Pentium II Mainboard
USER’S MANUAL
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction of LX6 Features
¬ Specifications.................................................. …….1-1
- Layout diagram .......................................................1-3
® The system block diagram........................................1-4
Chapter 2
Installing the Mainboard
¬ Installing the Mainboard to the Casing ....................2-3
- Standard External Connectors .................................2-4
® Jumper and Switches................................................2-9
¯ Installation of the CPU ..........................................2-10
° Installing System Memory ¡i DRAM Memory ¡j2-11
Chapter 3
Introduction of BIOS
¬ CPU Setup ¡i CPU SOFT MENU™¡j…………3-3
®
¯
°
±
²
³
´
µ
Standard CMOS Setup Menu ………………………3-7
BIOS Features Setup Menu ……………………….. 3-9
Chipset Features Setup Menu ………………………3-15
Power Management Setup Menu ………………….. 3-17
PCI & Onboard I/O Setup …………………………. 3-22
Load BIOS Defaults ……………………………….. 3-26
Load Setup Defaults ……………………………….. 3-26
Password Setting …………………………………… 3-27
IDE HDD Auto Detection ………………………….. 3-28
Chapter 4
Bus Master IDE Driver
Part No:MN-100-2A0-71
Rev:1.00
Appendix A Quick Installation
Appendix B General Discussion about HDD Installation
Appendix C Technical Support
Appendix D Flash BIOS User Instructions
Appendix E How to install Ultra DMA/33 drive
Appendix F
How to install PCI Bridge Batch file
Introduction of LX6
Chapter 1
Feature
1-1
Introduction of LX6
Feature
The mainboard is designed for the new generation CPU. It supports the Intel CPU
SLOT1(PentiumII), up to 1GB of memory, super I/O, and Green PC functions.
The mainboard provides high performance for the server system and meets the
requirements of the desktop system for multimedia in the future.
¬ Specifications
1. CPU
l CPU SOFT MENU™ eliminates the need for jumpers or DIP switches
needed to set CPU parameters
l Employs switching type regulators to stabilize CPU operation
l Supports 66, 75* and 83*MHz CPU external clock speeds
l Supports Pentium® II 233 ~ 300 MHz processor cartridge
2. Chipset
l
l
l
l
Intel 440LX chipset (82443LX and 82371AB)
Supports Ultra DMA/33 IDE protocol
Supports Advanced Configuration and Power Management Interface(ACPI)
Accelerated Graphics Port connector supports AGP 66MHz/133MHz
(Sideband) 3.3V device
3. Cache Memory
l Level 1 and Level 2 cache built into Intel Pentium II processor card
4. Memory(DRAM)
l Four 168-pin DIMM sockets support SDRAM and EDO DRAM modules
l Supports up to 512MB (EDO DRAM up to 1GB)
l ECC suppor
1-2
Chapter 1
5. System BIOS
l Award Plug and Play BIOS supports APM, DMI, and ACPI
6. Multi I/O Functions
l Floppy port supports up to 2.88MB, 3 mode floppy and LS-120
l Ultra DMA/33 bus master IDE supports up to 4 IDE devices
l Built-in Standard/EPP/ECP parallel port connector
l Two built-in 16550 fast UART compatible serial port connectors
l Built-in PS/2 keyboard and PS/2 mouse port connectors
l Built-in standard IrDA TX/RX header
l Two built-in USB connectors
7. Miscellaneous
l ATX form factor
l One AGP slot, Four PCI slots and Three ISA slots
l Reserved circuitry for LDCM feature
l PC97 / PC98 Compliant
l Board size: 304 * 204mm
Note: All brand names and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
*Above 66MHz bus speed supported but not guaranteed due to the PCI specs.
Introduction of LX6
Feature
- Layout diagram
Figure 1-1 Component Locations
1-3
1-4
Chapter 1
® The System block diagram
CPU-SLOT1
Control
Address
Data
AGP
SLOT
PMC
82443LX
Addr
Cntrl
Main
Memory
(DRAM)
PCI BUS
Control
Address/Data
USB1
PIIX4
PCI
SLOT(s)
PCI IDE
HEADER
USB2
ISA BUS
ISA
SLOT(s)
Buffer
KBC
RTC
Serial
83977F
LPT
IrDA
X BUS
Flash BIOS
FDC
Installing the Mainboard
Chapter 2
2-1
Installing the
Mainboard
This LX6 mainboard not only provides all standard equipment for classic
personal computers, but also provides great flexibility for meeting future upgrade
demands.
This chapter will introduce step by step all the standard equipment
and will also present, as completely as possible future upgrade capabilities.
This mainboard is able to support all Intel Pentium II processors now on the
market.
(For details, see specifications in Chapter 1.)
This chapter is organized according the following features:
ΠInstalling the Mainboard to the Casing
• Standard external connectors
Ž Jumpers and switches
• Presentation and Installing of the CPU.
º Installing the system memory.
NNNN
Before proceeding with the installation
Before installing the mainboard please be sure to turn off or disconnect the
power supply unit.
Before making any modifications to the hardware
configuration of the mainboard, the power supply to any areas of the mainboard
you plan to modify should be turned off to avoid unnecessary damage to the
hardware.
2-2
Chapter 2
&
User friendly instructions
Our objective is to enable the novice computer user to perform the
installation by themselves.
We have attempted to write this document in
a very clear, concise and descriptive manner to help overcome any obstacles
you may face during installation.
Please read our instructions carefully
and follow them carefully step-by-step.
Installing the Mainboard
2-3
¬ Installing the Mainboard to the Casing
Most computer cases will have a base on which there will be many mounting
holes that allows the mainboard to be securely attached and at the same time,
prevents short circuits.
There are two ways to attach the mainboard to the base.
lwith spacers
lor with bolts
In principle, the best way to attach the motherboard is with bolts, and only if
you are unable to do this should you attach the board with spacers. Take a
careful look at the mainboard and you will see many mounting holes on it. Line
these holes up with the mounting holes on the base. If the holes line up, and
there are screw holes this means you can attach the mainboard with bolts. If the
holes line up and there are only slots, this means you can only attach the
mainboard with spacers. Take the tip of the spacers and insert it into the slots.
After doing this to all the slots, you can slide the mainboard into position aligned
with the slots. After the mainboard has been positioned, check to make sure
everything is OK before putting the casing back on.
Note: If the mainboard has mounting holes, but don’t line up with the holes
on the base and their are no slots to attach the spacers, don’t panic, you can still
attach the spacers to the mounting holes. Just cut the spacers (along the dotted
line) (the spacer may be a little hard so be careful of our hands). In this way you
can still attach the mainboard to the base without worrying about short circuits.
Computer
Knowledge
Why is it that Cyrix is always raised in relation to IBM in books? In
fact, these two 6*86 CPUs (limited to the 6*86 series) are basically
the same thing. Because Cyrix does not have its own production line,
it has contracted IBM to manufacture their 6*86 CPUs for them.
However, IBM has stipulated that the Cyrix CPUs they produce
have both the Cyrix and IBM mark printed on it.
2-4
Chapter 2
- Standard External Connectors
Inside the case of any computer several cables and plugs have to be
connected.
These cables and plugs are usually connected one-by-one to
connectors located on the mainboard.
You need to carefully pay
attention to any connection orientation the cables may have and, if any,
notice the position of the first pin of the connector.
In the explanations
that follow, we will describe the significance of the first pin.
PN2(Pin 4-5-6-7) - Speaker Connector
Attach the system speaker to connector PN2.
Pin number
4
5
6
7
Name or significance of signal
+ 5VDC
Ground
Ground
Speaker data
Installing the Mainboard
2-5
PN2(Pin 1-2) - Hardware Reset Connector
Attach the cable from the case’s Reset switch to this connector. Press
and hold the reset button for at least one second to reset the system.
Pin number
Name or significance of signal
1
Ground
2
Reset input
PN1(Pin 13-14) - Hardware Suspend Switch (SMI Switch)
Attach the cable from the case’s suspend switch (if there is one) to this
switch. Use this switch to enable/disable the power management function by
hardware.
Pin number
13
14
Name or significance of signal
Ground
Suspend signal
PN1(Pin 1-2-3-4-5) - Keylock and Power LED Connector
Attach the case’s keylock to the connector.
Pin number
1
2
3
4
5
Name or significance of signal
+5VDC
No connection
Ground
Keylock inhibit signal
Ground
PN1(Pin 7-8) - HDD LED Connector
Attach the cable from the case’s HDD LED to this connector.
