Rorke Data The Galaxy 65 Product specifications

Galaxy RAID
Model GHDX2-2430S-24F4D
24 bay FC-4G to SATA-II RAID Subsystem
Single Controller
Model GHDX2-2430R-24F4D
24 bay FC-4G to SATA-II RAID Subsystem
Dual Controller
Installation and Hardware
Reference Manual
Version 1007
Version 1.0 (08, 2005)
Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Contact Information
Americas
Rorke Data Inc
7626 Golden Triangle Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
USA
Tel: +1-800 328 8147
Fax: +1-952 829 0988
sales@rorke.com
techsupport@rorke.com
http://www.rorke.com
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Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Copyright 2007
This Edition First Published 2007
All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced, transmitted,
transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or
computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
magnetic, optical, chemical, manual or otherwise, without the prior written
consent of Rorke Data , Inc.
Disclaimer
Rorke Data makes no representations or warranties with respect to the contents
hereof and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or
fitness for any particular purpose. Furthermore, Rorke Data reserves the right to
revise this publication and to make changes from time to time in the content
hereof without obligation to notify any person of such revisions or changes.
Product specifications are also subject to change without prior notice.
Trademarks
Galaxy and the Galaxy logo are registered trademarks of Rorke Data , Inc.
PowerPC® is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation and
Motorola Inc.
Solaris and Java are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
All other names, brands, products or services are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective owners.
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Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Warnings and Certifications
Restricted Access Location:
This equipment is intended to be installed in a RESTRICTED ACCESS LOCATION only.
Electric Shock Warning!
To Prevent Electric Shock:
Access to this equipment is granted only to trained operators and service personnel who have
been instructed of and fully understand the possible hazardous conditions and the
consequences of accessing non-field-serviceable units. For example, accessing the backplane
may cause electric shock.
FCC (applies in the U.S. and Canada)
FCC Class A Note
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference,
and (2) this device may accept any interference received, including interference
that may cause undesired operation.
NOTE:
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class
A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed
to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to
cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the
interference at his own expense.
The changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible
for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
WARNING:
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Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Use only shielded cables to connect I/O devices to this equipment.
You are cautioned that changes or modifications not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void your authority to operate the
equipment.
This device is in conformity with the EMC.
CB
This device is in conformity with the CB safety specifications.
This device meets the requirements of the CB standard for electrical
equipment with regard to establishing a satisfactory level of safety for
persons using the device and for the area surrounding the apparatus.
This standard covers only safety aspects of the above apparatus; it does
not cover other matters, such as style or performance.
CCC for Power Supplies’ compatibility to China Compulsory Certification.
This device is in conformity with UL standards for safety.
ITE BSMI Class A, CNS 13438 (for Taiwan)
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Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
This device is in conformity with UL standards for safety.
RoHS 2002/96/EC compliant
WEEE Disposal of Old Electrical and Electronic Equipment
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Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
1.1. PRODUCT OVERVIEW ................................................................................................1-1
1.1.1
Product Introduction ........................................................................................1-1
1.1.2
Enclosure Chassis ............................................................................................1-2
1.1.2.1
1.1.2.2
1.1.2.3
1.1.2.4
1.1.2.5
1.1.2.6
Chassis Overview........................................................................................................... 1-2
Physical Dimensions ...................................................................................................... 1-3
Front Panel Overview .................................................................................................... 1-3
Hard Drive Numbering .................................................................................................. 1-4
Rear Panel Overview ..................................................................................................... 1-4
Back-plane Board........................................................................................................... 1-5
1.2. SUBSYSTEM COMPONENTS ........................................................................................1-5
1.2.1
LCD Panel........................................................................................................1-5
1.2.2
Drive Trays.......................................................................................................1-6
1.2.3
RAID Controller Modules ................................................................................1-6
1.2.4
Controller Module Interfaces ...........................................................................1-7
1.2.5
DIMM Modules ................................................................................................1-9
1.2.6
BBU ..................................................................................................................1-9
1.2.7
PSUs ...............................................................................................................1-10
1.2.8
Cooling Modules ............................................................................................1-11
1.3. SUBSYSTEM MONITORING .......................................................................................1-12
1.3.1
I2C bus ...........................................................................................................1-12
1.3.2
LED Indicators ...............................................................................................1-12
1.3.3
Firmware (FW) and RAIDWatch GUI ...........................................................1-13
1.3.4
Audible Alarms ...............................................................................................1-13
1.4. HOT-SWAPPABLE COMPONENTS ..............................................................................1-13
1.4.1
Hot-swap Capabilities ....................................................................................1-13
1.4.2
Components ....................................................................................................1-14
1.4.3
Normalized Airflow ........................................................................................1-14
CHAPTER 2 HARDWARE INSTALLATION
2.1. INSTALLATION OVERVIEW ...............................................................................2-1
2.2. INSTALLATION PRE-REQUISITES.....................................................................2-1
2.3. SAFETY PRECAUTIONS:......................................................................................2-2
2.3.1
Precautions and Instructions............................................................................2-2
2.3.2
Static-free Installation ......................................................................................2-3
2.4. GENERAL INSTALLATION PROCEDURE .........................................................2-3
2.4.1
Installation Procedure Flowchart ....................................................................2-4
2.5. UNPACKING THE SUBSYSTEM..........................................................................2-5
2.6. INSTALLATION OVERVIEW ...............................................................................2-5
2.6.1
Pre-installed Components ................................................................................2-5
2.6.2
Uninstalled Components ..................................................................................2-5
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Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2.7. INSTALLING THE OPTIONAL BBU ....................................................................2-6
2.7.1
BBU Installation Overview...............................................................................2-6
2.7.2
BBU Warnings and Precautions.......................................................................2-6
2.7.3
Installation Procedure......................................................................................2-7
2.8. HARD DRIVE INSTALLATION ............................................................................2-9
2.8.1
Hard Drive Installation Prerequisites ..............................................................2-9
2.8.2
SATA Drive Installation ...................................................................................2-9
2.9. DRIVE TRAY INSTALLATION ..........................................................................2-10
2.10. RACK/CABINET INSTALLATION.....................................................................2-12
CHAPTER 3 SUBSYSTEM MONITORING
3.1. SUBSYSTEM MONITORING OVERVIEW ......................................................................3-1
3.2. STATUS-INDICATING LEDS .......................................................................................3-2
3.2.1
Brief Overview of the LEDs..............................................................................3-2
3.2.2
LCD Panel........................................................................................................3-3
3.2.3
Drive Tray LEDs ..............................................................................................3-4
3.2.4
Controller Module LEDs ..................................................................................3-5
3.2.5
LAN Port LEDs ................................................................................................3-6
3.2.6
BBU LED..........................................................................................................3-7
3.2.7
PSU LEDs.........................................................................................................3-8
3.2.8
Cooling Module LEDs......................................................................................3-9
3.3. AUDIBLE ALARM ....................................................................................................3-10
3.3.1
Default Threshold Values ...............................................................................3-10
3.3.2
Failed Devices ................................................................................................3-11
3.4. I2C MONITORING ....................................................................................................3-11
CHAPTER 4 SUBSYSTEM CONNECTION AND OPERATION
4.1
FC HOST CONNECTION PREREQUISITES ........................................................4-1
4.1.1
Choosing the Fibre Cables ...............................................................................4-1
4.1.2
FC Lasers .........................................................................................................4-2
4.1.3
FC Speed Auto-detection ..................................................................................4-2
4.1.4
SFP Transceivers..............................................................................................4-2
4.2
TOPOLOGY AND CONFIGURATION CONSIDERATIONS ..............................4-3
4.2.1
Basic Configuration Rules................................................................................4-3
4.2.2
Fibre Channel Topologies ................................................................................4-3
4.2.3
Host-side Topologies ........................................................................................4-4
4.2.4
Unique Identifier ..............................................................................................4-4
4.2.5
ID/LUN Mapping..............................................................................................4-4
4.3
SAMPLE TOPOLOGIES.........................................................................................4-4
4.3.1
Sample Topology – Clustered Hosts.................................................................4-4
4.3.2
Sample Topology – Direct-Attached.................................................................4-5
4.4
POWER ON .............................................................................................................4-6
4.4.1
Check List .........................................................................................................4-6
4.4.2
Power On Procedure........................................................................................4-7
4.4.3
Power On Status Check ....................................................................................4-8
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Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
4.4.4
LCD Screen ......................................................................................................4-9
4.5
POWER OFF PROCEDURE .................................................................................4-10
CHAPTER 5 SUBSYSTEM MAINTENANCE
5.1. OVERVIEW.............................................................................................................5-1
5.1.1
Maintenance .....................................................................................................5-1
5.1.2
General Notes on Component Replacement .....................................................5-1
5.2. REPLACING CONTROLLER MODULE COMPONENTS ...................................5-2
5.2.1
Overview...........................................................................................................5-2
5.2.2
Notes on Controller Module Maintenance .......................................................5-3
5.2.3
Removing the Controller Module .....................................................................5-3
5.2.4
Replacing the Controller Module .....................................................................5-4
5.3. DIMM MODULE REPLACEMENT .......................................................................5-6
5.3.1
DIMM Module Considerations.........................................................................5-6
5.3.2
DIMM Module Replacement Procedure...........................................................5-6
5.4. REPLACING A FAULTY BBU ..............................................................................5-7
5.5. REPLACING A FAULTY PSU MODULE..............................................................5-9
5.5.1
PSU Module Overview .....................................................................................5-9
5.5.2
Replacing the PSU Module.............................................................................5-10
5.6. COOLING MODULE MAINTENANCE ..............................................................5-13
5.6.1
Cooling Module Overview..............................................................................5-13
5.6.2
Replacing a Cooling Module..........................................................................5-14
5.7. REPLACING A FAILED HARD DRIVE ..............................................................5-16
5.7.1
Hard Drive Maintenance Overview................................................................5-16
5.7.2
Replacing a Hard Drive .................................................................................5-17
APPENDIX A SPECIFICATIONS
A.1. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................................. A-1
A.2. CONTROLLER SPECIFICATIONS ............................................................................... A-3
A.2.1
Configuration .................................................................................................A-3
A.2.2
Architecture ....................................................................................................A-3
A.3. DRIVE TRAY SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................ A-4
A.4. POWER SUPPLY SPECIFICATIONS ............................................................................ A-4
A.5. COOLING MODULE SPECIFICATIONS ...................................................................... A-5
A.6. RAID MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................. A-5
A.7. FAULT TOLERANCE MANAGEMENT........................................................................ A-6
APPENDIX B SPARE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES
B.1.
B.2.
SPARE PARTS ......................................................................................................... B-1
ACCESSORIES ......................................................................................................... B-2
APPENDIX C PIN OUTS
C.1.
SFP CONNECTOR PIN OUTS ................................................................................... C-1
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Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
C.2.
C.3.
C.4.
C.5.
C.6.
x
COM1 CABLE: DB9 AUDIO JACK PIN OUTS .......................................................... C-3
COM2 CABLE: DB9 AUDIO JACK PIN OUTS .......................................................... C-4
GAL-9011 NULL MODEM ...................................................................................... C-5
ETHERNET PORT PIN OUTS..................................................................................... C-6
MAIN POWER ......................................................................................................... C-6
Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Safety Precautions
Precautions and Instructions
•
Prior to powering on the subsystem, ensure that the correct power range is being
used.
•
The Galaxy subsystem comes with twenty four (24) drive bays. Leaving any of these
drive bays empty will greatly affect the efficiency of the airflow within the
enclosure, and will consequently lead to the system overheating, which can cause
irreparable damage.
•
If a module fails, leave it in place until you have a replacement unit and you are
ready to replace it.
•
Airflow Consideration: The subsystem requires an airflow clearance, especially at
the front and rear.
•
Handle subsystem modules using the retention screws, eject levers, and the metal
frames/face plates. Avoid touching PCB boards and connector pins.
•
To comply with safety, emission, or thermal requirements, none of the covers or
replaceable modules should be removed. Make sure that during operation, all
enclosure modules and covers are securely in place.
•
Be sure that the rack cabinet into which the subsystem chassis will be installed
provides sufficient ventilation channels and airflow circulation around the
subsystem.
•
Provide a soft, clean surface to place your subsystem on before working on it.
Servicing on a rough surface may damage the exterior of the chassis.
•
If it is necessary to transport the subsystem, repackage all disk drives separately.
•
Dual redundant controller models come with two controller modules that must be
installed into the subsystem. Single controller modules come with a single controller
module and a metal sheet is placed over the lower controller bay at the rear of the
subsystem. Since single controller modules cannot be upgraded, this metal sheet
should NEVER be removed.
ESD Precautions
Observe all conventional anti-ESD methods while handling system modules.
The use of a grounded wrist strap and an anti-static work pad are recommended.
Avoid dust and debris in your work area.
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Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
About This Manual
This manual:
•
Introduces the Galaxy RAID GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D 400mhz ASIC
subsystem.
•
Describes all the active components in the subsystem.
•
Provides recommendations and details about the hardware installation
process.
•
Briefly describes how to monitor the subsystem.
•
Describes how to maintain the subsystem.
This manual does not:
•
Describe components that are not user-serviceable.
•
Describe the configuration options of firmware, using terminal emulation
programs, or the RAIDWatch GUI software that came with your subsystem.
•
Give a detailed description of the RAID controllers embedded within the
subsystem.
Revision History
♦
Initial release
Who should read this manual?
This manual assumes that its readers are experienced with computer hardware
installation and are familiar with storage enclosures.
Related Documentation
xii
•
User’s Operation Manual
•
RAIDWatch User’s Manual
Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
These two documents can be found in the product utility CD included with your
subsystem package.
Conventions
Naming
From this point on and throughout the rest of this manual, the Galaxy series is
referred to as simply the “subsystem” or the “system” and Galaxy is frequently
abbreviated as “Gal.”
Lists
Bulleted Lists: Bulleted lists are statements of non-sequential facts. They can be
read in any order. Each statement is preceded by a round black dot “•.”
Numbered Lists: Numbered lists are used to describe sequential steps you
should follow in order.
Important information that users should be aware of is indicated with the
following icons:
NOTE:
These messages inform the reader of essential but non-critical
information. These messages should be read carefully as any directions
or instructions contained therein can help you avoid making mistakes.
CAUTION!
Cautionary messages should also be heeded to help you reduce the
chance of losing data or damaging the system.
IMPORTANT!
The Important messages pertain to use the Galaxy subsystem introduced
in this manual.
WARNING!
Warnings appear where overlooked details may cause damage to the
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Galaxy Raid GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
equipment or result in personal injury. Warnings should be taken
seriously.
