
Since Amarra Vinyl uses OS X’s Core Audio, the quality of audio playback will be entirely
dependent on the hardware and driver(s) used.
Note that, Amarra Vinyl 2.0 and later is not supported on G5 PPC Macs.
Learn Amarra Vinyl 2.0 is a 32-bit application with all processing done at double
precision.
2.1.2
Installation & Activation
To install Amarra Vinyl, please click on the Amarra_Vinyl_Release.pkg you downloaded from
www.sonicstudio.com. Follow the on-screen instructions to install your software.
Please refer to the Amarra Vinyl Activation Guide, located in your Amarra application folder, for
step-by-step instructions on activating Amarra Vinyl.
2.1.3
Lost Your Activation Code?
To have your Amarra Vinyl Activation Code and Password sent to your email address, please
visit:
Amarra Product Activation Code Control Panel
Page 12
2.1.4
Recording Requirements
At a minimum, Amarra Vinyl requires the following to record:
• Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) capable of recording at 96 kHz or greater. This can
be an external converter connected via USB or FireWire, or using the built-in line input
on your Mac.
• Interconnect cable from phono stage to ADC
• USB, FireWire or Thunderbolt cable for external ADC (if used)
2.2
Recording Your Records or Tapes With Amarra Vinyl
After initial set up, Amarra Vinyl makes it easy to quickly record professional quality highresolution audio files from your record or tape collection. If you remember how you recorded
your albums to cassette, you’ll find the task of digitizing your audio to be very similar. Here is
an overview:
• Set up an input device on your Mac
• Define where you want to put the recorded files
• Set up inputs in Amarra Vinyl
• Record your files
• Add metadata tags: Album, Artist and Track name to each track
• Export your files and add them to your iTunes Library
2.2.1
Input Set Up
Audio MIDI Set Up (AMSU) is the sound brain in your Mac. AMSU (Utilities/Audio MIDI Setup.
app) is where you define audio input and output routing for your computer into and out of
Amarra Vinyl. In this document, we’ll show two examples for getting audio into Amarra Vinyl:
Using the Built-in functionality of your Mac and using an external digital-to-analog converter
(ADC).
2.2.1.1
Using the Built-In Functionality of Your Mac
Your Mac has a built in digital-to-analog converter (ADC), which give you the ability to digitize
the output of your turntable pre amp and record into Amarra Vinyl. While not as high quality as
some external analog-to-digital converters, it does provide a clean and simple way to record
your Vinyl at sample rates up to 96 kHz and 24 bits.
The signal flow for this set up is: Turntable->Pre-amp/Phono Stage-> Line Input on your Mac.
Page 13
NOTE: A 3.5mm to dual RCA adaptor cable is required for this set up
To use the built-in audio functionality of your Mac to record your music into Amarra Vinyl, you
need to create as a single device known as an “Aggregate Device.”
To create an Aggregate Device:
1) Locate the Audio MIDI Set Up Utility in Applications/Utilities and launch.
2) In Audio MIDI Setup, click the Add (+) button in the Audio Devices window.
A new aggregate device appears in the list on the left side of the window. To rename the device,
double-click it.
3) With the new aggregate device selected, on the right side of the Audio Devices window click
the Use checkbox for Built-In Line Input and Built-in Output, or your DAC if you have one.
The list on the right shows the currently connected audio devices and the number of input and
output channels for each one.
4) Choose Built-in Line Input from the Aggregate Device’s Clock Source pop-up menu.
5) With the Aggregate Device selected, locate the Action pop-up menu at the bottom of the
window (looks like a gear) and select ‘Use this device for sound output’ and ‘Use this device for
sound input’. A Speaker and microphone icon will appear next to the device.
Page 14
Audio MIDI Set up showing ‘Aggregate Device’ settings for recording to
and playing back from your Mac at 96 kHz and 24 bits.
Important Note For the aggregate device to work correctly, the sample rates of
the combined devices in the aggregate device must be set to the same sample rate.
In this case. that is 96 kHz.
You are now set up to record using the Built-in feature on your Mac. Please skip to section 2.2.2
For more information on aggregate device settings, see the Help Menu in Audio MIDI Setup..
2.2.1.2
Using an External Digital-To-Analog Converter (ADC)
You may choose to purchase an external digital-to-analog converter (ADC). This gives you the
ability to digitize the output of your turntable pre amp and record into Amarra Vinyl with the
potential for higher quality recordings than using the built-in ADC in your Mac. Many external
ADCs also provide the option to record your Vinyl at sample rates up to 192 kHz and 24 bits of
depth.
The signal flow for this set up is: Turntable->Pre-amp/Phono Stage-> Analog-to-Digital Converter
->USB, FireWire or Thunderbolt port on your Mac.
Please refer to the User Manual of your ADC for driver installation and instruction for proper
connection to your Mac.
2.2.2
Defining A Recording Path In Amarra Vinyl
In order to record audio into a computer, some organization is required prior to recording each
album. This task can be equated to loading and labelling your cassette.
Page 15
1) Click on the Windows navigation menu at the top of the Amarra Vinyl screen and select ‘New
Soundfile Preference’ (or Cmd-7) to bring up the Recording Preferences Window.
New Soundfile Preferences
2) Click ‘Set Folder’ to define the location on your Mac to record your audio. A Mac Finder
window appears:
3) Make a new folder on your Desktop (or other location of your choice) where you want to
record by clicking on the ‘New’ Button
4) Title the new folder Vinyl Recordings:
5) Click New again to make another folder inside the ‘Vinyl Recordings’ folder. This should
be the title of the album you are going to record - ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ for example. Your
recorded files will be stored in this folder. Click OK.
Mac Finder window showing example path for recording
Back in the New Soundfile Preferences dialog box, you need to define the bit resolution (24 bit
is recommended) and file type (AIFF, WAV or BWF [Broadcast Wave File])
One advantage of using BWF is that you can specify the following metadata: Originator (you),
Reference information and a more complete description of the album you are recording
Page 16
New Soundfile Preferences window showing
additional fields for Broadcast Wave Files
2.2.3
Amarra Vinyl Input Set Up
Like selecting the correct inputs to record from on your receiver or pre-amp, you need to set
the inputs in the Amarra Vinyl interface to receive sound input from the selected Device in Audio
MID Set Up. Click on the Input selector in the left margin of Amarra Vinyl and choose the correct
channel for Track one and repeat for Track two.
Page 17
Selecting Line inputs in Amarra.
Note that, depending on your device, the selection in this list will vary.
2.2.3Recording
Once the Recording Preferences and inputs are set you can start the recording by clicking on the
Record Button on the project toolbar.
Recording button - Click to start recording.
If you have not armed (enabled) tracks for record, you will be warned. You will also be warned
to set the recording information if not already set. The recording will then start and the Tracks
window will turn pink in color.
Page 18
Amarra Vinyl in record showing level in the Meters window
Note waveforms do not draw during recording, but recording confidence is ensured
via the meters in Amarra Vinyl showing activity.
When you hit the Stop button the waveforms will be built and the recording opened in Wave
View.
Corner of a Project window showing the Track Bar and top Panel
You can also open existing files To open files, first collect the desired audio files, drag them and
drop the files onto the top Panel. If you would like to create Track Marks then hold the command
key down when releasing the files. The command key is only needed just before you drop the
Page 19
files. Amarra Vinyl will automatically create Track Marks, displayed in the Track Bar, from your
audio files.
HINT: More on recording can be found in Chapter 5 of this document.
Remember to Save your projects using the File->Save command. It’s a
good idea to save them in the same folder as your recordings. See Appendix 1 on
Project organization. Project files are very small and take up little disk space.
NOTE:
More on playing sound using Amarra Vinyl can be found in Section 3.5
Auditioning Sound.
Learn:
2.3 Step By Step — Export Your Recording
Once you have finished a recording, the files or folders you create can be dragged from the
Finder and dropped onto the iTunes window to import it into your iTunes library. However, you
may want to take advantage of the Export File or Export Tracks feature in Amarra Vinyl.
This section covers the basic steps to export a recording for use in another application such as
iTunes.
Exporting allows you to capture any changes you make to the original recordings as a new file.
Some common examples of why you want to export and make new files:
• create custom files of each track or different sides of an album
• trim the length of a file or cut out unwanted sections. See Section 3.8 and Chapter 4
• capture files processed with Gain, EQ or Normalization. See Sections 4.4, Chapter 10
and Section 7.2.15
• combine two sides of a record into one long file for the ultimate album listening
experience
Note: The examples above are non destructive. That means that no changes are
made to the original file. Because these changes are not applied to the recorded file,
a new file must be rendered or created using export.
Make sure to set dither to 24 bits for exporting files.
The Dither indicator in the top center section of the Project window shows green
when dither on output is enabled and grey when dither is disabled. To change dither,
control–click on the “Dither” label, and a contextual menu appears, allowing dither to
be enabled, disabled and change bit depth..
Learn About Dither:
Page 20
2.3.1
How To Export Your Recording as Separate Files for
Each Song
Learn Amarra Vinyl 2.2 now supports sample-rate conversion and 32-bit CAF
file support when using the ‘Export Tracks...’ or ‘Export Sound File...’ commands.
This feature creates multiple files at the same time, based on the sample rate and
bit depth you select. Supports 44/24 and 44/16 and 48/24. A new folder is created
for each conversion, at the Path you define from ‘Set Folder’, and titled ‘44-24’, ‘4416’ and ‘48-24’.
Since this action does multiple exports at the same time, processing can take a
while.
NEW Shortcut ctrl-cmd-E for Export Tracks
Step One: Define the songs to export by placing Track Marks to define custom regions such as
individual songs in your album. Here’s how:
Option Click on the Marks Button in the tool bar.
The Marks button defines the Track Start and Track End marks necessary to make an export.
Option + Click marks individual tracks.
The Analog Black to Marks dialog box appears:
Analog Black to marks window. Note the 3 seconds setting.
Page 21
Set the time to around 3 seconds, then click OK.
This action automatically marks your recording, from beginning to end, as one long track and
readies it for export to your hard drive for import into your iTunes Library.
Waveform window showing Track Start and End Marks for each song.
Next, enter the title for each track by clicking in the Track Name area next to the number for each
track. You can enter the title for each track:
Double-clicking on the Track Name brings up the box to title each track.
Hit the Enter or Return key to close.
Page 22
Step Two: Option + Click on the Export button in the tool bar. The Export Tracks dialog box
appears:
Click the Set Folder button to define the location of the exported file.
Note the sample-rate conversion options.
Create a new folder called ‘Exports’ in the folder for this album to store these exports. Click
on the Export button and your tracks are quickly created and ready to import into your iTunes
Library.
Note: We recommend using AIFF as the Format and 24 as Bit Resolution.
Learn: More on Exporting can be found in Exporting Selections,Tracks & Segments
Learn:
Selections.
More on Selecting sound segments in Amarra Vinyl can be found in
Learn: More on Editing sound segments in Amarra Vinyl can be found in Section
Simple Editing.
More on using Track Marks in Amarra Vinyl can be found in Section on
Track Marks: Defining Metadata.
Learn:
Page 23
2.3.2
How To Export Your Recording as One Long File
Learn Amarra Vinyl 2.2 now supports sample-rate conversion and 32-bit CAF
file support when using the ‘Export Tracks...’ or ‘Export Sound File...’ commands.
This feature creates multiple files at the same time, based on the sample rate and
bit depth you select. Supports 44/24 and 44/16 and 48/24. A new folder is created
for each conversion, at the Path you define from ‘Set Folder’, and titled ‘44-24’, ‘4416’ and ‘48-24’.
Since this action does multiple exports at the same time, processing can take a
while.
NEW Shortcut ctrl-cmd-E for Export Tracks
Step One: Define the file to export by clicking on the Title Bar of the file
This action selects your recording, from beginning to end, as one long track and readies it for
export to your iTunes Library.
Waveform window showing sound file selection of the entire album side.
Learn: More on navigating the Amarra Vinyl Project window can be found in
Section 3.6 Navigating the Waveform Display..
Step Two: Option + Click on the Export button in the tool bar. The Export Tracks dialog box
appears:
Page 24
Click the Set Folder button to define the location of the exported file.
Note the sample-rate conversion options.
Create a new folder called ‘Exports’ in the folder for this album to store these exports. Click on
the Export button and your tracks are quickly created and added to your iTunes Library.
Note: We recommend using AIFF as the Format and 24 as Bit Resolution.
2.3.3
Adding Exported Files or Folders To Your iTunes Library
To add your exported files or folders to your iTunes Library, you can simply drag the enclosing
folder from the Mac Finder on to the Music icon in iTunes. iTunes then imports those files into
your iTunes Library at their native sample rate and bit depth.
Drag The Exported Folder Or Files From Vinyl Onto Your iTunes Music Library.
Page 25
2.4
Step By Step — Restore a Recording
This section covers four basic steps to record and restore a recording. In general, you manually
remove large clicks first, then DeCrackle the entire song.
Important Note:
Create a copy of your original file before restoring.
While change made using NoNOISE II can be undone, the process is destructive.
That means that DeClick and DeCrackle changes are made directly on the file on which
you are working. Because these changes are applied to the file, Sonic recommends
that a new file be created by duplicating the original file and working on a copy. More
about copying files in the Mac Finder can be found online.
Step 1. Create a New Project
First create a New Project.
Open Amarra Vinyl. If a blank project is not open, choose File > New Project to create a new
Project.
If you want to work on an existing Project, choose File -> Open.
Step 2. Open a File
Drag the file you want to restore from the Finder window onto the firstTrack window. Waveforms
will be created.
Step 3. Remove Clicks or Scratches
Locate a click in your recorded file. You can find clicks by listening to your file by hitting the
space bar to play, then again to stop when you hear a click, or locating them in the waveform.
Waveform showing what clicks in a recording look like.
Page 26
Use your mouse to click in the waveform near a click. This places an Edit Point in the waveform:
Hold the Command Key down and hit the down arrow a few times on your keyboard. This action
zooms to the Edit Point:
HINT: More on zoom and waveform navigation can be found in Section 3.6 of this
document.
Move the Edit Point directly over the click by clicking directly on the click you want to remove.
It’s easy to see a click when you zoom in.
Page 27
In the DeClick toolbar, select ‘Click’
.
Amarra Vinyl removes the click under the Edit Point:
Click Removed using DeClick feature.
Page 28
Step 3. Remove Crackle or Surface Noise
The next step is to remove unwanted crackle. Crackle can be thought of as the surface noise of a
record, but it can also be the distortion found in many recordings. It’s easily removed using the
DeCrackle feature in Amarra Vinyl.
Select the entire soundfile by clicking once on the Title Bar or using the shortcut Command + A.
Click the MED button in the DeCrackle tool bar.
Amarra Vinyl will DeCrackle the entire sound file, first the Track 1 or Left Channel, then Track 2 or
Right Channel
HINT: DeCrackle can do its magic on the entire recording or on smaller selections
within a recording.
Note: DeCrackle can take a few minutes to process a file. Please be patient.
Step 4. Remove Analog Hiss or Hum (if present)
The next step is to remove any hiss or hum that may be left over from the analog equipment
used to record the music.
Click the BBDN button in the DeNoise tool bar.
The DeNoise Window appears:
Page 29
The DeNoise Window
Learn more about using Broadband DeNoise in Chapter 9 below.
Step 5. Export Processed File
Refer to Section 2.3 above for step-by-step Export instruction.
Learn: More on Exporting can be found in Exporting Selections, Tracks & Segments
Page 30
Chapter 3...................................................... Basic Operation
3.1
General Workflow & Explanation of Terms Used
In order to prepare your recorded audio, Amarra VINYL offers fast, simple audio editing along
with creation and modification of metadata such as album title, artist etc. Amarra Vinyl is designed
to primarily create finished stereo programs.
Amarra Vinyl includes an integrated recording scheme to allow high-resolution recordings up
to 192 kHz from external analog-to-digital converter (ADC) or internal hardware. Amarra Vinyl
provides complete flexibility for recording.
When opening a sound file into Amarra Vinyl, you are creating a copy of the file in memory that
you can manipulate. This copy is placed into a ‘Project,’ the workspace created by Amarra Vinyl.
Within the Project, you can add sound, create and edit marks that will generate Track codes,
modify volume levels, restore your recordings using NoNOISE and export those changes as new
files. All this information can be saved and later recalled.
Raw sound files can be imported from various file formats, including AIFF, WAV, BWF and a
variety of compressed files (MP3, AAC, and FLAC). These files are then edited, allowing you to
compile a new program from various sources.
NOTE: Before restoration of compressed files they must be converted to uncompressed PCM as AIFF or WAV/BWF. Use the Export command to create the AIFF/WAV
files for your work.
Using the NoNOISE toolset you can analyze the audio using FFT and Noise Estimates. With the
Sonic EQ and NoNOISE restoration you can perfect the audio.
When you are satisfied that your Project is acceptable, you can create separate tracks as AIFF or
WAV/BWF files using the Export feature.
Page 31
3.2Project Layout
Main components of a Project window
In Amarra Vinyl, all tasks are performed in or via a Project. The bottom half of a new Project
shows two empty Panels, containers for stereo sound files and their accompanying waveform
displays or text lists. The upper Panel shows the left channel while the lower Panel represents
the right channel. A scroll bar appears at the bottom of the Project, directly beneath the lower
Panel, allowing you to scroll across the time line. To the left of this scroll bar, a drop down menu
is available, where the time standard can be selected. 75 fps CD Frames is suggested.
To the left of each Panel are solo and mute buttons, labeled with an S and M respectively. Also,
a gain overlay button, labeled G, is available to the right of S and M buttons. The function of this
button and the application feature it brings up will be discussed later in section 4.4.
Immediately above the waveforms, is a black banner with time values in yellow. At the top of
the black area is the time line for the waveforms. The bottom of the black area is reserved for
Page 32
“Track Marks” and the Track Bar, discussed in section 3.9. The data underlying the whole of the
two Panels, with marks and all data describing the audio program, is also referred to as the ‘EDL’
or Edit Decision List, and is saved as a separate file within each Project’s folder.
Waveform display with marks above the Panels
Above the time line are the transport controls. They offer dedicated buttons for play, stop and
record.
A Project’s Transport Controls
Also along this bar is theToolbar with DeClick, DeCrackle, Undo, DeNoise, EQ and Export buttons:
A Project’s Toolbar
Finally, at the top of the main window is the mainTime Display, Sample Rate and Dither indicators:
Page 33
Time Display area.