Pin number
7
8
Name or significance of signal
LED power
HDD active
2-6
Chapter 2
PN1 (Pin 10-11) - Power Switch
Pin number
10
11
Name or significance of signal
Ground
Power Switch signal
PN2 (Pin 9-10) - Green LED
Pin number
9
10
Name or significance of signal
LED Power
Green LED Active
MOUSE - PS/2 Mouse Connector
Attach a PS/2 mouse to this 6-pin Din-connector.
Pin number
Name or significance of signal
1
Mouse data
2
No connection
3
Ground
4
+5VDC
5
Mouse clock
6
No connection
Installing the Mainboard
KB - PS/2 Keyboard Connector
Attach a keyboard to this 6-pin Din-connector.
Pin number
Name or significance of signal
1
Keyboard data
2
No connection
3
Ground
4
+5VDC
5
Keyboard clock
6
No connection
ATX PWR - ATX Power input Connector
Caution: If power supply connectors are not properly attached to
ATX PWR, the power supply or add-on cards may be damaged.
Attach the connectors from the power supply to ATX PWR.
Pin number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Name or significance of signal
+3.3V
+3.3V
Ground
+5V
Ground
+5V
Ground
Powergood
+5V
+12V
+3.3V
-12V
Ground
ON/OFF control signal
Ground
Ground
Ground
-5V
+5V
2-7
2-8
Chapter 2
FAN1, FAN2 , FAN3 - DC-FAN Power Connector
Pin number
1
2
3
Name or significance of signal
Ground
+12V
Sense
IR - IR Connector(Infrared)
Pin number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Name or significance of signal
+5V
FIRRX
IR_RX
Ground
IR_TX
No connection
CIRRX
+5V
No connection
No connection
I/O port connectors
Name
No. of pins
Description
IDE1
40
IDE channel 1 connector
IDE2
40
IDE channel 2 connector
FDC
34
Floppy disk connector
LPT
25
Parallel port
COM1
9
Serial port COM1 connector
COM2
9
Serial port COM2 connector
USB
8
Universal serial Bus
Notes: *IDE1, IDE2 are high performance PCI IDE connectors. Up to
four IDE interface devices are supported.
Installing the Mainboard
2-9
® Jumper and Switches
You can set jumper switches on the mainboard to configure various
hardware options. See Figure 1-1 for jumper locations.
Throughout this section, the following symbols are used to indicate jumper
settings.
For 3-pin jumpers, the symbols below are used:
Short Pins 1 and 2 with a jumper
cap.
Short Pins 2 and 3 with a jumper cap.
For 2-pins jumpers, the following symbols are used:
Place the jumper cap over the two pins of the
jumper to Short the jumper.
Remove the jumper cap to Open the jumper cap.
Note: To avoid losing jumper caps, attach the removed jumper cap to one of
the jumper pins.
2-10
Chapter 2
CCMOS 1 - CMOS Discharge Jumper
Jumper CCMOS discharge CMOS memory. When you install the
mainboard, make sure this jumper is set for Normal Operation(1-2). See
the jumper below.
Setting
CCMOS
Normal Operation
(Default)
Discharge CMOS
¯ Installation of the CPU
The mainboard is equipped with a CPU-SLOT1 slot to accommodate Intel
PentiumII CPU or above. The default clock rate setting for PentiumII
CPU is 233MHz and depends on auto detect from BIOS. But there is a etter
way to set up the menu. For details please refer the chapter 3 “Award BIOS
Setup”.
Installing the Mainboard
2-11
° Installing System Memory
The mainboard provides four 168-pin DIMM sites for memory expansion.. The
DIMM socket supports 1Mx64(8MB), 2Mx64(16MB), 4Mx64(32MB),
8Mx64(64MB), 16Mx64(128MB), and 32Mx64(256MB) or double sided DIMM
modules. Minimum memory size is 8MB and maximum memory size is 512 MB
SDRAM and 1GB EDO.
There are four banks of Memory on the system board.
In order to create a memory array, certain rules must be followed. The following
set of rules allows for optimum configurations.
l The memory array is 64 or 72 bits wide. (Without parity or with parity)
l Those modules can be populated in any order.
l Support single and double density DIMMS.
The following is the valid memory configuration:
Bank
Memory Module
Bank0
8MB,16MB, 32MB,64MB,
(DIMM1)
128MB
Bank1
8MB,16MB, 32MB,64MB,
(DIMM2)
128MB
Bank3
8MB,16MB,
(DIMM3)
32MB,64MB, 128MB
Bank4
8MB,16MB,
(DIMM4)
32MB,64MB,
128MB
Total System Memory
Total Memory
8MB ~ 256MB
2
8MB ~ 256MB
2
8MB ~ 256MB
1
8MB ~ 256MB
1
8MB ~ 1GB
=
Introduction of BIOS
Chapter 3
3-1
Introduction of BIOS
The BIOS is a program located on a Read-Only Memory chip on the
mainboard. This program will not be lost when you turn the computer off. This
program is also referred to as the boot program. It is the only channel for the
hardware circuit to communicate with the operating system. Its main function is
to manage the setup of the mainboard and interface cards parameters, including
simple parameters such as time, date, hard disk drive, as well as more complex
parameters such as hardware synchronization, device operating mode, CPU
SOFT MENU™ techniques, setup of CPU voltage and speed. The computer
will operate normally, or will operate at its best, only if all these parameters are
correctly configured through the BIOS.
M Don’t change the parameters inside the BIOS unless you know what
you are doing
The parameters inside the BIOS are used to setup the hardware
synchronization or the device operating mode. If the parameters are not
correct, they will produce errors, the computer will crash, and sometimes you
will even not be able to boot the computer after it has crashed. We recommend
that you do not change the parameters inside the BIOS unless you are familiar
with them. If you are not able to boot your computer anymore, please refer to
the section “Erase CMOS data” in Chapter 2.
When you start the computer, it is controlled by the BIOS program. The
BIOS first operates an auto-diagnostic for all the necessary hardware,
configurates the parameters of the hardware synchronization, and detects all the
hardware. Only when these tasks are completed does it give up control of the
computer to the program of the next level, which is the operating system. Since
the BIOS is the only channel for hardware and software to communicate, it will
be the key factor to system stability, and to ensure that your system performs at
its best. After the BIOS has achieved the auto-diagnostic and auto-detection
operations, it will display the following message:
PRESS DEL TO ENTER SETUP
3-2
Chapter 3
Three to five seconds after the message is displayed, if you press the Del
key, you will access the BIOS Setup menu. At that moment, the BIOS will
display the following message:
Fig 3
BIOS Setup main menu
In the BIOS Setup main menu of Figure 3, you can see several options. We
will explain these options step by step in the following pages of this chapter, but
let us first see a short description of the function keys you may use here:
l Press Esc to quit the BIOS Setup.
l Press ¡ô¡õ¡÷¡ö (up, down, left, right) to choose, in the
main menu, the option you want to confirm or to modify.
l Press F10 when you have completed the setup of BIOS parameters to
save these parameters and to exit the BIOS Setup menu.
l Press Page Up/Page Down or +/- keys when you want to modify the
BIOS parameters for the active option.
Computer
knowledge
CMOS DATA
Maybe you have heard somebody saying that their
CMOS
DATA was lost. What is the CMOS? Is it important? The
CMOS is the memory used to store the BIOS parameters that
you have configured. This memory is passive. You can read its
data, and you can also store data in it. But this memory has to
be powered by a battery, in order to avoid any loss of its data
when the computer is turned off. Since you may have to
change the CMOS battery when it is out of power and indoing
so, you will loose all CMOS data, therefore, we recommend
that you write down all the parameters of your hardware, or to
put a label with these parameters on your hard disk.
Introduction of BIOS
3-3
¬ CPU Setup ¡i CPU SOFT MENU™ ¡j
The CPU can be setup through a programmable switch (CPU SOFT
MENU™ ), that replaces traditional manual hardware configuration. This feature
allows the user to complete more easily the installation procedures. You can
install the CPU without configuring any jumpers or switches. The CPU must be
setup according its specifications.
In the first option, you can press <F1> at any time to display all the items
that can be chosen for that option.
Fig 3-1
CPU Name Is:
ä Intel Pentium II MMX
CPU SOFT MENU™
3-4
Chapter 3
CPU Operating Speed:
This option sets the CPU speed.
In this field, the CPU speed is indicated like this: CPU speed
(external
clock x multiplier factor)
Select the CPU speed according the type and the speed of your CPU.
