Dell DVS Enterprise VMware Horizon View 5.2

Dell | Product Group
Dell
Desktop Virtualization Solutions
Introduction to the
Dell DVS Enterprise Solution
VMware Horizon View 5.2
July 10, 2013
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
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DVS Enterprise with VMware Horizon
View 5.2: Reference Architecture
Introduction
Dell Desktop Virtualization Solutions (DVS) Engineering
Introduction Document: v 1.0
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
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Document Review and Approval List
Name
Role
Input
Company
Gus Chavira
Solutions Architect (ENG)
Author
Dell
Andrew McDaniel
Solutions Development Manager (ENG)
Reviewer
Dell
Darpan Patel
Solutions Engineering Lead (ENG)
Contributor
Dell
Nicholas Busick
Solutions Engineering Lead (ENG)
Contributor
Dell
Cormac Woods
Solutions Engineering Lead (ENG)
Contributor
Dell
Mike Leahy
Solutions Engineering Lead (ENG)
Contributor
Dell
Version
Document Control
Author
Description
Date
Version
Gus Chavira
Initial Draft
5/6/2013
Draft 1.0
Gus Chavira
Updates
5/1/2013
Draft 1.1
Gus Chavira
User Story Updates
6/11/2013
Draft 1.2
Gus Chavira
vSGA Updates
6/18/2013
Draft 1.3
Sean Copeland
Updates
6/24/2013
Draft 1.4
This document is for informational purposes only and may contain typographical errors and technical
inaccuracies. The content is provided as is, without express or implied warranties of any kind.
© 2013 Dell Inc. All rights reserved. Dell and its affiliates cannot be responsible for errors or omissions
in typography or photography. Dell, the Dell logo, OpenManage, Compellent, Force10, KACE, EqualLogic,
PowerVault, PowerConnect, and PowerEdge are trademarks of Dell Inc. Intel and Xeon are registered
trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. Microsoft, Windows, Hyper-V, and
Windows Server are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United
States and/or other countries. VMware, vSphere, ESXi, vMotion, vCloud, and vCenter are registered
trademarks or trademarks of VMware, Inc. in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. Linux is the
registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the U. S. and other countries. Other trademarks and trade
names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or
their products. Dell disclaims proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.
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Contents
1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 6
1.1 Desktop Virtualization Solutions Overview ............................................................................................ 6
1.2 The DVS Enterprise Solution Today ........................................................................................................ 7
1.3 Product Positioning ................................................................................................................................ 7
1.4 Feature Overview ................................................................................................................................... 8
1.4.1 Design Principles.............................................................................................................................. 8
1.4.2 Architecture Scalability .................................................................................................................... 8
2 The DVS Enterprise Solution Architecture ................................................................................................ 10
2.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 10
2.2 DVS Enterprise Solution Layers ........................................................................................................... 10
3 VMware.................................................................................................................................................... 12
3.1 VMware vSphere 5.1............................................................................................................................. 12
3.2 VMware Horizon View 5.2 .................................................................................................................. 13
3.3 Summary of Horizon View 5.2 Features .............................................................................................. 13
3.4 VMware Horizon View 5.2 Infrastructure ........................................................................................... 15
4
DVS Enterprise Server Scalability ....................................................................................................... 16
4.1 R720 Rack-based Server Scalability .................................................................................................... 16
4.2 M620 Blade-based Server Scalability .................................................................................................. 16
5
Scaling the Solution ............................................................................................................................ 17