Software and Firmware Updates
Please contact Rorke Technical Support for the latest software or firmware
updates.
Problems that occur during the updating process may cause unrecoverable errors
and system down time. Always consult technical personnel before proceeding
with any firmware upgrade.
NOTE:
The firmware version installed on your system should provide the
complete functionality listed in the specification sheet/user’s manual.
We provide special revisions for various application purposes.
Therefore, DO NOT upgrade your firmware unless you fully understand
what a firmware revision will do.
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Galaxy Raid Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
xv
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1.
Product Overview
This hardware manual briefly introduces the Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-16F4D Fibre-4G
to SATA-II RAID subsystem as shown in Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-1: GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D FC-to-SATA RAID Subsystem
The GHDX2-2430S-24F4D RAID subsystem is powered by a single RAID controller,
the GHDX2-2430R-24F4D by dual redundant RAID controllers. Each RAID controller
comes with two (2) 4Gbps Fibre host channels that are interfaced through four (4)
separate SFP ports. A total of eight (8) SFP ports are available in a redundant-controller
configuration. The additional SFP ports facilitate connection to multiple application
servers and for connecting fault-tolerant data paths. The subsystem houses twenty-four
(24) 3Gbps SATA-II disk drives each with dedicated channel bandwidth. Each controller
board comes with a pre-installed 512MB DDR RAM DIMM module and can support
memory modules with the capacities up to 2GB.
The Galaxy HDX2 series is built around a custom ASIC400 specifically designed with
the hardware RAID6 capability. RAID6 can sustain two member drives of a RAID array
to fail at the same time and thereby helps achieve a higher level of data availability.
There are six (6) dedicated RCC paths strung between the partner RAID controllers in a
dual-active configuration. The RCC chips reside on the third, separate PCI-X bus. This
design takes benefits of the abundant system bandwidth brought by the new architecture
and hence the inter-controller communications do not affect drive channel throughput.
Introduction
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
A SAS expansion port comes with each RAID controller and provides easy connectivity
to terabytes of expansion capacity over the 4x, wide SAS link cables.
Two (2) RS-232C (audio jack) serial port connectors are located on the controller
faceplate. One serial port (COM1) enables serial communication between the controller
and an external PC running terminal emulation software that can be used to configure and
manage the RAID subsystem. The second serial port (COM2) connects to an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS). An RJ-45 Ethernet connector allows telnet access
and web-based management using the included browser-based or Java-based versions of
the RAIDWatch manager software.
Disk drives in the front section of the subsystem are directly mated with a common
backplane. The backplane receives a maximum of twenty-four (24) SATA-II hard drives
that should be separately purchased.
Two (2) redundant, hot-swappable, dual-fan cooling modules protect the RAID
subsystem from overheating and three (3) redundant, hot-swappable, 1U 405W power
supply unit (PSU) modules provide constant power to the RAID subsystem. The modular
nature of the subsystem and the easy accessibility to all major components ensure that the
subsystem can be reliably and efficiently operated and maintained.
1.1.1
Enclosure Chassis
1.1.1.1 Chassis Overview
The Galaxy HDX2 24bay subsystem comes with a 4U compact steel chassis and
aluminum alloy framework for even distribution of component heat. A back-end PCB is
enclosed in thick gauge sheet metal that divides the enclosure internally into the front and
rear sections. (See Figure 1-2) The front section accommodates twenty-four (24) drive
trays (with their associated hard drives) and the rear section accommodates three (3) PSU
modules, two (2) dual-fan cooling modules, and RAID controllers in a single- or dualcontroller configurations. The two (2) foldable handles on the front of the chassis enable
you to easily extract the chassis from a rack cabinet. The subsystem enclosure can be
mounted into standard 19-inch rack cabinets using separately purchased slide rails.
1-2
Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
Figure 1-2: Galaxy 24-bay SATA RAID Subsystem Overview
1.1.1.2 Physical Dimensions
The Galaxy HDX2 24bay subsystem comes in a standard 4U chassis with the following
dimensions:
♦
With forearm handles: 482W x 174.4H x 514D mm (19 x 6.87 x 20.2 inches)
♦
Without forearm handles: 445W x 174.4H x 498D mm (17.5 x 6.87 x 19.6
inches)
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
1.1.1.3 Front Panel Overview
Figure 1-3: Galaxy HDX2 24bay RAID Subsystem Front View
As shown above, the front section of the subsystem features a 4-column by 6-row layout
to accommodate twenty-four (24) drive trays that are designed to house standard 3.5-inch
SATA drives. The left-side forearm handle comes with a 16 characters by 2 rows LCD
screen and four (4) function keys that can be used to configure and monitor the
subsystem.
1.1.1.4 Drive Slot Numbering
The front section of the enclosure houses twenty-four (24) hard drives. When viewed
from the front, the drive bays (slots) are numbered 1 to 24 from left to right, then from
top to bottom.
Slot-1
Slot-2
Slot-3
Slot-4
Slot-5
Slot-6
Slot-7
Slot-8
Slot-9
Slot-10
Slot-11
Slot-12
Slot-13
Slot-14
Slot-15
Slot-16
Slot-17
Slot-18
Slot-19
Slot-20
Slot-21
Slot-22
Slot-23
Slot-24
Figure 1-4: Hard Drive Slot Numbering
1-4
Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.1.1.5 Rear Panel Overview
Figure 1-5: Galaxy GHDX2-2430R-24F4D Rear View
Figure 1-6: Galaxy GHDX2-2430S-24F4D Rear View
The rear panel of the Dual redundant controller version of the Galaxy HDX2 subsystem
is shown in Figure 1-5. The rear panel provides access to all the components located in
the rear half of the RAID subsystem enclosure. The rear panel of the single controller
version of the Galaxy HDX2 subsystem is shown in Figure 1-5.
Three (3) (N+1) redundant, hot-swappable 405W PSU modules provide converted power
from the power source. Two (2) redundant, hot-swappable, dual-fan cooling modules are
located above the PSU modules. One power switch on the chassis rear panel controls all
PSU modules. Each PSU module contains two cooling fans.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Each RAID controller module comes with four (4) SFP host ports, two (2) RS-232C
(audio jack) serial ports, one (1) RJ-45 Ethernet connector and status-indicating LEDs
located on its rear-facing faceplate.
1.1.1.6 The Backplane Board
An integrated backplane board receives disk drives on the front end and connects the
RAID controller, cooling, and PSU modules on the other side. The PCB board provides
logic level signals and low voltage power paths. It contains no user-serviceable
components.
1.1.1.7 Subsystem Rack/Cabinet Installation
ƒ
The subsystem chassis has pre-drilled screw holes for rackmounting. Separately
purchased, independently installed rackmount rails are available for rack or cabinet
installation.
The slide rails come with their own printed copies of installation guide.
1.2.
Subsystem Components
1.2.1
LCD Keypad Panel
Figure 1-7: LCD Keypad Panel
The LCD keypad panel consists of an LCD display with push buttons and LEDs that
indicate array statuses. The LCD panel provides full access to all RAID configurations
and monitoring options. After powering up the subsystem, the initial screen will display
1-6
Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
the subsystem model name. A different name can be assigned for the subsystem or
specific logical drives. This enables ease of identification in a topology consisting of
numerous arrays.
1.2.2
Drive Trays
Figure 1-8: Drive Tray
The subsystems’ twenty-four (24) drive trays accommodate separately purchased,
standard 1-inch pitch, 3.5-inch disk drives. The drive bays are accessed through the front
of the enclosure. Two (2) LEDs on each tray bezel indicate the disk drive’s operation
status. A rotary bezel lock on each drive tray secures the hard drive in place, while a
release button can be used to open the front bezel.
WARNING!
Be careful not to warp, twist, or contort the drive tray in any way (e.g., by dropping
it or resting heavy objects on it). The drive tray has been customized to fit into the
drive bays in the subsystem and if it is deformed or altered it may not fit into the
drive bay.
NOTE:
The redundant-controller subsystem is shipped with twenty-four drive trays with
multiplexer (MUX) adapter boards. These MUX boards provide access routes for
different RAID controllers.
Please DO NOT use drive trays from a previous Galaxy model, GHDX-7376R624F2D. They are not compatible.
1.2.3
RAID Controller Module
The RAID controller module contains a main circuit board and a daughter card providing
additional interface connectors, management and host interfaces, and a preinstalled
512MB DDR RAM DIMM. The subsystem comes standard with BBU protection. The
BBU is installed in the module bay located at the top center of the controller module. The
BBU can be independently inserted or removed. Please note: The controller module
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
contains no user-serviceable components. Only remove the controller when replacing a
faulty unit or installing/ the cache memory inside.
WARNING!
Although the RAID controllers are hot-swappable, the only time you should handle
the controller itself is to remove a failed controller, or to install and replace
memory modules. Unnecessary tampering with the RAID controller can damage
the controller.
Figure 1-9: RAID Controller Faceplate
The controller faceplate provides external interfaces including four (4) SFP host ports,
two (2) RS-232C (audio jack) serial ports (labeled COM1 and COM2), one (1) RJ-45
Ethernet connector and six (6) status-indicating LEDs (labeled from 1 to 6), one Restore
Default LED and the associated push button. The controller main circuit board is housed
in a metal canister and can only be seen after the controller is removed from the chassis.
The controller canister has two (2) ejection levers that can be used to retrieve or secure
the controller module to the chassis. These levers are secured to the enclosure chassis
using two (2) retention screws through the screw holes underneath each lever.
1.2.4
Controller Module Interfaces
All host I/O and management interfaces are located on the controller faceplate. The
interfaces are listed below.
1-8
ƒ
SFP host ports: Host ports are SFP sockets that receive 4Gb/s interface fiber optical
transceivers. It is recommended to use only certified transceivers and cables.
ƒ
SAS expansion port: The SAS expansion port provides a 12Gb/s wide link to the
Galaxy series expansion JBODs.
ƒ
RS-232C (Audio Jack): All controller modules come with two (2) RS-232C (audio
jack) serial ports The serial ports can be used for establishing a management session
through terminal emulation and uninterruptible power supply (UPS) support.
Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
The dual-controller subsystem comes with a serial port Y-cable that allows you to
access a surviving controller in the event of controller failure without physically
changing the connection.
TIPS:
Connect both Ethernet ports (if you are using a dual-controller subsystem) to
the Ethernet ports of your network switch.
The Ethernet port on a non-dominant (secondary) controller will stay idle until
the occurrence of primary controller failure.
1.2.5
ƒ
Ethernet port: A single 10/100BaseT Ethernet port is used for local/remote
management over LAN/WAN. For a dual-controller configuration, connect the
Ethernet ports on both RAID controllers to your local network. The Ethernet port on
a non-dominant (stand-by, usually the controller in the lower slot) controller will
remain idle until a dominant, primary controller fails and the management service is
transferred to the surviving controller.
ƒ
Disk Drive Channels: All models come with twenty-four (24) SATA drive channels
that are interfaced thorough a backplane to the hard disk drives.
DIMM Module
Each controller module comes with a preinstalled 512MB DDR RAM DIMM module
mounted on the controller board within a metal chassis. The controller module supports
memory modules with sizes from 512MB to 2GB.
1.2.6
BBU Module
The BBU can sustain cached data for days during a power failure. If power outage
occurs, the BBU supplies power to sustain the unfinished writes in cache memory.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 1-10: BBU Module, Controller Top Cover, and the Module Slot
The BBU functionality consists of two major parts. One is the charger circuitry mounted
on top of the controller main board. The other is an optional BBU module that contains
several battery cells. On a single-controller configuration, the BBU is an optional
accessory. The BBU module is hot-swappable so it can be replaced while the subsystem
is running.
New Feature:
The battery cell packs come with an EEPROM to record the date of installation and other
service data; and when the approximate one-year life expectancy is reached (by checking
against the real-time-clock), system administrators will be notified for replacing the
BBU.
In accordance with international transportation regulations, the BBU is only charged to
between 35% and 45% of its total capacity when shipped. After powering on the
subsystem (see Section 4.1) the BBU will automatically start charging its battery cells. It
usually requires approximately twelve (12) hours for the battery to be fully charged.
The BBU is aware of its life expectancy as well as its charge level. Charge level
awareness helps avoid frequent re-charge.
1.2.7
Power Supply Units
The subsystem is equipped with three (3) hot swappable, 1U-profile, 405W PSU
modules. The PSU modules are located on the rear panel of the subsystem.
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Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
Figure 1-11: PSU Module
Each PSU module comes with a power socket for power cord plug-in. All three power
supplies are turned on and off using a single power switch on the enclosure chassis. Each
PSU also comes with two (2) embedded cooling fans to provide sufficient airflow across
its heat-generating components and one (1) LED to indicate the PSU status. An extraction
handle makes it easier to install or remove the PSU from the subsystem. While a PSU
may be removed when the system is still online, this should only be done if the PSU has
failed and needs to be replaced.
A retention screw through the extraction handle secures the PSU to the chassis. If the
PSU needs to be removed, the retention screw must be removed first. After installing a
new PSU module, make sure that the retention screw has been firmly secured. The
shipping package contains adjustable cable clamps that can be used to secure power cord
connections.
PSU specifications are shown in Appendix A.
Power Supply Safety Restrictions
No. of Failed PSUs
Responses and Preventive Actions
1.
Warning messages are issued.
2.
Cached data is flushed to the hard drives (also depends on
the Event Triggered configuration settings of the
firmware).
3.
If previously configured to the Write-back mode, the
caching mode is automatically switched to the
conservative Write-through mode.
1
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
2
1.
Warning messages are issued.
2.
The subsystem is temporarily held in an idle state.
3.
The firmware forces the subsystem to stop serving host
I/O requests.
4.
After the failed PSUs are replaced, array administrators
should manually turn the power switch off and then on.
5.
If the subsystem is powered on with only one PSU, the
firmware will start the initialization process but stays idle
until at least one other PSU is added.
Table 1-1: Power Supply Safety Restrictions
1.2.8
Cooling Modules
These Galaxy 24 bay subsystems come with two (2) hot swappable, redundant, dual-fan
cooling modules. Two (2) 8cm blowers are housed in each cooling module and provide
ventilation airflow from the front to the rear of the subsystem, extracting the heat
generated by the SATA hard drives and other components.
Intelligent Dual Speed Operation
The fans in the cooling module operate with two rotation speeds. Under normal operating
conditions, the cooling fans run at the low speed, which is sufficient for maintaining an
efficient airflow across components. Under the following conditions, the cooling fans
automatically increase their rotation speed to increase the airflow:
1. Component Failure: if a cooling fan, PSU, or temperature sensor fails, the
remaining cooling fan(s) automatically raises its rotation speed.