¡i Note 1 ¡j For Intel Pentium II MMX CPUs, you can choose the
following settings:
ä 233 (66x3.5)
ä 266 (66x4)
ä 300 (66x4.5)
ä 333 (66x5)
¡i Note 4 ¡j User define external clock and multiplier factor:
ä User Define
/ External Clock:
ä 60MHz
ä 66MHz
ä 75MHz
ä 83MHz
ä 100MHz
/ Multiplier Factor:
You can choose the following multiplier factors:
ä 2.0
ä 2.5
ä 3.0
ä 3.5
ä 4.0
ä 4.5
ä 5.0
ä 5.5
However, differences will exist because of the
various brands and types available.
Normally, we do not recommend that you use the “User Define” option to setup
CPU speed and multiplier factor. This option is for setup of future CPUs whose
specifications are still unknown. The specifications of all present CPUs are
included in the default settings. Unless you are very familiar with all CPU
parameters, it is very easy to make mistakes when you define by yourself the
external clock and the multiplier factor.
/ Turbo Frequency:
This item will only be displayed if your CPU external clock supports
Turbo mode.
The Turbo mode allows you to speed up the external clock by
approximately 2.5%. This feature is used to verify the design flexibility.
It is a very important tool for test units to verify CPU stability. Do not
use this feature.
Introduction of BIOS
3-5
ä Disable: CPU external clock is operating within the
normal limits.
ä Enable: CPU external clock is operating within the limits
of the Turbo mode.
Solution in case of booting problem due to invalid clock setup:
Normally, if the CPU clock setup is wrong, you will not be able to boot. In
this case, turn the system off than on again. The CPU will automatically use its
standard parameters to boot. You can then enter BIOS Setup again and set up
the CPU clock.
If you can’t enter BIOS setup , you must try turning the system on a few
times (3~4 times) and the system will automatically use its standard parameters
to boot.
You can then enter BIOS SETUP again and set up the new
parameters.
When you change your CPU:
The mainboard have been designed in such a way that you can turn the
system on after having inserted the CPU in the socket without having to
configure any jumpers or DIP switches. But if you change your CPU, normally,
you just have to turn off the power supply, change the CPU and then, set up the
CPU parameters through CPU SOFT MENU™ . However, if the CPU brand
and type is the same, and if the new CPU is slower than the old one, we offer
you two methods to successfully complete the CPU change operation.
Method 1: Setup up the CPU for the lowest speed for its brand. Turn the
power supply off and change the CPU. Then turn the system on
again, and set up the CPU parameters through CPU SOFT
MENU.
Method 2: Since you have to open the computer case when you change the
CPU, it could be a good idea to use the CCMOS jumper to
erase the parameters of the original CPU and to enter BIOS
Setup to set up CPU parameters again.
3-6
Chapter 3
Note :
The increase by 2.5% of the CPU speed is not a standard
feature of this product. It is only for use by our development
department to verify that the CPU is able to work normally
when CPU speed, operating temperature and power supply are
2.5% higher or lower than the standard values. This is to
guarantee product stability. We require the manufacturer of the
Clock Generator to meet the demands of our development
department and to add a TURBO Frequency feature used for
testing purposes by our R&D department. Of course, you can
use this feature to test the stability of your own system, but after
you have tested the product, we recommend that you set it back
to its normal value in order to guarantee system stability.
Attention: After setting up the parameters and you leave the BIOS SETUP, and
you have verified that the system can be booted, do not press the
Reset button or turn off the power supply.
Otherwise the BIOS
will not read correctly, the parameters will fail and you must enter
CPU SOFT MENU™ again to set up the parameters all over again.
Introduction of BIOS
3-7
- Standard CMOS Setup Menu
It is the basic configuration parameters of the BIOS. These parameters
include the settings of date, hour, VGA card, FDD and HDD.
Fig 3-2
l
Standard CMOS Setup Menu
Set up of HDD operating mode ¡i NORMAL, LBA,
LARGE ¡j
Since old operating systems were only able to support HDD whose capacity
was not bigger than 528MB, any hard disk with more than 528MB was
unusable. AWARD BIOS features a solution to this problem: you can,
according to your operating system, choose three operating modes:
NORMAL, LBA or LARGE.
ä Normal mode:
Standard normal mode supports hard disks of 528MB or less.
This mode directly uses positions indicated by Cylinders
(CYLS), Heads, and Sectors to access data.
3-8
Chapter 3
ä LBA (Logical Block Addressing) mode:
LBA mode supports hard disk drives up to 8.4Giga. This mode
uses a different method to calculate the position of disk data to
be accessed. It translates Cylinders (CYLS), Heads and Sectors
into a logical address where data are located. The Cylinders,
Heads, and Sectors displayed in this menu do not reflect the
actual structure of the hard disk, they are just reference values
used to calculate actual positions. Currently, all high capacity
hard disks support this mode, that’s why we recommend you
use this mode. The HDD AUTODETECTION option in the
Main Menu will automatically detect the parameters of your
hard disk and the mode supported.
ä LARGE Mode:
When the number of cylinders (CYLs) of the hard disk exceeds
1024 and DOS is not able to support it, or if your operating
system does not support LBA mode, you should select this
mode.
l
FDD supporting 3 Mode:
3 Mode floppy disk drives (FDD) are 3 1/2” drives used in Japanese
computer systems. If you need to access data stored in this kind of floppy,
you must select this mode, and of course you must have a 3 Mode floppy
drive.
2 For further information about HDD installation, refer to Appendix E.
Introduction of BIOS
3-9
® BIOS Features Setup Menu
BIOS Features Setup Menu has already been set for maximum operation. If
you do not really understand each of the options in this menu, we recommend
you use default values.
In each item, you can press <F1> at any time to display all the options for
this item.
Fig 3-3
BIOS Features Setup
Virus Warning:
This item can be set as Enable or Disable.
When this feature is enabled, if there is any attempt from a software or an
application to access the boot sector or the partition table, the BIOS will
warn you that a boot virus is attempting to access to the hard disk.
CPU Internal Cache:
This item is used to Enable or to Disable the CPU internal cache. When the
cache is set at Disable, it is much slower, so the default setting for this item
is Enable. Some old and very bad programs will make the computer
malfunction or crash if the system speed is to high. In that case, you should
Disable this feature.
CPU External Cache:
3-10
Chapter 3
This item is used to enable or to disable the CPU external cache. When the
external cache is enabled, the system works faster. The default is Enable.
Quick power on self test:
After the computer has been powered on, the BIOS of the mainboard will
run a series of tests in order to check the system and its peripherals. If the
Quick power on self test feature is Enable, the BIOS will simplify the test
procedures in order to speed up the boot process. The default is Enable.
Boot Sequence:
When the computer boots up, it can load the operating system from floppy
drive A:, hard disk drive C:, SCSI disk drive or CD-ROM. There are many
options for the boot sequence:
ä A, C, SCSI
ä C, A, SCSI
ä C, CD-ROM, A
ä CD-ROM, C, A
ä D, A, SCSI (at least 2 IDE HDD can be used)
ä E, A, SCSI (at least 3 IDE HDD can be used)
ä F, A, SCSI (at least 4 IDE HDD can be used)
ä SCSI, A, C
ä SCSI, C, A
ä A, SCSI, C
ä LS120, C
Swap Floppy Drive:
This item can be set as Enable or Disable.
When this feature is enabled, you don’t need to open the computer case to
swap the position of floppy disk drive connectors. Drive A: can be set as
drive B:, and drive B: can be set as drive A:.
Boot Up Floppy Seek:
When computer boots up, the BIOS detects if the system has FDD or not.
When this item is enabled, if the BIOS detects no floppy drive, it will
display a floppy disk drive error message. If this item is disabled, the BIOS
will skip this test.
Boot Up NumLock Status:
ä On: At boot up, the Numeric Keypad is in numeric mode.
Introduction of BIOS
3-11
ä Off: At boot up, the Numeric Keypad is in cursor control mode.
IDE HDD Block Mode:
This item can be set as Enable or Disable.
Most of new hard disk drives (IDE drives) support multi-sector transfers.
This feature speeds up hard disk drive access performance and reduces the
time necessary to access data. When this item is enabled, the BIOS will
automatically detect if your hard disk drive supports this feature or not, and
will choose the right settings for you.
2 For further details about hard disk drive installation, refer to appendix E.
Typematic Rate Setting:
This item allows you to adjust the keystroke repeat rate. When enabled,
you can set the two keyboard typematic control that follow (Typematic
Rate and Typematic Rate Delay). If this item is disabled, the BIOS will use
the default setting.