5.1 Local Tier 1 (RAID enabled local disks on Server with Tier 2 Shared Storage) ................................... 17
5.1.1
Local Tier 1 – 50 User/ Pilot - (RAID enabled local disks on Server with Tier 2 Shared Storage)
17
5.1.2 Local Tier 1 (iSCSI) - (RAID enabled local disks on Server with Tier 2 Shared Storage) ............... 18
5.1.2.1 Local Tier 1 – Network Architecture (iSCSI) .............................................................................. 18
5.1.2.2
Local Tier 1 Rack Scaling Guidance (iSCSI) .............................................................................. 19
5.2 Shared Tier 1 Rack .............................................................................................................................. 20
5.2.1 Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Rack – 500 users (iSCSI – EqualLogic) ....................................................... 20
5.2.2 Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Rack – 3000 users (iSCSI – EqualLogic) ..................................................... 21
5.2.2.1 Shared Tier 1 Rack – Network Architecture (iSCSI) ................................................................... 22
5.2.2.2 Shared Tier 1 Rack Scaling Guidance (iSCSI) ............................................................................. 22
5.2.3 Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Rack – 1000 Users (FC – Compellent) ....................................................... 23
5.2.4 Shared Tier 1 – Rack (FC – Compellent) ...................................................................................... 24
5.2.4.1 Shared Tier 1 Rack – Network Architecture (FC)...................................................... 24
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5.2.4.2 Shared Tier 1 Rack Scaling Guidance (FC) ................................................................................. 25
5.3 Shared Tier 1 (SAN) Blade ................................................................................................................... 26
5.3.1 Shared Tier 1 – Blade – 500 users (iSCSI – EqualLogic) ................................................................ 26
5.3.2 Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Blade (iSCSI – EqualLogic) ......................................................................... 27
5.3.2.1 Shared Tier 1 Blade – Network Architecture (iSCSI).................................................................. 28
5.3.2.2 Shared Tier 1 Blade Scaling Guidance (iSCSI) ............................................................................ 28
5.3.3 Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Blade (FC – Compellent) ........................................................................... 29
5.3.3.1 Shared Tier 1 Blade – Network Architecture (FC) ..................................................................... 29
5.3.3.2 Shared Tier 1 Blade Scaling Guidance (FC) ................................................................................ 30
6
Dell Wyse Cloud Clients ...................................................................................................................... 31
6.1 Dell Wyse P25 ..................................................................................................................................... 31
Dell Wyse P25 and Display Recommendations ...................................................................................... 32
6.2 Dell Wyse Z50D ................................................................................................................................... 33
6.3 Dell Wyse D50D .................................................................................................................................. 34
7
Dell DVS VMware Horizon View Solution New Feature Sets ............................................................. 35
7.1
Branch Office Deployments ............................................................................................................ 35
7.2
Microsoft Lync 2013 Enablement ................................................................................................... 37
7.2.1 Microsoft Lync 2013 Overview and Architecture .......................................................................... 37
7.7
AS 50, 200, 800, and 1000 (IOA and MSL) .................................................................................. 39
7.8
Win8 characterization and testing ............................................................................................. 39
8.9
Compellent 6.3 code update ...................................................................................................... 52
9 Management ......................................................................................................................................... 55
9.1 Solution Elements ............................................................................................................................... 55
9.2 Compliance - VMware vCenter Configuration Manager .................................................................... 55