The LOCK indicator is green when Amarra Vinyl’s audio engine is locked to a valid clock reference.
The DITHER indicator is green when redithering on output is enabled. In both instances, green
is good!
3.3
Starting a Project: Opening Files
Amarra Vinyl opens with a blank project window.
You can also create a new Project
by selecting File > New Project... from the menu bar.
A blank, default Project opens.
NOTE: Amarra Vinyl supports one Project window open at any time.
3.3.1 Opening Projects
You can open an existing Project by selecting File > Open Project... from the menu bar. This
brings up a standard Mac OS browser dialog for finding and selecting the desired Project file.
Confirm your selection with Choose and the Project opens into a new Project window.
Mac OS browser dialog for opening a Project
Page 34
After highlighting your selection and clicking Choose, the Project will be opened, together with
any available editing and Track metadata already saved in the Project folder.
A third way to open an existing Project is by using the Finder. Simply drag the file from any
folder onto the Amarra Vinyl application icon or, if the application is running, the application’s
Dock icon.
3.3.2
Opening Sound Files
Once your Project is open, you need to open your sound files into the Project. As with Projects,
using either the File menu or dragging and dropping will work. By holding down the command
key when dropping in sound files, Amarra Vinyl will autospace the new segment, as well as
auto–generate Track metadata. Section 3.9.4 discusses the auto–generated Track metadata while
section 4.2.1 below discusses autospacing functions in detail.
By selecting File > Open Sound File... from the menu bar, you will bring up a standard Mac OS
browser dialog for finding and selecting the desired audio file. Amarra Vinyl will open AIFF, WAV,
BWF and SD2 files with regions. Confirm your selection with Choose and the sound file opens
into your Project.
3.3.3
Adding Your First Sound File
In addition to the Open Sound File… command, you may also drag and drop sound files into a
Project. When dragging in split stereo sound files, always drag only the left channel onto the top
Panel. Amarra Vinyl will parse the file and open the right channel for you into the bottom Panel.
By holding down the command key before dropping sound files, Amarra Vinyl will also
automatically create Track metadata for all the files.
Note that command–dropping only applies to drag and drop, not to the Open Sound
File… command. Later in this chapter, section 3.9 discusses Track metadata in more
detail.
3.4
Waveforms
A waveform display provides visual reinforcement of audible cues when editing. Normally,
the audio file types that Amarra Vinyl opens contain metadata such as sample rate and related
information, but no information on visualization. Waveform shape information therefore has to
be generated by Amarra Vinyl itself. The application generates individual “waveform files,” one
for each channel, in order to display high resolution waveforms in the Panels at any zoom level.
The generation of waveform files is performed in the background so normal operation is not
interrupted.
Page 35
Display of a sound file without waveform metadata
If waveform files are absent from one or more audio files included in the Project, Amarra Vinyl
will automatically start generating those files in the background. Waveform files, identified by
their “.r” extension, are placed in the same folder as the audio files and can be read by any other
Sonic Studio product.
The building of waveform metadata in progress
Once the waveforms are visible, the arrow keys control the viewing window and a quick tap
of the E key always zooms out to view the entire Project. In section 3.6 below, navigating your
Project is discussed in more detail.
Page 36
3.5
3.5.1
Auditioning Sound
Playback
When you press the keyboard’s Space Bar, the cursor changes to a “speaker & note” and
playback begins. A thin vertical red line, the Playhead, spans the Panels and time line and moves
horizontally to indicate the location of playback.
Figure 3.8: The cursor changes into a speaker & note shape during playback
When you first open a sound file and begin listening, playback, once started, will begin at the left
edge of the audio. The Playhead will move to the right, across the file. When you hit the Space
Bar again, playback ends and the Playhead halts its motion. When you hit the space bar a third
time, the Playhead will jump back to the left side of the waveform display, the beginning of the
sound file, and playback will begin again.
3.5.2
Playback from the Edit Point
When you click anywhere inside the waveform display, the entire Panel, or rectangle containing
the waveform display, is selected. The selected Panel has a medium blue background and hairline
red border. Once selected, a click anywhere in that Panel produces a thin vertical red line, with an
inverted yellow triangle on top. This is the “Edit Point.”
Empty Panels with Edit Point at left and Playhead at right
When the Edit Point is present, playback will always start from the Edit Point. When you stop
playback and start again, the Playhead will jump to the Edit Point and start playback from there.
Page 37
You can move the Edit Point by clicking on a new location in the waveform display. The Edit Point
will jump to the click location. Alternatively, you can click and drag the Edit Point’s yellow triangle
to move it to a new location.
3.5.3
Playback from Playhead
The Playhead itself can also be manipulated directly. By double clicking in the black time line
banner, the Playhead is moved to the click location and playback begins. You can also edit the
large, central time code address in the time display at the top of a Project, which will move the
Playhead to the specified address. Section 3.5.5 below discusses the time display.
The Transport Controls above the top Panel provide tape transport emulation, so you can play,
stop and continue playing from the current location. You can also select the Play > From Playhead
command.
3.5.4
Random Play
If you hold down the option key and move your cursor to any location in the waveform, you can
click–hold the mouse button. The Playhead will move to your click location, playback will begin
and continue as long as the mouse button is held down.
3.5.5
Time Displays
The large, central time code display in the center top of the Project window is live and editable.
As mentioned above, you can click on any subdivision or click–drag on the entire central time
code display to select and modify the current location of the Playhead.
For all editable time code addresses, a single click in any HH:MM:SS:FF subdivision will highlight
that subdivision, allowing you to type in a value. By click–holding and dragging up or down,
the cursor will change to an arrow and the numeric value displayed will increase or decrease
respectively.
All modifiable time code fields in Amarra Vinyl support cut, copy and paste. Double clicking on
any time field will select the entire field, allowing you to enter a complete time code address.
3.6
Navigating the Waveform Display
There are many tools for quickly moving around inside of the waveform display. This section
covers scrolling and zooming, in general and on selections.
3.6.1
Scrolling
If you are zoomed all the way out, the entire waveform will be displayed. If you are not zoomed
out entirely, some of the waveform will be invisible, off the edges of the Panel. You can move the
window view left or right by moving the scroll bar at the bottom of the waveform display. You
can also move the window view left and right by using the Left and Right Arrow key respectively.
Page 38
Finally, you can drag the view left or right by simultaneously holding the control, option and
command keys. When you click–hold, the cursor changes to a hand to indicate you are in Move
View mode.
3.6.2
Zooming
You can zoom in using the Down Arrow key, and zoom out using the Up Arrow key. To zoom all
the way out, hit the E key, to see your “entire” program.
3.6.2.1
Zoom around Edit Point
As you zoom in and out, it is likely that you will want to keep the Edit Point in view. To do this,
hold down the Apple or command key as you use the Up Arrow or Down arrow keys. This will
keep the Edit Point centered in the middle of the display.
3.6.2.2
Zoom to Selection
Clicking and dragging on the waveform itself selects a region, highlighted in yellow–orange.
Typing command-G or selecting View > Zoom to Selection... will zoom around that selected
region. See section 3.7 for more information on region selection.
You can also zoom to a selection while making the selection. By holding down the command
and option keys while click–dragging on the waveform will define a selection and zoom to that
selection as well.
3.6.2.3
Zoom Around Time Selection
If you click and drag in the black time line banner above the top Panel while holding down the
Apple or command key, the Panel will zoom to display the region of the time line that your click–
drag defined.
3.7
Selections
Selections let you highlight a portion of the audio where you want to perform a desired operation.
3.7.1
Selecting a Region
To select a region, click–drag on the waveform display. At the point that you want the selection
to start, click and hold down the mouse button, then drag to complete your selection. An area
will be highlighted in yellow–orange, indicating the selected region.
Page 39
A region selected, indicated by the yellow highlight
You can click–drag either left or right to define a selection. In addition, you can fine tune the
boundaries of a selected region. Hold down the shift key and click on either side of the selected
region then, while continuing to hold the shift key, drag left or right to expand or contract the
selection.
Note that the format in which all time fields are represented in Amarra Vinyl is set
to 75 CD Frames per second.
Note also that, when a region is selected and playback is invoked, the Playhead
relocates and playback starts at the beginning of the selection.
3.7.2
Selecting Segments
An entire sound file “segment,” the representation of contiguous samples from a single sound
file, can be chosen as a selection. Click on the white Title Bar at the top of any segment, which
displays the source sound file name.
The Title Bar
The waveform highlights yellow-orange and a bright yellow bar appears below it, running the
entire length of the segment, to indicate that the segment has been selected.
Page 40
A selected segment, indicated by the yellow highlight
By holding down the shift key and simultaneously clicking in other segment’s Title Bars, a
selection of contiguous segments can be made. Also, while holding down the Apple or command
key and clicking any Title Bars, a group of non–contiguous or random segments can be selected
simultaneously.
Multiple selected segments
If you have an existing selected segment, several additional segment selection choices
are available. By tapping the left or right arrow key, you can select prior or latter segments,
respectively. By holding down the shift key, you can tap the left or right arrow key to contiguous
select prior or latter segments, respectively.
Note that, when one or more segments are selected and playback is started, the
Playhead moves to the head of the first selected segment and playback commences
from there..
3.8
Simple Editing
There will be occasions where raw sound files need modifications. Amarra Vinyl offers advanced
editing features, as well as simple tools to change amplitude and transitions.
3.8.1The Fade Tool
The head (start) or tail (end) of segments are represented in the display by a thin black vertical
line. When zooming in, this line will reveal itself to be a curve representing a ‘fade’ or amplitude
versus time “envelope.” Each segment starts with an Fade In and ends with an Fade Out. Fade
Page 41
Ins and Outs are both “Black Fades” where “black” refers to “Edited Black,” the absence of audio
data in the Panel.
End of a segment with Fade Out glyph
Fades have a specific starting location and duration. Both parameters can be easily adjusted
with the “Fade Tool.”
First, the duration or length of the fade can be changed. To do so, zoom in so you can see what
you’re doing and have reasonable control of the fade. Then, click–hold and drag on the upper
“inside” edge of the fade to the desired location.
Note that, with the cursor on the upper inside edge, the cursor changes into a cross
with left, right and up arrows indicating you can change the duration.
Fade tool symbol while moving top inside edge of the Fade
Of course, the length of a fade can also be changed by moving the lower or “outside” edge of a
fade, leaving the inside edge in place. To do so, move the cursor over the fade near the bottom of
the display until the cursor changes into the Fade Tool again. This time, the cursor changes into
a cross with left, right and down arrows.
Fade tool symbol indicating you are changing the outside edge of the fade
Page 42
Click–hold and drag the bottom end of the fade to the desired position. Release the button to
confirm the change. Remember that modifying the outside edge is only possible within the limits
of the actual samples of audio data represented by the segment.
If the cursor is moved over the middle portion of a fade, the Fade Tool cursor also appears but
this time as a horizontal arrow with a vertical center line. In this trim mode, you are able to
move the entire fade left or right, changing its location without changing its duration. This allows
you to “hide” or “reveal” portions of the underlying segment, by shortening or lengthening the
segment duration, trimming the segment as you go. Click–hold on the fade and drag the fade
left or right. Releasing the mouse button fixes the fade in that location. While you are moving
or changing a fade with the Fade Tool, the waveform is “live,” continuously changing visually to
reflect the modifications you are making.
Dragging the inside edge to lengthen a Fade
Note that the maximum duration of a fade is equal to the underlying sound file
duration. As mentioned above, it is not possible to move a fade past the actual start
or end of an underlying sound file.
Also, moving Black Fades so more than two overlap is not allowed as well. A modal
“CheckForTripleOverlap” dialog will pop up, telling you that your command would result in
three Black Fades lying on top of each other.
3.8.2
Deleting Part of a Sound File
It may be necessary to edit out some part of a sound file. Amarra Vinyl allows you to do so quickly
and with great precision. To easily cut out a portion of a sound file, simply select the region that
you want to remove. Then, select Edit > Delete Selection or hit the delete key to remove the
selected region and “slip” all downstream segments left to close the gap. More on this later...
Similar to clearing the selected region, you now have two new segments. When deleting the
selection, however, the two new segments are joined together with a “Crossfade.” It is represented
in the waveform display as an overlapping Fade In and Out.
The delete functions mentioned above also work with one or more selected regions. Simply
click–drag to select a region, and hit delete or option–delete.
3.8.3
Splitting a segment into new segments
Occasionally, existing segments need to be split in separate segments before further editing can
be performed. This can be achieved by manually creating a new Crossfade within a segment.
Page 43
To create a new Crossfade, simply place your cursor at the desired location, and double click.
This moves the Edit Point to the click location. Then, select Edit > Create Crossfade from the main
menu. A new Crossfade is created at the location of the Edit point. Also see section 3.8.2 above
for information on deleting segments.
3.8.4
Manipulating Fades
With Crossfades, the FadeTool can also be used to modify or move the fades, either as a complete
Crossfade or as individual Black Fades. When the cursor is moved over a Crossfade, it changes
into a pair of parallel horizontal arrows. The Fade Out changes to red while the Fade In changes
to green.
To move the whole Crossfade either left or right, once again hiding and revealing audio on either
side, simply click and drag the Crossfade to the desired location. Release the mouse button to
drop the Crossfade at a specific spot.
To modify the fades individually, press the option key while modifying the Fade Out, and the
Apple or command key while modifying the Fade In. With these modifier keys, the Fade Tool
works as if the fades were isolated, as described in section 3.8.1 above. While operating on one
fade of a Crossfade individually with modifier keys, the fade not being manipulated will deselect,
indicated by its color changing to black.
If you decide that default duration of your crossfade is not right, simply hold down the shift
key and place the cursor over the center of the crossfade until the cursor changes into the pair
of parallel horizontal arrows. Click–drag up or down and the duration will increase or decrease,
respectively.
Note that, to be able to do any of the above fade manipulations with accuracy, it
may be necessary to zoom in until the Crossfade extends over a significant proportion
of the waveform display. The View > Zoom To Previous command will zoom you out to
your previous view quickly after such fine adjustments.
3.8.5
Exporting Selections, Tracks & Segments
Selections, including both selected segments and selected regions, can be exported as AIFF, WAV
or BWF files, with source resolution of up to 192 kHz sample rate and 16 or 24 bit word length. To
do this, use the Export button. It exports the audio with amplitude changes from segment gain,
plus any Gain Overlay and NoNOISE processing.
To use this function, create a selected region. Then click the Export button and choose the
destination directory with the Set file button. Finally, set the file type, word length and speed
(8x or MAX is recommended, then click the Export button. Amarra Vinyl will “play” the selected
region out of realtime, exporting the audio as a new file.
Note that playing the material at 1x speed during export will not improve the quality
so, it is recommended that, unless real–time playback is needed, you use the highest
speed setting as it has better temporal resolution. Also, during high speed exports,
the time display and Playhead do not operate in real time.
Page 44
Note that 24-bit soundfiles can be created using the Export Sound File feature.
3.9
Track Marks: Defining Metadata
This section provides the basics on Track and delivery aspect of Amarra Vinyl…Once all of your
tracks for our recording are put in the right order and spaces between the tracks are adjusted to
taste, the Track marks can be created. Track marks generate the TOC or Table of Contents for the
final replication master. Track marks are shown in the black banner just below the time line.
The Track Bar and its Track marks
With the Track Bar visible, Start of Track marks are indicated by an arrow pointing to the right
while End of Track marks are indicated by a arrow pointing left. Index marks are indicated by a
yellow arrow pointing down.
3.9.1
Inserting Track Marks Manually
To insert a new Track mark, place the Edit Point at the location where you want the new mark to
appear. Then select Mark > Track Start Mark, which adds the new Start of Track mark.
3.9.2
Moving Track Marks
It’s easy to relocate Track marks. Simply click–drag on a mark to move it to the desired location.
3.9.3
Removing Track Marks
To remove one or more Track marks, click–drag in the waveform display to select a region that
includes the mark(s) you want to remove. Then, select Mark > Delete Mark and all marks within
the selected region will be deleted. If you are working in the Windows > Mark Info window and
have a mark selected, you can also use the Mark > Delete Mark command to remove the mark.
The Mark Info window is discussed in detail in section 3.11.1 below.
A third method is to use the contextual menu to delete or otherwise modify a mark. Simply
control–click on a mark, and make your selection from the menu.
Page 45
3.9.4
Inserting Track Marks Automatically
3.9.4.1Command–Dragging
The fastest and easiest way to generate Track metadata is to simply drag and drop. By holding
down the command key before dropping one or more sound files onto the top Panel of your
Project, Amarra Vinyl automatically creates CD Track definitions by generating Start and End of
Track marks for each file. These Track definitions can later be rearranged or modified to taste.
3.9.4.2Analog Black To Marks
If you material consists of one long, consolidated file with few or no edits, then you may want to
automatically place Track marks with the Analog Black to Marks function. This function measures
the amplitude of your audio and places Track marks at the edges of long duration quiet passages.
Both amplitude and duration are user adjustable.
To use, first Option + click on the Marks button to create Track Start and Track End marks. Double
Click on each title to enter Title text. Then, Option + CIick on the Export Button. In the resulting
modal dialog, specify the amplitude (default is good) and duration (usually 3 seconds) of the
selected region you want to mark.
The results of the Analog Black To marks function will provide quite usable Track mark placement
even with un–edited material. The placement accuracy is dependent on the settings used, as well
as the assumption that tracks always start and end with an increase then decrease in amplitude
and quiet in between. However, it is very likely that those same criteria also apply to other
moments in the course of a musical piece so, the results of the Analog Black To marks function
should always be checked for acceptable accuracy. You may also try the command, check the
result and adjust the parameters prior to undoing or deleting marks and using the function
again. See section 3.9.6 below for useful information on checking mark accuracy.
3.9.5Tracks
Amarra Vinyl allows you to display and manipulate Track Start and Track End Marks. Each Track
that will result from your current Track placement is shown in grey while the pause between
tracks is shown in blue.
An enlarged portion of the Track Bar and the Start of Track 1
Double-clicking in the Track Name area next to the number for each track, you can enter the title
for each track:
Page 46
Double-clicking on the Track Name brings up the box to title each track.
Hit the Enter or Return key to close.
