Jasper National Park Backcountry Guide

Geraldine Lakes
Receive a lower level of
service. Expect windfall to
cleared and bridges, corduroys and
signs maintained. Campsites are
equipped with cable food-storage,
picnic tables, throne pit privies and
fireboxes (where fires are permitted).
You are very likely to meet
others on the trail.
be cleared and bridges to be
maintained annually, but may not
be maintained prior to your trip.
Campsites are equipped with
bear poles and pit privies.
More remote. You may meet
others on the trail.
Humans have an impact in all areas of the park. The
backcountry is especially vulnerable to our use. Park
management regulations are in place to minimize our
environmental impact. They include quota restrictions
on trails and campsites, a limit on group size, a permit
system and restrictions on special use.
Mountain Biking
Uniformed Parks staff you encounter in the backcountry
may ask to see your Backcountry Camping Permit.
Mountain biking is permitted only on trails designated
for bike use. Refer to the map for trails open to
mountain biking.
Campfires
Please–Pack it in and pack it out! You are responsible
for everything you take into the backcountry and this
includes garbage. Do not dispose of garbage in pit
toilets—it may attract animals.
Campfires are a luxury in the mountains and are not
permitted in some areas (see map). If you choose to
have a fire, use the metal fireboxes provided, keep
your fire small and use only deadfall. Tend to your fire
at all times and extinguish it completely before you
move on. Gas stoves are cleaner and more efficient
for cooking. We recommend you use one.
Shortcutting between trail switchbacks damages both
the soil and plant life. This not only ruins the look of
an area, but makes it susceptible to further damage
by erosion.
Collecting natural or cultural objects
Photo: M
. Bradle
y
Rocks, fossils, horns, antlers, wildflowers, nests and
all other natural or historical objects in a national park
are protected by law. Leave them as you found them
for others to enjoy.
Camping
Filtering water
Fishing
Please camp only at the campsites indicated on
your Backcountry Camping Permit and use the tent
pads (where provided). Check with park staff for
special restrictions.
Photo: N. Gabour
y
ar
e
Grizzly B
To wash yourself or your dishes, carry water 70 m
away from streams or lakes and use small amounts
of biodegradable soap. Strain out those last bits of
food waste and pack them out. Disperse strained
water on land.
The ideas on the back of this guide are a good starting
point for selecting a trip that meets your needs and
abilities. For more information, visit the Jasper National
Park website or talk with park information centre staff,
who can provide you with up-to-date information (see
Information Sources).
When to go?
The summer season usually begins in May in the
valley, but most alpine areas are still snow-bound until
late June. At this time of year low-elevation trails are the
best option. Be prepared for mud.
The best time for an alpine trip is late June to midSeptember, although snow often persists in high
passes until the middle of July. Even in summer,
mountain weather can be unpredictable. Always be
prepared for rain. Freezing temperatures and snow
are not uncommon above 1500 metres. Trails are
the busiest at this time of year.
Mid-September though October can be a lovely
time of year on the trails, the bugs are dead and there
are fewer people on the trails. But temperatures are
much colder with a greater chance of snowfall, and the
days are shorter.
November to April is winter in the mountains. Winter
travelers need to be prepared to cope with cold
temperatures, short days, deep snow and avalanche
danger. Winter guidelines are in effect at this time of
year. pc.gc.ca/mountainsafety
Reservations
Jonas Pass
Sharing the Trail
Brazeau in September
How to properly store your food
Human waste
Use the pit toilets provided. When there are no facilities
nearby, select a spot away from trails, campsites and
at least 70 m from water sources. Dig a hole 12 to 16
cm. to the dark-coloured, biologically active soil layer.
Loosely fill the hole with soil afterward. Use as little
toilet paper as possible.
For more information on
low impact travel in the
backcountry contact:
leavenotrace.ca or
1-877-238-9343.
50 metres
At least 4 m from ground and
1.3 m from the top and side
supports
50
s
tre
me
Sleeping area
Guidebooks on Jasper’s trails
Backcountry camping permits
A backcountry camping permit is mandatory for all
overnight trips and can be obtained by phoning the Trail
Office (780) 852-6177.
Frequent backcountry travellers can purchase an
annual backcountry pass, valid in all the mountain
national parks for a full year after purchase date. If
you have an annual backcountry pass, you also need
a backcountry camping permit for each trip. Annual
backcountry pass holders pay only the reservation
fee for their backcountry camping permit.