Typematic Rate (Chars/Sec):
When you press a key continuously, the keyboard will repeat the keystroke
according to the rate you have set. (Unit: characters/second ¡^
Typematic Rate Delay (Msec):
When you press a key continuously, if you exceed the delay you have set
here, the keyboard will automatically repeat the keystroke according a
certain rate. (Unit: milliseconds)
3-12
Chapter 3
Security Option:
This option can be set to System or to Setup.
After you have created a password through PASSWORD SETTING, this
option will deny access to your system (System) or modification of
computer setup (BIOS Setup) by unauthorized users.
ä SYSTEM: When you choose System, a password is required each time
the computer boots up. If the correct password is not given, the system
will not start.
ä SETUP: When you choose Setup, a password is required only when
accessing the BIOS Setup. If you have not set a password in the
PASSWORD SETTING option, this option is not available.
Notice: Don’t forget your password. If you forget the password, you will
have to open the computer case and clear all information in the
CMOS before you can start up the system. But doing this, you
have to reset all the options you had set up before.
PCI /VGA Palette Snoop:
This option allows the BIOS to preview VGA Status, and to modify the
information delivered from the Feature Connector of the VGA card to the
MPEG Card. This option can solve the display inversion to black after you
have used the MPEG card.
Delay IDE Initial:
This item is using for support some old model or special type of hard disks
or CDROMs .
Because the BIOS may not detect those kinds of
devices during system booting .
OS Select For DRAM > 64MB:
When the system memory is bigger than 64MB, the communication method
between the BIOS and the operating system will differ from one operating
system to another. If you use OS/2, select OS2; if you choose another
operating system, select Non-OS2.
Introduction of BIOS
3-13
Video BIOS Shadow:
This option is used to define whether the BIOS on the video card uses
shadow feature or not. You should set this option to Enable, otherwise the
display performance of the system will greatly decrease.
Shadowing address ranges (C8000-CBFFF Shadow):
This option allows you to decide if the memory block (BIOS) of an
interface card at the address C8000-CBFFF uses the shadow feature or not.
If you have no interface card using this memory block, don’t enable this
option.
Shadowing address ranges (CC000-CFFFF Shadow):
This option allows you to decide if the memory block (BIOS) of an
interface card at the address CC000-CFFFF uses the shadow feature or not.
If you have no interface card using this memory block, don’t enable this
option.
Shadowing address ranges (D0000-D3FFF Shadow):
This option allows you to decide if the memory block (BIOS) of an
interface card at the address D0000-D3FFF uses the shadow feature or not.
If you have no interface card using this memory block, don’t enable this
option.
Shadowing address ranges (D4000-D7FFF Shadow):
This option allows you to decide if the memory block (BIOS) of an
interface card at the address D4000-D7FFF uses the shadow feature or not.
If you have no interface card using this memory block, don’t enable this
option.
Shadowing address ranges (D8000-DBFFF Shadow):
This option allows you to decide if the memory block (BIOS) of an
interface card at the address D8000-DBFFF uses the shadow feature or not.
If you have no interface card using this memory block, don’t enable this
option.
3-14
Chapter 3
Shadowing address ranges (DC000-DFFFF Shadow):
This option allows you to decide if the memory block (BIOS) of an
interface card at the address DC000-DFFFF uses the shadow feature or not.
If you have no interface card using this memory block, don’t enable this
option.
Computer
knowledge
SHADOW
What is the SHADOW? The BIOS of standard video or
interface cards is stored in ROM, and it is often very slow.
With the Shadow feature, the CPU reads the BIOS on the
VGA card and copies it into RAM. When the CPU runs this
BIOS, the operation is speeded up.
Introduction of BIOS
3-15
¯ Chipset Features Setup Menu
The Chipset Features Setup Menu is used to modify the contents of the
buffers in the chipset on the mainboard. Since the parameters of the buffers are
closely related to hardware, if the setup is not correct or false, the mainboard
will become unstable or you will not be able to boot up. If you don’t know the
hardware very well, use default values (use the LOAD SETUP DEFAULTS
option).
Fig 3-4
Chipset Features Setup
You can use the arrow keys to move between the items. Use "PgUP",
"PgDn", "+" and "-" to change the values. When you have finished setting up the
chipset, press "ESC" to go back to the main menu.
Auto Configuration:
This option allows (Enable) or prevents (Disable) the BIOS from using
default values for Auto Configuration. The BIOS default is Enable.
ä When you select Enable, the BIOS will automatically use the values
related to DRAM. You will not be able to set up the following options.
ä When you select Disable, you can manually set up DRAM options.
3-16
Chapter 3
Attention:Unless you are very familiar with your computer and with the
DRAM configuration and speed, we recommend you not
change the DRAM options but enable this option.
DRAM settings:
The other DRAM settings are all closely related to hardware. If you do not
understand this very well, don’t make any changes. Our BIOS is able to
autodetect the characteristics of your DRAM and to choose the best
settings.
Memory Hole At 15M-16M:
This option is used to free up the 15M-16M memory block. Some special
peripherals need to use a memory bloc located between 15M and 16M, and
this memory block has a size of 1M. We recommend that you disable this
option.
There are small differences in the chipset feature setup according to
different mainboard models, but this has no influence upon performance. Our
default setup should be the best one. That is the reason why we do not describe
all the features of this menu.
Introduction of BIOS
3-17
° Power Management Setup Menu
The difference between Green PCs and traditional computers is that Green PCs
have a power management feature. With this feature, when the computer is powered on
but inactive, the power consumption is reduced in order to save energy. When the
computer operates normally, it is in Normal mode. In this mode, the Power Management
Program will control the access to video, parallel ports, serial ports and drives, and the
operating status of the keyboard, mouse and other device. These are referred to as
Power Management Events. In cases where none of these events occur, the system
enters the power saving mode. When one of the controlled events occurs, the system
immediately returns to normal mode and operates at its maximum speed. Power saving
modes can be divided into three modes according to their power consumption: Doze
Mode, Standby Mode , and Suspend Mode. The four modes proceed in the following
sequence:
Normal Mode===> Doze Mode===> Standby Mode===> Suspend Mode
The system consumption is reduced according the following sequence:
Normal
>
Doze >
Standby
>
Suspend
1. In the Main Menu, select "Power Management Setup" and press "Enter". The
following screen is displayed:
Fig 3-5
Power Management Setup Menu
3-18
Chapter 3
2. Use arrow keys to go to the item you want to configure. To change the
settings, use "PgUP", "PgDn", "+" and "-".
3. After you have configured the Power Management feature, press “Esc” to go
back to the Main Menu.
We are now going to briefly explain the options in this menu:
Power Management:
Four options:
ä
User Define
User Define defines the delay for accessing the power modes.
ä
Min Saving
When the three saving modes are enabled, the system is set up for
minimum power savings.
Doze = 1 hour
Standby = 1 hour
Suspend = 1 hour
ä
Max Saving
When the three saving modes are enabled, the system is set up for
maximum power savings.
Doze = 1 minute
Standby = 1 minute
Suspend = 1 minute
PM Control by APM:
Power Management is completely controlled by the APM.
APM stands for Advanced Power Mangement, it is a power management
standard set by Microsoft, Intel and other major manufacturers.
Video Off Method:
Three video off methods are available: "Blank", "V/H SYNC+Blank" and
"DPMS". The default is "V/H SYNC+Blank".
If this setting does not shut off the screen, select “Blank”. If your monitor
and video card support DMPS standard, select “DPMS”.
Introduction of BIOS
3-19
Video Off After:
Select the saving mode in which the video is switched off.
ä
NA
The video will never be switched off in no saving mode.
ä
Doze
The video will be switched off in all saving modes.
ä
Standby
The video will only be switched off in Standby or Suspend mode.
ä
Suspend
The video will only be switched off in Suspend mode.
IDE HDD Power Down:
If the system has not accessed data on the hard disk drive during the
specified time period, the engine of the HDD will stop in order to save
electricity.
You can set 1 to 15 minutes or select Disable according to your use of the
HDD.
Doze Mode:
When the setting selected for "Power Management" is "User Define", you
can define for this mode any delay from 1 minute to 1 hour. If no power
management event occurs during this time period, meaning that computer is
inactive during this period, the system will enter the Doze power saving
mode.
If this mode is disabled, the system will enter the next mode in the sequence
(Standby or Suspend mode).
Standby Mode:
When the setting selected for "Power Management" is "User Define", you
can define for this mode any delay from 1 minute to 1 hour. If no power
management event occurs during this time period, meaning the computer is
inactive during this period, the system will enter the Standby power saving
mode.