2. Elevated Temperature: if the temperature breaches the upper threshold set for any
of the interior temperature sensors, the cooling fans automatically raise its rotation
speed.
3. During the initialization stage, the cooling fans operate at the high speed and
return to low speed once the initialization process is completed and no erroneous
condition is detected.
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Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
Figure 1-12: Cooling Module
1.2.9
Enclosure DIP Switches
Figure 1-13: Enclosure DIP Switches
DIP switches are located on the upper left corner of enclosure rear panel. The first tree
switches determine an enclosure ID and should always be kept at their default, “0-0-0.”
The two (2) switches marked as #7 and #8 have no function. The #4 switch is for
controlling the onboard hub across the host ports on partner controllers, to enable/disable
the onboard bypass. Switch #4 is only applicable in a dual-controller configuration.
Switches #5 and #6 control host channel 4G or 2G speed.
When the onboard hub is enabled, host channels on the partner controllers will be
combined, e.g., Channel 0 on Controller A and Channel 0 on Controller B combined into
a host loop. Using the onboard hub enables fault-tolerant host links without the use of
expensive FC switches in a DAS (Direct Attach Storage) topology.
The configuration options for setting the DIP switches is fully discussed in Chapter 4.
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1.3.
Subsystem Monitoring
The RAID subsystem comes with several monitoring methods to give you constant
updates on the status of the system and its individual components. The following
monitoring features are included in the subsystem.
1.3.1
I2C bus
The following subsystem elements interface to the RAID controller over a non-userserviceable I2C bus:
1.3.2
ƒ
Disk drives (drive failure output)
ƒ
PSU modules
ƒ
Cooling modules
ƒ
Temperature sensors
LED Indicators
The following active components all come with LEDs that indicate the status of the
individual component:
1.3.3
ƒ
RAID controller (7 LEDs)
ƒ
LCD keypad panel (3 LEDs)
ƒ
Cooling module (2 LEDs)
ƒ
PSU module (1 LED)
ƒ
Drive tray (2 LEDs)
ƒ
BBU module (1 LED)
Firmware and RAIDWatch® GUI
Firmware: The firmware (FW) is pre-installed software that is used to configure the
subsystem. The FW can be accessed through either the front panel LCD keypad or a
terminal emulation program that is installed on an external computer/application server
used as a management station.
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Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
RAIDWatch: RAIDWatch is a premier, web-based or Java-based graphical user
interface (GUI) that can be installed on an adjacent or a remote computer and accessed
via standard TCP/IP.
1.3.4
Audible Alarm
The RAID subsystem comes with audible alarms that are triggered when certain active
components fail or when certain controller or subsystem thresholds are exceeded. When
you hear an audible alarm emitted from the subsystem, it is imperative that you determine
the cause and rectify the problem immediately.
WARNING!
Failing to respond when an audible alarm is heard can lead to permanent
subsystem damage. When an audible alarm is heard, rectify the problem as soon as
possible.
1.4.
Hot-swappable Components
1.4.1
Hot-swap Capabilities
The subsystem comes with hot-swappable components that can be exchanged while the
subsystem is still online without affecting the operational integrity of the subsystem.
These components should only be removed from the subsystem when they are being
replaced. At no other time should these components be removed from the subsystem.
1.4.2
Components
The following components are all hot swappable:
ƒ
RAID controller modules
ƒ
PSU modules
ƒ
Host I/O modules
ƒ
Cooling modules
ƒ
Hard drives
ƒ
BBU modules
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
1.4.3
Normalized Airflow
Proper subsystem cooling is referred to as “normalized” airflow. Normalized
ensures the sufficient cooling of the subsystem and is only attained when
components are properly installed. Therefore, a failed component should only
swapped when a replacement is available. If a failed component is removed
replaced, permanent damage to the subsystem can result.
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airflow
all the
be hotbut not
Introduction
Chapter 1: Introduction
This page is intentionally left blank.
1-17
Chapter 2
Hardware Installation
2.1.
Installation Overview
This chapter gives detailed instructions on how to install hard disk drives and drive trays
into the subsystem. Installation into a rack or cabinet should occur before hard drive
installation. Please confirm that you received all of the components listed on a printed
copy of Unpacking List included in the shipping package before proceeding with the
installation process.
2.2.
Installation Pre-requisites
1.
Static-free installation environment: The subsystem must be installed in a staticfree environment to minimize the possibility of electrostatic discharge (ESD)
damage. (See Section 2.3) Use of anti-static wristband and static-control devices
such as ionizers, is recommended.
2.
Component check: Before installing the subsystem, you should confirm that you
have received all of the required components by checking the package contents
against the Unpacking List.
3.
Memory modules: If you wish to change the pre-installed memory modules, it is
preferred that you install the separately purchased modules during the initial
installation stage. (See Section 2.6.2)
4.
Hard drives: Up to 24 hard drives have been pre-integrated into drive trays. On the
rare occasion that a drive needs to be replaced, use this procedure. (See Section 2.7)
5.
Cabling: All optical FC cables and SFP transceivers are user-supplied and should be
purchased separately. (See Chapter 4)
Hardware Installation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
6.
2.3.
Rack installation: The enclosure chassis can be installed into standard, 19-inch
wide rack cabinet using self-purchased mounting rails the Galaxy slide rails.
Static-free Installation
Static electricity can damage the system’s electronic components. Most of the subsystems
that are returned for repair result from improper installation and ESD damage. To prevent
ESD damage, follow these precautions before handling any of the components:
2.4.
ƒ
When installing the subsystem, you should wear an anti-static wristband or touch a
grounded metal surface to discharge any static electricity from your body.
ƒ
Avoid carpets, plastic, vinyl, and Styrofoam in the work area.
ƒ
Handle all components by holding their edges or metal frame. Avoid touching circuit
boards or connector pins.
General Installation Procedure
Detailed, illustrated instructions for each step are given in the following sections.
CAUTION!
To ensure that the system is correctly installed, please follow the steps outlined
below. If these steps are followed, the installation will be fast and efficient. If these
steps are not followed, the hardware may accidentally be installed incorrectly.
2-2
Step 1.
Unpack the subsystem. Make sure that all the required subsystem
components have indeed arrived.
Step 2.
Change the DIMM module. Although a DIMM module comes with
the RAID controller, if you wish to use a different DIMM module
with a larger memory capacity, then the DIMM module exchange
should be made first. (See Section 2.6.2)
Step 3.
Rack/Cabinet installation. The subsystem should be installed into a
rack cabinet prior to installing the hard drives. Installation into a rack
cabinet requires separately purchased mounting rails. There are also
Galaxy rail kits for 32 or 36-inch deep racks. Installing the subsystem
into a rack or cabinet requires at least two or three people.
Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
Step 4.
Verification of hard drive installation into the drive trays.
Although SATA-II interface hard drives have been installed into drive
trays for you, follow this procedure to replace individual hard drives.
(See Section 2.7)
Step 5.
Install the drive trays into the enclosure. Note that the drive trays
used in single- or redundant-controller subsystems are different. Make
sure not to mix the drive trays. A redundant-controller subsystem
requires the MUX boards on its drive trays.
Step 6.
Connect the cables. Use the supplied power cords to connect the
subsystem to power mains. It is recommended to connect power cords
to separate and independent power sources, e.g., UPS systems, for
higher redundancy. Make sure your subsystem is electrically
grounded.
It is also recommended to use the included cable clamps to prevent
accidental disconnection of the power cords. Use separately purchased
Fibre Channel optical cables and transceivers to connect the host ports
to your Fibre Channel storage network or directly to the host
computers. (See Chapter 4)
SAS expansion JBODs come with SAS 4x, wide link cables.
Step 7.
Power up. Once all of the components have been properly installed
and all the cables properly connected, the subsystem can be powered
up and the RAID array configured. (See Chapter 4)
2.4.1 Installation Procedure Flowchart
Figure 2-1 shows a flowchart of the installation procedure. As you complete each step,
check off the “Done” box on the right. Please use this flowchart in conjunction with the
instructions that follow.
Hardware Installation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-1: Installation Procedure Flowchart
2.5.
Unpacking the Subsystem
The subsystem components are packed in several boxes.
WARNING!
For a detailed packing list, refer to the included Unpacking List. Do not rely on the
non-definitive, summarized checklist shown below - it is for reference only.
The following items should be packed in individual boxes and are not pre-installed:
ƒ
Twenty four (24) drive trays and pre-installed drives
ƒ
Accessory items
The enclosure chassis, with its pre-installed components, is located at the bottom of the
package. The pre-installed components include:
2-4
ƒ
Two (2) controller modules
ƒ
Three (3) PSU modules
ƒ
Two (2) cooling modules
ƒ
Two (2) foldable forearm handles
Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
2.6.
ƒ
One (1) LCD keypad panel on the left side foldable handle
ƒ
Back-end PCBs
Memory Module Installation
2.6.1 Memory Module Installation Overview
The subsystem comes with a pre-installed 512MB DDR RAM DIMM module on each
controller. The controller supports memory modules with sizes up to 2GB. If memory
modules with a different size need to be used, the pre-installed DIMM module can be
removed and the new ones installed. Replacement and installation instructions are
described fully below.
NOTE:
A DIMM of a different size can be ordered from your subsystem supplier. Using
non-certified modules can cause unexpected compatibility problems.
Considerations:
1.
A DIMM socket is located on the side of the controller main board. Prior to changing
the DIMM module, the controller canister must first be removed from the enclosure
chassis.
2.
With a new subsystem, there may not be cached data in the DIMM module. If the
subsystem has been operating and there is cached data, the BBU will discharge to
support the cache contents. It is therefore recommended to make sure BBU module
is removed before replacing the DIMM module. The BBU can be removed simply by
loosening its retention screw.
If you are replacing the memory modules, please refer to the installation procedure
below. If the memory modules do not need to be changed, proceed to Section 2.7.
Hardware Installation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
WARNING!
ƒ
The controller board in the controller module is a sensitive item. Please
ensure that all anti-static precautions stipulated above are strictly adhered to.
Only qualified engineers should replace the DIMM module.
ƒ
Removing the DIMM module while it contains cached data and when the
BBU is still attached to the controller can damage the DIMM module. When
the controller is removed from chassis, the BBU will start to discharge
supplying power to memory. Removing the DIMM module while it is being
powered by the BBU may damage the DIMM module.
Therefore, remove a BBU module before you replace a DIMM module if you
prefer using a different DIMM module.
2.6.2 Selecting the Memory Modules
If the memory module on the RAID controller is going to be replaced, the following
factors must be considered when purchasing replacement DIMM modules:
ƒ
DDR DIMM modules supported: The subsystem supports DDR RAM DIMM
modules with memory capacities ranging from 512MB to 2GB.
ƒ
Installation considerations: When installing the DIMM module, it is necessary to
handle the controller module. The controller board is more susceptible to damage
than the other components and must therefore be handled with extreme care. ALL
anti-static precautions specified in Section 2.3 must be strictly adhered to.
ƒ
Secure installation: If the DIMM module is not firmly in place, the subsystem will
not run and the controller will need to be removed and the DIMM module correctly
installed.
ƒ
Purchasing considerations: When purchasing a DDR DIMM to install on the
controller board, contact your system vendor for an adequate module.
2.6.3 DIMM Module Installation/Replacement
WARNING!
2-6
1.
Consult the technical support of your reseller or distributor if you are not
sure which memory module can be installed into the controller. To avoid
compatibility problems, it is recommended to purchase only certified
DIMM modules for the Galaxy RAID.
2.
The BBU and controller module must be removed prior to installing a new
memory module. Do this with care. Sensitive components can be damaged
during the process.
Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
3.
The BBU module is hot-swappable and can be independently swapped
from the controller. However, as a safety precaution and just in case your
memory still holds cached data, it is recommended to flush the unfinished
writes using the “Controller Shutdown” command in firmware and remove
the BBU module before handling the DDR RAM module. If the BBU is
supplying power to the memory when the DDR module is being removed,
damage may occur.
Step 1.
Prepare an anti-static work pad for placing a removed controller. Use
of an ESD grounding strap is highly recommended.
Step 2.
Remove the pre-installed BBU module. Use a Phillips screwdriver
to loosen the retention screw that secures the BBU module to the
enclosure chassis and carefully remove the module. Carefully place
the module for it contains Li-ION batteries. Do not drop it to the floor
or place it near any heat source or fire.
Figure 2-2: Removing the BBU Module
Step 3. Remove the controller module. Remove the retention screws
that secure the controller’s ejection levers using a cross-head
screwdriver. Using both hands, simultaneously press the ejection
levers downward until the controller is removed from the chassis.
Hardware Installation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-3: Removing the Controller Module
Step 4.
Remove the DDR DIMM module. You can access the DIMM
module from the opening on the right side of the controller canister.
To remove the DIMM module, press the white, plastic ejectors (clips)
on the sides of the DIMM socket. Grasp the DIMM module by its
edges and pull it out of the socket without touching the electrical
components nearby. Place the module in an anti-static bag.
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
Figure 2-4: Accessing a DIMM Module
Step 5.
Install the replacement DIMM module. Carefully remove the
replacement module from its anti-static bag. Grasp the module by
edges. Make sure the white, plastic ejectors on the sides of DIMM
socket are open. Carefully align the DIMM module to the socket.
Pressing firmly on both ends, push the module into the socket until the
ejectors return to the closed position.
Figure 2-5: Accessing a DIMM Module
Step 6.
Hardware Installation
Install the controller and the BBU module (if installed). Proceed
with the following to install the controller:
1.
Insert the controller into the respective module slot with the
ejector levers at the lowest position.
2.
Push the controller in until you feel contact resistance with its
back-end connectors. Use slightly more force to engage the backend connectors.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
3.
Use the ejector levers on the sides to secure the controller into the
chassis slot. Make sure the squared notches of the ejector levers
lock onto the metal grooves on the interior walls of the module
slot. Once in place, pull the levers up to secure the controller.
4.
Insert and fasten the retention screws underneath each ejector
lever to secure the modules. After the controller is properly
installed, install the BBU module by pushing it into the module
slot and fasten its retention screws.
Figure 2-6: Installing the Controller Module
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
2.7.
Rackmounting the Subsystem
2.7.1
Package Contents
The slide rail kit (32- or 36-inch versions) includes the following components. You
should check to ensure that the slide rail kit you received contains the items listed below.
NOTE:
Except for the different length of mounting brackets, the 32- and 36-inch versions
use the same mounting screws and mounting holes on rack posts.