Page 47
Chapter 4....................................................Advanced Editing
4.1
Fade Tool Options
4.1.1
Changing Fade Parameters
Amarra Vinyl offers a simple and intuitive tool for changing a fade’s gain characteristics: the Fade
Tool. In the previous chapter, we have seen how to use this to perform simple operations. The
Fade Tool offers additional possibilities to alter fades according to your needs and preferences.
The Fade Tool is enabled by default. By holding the control key and typing A, you can quickly
disable or enable the Fade Tool. Alternately, you can force the Fade Tool off by default. In the EDL
tab of the Windows > Preferences window, the Fade Tool check box keeps the Fade Tool enabled
until you choose to disable it manually.
When moving the cursor over a fade with the Fade Tool enabled, the default cursor changes into
the Fade Tool and the selected fade turns either green for an Fade In, red for an Fade Out or both.
Depending on cursor location relative to the fade, the Fade Tool modifies the start, end, length or
position of the fade. See section 3.8.1 for basic information about the Fade Tool.
If you zoom in on a Fade so that more than about 10% of the waveform display is occupied by
the fade, you will see the thin blue vertical line that represents the edit event and a diagonal line
or “curve” that represents the gain law or change in amplitude dictated by the fade. Situated in
the middle of the diagonal curve and attached to that line is a square “bead,” the Control Point
for the fade curve.
1
2
Fade Tool
control point
➷
Edit Event
➷
3
Anatomy of a Fade
Figure 4.1 above shows the major parts of a Fade and the various contextual shapes that the
cursor assumes based on location. Note the Control Point and edit event, discussed in upcoming
sections.
On the left, the #1 cursor is set for an “inboard” duration change. Placing the cursor at that
location and click–dragging will increase or decrease the duration of the fade without changing
the edit event location or gain law. This is the preferred handle to use when changing duration.
Page 48
Next is the #2 cursor shape, displayed when the cursor is set to change the overall location of
the fade. Placing the cursor in that location and click–dragging will re–locate the fade, “sliding it”
earlier or later on the time line without changing the duration, edit event or gain law. Remember
that you cannot move a fade past the head or tail of the underlying audio.
In position #3, the cursor is set for a duration change “toward the outside” of the Fade. Placing
the cursor in that location and click–dragging will increase or decrease the duration of the fade
without changing the overall location or gain law.These “outboard” handles do effect the location
of the edit event, so it’s recommended that you not use the outboard handle, employing the
inboard handle instead as mentioned above. Section 4.1.4 below discusses edit events as they
relate to controlling fade parameters.
4.1.2
Changing the shape of the Fade
By clicking the Control Point “bead,” shown in Figure 4.1, and dragging it up or down, you can
adjust the rate of change setting for the fade. Specifically, for all fade types except exponential,
moving the Control Point adjusts the “dB down” while, for an exponential fade, the Control
Point adjusts the “Alpha” or shape. In either case, as you make this change, the fade curve
will dynamically change in response and the underlying audio will also change since you are
affecting the gain across the fade event.
When the Fade Tool is active, holding the control key brings up a contextual menu.
The Fade Tool contextual menu
The Fade Tool contextual menu offers the following choices for gain law or curve:
Page 49
• Linear — default 6 dB down in the center
• Root Linear — 3 dB down in the center
• Cosine — default 3 dB down in the center
• Root Cosine — default 6 dB down in the center
• Exponential — provides very rapid reduction in gain across the Fade
Amarra Vinyl provides five fade shapes to allow you to produce a pleasing edit or transition,
no matter what sort of material you have available. You can also use fades for less obvious
purposes, such as applying a new Crossfade on an unwanted sound, changing the gain law to
exponential, and adjusting the duration to “drop out” or suppress the unwanted sound. Though
each gain law is useful in certain situations, the linear fade shape is the most widely applicable.
4.1.3
Changing the Fade Duration
In the Fade Tool contextual menu, the Set Fade to Selection forces the fade duration to match
the duration of a selected region that encloses the fade. When a region is selected, this option
stretches or shrinks the length of the Fade to match the position and length of the selected
region. The contextual menu changes to reflect the currently selected Fade Type.
The Fade Tool functions also apply to a Crossfade. Figure 4.3 below shows the Fade Tool in
Crossfade Mode. Notice that the cursor assumes a double horizontal arrow shape and both
fades are highlighted, both green and red.
The Fade Tool in Crossfade Mode
By click–dragging left or right, the overall Crossfade location can be altered. By shift–click–
dragging, notice the cursor shape changes to a vertical arrow, the Crossfade duration can be
symmetrically altered. Holding the command key allows you to override symmetrical mode
and alter duration with the left edge anchored while holding the option key provides the same
override mode for the right edge.
4.1.4
Changing the Fade Type
The Fade Tool contextual menu also offers two choices for fade type. These choices, accessed by
hold the control key while using the Fade Tool, allow you to change the context in which the fade
will be used. For the purpose of CD preparation, Fade Ins and Fade Outs are fundamentally different
from Crossfades. The difference is where the actual edit event occurs in the underlying audio and
Page 50
this subtly but profoundly effects the accuracy of your Track marks and resulting metadata, since
the edit event is where Amarra Vinyl places the Track marks in any of the automatic modes.
With a Crossfade, the edits occur at the very center of the two Black Fades (see section 3.8.1).
Fade Ins and Fade Outs, on the other hand, are designed to be used as the transition to or from
“Edited Black,” where no audio is present on the time line. Use the Set Fade to Crossfade option
when you expect to connect its associated segment to another segment for a seamless edit
between segments.
The ‘Set Fade to Default...” options force all fade parameters back to their appropriate defaults.
• Set Fade to Fade In/Out: forces parameters to the appropriate default Black Fade
• Set Fade to CrossFade: forces parameters to a default Crossfade
• Set In/Out Fade(s) to Selection: forces either a Black Fade or Crossfade to the duration
and overall location of a selected region.
• Set Fade To Default...: changes the Fade(s) based on user defined pre–sets from the
EDL > Edit Fade Mode.
When the Fade Tool is active, any change you make using the tool, to a Fade or to the underlying
audio is real time. The default fade shape can be selected in the Editing Tools tab in Windows >
Preferences.
4.2
4.2.1
Drag & Drop
Resequencing
For rapid assembly of program material, Amarra Vinyl provides three easy methods for
automatically snapping to either 1, 2 or 3 seconds of Edited Black between segments.
4.2.1.1
AutoSpace All Segments
The first method is the Edit > AutoSpace All Segments command discussed in section 3.8.6
above.
4.2.1.2
Drag & Drop
The second method entails manually dragging CDTracks. DraggingTracks requires that the Show
Track Bar preference in the EDL tab of Windows > Preferences be enabled. Once Track Bars are
visible, click–hold on any song’s Track Bar to select it, and drag it to the desired location. Existing
Tracks “shuffle” into place and the dragged Track takes its place, where dropped, in the CD track
sequence. The audio associated or “attached” to the marks shuffles along with the marks. The
pause between an End of Track mark and a subsequent Start of Track mark are always considered
to be part of that Track.
Page 51
The Track Bar
This same drag–to–resequence behavior is also available in the Windows > Mark Info dialog.
Simply drag an entry in the track list to a new location to resequence Tracks.
4.2.1.3
Snap to Zone
The third method entails manually dragging and snapping segments to a pre–defined song
timing. It is best to drag segments if you have not created Track marks to prevent unwanted mark
relocation.
This drag and snap segments method of resequencing requires that the Snap to Zone preference
in the Editing Tools tab of Windows > Preferences be enabled. Once the Snap Zone preference
is set, click on a segment’s Title Bar to select it. After it’s selected, all you have to do is click–drag
on its Drag Bar as you move its head close to another segment’s tail. You will see either a vertical
red or blue bar appear, visually indicating you are in the snap zone.
The Title Bar and Drag Bar
The red auto–spaced snap indicator
Page 52
The blue flush snap indicator
The bold blue bar indicates a “flush” snap where, if you drop at that location, the two segments
will be tightly butted with no space, no Edited Black in between. The bold red bar indicates an
auto–spaced snap where, if you drop at that location, the two segments will have a precise, preset
space between. The duration of the inter–segment spacing is determined by the AutoSpacing
Duration selector in the Editing Tools tab of the Windows > Preferences window.
Drag and drop with autospacing is useful in conjunction with the Edit > Clear/Delete Selection
commands to start with one long continuous segment, such as a consolidated complete mix,
and quickly segment, space and resequence the individual songs.
Note that, when using this fully manual method, sequencing should be performed
prior to mark placement. This will prevent erroneous repositioning of marks as your
segments are shuffled.
4.2.2
Drag–Overlay
When you drag and drop one segment on top of another, with no modifier keys employed, one
segment will overlay another when you drop it on top. The two segments coexist in the same
location on the time line and sum together during playback. This feature is useful when used in
conjunction with Text Mode, discussed in the next section, so you can individually control the
overlapping segments. Also see section 4.3.2 below for creating a combo Project, a combination
waveform plus text Project layout.
4.2.3
Drag–Insert & Ripple
Shift–dragging segments is another useful editing feature. With the shift key held down, the
dragged segment is inserted when you drop it on top. In addition, “downstream” segments,
those later on the time line, are pushed or “rippled” to the right, making room for the inserted
segment.
4.2.3
Drag–Replace
When you command-drag and drop one segment on top of another, then the dragged segment
replaces the existing audio where it’s dropped. As with all editing in Sonic Studio’s products, this
move is non–destructive.
Page 53
4.3
Text Mode
Text Mode provides a playlist view of the Panel’s contents, with editable segment names along
with editable start and end times. An editable Gain value, see section below, along with a non–
editable Duration value are also shown. To view Text Mode, select the EDL > Show Text View
command. To switch back to Waveform mode, select the EDL > Hide Text View command.
4.3.1
Gain Adjustment
Compiling audio from different sources usually makes it necessary to alter the amplitude of some
of your source material. The last column in Text Mode displays the current gain of all segments.
When Segments are opened or added to the EDL, the segment gain is nominally set to zero dB.
By double-clicking on the Gain value of the selected segment, the Segment Gain modal dialog
opens.
The Segment Gain dialog is also available via the Edit > Segment Gain… command for selected
segments, and also via a segment’s Title Bar contextual menu. Control–click on any Title Bar to
Page 54
invoke the Segment Gain dialog. Other functions, like Reverse Polarity and Build Waveforms,
are also available. As with other modal dialogs in soundBlade, gain changes will not be applied
unless the OK button is clicked.
The Segment Gain dialog
The Segment Gain dialog offers several options for altering segment gain. It also provides
polarity inversion.
The large central field lets you enter gain directly. Alternatively, course and fine adjustments are
available via up/down arrows. Simply click the arrows to increment or decrement gain in 1.0 or
0.1 dB steps.
Segment Gain can be applied in two different ways. First, it can be applied as an ‘Absolute’
value, meaning that the entry in the gain field will be applied in place of any previous value. The
value entered in the gain field will replace any previous state, ignoring the existing gain of that
segment.
Alternatively, the gain can be applied as a ‘Relative’ value. In relative mode, the entry in the gain
field will be added to or subtracted from the previous value. Positive values will be added to the
previous state while negative values will be subtracted from the previous gain state.
A third ‘Normalize’ radio button is available. Choosing this option will cause the segment’s
absolute sample amplitude to be evaluated, after which the amount of headroom or surplus
level below 0 dBFS will be entered in the central gain field. In other words, this function shows
Page 55
how much gain can be added before digital clipping will occur. The value given is relative to the
current gain state so, the normalize function is a subset of a relative gain adjustment.
Though not a gain function, a Reverse Polarity check box is available. This check box inverts the
polarity of the selected segments.
Segment gain can be applied to multiple segments at once. Simply command–click on the
desired segments in the Text View list, then open the Segment Gain window to make a change.
Changes in Segment Gain will be applied to all selected segments equally, as described above.
This implies that, in relative mode, the gain changes will retain any relative loudness differences
between selected segments. In normal use, Segment Gain is used on individual segments to
make them play seamlessly or as desired. Once the entire show has been gain adjusted, then
all segments can be selected and normalized, thus maximizing the amplitude for the whole
program.
4.4
Gain Overlay Mode
As described in section 4.3.1 above, the gain of individual segments can be easily changed with
the Segment Gain dialog. Amarra Vinyl offers another, global, time line–oriented approach to
changing amplitude. Gain Overlay Mode can be used to change level independent of segments
and fades and works as a master automated fader.
Gain Overlay Mode is enabled by clicking on the G button to the left of a Panel, and is available
only when in Waveform Display Mode. When enabled, a red line appears superimposed on the
waveform display. The waveform display’s amplitude scale, along the left edge, switches to a
different standard that ranges from -144 to +24 dB, the range of gain change available. Initially,
the Gain Overlay is flat at the 0 dB setting.
Figure 4.9: Gain Overlay function activated, showing the red Overlay and Nodes
To change gain, simply point at the desired time location and click on the Overlay. The cursor
changes to a round shape and a square Node will appear. Nodes can only be added, deleted or
modified while playback is stopped.
You can also place gain nodes with region selections or the Edit Point. To use this function, first
click–drag within the waveform display to select a region. Then, select Edit > Create Gain Nodes
to add two nodes at the “edges” of the Gain Overlay and the selected region. Because the Edit
Point is really a zero duration selection, it can also be used to create a single gain node with the
Create Gain Nodes command.
Page 56
When you add a node, a yellow highlighted Gain call–out appears in theTitle Bar of the associated
segment.
A newly created Gain Node with its Gain call–out
If you click–drag a Gain Node, it can be moved both horizontally and vertically. Dragging a Gain
Node horizontally moves it to a different time location while dragging it vertically changes the
gain. The current gain value of that node is continuously shown in the yellow Gain call–out.
When moving Gain Nodes vertically, the gain changes in steps of 1 dB. By holding the option
key while dragging a Gain Node, the resolution of the gain change increases to 0.1 dB to provide
fine control.
Note that gain changes between Gain Nodes follows a linear gain law. By adding
multiple Nodes, other curves can be emulated. Unwanted Gain Nodes can be deleted
by holding down the option key while clicking on the Node.
You can make changes to a group of Gain Nodes simultaneously. To do so, select a region
that includes the Node on which you want to work. Then, select the EDL > Select Gain Nodes
command. All selected Gain Nodes will fill with yellow to indicate their state. You can also shift–
click to “gather” a collection of grouped Nodes.
When grouped, only the gain can be modified. When changing the gain of grouped Nodes, the
Gain call–out shows both the current value and gain delta or difference from the original value.
Also, when grouped, holding the option key for fine gain adjustment is disabled.
The Gain call–out for grouped Nodes
Once your Gain Overlay is configured according to taste, all or some Gain Nodes can be locked
against unwanted changes. To do so, first click–drag to select a region containing the Gain Nodes
you want to lock. Then, move the mouse over one of the selected Gain Nodes and control–click
to invoke a contextual menu.
Page 57
The Gain Node contextual menu
By default, the Unlock Gain Node option will be checked. To lock the selected Gain Nodes, click
on the GainOverlayNode Locked option. The selected Gain Nodes will now turn red to indicate
their locked status. Unlocking the Gain Nodes simply requires selecting the GainOverlayNode
Unlocked option.
In the same contextual menu, Nodes can also be locked and unlocked for the whole Panel by
selecting the Lock/Unlock All Nodes In Track options.
Delete Nodes from Selection deletes all Gain Nodes in the current selection. If no selection is
made but one or more segments are selected, all nodes within the selected segment(s) will be
deleted.
Once Gain Overlay is used, the gain changes stay active in the output of Amarra Vinyl, both
during playback and Delivery. To temporarily bypass the Gain Overlay, select the EDL > Bypass
Gain Overlay command. Also, the Gain Overlay can be put into bypass mode by option–clicking
the “G” or Gain button on the left side of each Panel. In both cases, the Gain Overlay line will turn
grey and the Gain button will turn yellow, both indicating the bypass state. Once in Bypass, Gain
Overlay can only be activated again by selecting the same command, which changes to Activate
Gain Overlay. When off or disabled, the Gain turns grey.
Note that, while in Gain Overlay Mode, all normal editing functions are disabled
and only the gain nodes can be manipulated. Reverting to normal Editing can only be
achieved by selecting the Hide Gain Overlay command.
4.5
Project Sample Rate
To the left of a Project’s time line, a drop down menu is located for selection of the Project default
sample rate. This menu has a simple function, to set the sample rate when making address
calculations on the time line. Since, “under the hood,” Amarra Vinyl uses samples per second as
the counting method for all time code, time line and address calculations, sample rate becomes
the basis on which all the above calculations are made. Amarra Vinyl converts all thirteen of the
alternate, non–“samples” time standard choices, discussed in section 3.7.1, to samples when
constructing a Project.
Page 58
Note that the Project default sample rate has nothing to do with the sample rate of
any audio interface used, nor does it impact the clocking of your system. It is only for
locating segments on a Project’s time line.
Page 59
Chapter 5..................................................... Recording Audio
In addition to assembling audio from existing sound files, Amarra Vinyl offers the functionality
of recording audio from external audio sources. Supported file formats for recording are AIFF
and broadcast WAV or BWF. Sample rate and resolution are limited by the capabilities of the
available Core Audio hardware or your Series 300 I/O Processor. Audio can be recorded directly
into any Panel, in either mono or stereo.
Note that audio is recorded as non-interleaved files when recording in AIFF or BWF
format.
5.1
1
Four Steps to Recording
Open a new Project
Audio can only be recorded in Panels, so a Project must be open. Choose File > New to create
a new Project or File > Open… to open an existing Project. By default, Amarra Vinyl records
external audio from the first two input channels of the active interface, as defined in OS X’s
Audio MIDI Setup utility.
2
Set Recording Parameters
Choose Windows > New Sound file Preferences. Set the destination directory, filename, word
length and file type for the sound file you wish to record. See section 5.2.1 below for more
information.
3
Record Enable Panels
Record Enable the desired tracks for recording. To do this, click on the R button in the upper left
corner. See section 5.2.2 for more explanation.
4
Start your recording
Initiate the recording of audio. To do this, use the Transport Controls at top left of the Project.
Clicking on the green record button will start a recording. See chapter 5.2.3 for more information.
Page 60
5.2
5.2.1
Audio Recordings
Selecting external input(s)
By default, Amarra Vinyl can record audio from the first two available inputs of the interface
currently configured as input in Audio MIDI Setup. However, Amarra Vinyl can be configured to
record from any valid input source by means of the Windows > Audio I/O Preferences window.