If this mode is disabled, the system will enter the next mode in the sequence
(Suspend mode).
3-20
Chapter 3
Suspend Mode:
When the setting selected for "Power Management" is "User Define", you
can define for this mode any delay from 1 minute to 1 hour. If no power
management event occurs during this time period, meaning the computer is
inactive during this period, the system will enter the Suspend power saving
mode. The CPU stops working completely.
If this mode is disabled, the system will not enter the Suspend mode.
Throttle Duty Cycle:
This is used to specify the CPU speed in saving mode. Seven options are
available: 12.5%, 25.0%, 37.5%, 50.0%, 62.5% or 75.0% .
CPU Fan Off In Option:
CPU fan can be turn off in suspend mode.
Power Button Override:
Support ACPI Power Button Over-ride. The user presses the power button
for more then four seconds while the system is in the working state, then
the system will transition to the soft-off(Power off by software). This is
called the power button over-ride.
IRQ8 Break Suspend :
Support RTC alarm wake up from suspend function (via IRQ8).
Reload Global Timer Events
When one of the speficied occurs, the count down made for entry in power
saving mode goes back to zero.
Since the computer will enter a power saving mode only after an inactivity
delay specified (time speficied for Doze, Standby and Suspend modes) and
after it has no activity, during this time period, any event will cause the
computer to re-count the time elapsed. Resume events are operations or
signals that cause the computer to resume time counting.
Resume by Ring:
To connect a external modem with the onboard serial port, the system will
be turned on when telephone ring-up.
Introduction of BIOS
3-21
Resume by Alarm :
RTC alarm can turn on the system . You can set date ( of month )
and time ( hour , minute , second ) .
3-22
Chapter 3
± PCI & Onboard I/O Setup
In this menu, you can change the INT# and IRQ of the PCI bus and the
onboard I/O device, I/O port address and other hardware settings.
Fig 3-6
PCI & Onboard I/O Setup
PnP OS Install :
Device resource assigned by PnP OS or BIOS.
Force Update ESCD:
If you want to clear ESCD data next time you boot up, and ask the BIOS to
reset the settings for the Plug & Play ISA Card and the PCI Card, select
Enabled. But the next time you boot up, this option will automatically be set
as Disabled.
Computer
Knowledge
ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data)
The ESCD contains the IRQ, DMA, I/O Port, Memory
information of the system. This is a specification and a feature
specific to Plug & Play BIOS.
Introduction of BIOS
3-23
Resources Controlled By:
When you select Auto, the BIOS will automatically assign the IRQ and
DMA to PCI / ISA PnP . When this option is Manual, you can choose which
IRQ or DMA can assign to PCI / ISA PnP .
PCI IDE Card 2nd Channel:
This option can be enabled or disabled. BIOS default is Enable.
Since this channel uses IRQ15, if you want to use this channel, you have to
enable this option to make the BIOS assign IRQ15 to this channel.
PCI IDE Card IRQ Map to:
Three options are available for this item: PCI Auto, PCI-slotX and ISA.
ä PCI-Auto: The onboard BIOS auto-detects which PCI slot has an IDE
card inserted in.
ä PCI-slotX: Some old PCI IDE cards cannot be detected by the BIOS. If
the onboard BIOS cannot detect a PCE IDE card, you have to specify
on which PCI slot the IDE card is inserted, to make the BIOS assign
IRQ14 for use by the interrupt number (INT#) of this PCI slot.
ä ISA: If you select ISA, it means that your PCI IDE card features a
“paddleboard” and a cable that can be connected to IRQ on the ISA
slot, because the BIOS will not assign any IRQ to this PCI slot.
Attention:Primary Channel and Secondary Channel : The BIOS needs two
independent interrupt number (INT#) lines to be allocated to the
PCI IDE card. Be careful not to choose twice the same interrupt
number (INT#).
Assign IRQ for PCI VGA :
You can assign IRQ for PCI VGA or not .
On Board FDD Controller:
This is to Enable or Disable the Onboard FDD Controller.
3-24
Chapter 3
On board Serial Port 1:
This is used to specify the I/O address and IRQ of Serial Port 1. Ten
options are available: Disable, 3F8h/IRQ4, 2F8h/IRQ3, 3E8h/IRQ4 or
2E8h/IRQ3.3F8h/IRQ10, 2F8h/IRQ11, 3E8h/IRQ10, 2E8h/IRQ11, and
AUTO.
On board Serial Port 2:
This is used to specify the I/O address and IRQ of Serial Port 2. Ten
options are available: Disable, 3F8h/IRQ4, 2F8h/IRQ3, 3E8h/IRQ4 or
2E8h/IRQ3. 3F8/IRQ10, 2F8/IRQ11, 3E8/IRQ10, 2E8/IRQ11, and
AUTO.
/ Onboard IR function:
Three options are available:
ä IrDA (HPSIR)mode.
ä ASK IR (Amplitude Shift Keyed IR)mode.
ä Disabled.
/ RxD , TxD Active:
Set IR transmission/reception polarity as High or Low.
/ IR Transmission Delay:
Set IR transmission delays 4 character-time(40 bit-time) when SIR is
changed form RX mode to TX mode.
On board Parallel Port:
Set the I/O address and IRQ of the onboard parallel port. Four options are
available: Disable, 3BCh/IRQ7, 278h/IRQ5 and 378h/IRQ7. Default is
378h/IRQ7.
/ Parallel Port Mode:
Can be set as ECP, EPP , ECP+EPP, or Normal (SPP) mode. Default
is Normal (SPP) mode.
/ ECP Mode Use DMA:
When the mode selected for the onboard parallel port is ECP, the
DMA channel selected can be Channel 1 or Channel 3.
/ EPP Mode Select:
When the mode selected for the onboard parallel port is EPP, two
EPP version options are available: EPP1.7 or EPP1.9 .
Introduction of BIOS
3-25
On board IDE-1 Controller:
Onboard PCI IDE 1 controller can be set as Enable or Disable.
/ Master drive PIO Mode:
ä Auto: the BIOS can auto-detect the PIO mode of the HDD in
order to set its data transfer rate. (Default)
ä Mode 0~Mode 4: User can specify the PIO mode of the HDD in
order to set its data transfer rate.
/ Slave drive PIO Mode:
ä Auto: the BIOS can auto-detect the PIO mode of the HDD in
order to set its data transfer rate. (Default)
ä Mode 0~Mode 4: User can specify the PIO mode of the HDD in
order to set its data transfer rate.
On board IDE-2 Controller:
The onboard IDE-2 controller can be set at Enable of Disable.
/ Master drive PIO Mode:
ä Auto: the BIOS can auto-detect the PIO mode of the HDD
installed in order to set its data transfer rate. (Default)
ä Mode 0~Mode 4: User can specify the PIO mode of the HDD in
order to set its data transfer rate.
/ Slave drive PIO Mode:
ä Auto: the BIOS can auto-detect the PIO mode of the HDD
installed in order to set its data transfer rate. (Default)
ä Mode 0~Mode 4: User can specify the PIO mode of the HDD in
order to set its data transfer rate.
MODE 0~4 reflects the HDD data transfer rate. The higher the
MODE value is, the better is the HDD data transfer rate. But it
does not mean that you can select the highest MODE value
just as you like, you first have to be sure that your HDD
supports this MODE, otherwise the hard disk will not be able
to operate normally.
2 For further information about HDD installation, refer to Appendix E.
3-26
Chapter 3
² Load BIOS Defaults
BIOS defaults are the reference settings that allow your system to work at
a comparatively low performance. When you choose the option, the following
message is displayed:
“Load BIOS Defaults (Y/N)? N”
If you want to use BIOS default values, press “Y”, than <Enter>.
³ Load Setup Defaults
Setup defaults are the settings that allow your system to operate at its
highest performance. When you choose this option, the following message is
displayed:
“Load Setup Defaults (Y/N)? N”
If you want to use BIOS Setup default values, press “Y”, than <Enter> to
complete the loading of the settings for best performance.
You should first load the best settings, than enter the CPU Soft Menu to
set up CPU parameters, otherwise the BIOS will replace set parameters by
default parameters.
Introduction of BIOS
3-27
´ Password Setting
This option allows you to set a password required to start the system
(System) or to access to the BIOS (Setup).
After you have set a password through the PASSWORD SETTING option,
you can enter the Security Option in the “BIOS Features Setup Menu” to select
the security level in order to prevent any unauthorized access.