9.3 Cortado ThinPrint ............................................................................................................................... 55
9.4 Imprivata OneSign ............................................................................................................................... 56
10
Reference ........................................................................................................................................ 57
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1 Introduction
1.1 Desktop Virtualization Solutions Overview
Dell Desktop Virtualization Solutions’ offers a comprehensive solution portfolio designed to
deliver the benefits of virtual end user and Cloud Client Computing. While there are several
ways of delivering virtual desktops, this solution is built on the Virtual Desktop Infrastructure
(VDI) model. In a VDI environment, user desktops are hosted as virtual machines (VMs) in a
centralized infrastructure and delivered over a network to an end user’s client device.
Getting the most out of a VDI infrastructure requires a well-developed, reliable architecture. If
the VDI architecture is undersized in terms of processing, memory or storage, then
performance will suffer and the experience will be less user-friendly than a traditional PC. If the
architecture is oversized, then the cost per virtual desktop will be economically unfeasible for
VDI adoption.
In order to enable Dell to compete efficiently in the VDI space and to accelerate the sales cycle,
we have developed a Solution Source Architecture (SSA) approach. Accelerate your time to
benefit and increase your operating efficiency with this tested methodology.
Our extensively pre-tested Dell Desktop Virtualization Solutions leverage purpose built
hardware, software and services to enable a “capable” architecture that maximizes IT control
while enhancing the end user experience. Choose a clear path to flexible options, expedient
upgrades and support through the solution life cycle with industry standard components. Dell
invests in extensive R&D and solution validation to ensure you experience a fine-tuned
deployment process that leads to deterministic operational costs. And you can minimize your
capital costs with Dell’s subscription based Desktop-as-a-Service.
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1.2 The DVS Enterprise Solution Today
Dell Desktop Virtualization Solutions deliver a range of purpose-built horizontal architectures.
These architectures are designed and tested to be modular and scalable for an array of your
needs and a defined and tested services methodology. To provide a simplified solution stack we
have designed and enhanced the original DVS Enterprise Solution to address the vast majority
of your needs and use cases for Desktop Virtualization. Simultaneously, we have worked to
make the solution easier to deploy and scale.
Initially there were the ISS Enterprise and ISS Enterprise+ bundles; both with strict guidelines
and constraints on sizing and scaling. Subsequently, the DVS Enterprise solution has been
refined and enhanced to be custom-tailored and sold as one cohesive stack known as DVS
Enterprise. The solution now has the ability be sold initially as an entry level rack-based solution
for as few as 50 users. Alternatively, the solution can either grow into, or be customized and
sold as a highly scalable, blade-based solution serving 50,000 users or more.
The DVS Enterprise solution is an architecture incorporating a VMware vSphere hypervisor with
a Horizon View 5.2 desktop virtualization solution. On top of this foundation runs Dell’s core
architecture components for networking, compute and storage designed from a tested and
effective selection of components.
1.3 Product Positioning
The Dell Desktop Virtualization Solution is a prescriptive, highly scalable, flexible architecture
designed to meet the wide array of your VDI needs that exist today. The DVS Enterprise Solution
has the ability to scale anywhere from 50 to 50000 users with a high degree of prescription at
every user level along the way. This granularity of scale allows you to leverage Dell DVS’s
accurate pay-as-you-grow model and add VDI capability as their VDI needs increase.
To provide this level of proven prescription, the DVS Enterprise leverages a core set of hardware
and software components that have been tested and proven to provide optimal performance at
the lowest cost per user. To provide this level of flexibility, the DVS Enterprise also includes an
extended list of optional/upsell components that you can chose from for environments with
unique VDI feature, scale or performance needs.
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Whether you require a Managed Solution from Dell or prefers to manage the solution in-house,
the tenants of the DVS Enterprise Solution remain consistent and will be leveraged as the
horizontal platform. If the various approved configurations do not meet your requirements then
a custom solution can be provided.
1.4 Feature Overview
1.4.1 Design Principles
The design principles for the flexible computing solution are:

Secure – Security risks, concerns and policies are addressed or mitigated

Manageable – The solution includes the tools and software services required to manage
the environment

Standards-based – Makes use of commodity, off-the-shelf components wherever
possible

Distributed – Non-blocking and built with distributed components to maximize the use
of available computing resources and eliminate bottlenecks

Scalable – Capable of scaling up or down to support business needs

Resilient – Capable of withstanding the failure of a single infrastructure component.
1.4.2 Architecture Scalability
The architecture is designed to provide a scalable platform:

The components can be scaled either horizontally (by adding additional physical and
virtual servers to the server pools) or vertically (by adding virtual resources to the
infrastructure)

The architecture eliminates bandwidth and performance bottlenecks as much as
possible

This scalability enables the reduction of the future cost of infrastructure ownership
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Component
Horizontal scalability
Vertical scalability
Virtual Desktop
Compute Servers
Additional servers added as
necessary.
Additional RAM or CPU compute power.
View Connection
Servers
Additional physical servers added to the
Management cluster to deal with
additional management VMs.
Additional network and I/O capacity
added to the servers.
VMware vCenter
Deploy additional servers and use
linked mode to optimize management.
Additional vCenter Management VMs.
Database Services
Migrate databases to a dedicated SQL
server and increase the number of
management nodes.
Additional RAM and CPU for the
management nodes.
File Services
Split user profiles and home
directories between multiple file
servers in the cluster.
Additional RAM and CPU for the
management nodes.
File services can also be migrated to the
optional NAS device for high availability.
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2 The DVS Enterprise Solution Architecture
____________________________________________________________________________________________
2.1 Introduction
The DVS Enterprise Solution leverages a core set of hardware and software components in
the following categories:




Networking
Virtualization Compute Servers
Management Servers
Storage Tiers
These components have been tested and proven to provide the optimal balance of high
performance and lowest cost per user. Additionally, the DVS Enterprise also includes an
approved extended list of optional/upsell components in all the same categories. This
extended list of components you can chose from to custom tailor the solution for
environments with unique VDI feature, scale or performance needs. The Enterprise stack is
designed to be a cost effective starting point when you want to start your transition to a fully
virtualized desktop environment slowly, allowing you to grow the investment and
commitment as needed or as you become comfortable with VDI as a solution.
2.2
DVS Enterprise Solution Layers
Only a single high performance PowerConnect or Force10 48-port switch is required to get
started in the Network layer. This switch will host all solution traffic consisting of 1Gb iSCSI
and LAN sources for smaller stacks. Above 1000 users we recommend that LAN and iSCSI
traffic be separated into discrete switching fabrics. Additional switches can be added and
stacked as required to provide High Availability for the Network layer.
The Compute layer consists of the server resources responsible for hosting the user sessions.
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VDI Management components are dedicated to their own layer so as to not negatively
impact the user sessions running in the Compute layer. This physical separation of
resources provides clean, linear, and predictable scaling without the need to reconfigure or
move resources within the solution as you grow. The Management layer will host all the VMs
necessary to support the VDI infrastructure.
The Storage layer consists of options provided by EqualLogic for iSCSI and Compellent
arrays for Fibre Channel to suit your tier 1 and tier 2 scaling and capacity needs. Shared or
local Tier 1 will include shared Tier 2 data for user data and management VMs.
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3 VMware
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3.1
VMware vSphere 5.1
VMware vSphere 5.1 includes the ESXi™ hypervisor as well as vCenter™ Server which is
used to configure and manage VMware hosts. Key capabilities for the ESXi Enterprise Plus
license level include:










VMware vMotion™ - VMware vMotion technology provides real-time migration of
running virtual machines (VM) from one host to another with no disruption or
downtime.
VMware High Availability (HA) - VMware HA provides high availability at the virtual
machine (VM) level. Upon host failure, VMware HA automatically restarts VMs on other
physical hosts running ESXi. VMware vSphere 5.1 uses Fault Domain Manager (FDM)
for High Availability.
VMware Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) and VMware Distributed Power
Management (DPM) - VMware DRS technology enables vMotion to automatically
achieve load balancing according to resource requirements. When VMs in a DRS
cluster need fewer resources, such as during nights and weekends, DPM consolidates
workloads onto fewer hosts and powers off the rest to reduce power consumption.
vSphere Storage DRS™ and Profile-Driven Storage - New integration with VMware
vCloud® Director™ enables further storage efficiencies and automation in a private
cloud environment.
VMware Storage vMotion™ - VMware Storage vMotion enables real-time migration of
running VM disks from one storage array to another with no disruption or downtime. It
minimizes service disruptions due to planned storage downtime previously incurred
for rebalancing or retiring storage arrays.
Space Efficient Sparse Virtual Disks - SE Sparse Disks introduces an automated
mechanism for reclaiming stranded space. SE Sparse disks also have a new
configurable block allocation size which can be tuned to the recommendations of the
storage arrays vendor, or indeed the applications running inside of the Guest OS.
VMware Horizon View 5.2 will use the new SE Sparse Disk in vSphere 5.1.
VMware vCenter Update Manager - VMware vCenter Update Manager automates
patch management, enforcing compliance to patch standards for VMware ESXi hosts.
Host Profiles - Host Profiles standardize and simplify the deployment and
management of VMware ESXi host configurations. They capture and store validated
configuration information, including host compliance, networking, storage, and
security settings.
vSphere Web Client - The vSphere Web Client is now the core administrative interface
for vSphere. This new flexible, robust interface simplifies vSphere control through
shortcut navigation, custom tagging, enhanced scalability, and the ability to manage
from anywhere with Internet Explorer or Firefox-enabled devices.
vCenter Single Sign-On - Dramatically simplify vSphere administration by allowing
users to log in once to access all instances or layers of vCenter without the need for
further authentication.
For more information on VMware vSphere, see www.vmware.com/products/vsphere.
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3.2
VMware Horizon View 5.2
VMware Horizon View 5.2 is a desktop virtualization solution that delivers virtual desktops as
an on- demand service to any user, anywhere. With VMware’s desktop delivery technology,
Horizon View 5.2 can quickly and securely deliver individual applications or complete
desktops to the entire enterprise, whether they are task workers, knowledge workers or
mobile workers. Users now have the flexibility to access their desktop on any device, anytime,
with a high-definition user experience. With VMware Horizon View 5.2, IT can manage single
instances of each OS, application and user profile and dynamically assemble them to
increase business agility and greatly simplify desktop management.
3.3
Summary of Horizon View 5.2 Features
End User Experience

Support for Windows 8 based desktops
o View5.2 offers support for Windows 8 desktops
o Facilitates a smooth transition in rolling out Windows 8
o Enables IT to leverage the latest Windows capabilities in VDI
Hardware Accelerated 3D Graphics

Horizon View5.2 provides a rich workstation class user experience with high
performance graphics
o Enables shared-access to physical GPU hardware for 3D and high performance
graphical workloads.
o Very cost effective as multiple VMs share the same GPU resource
o Offers full compatibility with hosts lacking physical GPUs
Improved Video and VOIP communications with Microsoft Lync 2013 support

View5.2 offers tighter integration with Microsoft Lync and Office applications
o Full collaboration capabilities with Microsoft Lync on View Desktops.
o Full support for Unified Communications VoIP and Video using Lync client on
View desktops
o Support PCoIP
Streamlined access to View Desktops from Horizon

View desktops can now be accessed via Horizon gateway.
o Horizon provides a single point of access for end users to desktops, data and
apps.
o This provides a one-stop shop for all end-user access to their corporate
workloads
Easily connect to desktops from any device with HTML Access

View Desktops can now be accessed through a HTML5 capable web browser via
Horizon.
o This provides install-free access to Desktops from ANY modern device.
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Ease of Management



Large Pool creation with elimination of 8 host limits and multiple vLAN support
o View5.2 has support for large View pools with more than 8 hosts.
o This offers OPEX savings with less admin time spent on common operations.
o Even more OPEX savings with fewer pools to manage in multi-thousand user
deployments.
Tech Preview of a new Integrated Service Console in the VC Web Client
o View5.2 offers a View plugin into vSphere Web client.
o Allows for easier desktop support and troubleshooting.
o Offers a simple interface for novice administrative users which allows for
increased efficiency
Support for VC Virtual Appliance based deployments
o View5.2 is fully compatible with Virtual Appliance-based VirtualCenter
deployments.
o This eliminates VirtualCenter dependencies on Windows
o Easier installation and upgrades.
Total Cost of Ownership