The Audio I/O Preferences window
The bottom half of this window shows the currently active audio interface as selected in Audio
MIDI Setup.
Page 61
Note that virtualized or “aggregated” devices, as defined in OS version 10.4 and
higher, appear as one recording interface.
In the area of the audio interface icon, the line inputs L1 to Ln are shown, together with a
drop down menu selector. When one of the line input selectors are clicked, a list of all available
inputs for that selected audio interface are shown. Selecting any available input from the audio
interface re-maps that input to Amarra Vinyl’s inputs used for recording external sources. It also
relabels the output bus assigns on the Desk.
Input selectors
Amarra Vinyl’s clock source should be checked as well. To do so, select either “internal” or
“external” from the Master Clock source selectors.
Clock source selection
In addition, the sample rate must be set to match the incoming clock source, even when an
external clock source is selected.
Sample rate selection
The settings in the Audio I/O Preferences window reflect the settings in Audio MIDI Setup at
the instant you open the Audio I/O Preferences window. However, the information in Audio I/O
Preferences are not dynamically updated if anything in Audio MIDI Setup are changed while
the Audio I/O Preferences window is open. To make sure that the Audio I/O Preferences window
accurately reflects the current setting of Audio MIDI Setup, press the “Re-Scan I/O” button. This
updates the Audio I/O Preferences and re-loads the current settings from Audio MIDI Setup. To
Page 62
open Audio MIDI Setup from within Amarra Vinyl, click the “Audio MIDI Setup…” button in the
Audio I/O Preferences window.
Note that any new settings in the Audio I/O Preferences window come into effect
immediately. However, only after saving the settings with the “save” button will the
new settings be stored as defaults used for subsequent Amarra Vinyl sessions.
5.2.2
New Soundfile Parameters
You must specify where recorded files will be stored and in what format and resolution the
recordings will be made. To set the sound file parameters or, to change the current parameters,
select Windows > New Soundfile Preferences. The New Soundfile Parameters window appears.
The New Soundfile Parameters window showing AIFF recording format
To select the destination folder for recorded sound files, click on Set Folder to open a standard
Mac OS browser and select the target destination folder. Then click OK to confirm your choices
and return to the New Sound file Settings window.
Note that, although it is possible to select a destination for your sound files on
external direct–attached or network–attached volumes, this is no guarantee it will work
flawlessly. Please check that the necessary Quality of Service is supported throughout
the entire virtual path to the selected volume. This is especially true of USB–attached
mechanism. USB may not be suitable for high-resolution audio production.
Next, the default sound file prefix can be set in the “Name” field. Recorded sound files will be
collectively placed in a folder carrying the same name as the sound file prefix. Additionally, in
the “Take #” field, a numeric take number suffix can be entered that will be incremented for
subsequent recordings, creating unique names for each file.
The word length and file type for the recording should also be set via the appropriate drop down
menu. You do not have to close the New Soundfile Parameters window to save your settings.
When selecting BWF as recording format, the New Sound file Parameters window is extended
by some extra fields
Page 63
The New Sound file Parameters window for BWF recording format
The “Originator”, “Reference” and “Date/Time” fields can be filled with up to 22 characters.
The “Description” and “Coding History” fields each hold up to 120 characters. The standardized
contents of these metadata fields are stored in the header of the BWF file.
• Originator — an ASCII string containing the name of the originator/producer of the
audio file.
• Reference — Technically known as the “OriginatorReference,” an ASCII string
containing a non–ambiguous reference “allocated by the originating organization.” The
EBU has defined a format for the OriginatorReference field. For more information, see
EBU Recommendation R99-1999[2].
• Date — Technically known as the “OriginationDate,” ASCII characters containing the
date of creation of the audio file. The format is “yyyy-mm-dd” (year-month-day).
Year is defined from 0000 to 9999, month is define from 1 to 12, day is defined from 1 to 28,29,30
or 31, while the separator between the items can be anything but it is recommended that one of
the following characters is used:
1. -(hyphen)
Page 64
2. _(underscore)
3. :(colon)
4.
(space)
5.
.
(stop or period)
• Time — Technically known as the “OriginationTime,” ASCII characters containing the
time of creation of the audio file. The format is “HH-MM-SS” (hours-minutes-seconds).
Hour is defined from 0 to 23, while minute and second are defined from 0 to 59. The separator
between the items can be anything but it is recommended that one of the above characters.
• Description — An ASCII string containing a un–formatted description of the sequence.
To help applications which only display a short description, it is recommended that a
resumé of the description is contained in the first 64 characters, and the last 192
characters are use for details.
• Coding History — The Coding History field is usually filled in and appended by any
application that creates and subsequently modifies a BWF sound file.
Finally, the optional “Edit Recording” check box enables files to be opened while their recording
is in progress. This feature allows you to begin marking and making other editing decisions
while a recording progresses. See section 5.2.6 below for more information.
Note that the sample rate of the sound file to be recorded is not set via this window.
It is set in your host’s Audio MIDI Setup. See section 5.2.1 above for more information.
5.2.3
Track arming and enabling recording
To prepare audio for recording, any track you want to record audio into must be enabled or
“armed” first. To arm the desired Panel(s), click on the Record Ready button, labeled “R,” on the
left of the corresponding Panel. To disarm a Panel, simply click the Record Ready button again
and the Panel will return to “Safe” mode again.
HINT: Option + Clicking on the Record button enable both tracks with one click.
5.2.4
Initiating a recording
To initiate a recording, click the Record button in the Transport Controls to start the recording.
The Playhead starts at the beginning of the time line or at the Edit Point if present. The Record
buttons turns red, recording begins and, the backgrounds of the Panels in record along with their
corresponding Record Ready buttons turn red while the cursor changes to a microphone symbol.
Page 65
A Panel in record mode showing the “microphone” cursor
Once the recording is stopped, by either hitting the space bar or the Stop button in the Transport
Controls, the newly recorded audio segment(s) are shown in the Panel(s) while Amarra Vinyl
generates waveforms in the background.
If recordings replace any existing segments in the Panel, the original segment will be joined to
the new recording with a default Crossfade.
Note that any existing SRPs, Track Marks or Gain Overlay nodes will be deleted
by a recording. Since recording is non–destructive, any existing audio segments in
a Panel that seem to be “overwritten” during recording are not physically erased
from your designated volume, only the Edit Decision List has been modified. They
can be reopened at any time. Alternatively, the original state of the Panels before the
recording was started can easily be restored with the Edit > Undo command.
5.2.5Manual punch in
It is also possible to “punch in” audio at any desired location within a Panel while playback is in
progress. To punch into record, first arm the Panel(s) where the punch in is needed. Then, locate
the Edit Point or Playhead in advance of the punch in point, providing 1 to 3 seconds of pre–roll,
and commence playback by pressing the spacebar or the Play button on the Transport Controls.
When the Playhead arrives at the desired punch in point, select Play > Record or click the Record
button from the Transport Panel, and the punch will start. To stop the recording, either tap the
space bar, select Play > Record or click the Record button again and the recording will stop,
leaving the Playhead at the location where the punch out occurred.
5.2.6
Edit Recording
This option, located in the New Sound file Parameters window, allows opening, viewing and
editing of the file being recorded during the recording. It should not be used in Amarra Vinyl.
Note that, when the Edit Recording option is selected, Amarra Vinyl uses about
15% more disk bandwidth for a stereo recording, so hard drive performance may be
affected.
Page 66
5.3
Preset a Recording Duration
When the length of a recording is known in advance, Amarra Vinyl can be set to record for a
preset duration. This “timed” recording can be used for unattended recording, conserving disk
space, or to replace parts of pre–existing material in one or more Panels.
5.3.1
Recording a Selection or Segment
Select a region of the desired length in the Panel(s) where recording should take place by click
+ drag to create a yellow-highlighted area that represents the length of your recording, then
initiate the recording. When the recording is started, it will commence at the start of the selected
region, and stop automatically at the end of the selected region. This is useful for recording one
side of an album.
Playback commences at the start of the selection. Amarra Vinyl will drop into recording, punching
out at the next SRP. This repeats itself until the end of the selection is reached. Playback stops
and the areas marked by SRPs are replaced by newly created sound files. If recording was still
active when the end of the selection was reached (an uneven number of SRPs was included in
the selection), recording will stop at the end of the selection as well.
Note that for this method of “timed” recording, Amarra Vinyl only uses the SRPs
in the top Panel being played and recorded. If SRPs are set in any other Panel that
is armed for recording, they will be ignored and recording in those Panels will take
place at the same position as in the top Panel being played.
After recording, the SRPs will be erased and in their place, default crossfades will
connect the newly recorded segments to any existing audio segments.
Page 67
Chapter 6...................................................................... Meters
6.1
Meters Window
The “Meters window” provides a Master section, the final output control for your Project. The
Master section window can be opened by selecting the Windows > Meters command.
The Master section
The Master section resembles a master fader section of a typical mixing desk and features a
number of elements. Most important, at right, is a Master fader.
The Master Fader controls output amplitude across all output buses. It has a amplitude scale at
right, with three triangular hot spots, at left, for rapid gain setting. Clicking on a hot spots instantly
moves the fader to the corresponding preset position. Hot spot values are not adjustable.
Below the fader is a gain call out field where the gain setting of the fader can be manually
entered as a numerical value. To alter the master fader’s position, a new value can be manually
Page 68
entered in this field and, after confirming the new value with the Enter key, the fader will move
to the corresponding position.
Also, at the bottom a “dim” button is found. Clicking the dim button immediately moves the
fader to the predefined position of -20 dB, returning to it’s original position when the dim button
is disengaged. When the dim button is engaged, it’s label color changes to red to indicate that
dim mode is active.
To the left of the Master fader is a section from which the window gets its name, the bus meters.
Above each meter is a field showing the numerical value of the current instantaneous amplitude.
When an overload occurs, these boxes turn red.To clear the overload display, click on the indicator
and the red surround will disappear.
Finally, at the top left of the Master section are two more buttons. Clicking the Clear button clears
the peak values for the numerical level indicators, as well as any overloads indicated. Clicking
Reset resets the peak-hold of the meters, as well as any peak-hold value.
Page 69
Chapter 7....................................................................... Menus
For all menus, the keyboard equivalents for all commands are listed in Appendix 1. Also note
that the word folder is used to describe disk directories, in keeping with Mac OS tradition. Finally,
all edits in Amarra Vinyl are both instantaneous and non–destructive. The only exception is the
File > Save Reversed command, which “renders” or creates a new sound file of the reversed
material.
7.1
The Amarra Vinyl Menu
The Amarra Vinyl Menu
7.1.1
About Amarra Vinyl
Opens a dialog box describing the version and build numbers of your Amarra Vinyl application.
Clicking on the dialog box closes it.
7.1.2Preferences...
Some of the functions and commands within Amarra Vinyl can be changed to adhere to your
preferred values or behavior. All of these preferences can be adjusted in the menu Amarra Vinyl
> Preference Window. See Section 7.8.5 for more information on setting Preferences.
7.1.3Services
The Services menu item provides access to Mac OS X’s system-wide services.
Page 70
7.1.4
Hide Amarra Vinyl
Use the Hide Amarra Vinyl menu item to hide Amarra Vinyl and all of its open windows, allowing
you access to other programs running in Mac OS X. Clicking on the Amarra Vinyl icon in your
Dock returns Amarra Vinyl to view
7.1.5
Hide Others
Use the Hide Others menu item to hide all visible applications except Amarra Vinyl allowing
you to focus on Amarra Vinyl alone. Clicking on any icon in the doc will return that application
to view.
7.1.6
Show All
The Show All menu item unhides all running programs in Mac OS X.
7.1.7
Quit Amarra Vinyl
Use the Quit Amarra Vinyl menu item to quit Amarra Vinyl and close all open documents. You
will be prompted to save any unsaved work before Amarra Vinyl exits.
Page 71
7.2The File Menu
The File menu
7.2.1
New Project
Selecting New Project from the File menu will open a new, empty Project. Any currently active
Projects are unaffected but moved to the background. Amarra Vinyl allows you to have as many
open Projects but, when the application runs out of RAM, it will begin to use virtual memory,
significantly slowing down the application.
7.2.2
Open Project
A Project file lets you save your editing work in a set of files, along with most of the editing
metadata you added. An additional feature of a Project is that you can save your edit decisions
without committing them back to a DDP file set. The Project file saves all segment names, SRPs,
marks and edits and, they are all restored upon re–opening that Project.
Selecting File > Open Project brings up a standard Mac OS file browser. Locate the requested
Project file and select it to open the Project in a new window.
Page 72
7.2.3
Open Recent
With this menu, a list of recently opened Projects and sound files is shown. Selecting one of
those files will re-open it.
If you hold down the option key prior to accessing this menu command, it divides the resulting
list into Project files first and sound files second, with a divider in between. The files appear in
the list with the most recently used files at the top, in the order they were opened.
Finally, if you select a sound file from this menu without any target Projects open, Amarra Vinyl
will create a new (default) Project and open the sound file into that Project.
7.2.4
Open Sound File…
This command opens a Mac OS file browser, allowing you to select any sound file recognized
by Amarra Vinyl. This includes AIFF, WAV and BWF files along with SD2 or Sound Designer II files
with region definitions. See section 6.9.4.4 for more information on importing SD2 files. Amarra
Vinyl is also able to open audio files by dragging and dropping the files into the top Panel of a
Project.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.2.5
Close Window
This command closes the currently active window. This can be a Project, the Mark Info window
or, the Preferences window. Upon closing a Project that contains unsaved changes, Amarra Vinyl
will open a dialog asking for changes to be saved, discarded or offering to cancel the close
window operation.
7.2.6
Close Project
This command closes the currently active window. Upon closing a Project that contains unsaved
changes, Amarra Vinyl will open a dialog asking for changes to be saved, discarded or offering to
cancel the close window operation.
7.2.7
Save Project
This will save the current state of the active Project. It is saved with its current name and path.
This command will overwrite any previously saved Project file with that name and path.
7.2.8
Save Project As…
This command lets you save a copy of the active Project under a new file name or different path.
Amarra Vinyl allows you to choose either a destination folder or, you can navigate to an existing
folder. If the destination is empty, Amarra Vinyl simply writes the audio and/or metadata files as
directed. If, however, the destination folder is not empty, Amarra Vinyl alerts you that a potential
conflict exists to overwrite files and asks for more direction.
Page 73
7.2.9
Save As Default Project
This command save the foreground Project as the default document layout when new Projects
are created. Since this is a literal “save as,” you should always deploy an empty Project, without
any sound files opened into the Project, before you invoke this command.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.2.10
Activation…
This command opens the Amarra Vinyl Activation window.
7.2.11
Audio MIDI Setup…
This command opens the Audio MIDI Setup utility from within Amarra Vinyl, allowing you to
configure your clock source and sample rate.
7.2.12
Audio Device Preferences
This command opens Amarra Vinyl’s Audio I/O Preferences window.
7.2.13 Extras
7.2.13.1
Enable Debugging
This command outputs all Desk and Output Desk settings to the Console Log.
7.2.13.2Open Console Log
Invoking this command launches the Console utility and opens the log associated with soundBlade
SE. Console is the central repository for reports from running processes and applications. While
soundBlade SE is running, it outputs information to Console and that information, such as details
on installed options, system status and actions undertaken, then appears in the log. Also, at the
command of the user, certain information regarding EDLs or Projects can be output to the log as
well. See the following sections for more information on user selectable printing to the log file.
7.2.13.3
Send Crash Report
This command is designed to help Sonic Studio to diagnose problem you may be experiencing
with your installation. It collects the most recent crash report for soundBlade SE and sends it via
your internet connection to Sonic Studio.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 74
7.2.14
Reveal Sound in Finder
This command requires a single selected segment. As the name implies, Reveal Sound In Finder
switches context to the Finder and opens a new window with the source sound file highlighted.
7.2.15
Build Waveform...
Files originating from a non–Sonic Studio product includes sample values but do not contain
the amplitude-specific metadata needed to draw our very detailed audio time versus amplitude
“waveforms.” If you would like to add waveforms while working with your sound files and have
unchecked the default Windows > Preferences > EDL > View > Background Waveforms preference,
you must select the Build Sound Waveform… command.
First, select the parent sound file by clicking on the segment’s Title Bar. The Title Bar will turn
yellow to show that it is selected. Then, select the File > Build Sound Waveform… command.
7.2.16
Visit Sonic Studio Website
Selecting Visit Sonic Studio Website... from the File menu launches your default web browser
and directs you to www.sonicstudio.com.
7.2.17
Visit Support Portal
Selecting Visit Support Portal... from the File menu launches your default web browser and
directs you to http://www.sonicstudio.com/sonic/support/sonic_portal
Page 75
7.3The Edit Menu
The Edit menu
7.3.1
Undo (action)
This command reverts the last command executed. For clarification, the Undo command also
appends the last action performed to the menu name.
Amarra Vinyl provide an almost unlimited number of undos. The only limiting factor is the
amount of RAM which, when completely used, will force the operating system to use virtual
memory. This will slow down the operation of Amarra Vinyl.
Note that some individual commands actually perform several functions “behind
the scenes” though to you, the user, it appears to be only one function. For that
reason, you may have to Undo several times to recover a state that was reached with
a single user command.
Page 76
7.3.2
Redo (action)
This command reverts the last undo command, reinstating the last command performed.
Additionally, for clarification the Undo command in this menu shows the last action undone.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.3.3
Cut
The Cut command operates on a region within Edit Points as well as selected regions or segments,
removing the defined item from the Project and placing it in Amarra Vinyl’s “Clipboard.” The
Clipboard is a temporary memory location reserved by the operating system for each running
application.
7.3.4
Copy
The Copy command operates on a region within Edit Points as well as selected regions or
segments, copying the defined item from the Project and placing it in Amarra Vinyl’s Clipboard.
Unlike the Cut command, the Copy command leaves the defined item intact instead of deleting
it after copying the selection to the Clipboard.
7.3.5
Paste (Replace / Insert / Overlay)
The Paste command inserts the content of the Clipboard into the Project, replacing, in order of
choice, either:
1.
A region within Edit Points
2.
Selected regions or segments
3.
From the Edit Point position
…for the duration of the audio currently of the Clipboard. The inserted content is placed between
Crossfades and the Edit Point is moved, for visual reference, to the end of the inserted material.