Fees
Classic Hikes in the Canadian Rockies
by Graeme Pole
Note to Alpine Club of Canada hut users:
If you are staying at an Alpine Club of Canada hut you
must either obtain a backcountry camping permit
from the Alpine Club, or bring along your annual
backcountry pass.
Voluntary Safety Registrations
If you do not have a reliable local contact to leave your
detailed backcountry travel information with, you can
Weather
The most predictable thing about mountain weather is its
unpredictability. Rain or snow can fall at any time of
the year and freezing temperatures are possible even
during the summer. The best way to deal with the
weather is to prepare for all conditions. For a detailed
weather forecast, contact the Environment Canada
Weather Office at 780-852-3185 or visit their website
at www.weatheroffice.gc.ca.
North Bou
ndary
Skyline Trail
Safety
Playing it safe
Campsite reservations are strongly recommended. You
can make a reservation by phoning the Trail Office
780-852-6177 up to 3 months before your departure
date. A non-refundable registration fee applies.
Book early for semi-primitive and primitive campsites
(see map), as these are most popular.
For updated fee information visit:
pc.gc.ca/jasperfees
Hikers, horse parties and
mountain bikers often share
trails and campsites in certain
Partageons les sentiers
parts of the park. Respect
for others can go a long way toward reducing
conflicts. Make noise if you are travelling
quickly or silently, move off the trail to allow
larger parties to pass, and avoid sudden
movement around horses as they may spook.
Share the trails
To reduce your campsite’s attractiveness to bears,
all food, garbage, toiletries and cooking equipment
must be hung from the food storage cables provided at
designated campsites. In wildland camping areas, bearresistant containers are required to store food.
register your trip in person at park information centres. A
safety registration ensures that if you do not return by
the date and time recorded, a search will be initiated
on your behalf. If you use the service, you must
report back immediately upon your return to a park
information centre.
Backcountry camping fees, excluding the reservation
fee, are entirely refundable up to 48 hours before your
proposed date of departure. If your plans change,
please take advantage of our refund policy and make
your space available to others.
Check the trailhead kiosk prior to your hike. It contains valuable information about closures and warnings.
For further details on PLANNING YOUR TRIP
visit pc.gc.ca/jasperbackcountry.
Cooking/eating area
Washing
Let a friend or family member know about your
travel plans – or use Parks Canada’s safety
registration service.
Many of these areas are
extremely remote.
Food storage
All outdoor activities involve some degree of risk.
Rapidly changing weather, steep, rugged or unfamiliar
terrain, avalanches (at any time of year), cold, swiftflowing streams, canyons, rapids and waterfalls,
glacial crevasses, falling rocks and wild animals are all
backcountry hazards visitors may encounter. Caution
and self-reliance are essential.
Planning your trip
Where to go?
Little or no maintenance.
Provide opportunities for
experienced, self-reliant
users to travel and camp
in unmaintained areas
of the park
*While we aim to achieve the above standards, inclement mountain weather and events can considerably
change trail, river and campsite conditions instantly. Self-reliance is important in all backcountry areas.
Garbage
Shortcutting trails
Be prepared to be self-sufficient during inclement
and rapidly changing mountain conditions by
packing the right clothing and camping gear.
Graham
Park information centres have information about guided
day or overnight horse trips in the park. The Horse
Users’ Guide (pc.gc.ca/jasperhorses) provides detailed
information to individuals or groups planning a horseback
trip. Call the Trail Office to obtain backcountry camping
and grazing permits (see Information Sources).
Wildland
Photo: J. Nadeau
Managing Our Use
Fishing is permitted in many backcountry lakes. A
National Park Fishing Permit is mandatory. Provincial
fishing permits are not valid in National Parks.
Permits are sold at park information centres and
Jasper retail outlets that sell angling supplies. Get a
copy of the current Fishing Regulations Summary
with your permit. Visit pc.gc.ca/jasperfishing for
more information.
Receive the highest level of
service. Expect windfall to be
Please leave no trace!
Travelling with Horses
Mountaineering parties can apply at a Parks information
centre to bivouac in non-vegetated areas. Special
restrictions may apply. A voluntary safety registration
is recommended. Visit pc.gc.ca/mountainsafety for
more information.
Primitive
Photo: A.
For more detailed backcountry planning and trip information, visit www.pc.gc.ca/
jasperbackcountry. Before setting out on a trip, check the latest trail conditions at
www.pc.gc.ca/jaspertrails
Semi-primitive
boury
guide will help you plan a trip that is exciting, safe, and has low environmental impact.