Item 32-inch/812.8mm; 36-inch/914.4mm
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Hardware Installation
Quantity
Screw, cross recess round head, M5x35, rev.: 1.0
1
1
1
1
4
Screw, M5x5mm, position screws for square racks, free cutting
steel, rev.: 1.0
8
Mounting bracket assembly, left
Mounting bracket assembly, right
End bracket, left
End bracket, right
Screw, crosshead flat head, #6-32x8mm, rev.: 1.0
Screw, M5 cage nuts, rev.: 1.0
Screw, crosshead round screws, P+6#-32x6mm, rev.: 1.0
4U spacer behind forearm handle
6
4
4
2
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-7: Package Contents
The rackmount rails secure the Galaxy 4U chassis to standard 19-inch wide, four-post
cabinets or racks that are between 23 and 36 inches deep. These heavy-duty
rackmount rails provide an easy and safe access to the subsystems as well as a solid
support.
Prepare the tools needed to install the enclosure into rack. The following
should be necessary:
2.7.2
•
A medium-sized cross-head screwdriver.
•
A small-sized cross-head screwdriver.
•
A medium-sized flathead screw driver.
Installation Steps
Step 1. Determine the exact position where you want to install the
Galaxy RAID enclosure in the rack, and then measure the
position.
Step 2. The mounting kit comes with M5 cage nuts that can be used
with racks that have square, unthreaded holes. Align the front
edge of a support bracket against a rack post and adjust spacing
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
so that the front and rear edges of the bracket fit the vertical
rack posts.
Figure 2-8: Fitting a Support Bracket to Rack Posts
Step 3. Determine where in the rack the subsystem is going to be
installed. Attach four (4) M5 flathead screws (#6 in the packing
list) to secure the bracket to the front and the rear rack posts.
See the drawing above. Note that the lower part of the Lshaped brackets should always face inward.
Step 4. Attach two (2) M5 cage nuts (#8 in the packing list) onto each
front rack post. The first cage nut is inserted through the hole
right above the M5 screw at the bottom. Cage nuts should be
attached from the inside of the rack facing outward. Leave six
holes between the two cage nuts on each rack post. These cage
nuts allow you to secure the enclosure from the front of the
chassis through the mounting holes on the forearm handles.
Repeat the process to install another support bracket on the left.
Hardware Installation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-9: Attaching M5 Cage Nuts to Rack Posts
CAUTION!
The mounting positions on the rack posts must be carefully measured so that rails are
mounted parallel to each other. Also pay attention to the clearance between the rackmounted units.
Step 5. Attach a spacer (#10 in the packing list) to the back of each
enclosure forearm handle using three (3) included flathead
screws (#7 in the packing list).
Figure 2-10: Attaching Spacers to the Back of Enclosure Forearm Handles
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
Step 6. Use the included crosshead round screws (#9 in the packing
list) to secure two (2) end brackets (#3 or #4) to the back of the
subsystem.
Figure 2-11: Attaching End Brackets to the Rear Side of Enclosure
Step 7. Gently slide the subsystem into the rack by aligning the tips of
the end brackets with the support brackets. Carefully rest the
tips of the end brackets onto the support brackets and slide the
chassis forward.
Step 8. When the chassis is inserted towards the end of the rack, the
recessed parts of end brackets should engage the two rivets on
the support brackets. Once the enclosure reaches the end,
proceed with securing the chassis through the mounting holes
on the forearm handles.
Figure 2-12: Installing Enclosure
Step 9. Slide the subsystem in as far as it will go, then secure the
system using four (4) pan head screws (see #5 in the packing
Hardware Installation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
list) through the holes on the left- and right-side handles to
both of the front rack posts.
Figure 2-13: Securing Enclosure through the Front
2.8.
Hard Drive Installation
2.8.1 Hard Drive Installation Overview
WARNING!
1.
Handle hard drives with extreme care. Hard drives are very delicate.
Dropping a drive onto a hard surface (even from a short distance) and hitting
or touching the circuits on the drives with your tools may all cause damage to
drives.
2.
Observe all ESD prevention methods when handling hard drives.
3.
Only use screws supplied with the drive canisters. Longer screws can damage
the disk drives.
2.8.2 Hard Drive Installation Pre-requisites
CAUTION!
The hard drives and drive trays should only be installed into the subsystem after
the subsystem has been mounted into a rack cabinet. If the hard drives are
installed first, the subsystem will be too heavy to lift into position and the possible
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
impact during installation may damage your hard drives.
Hard drives for the subsystem must be purchased separately. When purchasing the hard
drives, the following factors should be considered:
ƒ
Capacity (MB/GB): Use drives with the same capacity. RAID arrays use a “leastcommon-denominator” approach meaning the maximum
applicable capacity from each member drive in the array is
the maximum capacity of the smallest drive.
ƒ
Profile:
The drive trays and bays of the system are designed for 3.5inch wide x 1-inch high hard drives.
ƒ
Drive type:
The Galaxy subsystem complies with SATA-II interface hard
drives.
2.8.3 Drive Installation
NOTE:
Although your drives have been preinstalled and tested you may need to replace a
faulty drive. Use the following procedure to replace a faulty drive.
Step 1.
Hardware Installation
Place the hard drive into the drive tray. Make sure the hard drive is
oriented that the drive’s SATA connector is facing the open side of the
drive tray and its label side facing up.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-14: Installing a Hard Drive
Step 2.
Adjust the drive’s location until the mounting holes in the drive
canister are aligned with those on the hard drive. Secure the drive with
four (4) supplied 6/32 flathead screws. See the diagram below for the
screw hole locations using a drive tray with or without a MUX board.
Figure 2-15: Screw Hole Locations
WARNING!
Only use screws supplied with the drive canisters. Longer screws can damage the
hard drives.
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
2.9.
Drive Tray Installation
Before drive tray installation, you need to access the drive bays on the left- and right-side
columns:
To access drive bays hidden behind the forearm handles, first release the retention latches
on the enclosure front handles, and then swing the handles to the left and right-hand
sides. To close the handles, see Figure 2-16, first swing the handles towards the center to
reveal the retention latch, release the latch, and then close the handles.
Figure 2-16: Closing the front handles
Install the drive trays into the subsystem once the hard drives have been installed in the
drive trays.
Step 1.
Use a flat blade screwdriver to turn the rotary bezel lock to the
unlocked position, i.e., the groove on its face is in a horizontal
orientation. If the groove is in a vertical position, then the bezel lock is
locked and the front bezel cannot be opened.
Clip
Figure 2-17: Drive Tray Front Bezel
Step 2.
Hardware Installation
Open the front bezel by pushing the release button. The front bezel
will automatically swing open.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-18: Opening Front Bezel
Step 3.
Line up with the tray slot in which you wish to insert it. Once the
drive tray is lined up with the slot, gently slide it in. This should be
done smoothly and gently.
Step 4.
Close the front bezel. Make sure the front bezel is closed properly to
ensure that the back-end connector is firmly mated with the
corresponding connector on the backplane. If the front bezel is not
closed properly, the connection between the hard drive and the
subsystem will not be secure.
Figure 2-19: Installing a Drive Tray
Step 5.
2-20
Lock the bezel. Use a flat blade screwdriver to turn the rotary bezel
lock until the groove on its face is in a vertical orientation.
Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
Figure 2-20: Drive Tray Bezel Lock Rotation
WARNING!
All the drive trays must be installed into the enclosure even if they currently do
not contain a hard drive. If the drive trays are not installed, then the ventilation
required for cooling will not be normalized and the subsystem will be damaged.
2.10.
Power Cord Cable Clamp Installation
Several cable clamp assemblies are included in the accessories boxes in the RAID
shipping package. When installing the subsystem, it is recommended to secure all power
cords using these cable clamps to help prevent accidental disconnection that could result
in costly down time.
2.10.1
Component Description
Each cable clamp consists of the following:
1.
A cable strap with a “push barb” anchor mount
2.
An adjustable cable clamp
The cable strap is secured to the chassis by inserting the barb anchor into the pre-drilled
hole located under each power supply module. The cable clamp is then secured to the
cable strap and is wrapped around the power plug to hold it in place to ensure that the
power cord connection can withstand vibration and accidental impact.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 2-21: Cable Clamp and Cable Strap (Cable Mount)
2.10.2
Cable Clamp Installation
Step 1.
Connect a power cord to a subsystem power socket so that you can
determine the correct position of the cable clamp along the cable
strap. The diagram below shows the relative positions of a power
cord, cable clamp, and cable strap.
Figure 2-22: Power Cord, Cable Clamp and Cable Strap Positions
Step 2.
2-22
Connect the cable clamp to the cable strap. Insert the flat angled
end of the cable strap through the small opening (the tie head)
underneath the cable clamp with the smooth side of the strap facing up
Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
and the ribbed side facing down. Press the release tab and adjust the
position of the cable clamp along the strap.
Figure 2-23: Inserting Cable Strap into Cable Clamp
Step 3.
Mount the cable strap to the chassis by inserting the push-in barb
anchor into the pre-drilled hole underneath the power supply.
Step 4.
Secure the power cord with the cable clamp Flip open the cable
clamp and wrap it around the power plug. If necessary, press on the
release tab to adjust the location of the clamp so it aligns with the base
of the power plug as shown below. Press the clip lock on the side of
the clamp until it snaps into position.
Figure 2-24: Power Cord Locked into Position
Step 5. Repeat the process to secure every power cords to the subsystem.
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Hardware Installation
Chapter 3
Subsystem Monitoring
3.1.
Subsystem Monitoring Overview
The Galaxy GHDX2-2430S-24F4D and GHDX2-2430R-24F4D subsystems are equipped
with a variety of self-monitoring features that keep you informed of the subsystem’s
operational statuses. These monitoring features provide vital feedback to help you
maintain the operational integrity of the subsystem. Prompt response to warnings and
component failure notifications will help ensure data integrity and the longevity of the
RAID subsystem.
Self-monitoring features include:
ƒ
Management firmware (FW): The firmware manages the array, provides device
status information, and is preinstalled in the subsystem controller. You can access
firmware functionalities using either the LCD keypad panel or a PC running a
terminal emulation program and is connected through the subsystem’s COM 1 RS232C (audio jack) serial port. The firmware is fully described in the firmware
Operation Manual that came with the subsystem. Please refer to this manual for
further details.
ƒ
RAIDWatch: RAIDWatch is a Java-based program that came with the subsystem
and can be used to monitor and manage the subsystem locally or remotely over
TCP/IP. You can use the powerful Configuration Client or Notification Process
Center (NPC) sub-modules to keep you informed over a variety of communications
methods such as fax, pager, email, etc. For further details on the installation and
operation of RAIDWatch, please refer to the RAIDWatch User’s Manual.
ƒ
LEDs: Device-status-indicating LEDs are placed on all of the active components to
inform users of the integrity of a given component. You should become familiar with
the different LEDs and be aware of their functions.
System Monitoring
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
ƒ
Audible alarm: The audible alarm on the subsystem controller board will be
triggered if any of a number of threatening events occurs. These events usually
jeopardize the functional and operational integrity of the controller board and must
be heeded at all times. Events such as a breach of the temperature threshold will
trigger the alarm and if an onsite subsystem manager is present, the manager should
use either the LCD keypad panel or a PC running terminal software to determine the
cause of the alarm and take appropriate corrective measures.
ƒ
I2C: An I2Cbus connects sensors and presence detection circuitries within the
subsystem (present/not present, ready/failed, etc.).
Subsystem monitoring is a necessary part of subsystem management. When system fault
events or other disruptive events are detected and reported, the subsystem manager must
take appropriate actions to rectify the problem. Failure to act in a properly specified
manner to a system event (such as overheating) can cause severe and permanent damage.
3.2.
Status-indicating LEDs
3.2.1
Controller Module LEDs
The controller module faceplate is shown in Figure 3-1 below. The LEDs are numbered
from 1 to 6 and their definitions are shown in Table 3-1 below.
Figure 3-1: Galaxy HDX2 Controller Faceplate
LED
1
3-2
Name
Ctrl
Status
Color
Green/
Amber
Status
GREEN indicates that the controller is active and
operating normally.
AMBER indicates the controller is being initialized
or has failed. The controller is not ready.
2
C_Dirty
Amber
ON indicates that data is currently cached in
memory or is supported by the BBU during a power
loss.
3
Temp.
Amber
ON indicates that one of the preset temperature
System Monitoring
Chapter 3 Subsystem Monitoring
thresholds is violated.
BBU
Link
4
5
Hst Bsy
Green
ON indicates BBU is present.
Green
FLASHING indicates there is active traffic through
the host ports.
OFF indicates there is no activity on the host ports.
FLASHING indicates there is active traffic on the
drive channels.
6
Drv Bsy
Green
OFF indicates there is no activity on the drive
channels.
Table 3-1: Controller Module LED Definitions
3.2.1.1
Fibre Port LEDs
Each I/O module provides 4G FC SFP ports. Each of these ports has two (2) LEDs for
displaying the link and speed statuses. Host port LEDs are used here as examples.
Name
Color
Status
Steady GREEN indicates that channel
link is valid.
Green
Link
OFF indicates no valid link is made
through the FC port.
Steady GREEN indicates 4Gb/s link
speed.
Green/
Amber
Speed
Steady AMBER indicates 2Gb/s link
speed (drive channels only).
Off indicates incongruous link status.
Table 3-2: Fibre Port LED Definitions
3.2.1.2
Restore Default LED
A restore default LED is located above the Restore Default push button on the lower right
corner of the controller faceplate. To restore firmware defaults, press and hold the button
before powering on the subsystem. Once the factory defaults are successfully restored,
the restore default LED lights green and then you can release the button.
CAUTION!
Restoring default is more or less a last-resort method. Although logical drives
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
remain intact after default restoration, configuration data such as LUN mapping
and performance preferences will be erased. Before using this button, make sure
you have a written record or a previously saved configuration profile (one of
firmware’s functionalities, “Save NVRAM”).
Please refer to Chapter 1 for the correct procedures of default restoration.
3.2.2
LAN Port LEDs
A shielded Ethernet cable is recommended for connecting the RJ-45 Ethernet
management port to a local network after you configure an IP address. This enables you
to manage your subsystem via LAN/WAN. Two (2) LEDs on the Ethernet port indicate
connection statuses. Please refer to Error! Reference source not found. for the LED
definitions.
Figure 3-2: LAN Port Indicators
Name
Color
Status
Link
Green
ON indicates the management port is connected to a
node or networking device.