7.3.6
Select/Deselect All
These commands select or deselect all segments or regions in the current Project.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.3.7
Delete Selection
If a region or segment is selected, this command will delete the defined item. It will then “slip”
or move left any audio after the deleted region or segment, filling in the space formerly occupied
by the selected segment or region. A Crossfade is placed to transition across the deletion.
Page 77
Note that, as with all editing in Amarra Vinyl, if both an In and Out Point are present,
and the Out point is after the In Point, then they take precedents over both selected
region and segments.
If only an In Point is present, then the command will not work. Finally, if both an In
and Out Point are present, the Out point is after the In Point, and the edit points are
inside “Edited Black,” the empty area between segments, then that region defined by
the edit points will be deleted and “downstream” audio will be moved left.
7.3.8
Clear Selection
Clear Selection works similarly to the Delete Selection command. The Clear Selection command
clears the selected segment, region or area defined by Edit Points, but does not move any other
audio on the time line.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.3.9
Delete Selection
This command deletes the current selection or selected segments. The outer edges of the
selection are joined with a default crossfade and all subsequent audio is shifted relatively.
7.3.10
Clear Selection
This command clears the current selection or selected segments, leaving all audio in place and
replacing the audio to be cleared with digital silence. The edges of the cleared area are faded out
and in with default crossfades.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.3.11
Create Crossfade/Create Segment
This command is context sensitive and it’s appearance in the menu will change according to the
current Panel’s state. It either creates a new crossfade from the current Cursor’s position when
no selection is made, or it creates a new segment at the place of the selection when a selection
is made. This command uses crossfade defaults when creating crossfades.
7.3.12 Create Crossfade from In Point/Create Segment from
In & Out Point(s)
As with the previous commands, this command is context sensitive and it’s appearance in the
menu will change according to the current Panel’s state. It either creates a new crossfade from
the current In Points position when no Out Point is seen, or it creates a new segment at the
area included by a set In and Out Point. This command uses crossfade defaults when creating
crossfades.
Page 78
7.3.13
Delete Crossfade
The Delete Crossfade command deletes all “frivolous” Crossfades, ones that cause no audible
change in the underlying audio, from the selected region. Superfluous Crossfades are usually
created with the Create Crossfade command, discussed in the previous section and, after an
extensive editing session, the Delete Crossfade command will clear any visual clutter, making it
easier to see the operative edits.
7.3.14
Move Segments…
The Move Segment command allows the user to move one or more segments to another location
on the time line. Selecting this command opens the Move Segments modal dialog, which shows
the current position of the Playhead or start of the first selected segment.
Entering a new start time and clicking the Move button causes the head of the first selected
segment to move to the new location. All selected segments will also more by the same amount,
maintaining their relative position to each other.
Additionally, this dialog offers three extra options. By clicking the Where button, you can load
either the current position of the Playhead or the location of extant In point or Out Points, all
from a drop down menu. Then, by clicking the Move button, the segment(s) shift to the new
location. The SRP button lets you load the current position of any extant SRPs, also from a drop
down menu.
The Move button moves the defined item to the location shown in the dialog’s time code address.
Clicking the Cancel button leaves the selected segments at their original position.
7.3.15
Segment Gain…
This command invokes the Segment Gain dialog. For more detailed information on the Segment
Gain dialog, See .
7.3.16
Reverse Polarity
The Reverse Polarity command inverts the polarity of the selected segment(s) in all selected
Panels. Segments with inverted polarity acquire a small, bright red dot in the upper left corner of
their Title Bar to visually remind you of their inverted status.
Note that, to change the polarity relationship between a stereo pair, this command
must be applied to only one channel of the pair. To do this, change the Edit Group
Selector of one Panel, located on the left edge of both Panels, from the default stereo
setting to mono. To read more about Edit Group Selectors, refer to section 4.7 for
more information.
7.4.17
Nudge Segment Left/Right
The Nudge Segment commands move or “nudge” the selected segment(s) left or right, earlier
or later respectively, on the time line by a predefined value. The default “Nudge B” value used is
Page 79
defined in the Time Display tab of Preferences window. See section 6.9.5 for more information
on the Time Display preferences.
7.3.18
Edit Segment Name
When a segment is selected, choosing the Edit Segment Name command allows the user to edit
the name of the segment as it appears in the Title Bar, and in Text Mode view. As with all actions
in a Project, changing the Segment name has no effect on the underlying referenced sound file.
This command is equivalent to double clicking on the Title Bar to change a segment’s name.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.3.19
Editing Auto Tool Override
This commands toggles the Editing Auto Tools state, either enabled or disabled. See section
6.9.6 for more information on the EDL preferences.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
7.3.20
Auto Space All Segments/Tracks
The AutoSpace function offers a simple but effective tool to change all pauses between tracks
to a pre-defined value. Simply select Edit > AutoSpace all Segments and all segments will be
moved on the time line, with equal space between according to the Preference > Editing Tools >
AutoSpacing Duration setting.
If you have Track marks already placed in the Project, the command name changes contextually
from Auto Space All Segments to Auto Space All Tracks. See sections 3.8.6 and 4.2.1 above for
practical discussions about the autospacing function.
Page 80
7.4The EDL Menu
The EDL menu
7.4.1
Show/Hide Text View
The Show/Hide Text View command toggles the display of the selected Panel between Text Mode
and Waveform Mode views.
7.4.2
Show/Hide Gain Overlay
This command forces the selected Panel to show or hide the Gain Overlay feature. The Gain
Overlay is only visible in Waveform Mode, and is shown as a thin red line superimposed on the
waveform display. Projects saved with Gain Overlay will open with Gain Overlay visible upon
reopening.
Note that, although Gain Overlay may not be visible, when activated it is always
active in the audio output signal path. Only the EDL > Bypass Gain Overlay command
will bypass any Gain Overlay functionality. See section 6.3.3 below for more
information on the Bypass Gain Overlay command.
7.4.3
Bypass/Enable Gain Overlay
This command bypasses or engages the Gain Overlay function. When in bypass, the Gain
Overlay line in the waveform display turns grey and the corresponding Gain Overlay Button(s)
on the left side of each Panel turn yellow.
Note that the Bypass/Enable Gain Overlay function can only be selected when Gain
Overlay is shown. Option–clicking on a Gain Overlay Button will also bypass the Gain
Overlay function.
Page 81
7.4.4
Create Gain Nodes
With Gain Overlay enabled and a region of the time line selected, this command creates Gain
Overlay nodes at the boundaries of the region. To use this function, first click–drag within the
waveform display to select a region. Then, select Edit > Create Gain Nodes to add two nodes at
the “edges” of the Gain Overlay and the selected region.
Because the Edit Point is really a zero duration selection, it can also be used to create a single
gain node with the Create Gain Nodes command. For more detailed information on working with
the Gain Overlay, see section 4.5 above.
7.4.5
Select Gain Nodes
This command selects all Gain Nodes contained within the currently selected segment(s) or
region. Selected Gain Nodes can then be subject to simultaneous changes such as gain setting,
lock state, or deletion.
For more information on working with Gain Overlay mode, see section 4.4 above.
7.4.6
Refresh
The Refresh command redraws the current waveform display for the selected Panel. This
command is especially useful after rebuilding the waveform files of one or more segments, to
force the waveform display to display the updated information.
7.4.7
Standard/Large Track Size
The Standard and Large Track Size commands resize the selected Panel(s) to standard or large
vertical size. Large sized Panels are two times as tall as standard size, offering a better display
with larger display or desktop settings. A Large Panel also lists more segments in Text Mode.
Page 82
7.5The Play Menu
The Play menu
7.5.1
Play From Selection
This command starts playback from the beginning of a selected region. If no region is selected,
then playback starts at the Edit Point. If the Edit Point is not available, playback commences at the
start of the first segment in the Project. This command is equivalent to tapping the Spacebar on
the keyboard. The Play From Selection command will continue to play until either the Spacebar
is hit again or the Playhead reaches “midnight” (23:59:59:74).
Page 83
7.5.2
(Play) Selection
This command plays a selected region or segments. Whereas the Play From Selection command
mentioned in section 7.4.1 above will continue to play until stopped, the play Selection command
stops automatically at the end of the selection.
7.5.3
(Play) From Playhead
In normal operation, when you tap the Spacebar to start playback, the Playhead will jump to
the Edit Point or, the start of the file if there is no Edit Point, and begin playback. The Play From
Playhead command emulates a tape transport, with playback instead starting at the current
Playhead location.
7.5.4
Repeat Play
If there is a selected region, the Repeat Play command will repeatedly play the region until
stopped. If there is not a selected region, Amarra Vinyl will repeatedly play the entire Panel. Repeat
playback continues until you stop play with the menu command or by hitting the Spacebar.
7.5.5
Stop All
This command stops playback and/or recording and is equivalent to tapping the Spacebar during
playback or clicking on the Stop button in the Transport Bar.
7.5.6
Mute Track
This command mutes the selected track(s) panel in the Project window.
7.5.7
Solo Track
This command mutes the selected track(s) panel in the Project window.
7.5.8
Monitor Input
This command switches to listen to the input of the selected track(s) panel in the Project window.
7.5.9
Monitor Output
This command switches to listen to the output of the selected track(s) panel in the Project window.
7.5.10
Record Arm
This command sets the selected track panel(s) to record ready.
7.5.11 Record
This command puts Amarra Vinyl into record mode.
Page 84
7.5.12
Around Selection Center
This command plays a section of sound centered around a selected region. When you choose
Play Around Selection Center, a submenu appears, allowing you to select the length of playback
time.
Play Around Selection Center submenu
7.5.13
Play from Selection
Like the Play Around Selection Center discussed in section 6.4.6 above, this command requires
that you first select a region. Also, this command offers a submenu with duration choices for
playback. Unlike Play Around Selection Center, this command begins playback at the left edge of
the selection and continues, for the specified duration.
Play from Selection
7.5.14
Play to End of Selection
This command is the opposite of the Play from Selection command discussed in section 6.4.7
above, except that playback ends at the trailing edge or right side of a selected region. If there is
Page 85
not a selected region, playback ends at the Edit Point. This command also offers a submenu with
a number of choices for the duration of the playback.
Play to End of Selection submenu
7.5.15
Move Playhead
This command lets you place the Playhead at a specific location on the time line. When you
select this menu item, the Move Playhead modal dialog appears.
The Move Playhead dialog
When you enter a new time code address in the Move Playhead dialog and click Move, the
Playhead will jump to the new location. Besides manually entering a new location, you can also
use the Where button to load the address of the In or Out Point, if present, while the SRP button
loads the locations of any existing SRPs. Clicking the Cancel button leaves the Playhead at its
original location.
Note that, when the Playhead is visible by disabling the Play > Hide Playhead When Stopped
toggle, you can hover the cursor over the Playhead’s location, either in the time line or Panels,
the cursor changes shape to a sine wave–with–vertical line. Once in that mode, you can click–
drag the Playhead to a new location.
Page 86
7.5.16
Hide Playhead When Stopped
This command is somewhat of a misnomer in that it toggles, on or off, the ability to drag the
Playhead to a new location when stopped. A check mark appears next to this menu item when
this function is disabled.
This command applies to relocating the Playhead in either a Panel or on the time line, and is
useful if you find yourself grabbing the Playhead accidentally while attempting to edit or modify
some other object in a Project. Even with this command enabled (checked), you can always
double click in the time line to relocate the Playhead and begin playback at that location.
7.6The Mark Menu
The Mark menu
7.6.1
Track Start Mark
The Track Start Mark command inserts a Start of Track Track mark at the location of the Edit Point.
7.6.2
Track End Mark
The Track End Mark command inserts an End of Track Track mark at the location of the Edit Point.
7.6.3
Delete Mark
The Delete Mark command is used to remove existing Track marks. If a region is selected in a
Panel, all of theTrack marks inside the selection are deleted. If no region is selected, this command
will remove a Track mark if the Edit Point is at the exact time location of that mark.
Page 87
7.6.4
Lock Marks from Selection
The Lock Marks from Selection command is used to lock Track marks to the time line. This
command locks all Track marks inside a selected region. Once locked, mark locations cannot
be modified until they are unlocked. This command is equivalent to clicking the Lock button, if
disabled, in the Track Info tab of the Windows > Mark Info window.
Note that this command does not affect the ability to change Title, emphasis state,
ISRC or SCMS metadata associated with a mark. Also note that this command does
not attach marks to audio segments. Editing any audio with locked Track marks will
change the time relationship between those marks and the associated audio.
7.6.5
Unlock Marks from Selection
The Unlock Marks from Selection command is used to unlock Track marks within a selected
region.
7.6.6
Lock All Marks
This command locks all Track marks on the time line, regardless of selected regions or segments.
Once locked, the location of Track marks cannot be altered until they are unlocked.
7.6.7
Unlock All Marks
This command unlocks all Track marks on the time line.
7.6.8
Analog Black to Marks
This function measures the amplitude and duration of the audio in a selected region, placing
End of Track and Start of Track marks in locations that approximate the end of one track and
beginning of the next. Both amplitude and duration are user defined. The default amplitude is set
in the Editing Tools tab of the Windows > Preferences window.
When invoking this function, the Analog Black to Marks modal dialog appears. In the dialog, the
default parameters can be changed, after which the Analog Black to Marks function is started by
selecting OK. By clicking on the Cancel button, the operation is stopped without further action.
Note that the results of the Analog Black to Marks function is never as accurate as
the Edited Black to Marks function, discussed in section 7.5.11 below. The accuracy of
the mark placement depends entirely on the accuracy of the parameters used so, you
may want to zoom in and, with the Show Track Scale in dB preference set (Editing Tools
tab of the Windows > Preferences window), visually estimate amplitudes of your fade
outs and noise floor. The result of the Analog Black to Marks function should always
be checked for errors and unintended placement.
Page 88
7.6.9
Edited Black to Marks
The Edited Black to Marks command automatically places Start of Track Track marks at the
beginning and end of all Fade Ins and Fade Outs respectively. To use the Edited Black to Marks
command, you must first select either segments or a region. The presence of End of Track Marks
makes it a bit less predictable when using the Track Bar for resequencing but, the presence
of End of Track Marks means that there will be a countdown on the player’s display when the
resulting CD is played back.
7.6.10
Edited Black to Start Marks
The Edited Black to Start Marks command automatically places Start and End of Track Track
marks at the beginning and end of all Fade Ins and Fade Outs respectively. To use the Edited
Black to Marks command, you must first select either segments or a region.
Because only Start of Track Marks are created, it makes it very easy to resequence using the Track
Bar. On the other hand, the absence of End of Track Marks means that there will be no countdown
on the CD player’s display when the resulting disc is played back.
7.6.11
The Mark Contextual Menu
By control–clicking on a mark, a contextual menu appears. This menu provides choices similar
to the Mark main menu, and allows you to modify the behavior of a mark without using this pulldown menu.
The Mark contextual menu
Page 89
Move Edit Point To Mark: This command moves the Edit Point to the current Mark.
Lock/UnLock Mark commands: These commands are discussed above in this section.
Set/Reset Emphasis: Also available in the Mark Info window, these commands flip the state of
the AES/EBU emphasis bit for the current mark.
Delete Mark: This command deletes the current mark.
7.7The Selection Menu
The Selection menu
7.7.1
Set SRP
This command places an SRP or Selection Reference Point in the selected Panel at the location
of the Playhead or Edit Point, if play is stopped.
Page 90
7.7.2
Set SRP with Text
When this alternate command is selected, the SRP is placed as in section 7.7.12 above except
the text field that accompanies all SRPs is activated and the text insertion point is set, ready for
typing in a label.
7.7.3
Lock SRPs from Selection
This command locks all SRPs within a selected region.
7.7.4
Unlock SRPs from Selection
This command unlocks all SRPs within a selected region.
7.7.5
Clear Selected SRPs
This command removes all SRPs within a selected region, whether they are locked or not.
7.7.17
Drop Edit Point at Playhead
This command moves the Edit Point to the current location of the Playhead and is typically
used when the Edit Point to Playhead command, discussed in section 7.7.18 below, is disabled
(unchecked).
7.7.6
Edit Point to Playhead
This command toggles a mode on or off whereby, when playback is stopped, the Edit Point
jumps to the location of the Playhead.
7.7.7
Move Edit Point to…
This command has a submenu, with ten possible choices.
The Move Edit Point to submenu
Page 91
With this set of choices, the Edit Point can be quickly moved to a number of predefined positions:
• The next Track mark
• The previous Track mark
• The next Segment Edit Point
• The previous Segment Edit Point …the previous Black Fade or Crossfade
• The In Point
• The Out Point
• The next SRP
• The previous SRP
• The End of Track
…the last Fade Out of the Project
• The Start of Track
…the first Fade In of the Project
7.7.8
…the Black Fade or Crossfade
Edit Point to Next Peak
This command examines the amplitude of all audio samples in the selected region or segments,
and moves the Edit Point to the location of the maximum sample within the selection. If there are
more than one equal amplitude maximum samples, then the command moves the Edit Point to
the location of the first, then next maximum samples in turn.
7.7.9
Select Start to Edit Point
This command selects a region from the first Fade In of the Project to the location of the Edit
Point.
7.7.12
Select Edit Point to End
This command selects a region from location of the Edit Point to the last Fade Out of the Project.
7.7.11
Selection from Selected Segments
This command selects a region from the first Fade In of the first selected segment to the last
Fade Out of the last selected segment.
7.7.12
Select Segment to End
This command selects all segments from the Edit Point to the last segment in the Project,
including the segment in which the Edit Point is located. If the Edit Point has not been placed, the
command selects all segments from the first selected segment to the last segment in the Project.
Page 92
7.7.25
Select Segment to Start
This command selects all segments from the first segment in the Project to the Edit Point,
including the segment in which the Edit Point is located. If the Edit Point has not been placed,
the command selects all segments from the first segment in the Project to the selected segment.
7.7.26
Select Segments from Selection
This command selects all segments that are part of the selected region, including the segments
in which the start and end of the selection is located.
7.8 The View Menu
The View menu
Page 93
7.8.1
Segment
Move
Forward/Backwards/Select
Next/Previous
These contextual commands change dynamically, depending on whether a segment is selected
or not. When a segment is not selected, Move Forward/Backwards move the contents of the Panel
forward and backward along the time line. The zoom factor or magnification stays the same.
When one or more segments are selected, these commands change to enable you to select the
“next” segment. If one segment is selected, the meaning and function of the commands are
clear but, if more than one segment is selected, then Select Next will select the segment after
the last currently selected segment and Select Previous will select the segment just before the
first currently selected.