Check trail conditions and weather prior to
departure.
Here’s what you can expect*:
Photo: N. Ga
With nearly 1000 km of trails and routes to choose from, backcountry camping is a great
way to experience the rugged and untamed wilderness of Jasper National Park. This
Obtain a Backcountry Camping Permit from a
Park Information Centre.
Jasper National Park offers a range of backcountry opportunities. Trails
and campsites are designated as semi-primitive, primitive or wildland.
Photo: R. Gruys
North Boundary Trail - Photo: A. Graham
Jasper National Park is the largest and most northerly of Canada’s mountain
national parks. It protects over 11,000 square kilometres of the Rocky Mountains,
a beautiful and dramatic landscape supporting a rich variety of plants and animals.
Many of the park’s backcountry trails were established by early travellers including
First Nations people, fur traders, explorers and adventurers.
Climbing, Mountaineering
and Glacier Travel
Familiarize yourself with the trail you have
selected. This includes using additional reference
guides and topographic maps.
On the trail
Welcome to the backcountry
Exploring the backcountry
Marmot
Select a trip which best suits your party’s
abilities and experience, interests, equipment
and the time you have available.
Photo: C. Roy
Spruce Grouse
Photo: A. Zier-Vogel
Snake Indian Falls
Photo: R. Gruys
Photo: R. Gruys
Photo: N. Gaboury
JASPER NATIONAL PARK
Backcountry Guide
Checklist
Tonquin Valley
Photo: M. Bradley
Fryatt Valley
Guidebooks and maps are available at the Friends
of Jasper or bookstores.
The Canadian Rockies Trail Guide
by Brian Patton and Bart Robinson
Water
Giardia lamblia is a parasite carried by humans and
some domestic and wild animals. These parasites
can occur in any surface water in the park and may
contaminate the water supply. Boil your drinking
water or purify it with a water filter or iodine tablets.
Wildlife
Jasper-Robson: A Taste of Heaven
by Don Beers
Hiking Jasper and Mount Robson
by Rob Bryce
Never forget that park animals are wild and can be
dangerous. Any animal can become aggressive if it
feels threatened, so keep your distance — 30 metres
from most animals, and at least 100 metres from bears.
Maps of Jasper
Bears
Government of Canada NTS topographic maps,
1:50,000
Gemtrek Jasper and Maligne Lake, 1:100,000,
Columbia Icefield 1:75,000, Best of Jasper 1:35,000
National Geographic Trails Illustrated
T903, Jasper North, T902, Jasper South
1:100,000,
Map-it-First: mapitfirst.ca
For more information on each trail, trip planning and
topographical maps visit: pc.gc.ca/jasperbackcountry
Both black and grizzly bears are of special concern
to backcountry travellers. Learn more about how to
reduce the risk of bear encounters by reading the
wildlife safety brochures available at park information
centres or on the web at pc.gc.ca/jasper-bears.
Dogs
Wild animals see dogs as either prey or predator. They
can provoke confrontations with wildlife and affect
your safety. This is why dogs must be kept on leash
while in a national park. Please note that dogs are not
allowed in some backcountry areas to protect caribou.
Remember - YOU are responsible for your
own safety.
Information
Parks Canada Trail Office
JASPER TOWNSITE INFORMATION CENTRE 500 Connaught Dr. • 780-852-6177
Wilderness Passes, safety registrations (in person only), trail reservations/information. jnp.info@pc.gc.ca • pc.gc.ca/jasper
Weather forecasts 780-852-3185 • weatheroffice.ec.gc.ca
Winter avalanche information 1-800-667-1105 pc.gc.ca/avalanche
Trail conditions 780-852-6177 • pc.gc.ca/jaspertrails
Park safety information • pc.gc.ca/mountainsafety
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY CALL 911.
Cell phone reception outside of the Jasper townsite is unreliable.
Additional Contacts
PARKS CANADA INFORMATION, ICEFIELD CENTRE (mid-May to early Sept) 780-852-6288 • jasper.icefield@pc.gc.ca
Wilderness Passes, safety registrations (in person only), trail
information. 103 km south of Jasper on the Icefields Parkway.
Public Safety Office 780-852-6155
Information on mountaineering, ice climbing, public safety.