Activity
Green
BLINKING indicates active transmission
Table 3-3: LAN Connector LED Definitions
3.2.3
LCD Keypad Panel
The LCD keypad panel comes with three (3) status-indicating LEDs, from top to bottom,
PWR, BUSY, and ATTEN. The definitions of these LEDs are shown in Table 3-5.
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Chapter 3 Subsystem Monitoring
Figure 3-3: LCD Panel LEDs
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
LED Name
Color
Status
PWR
Blue
ON indicates that power is supplied to the subsystem.
OFF indicates that no power is supplied to the subsystem
or the subsystem/RAID controller has failed.
BUSY
White
ON indicates that there is active traffic on the host/drive
channels.
OFF indicates that there are no activities on the host/drive
channels.
ATTEN
Red
ON indicates that a component failure/status event has
occurred.
OFF indicates that the subsystem and all its components
are operating correctly.
Table 3-4: LCD Panel LED Definitions
NOTE:
3.2.4
ƒ
During the power up process, the LCD panel ATTEN LED will be turned on.
If the subsystem boots up successfully, then the ATTEN LED will be turned
off after the boot up procedure is complete.
ƒ
The MUTE button silences the alarm temporarily until the next controller
event occurs.
Drive Tray LEDs
Each drive tray comes with two (2) status-indicating LEDs. One indicates power and the
other hard drive activities. Their definitions are shown in Table 3-5.
Figure 3-4: Drive Tray LEDs
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Chapter 3 Subsystem Monitoring
LED Name
Color
Status
Drive Busy
Blue/Amber
FLASHING blue indicates there is read/write
activity on the drive from Controller A.
FLASHING amber indicates there is read/write
activity on the drive from Controller B (in a
redundant-controller mode).
OFF indicates there is no read/write activity on
the drive.
Power
Status
Green/Red
GREEN indicates that power is supplied to the
hard disk drive and the disk drive is present.
RED indicates that there is a disk drive failure or
the disk drive is absent.
Table 3-5: Drive Tray LED Definitions
3.2.5
BBU Module LED
The hot-swappable BBU module comes with an LED that indicates module failure, or
when battery cells are being replenished.
Figure 3-5: BBU Module LED
LED Name
Color
Status
BBU Status
Amber
ON indicates the BBU has failed and cannot sustain
the cache memory.
OFF indicates the BBU is sufficiently charged and
can sustain cached data.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
FLASHING indicates the batteries are being charged.
Table 3-6: BBU LED Definitions
IMPORTANT!
In addition to BBU failure itself and the charger failure, the subsystem may
also light the BBU fault LED when the following occur:
1.
The temperature sensor embedded with the charger circuit reports a
temperature reading exceeding 45 degree Celsius.
2.
The BBU (battery backup unit) has been charged for over 12 hours. The
BBU charger will enter a timer fault state.
When the above conditions occur, the charger circuit will enter a low-power
and self-protection state.
You may correct the faults when receiving
Shutdown/Enter Sleep-Mode!” event message:
3.2.6
a
“BBU
Thermal
1.
Check proper ventilation within the subsystem. You may also check the
readings from other sensors within the enclosure. Airflow might have been
disrupted by the absence of one or several major modules or the failure of
a cooling fan. Once the thermal condition is improved, charging will
resume automatically.
2.
If a new battery module has been charged for over twelve (12) hours and
this event is issued, you may remove and re-install the battery module. An
empty battery module may take more than 12 hours to be fully charged.
There is a timer embedded with the charger, doing so can reset the timer.
Charging will resume automatically.
3.
Whenever you install/re-install a BBU, the subsystem recognizes a BBU
only after a system reset.
PSU Module LED
Each PSU module has one (1) LED just below the retention screw to indicate the
operational status of the PSU module. Please refer to Table 3-7 for PSU LED definitions.
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Chapter 3 Subsystem Monitoring
Figure 3-6: PSU Module LED
Color
Status
Static Green
The PSU is operating normally and experiencing no problems
Static Red
The PSU has failed and is unable to continue providing power to
the subsystem.
Blinking
Green
The PSU is not turned on. This LED blinks when the power cord
is connected but the power switch is not turned on.
OFF
The PSU is not turned on, no power is supplied to the PSU or the
power plug is not connected.
Table 3-7: PSU Module LED Definitions
3.2.7
Cooling Module LED
Figure 3-7: Cooling Fan Module LEDs and Cooling Fan Locations
Each cooling module has two (2) red LEDs. Each LED corresponds to a single cooling
fan within the module.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
LED
Status
OFF
The respective cooling fan is operating normally.
ON
The respective cooling fan has failed and the module must be
replaced.
Table 3-8: Cooling Fan Module LED Definitions
3.3.
Audible Alarm
Different controller environmental and operational parameters (such as temperature, etc.)
have been assigned a range of values between which they can fluctuate. If either the
upper or lower thresholds are exceeded, an audible alarm will automatically be triggered.
The alarm will also be triggered when an active component of the subsystem fails. If the
subsystem manager is onsite and is alerted by the alarm, the manager needs to read the
error message on the LCD screen or on the PC terminal to determine what has triggered
the alarm and then take appropriate actions to rectify the problem.
WARNING!
Whenever an alarm is triggered, you must determine the cause of the problem. If
the audible alarm is ignored or not taken seriously and the problem is not rectified,
permanent damage to the system can result.
3.3.1
Default Threshold Values
Table 3-9 shows the default threshold values for the subsystem. If these values are
surpassed, the alarm will sound. The enclosure sensor default is set at a higher value than
the suggested ambient temperature threshold; however, it is crucial you maintain an
ambient temperature below 40ºC (and below 35ºC if BBUs are applied) at your
installation site.
3-10
Parameter
Upper Threshold
Lower Threshold
+3.3V
+3.6V
+2.9V
+5V
+5.5V
+4.5V
+12V
+13.2V
+10.8V
Enclosure Ambient
40ºC
0ºC
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Chapter 3 Subsystem Monitoring
CPU Temperature
90ºC
5ºC
Board Temperature
80ºC
5ºC
Table 3-9: Default Threshold Values
The thresholds in Table 3-9 are the default threshold values. To see how to change these
values, please refer to the firmware Operation Manual that came with your system.
3.3.2
Failed Devices
If any of the following devices fail, the audible alarm will be triggered:
3.4.
ƒ
RAID controller module
ƒ
Cooling modules
ƒ
PSU modules
ƒ
BBU modules
ƒ
Hard drives
ƒ
Temperature sensors
I2C Monitoring
The PSUs, cooling modules, temperature sensors, and disk drive failure outputs are
monitored through an I2C serial bus. If any of these modules fails, you will be notified
through the various methods described above.
System Monitoring
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Chapter 4
Connection and Operation
This chapter outlines some basic rules you should follow when configuring a
storage system and introduces basic information about how to connect the
cabling and design a topology for the Galaxy 24bay RAID subsystems. You can
follow these sample topologies or use them as a guide for developing your own
unique topologies. A complete description of the power on and power off
procedures is also given in this chapter.
4.1
FC Host Connection Prerequisites
4.1.1
Choosing the Fibre Cables
It is recommended to apply Galaxy certified Fibre Channel transceivers and
optical cables. The Fibre host ports connect to Fibre Channel host adapters
(HBA) that features a 4/2Gbps transfer rate, SFP interface, and support for fullduplex transfer, best interfaced through a 64-bit/133MHz PCI-X or higher speed
system bus. In order to bring out the best of your RAID performance, HBAs of
high speed interface are recommended.
WARNING!
All Fibre cables are sensitive and must be handled with care. To prevent
interference within a rack system, the cable routing path must be carefully
planned and the cables must not be bent.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
4.1.2
FC Lasers
CAUTION!
Lasers can be hazardous and may cause permanent eye damage, and
therefore must be treated with respect and used with caution. Never look
at lasers without knowing that they are turned off.
Wavelengths: The lasers on fiber optic cables emit either short wave (SW)
beams (770nm-860nm) or long wave (LW) (1270nm-1355nm) beams. Cables
using either of these wavelengths can be used.
Laser types: Two (2) types of laser devices can be used in FC cables: Optical
Fibre Control (OFC) and non-OFC lasers. The OFC lasers are high-powered and
can be used over long distances.
Safety features: Due to their high power output, OFC lasers usually come with
a safety mechanism that switches the laser off as soon as it is unplugged.
Although non-OFC lasers are low power and do not come with this safety
feature, they can still inflict damage.
4.1.3
FC Speed Auto-negotiation
Speed auto-negotiation is currently not supported. All networking devices, e.g.,
HBAs, switches, must operate at the configured speed. Channel speed can be
configured via the rear panel DIP switches.
NOTE:
4.1.4
1.
Fibre Channel transmission speed is also determined by cable length
and other factors. Make sure your connection and device
configuration meet the requirements specified by your cabling
devices vendors.
2.
Currently Fibre host channels only operate at either the fixed 4Gb or
2Gb speed. For example, if set to 4Gb/s, all networking devices must
support the 4Gb/s transfer rate.
SFP Transceivers
The SFP transceivers for connecting your storage network should comply with
4Gbps or 2Gbps bi-directional data link specifications, and come with a laser
transmitter (for fiber optic cables), LC type connector, and a metal enclosure to
lower EMI.
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Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
NOTE:
LC connectors are small form-factor, fiber-optic connectors based on a
1.25-mm ceramic ferrule with the familiar latching mechanism of the RJ45 modular plug and jack.
Other beneficial features of a typical SFP transceiver include a single power
supply, low power dissipation, and hot-swap capability. It is also important that
any transceiver you use meets the FC performance and reliability specifications.
NOTE:
SFP transceiver modules must be purchased separately. You may also
purchase the SFP transceivers from your Galaxy subsystem
vendor/distributor.
4.2
Topology and Configuration
Considerations
4.2.1
Basic Configuration Rules
When you are configuring your subsystem, the following are some basic rules
that should be followed.
•
When selecting the number of hard drives to be included in a logical
configuration, the host channel bandwidth and the mechanical performance
of individual disk disks should be considered.
It is a good practice to calculate performance against the host port
bandwidth when designing an application topology. As shown below, if
eight (8) members are included in a logical drive, this logical drive should
be associated with a host ID, and accessed through a host channel making
efficient use of the channel bandwidth. If, for example, two 8-drive logical
arrays are associated with IDs residing on a single host channel, there may
be a trade-off with the best performance.
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Figure 4-1: Drive Mechanical Speed and Logical Drive Speed
There are other considerations. For example, a spare drive carries no data
stripes and will not contribute to disk-level performance. Refer to the
documentation that came with your hard drives for performance data.
4-4
•
Follow all the Fibre Channel specifications when cabling. Pay attention to
signal quality and avoid electronic noise from adjacent interfaces.
•
The disk drives included in the same logical array should have the same
capacity, but it is preferred that all disk drives within a chassis have the
same capacity. Even disk drives of the same model name may carry
different block numbers. One way to get around this issue is to tune down
the “Maximum Drive Capacity” to a lower number. Please refer to your
firmware operation manual for details.
•
A spare drive should have a minimum capacity equivalent to the largest
drive that it is expected to replace. If the capacity of the spare is smaller
than the capacity of the drive it is expected to replace, then the controller
will not proceed with the failed drive rebuild.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4.2.2
Fibre Channel Topologies
The Fibre Channel standard supports three (3) separate topologies: point-topoint, Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL), and fabric switch.
4.2.3
•
Point-to-Point: Point-to-point topology is the simplest topology that
can be used. It is a direct connection between two (2) Fibre Channel
devices. System firmware has a related configuration option, and when
set to “Point-to-Point,” only one target ID is available on each channel.
•
FC-AL: This is the most common topology currently in use. The Fibre
Channel devices are all connected in a loop and each device is assigned
an arbitrated loop physical address (AL_PA). FC-AL supports 124
devices on a single loop.
•
Fabric: The fabric topology supports up to 224 Fibre Channel devices.
This topology allows many devices to communicate at the same time.
A Fibre switch is required to implement this topology.
Host-side Topologies
In a configuration designed for high data availability, the primary concern for
host-side topologies is to avoid points of failure. It is therefore recommended
that an application server be connected to at least two (2) HBAs. It is also
preferable to connect the RAID subsystems to the host computer(s) through a
Fibre switch. The 24bay Galaxy RAID subsystems come with the onboard hub.
In a directly-attached application, the onboard hub feature provides path
redundancy and saves you the cost of a FC switch.
NOTE:
To create fault-tolerant data paths on the host side, a third-party multipathing software is necessary for managing access routes to the RAID
subsystem to avoid access contention and path failover.
4.2.4
Drive-side Topologies
Each disk drive is connected through a dedicated channel. Note that the driveside expansion is made through the SAS expansion port on each controller.
4.2.5
Internal Connections
The internal connections described here apply to the redundant controller
subsystem, GHDX2-2430R-24F4D. The two (2) RAID controllers are connected
to each other internally through a common backplane. This enables the
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controllers to synchronize cached data and configuration profile. When the
onboard hub is enabled by the enclosure DIP switches, the two (2) host channels
on individual RAID controllers are connected internally via bypass. This
mechanism provides access routes to a surviving controller in the event of a
single controller failure.
•
4.2.6
Make sure you select the appropriate host port topology option through
the firmware configuration utilities. The available options include:
-
Loop Only
-
Point-to-point
•
If the onboard hub is enabled, the host IDs on the two (2) host channels
are associated with specific WWN node names and port names. If a
controller fails, the surviving controller will avail itself using the
original node names and port names.
•
In the event of cable disconnection or RAID controller failure, a valid
data link through the existing controller will continue data transfer that
was previously served by the failed controller.
Unique Identifier
The unique identifier is a user-specified, 16-bit hexadecimal number that is used
to generate FC ports’ node names, port names, and also the Ethernet port MAC
address. Each subsystem has a factory-assigned hexadecimal number and there
is no need to change it unless you accidentally lose the identifier.
4.2.7
ID/LUN Mapping
I/O load distribution between the dual-redundant RAID controllers (in the
GHDX2-2430R-24F4D) is determined by the host ID/LUN mapping, a process
done by associating logical configurations of disk drives with host channel
ID/LUN combinations. Different logical groups of drives can be mapped to
channel IDs or the LUN numbers under a host ID. For a multi-path
configuration, a logical drive configuration can be mapped to different ID/LUN
combinations. In this case, the multi-path management software or file locking
mechanism is required on the host side. ID/LUN mapping procedures are
described fully in the interface-specific firmware Operation Manual.
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Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4.3
Fibre Channels
4.3.1
Onboard Hub Settings
The subsystem comes with embedded hub on their host channels. Channel bus
and access routes configurations with different DIP switch settings are
diagrammed below.