7.8.2 Zoom In/Out
The zoom commands change the zoom factor or magnification, expanding or reducing the time
scale by 90%, with 10% overlap from the previous view for visual context. Zooming in provides
more detail while zooming out lets you see more of the overall program.
7.8.3
Zoom In Around In/Out Point
These commands change the magnification of the waveform display while centering the
waveform display on the In Point or Out Point. The amount of time shown around the In or Out
Point is defined by the Zoom to In/Out setting in the Time Display tab of Windows > Preferences.
See section 7.9.5 for information on the Time Display tab.
7.8.4
Zoom In/Out around Edit Point
These commands change magnification while keeping the waveform display centered on either
the Edit Point and is very handy for determining context. The amount of time shown around the
In or Out Point is defined by the Zoom to In/Out setting in the Time Display tab of Windows >
Preferences. See section 7.9.5 for information on the Time Display tab.
7.8.5
Zoom In/Out around Playhead
These commands combine a Zoom In/Out command while keeping the waveform display
centered on the Playhead, also very handy for determining context.
7.8.6 Zoom to Previous/Next
These commands are like Undo/Redo for zoom commands. Amarra Vinyl remembers the
last lower resolution (out) zoom level. To return to an prior zoomed out level, choose Zoom to
Previous. To return to the more recent zoom level, choose Zoom to Next.
Page 94
7.8.7 Zoom around Playhead
This command zooms with the Playhead in the center of the waveform display, and is very
handy for determining context. The level of zoom is determined by a submenu.
The Zoom around Playhead menu
The amount of time chosen in the submenu indicates the total amount of time shown in the
display after the Zoom Around Playhead command is selected.The amount of time will be equally
divided between the area to the left and right of the Playhead position.
7.8.8
Zoom around Selection Center
This command is similar to Zoom around Playhead, except that instead the display is centered
around the centre of a selected region or selected segment(s).
7.8.9
Zoom to Selection Start/End
This command zooms the waveform display to the start or end of the current selection with the
start or end of the selection centered in the waveform display and is very handy for refining a
selection’s boundaries. The amount of time shown around the selection boundaries is defined
by the Zoom to Sel Start/ setting in the Time Display tab of Windows > Preferences. See section
7.9.5 below for information on the Time Display tab.
7.8.10
Zoom to Selection
This command zooms to the currently selected region such that the selection is centered in the
waveform display and covers a preset percentage of the waveform display area. The amount of
time shown around the selection boundaries is defined by the Zoom to Sel Start/ setting in the
Time Display tab of Windows > Preferences. See section 7.9.5 for more information on the Time
Display tab.
Page 95
7.8.11
Zoom to Entire Project/Track
Under normal operation with a stereo Project, these two menu commands work identically.
These commands zoom so that the entire program is shown across the entire waveform display.
However, if one of the two Panels contains more audio information, stretching over a longer
duration on the time line than the other channel, the Zoom to Entire Track command will zoom
to the length of the selected track. This situation typically occurs if the two Panels contain dual
mono material or a wildly “stereo” program created in mono editing mode.
7.9 The Windows Menu
The Windows menu
The Windows menu provides quick access to all available windows within Amarra Vinyl and an
active Project.
7.9.1
Meters
This command toggles the Meters window or Master section. See section 5.1 for a detailed
description of this window.
7.9.2
Equalizer
This command opens the Sonic EQ Window. Sonic EQ is global meaning it applies to all files
played in or exported from Amarra Vinyl. Read the chapter on Sonic EQ for more info on use.
7.9.3
Export Sound File...
This command opens the Export Soundfile dialog box and exports sound files in either AIFF,
WAV, BWF format, in 16 or 24 bit word length, and CAF files in 32 bit format. This is the same
things as clicking the Export button. It exports the audio with amplitude changes from segment
gain, plus any Gain Overlay and fades.
Page 96
Learn Amarra Vinyl 2.2 now supports sample-rate conversion and 32-bit CAF
file support when using the ‘Export Tracks...’ or ‘Export Sound File...’ commands.
This feature creates multiple files at the same time, based on the sample rate and
bit depth you select. Supports 44/24 and 44/16 and 48/24. A new folder is created
for each conversion, at the Path you define from ‘Set Folder’, and titled ‘44-24’, ‘4416’ and ‘48-24’.
Since this action does multiple exports at the same time, processing can take a
while.
NEW Shortcut ctrl-cmd-E for Export Tracks
The Export Sound File Dialog Box. Note the sample-rate conversion options.
To use this function, create a selection by either clicking on a segment’s Title Bar or by click–
dragging in the top Panel to create a time region selection. Then choose the destination directory
with the Set File button. Then, set the file type, word length and speed.
Optionally, you can specify that the newly created material replace the existing. The Edit after
Export check box performs a Replace edit, synchronously replacing the material existing prior to
the export with consolidated material created from the export function. Once all options are set,
clicking on the Export button causes soundBlade HD to “play” the selected region, exporting the
audio as it plays. See section 4.9.4 for more information on Replace edits.
Page 97
Note that playing material at 1x speed will not improve the quality during an
export so, it is recommended that, unless real–time playback is needed, you use
either the 8x or Max speed setting as it has better temporal resolution. Also,
during high speed exports, the time display and Playhead do not operate in real
time and audio is not available at the outputs.
Make sure to set dither to 24 bits for exporting files.
The Dither indicator in the top center section of the Project window shows green
when dither on output is enabled and grey when dither is disabled. To change dither,
control–click on the “Dither” label, and a contextual menu appears, allowing dither to
be enabled, disabled and change bit depth..
Learn About Dither:
7.9.4
Export Tracks...
Learn soundBlade 2.2 now supports sample-rate conversion and 32-bit CAF
file support when using the ‘Export Tracks...’ or ‘Export Sound File...’ commands.
This feature creates multiple files at the same time, based on the sample rate and
bit depth you select. Supports 44/24 and 44/16 and 48/24. A new folder is created
for each conversion, at the Path you define from ‘Set Folder’, and titled ‘44-24’, ‘4416’ and ‘48-24’.
Since this action does multiple exports at the same time, processing can take a
while.
NOTE: Dither Type is set in Preferences’ Delivery tab.
NEW Shortcut ctrl-cmd-E for Export Tracks
This command exports sound files in either AIFF, WAV, BWF format, in 16 or 24 bit word length,
and CAF files in 32 bit format based on the Start Mark and End Mark It exports the audio between
a Start Mark and End Mark as separate tracks, with amplitude changes from segment gain, plus
any Gain Overlay or plug–ins. This is the same as option+clicking the Export button.
Page 98
The Export Tracks Dialog Box. Note the sample-rate conversion options.
To use this function, create a selection by either clicking on a segment’s Title Bar or by click–
dragging in the top Panel to create a time region selection. Make sure the top two Panels are
assigned, on the first two Desk Strips, to M1-Out and M2-Out. Then choose the destination
directory with the Set File button. Then, set the file type, word length and speed.
Make sure to set dither to 24 bits for exporting files.
The Dither indicator in the top center section of the Project window shows green
when dither on output is enabled and grey when dither is disabled. To change dither,
control–click on the “Dither” label, and a contextual menu appears, allowing dither to
be enabled, disabled and change bit depth..
Learn About Dither:
Page 99
7.9.5 The Preferences Window
Some of the functions and commands within Amarra Vinyl can be changed to adhere to your
preferred values or behavior. All of these preferences can be adjusted in the Windows > Preference
Window
7.9.5.1
Setting Preferences — Editing Tools Tab
The Preference window showing the Editing Tools tab
Page 100
7.9.5.2
Editing Auto Tools
The Editing Auto Tools section has the following options:
• Fade Tool: When checked, the Fade Tool will be enabled for editing. To learn more
about the Fade Tool and its properties, see section 3.8.1 and 4.1 for a full description.
• Snap to Edit Point ON: When checked, dragging a segment near the position of the
Edit Point will cause the segment to auto–snap. This feature is really only applicable
when dragging audio into a Project from the Finder or another open Project.
• Snap To Zone: When the zone snap is checked, dragging a segment near the start
or end of another segment will cause the segment to auto–snap to the red or blue
snap locations. See section 4.3 for more information on the drag & drop, auto–snap
functions.
• AutoSpacing Duration: AutoSpace uses a pre-selected time value to space the
segments. Here, this value can be selected between 1 and 3 seconds. Alternatively,
AutoSpace can be turned by setting to zero.
• Analog Black Threshold: This field shows the default value used by the Mark > Analog
Black to Marks command for the amplitude threshold. This value, expressed as dB
below 0 dBFS, sets the loudness threshold below which a Start of Track or End of
Track mark will be placed. See section 3.9.4 for more information on automatically
placing Track marks.
7.9.5.3
Edit with Audio
• Selection Reference Points: When editing, this setting causes SRPs to move along
with their associated segment. They are also included with the audio when it is copied
to the clipboard.
• Gain Overlay: When editing, this setting causes gain nodes to move along with their
associated segment. They are also included with the audio when it is copied to the
clipboard.
7.9.5.4
Fade Shape - Default Fade
This selector determines the default fade curve used when any new fades are created Amarra
Vinyl. The five curve options are:
• Cosine
• Root Cosine
• Linear
• Root Linear
• Exponential
Page 101
Linear fades, the default, are the most broadly applicable choice. Section 4.1.2 briefly discusses
the five curve shape options.
7.9.5.5
Import Fade
• Fade In/Fade Out: On drag and drop, applies the selected Fade Shape to each file as
an In/Out Fade. This setting abuts soundfiles together and is recommended for use
when Importing SDII files.
• Crossfade: On drag and drop, applies the selected Fade Shape to each file as a
crossfade..
Page 102
7.9.5.6
Setting Preferences — EDL Tab
The Preference window showing the EDL tab
7.9.5.7
View
The View section has the following options:
• Show Track Bar: When checked, an additional layer of visual feedback is enabled
in the Project. This alternate view provides a graphical approach to evaluating and
manipulating your Track metadata. Existing metadata is displayed from an object–
Page 103
oriented perspective, whereby each CD Track that will result from your current Track
placement is shown in grey while the pause between tracks is shown in blue. Section
3.9.5 above discusses the Track Bar.
• Show Segment Names: When checked, segment names will show in the Title Bar.
When unchecked, the Title Bar of segments remains empty.
• Zoom Factor (%): When zooming in or out, the display will be zoomed by the factor
defined in this field. The default 90% means that 90% of the current waveform view
will be zoomed, with 10% overlap for visual context. This preference only applies to
selections.
• Create Waveforms Manually: When checked, Amarra Vinyl does not create waveforms
automatically when a file is added to an EDL. Waveforms for these files can be created
by selecting the file in the EDL, then File>Build Waveforms.
• Background Waveforms: When checked, waveforms will be generated in the background
upon opening sound files from other DAWs. When unchecked, no graphical “waveform
files” will be produced automatically. The File > Build Waveform… command will
manually generate waveform files.
• Remove Waveforms on Close: When checked, waveform metadata will be deleted
when a Project is closed.
7.9.5.8
Display Auto Tools
The Display Auto Tools has the following options:
• AutoScale On: When enabled, the display is scaled vertically so that the maximum
peak within the entire Panel becomes full scale. This preference provides overall
amplitude scaling while maintaining visual context between loud and soft passages.
• Scale to View: When enabled, the display is scaled vertically so that the maximum
peak within the currently visible waveform becomes full scale. This preference
provides local magnification, excellent for fine editing, but requires that you refer to
the numeric vertical scale to determine the general amplitude.
• Show Track Scale in dB: When enabled, the amplitude scale is shown in dBFS, or
dB full scale referenced to a “full” 24 bit AES/EBU data word. When off, the Panel’s
amplitude scale is shown as a non–dimensional, normalized value ranging from 0 to
±1, equating to digital silence or full scale, respectively.
• Scroll Mouse Down: Takes advantage of your mouse scroll wheel. When selected,
downward scrolling moves are respected. When deselected, downward scrolling
moves upward.
7.9.5.9
Playing Auto Tools
The Playing Auto Tools section has the following settings:
Page 104
• AutoScroll Playhead: When selected, the Playhead will move as normal until it
reaches the right edge of the waveform display. Then, the Move Forward command
automatically takes place, moving the waveform view to the right.
• AutoScroll Track: When selected, the Playhead stays centered in the waveform display
while the underlying waveform display continuously scrolls.
7.9.6 The Help Menu
The Help Menu. Selecting Amarra Vinyl Help opens a Help Window that displays
Amarra Vinyl topics of interest.
Page 105
Chapter 8.......................NoNOISE II: DeClick & DeCrackle
Sonic Studios’ NoNOISE II is the world’s premier tool for restoring vintage and problematic
audio recordings. Amarra Vinyl offers two options that are part of the larger NoNOISE II family.
The DeClick option precisely removes scratches impulse noise, analog or digital overloads,
harmonic and intermodulation distortion. The DeCrackle option removes the noise associated
with the surface noise on a Vinyl record or general distortion.
NoteThe Amarra Vinyl restoration tool set includes the Manual DeClick tool, DeCrackle
tool, Sonic EQ and a high-quality Sample Rate Conversion utility.
Note DeClick first and DeCrackle last.
Important Note the DeClick and DeCrackle interpolations are destructive in nature.
This means that the file that these interpolations are applied to are altered from their
original state. It is important that your make a duplicate of any file that will have the
interpolations listed below applied to them. Simply find the file in the Finder, select it
and hit Cmd+D.
8.2.3
Basic Manual DeClick & DeCrackle
The Amarra Vinyl version of NoNoise II option provides a smart tool for isolating and removing
individual transient impairments in a sound file. Manual DeClick assists in removing unwanted
noises such as clicks, pops and thumps. The algorithm analyze audio on either side of the
anomaly and, based on this information, synthesizes replacement samples. Manual DeClicking
substitutes the repaired samples for the original program material.
Amarra Vinyl also includes a entry level version of DeCrackle, an algorithm that reduces surface
noise on mechanical recordings, and distortion in any sound file.
Note that Manual DeClick processes generate two new files for each sound file that
is repaired. These “.cd” and “.rl” files contain the samples removed during repair and a
list of their locations, respectively. If you move or delete either of these files, you will
not be able to restore the original samples, undoing the repair.
Manual DeClick is generally used, on very short duration regions; 14 msec. or less.
The DeCrackler can process an unlimited amount of material.
Page 106
8.2.3.1 Interpolation Algorithms
There are two interpolators that are available in Amarra Vinyl. Each is suited to a particular type
of audio problem and context.
8.2.3.2The DeClicker
The DeClick feature in Amarra Vinyl has three useful repair tools:
Pitched DeClick
General DeClick
DeClick for small clicks or ticks
The DeClicker is a general purpose algorithm. The majority of de-clicking situations can be
handled by simply choosing this option.
The DeClicker examines the audio on either side of the selection to determine the context for
resynthesizing audio to fill the gap.
Here’s an example:
Page 107
The original material
A “repair,” using the DeClicker
8.2.3.3The DeCrackler
The DeCrackler,is quite different from the Declicker. It is designed to reduce all kinds of distortion
and, unlike the DeClicker, is implemented so it can be applied to passages of unlimited duration.
You may have to wait a while for your result but, it is worth it. The DeCrackler is capable of
reducing distortion, including offensive, harsh sounding material. Its micro–repairs leave the
audio sounding better without resorting to low pass filtering.
The DeCrackler’s micro–repairs
8.2.3.4Using DeClick and DeCrackle
Either channel of a stereo pair can be operated on, the repair will be performed on both. Either
DeClick algorithm can perform stereo or mono repairs.
Page 108
Using the Waveform display and playback, identify the location of an impairment. Zoom in until you can
clearly see the impairment.
1. Place an Edit Point over the click or crackle. Click on the appropriate button to repair.
2.Click–drag in the Panel to create a time region selection that fully contains the damaged
samples. Click on the appropriate button to repair.
3.Click–drag in the Panel to create a time region selection that fully contains the damaged
samples. Control + click to reveal a contextual menu with restoration options for your
selection:
Contextual Menu showing restoration options.
On selection of a repair tool, Amarra Vinyl replaces the compromised audio with repaired
samples. Don’t worry about selecting on zero crossing boundaries, the software’s intelligence
will provide a seamless transition. However, do be aware that very low frequency artifacts may
be present after a click and, they will not be obviously visible in the waveform. If you find that
the DeClicker “leaves behind” some low frequency noise after a click has been removed, then
Restore the click back to its original state, then select more time after the visual end of the click
and repair again.
The DeCrackler is able to intelligently identify distortion on a very small time scale. Don’t be
surprised to find “micro–repairs” within your time region selection.
8.2.3.5
Restoring Clicks
First, make sure the NoNoise II > Show Interpolations option is checked. Any existing
“interpolation” or repair will appear marked with a horizontal red line, the “Restore Bar,” over
the samples that have been altered.
1.To remove an existing repair, zoom in on the waveform and locate the red Restore Bar.
2. Click–drag in the Panel to select a region that contains only the Restore Bar you wish
to undo.
Page 109
3. From the NoNOISE menu, choose Restore Click.
NoNOISE replaces the repaired audio with the original samples containing the defect.
Page 110
Chapter 9............................................... Broadband DeNoise
Broadband DeNoise (BBDN) is the highest fidelity single–ended noise reducer available today and
can rescue both old and new recordings alike. Broadband noise, whether white, pink or brown
in spectrum, is one of the most common forms of audio degradation. Noise can be introduced
from any of a number of sources, including the modulation and asperity noise inherent in analog
tape recording and Johnson or thermal noise from microphones, preamps, and other analog
signal processing equipment. BBDN is a single ended broadband noise reducer that, unlike less
refined products, can suppress or eliminate broadband noise with little or no audible artifacts,
even at extreme settings.
BBDN is an updated and improved version of the legendary restoration technology from Sonic
Solutions. The Grammy® award winning NoNOISE technology set the standard by which all
other restoration toolsets are judged. And, because BBDN is built on the Sonic Studio Engine,
you can be certain that the processing is double-precision resulting in less quantization noise,
no timbral shifts and dramatically lower distortion and artifacts.
9.1Overview
BBDN is designed to address audio contamination from broadband or wide-band noise sources.
Whether the problems are electrical or acoustical, BBDN can vastly improve perceived fidelity
and provide a quiet, more uniform noise floor to your recordings without objectionable artifacts
or any shift in timbre or room tone.