Parks Canada – General inquiries
1-888-773-8888 (Canada) 613-860-1251 (international)
information@pc.gc.ca • pc.gc.ca
Friends of Jasper National Park 780-852-4767
Retail outlet at the Parks Canada information centre in Jasper.
friends@incentre.net • friendsofjasper.com
Mt. Robson and Hamber Provincial Parks
Ph (250) 566-4325 (year round) 566-9174 (summer)
Reservations: 1-800-689-9025 • bcparks.ca
Également offert en français
Printed on recycled paper.
Printed in 04•2013
Trip ideas
Grande Cache
and Grande Prairie
70
r
ak
150
BR
158
Emperor Falls
Whitehorn
IT
IS
Robson
Glacier
Robson
105
Maccarib
Pass
42
45
Kerkeslin
r
122
Christie
hi
W
. Whitty
Photo: C
Photo: C. Roy
BE
CO
LU
JACQUES LAKE (139)
38
Semi-primitive
4
Jacques Lake
8
SATURDAY NIGHT LAKE LOOP (3)
ATHABASCA RIVER
39
Saturday Night Lake
8
Minnow Lake
8
11
Athabasca Island
2
40
12
Brûlé
2
NORTH BOUNDARY (150)
MALIGNE LAKE
41
13
Fisherman's Bay
8
14
Coronet Creek
8
BRAZEAU (130,131,132)
Celestine Lake
8
TONQUIN VALLEY (105, 106)
63
Seldom Inn
64
Seldom Inn
65
Horseshoe
66
Willow Creek
67
Willow Creek
68
Welbourne
69
Welbourne
70
Blue Creek
72
Three Slides
Astoria
4
73
Oatmeal
43
Switchback
8
74
Byng
44
Clitheroe
8
75
Twintree
45
Surprise Point
4
76
Donaldson Creek
46
Amethyst
8
77
Chown Creek
47
Maccarib
4
78
Chown Creek
48
Portal
8
79
Timothy Slides
80
Wolverine North
81
Adolphus
82
Adolphus
84
Little Heaven
85
Spruce Tree
86
Ancient Wall
87
Natural Arch
Boulder Creek
4
16
Four Point
8
18
Wolverine South
4
19
Brazeau River
4
20
Brazeau Meadows
8
21
Brazeau Lake
8
22
John-John
4
Primitive
23
Jonas Cutoff
8
FORTRESS LAKE (126)
24
McCready
8
49
Big Bend
4
25
Waterfalls
4
50
Athabasca Crossing
4
26
Poboktan
4
FIDDLE RIVER (140)
51
Utopia
4
52
Slide Creek
4
53
Slide Creek
4
54
Whitehorse
4
27
Evelyn Creek
4
28
Little Shovel
8
29
Snowbowl
8
30
Curator
8
Wildland
31
Tekarra
8
32
Signal
4
33
Watchtower
4
FRYATT VALLEY (122)
Shalebanks
42
15
SKYLINE (100, 101, 102)
62
MB
FORTRESS
LAKE
IA
Rocky Forks
91
Rocky Forks
92
Medicine Tent
ATHABASCA PASS (115)
93
Medicine Tent
55
Whirlpool
94
La Grace
56
Tie Camp
95
Cairn Pass
58
Middle Forks
96
Cairn River
34
Lower Fryatt
4
59
Scott Camp
97
Southesk
35
Brussels
8
60
Kane Meadows
98
Isaac Creek
36
Headwall
8
61
Athabasca Pass
99
Arête
130
25
kt
on
Brazeau
Lake
Cr
Jon
Fortress Lake
21 20
24
132
ee
k
23
as C
ree
k
Pobokton
Pass
132
19
22
BRAZEAU
Sunwapta
PARK
131
Jonas
Pass
Mushroom
Tangle
Nigel
Pass
Tangle
Falls
Alberta
Chaba
Icefield
Chaba
Glacier
Clemenceau
18
130
Woolley
Stutfield
Twins
16
Columb
WHITE GOAT
WILDERNESS
15
AREA
Icefield Centre
Stutfield
Glacier
130
Kitchener
ia Ic Athabasca
efi Glacier
eld
Snow Dome
Athabasca
Andromeda
Clemenceau Icefield
Columbia
Saskatchewan
Glacier
Columbia Icefield
BANFF
NATIONAL
PARK
Lake Louise
and Banff
Woodland caribou
The woodland caribou found in Jasper are
a threatened species. Less than 100 caribou are
left in south Jasper.