4.3.2
Jumper Assignments
Figure 4-2: Location of the DIP Switches
•
Pin #4:
CH0 and CH1 onboard hub en/disable
The onboard hub enabled on CH0 and
CH1.
The onboard hub disabled on CH0 and
CH1.
•
Pins #5 and #6: CH0 and CH1 4G/2G speed selector
These combinations set all host
ports to 4Gbps speed.
The pin combination sets all host
ports to 2Gbps speed.
DIP switches are located on the upper left corner of the subsystem rear panel.
Use a ballpoint pen to change the setting.
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DIP Switch Configurations and Host Port Connectivity:
•
Pin #4: The host channels of the partner controllers are connected together
across the backplane signal paths. Host ports are combined into
host loops; for example, the CH0 ports on Controller A and
Controller B form a 4-port host loop.
Every host I/O port connects to both of the RAID controllers.
Figure 4-3: Hub Enabled: Controller A and B ports Combined
into Host Loops.
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Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
Figure 4-4: Host Port Bandwidth when the Onboard Hub is Enabled or
Disabled
IMPORTANT:
1.
One drawback of using the hub function is that the host ports hubbed
together may not be connected to the N_ports on a fabric switch.
When host ports are hubbed together, they are ideal for connecting
other RAID enclosures and direct-attached servers with path
redundancy without the costs on expensive FC switches.
2.
Another drawback is that if host ports are hubbed together, the
overall host port bandwidth is halved.
For example, the Channel 1 host ports on each controller feature a
4Gb/s bandwidth and a total of 8Gb/s bandwidth from the host ports
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
on two controllers.
If host ports are hubbed together, all four “Channel 1” host ports on
bother controllers share a 4Gb/s bandwidth.
Figure 4-5: Channel Bus Connection and Cascaded Subsystems
o Usage:
4-10
The onboard hub applies when an additional RAID enclosure
is needed and when you run short of the available switch
ports, HBA ports, or installation space.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
o Concern:
•
One major concern for this topology is to avoid ID conflicts
on the host channels. When cascaded, logical drives from
different RAID subsystems should be associated with
different host channel IDs.
o Hub Disabled:
When the onboard hub is disabled, SFP ports are
specific to each RAID controller. If you connect
application servers through FC switches, disable the
onboard hub. Namely, the onboard hub should be
disabled where FC port bypass can be provided
externally.
Pins #5 + 6:
Currently the Fibre Channel device Auto- Negotiation
does not work with all FC HBAs or switches. Please
contact Galaxy tech support for certified equipment
list for more information. Host-side connections must
operate either at the fixed 4Gbps or 2Gbps speed. If
your current storage network comprises of 2Gbps
devices, set channel speed to 2Gbps.
WARNING!
When the speed selection is manually switched for host channels to run at
a 2G speed, subsystem firmware must also be adjusted accordingly. You
may access the firmware using the LCD in front of the subsystem, RS232C hyper terminal screen, telnet and RAIDWatch management software.
If the Fibre port speed options are not coordinated with the firmware, the
data transfer rate may eventually slow down and cause system error.
Make sure the Channel bus Data Rate setting in firmware is consistent
with your DIP switch selection. The firmware configuration options can be
found in Main Menu, “View and Edit Channels,” “Data Rate.”
Changing the configuration requires resetting the subsystem.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
NOTE:
To answer questions related to firmware configuration such as the channel
speed selection, please refer to the FC to SATA RAID Subsystem
Operation Manual that came with the Product Utility CD in your
subsystem package.
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Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4.4
Host Connection Sample Topologies
4.4.1
Simple, Direct Connection to Host Computers
The subsystem is directly connected to two application servers. Each server is
equipped with two HBA cards.
Figure 4-6: Direct-attached Clustered Servers Connections – Hub Disabled
Note that if a logical drive is associated with both an AID and a BID, logical
drive’s performance may not be as good as those associated with two AIDs or
two BIDs. A logical drive is managed by Controller A if it is associated with
AIDs.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Shown below is an example showing logical drives each managed by a single
RAID controller, host ports hubbed together, and access routes forming faulttolerant pairs. Multiple IDs will appear through the host ports; namely, multiple
RAID volumes will appear through a host data link. Host management software
will be necessary to manage access contention and provide failover capability.
Because each channel’s host ports on controller A and controller B are hubbed
together, a BID (ID managed by controller B) can appear through a host link to
an SFP port on controller A.
Figure 4-7: Direct-attached Clustered Servers Connections – Hub Enabled
Channel Settings
Host
4-14
CH0 and CH1
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
Drive
Via system bus, through the backplane
4th DIP Switch
Hub enabled/disabled
Configuration Information
4.4.2
RAID Controllers
2
Application Servers
2
Data path Connection
Fault-tolerant paths
Host Channel Bandwidth
800 MBps
Max. Number of Drives
24
•
This is a direct-attached configuration showing two (2) host computers
sharing the storage volume of one (1) RAID subsystem. Disk drives in the
enclosure can be configured into one or more arrays, and made available
through individual host ports.
•
Operating system(s) might boot from the array. Operating using a protected
capacity decreases the chance of server downtime. The logical arrays can be
associated with different controller IDs on different host channels so that if
a cable link fails, the host can still access the arrays through another channel
link. File locking or access management utilities will be necessary to avoid
access conflicts.
•
Depending on I/O characteristics, each configured array should be properly
optimized either for Random or Sequential I/Os.
•
Multiple logical drives or multiple RAID partitions can be created and made
available separately through different ID/LUNs on the host ports.
Direct-attached Connections with Data Link Fault
Tolerance
This is a direct-attached configuration making use of all connection points and
shares storage with four (4) host computers, each of the host computers with two
(2) single-ported HBAs for path redundancy.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 4-8: Clustered Servers with Redundant Paths
Channel Settings
Host
CH0 and CH1
Drive
Via system bus, through the backplane
4th DIP Switch
Hub disabled
Configuration Information
4-16
RAID Controllers
2
Application Servers
4
Data Path Connection
Fault-tolerant data paths
Host Channel Bandwidth
1600 MB/s
Max. Number of Drives
24
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
•
This is a direct-attached configuration showing four (4) host computers
sharing the capacity in one (1) RAID subsystem. Disk drives in the
enclosure can be configured into one or more arrays, and made available
through individual host ports.
•
Each configured array (logical drive) is separately mapped (or associated)
with more than one host ID/LUN. A logical configuration of drives may
appear as two array volumes to the host, and the multi-path management
software on the host should recognize them as access routes to the same
storage volume.
•
In the sample diagram above, up to two IDs may appear through a host link.
To avoid access contention, you will need access management provided by
3rd party software.
•
If a RAID controller fails or a data path is disconnected, the host computer
can still access the array. By associating an array with IDs on two different
host buses and two different RAID controllers, the host computer can
access the array in the event of single component failure.
•
If Controller A fails, Controller B will take over to eliminate any downtime
for high-availability applications.
•
Operating system(s) might boot from the array. Operating using a protected
capacity decreases the chance of server downtime. Each server may use
separate capacity volumes or share volumes using file locking or access
management utilities.
•
Depending on I/O characteristics, each configured array should be properly
optimized either for Random or Sequential I/Os.
•
You may also partition a logical capacity into two or more volumes and let
each server access separate partitions.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
4.4.3
Hub Disabled and Switched Fabric Connection
With disabled hub, the individual host channels from individual RAID
controllers are connected to two separate switched fabric networks. This can
apply to applications using the RAID subsystem as a common storage pool
where component and path redundancy is also important.
For simplicity reason, only two servers are shown in the diagram. More cable
links can be used to connect more application servers within a switched fabric.
Figure 4-9: Hub Disabled and Switched Fabric
Please note, in the example shown in Figure 4-9, the channels are configured as
follows:
Channel Settings
Host
CH0 and CH1
Drive
Via system bus, through the backplane
4th DIP Switch
Hub disabled
Configuration Information
4-18
RAID Controllers
2
Host Servers
Multiple through fabric links
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
Data Path Connection
Fault-tolerant data paths
Host Channel Bandwidth
1600 MB/s
Max. Number of Drives
24
The onboard hub can be disabled so that individual host ports provide access to
individual RAID controllers.
•
This is a SAN storage application using two (2) host channels through four
(4) separate FC links from individual RAID controllers.
•
Path bypass redundancy is provided externally by a fabric switch.
•
Depending on switch port configuration, change your FC host-side protocol
through firmware utilities to fit the connection type either to the N_ports or
the NL_ports as specified by your FC switches.
•
Access management software can be implemented to direct data flow
through an existing host link if one of the data paths fails. The precondition
is that an array should also be available through the host ID/LUNs on
another host link.
CAUTION!
Figure 3-10: Faulty Connections in a Public Loop
Please DO NOT connect the cascade ports of a single host channel on a
RAID controller to two different FC switches. A public loop contains only one
FL_port, and hence the second FL_port will become non-functional.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4.4.4
Expansion Links
A redundant-controller RAID enclosure connects to a maximum of two (2) 16
drive SAS expansion enclosures which house either SAS or SATA disk drives.
SAS link cables are provided with the expansion enclosures.
A unique enclosure ID should be individually configured for each expansion
enclosure using the rotary ID switch on its LED panel.
Figure 4-11: Expansion: Redundant Controller Configuration
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
A single-controller RAID enclosure connects to a maximum of four (4) 16 bay
SAS expansion enclosures which house either SAS or SATA disk drives. SAS
link cables are provided with the expansion enclosures. The single-controller
configuration provides no data link redundancy.
Figure 4-12: Expansion: Single Controller Configuration
4.5
Power On
Once all of the components have been installed in the subsystem and the host
ports have been connected, the subsystem can be powered on.
4.5.1
Check List
BEFORE powering on the subsystem, please check the following:
‰
4-22
Memory module: Memory modules have been correctly installed on
the controller boards.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4.5.2
‰
BBU: If used, make sure the optional BBU has been installed correctly
in the single-controller enclosure.
‰
Hard drives: Hard drives have been correctly installed in the drive
trays.
‰
Drive trays: All the drive trays, whether or not they contain a hard
drive, have been installed into the subsystem.
‰
DIP switch settings: All the appropriate DIP switch settings have been
made. The hub has been enabled/disabled (as required) and the channel
speed has been properly configured.
‰
Cable connections: The subsystem has been correctly connected to
host computer(s), external networking devices, expansion enclosures,
and/or cascaded subsystems.
‰
Power cords: The power cords have been connected to the PSUs on
the subsystem and plugged into the main power source.
‰
Ambient temperature: All the subsystem components have been
acclimated to the surrounding temperature.
Power On Procedure
When powering on the subsystem, please follow these steps:
Step 1.
Power on the Fibre Channel connection devices.
These devices include the FC switches and any other such
device that have been connected to the subsystems. Please
refer to the documentation that came with your networking
devices to see their power on procedure.
Step 2.
Power on the cascaded subsystems or the expansion JBODs
that are not connected directly to the host computers.
Step 3.
Power on the subsystem.
The subsystems should be powered on before the host
computers. Turn the power switch on. (See Figure 4-13) One
(1) power switch that controls all PSUs is shielded by an antitamper plastic cover.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 4-13: Power Switch
CAUTION!
Although the PSUs are redundant and the subsystem can withstand a
single PSU failure, it is advisable to replace a failed PSU immediately.
The subsystem will be held in an idle state if two PSUs have already failed
in the subsystem.
Step 4.
Power on the host computers.
The host computers are the last devices that are turned on.
Please refer to the documentation that came with your host
computers to see their own power on procedures.
4.5.3
Power On Status Check
Once the subsystem has been powered on, the status of the entire subsystem
should be checked to ensure that all components are receiving power and
functioning without complications or malfunctions.
…
…
…
…
4-24
Controller module LEDs – The controller ready, host and drive ports
active LEDs should all flash green after a successful initialization.
Drive tray LEDs – The blue LED for all the drive trays (that contain
hard drives) should light up, showing that there is power.
LCD panel LEDs – The blue LED on the LCD panel should be lit,
indicating that power is supplied to the system.
Firmware and RAIDWatch – The overall status of the system can be
checked using the firmware or the RAIDWatch GUI.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
…
Audible alarm – If any errors occur during the initialization process,
the onboard alarm will sound in a hastily repeated manner.
Drive tray LEDs should normally start flashing, indicating the RAID controller
units are attempting to access the hard drives.
System firmware can be configured to support a delayed sequence for starting
drives. Please consult your interface-specific Operation Manual for more
details.
NOTE:
The subsystem has been designed to run continuously. If a component
fails, the fault can be corrected online.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
4.5.4
LCD Screen
When powering on the subsystem, the following messages should appear on the
front panel LCD screen. Wait for the front panel LCD to show “READY” or
“No Host LUN” before the host boots up.
Model Name
GHDX2-24
Ready
Status/Data Transfer Indicator
Figure 4-14: The LCD Initial Screen
The LCD screen startup sequence is shown and described in the sequence
below.
4-26
Initializing….
Please Wait...
This screen appears when the PSUs are
turned on.
Power On Self
Test Please Wait…
System is performing a self test.
Power on
Init Completed..
System power-on self test is completed.
GHDX2-24
System is accessing various interfaces.
GHDX2-24
512MB RAM, Wait...
Verifying installed memory.
GHDX2-24
No Host LUN
System is ready. You can now start to
configure the subsystem.
GHDX2-24
Ready
System is ready for I/Os.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 4: Subsystem Connection and Operation
4.6
Power Off Procedure
To power off the subsystem, please follow these steps:
NOTE:
When powering off the subsystem, please ensure that no time-consuming
processes, like a “logical drive parity” check or a “Media Scan,” are running.
Step 1.
Stop I/O access to the system.
Use the software provided on the host computer to stop all I/O
accesses to the subsystem. Please refer to the documentation
that came with your application servers and operating systems.
Some operating systems may require “unmounting” disk
volumes (mapped LUNs) before powering off the array.
Step 2.
Flush the cache.
Usually the cached writes will be distributed in a short time.
You may also use the “Shutdown Controller” firmware
function to flush all cached data. This prepares the RAID
subsystem to be powered down.
Step 3.
Turn off the power.
Turn off the power switch at the rear panel of the RAID
subsystem. Once the RAID subsystem has been powered off,
other devices connected to the subsystem may be powered
down.
Subsystem Connection and Operation
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4-28
Subsystem Connection and Operation
Chapter 5
Subsystem Maintenance
5.1.