Password setting procedure:
When you choose the Password setting option, the following message
is displayed:
“Enter Password:“
Type your password. When complete, press <Enter>. The following
message is displayed:
“Confirm Password:“
Type your password again. When complete, press <Enter>. The password
setting is completed.
Password clearing procedure:
When you select the Password setting option, the following message is
displayed:
“Enter Password:“
Press <Enter>, the message “Password Disable” is displayed. Press a key.
The password clearing procedure is completed.
Notice:
Do not forget your password. If you forget it, you will have to
open the computer case, clear the contents of the CMOS, and
boot the system up again. But doing this, you must reset all your
settings.
3-28
Chapter 3
µ IDE HDD Auto Detection
After you have installed the hard disk, in old systems, you had to know the
hard disk specifications, such as the number of cylinders, heads and sectors, and
to enter the relevant information into the hard disk information section. If the
CMOS data were erased, and you had forgotten the hard disk specifications, it
was a great problem. But now, you can use this option to autodetect the hard
disk type and specifications, and the BIOS will automatically detect all the
relevant information and place them in the Hard Disk data section of the
Standard CMOS Setup Menu, in order to allow you to use your hard disk.
Bus Master IDE Driver
4-1
Chapter 4 Bus Master IDE Driver
The Intel PIIX4Bus Master IDE is now include in the mainboard.
OS Support:Windows 95, Windows NT 3.5/3.51/4.0, OS/2 V2.x & Warp 3.0
Installation:Each OS has different install procedure, please check
README.TXT file under each OS’s directory.
4-2
Chapter 4
Quick Installation
Appendix A
A-1
Quick Installation
Appendix A will give you a simplified installation procedure, in order to
allow you to install tour mainboard quickly and correctly.
If you need further information or if you need to change some other settings,
read from Chapters 1.
Installing the CPU:
Lift up the lever of the CPU socket, insert your
CPU on the socket, and lower the lever back in position. Don’t worry, if you
don’t respect the correct orientation, you will not be able to insert the CPU.
Adjusting CPU voltage and speed:
According to your CPU speed,
set up the CPU in the CPU SOFT MENU™ of the BIOS SETUP.
Installing DRAM:
DIMM1 ~ DIMM4
Installing FDD:
FDC- Connect one end of the 34-pin cable that comes
with the drive to the FDD connector, and the other end of the cable to the FDC
pin connector on the mainboard.
Note: Be sure that the red line on the cable connects to the first pin of the
connectors.
A-2
Appendix A
Installing HDD:
IDE1- Connect one end of the 40-pin cable that comes
with the drive to the HDD connector, and the other end to IDE1 pin connector
on the mainboard.
Note: Be sure that the red line on the cable connects to the first pin of the
connectors.
Installing CD-ROM Drive:
IDE2- Connect one end of the 40-pin
cable that comes with the drive to the CD-ROM connector, and the other end to
the IDE2 pin connector on the mainboard.
Note: Be sure that the red line on the cable connects to the first pin of the
connectors.
Watch the pin position and the
orientation
PN1 - There is a specific orientation for pin 1 to pin 5. Insert the five-threads
keylock cable into correct pins of connector on the mainboard.
Installing Keylock connector:
Pin
number
1
2
3
4
5
Name of the signal or signification
+5VDC
No connection
Ground
Keyboard inhibit Signal
Ground
Watch the pin position and the
orientation
PN1 - There is a specific orientation for pin 7 and pin 8. Connect the twothreads IDE LED connector to the connector on mainboard.
Installing HDD LED connector:
Pin
number
7
8
Name of the signal or signification
HDD LED signal ¡i LED Cathode ¡j
HDD LED signal ¡i LED Anode ¡j
Quick Installation
A-3
Installing Suspend switch connector:
PN1 - There is a specific
orientation for pin 10 and pin 11. Connect the two-threads suspend switch
connector of the computer case to correct pins of connector on the mainboard.
You can ignore this connector since most of computer cases do not support this
feature (the mainboard itself supports it).
Pin number
14
13
Sleep LED connector:
Connect the two-threads
Pin
number
9
10
Name of the signal or signification
Suspend signal
Ground
PN2 - This connector has a specific orientation.
LED connector on the mainboard.
Name of the signal or signification
LED’s Cathode
LED’s Anode
Installing speaker connector:
PN2 - There is no specific orientation
for pin 4 to pin 7. Connect the four-threads speaker cable to the PN2 connector
pins on the mainboard.
Pin
number
4
5
6
7
Name of the signal or signification
+5VDC
Ground
Ground
Sound Signal
A-4
Appendix A
Installing Power ON/OFF switch connector :
PN1 : Connect the
two- threads switch connector on the mainboard.
Pin number Name of the signal or signification
11
Power on/off
10
Ground
Watch the pin position and
the orientation
ATXPWR - Connect the power supply unit to the correct connectors on the
mainboard.
Installing ATX Power input connector:
Pin
number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Name of the signal or
signification
+3.3VDC
+3.3VDC
Ground
+5VDC
Ground
+5VDC
Ground
POWERGOOD
+5VDC
+12VDC
Pin
number
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Name of the signal or
signification
+3.3VDC
-12VDC
Ground
PS_ON
Ground
Ground
Ground
-5VDC
+5VDC
+5VDC
Installing Keyboard connector:
KB1 - There is an orientation pin. Connect your keyboard connector to
connector on the mainboard.
Quick Installation
A-5
Installing PS2 Mouse:
Mouse - There is an orientation pin. Connect
your mouse connector to connector on the mainboard.
Installing CPU Fan Power connector:
FAN - There is a specific
orientation. Connect the three-threads CPU Fan power cable to the Fan
connector on the mainboard.
CPU FAN/FAN2/FAN3
Pin number
Name of the signal or signification
1
Sensor
2
+12V
3
Control on/off
Adjusting other jumpers:
Some jumpers are reserved for future
functions or are not to be adjusted in normal operation. Adjust them according
to the following recommendations.
CCMOS ¡G Put jumper on pin 1 and pin 2.
BIOS Setup:
Parameters and CPU settings After you have followed the
steps described above and completed the installation, when you power the
computer on, you will see the following message displayed
PRESS DEL TO ENTER SETUP
Press immediately Del key to enter BIOS Setup. Select Load Setup Defaults,
than enter CPU Soft Menu to set CPU parameters.
A-6
Appendix A
General Discussion about HDD Installation
Appendix B
B-1
General Discussion
about HDD Installation
Most of the present HDDs use IDE interface. Installing an IDE hard disk
does not require a huge amount of intelligence like installing the driver for a
SCSI hard disk, but this means that the user often must install the hard disk by
himself and cope with all the problems he may encounter. Here, we will try to
help you solve these possible problems.
The data stored in the hard disk are accessed through a chipset located on
the mainboard. You probably often hear about the PIO mode, Master mode or
DMA mode of HDD. These modes reflect the way data is transferred from and
to the IDE drive and the mainboard.
What is the PIO mode? When the system needs to access hard disk data,
the CPU delivers input/output (I/O) orders through the chipset on the mainboard
to the hard disk drive, and than puts these data into the system memory. This is
the PIO mode.
What is the Master mode? When the system needs to access hard disk data,
these data are directly accessed from the hard disk by the chipset on the
mainboard (using a DMA or a PIO mode), and then the data is put into the
memory. In this case, the CPU does not participate in the data transfer.
What is the DMA mode? Usually, DMA mode refers to accessing the hard
disk data by the chipset, it does not refers to data transfer mode.
Here are some examples of data transfer rates for IDE HDD with PIO
interface:
PIO Mode 0 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 3.3Mbyte/sec
PIO Mode 1 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 5.2Mbyte/sec
PIO Mode 2 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 8.3Mbyte/sec
PIO Mode 3 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 11.1Mbyte/sec
PIO Mode 4 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 16.6Mbyte/sec
B-2
Appendix B
The higher the MODE value is, the best is the hard disk data transfer rate.
But this does not mean that you can select the highest mode value as you like.
You must be sure that your hard disk supports that type of fast data transfer,
otherwise your hard disk will not be able to operate correctly.
Here are some examples of data transfer rates for IDE HDD with DMA
mode:
DMA Mode 0 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 4.16Mbyte/sec
DMA Mode 1 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 13.3Mbyte/sec
DMA Mode 2 The fastest data transfer rate reaches 16.6Mbyte/sec
Usually, PIO mode means that the hard disk data are accessed by the CPU
through the chipset and placed into memory, and the chipset is using PIO mode
to access hard disk data.