What you can do to help woodland caribou:
•Stay on designated trails and if you see caribou give them space.
•Dogs are not allowed in caribou habitat (see map).
•Avoid hiking in caribou habitat during calving SOUTH BOUNDARY (130, 135)
90
bo
93
50
PROVINCIAL
Athabasca
Pass
26
ay
Po
season (June – early July) and rut season (late September to early October).
Photo: M. Bradley
Backcountry Campgrounds
# of
and usage type (trail number) tents
Second Geraldine Lake
A
HAMBER
Hooker Icefield
61
RT
w
r
Photo: N. Gaboury
H
a
r
IS
126
pt
ve
IT
49
Ri
115
Backcountry Campgrounds
and usage type (trail number)
wa
Brussels
99
ve
TRAILHEADS: Rocky Pass via Hwy 40, 77 km SE of Hinton.
Nigel Pass: 112 km from Jasper townsite on the Icefields
Parkway.
de
AL
Ch
ai
n
fi e
lds
Sunwapta
Pa
Su
Falls
rk
n
Ri
NOTES: Due to a recent landslide and post-fire deadfall, the
trail between Jacques Lake and Rocky Forks Campground
is very difficult to navigate. Travel through this area is not
recommended. Beyond Brazeau Lake, trail is maintained
infrequently. Overlaps popular Brazeau loop trail. Check on
campsite availability.
BR
s
a
This high country trek travels through lowland forest
and over two alpine passes. Most major water crossings
are bridged but the smaller streams may require fancy
footwork. Much of this trail is very remote.
59
es
sc
120 km Maximum elevation: 2262m,
Minimum elevation:1580 m
lD
i vi
dl
ba
Wildland
ta
En
F R YAT T
VA L L E Y
NORTH BOUNDARY (150)
GERALDINE LAKES TRAIL (120)
Warren
ha
TRAILHEADS: End of Celestine Road, 53 km from Jasper
townsite; Rock Lake, 32 km from Hwy 40 to Grande
Cache; and at Mount Robson, 88 km west of Jasper
townsite on Highway 16.
# of
tents
14
Ice
35
PA S S
r
Mary Vaux
34
GERALDINE
LAKES
ve
130
Brazeau
37
Ri
Cree k
98
At
NOTES: Due to a recent flooding, Blue and Caracajou
Creek bridges may be out.
AT H A B A S C A
u
sk
Monkhead
ol
56
So
e
th
97
96
Paul
Charlton
r
120
60
37
Unwin
ve
s
130
MALIGNE LAKE
Ri
55
95
Southesk
Lake
Maligne
13
Athabasca Falls
115
Nigel Pas
Arnica
Backcountry Campgrounds
and usage type (trail number)
Samson
ER
Wildland
North Boundary country possesses its own unique
brand of beauty – a wilderness of broad valleys and
distant views that is inhabited by an array of wildlife.
The trail is rugged in places although most major
river crossings are bridged. Some horse traffic.
Very remote, trail is maintained infrequently.
Skyline Trail
Hardisty
36
Tonquin Valley
Leah
Maligne
Lake
Horseshoe
Lake
58
179 km Maximum elevation: 2020 m,
Minimum elevation:1355 m
South Boundary
28
Edith
Cavell
r
Southesk
(Cairn) Pass
Maligne Lake
27
93
Edith
Cavell
106
100
93A
Kilometres
12 16 20
SOUTH BOUNDARY
SKYLINE
30
8
µ
ve
101
A
94
e
43
nt
0 2Ri 4
29
105
93
Te
lign
44
92
Ma
46
48
Me dic ine
33
Fryatt
TRAILHEAD: Km 6.4 of Moab Lake road, off Highway 93A south
130
A
A
Marmot
47
Amethyst
Lakes
Ra
m
NOTE: Bikes allowed to Tie Camp.
North Boundary
SC
91
ke
100
H
93A
La
THIS IS NOT A TOPOGRAPHIC MAP.
iT IS NOT SUITABLE FOR ROUTE FINDING.
135
er
Fitzwilliam
ine
102
Five
Lakes
AT
Whistlers
Medicine Lake
Riv
Yellowhead
Lake
dic
31
Tekarra
T O N Q U I N VA L L E Y
Wildland
90
Me
Signal
3
Cardinal
(Rocky)
Pass
JACQUES LAKE
R iv er
32
98 km return Maximum elevation: 1755 m,
Minimum elevation: 1210 m
150
SC
BA
A
TH
40
Ri ve r
r
u
Miette
39
ve
Jacques
Lake
ea
16
16
r
In wildland camping areas, toilets and food
storage may not be present in some locations.