BBDN is effective on these and other types of noise:
• Modulation and asperity noise on analog magnetic recordings
• Obtrusive grain–induced noise in optical motion picture soundtracks
• Johnson-Nyquist noise in analog signal chains
• Acoustical noises from engines, HVAC units, wind, water, insects & other sources
Page 111
• Colorless suppression of excessive reverberation
Noise removal is easy:
1) Define small sample of noise - generally 1/2 second is good. Set Amarra
Vinyl to play a second or two before the noise by clicking once and setting the
Edit Point before the noise sample.
2) Play the file and press the Take Est button during the section you defined as
noise. Save the estimate that appears by clicking the Save Est button
3) Adjust the Thresh (Threshold) and Atten (Attenuation or reduction) sliders to
taste. Use the NoNoise In/Out button to compare processed vs. original.
4) You will need to export or ‘bounce’ your files to apply BBDN processing to
a finished file. Note that BBDN is a non-destructive process. It does not alter
your original files.
LEARN The operation of the Broadband DeNoise is a subjective process –
there is no single ‘correct’ setting – only your hearing can decide. In general
though, if too much program is present in the suppressed signal, then you are
probably using Threshold or Attenuation settings that are too aggressive. Also,
it’s fairly easy to misinterpret noise as high frequency content so, critical listening
with a wide-band speaker system or quality headphones are required for proper
operation.
9.2The Noise Estimate
The first step in denoising is to derive a Noise Estimate from the material to be processed. The
Noise Estimate, or simply Estimate, is an individual “fingerprint” of the noise and determines
local threshold values for each frequency bin. The BBDN user interface provides a group of
commands for creating, processing, editing and storing the Estimate. The Estimate determines
the result of the entire denoising process, so it is important to ensure that the estimate taken is
valid and represents the true noise floor of the source sound file.
9.2.1
Noise Estimates
The procedure for taking a usable Estimate has several steps. First, open the source sound file
into either soundBlade or your audio software, then open the BBDN plug-in. Next, identify a
short section of audio where there is only noise or predominantly noise. About 0.3 to 0.5 seconds
is sufficient. Set the playback cursor to a few seconds before the section you’ve identified as
noise. Start playback, and as the play head move over the noise segment, press the Take button
once. That action automatically interpolates the Estimate, applying “Bin Controls,” which are
individual threshold controls for separate regions of the frequency spectrum, and writes that
Estimate into the Estimate Window. Section 1.2.2.2 below discusses where to take a Estimate
in detail.
Page 112
9.2.3
Where to take an Estimate
Once the source sound file is opened into your audio app., the first step is to identify a suitable
location from which to take the Estimate. Since the denoising algorithm depends on a constant
amplitude and spectrum in the noise floor, try to listen and locate a time region with uniform
noise. As to duration, optimum results are obtained when the Estimate is taken from a section
of pure noise between about 0.3 and 0.5 seconds in length, with a worst case minimum of 100
milliseconds.
Where To Take A Noise Estimate. Press Take Est button during playback.
If a region of pure or “clean” noise, noise uncontaminated with program, is unavailable as is
often the case with tightly edited material, then choose a region with minimal program. The
resulting Estimate will require manual adjustment as discussed below. If an Estimate must
be taken in presence of signal, it is advisable to avoid sections of spectrally complex or non–
harmonic material as it makes manual adjustment more time consuming.
Note BBDN is a non-destructive process. It does not alter your original files..
Page 113
9.3
User Interface Overview
9.3.1
Take Est [1]
[1] Clicking the Take button samples the audio that’s playing and creates a noise Estimate. A
Mac Finder window opens and asks where to save the Estimate file. We suggest saving the
Estimate within the Project folder for this record.
9.3.2
Open Est [2]
[2] The Open button displays a Mac Open File dialog allowing you to select previously-saved
Estimate files. Choose the Estimate file you want to open and click OK.
9.3.3
NoNoise [3]
[3] The NoNoise button toggles the BBDN processing to a solo mode where only the noise
being removed is heard (Red= solo mode). Soloing just the noise is useful for adjusting DeNoise
parameters.
9.3.4
Bypass [4]
[3] The NoNoise button toggles the BBDN processing to a solo mode where only the noise
being removed is heard (Red= solo mode). Soloing just the noise is useful for adjusting DeNoise
parameters.
9.4
DeNoise Window Parameters
9.4.1
Thresh (Threshold [5]
Together with the [6] Atten (Attenuation) parameter, the Threshold parameter provides the basic
control over how aggressively the process is applied.
Page 114
As Threshold is raised, more of the signal at all frequencies is processed. At extremely high
settings, a distinctive watery aliasing may be heard in the resulting audio. If the Threshold is set
too low, little or no noise reduction is obtained. The Threshold can be thought of as the fine line
between noise and music, globally raising or lowering it relative to its original position.
The default Threshold is arbitrary. Threshold and Attenuation settings should generally be
adjusted together for best results. The [3] Noise/NoNOISE button can help to determine an
acceptable compromise setting.
9.4.2
Atten (Attenuation) [6]
This value, in decibels, sets the maximum attenuation to be applied. A setting of 0 produces no
noise reduction. The higher or more negative this value is set, the greater the reduction in noise,
but with increasing danger of producing audible artifacts in the audio signal. Again, Threshold
and Attenuation settings should be adjusted together for best results. Critical listening and use
of the Noise/NoNOISE button can help to determine an acceptable compromise setting. If the
maximum attenuation setting is too extreme, ambience and/or high frequency content may be
lost.
Page 115
Chapter 10................................................................. Sonic EQ
The Sonic EQ option provides seventeen different types of filtering, with some best used for
restoration and damage control while other are excellent for changing color or timbre. The EQ is
available in two forms, either as a EQ function in its own window or, as a plug–in for the Project,
Desk or Master Section.
10.1 Sonic EQ Pre–processor
10.1.1Overview
The first instance of Sonic EQ processing to be discussed is the separate Sonic EQ form, in a
stand alone window. As shown in figure 6.1, the processing for this form appears very early in
the signal path, just after segment and fade gain, and before plug–ins and the gain overlay. It can
be thought of as pre-processing for your Project. A Project must be open to use this form since
it is intimately associated with the Project.
10.1.2Operation
To start the separate Sonic EQ form, select the Sonic EQ command from the Windows menu. You
may open a Projects either before or after you open Sonic EQ but you must have a Project open
for the pre–processor to work. The name of the Project will appear in the Title Bar of the Sonic
EQ window.
Page 116
Sonic EQ pre–Processor form
10.1.2.1
Open & Saving Parameters
At upper left are the Open Param and Save Param buttons. These allow you to save and recall
parameters or settings, and function by via a standard Mac OS file browser mechanism.
10.1.2.2
Track Menu
The Track menu switches the user interface for each Panel and its track in the current EDL. As you
select a Panel in the Project, its track number will show in that menu so, if you have an 8 Panel/
track EDL, then that menu will show 1 through 8. Notice that the window’s Title Bar shows the
Track number and EDL number in parenthesis next to the Project name, to remind you of which
track in which EDL you are controlling.
10.1.2.3
Sections
Each track can have up to four sections of EQ assigned to it. Sections appear in the central section
of the window. Each section has a Type menu that lets you assign a filter topology, parametric,
shelf, etc., as discussed in section 10.1.2.6 below.
To the right of the Type menu is a parameter call out field that shows the current settings and,
to the right of that is the Group menu. Clicking on the Type menu, the call out field or the Group
menu selects the respective section.
Page 117
10.1.2.4
Group Menu
The Group menu lets you group or link sections together. This allows you to apply the same
processing to more than one track without recreating redundant settings…Say you want a 1st
order Parametric across 6 tracks in an EDL. Set up the parametric in the top section, then assign
it to Group A. Then using the Track menu, go through all the other tracks, and assign their top
sections to Group A as well. The settings for your 1st order parametric will appear for all tracks
and, if you change any member of the Group, all the other members of the group will update
accordingly.
10.1.2.5
Bypass
To the right of the Track menu and all sections are Bypass buttons. As expected, they disable or
bypass processing. The Bypass button to the right of the Track menu is global and bypasses the
entire EQ. The individual Bypass buttons, to the right of each section, are local and apply only to
that Panel/track and that section.
10.1.2.6
Parameters
The bottom half of the Sonic EQ window contains the parametric controls. The controls are
context–sensitive and apply to the selected filter section.
Available filter types are:
• 1st -4th Order Parametric
• High & Low Shelf
• High & Low Pass
• Bandpass
• Bandstop
• Notch
• RIAA Emphasis and De–emphasis
• AES/EBU Emphasis and De–emphasis
• DC Removal
• DC Removal & AES/EBU De–emphasis
The parametric filters are classic, three parameter versions, with Resonant Frequency, gain, and
Q. Q or Quality Factor is defined as the resonant frequency, or center frequency in the case of a
symmetrical filter, divided by the bandwidth. The bandwidth is, in turn, defined as the one or two
frequencies at which the filter response is 3 dB up or down from unity gain.
Expressing the width of a filter as a Quality Factor, rather than bandwidth, provides a more
intuitive sense of the filter’s subjective “sound,” since the same value of Q will produce different
bandwidths at different frequencies. The higher the frequency, the wider the bandwidth will be
for a given Q value, which roughly corresponds to our auditory mechanism’s ability to perceive
a filter’s action. As an example, a parametric filter with a Q of 1 has a bandwidth of 100 Hz when
Page 118
its center frequency is set to 100 Hz but, it has a bandwidth of 1000 Hz when the center frequency
is set to 1000 Hz.
The order or slope of the filter is controllable, with 1st through 4th order or 6 to 24 dB per octave
slope, respectively. Each of the four orders are separate menu choices. The family of curves
shown below include a wide Q of 0.5, a medium Q of 2.0 and a narrow Q of 10.
1st order parametric with ƒR of 1000 Hz
2nd order parametric with ƒR of 1000 Hz
Page 119
3rd order parametric with ƒR of 1000 Hz
4th order parametric with ƒR of 1000 Hz
The high and low shelves are also three parameter filters, with Resonant Frequency, gain,
and order. The family of curves below include 1st through 4th order. The 4th order response is
practically vertical in the transition region.
Page 120
High shelf with ƒR of 1000 Hz
The high and low pass filters also have three parameters. However, in this case stopband ripple,
labeled Stop, has taken the place of gain. As with the shelving filter above, the family of curves
below include 1st through 4th order.
High pass with ƒR of 1000 Hz
Stopband ripple describes the amount of amplitude variation or ripple in a filter’s out of band
response. Indirectly, it describes two more important parameters. One is out of band suppression
Page 121
or, how much “leakage” of unwanted signal you receive, and the other is phase shift and group
delay.
The stopband ripple parameter provides a range of -12 to -108. At the -12 setting, only 12 dB
of loss will occur out of band, no much for a filter of this type. However, because the stopband
ripple value is so low, the phase response and resultant temporal response of the filter will
be excellent. At the other extreme of its range, stopband ripple will be 108 dB down from the
(unity) passband gain but, the phase response will suffer, the group delay will be severe and
the resulting temporal smearing may be unacceptable. As with any filter, careful listening will
determine the trade-off between stopband suppression and side effects.
Figure 10.8 below shows an typical 3rd order high pass filter. Superimposed on that curve is
another 3rd order high pass with 6 dB of passband ripple & 120 dB of stopband attenuation. Notice
the rippling “bouncing ball” amplitude response in the region above the resonant frequency.
This passband ripple would create some possibly undesirable amplitude effects but, because the
ripple spec has been relaxed, the phase response would be improved.
3rd order high pass with 6 dB of passband ripple & 120 dB of attenuation
Compare the response in figure 10.8 with the next figure, which shows a 3rd order high pass
with 0.10 dB of passband ripple & 10 dB of stopband attenuation. This time, the stopband ripple
would allow some material below the resonant frequency to “leak” into the filter’s output. Again
however, because the ripple spec has been relaxed, the phase response would be improved.
Page 122
3rd order high pass with 0.1 dB of passband ripple & 10 dB of attenuation
The bandpass and band stop filters are straightforward, three parameter forms, and the notch
filter has only two parameters as the gain is implied to be -∞. The next two figures once again
include quality factors (Q) of 0.5, 2 and 10.
1st order bandpass with ƒR of 1000 Hz
Page 123
3rd order bandpass with ƒR of 1000 Hz
Notch filter with ƒR of 1000 Hz
The RIAA filters provide emphasis, for creating cutting masters for lacquer, and de–emphasis for
correcting material that is digitized flat from 33 1/3 RPM phonograph record.This approach means
that the excellent, minimal phase characteristics of this digital RIAA de–emphasis implementation
can be used in place of an imprecise and potentially colored analog filter network in a phono
preamplifier.
Page 124
: RIAA de–emphasis
The “Emph” and “DeEmph” selection are for 44.1 kHz AES/EBU audio. The de–emphasis type
is quite useful when archival material was emphasized during recording but the Emphasis flag
was not set.
The No DC type is a special form of high pass filter designed for archival recordings made with
EIAJ adapters, so called “F1” recorders, which were short lived consumer digital audio recorders
manufactured by Sony, Matsushita and others. They employed very simple, low cost converters
and often injected a large amount of DC offset into the signal to overcome crossover distortion.
This filter will remove that DC offset. Lastly, the “NoDC/DeEmp” type is, again, a special filter for
recordings made with an EIAJ adapter that both removes DC offset and applies de–emphasis.
Page 125
DC reject plus RIAA de–emphasis, the “NoDC/DeEmp”
In the plug–in menu, two versions are available. One is monaural while the other, SonicEQ(S), is
stereo. Otherwise, the controls and parameters are the same as the pre–processor form discussed
in section 10.1 above, with one exception. The plug–in version has an added convenience feature.
Tip: When adjusting controls with the sliders, hold down the shift key reduces the scaling and
provides greater control.
Page 126
Appendix 1........................Best Practices & Maintenance
A1.1Introduction
Although versatile in many ways, not every function that Amarra Vinyl offers is the best way
of structuring your recording and restoration workflow. Some solutions are better than others,
either for quality reasons or other reasons beyond the scope of this manual. In this appendix,
we’d like to provide some guidelines in order to get the best out your software and establish a
smooth and efficient production flow.
A1.2 Source Material Considerations
Amarra Vinyl handles a variety of source file formats and sample rates. It is therefore very
tempting to ‘grab’ what you need and add it to your Project. But that may not be the best
solution.
Important Note It’s a good practice to prepare all source material needed
before moving forward with sequencing, editing and finishing. By organizing your
source material and storing all relevant data in the same directory, your projects will
be highly portable, easy to archive and you’ll avoid situations where files have “gone
missing” from a job because they were not included in the Project subfolder. See the
figure below as an example.
The Anatomy Of An Amarra Vinyl Project.
A few words about dither: If you make any changes to your recorded audio such as gain,
EQ, NoNOISE or adding a fade, you will need to use the dither feature in Amarra Vinyl when
exporting your files for best results. Because the audio data is being modified, it must also be
redithered or subtly randomized with an injection of tiny amounts of “shaped” noise in order to
Page 127
prevent distortion. In the Window> Preferences > Delivery pane, you will find that Amarra Vinyl
has a default preference to always redither the data when exporting or when simply playing
back audio. Redithering at 16 or 24 bits is always a trade off between lower distortion and a
slightly but audibly elevated noise floor. Amarra Vinyl uses an exclusive, spectrally shaped “2nd
order” or triangular PDF redithering scheme. PDF or Probability Density Function describes the
amplitude versus frequency plot of the dither generator. Our shaped dither is an excellent trade
off between audibility and optimal linearity.
A1.3
Naming Conventions
1.Do not use audio files with the same file name within a Project. Rename beforehand,
where necessary, with a descriptive name for later ease of archiving, restoration and
project interchange.
2.The P&E wing of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences has
published recommendation for naming conventions and other workflow methods
to improve project interchange and archiving. See section A4.1 below…
LEARN: As a general practice, before importing then into soundBlade, make
sure your soundfile names are less than 27 spaces long before file type suffix.
You may need to rename them, removing extra characters, in the Finder prior to
importing them into the soundBlade environment.
For example:
01 Copland_Fanfare_For_The_Common_Man.aiff
should be renamed to
01 Copland_Fanfare.aiff
You can always rename files to their proper titles in the Finder, prior to final
delivery, after exporting or in the Mark Info window for CDTEXT.
A1.4 Hardware Considerations & Routine Maintenance
In this day and age of a BSD–based operating system and a journaling, self healing file system,
it still is incumbent upon the cautious and wise engineer to perform routine maintenance on any
host computers. Here are some tips we recommend…
File Systems
If you own a copy of DiskWarrior <www.alsoft.com>, run it monthly or when you host behaves
strangely. If you don’t own a copy, you should. Periodic maintenance is still needed with OS 10
and there is no better file system maintenance utility than DiskWarrior.
Storage Systems
Amarra Vinyl is fully compliant with Mac OS 10.5.8 and higher. Therefore, sound material can
be used from any drive that your computer can access. This includes network–attached and
Page 128
removable drives as well near–line optical drives.That said, not all mountable storage devices are
suitable for reliable real-time or higher speed reads and writes of sound files. Always run Amarra
Vinyl from the boot volume. Always store all files involved in your jobs on direct-attached, local
volumes: internal ATA, FireWire, Thunderbolt, FC, SATA or SAS are acceptable. USB-attached
storage peripherals of any kind should never be used. Also, disks must have more than enough
free space, to store, record and playback all of your sound files.
1.Although you may find it will actually work, never use LAN or WAN–networked, flexible
media or optical drives to record or playback sound files due to their excessive latency.
Always copy files from those storage types to a dedicated, local, direct–attached hard
disk or FC–networked storage (Fibre Channel) first, then use that disk for all Amarra
Vinyl work.
2.When creating, copying or moving files, consider the file name and path name. Use
short path names and employ only alphanumeric characters. The only non-alphanumeric
characters that should be used are the hyphen ( - ) and underscore ( _ ) characters.
Other characters, such as !, @, #, $, %, ^, &, *, {, }, |, [, ], \ and / will very likely cause
problems in your work.
Permissions
Check that you have read and write permissions for the entire application package. Holding
down the control key and highlighting the application will spawn a contextual menu with the
choice to “Show Package Contents.” Showing the package contents allows you to set yourself as
read/write, the group should be “admin,” also with read/write privileges.