MASTER mode means that hard disk data are accessed by the chipset, and
that the chipset places the data into memory. The chipset is using DMA or PIO
mode to access data stored in the hard disk drive. The Master mode can reduce
the CPU load, especially in a Multi-task environment. This can help system
performance.
General Discussion about HDD Installation
B-3
Installing a hard disk:
In the Standard CMOS Setup Menu,
♦ Primary means the first connector on the mainboard, that is,
connector IDE1 on our mainboard.
♦ Secondary means the second connector on the mainboard, that is,
connector IDE2 on our mainboard.
♦ Two HDDs can be connected to the each connector:
The first HDD is referred to as Master,
The second HDD is referred to as Slave.
The Master or Slave status of the hard disk drive is set on the hard
disk itself. Refer to the hard disk drive manual.
Installing one HDD : The red line on the connection cable must be lined up with pin 1 on the connector.
Be sure that your hard disk drive is set at Master. Actually, most hard
disk drives are set at Master as a default, so you don’t need to adjust
any setting. Just connect one end of the 40 pin cable on the drive
connector, and the other end to connector IDE1 on the mainboard.
Installing one HDD + one CD-ROM drive:
The red line on the connection cable must be lined up
with pin 1 on the connector.
Method 1: Set the HDD at Master, and the CD-ROM drive at Slave.
Connect one connector of the 40-pin cable to the hard disk,
another one to the CD-ROM drive, and the other end to
connector IDE1 on the mainboard.
Method 2: Set the HDD as Master and connect one end of the 40-pin
cable to the HDD, and the other end to connector IDE1 on
the mainboard.
You can ignore the setting of the CD-ROM drive, just
connect one end of the 40-pin cable to the CD-ROM drive,
and the other end to connector IDE2 on the mainboard.
We recommend you use this kind of connection, which has
no influence on HDD speed.
B-4
Appendix B
Installing two HDDs: The red line on the connection cable must be lined up with pin 1 on the connector.
Method 1: Set the hard disk drive used for boot up at Master, and the
other drive at Slave. Connect one of the connectors of the
40-pin cable to the first drive, another connector to the
second drive, and the other end of the cable to connector
IDE1 on the mainboard.
Method 2: Set the hard disk drive used for boot up at Master, connect
one end of the 40-pin cable to the drive, and the other end
to connector IDE1 on the mainboard.
Set the other hard disk drive at Master, connect one end of
the 40-pin cable to the drive, and the other end to
connector IDE2 on the mainboard.
Installing two HDDs + one CD-ROM drive:
The red line on the connection cable must be lined up
with pin 1 on the connector.
Method 1: Set the hard disk drive used for boot up as Master, set the
other HDD at Slave, connect one connector of the 40-pin
cable to the first drive, another connector to the second
drive, and the other end of the cable to connector IDE1 on
the mainboard.
You can ignore the setting of the CD-ROM drive. Connect
one end of the 40-pin cable to the drive, and the other end
to connector IDE2 on the mainboard.
We recommend you use this method, which has no
influence on HDD speed.
Method 2: Set the hard disk drive used for boot up at Master, connect
one end of the 40-pin cable to the drive, and the other end
to connector IDE1 on the mainboard.
Set the other hard disk drive at Master, and be sure that the
CD-ROM drive is set at Slave. Most of CD-ROM drives
are set at Slave as a default, so you will normally not have
to set the CD-ROM drive. After you have verified the
settings, connect one connector of the 40-pin cable to the
HDD, another connector to the CD-ROM drive, and the
other end of the cable to connector IDE2 on the
mainboard.
General Discussion about HDD Installation
B-5
Installing three HDDs: The red line on the connection cable must be lined up with pin 1 on the connector.
Method 1: Set the hard disk drive used for boot up at Master, set the
second drive at Slave. Connect one connector of the 40-pin
cable to the first drive, another connector to the second
drive, and the other end of the cable to connector IDE1 on
the mainboard.
Set the other (the third) drive at Master, and connect one
end of the 40-pin cable to the drive, and the other end to
connector IDE2 on the mainboard.
Method 2: Set the hard disk drive used for boot up at Master, and
connect one end of the 40-pin cable to the drive and the
other end to connector IDE1 on the mainboard. Set
another drive (the second drive) at Master and the third
drive at Slave, connect one connector of the 40-pin cable
to the second drive, another connector to the third drive,
and the other end of the cable to connector IDE2 on the
mainboard.
Installing three HDDs + one CD-ROM drive: The red line on the connection cable must be lined
up with pin 1 on the connector.
Set the hard disk drive used for boot up at Master, set another HDD
(the second) at Slave, connect one connector of the 40-pin cable to the
first drive, another connector to the second drive, and the other end of
the cable to connector IDE1 on the mainboard.
Set the third hard disk drive at Master, set the CD-ROM drive at
Slave, connect one connector of the 40-pin cable to the third HDD,
another connector to the CD-ROM drive, and the other end of the
cable to connector IDE2 on the mainboard.
BIOS Setup:
♦ If all your HDDs are new, you can use the IDE HDD Auto Detection
option in the CMOS to autodetect the parameters of all your drives.
You don’t need to set any hard disk parameter.
♦ If one or several of your HDDs are old, and if you don’t know their
parameters, and you want to reconfigure your drives, you can also use
the IDE HDD Auto Detection option in the CMOS to autodetect the
drives parameters.
B-6
Appendix B
♦ If one or several of your HDD are old, and if you don’t want to erase
the data stored in your drives, you will have to remember the
parameters (Type, Cylinders, Heads, Sectors, Mode) of the drive(s)
you don’t want to erase. After you have used the IDE HDD Auto
Detection option in the CMOS, enter the Standard CMOS Setup
Menu to change the settings of the related hard disk drive.
Software use:
The basic step in using a hard disk drive is to make a HDD Low Level
Format, than run FDISK, and than FORMAT the drive. Most of present
HDD have already been subjected to low level format at the factory, so
you probably can skip this operation.
Boot with a bootable floppy disk, then enter FDISK.
Using FDISK: (DOS command)
This command is found in the DOS disks.
FDISK is a tool used to organize and to partition the hard disk. The
hard disk must have been partitioned before use. You can create one
unique partition on the hard disk, or create several partition and use a
different Operating System on each partition. Just don’t forget that
you have to specify an Active partition, otherwise your hard disk will
not be bootable. For further information about FDISK, refer to the
FDISK section in the DOS user’s manual.
After you have partitioned the hard disk with FDISK, the system will
reboot automatically. Boot from a system floppy disk, and type
FORMAT C:/S
Using FORMAT: (DOS command)
This command is found in the DOS disks.
FORMAT is used to format the hard disk. The HDD have to be
formatted before use. Don’t forget to add /S after C:, otherwise the
hard disk will not be bootable after formatting.
Technical Support
Appendix C
C-1
Technical Support
L When you have a problem during operation...
In order to help our technical support personnel to quickly find out what is the
problem of your mainboard and to give you the answers you need, before filling
in the technical support form, eliminate any peripheral that is not related to the
problem, and indicate on the form the key peripherals. Fax this form to your
dealer or to the company where you bought the hardware in order to benefit
from our technical support. (You can refer to the examples given below.)
2
Example 1: With a system including: mainboard (with CPU, DRAM, COAST...)
HDD, CD-ROM, FDD, VGA CARD, MPEG CARD, SCSI CARD,
SOUND CARD..., after the system is assembled, if you cannot boot
up, check the key components of the system using the procedure
described below.
First remove all interface cards except the VGA card and try to
reboot.
F If you still cannot boot up:
Try installing another brand/model VGA card and see if the
system will start. If it still does not start, note the VGA card
model, mainboard model, Bios identification number, CPU on
the technical support form (refer to main instructions), and
describe the problem in the problem description space provided.
F If you can boot up:
Insert back the interface cards you have removed one by one
and try to start the system each time you insert a card, until the
system doesn’t start anymore. Keep the VGA card and the
interface card that causes the problem inserted on the mainboard,
remove any other card or peripheral, and start again. If you still
cannot start, note down the information related to both cards in
the Add-On Card space provided, and don’t forget to indicate
the mainboard model, version, BIOS identification number,
CPU (refer to main instructions), and give a description of the
problem.
C-2
Appendix C
2
Example 2: With a system including the mainboard (with CPU, DRAM,
COAST...) HDD, CD-ROM, FDD, VGA CARD, LAN CARD,
MPEG CARD, SCSI CARD, SOUND CARD, after assembly and
after having installed the Sound Card Driver, when you restart the
system, when it runs the Sound Card Driver, it resets automatically.