Bear-resistant containers are required to
store food.
This remote historic trail follows the Whirlpool
River valley, the traditional route of early fur traders
crossing the Rocky Mountains. Large gravel flats and
glaciers dominate the scenery in sections. Most major
crossings are bridged as you climb toward Athabasca
Pass National Historic Site. Some horse traffic.
Caribou range - No dogs allowed
az
er
ad
Valemount
Athabasca Pass
Patrol station
Br
Riv
Ri
38
e
IV
TRAILHEAD: Km 2.0 of Geraldine road, off Hwy 93A just
north of Athabasca F alls.
ser
Yellowhe
Pass
Roche
Noire
ve
Information centre
Fiddle
Pass
po
Ri
140
rl
er
Cadomin
53
WHITEHORSE
River
5
Seven to Ten Day Trips
52
R
The Fryatt Valley trail is long, and the final climb
up the Headwall to the upper valley is one you
won’t soon forget. But this tiny hanging valley
tucked into one of Jasper’s great mountain ranges is
a jewel that rewards all your efforts. Biking allowed
to lower Fryatt campsite. Alpine hut must be booked
in advance (see Information Sources).
ke
ng
M al ig ne
JASPER
S AT U R D AY
NIGHT LOOP
er
A
22 km one way Elevation gain: 934 m, loss: 157 m
Maximum elevation: 2040 m
Riv
Fra
Ra
A st or ia
La
k
ose
Rearguard
Falls
as
Hostel
r
y
139
Pyramid
Lake
ee
Mo
Fr
ck
Pyramid
Bridgland
Cr
TRAILHEAD: Sunwapta station, 72 km S of Jasper
townsite on Icefields Parkway.
ve
AREA
Bonhomme
Overlander
Falls
Tête Jaune
Cache
Ri
51
54
AB
Fryatt Valley
Ro
l
16
Utopia
FIDDLE RIVER
lin
122
Semi-Primitive
ge
734
Roadside campground
140
Morro
PROVINCIAL PARK
Prince George,
Prince Rupert and
Fort St. James
Provincial campground
Miette Hot
Springs
id
Cinquefoil
Esplanade
r
en
TRAILHEADS: Km 12.7 on the Cavell Rd (Astoria trail) and at
km 6.3 on the Marmot Basin Rd (Portal Creek trail).
ve
in
NOTES: No fires. Use of a stove is mandatory. Recommended
travel between July 1 and September. Regular horse use
during July and August and rain can make trails muddy and
challenging for hikers.
eR
nt
The Tonquin Valley’s scenery is unrivalled. This is
one of Canada’s premiere alpine regions, a unique
combination of rugged peaks, ghostly ice and fertile
lakes. There are several excellent day hikes in the area.
Ri
Co
43 km Elevation gain from Astoria trail: 1053 m
and loss: 1293 m. Maximum elevation: 2210 m
Caribou range – dogs not allowed
Sn
A
rts
Tonquin Valley Loop
lin
Talbot
Lake
AT H A B A S C A
R I V E R 11
g
pa
105
Semi-Primitive
BI
n
ari
te
TRAILHEADS: Maligne Lake (50 km from Jasper
townsite) and just before Maligne Canyon (about 8 km from
Jasper on the Maligne Road). Recommended direction is
from Maligne Lake to Maligne Canyon.
Greenock
M
nc
Alpine hut
40
Jasper
Lake
A
iet
A shorter alternative to the Brazeau loop, This is
an impressive hike with over 13 km of travel above
treeline. Good views and prime habitat for park wildlife
including hoary marmot and woodland caribou. See
notes for Brazeau loop above.
ke
NOTES: No fires. Use of a stove is mandatory. Snow may
remain in higher areas until mid-July. Recommended travel
between July 1 and September.
Sy
MOUNT ROBSON
La
A classic Rockies trail, most of it above treeline.