Introducing Subsystem Maintenance and
Upgrading
5.1.1
Maintenance
Constant monitoring and maintenance of your subsystem will minimize
subsystem downtime and preserve the working integrity of the system for a
longer period of time. If any of the subsystem components fail, they must be
replaced as soon as possible.
WARNING!
Do not remove a failed component from the subsystem until you have a
replacement on hand. If you remove a failed component without replacing
it, the internal airflow will be disrupted and the system will overheat
causing damage to the subsystem.
All of the following components can be replaced in case of failure:
1.
RAID controller module – Section 5.2.3
2.
DIMM module – Section 5.2.4
3.
BBU module – Section 5.3
4.
PSU modules – Section 5.4
5.
Cooling modules – Section 5.5
6.
Hard drives – Section 5.6.2
Subsystem Maintenance
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5-2
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
5.1.2
General Notes on Component Replacement
ƒ
All of the components on the subsystem, including the RAID controllers,
PSU modules, cooling modules, and drive trays, are hot-swappable and can
be changed while the subsystem is still in operation.
ƒ
Qualified engineers who are familiar with the subsystem should be the only
ones who make component replacements. If you are not familiar with the
subsystem and/or with RAID subsystem maintenance in general, it is
strongly advised that you refer subsystem maintenance to a suitably
qualified maintenance engineer.
ƒ
Normalized airflow is directly dependent upon the presence of all
subsystem components. Even if a subsystem component fails, it should not
be removed from the subsystem until a replacement is readily at hand and
can be quickly installed. Removing a subsystem component without
replacing it can lead to permanent subsystem damage.
ƒ
When replacing any hot-swappable component, caution should be taken to
ensure that the components are handled in an appropriate manner. Rough or
improper handling of components can lead to irreparable damage.
WARNING!
When inserting a removable module, DO NOT USE EXCESSIVE
FORCE! Forcing or slamming a module into the chassis can damage the
connector pins on the module or the backplane. Gently push the module in
until it reaches the end of module slot. Once you feel the contact
resistance, use slightly more pressure to ensure the module connectors are
properly mated. Use the extraction levers or retention screws to secure the
module.
5.2.
Replacing Controller Module Components
5.2.1
Overview
The controller module consists of the components shown below:
Component
DIMM Module
Subsystem Maintenance
Maintenance Procedures
The DIMM module can be replaced when it fails
or if a larger capacity DIMM module is required.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5.2.2
5.2.3
BBU Module
The BBU can be installed after the initial
installation procedure or replaced if a previously
installed BBU module is faulty or fails to hold its
charge.
Main Board
If the controller module in a single controller
model fails, it is necessary to power the system
down and replace the controller.
Notes on Controller Module Maintenance
ƒ
The controller module contains a DIMM module and a BBU module. When
replacing the controller module, these components can be removed and used
on the new controller module if they are functioning normally.
ƒ
When replacing the controller module, you must remember that the
controller board is one of the most sensitive components in the subsystem.
All previously stipulated safety precautions (see Chapter 2) must be strictly
adhered to. Failure to adhere to these precautions can result in permanent
damage to the controller board, resulting in timely delays.
Removing the Controller Module
CAUTION!
1.
It is recommended to apply Galaxy certified memory modules to avoid
compatibility issues.
2.
The installed BBU and controller module must be removed prior to installing
new memory modules. Do this with care. Sensitive components can be
damaged during the process.
3.
The BBU is hot swappable and can be independently swapped from the
controller. However, as a safety precaution and in case your memory still
holds cached data, it is recommended to remove the BBU before handling
the DDR RAM module. If the BBU is supplying power to the memory when
the DDR module is being removed, damage may occur!
To remove the controller module:
Step 1.
5-4
Prepare a clean, static-free work pad on which to place the
controller that will be removed from the chassis.
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Step 2.
If working on the dual-controller Galaxy HDX2, the workload
should have been taken over by the surviving RAID controller
in the event of single controller failure.
Step 3.
Remove the BBU module if one has been installed. Loosen
the BBU module’s retention screw and then simply retrieve it
from the chassis.
Figure 5-1: Removing the BBU Module
Step 4.
Disconnect all cables that are connected to the controller
module you wish to replace. These include the FC cables
connecting to the host or cascaded enclosures the SAS cable to
the expansion enclosure, an Ethernet cable to the management
port, and any cables connected to the RS-232C audio jacks.
Step 5.
Loosen the retention screws that secure the controller’s
ejection levers to the enclosure chassis.
Figure 5-2: Removing the Retention Screws
Step 6.
Subsystem Maintenance
Gently press both of the ejector levers in a downward
motion at the same time to disconnect the controller from the
back-end PCB. When the ejector levers are at their lowest
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
positions, the controller module will automatically be eased out
of the controller module bay in the subsystem.
Figure 5-3: Removing the Controller Module
Step 7.
5.2.4
Carefully pull the controller module out of the subsystem
chassis keeping one hand underneath to support the weight of
the module.
DIMM Module Replacement
If a DIMM module fails or a DIMM module with a higher memory capacity is
required, the onboard DIMM module can be replaced.
5.2.5
ƒ
DIMM module replacement: When replacing DIMM module, make sure
that the subsystem is correctly powered down and disconnect all the cables
connected to the controller prior to removing the controller module.
ƒ
Procedures on replacing the DIMM module: For complete illustrated
instructions on how to replace a DIMM module, please refer to Chapter 2.
Replacing the Controller Module
If the controller module has failed, it must be replaced. To replace a failed
controller module:
Step 1.
5-6
Remove the BBU module (if it was installed) from the faulty
controller, and then remove the faulty controller itself. Unless
you have a similar subsystem to test whether the DIMM
module on the faulty controller is functional, it is not
recommended to re-use the DIMM module. (See Section 5.2.4)
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Step 2.
Install the BBU module onto the replacement controller. You
may need to install a DIMM module to your replacement
controller if it comes without a pre-installed module.
Step 3.
Install the replacement controller into the subsystem by
pushing it into the module slot. Carefully push it in until you
feel the contact resistance. Use slightly more force and when
the controller faceplate is almost aligned with the chassis rear
panel, pull up the ejection levers to secure the controller into
chassis.
Figure 5-4: Installing a Replacement Controller
Step 4.
Fasten the previously removed retention screws to secure the
ejection levers.
Step 5.
Re-attach all the cables that were removed. These include the
host FC cables, SAS expansion link, the Ethernet cable, and
the serial port cables.
Subsystem Maintenance
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Step 6.
Power up the system. Please follow the correct power up
sequence that is described below.
5.3.
Replacing a Failed BBU Component
5.3.1
Replacing the BBU Module
NOTE:
When replacing a BBU in a single controller model, the whole subsystem
needs to be powered down. Therefore, when replacing a failed BBU, you
should carefully select the time at which the replacement will be made to
minimize the overall disruption to the service.
CAUTION!
5-8
ƒ
Install or replace the BBU with BBUs supplied by your subsystem
vendors only. Use of battery cells from another source will void our
warranty.
ƒ
Always dispose of discharged or used batteries in an ecologically
responsible manner. Dispose of used BBUs at authorized disposal
sites only.
ƒ
Do not use nor leave the BBU near a heat source. Heat can melt the
insulation and damage other safety features of battery cells, possibly
causing it to leak acid and result in flames or explosion.
ƒ
Do not immerse the BBU in water nor allow it to get wet. Its
protective features can be damaged and abnormal chemical reactions
may occur, possibly causing functional defects, acid leak, and other
hazardous results.
ƒ
Do not disassemble or modify the BBU. If disassembled, the BBU
could leak acid, overheat, emit smoke, burst and/or ignite.
ƒ
Do not pierce the BBU with a sharp object, strike it with a hammer,
step on it, or throw it against a hard surface. These actions could
damage or deform it and internal short-circuiting can occur, possibly
causing functional defects, acid leak, and other hazardous results.
ƒ
If a BBU leaks, gives off a bad odor, generates heat, becomes
discolored or deformed, or in any way appears abnormal during use,
recharging or storage, immediately remove it from the subsystem
and stop using it. If this is discovered when you first use the BBU,
return it to your Galaxy subsystem vendor.
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
BBU failure can result from the following:
1.
A BBU (Battery Backup Unit) has lost its ability to hold electrical charge.
This may be the case after the battery cells have been recharged for many
times regardless of how long the module has been used. Therefore, a stable
power source is important for system operation.
2.
The charger circuitry mounted underneath the controller top cover has
failed.
There are other conditions that might trigger the BBU fault events and light the
BBU fault LED:
1.
The temperature sensor embedded with the subsystem’s charger circuit
reports a temperature reading exceeding 45 degree Celsius. The charger
circuits will enter a low-power and self-protection state.
2.
A BBU module has been charged for over seven (7) hours. A timer is
embedded with the charger. When this occurs, the charger will
enter a timer fault state. The fault condition usually occurs with a
brand new BBU or with a totally discharged BBU. Charging will
resume automatically if you remove and re-install the BBU module.
To replace a BBU module, please follow these steps:
Step 1.
Remove the BBU module from the subsystem by
loosening its retention screw, and then gently removing the
module from the chassis.
Figure 5-5: Removing the BBU Module
Step 2.
Subsystem Maintenance
Re-install the new BBU. To do this, insert the BBU into the
module slot, and fasten the retention screw to secure the
BBU.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
NOTE:
1.
The chance of BBU charger failure is comparatively low. If the cause
of a failure cannot be determined even after a BBU module is
replaced, contact your system vendor for a replacement controller and
return the controller module through the standard RMA procedure.
Details of the RMA procedure can be found on the Galaxy website.
2.
It is recommended to include BBU failure as one of the Event
Triggered reaction item in firmware configuration utility. If so
configured, data caching will be temporarily disabled during the time
when a BBU fails.
5.4.
Replacing a Failed PSU Module
5.4.1
Notes on PSU Module Maintenance
ƒ
Redundant (N+1) PSU modules: The subsystem comes with three fully
redundant, hot-swappable PSU modules. These modules are accessed
through the rear of the subsystem.
ƒ
Immediate replacement: When a PSU fails, it should ideally be replaced
immediately. Do not remove a PSU module unless a replacement is readily
available. Removing a PSU without a replacement will cause severe
disruptions to the internal airflow and the subsystem will overheat, possibly
causing irreparable damage to some of the subsystem components.
WARNING!
Although the PSU modules are fully redundant, it is not advisable to run
the subsystem with any failed PSU module for a long period of time. If a
second PSU module fails, the subsystem will enter an idle state to protect
the stored data.
5.4.2
Replacing a PSU Module
To replace a PSU, please follow these steps:
Step 1.
5-10
Flip open the cable clamp (if used) and disconnect the
power cord that connects the failed module to the main power.
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Figure 5-6: Removing the Power Cord
Step 2.
Remove the retention screw underneath the PSU’s extraction
handle.
Figure 5-7: Removing the PSU Retention Screw
Step 3.
Subsystem Maintenance
Remove the failed module by pressing the extraction handle
down until the PSU is released from the enclosure chassis.
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Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Figure 5-8: Dislodging the PSU
Step 4.
Gently pull the PSU module out of the chassis using the
retention handle.
Step 5.
Insert the replacement PSU module into the slot with the
retention handle at its lowest position. Push the PSU in until
you feel the contact resistance with its back-end connectors.
Do not use force or slam the module into place. Doing so
can damage the back-end connectors or enclosure backplane.
Secure the PSU into the chassis slot. Make sure the saddle
notches of the extraction handle lock onto the anchor pins on
the interior walls of the module slot. Once in place, pull the
extraction handle in an upward motion to secure the module.
Figure 5-9: Securing PSU Using the Extraction Handle
5-12
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
Step 6.
Insert and fasten the retention screw underneath the
extraction handle to secure the module.
Step 7.
Install the cable clamp assembly (if used).
5.5.
Cooling Module Maintenance
5.5.1
Notes on Cooling Module Maintenance
ƒ
Two redundant cooling modules: The subsystem is equipped with two
redundant, hot swappable, dual-fan cooling modules located above the PSU
modules. These cooling modules control the internal operating temperature
of the subsystem and therefore their working integrity should be maintained
at all times.
ƒ
Detecting a failed cooling fan module: If a cooling module fails, you can
choose to be notified of the failure by the LEDs located at the back of the
module, an audible alarm, the firmware terminal access, the RAIDWatch
Panel View, or the various event notification methods.
Shown below are the locations of cooling fans:
Figure 5-10: Locations of the Subsystem Cooling Fans
NOTE:
To reduce the risk of system down time, replace a cooling fan/PSU module
even when only one cooling fan fails within. Replacing a single cooling fan
within each module may take several minutes and is not an operation
completed at the installation site.
Subsystem Maintenance
5-13
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
ƒ
Replacing a cooling module: When you are notified that a cooling module
has failed, it should be replaced as soon as possible. A failed cooling
module should only be removed from the subsystem when you have a
replacement module that can be installed as soon as the failed cooling
module has been removed.
WARNING!
It is not advisable to run the subsystem with a single cooling module for a
long period of time. If the second cooling module fails, the system is at
risk of sustaining irreparable damage.
5.5.2
Replacing a Cooling Module
To replace a cooling module, please follow these instructions:
Step 1.
Remove the cooling module by pressing the slide lock on the
side of the module towards the center of the chassis and then
pulling the module out of the chassis.
Figure 5-11: Removing the Cooling Module
Step 2.
5-14
Gently slide the new cooling module into the chassis. Do not
use force or slam the module. The slide lock will hold the
module in place. If the cooling module is added online, the
respective cooling fan LEDs should light constant green.
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
5.6.
Drive Tray Maintenance
5.6.1
Notes on Hard Drive Maintenance
ƒ
Hot-swappable drive trays: The drive trays are all hot-swappable. If a hard
drive fails, it can be replaced while the subsystem is still running.
ƒ
Remove drives slowly: When removing a drive tray, withdraw it from the
enclosure slowly.
ƒ
Open the front flap: Once the front flap on the drive tray has been opened,
the drive tray must be removed from the subsystem. Failure to remove the
drive tray from the subsystem after the front flap has been opened may
result in signal glitches and Data Compare Errors.
ƒ
Replacement on-hand: Before removing a failed hard drive from the
subsystem, make sure you have a replacement hard drive readily available.
Do not leave the drive tray slot open for an extended period of time.
Otherwise, the normalized airflow will be disrupted and subsystem
components will overheat and may become permanently damaged.
5.6.2 Hard Drive Replacement
If a hard drives fails in a logical configuration with parity redundancy, the hard
drive should be replaced as soon as possible. If any member drive fails in the
configuration, data will be lost. To replace a hard drive, please follow these
steps:
Step 1.