You should also boot from the Apple-supplied install disc that came with your computer. Run
the Disk Utility application and perform a Repair Permissions pass on your host. This is a routine
maintenance task that, along with DiskWarrior, should be run about once a month.
3rd Party Configuration Management
As with OS 9, OS 10 employs “extensions” to the operating system that extend and sometimes
complicate your life. Mac OS 9 had the Extensions Manager but, OS 10 does not ship with such
a utility.
Fortunately, several vendors provide shareware or freeware versions of an Extensions Manager
equivalent for OS 10. One is White Box’s free Diablotin, available from <http://s.sudre.free.fr/>
and the other is Teng Chou Ming & Scott Mitchell’s X Overload2, a shareware utility available
from <http://www.xoverload.com/>. Neither of these products can manage audio plug–ins.
A1.5
Apple’s Spotlight Utility
We have found that on certain OS X systems, Apple’s Spotlight can seriously affect not only
soundBlade and Amarra Vinyl’s performance, but other audio applications as well. We recommend
Page 129
disabling Spotlight as a step to resolving problems related to sound skipping on playback, record,
export and DDP/CDR delivery.
To turn off Spotlight for a specific folder, volume or drive:
• From the Apple menu in the top left corner of your screen, select System Preferences...
• In the Personal section, select Spotlight, then select the Privacy tab.
• Click the + button in the lower left corner and select the folder, volume or drive to be
excluded.
• You can also drag the desired item to the list.
Start by preventing Spotlight from searching these locations:
• Your Home Folder
• Your internal or external audio drives
• Any back up drives connected
While disabling Spotlight completely on your Home Folder is an effective step in troubleshooting
it may not be the best permanent solution for some users. There is an excellent article from the
folks at tekreview.com with more specific instructions on troubleshooting Spotlight:
http://www.tekrevue.com/tip/three-ways-to-prevent-spotlight-from-indexingitems-on-your-mac/
For OS 10.6 and later this text can be typed into the Terminal Application: sudo mdutil -a -i off
Page 130
Appendix 2............................................ Keyboard Shortcuts
Windows Shortcuts
Meters / Desk
Console Log
Preferences
command + 1
command + 4
command + comma (,)
File & Project Shortcuts
New Project
Open Project
Save Project
Close Window
Open Sound File
Quit (application)
command + N
command + O
command + S
command + W
shift + command + O
command + Q
Playback Shortcuts
Stop/Start Playback from Edit Point
Play Selection
Play from Playhead
Repeat Play
Hide Playhead When Stopped
spacebar
command + spacebar
option + spacebar
command + option + spacebar
option + P
Editing Shortcuts
Undo last Edit
Redo last Undo
Select All
Deselect All
Cut
Copy
Paste (Replace)
Paste (Insert)
Paste (Constrained)
Paste (Overlay)
Select All
Page 131
command + Z
command + shift + Z
command + A
command + D
command + X
command + C
command + V
command + option + V
command + shift + V
option + V
command + A
Deselect All
command + D
Delete Selection
delete (backspace)
Clear Selection
option + delete (backspace)
Create Crossfade
control + G
Create Crossfade from In/In & Out Point
control + option + G
Nudge Selected Segment(s)
plus or minus (+ or -, numeric keypad)
Find & Set Points
command + backslash (\)
Set SRP
command + semicolon (;)
Set SRP with Text
F12
Clear Selected SRPs
control + semicolon (;)
Drop Edit Point
backslash (\)
Edit Point to Playhead
option + command + backslash (\)
Move Edit Point to Next Track Mark
shift + F6
Move Edit Point to Previous Track Mark
shift + command + F6
Move Edit Point to Next Segment Edit Point
shift + F5
Move Edit Point to Previous Segment Edit Pointshift + command + F5
Move Edit Point To In/Out Point
shift + F7
Move Edit Point to Next SRP
shift + F10
Move Edit Point to Previous SRP
shift + command + F10
Select Start to Edit Point
option + hyphen (-)
Select Edit Point to End
option + equals (=)
Select Segments to End
shift + command + right arrow
Select Segments To Start
shift + command + left arrow
Select between SRPs
double click at bottom of waveform display
Change Crossfade duration
shift + click/drag with Crossfade Tool
Viewing Shortcuts
Show Text View
Show Gain Overlay
Refresh
Standard Track Size
Large Track Size
Move Forward
Move Forward/Backward
Move Backward
Zoom In
Zoom Out
Zoom In Around In Point
Page 132
option + T
option + G
command + R
option + 5
option + 6
right arrow
command + option + control + click/drag on waveform
left arrow
down arrow
up arrow
command + arrow left
Zoom Around Out Point
Zoom Around Edit Point
Zoom Out Around Edit Point
Zoom In Around Playhead
Zoom Out Around Playhead
Zoom to Previous
Zoom to Next
Zoom to Selection
Zoom to Selection
Zoom to Entire EDL
Zoom to (Time Line) Selection
Zoom to Waveform selection
command + arrow right
command + arrow down
command + arrow up
option + arrow down
option + arrow up
command + P
command + option + P
command + G
command + option + click/drag on waveform
command + E
command + click/drag right on time line
command + option + click/drag on waveform
Track Prep
Create Track Start Mark
Create Track End Mark
Delete Mark(s)
F9
F10
command + F12
System
Preferences
Select Nudge Size A
Select Nudge Size B
Select Nudge Size C
Page 133
command + comma
control + 1
control + 2
control + 3
Appendix 3...............................................Contextual Menus
Control–Click...
In the Waveform —
With a selection active, or on the selection’s Drag Bar:
With a segment selected:
Page 134
With Gain Overlay on —
On a Gain Node:
Lock Gain Node — locks the selected Gain Node(s)
Unlock Gain Node — unlocks the selected Gain Node(s)
Delete Nodes From Selection — deletes all nodes within the current selection
Lock Nodes from Selection — locks all nodes within the current selection
Unlock Nodes from Selection — unlocks all nodes within the current selection
Lock All Nodes in Track — locks all nodes in the Panel
Unlock All Nodes in Track — unlocks all nodes in the Panel
In the Track Bar —
Hovering over a Track Start, End or Index Mark:
Track Mark Locked — locks the selected Track Mark
Track Mark Unlocked — unlocks the selected Track Mark
Lock marks From Selection — locks all Track Marks in a selected region or segment(s)
Unlock marks From Selection — unlocks all Track Marks in a selected region or segment(s)
Lock All Marks — locks all Track marks in a track
Unlock All Marks — unlocks all Track marks in a track
Set Emphasis — sets emphasis flag for the selected Track Mark
Reset Emphasis flag — resets emphasis flag for the selected Track mark
Delete Mark — deletes selected Track mark
In the waveform display —
Hovering over a fade-in, fade-out or crossfade with Fade Tool enabled:
Linear — set the fade curve to be 6dB down in the center of the fade
Root-linear — set the fade curve to be 6dB down in the center of the fade
Cosine — default 3 dB down in the center
Root Cosine — default 6 dB down in the center
Exponential — provides very rapid reduction in gain across the fade
Set Fade to Fade In/Out/Crossfade — change the fade type to one of the default fade types
Set Fade To Selection — Sets the fade duration to match the current selection
Set Fade To Default Fade In/Out/Crossfade — changes all fade parameters to the Default Fade’s characteristics
On a Track mark —
Hovering over a mark:
Page 135
Move Edit Point To Mark — Moves Edit Point to this mark
Lock Mark — Locks this mark
UnLock Mark — Unlocks this mark
Lock Marks From Selection — Locks these marks
UnLock Marks From Selection — Unlocks these marks
Lock All Marks — Locks all marks
UnLock All Marks — Unlocks all marks
Set Emphasis — Sets the emphasis bit for this mark
Reset Emphasis — Disables the emphasis bit for this mark
Delete Mark — Deletes this mark
Page 136
Note that, for the PDF version of this Index, only the page numbers, not the preceding
descriptive subject text, are hyperlinked.
Amarra Vinyl 2.2 User Manual Index
A
Absolute 55
AIFF 35, 60, 96, 98
AIFF export 44
Analog Black Threshold 101
Analog Black To Marks 46, 88
Around Selection Center 84, 85
Audio MIDI Setup 60, 61, 62, 63, 65
Audio MIDI Setup… 74
AutoSpace All Segments 51, 80
AutoSpacing 53
AutoSpacing Duration 101
Auto Space All Segments 80
B
Background Waveforms 104
BBDN 29, 111, 112, 113, 114
Bin Controls 112
Broadband DeNoise 10, 111
BWF 31, 35, 60, 63, 96, 98
Bypass/Activate Gain Overlay 81
B Type 107
C
CAF 21, 24, 96, 97, 98
CD-R delivery 20
CD-R delivery 26
changing Fade parameters 48
changing Fade shape 49
changing Fade type 50
Clear Selected SRPs 91
Clear Selection 78
clocking 34, 74
Close Window 73
Page 137
combo Text+Waveform Project 53
Console Log 74
Copy 77
cosine Fades 50
Create Crossfade 78
Create Crossfade from In Point 78
Create Gain Nodes 82
Create Segment 78
Create Segment from In & Out Points 78
crossfade 50
Crossfades 43
deleting 79
Cut 77
D
DDP
file sets
opening 34, 35
DeClick 10, 26, 28, 33, 106, 108
DeCrackle 10, 23, 26, 29, 30, 33, 106
Default Fade 101
default Project 74
Delete Crossfade 79
Delete Mark 87
Delete Selection 77, 78
deleting part of a sound file 43
DeNoise 10, 29, 30, 111
dim 69
DiskWarrior 128
Display Auto Tools 104
dither
2nd order 128
PDF 128
triangular 128
Drag-Insert & Ripple 53
Drag-Overlay 53
Drag-Replace 53
drag & drop 51
ReSequence 51
Drag Bar 52
Drop Edit Point at Playhead 91
Dual EDL Mode 58
Page 138
E
Edit after Export 97
Edited Black to Marks 89
Edited Black to Start Marks 89
editing 78
Auto Space All Segments 80
Auto Tool Override 80
Clear Selection 78
Create Crossfade 78
Create Segment 78
Create Segment from In & Out Points 78
Crossfades 43
Delete Selection 78
deleting 43
Drag-Insert & Ripple 53
Drag-Overlay 53
Drag-Replace 53
drag & drop 51
Edit Point
placing & moving 91
Fade Tool 41
ReSequence 51
selecting Regions 39
selecting Segments 40
Editing Auto Tools 101
Editing Auto Tool Override 80
Editing Tools preferences 100
edit event 48, 50
Edit menu 76
Edit Points 56
Move Edit Point to submenu 91
moving 91
placing 91
Edit Point to Next Peak 92
Edit Point to Playhead 91
Edit Recording 66
Edit Segment Name 80
Edit with Audio 101
EDL 66
dual EDL mode 58
EDL menu 81
EDL preferences 103
Page 139
Estimate 112, 113, 114
exponential Fades 50
exporting audio
Edit after Export 97
Exporting Audio
Selections & Segments 44
E Type 108
F
Fades 42
edit events 48, 50
shape
changing 49
gain laws 50
Fade Tool 41, 48, 101
changing parameters 48
changing the shape 49
changing the type 50
File menu 72
file systems 128
G
Gain 54
Absolute 55
changing multiple segments 56
Normalize 55
Relative 55
Segment Gain 79
Gain Adjustment 54
Gain Nodes
creating 82
locking & unlocking 58
selecting 82
Gain Overlay 56, 96, 98
Bypass/Activate 81
Show/Hide 81
Gain Overlay Mode 56
General practice 128
H
Help 15, 105
HH:MM:SS:FF 38
Page 140
Hide Playhead When Stopped 87
hot spots 68
I
Import 5.4 EDL 74
importing
sound file types 31, 73
inserting PQ Marks
automatically 46
manually 45
installation 12
Interpolation 112
Interpolation Algorithms 107
iTunes 13, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25
L
linear Fades 50
Lock All Marks 88
Lock Gain Node 58
Lock Marks from Selection 88
M
M1-4 99
Mac OS 128
maintenance
DiskWarrior 128
file systems 128
permissions 129
storage systems 128
Marks
Analog Black to Marks 88
Delete Mark 87
Edited Black to Marks 89
Edited Black to Start Marks 89
End of Track 87, 89
locking Marks 88
Mark Info 87
Start of Track 45, 51, 89
unlocking Marks 88
Mark Info 87, 96
Mark menu 87
Master Section
Page 141
dim 69
hot spots 68
metadata
waveform 75
meters 96
Meters window 68
mono editing mode 96
Move Edit Point to submenu 91
Move Playhead 86
Move Segments 79
Move View mode 39
moving PQ Marks 45
N
New Project 72
Noise Estimate 112
NoNOISE 3 111, 112, 114
NoNOISE II
Bin Controls 112
Broadband DeNoise
parameters 114
Threshold 114
B Type 107
E Type 108
interpolation algorithms 107
noise Estimate 112
Normalize 55
Nudge Segment 79
O
Open 112
opening
sound files 35
split stereo files 35
Open Project 72
Open Recent 73
Open Sound File 73
P
Panels
Show/Hide Gain Overlay 81
Show/Hide Text 81
Page 142
standard/large size 82
Parameters 114
paste 77
permissions 129
playback 37
Around Selection Center 84, 85
From In Point 84
From Playhead 84
From Selection 83, 84, 85
Move Playhead 86
Repeat Play 84
Selection 84
Stop All 84
to End of Selection 85
to In Point 84
to Out Point 84
Playhead 37
hiding the Playhead when stopped 87
moving the Playhead 86
Playing Auto Tools 104
Play From In Point 84
Play From Playhead 84
Play From Selection 83
Play menu 83
Play Selection 84
Play to End of Selection 85
Play to In Point 84
Play to Out Point 84
PQ 35, 103
emphasis 88, 90
PQ Marks
Analog Black To Marks 46
inserting
automatically 46
manually 45
moving 45
removing 45
preferences
Display Auto Tools 104
Playing Auto Tools 104
View 103
Preferences Window 105
preferences
Page 143
Default Fade 101
Editing Auto Tools 101
Edit with Audio 101
Preferences Window 100
Preset 114
Preview 114
Process 114
Project
combo Text+Waveform 53
Projects
default 74
layout 32
new 72
open 34, 72
opening 34
Panel 10, 32, 37
sample rate 58
punch in 66
Q
Q
Quality Factor 118
Quality Factor 118
R
Recall 112
recording 60
Edit Recording 66
punch in 66
timed 67
Redo 77
Refresh 82
Relative 55
Remove Waveforms on Close 104
removing PQ Marks 45
Repeat Play 84
Replace 97
Rescan IO… 74
Resequence 51
Reverse Polarity 56, 79
root cosine Fades 50
root linear Fades 50
Page 144
S
Save 112
Save As Default Project 74, 75
Save Project 73
Save Project As... 73
Scrolling 38
Move View mode 39
SD2 35, 73
Segments
Auto-space 35
deleting 43
Move Segments 79
moving segments 80
Nudge Segment 79
nudging segments 80
Reverse Polarity 79
Segment Gain 54
segment gain 79
segment names 80
snapping 53
snap zone 52
Title Bar 41, 54
Segment Gain 79
Absolute 55
Normalize 55
relative 55
Reverse Polarity 56
Select/Deselect 77
Clear Selection 78
Delete Selection 77
selecting a Region 39
selecting Segments 40, 93
select Regions 93
Selections 39
zooming to selections 95
Selection from Selected Segments 92
Selection menu 90
Select Edit Point to End 92
Select Gain Nodes 82
Select Segments from Selection 93
Select Segment to End 92
Select Segment to Start 93
Page 145
Select Start to Edit Point 92
Sending a Crash Report 74
Series 300 DSP I/O Processors 60
Set File 97, 99
Set SRP 90
Set SRP from selection 91
Set SRP from selection 91
Show/Hide Gain Overlay 81
Show/Hide Text View 54, 81
Show Segment Names 104
Show Track Bar 51, 103
Snap to Edit Point ON 101
Snap To Zone 101
snap zone 52
Sonic EQ 116
Bypass 118
Group menu 118
Open Param 117
parameters 118
pre-processor 116
Q or Quality Factor 118
Save Param 117
sections 117
stopband ripple 121
Track Menu 117
sound files
importing 31
opening 31, 34, 73
split stereo 35
source material 127
source material considerations 127
split stereo files
opening 35
split stereo sound files 35
SRPs 72
clearing 91
setting 90, 91
SRP from Segment Edit Points 91
SRP from Selection 91
Standard/Large Track Size 82
Stop All 84
storage systems 128
Page 146
System Information
Console Log 74
T
Take 112, 113, 114
Text Mode
Gain 54
Show/Hide Text View 54, 81
Threshold 112, 114, 115
Thunderbolt 12
timed records 67
time code 38
time code address 38
time display 38
time line 32, 38, 39, 45
Title Bar 41, 54, 75, 97, 99
Track Bar 51, 103
Track End Mark 87
Track Start Mark 87
transport controls 33
triangular dither 128
U
Undo 76
Unlock All Marks 88
Unlock Gain Node 58
Unlock Marks from Selection 88
V
View
Background Waveforms 104
Remove Waveforms on Close 104
Show Segment Names 104
Zoom Factor 104
View menu 93
W
WAV 31, 35, 60, 73
waveforms 35, 38, 94, 104
refresh 82
scrolling 38
Page 147
zooming 39, 94, 95
Waveform Mode 81
Windows
Mark Info 96
Meters 96
Windows Menu 96
Z
Zoom Factor 104
zooming 39, 94, 95, 96
Zoom around Playhead 95
Zoom In/Out 94
Zoom In/Out around Edit Point 94
Zoom In/Out around Playhead 94
Zoom In Around In/Out Point 94
Zoom to Previous/Next 94
Zoom to Selection 95
Zoom to Selection Start/End 95
Page 148
© 2009- 2014 Sonic Studio, LLC • 1340 Mission Street • San Francisco CA 94103 • 1-415-944-7642
Amarra, Amarra HIfi, Amarra Vinyl, sonicstudio.com, the Sonic Studio logo and type are trademarks of Sonic Studio, LLC in the
United States and other countries. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to
their respective companies.
From all of us at Sonic Studio, we thank you for your support and encouragement. We would also like to thank all our
dedicated testers for their assistance in bringing this product to your studio…Thank you very much!
Comments, corrections and suggestions regarding this manual are always welcome.
Please contact us at <support@sonicstudio.com>.
AmarraVinyl22_UM_v01r04
Page 149