The high elevation allows for panoramic views that
extend over much of the park, encompassing vast
meadows, windswept ridges and the chance to spot
wildlife in the distance.
er
Colin
et
44 km Elevation gain from Maligne Lake: 1410 m
and loss: 1928 m. Maximum elevation: 2510 m
Caribou range – dogs not allowed
Riv
No dogs
c
Resplendent
sk
Semi-Primitive
LU
RT
150
Trail number
100
Roche Ronde
Roche
à
Bosche
Celestine
41
Roche
Lake
Miette
62
WILDERNESS
ba
Skyline
Horse camp - Fires permitted
k
aa
Kinney Lake
CO
Reef
Icefield
in
100
H
BE
Hiker/Horse camp - Fires not permitted
16
ee
Co
54 km to Nigel Creek, one way Elevation gain: 1691 m
and loss: 1346 m. Maximum elevation: 2470 m
Caribou range – dogs not allowed
Cr
Is
Poboktan - Jonas Pass
AL
Robson
Pass
Berg
Lake
rn
Ri ve r
Hargreaves
Glacier
82
ho
Chaba
81
Hiker/Horse camp - Fires permitted
se
ve
Mural
Glacier
Swiftcurrent
Glacier
oo
63
Snake Indian Falls
JASPER
NATIONAL
PARK
Moose
Pass
80
M
64
Ri
ve
Hiker camp - Fires not permitted
Brûlé
Lake
12
72
73
Ri
65
150
NORTH BOUNDARY
e
Snake Indian
Pass
79
Semi-Primitive
115
Three Day Trips
R
150
Hiker camp - Fires permitted
40
66
68
74
77
78
n
K
TRAILHEAD: Sunwapta Falls, 54.5 km south of Jasper
townsite
69
86
M
Rolling along the upper Athabasca Valley, this trail
follows a wide, well-packed fire road that is easily
traversed on foot or bike. Make a day of it, or stay
overnight at Big Bend Campground.
ek
ia
Ind
er
15.6 km return Elevation gain/loss: 267 m
Maximum elevation: 1400 m
Cre
154
iv
Big Bend
150
All users
150
R
126
Primitive
155
Topaz
Lake
Hiker & cyclist only
HINTON
Hiker & horse only
ose
TRAILHEAD: South end of Medicine Lake, 28 km from
Jasper townsite
76
TRAILHEAD: 112 km south of Jasper townsite on the
Icefields Parkway at Nigel Creek.
130
75
Twintree
Lake
Chown
Glacier
NOTES: Snow levels may hinder travel until mid-July. No fires
at Jonas Cutoff 23. Campsites are located at the beginning
and end of the 20 km pass section. Horse use prohibited
in Jonas Pass.
132
Lakes
Hiker only
67
84
Mo
This unique trail travels through a narrow
mountain valley, skirts four lakes and crosses a
watershed - all in less than 13 km and with little
change in elevation. A good choice for novice
hikers. Camping is not permitted at Beaver Lake.
NORTH
BOUNDARY
SIDE TRAILS
87
Legend
WILDLAND PARK
153
rta
12 km one way Elevation gain: 41 m, loss: 8 m
Maximum elevation: 1540 m
ue
Caribou
SOLOMON CREEK
Po
Semi-Primitive
Resthaven
Icefield
85
Glacier
Pass
Creek
ck
Cre ek
Jacques Lake
Bl
Ro
ROCK LAKE
M ea d ow
139
The “grand tour” of the southern ranges, this circuit
includes one of the park’s largest backcountry lakes
and an extraordinary alpine traverse with glaciated
peaks, lush wildflowers and a variety of wildlife. The
trail passes through extensive alpine meadows and
three passes.
Hardscrabble
Pass
y
TRAILHEADS: Townsite - Junction of Bonhomme St.
and Patricia St.
80 km Elevation gain/loss-clockwise loop: 2351 m
Maximum elevation: 2475 m
Caribou range – dogs not allowed
ok
This well-marked trail begins and ends in the Jasper
townsite. It follows a plateau below timberline,
making it a good selection for the novice or early
season hiker.
Semi-Primitive
Sm
24 km Elevation gain/loss: 786 m
Maximum elevation: 1640 m
Brazeau Loop
Rock
Lake
Sn
Semi-Primitive
Desolation
Pass
Photo: A. Zier-Vogel
Saturday Night
Lake Loop
130 131 132
40
N
3
WILLMORE WILDERNESS PARK
Four Day Trips

Two-Day Trips
IV
ER
Edson
and
Edmonton
0 2 4
8
12
16
20
To find out more about caribou conservation in the
mountain national parks, visit www.pc.gc.ca/caribou.
THIS IS NOT A TOPOGRAPHIC MAP.
iT IS NOT SUITABLE FOR ROUTE FINDING.