Identify the correct location of a faulty drive. Use your
RAIDWatch or terminal management screen to acquire the
information of a faulty drive, e.g., slot number or channel
number/ID number. You may then visually examine the
location by checking the drive tray LEDs. One LED should
light red.
Step 2.
Remove the drive tray from the enclosure. First unlock the
rotary bezel lock on the drive tray front bezel using a flat-head
screwdriver until the groove on its face is in a horizontal
orientation.
Step 4.
Open the front flap by pressing the release button. This will
dislodge the hard drive from the enclosure and the hard drive
can be carefully withdrawn.
Subsystem Maintenance
5-15
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
5-16
Step 5.
Remove the retention screws on the sides of the drive tray
and then remove the hard drive from the drive tray.
Step 6.
Install the replacement drive. Please refer to the complete
hard drive installation procedure in Chapter 2.
Subsystem Maintenance
Chapter 5: Subsystem Maintenance
This page is intentionally left blank.
Subsystem Maintenance
5-17
Appendix A
Subsystem Specifications
A.1.
Technical Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Humidity
Temperature
Altitude
5% to 95% (non condensing – operating and nonoperating)
Operating: 0º to 40ºC
(0º to 35ºC when BBU is applied)
Non-operating: -20º to 60ºC
Operating: sea level to 12,000 ft
Non-operating: sea level to 20,000 ft
Power Requirements
Input Voltage
100VAC @ 16A
240VAC @ 8A with PFC
(auto-switching)
Frequency
50 to 60Hz
Power
Consumption
405W
Dimensions
With Forearm Handles
Without
Forearm
Handles
Specifications
Height
174.4mm (6.86 inches)
174.4mm (6.86 inches)
Width
482mm (19 inches)
445mm (17.5 inches)
Length
514mm (20.2 inches)
498mm (19.6 inches)
A-1
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Certifications
•
•
•
•
•
FCC Class-A
CE
CB
UL60950 / IEC 60950
BSMI
Shock
Half-sine
Operating: 5G peak, 11ms duration
Non-operating: 10G peak, 11ms duration
Vibration
Operating
5 to 500Hz, 0.2G, 0.5oct/min
Non-operating
5 to 500Hz, 1.0G, 0.5oct/min
Warning Alarms
•
•
•
•
•
A-2
Audible alarms
System LEDs
LCD screen
Terminal screen
Event notification via the RAIDWatch Manager
Specifications
Appendix A: Subsystem Specifications
A.2.
Controller Functional Specifications
Specification
RAID Levels
Host O/S
Compatibility
Host Interface
Host Channels
Drive Interface
Drive Channels
Cache Mode
Cache Memory
Number of LUNs
RCC channels
Multiple Target
IDs/Host Channel
Aliases for Target
IDs
Firmware on
Flash Memory
Drive Hotswapping
Controller Hotswapping
A.3.
0, 1(0 + 1), 3, 5, 6, 10, 30, 50, 60, JBOD, and nonRAID disk spanning
Host O/S independent; supports all major platforms
Two 4Gbps Fibre channels via four SFP ports
Two pre-configured 4Gbps host channels
Supports up to 24 dedicated 3Gbps SATA-II
channels
All drive channels are pre-configured, routed through
a back-end PCB and cannot be changed
Write-through and write-back
Pre-installed 512MB DDR RAM DIMM, supports up
to 2GB DDR RAM with ECC, registered
Up to 32 per ID; up to a total of 1024, configurable
depending on the size of installed DDR memory
6 dedicated SATA channels for cross-controller
synchronized cache communications
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes (redundant controller models only)
Drive Tray Specifications
Specification
Specifications
Height
28mm (1.1inch)
Width
110mm (4.3 inches)
Depth
218.92mm (8.6 inches)
Bezel lock
Yes
A-3
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
A.4.
Power Supply Specifications
Specification
Nominal Power
DC Output
Input Frequency
AC Input
Power Factor
Correction
Hold-up Time
I2C
A.5.
405W
+3.3V: 3.20V to 3.465V; max. 20A
+5V: 4.80V to 5.25V; max. 36A
+12V: 11.52V to 12.60V; max. 24A
+5V SB: 4.85V to 5.25V; max. 0.5A
+3.3V & +5V combined power; max. 205W
50 to 60Hz
100VAC @ 8A – 240VAC @ 4A with PFC
Yes
At least 20ms at 115/230VAC full load after a
loss of AC input
Links to presence detection circuitry and sensors
through backplane to controller
Over-temperature
Protection
Lost cooling or excessive ambient temperature
Cooling Fans
Two fans inside each PSU
Cooling Module Specifications
Specification
Speed
Max. Airflow
(per module)
Operating Voltage
Rated Current
Rated Voltage
Temperature
A-4
High (6300rpm) or low (4600rpm) rotation speeds
controlled by firmware (measurements by one
cooling fan)
High speed: 48.12 CFM
Rated Voltage ± 10% (10.8V DC to 13.2V DC)
1.1A@12V DC (high speed); 0.55A@12V (low
speed)
DC 12V
Operating: -10° to 70°C
Specifications
Appendix A: Subsystem Specifications
A.6.
RAID Management
Specification
•
•
Configuration
•
•
Performance
Monitoring
Remote Control and
Monitoring
Event Notification
Management
Connection
Configuration on
Disk
Failure Indicator
A.7.
LCD keypad panel
Text-based firmware-embedded utility over
RS-232C connection through the included
audio jack-to-DB-9 serial cable
RAIDWatch Manager using an Ethernet link
Telnet access through an Ethernet link
Yes
Yes
Yes (via RAIDWatch’s sub-modules,
Configuration Client and NPC)
In-band over Fibre or out-of-band over Ethernet
or RS-232C
Configuration data stored on disks for logical
drive assemblies to exist after controller
replacement or hardware failure; basic settings,
e.g., channel model settings, are stored on
NVRAM
Via audible alarm, LCD keypad panel,
RAIDWatch Manager session, event notifications,
or event prompts on terminal emulation
Fault Tolerance Management
Specification
SATA Drive S.M.A.R.T Support
Battery Backup Option
ISEMS (Enclosure Management Service) via
I2C Interface
Automatic Drive Failure Detection
Specifications
Yes
Yes, comes standard on
redundant controller model
Yes
Yes
Automatic Rebuild on Spare Drives
Yes
Regenerate Logical Drive Parity
Yes
Bad Block Reassignment
Automatic Rebuild upon Failed Drive
Replacement
Manual Clone of Suspected Failed Drive
Concurrent Rebuild on Multiple Drives in a
RAID (0 + 1) Logical Drive
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
A-5
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Salvage the 2nd Temporary Failed Drive in a
Yes
RAID 1, 3, 5, or 6 Logical Drive
Salvage the 1st Temporary Failed Drive in a
Yes
RAID 0 Logical Drive
* For more firmware details, please refer to your interface-specific
firmware Operation Manual.
A-6
Specifications
Appendix A: Subsystem Specifications
This page is intentionally left blank.
Specifications
A-7
Appendix B
Spare Parts and Accessories
B.1.
Spare Parts
Spare parts that come with the subsystem are listed in Table B-1.
Model Name
Description
GHDX2/24-2430S-FC4
Fibre to SATA RAID controller module, for Single
controller Galaxy GHDX2-2430S-24F4D subsystem,
ASIC 400, four 4G FC SFP host connectors, one SAS
SFF-8470 expansion port, 512MB pre-installed DIMM
module
GHDX2/24-2430R-FC4
Fibre to SATA RAID controller module, for dual
controller Galaxy GHDX2-2430R-24F4D subsystem,
ASIC 400, four 4G FC SFP host connectors, one SAS
SFF-8470 expansion port
GALHDX-9273CDTray
(tray without MUX board)
Drive tray, (Type-III bezel and Type-II LED lightpipe)
for Single controller Galaxy GHDX2-2430S-24F4D
subsystem
GALHDX-9273CDTrayMUX (tray with MUX
board)
Drive tray (Type-III bezel and Type-II LED lightpipe),
2-to-1 SATA MUX conversion, power MOS switch
embedded, for dual-controller Galaxy GHDX2-2430R24F4D subsystems
GALHDX-9274CPSU
Power supply module, for Galaxy 24-bay GHDX22430S/R-24F4D subsystems, 405W (N+1) capacity
GHDX-9274CFANMOD
Cooling fan module, for Galaxy 24-bay GHDX22430S/R-24F4D subsystems
Spare Parts and Accessories
B-1
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
GHDX29274HANDLLCD
Left-side forearm handle, for Galaxy 24-bay GHDX22430S/R-24F4D subsystems LCD keypad panel
GHDX2-9274CHANDR
Right-side forearm handle, for Galaxy 24-bay GHDX22430S/R-24F4D subsystems
GALHDX-9274CBTC
Battery cell pack, Li-Ion, for Galaxy 24-bay GHDX22430S/R-24F4D subsystems
Table B-1: Spare Parts Shipped with the Subsystem
B.2.
Accessories and Optional Items
Accessories that come with the subsystem are listed in Table B-2.
Model Name
Description
GALHDX-9011
Null Modem, DB9 female to DB9 male, wires swapped
GALHDX-9270ASCAB
(single controllers)
Serial port cable for single-controller subsystems, 1
audio jack -to- 1 DB-9
GALHDX-9270AYCAB
(redundant controllers)
Serial port Y-cable for dual-controller subsystems, 2
audio jacks -to- 1 DB-9; maintenance-free during
controller failover/failback
Table B-2: Accessories Shipped with the Subsystem
Accessories that must be separately purchased are listed in Table B-2.
Model Name
Description
GALHDX-512MB-UPG
512MB DDR RAM DIMM module, for Galaxy 24-bay
GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D subsystems
GALHDX-1GB-UPG
1GB DDR RAM DIMM module, for Galaxy 24-bay
GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D subsystems
GALHDX-2GB-UPG
2GB DDR RAM DIMM module, for Galaxy 24-bay
GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D subsystems
Table B-3: Separately Purchased Accessories
B-2
Spare Parts and Accessories
Appendix B Spare Parts and Accessories
This page is intentionally left blank.
Spare Parts and Accessories
B-3
Appendix C
Pinouts
C.1.
SFP Connector Pinouts
Each of the SFP host or expansion ports is comprised of a case bottom, an EMI
case, and a 20-pin host connector. These port sockets receive Small-FormFactor Pluggable (SFP) fiber optic and copper-based transceivers.
Figure C-1: SFP Connector Pinouts
Pinouts
C-1
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
Pin
C-2
Pin Name
Pin Description
1
VEET
Transmitter ground (common with receiver
ground)
2
TFAULT
Transmitter fault; not supported
3
TDIS
Transmitter disable; laser output disabled on
high or open
4
MOD_DEF(2)
Module definition 2; data line for serial ID
5
MOD_DEF(1)
Module definition 1; clock line for serial ID
6
MOD_DEF(0)
Module definition 0; grounded within the
module
7
Rate Select
No connection required
8
LOS
Indicates loss of signal; logic 0 indicates
normal operation
9
VEER
Receiver ground (common with transmitter
ground)
10
VEER
Receiver ground (common with transmitter
ground)
11
VEER
Receiver ground (common with transmitter
ground)
12
RD-
Receiver inverted DATA out; AC coupled
13
RD+
Receiver non-inverted DATA out; AC coupled
14
VEER
Receiver ground (common with transmitter
ground)
15
VCCR
Receiver power supply
16
VCCT
Transmitter power supply
17
VEET
Transmitter ground (common with receiver
ground)
18
TD+
Transmitter non-Inverted DATA in 100 ohm
termination between TD+ and TD-; AC
coupled thereafter
19
TD-
Transmitter inverted DATA in. See TD+
20
VEET
Transmitter ground (common with receiver
ground)
Pinouts
Appendix C Pinouts
Table C-1: SFP Pin Out Definitions
C.2.
COM1 Serial Port Cable
COM1 Cable: This cable connects between COM1 serial port on the controller
module to the serial port of a management computer. The serial port’s defaults
and requirements are:
1.
Set at 38400 baud, 8 bit, 1 stop bit, and no parity.
2.
In most cases, connecting RXD, TXD, and GND is enough to establish
communications with a terminal.
Figure C-2: Adapter Cable for COM1 - Connector Pinouts
CN1 Pin Number
1
2
3
CN2 Pin Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Pin Name
Ground
TXD
RXD
Pin Name
NC
RXD
TXD
DTR (Shorted)
GND
DSR (Shorted)
RTS (Shorted)
CTS (Shorted)
NC
Table C-2: COM1 Adapter Cable CN1 and CN2 Pinout Definitions
Pinouts
C-3
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
C.3.
COM1 Cable: DB9 Audio Jack Y-Cable
Pinouts
The 2-audio jacks to DB9 Y-cable connects the COM1 serial ports on the
redundant RAID controllers for maintenance-free terminal emulation connection
during controller failover/failback.
Figure C-3: COM1 Cable CN1 and CN2 Connectors
CN1 Pin Number
1
2
3
CN2 Pin Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Pin Name
Ground
TXD
RXD
Pin Name
NC
RXD
TXD
DTR (Shorted)
GND
DSR (Shorted)
RTS (Shorted)
CTS (Shorted)
NC
Table C-3: COM1 Y-Cable CN1 and CN2 Pinout Definitions
C.4.
COM2 Serial Port Cable to UPS
COM2 Cable: Use this cable to connect the COM2 port to a UPS.
C-4
Pinouts
Appendix C Pinouts
Figure C-4: Connector Pinouts - Adapter Cable for COM2
Pinouts
C-5
Galaxy GHDX2-2430S/R-24F4D Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
CN1 Pin Number
1
2
3
CN2 Pin Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Pin Name
Ground
TXD
RXD
Pin Name
TXD
RXD
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Ground
Table C-4: COM2 Adapter Cable CN1 and CN2 Pinout Definitions
C.5.
Null Modem
A null modem is used for wire-swap and is necessary for connecting COM1
CN2 to a PC serial port.
C-6
Pinouts
Appendix C Pinouts
Figure C-5: Null Modem
Swap pin 2 and pin 3
Swap pin 4 and pin 6
Swap pin 7 and pin 8
Table C-5: Null Modem Pinouts
C.6.
Ethernet Port Pinouts
Figure C-6: Ethernet Port Connector
Pin
Pin Name
Pin
Pin Name
1
LAN_TXP
5
N2
2
LAN_TXN
6
LAN_RXN
3
LAN_RXP
7
N1
4
N2
8
N1
Table C-6: Ethernet Port Pinouts
C.7.
Power Socket
IEC-type receptacle.
Pinouts
C-7