This problem may be due to the Sound Card Driver. During the
Starting DOS… procedure, press SHIFT (BY-PASS) key, to skip
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT; edit CONFIG.SYS with a
text editor, and in front on the line that loads the Sound Card Driver,
add a remark REM, in order to disable the Sound Card Driver. See
the example below.
CONFIG.SYS:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE HIGHSCAN
DOS=HIGH,UMB
FILES=40
BUFFERS=36
REM DEVICEHIGH=C:\PLUGPLAY\DWCFGMG.SYS
LASTDRIVE=Z
Restart the system. If the system starts and does not reset, you can
be sure that the problem is due to the Sound Card Driver. Note
down the Sound Card model, mainboard model, BIOS identification
number on the technical support file (refer to main instructions), and
describe the problem in the space provided.
JJJ
Technical Support
C-3
$$ Main instructions...
To fill in this “Technical Support Form”, refer to the step-by-step
instructions given below:
*1. MODEL: Note the model number given in your user’s manual.
Example: PT5R2, PR5R2...
*2. Mainboard model number (REV): Note the mainboard model number
labeled on the mainboard as “REV:*.**”.
Exemple: REV:2.11
*3.BIOS ID# : See below:
Example:
“3R” is the “BIOS” ID
number
“2A59GA1EC” is the “BIOS” part
number
C-4
Appendix C
4. DRIVER REV: Note the driver version number indicated on the
DEVICE DRIVER disk as “Release *.**”.
Example:
<
IDE Device Driver
Drivers Diskette Release 1.09A
Release 1.09A
*5. OS/APPLICATION: Indicate what are the operating system and
the applications your are running on the system.
Example: MS-DOS 6.22, Windows 3.1....
*6. CPU: Indicate the brand and the speed (MHz) of your CPU.
Example: (A) In the “Brand” space, write “Intel”, in the
“Specifications” space, write “150MHz”¡C
(B) In the “Brand” space, write “Cyrix”, in the
“Specifications” space, write “P166+”¡C
(C) In the “Brand” space, write “AMD”, in the
“Specifications” space, write “P75”.
7. HDD: Indicate the brand and specifications of your HDD(s), specify if
the HDD is using ¨IDE1 or ¨IDE2. If you know the disk capacity,
indicate it and check (“ü”) “ ”; in case you give no indication, we will
consider that your HDD is “þIDE1” Master.
Example: In the “HDD” space, check the box, in the Brand space, write
“Seagate”, in the Specifications space, write “ST31621A
(1.6GB)”.
8. CD-ROM Drive: Indicate the brand and specifications of your CDROM drive, specify if it uses ¨ IDE1 or ¨IDE2 ¡A and check (“ü”)
“ ”; in case you give no indication, we will consider that your CDROM is “þIDE2” Master.
Example: In the “CD-ROM drive” space, check the box, in the Brand
space, write “Mitsumi”, in the Specifications space, write “FX400D”.
Technical Support
C-5
9. System Memory (DRAM):
Indicate the brand and specifications
(SIMM/DIMM) of your system memory.
Examples:
In the Brand space, write “Panasonic”, in the Specifications space,
write “SIMM-FP DRAM 4MB-06”.
Or, in the Brand, write “NPNX”, in the Specifications space, write
“SIMM-EDO DRAM 8MB-06”.
Or, in the Brand space, write “SEC”, in the Specifications space,
write “DIMM-S DRAM 8MB-G12”.
10. COAST: Indicate the brand and specifications of your COAST.
Example: In the Brand space, write “Winbond”, in the Specifications
space, write “256KB” or “W25P010AF-8”¡C
11. ADD-ON CARD: Indicate which add-on cards you are “absolutely
sure” are related to the problem.
If you cannot identify the problem origin, indicate all the add-on cards
inserted into your system.
Note: Items between the “*” are absolutely necessary.
C-6
Appendix C
Technical Support
C-7
&
Technical Support Form
( Phone #:
/Fax #:
BIOS
ID #
*
DRIVER REV
Company name:
J Contact:
Model
*
Mainboard model
no.
OS/Application
*
Hardware name
C.P.U
HDD
CD-ROM Drive
*
IDE1
IDE2
IDE1
IDE2
System Memory
(DRAM)
COAST
ADD-ON CARD
?
Problem Description:
Brand
Specifications
C-8
Appendix C
Appendix D
Example 1
Flash BIOS User
Instructions
To update BIOS and create a backup of the current system BIOS
execute this command:
AWDFLASH
NEWBIOS
/Py
SAVEBIOS
/Sy
Example 2
To update BIOS, create a backup of current system BIOS, and
clear the CMOS, execute this command:
AWDFLASH
NEWBIOS
SAVEBIOS
/CC
Example 3
To update BIOS and clear PnP settings execute this command:
AWDFLASH
NEWBIOS
/Sn
/CP
Example 4
To make a backup of the current system BIOS execute the
following command:
AWDFLASH
NEWBIOS
/Pn
SAVEBIOS
Notes:
“NEWBIOS” indicates file name for the new BIOS which can be
downloaded from our website at http://www.abit.com.tw (user can
choose a different file name in place of NEWBIOS).
“SAVEBIOS” indicates the filename of the old system BIOS (user
can choose a different file name in place of SAVEBIOS).
D-2
Appendix D
Explanation of parameter names:
/CC: Clears CMOS data
/CP: Clears PnP data
Remarks:
¬ When executing AWDFLASH.EXE, do not run HIMEM.SYS and
EMM386.EXE in the CONFIG.SYS.
- Please take the following actions to solve problems caused by
power shortage or other other unpreventable malfunctions during
BIOS update that lead to update failure.
First, it is strongly
suggested that you format a disk that can boot your computer
before you update your BIOS.
If the above mentioned
problem occurs during BIOS update you will be able to use this disk
to automatically execute a BIOS update.
The content of the disk
should be the following:
a. Startup system files (COMMAND.COM, MSDOS.SYS,
IO.SYS...)
b. AWDFLSH.EXE
c. The NEWBIOS file which can be downloaded from ABIT’s
website.
d. AUTOEXEC.BAT, which has the following content:
A:\AWDFLASH
NEWBIOS
/Py
/Sn
/CC .
® When a version of BIOS that is for the incorrect mainboard
model the following message will appear:
“The program file’s part number does not match with your
system!”
How to install the Ultra DMA/33 drive.
E-1
Appendix E
How to install the Ultra DMA/33 drive.
For best results from your Ultra DMA/33, your PC must meet the following
requirements:
1. Your motherboard must support the Ultra DMA/33 interface.
2. It must support the Ultra DMA hard drive.
3. It must support the operating system’s Ultra DMA driver software. All packages
sold by ABIT contain this driver software. Complete the installation process
exactly as below;
In Windows 95, place the Ultra DMA/33 diver disk into the floppy drive. The file
‘Bmide_95’ (compressed) will appear. Run this file. The file will automatically
decompress the following files; README.TXT, _INST32I.EX_, _SETUT.DLL,
_SETUP.LIB, PIIXDRV.Z, SETUP.EXE, SETUP.INS
Run SETUP.EXE and the following seven windows will appear
1. Welcome:
Click ‘NEXT’
E-2
2.
License:
3. Question:
Appendix E
Notebook - close the view
Click ‘Yes’
How to install the Ultra DMA/33 drive.
4.
Select Components: Click ‘INSTALL
5.Question:
Click ‘Yes’
6. Question:
Click ‘Yes’
E-3
E-4
7. Information:
Appendix E
Click ‘OK’
After previous instructions have been followed, the driver will automatically install.
It will automatically restart the computer after it has finished installing.
How to install the PCI Bridge Batch File
F-1
Appendix F
How to install the PCI Bridge Batch File.
First of all, you may ask, ‘why do I have to install it?’. Well, the main reason is that
Windows 95 has no way of recognising the 440LX chip set. Because of this, the error,
‘?PCI Bridge’ will appear in the system content (see picture below).
To get rid of this from the system content, the batch file must be run.
The file can be found at our web-site at <http://www.abit.com.tw/html.loadut.htm
F-2
Appendix F
or http://www.abit.com.tw/html/cloadut.html/>. Just download PCI_TX.EXE and
run it. It will automatically decompress and you will see 26 icon files appear in
Windows 95.
After you open the file, run AbitTX and a view will appear (see picture below).
Click on ‘OK’.
How to install the PCI Bridge Batch File
F-3
After the process has been completed another view will appear (see picture below).
Again, click on ‘OK’.
After clicking on ‘OK’, the driver will automatically install and restart the computer
after it has finished.
F-4
Appendix F