Substantial storage capacity savings for persistent desktops with Space Efficient Disks
o View 5.2 leverages a vSphere capability to offer a new disk format for VMs on
VMFS or NFS.
o Space Efficient disks provide reduced storage capacity requirements (lower
CAPEX) for persistent desktops
o Unused space is reclaimed and View composer desktops stay small
o IO alignment and grain size - Space Efficient disks guarantee that there will be
no misalignment on storage arrays that are 4k aligned
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3.4
VMware Horizon View 5.2 Infrastructure
The DVS Enterprise architecture with VMware Horizon View 5.2 is designed to provide
maximum performance and scalability starting at very low user counts for SMBs and up to
tens of thousands of users for large enterprise deployments. VMware Horizon View 5.2 brings
with it many new features, as outlined above. This solution architecture follows a distributed
model where solution components exist in tiers. The Compute tier is where VDI desktop VMs
execute/run, the Management tier being dedicated to the broker management server role
VMs. Both tiers, while inextricably linked, scale independently.
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4
DVS Enterprise Server Scalability
As workloads increase, the solution can be scaled to provide additional compute and storage
resources independently. Based on the best practices from VMware and DVS Engineering
validation work the following scaling guidelines have been established for the virtual
management infrastructure and the hosts.
4.1
R720 Rack-based Server Scalability
4.2
M620 Blade-based Server Scalability
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5
Scaling the Solution
As your VDI needs grow, so does the depth and breadth of the DVS Enterprise. The various
management components exist as virtual server instances running on physical servers. This
provides tremendous flexibility when adding resources to the solution while keeping the
existing components intact and untouched. This also adds a level of resiliency in being able
to backup copies of the server virtual images. The following tables gives an overview of
Dell’s recommended scaling of management components.
Local Tier 1 (RAID enabled local disks on Server with Tier
2 Shared Storage)
5.1
Local Tier 1 – 50 User/ Pilot - (RAID enabled local disks on Server with Tier 2
Shared Storage)
5.1.1
For a very small deployment or pilot effort, we offer a 50 user/pilot solution. This
architecture is non-distributed with all VDI and Management functions on a single host.
If additional scaling is desired, you can grow into a larger distributed architecture
seamlessly with no loss on your initial investment.
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
Local Tier 1 (iSCSI) - (RAID enabled local disks on Server with Tier 2 Shared
Storage)
5.1.2
The local tier 1 solution model provides a scalable rack-based configuration that hosts user VDI sessions
on local disk in the Compute layer.
5.1.2.1
Local Tier 1 – Network Architecture (iSCSI)
In the local tier 1 architecture, a single PowerConnect or Force10 switch can be shared
among all network connections for both Management and Compute, up to 1000 users.
Over 1000 users DVS recommends separating the network fabrics to isolate iSCSI and LAN
traffic as well as making each stack redundant. Only the Management servers connect to
iSCSI storage in this model. All Top of Rack (ToR) traffic has been designed to be layer
2/switched locally, with all layer 3/routable VLANs trunked from a core or distribution
switch. The following diagrams illustrate the logical data flow in relation to the core switch.
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.1.2.2
Local Tier 1 Rack Scaling Guidance (iSCSI)
Local Tier 1 HW Scaling (iSCSI)
User
Scale
ToR
LAN
ToR 1Gb
iSCSI
EQL
T2
EQL
NAS
0-1000
S55
S55
4100E
0-1000 (HA)
S55
S55
4100E
FS7600
0-3000
S55
S55
6100E
FS7600
3000-6000
S55
S55
6500E
FS7600
6000+ users
S60
S60
6500E
FS7600
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.2
5.2.1
Shared Tier 1 Rack
Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Rack – 500 users (iSCSI – EqualLogic)
For POCs or small deployments, tier 1 and tier 2 can be combined on a single 6110XS storage
array. Above 500 users, a separate array needs to be used for tier 2.
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.2.2
Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Rack – 3000 users (iSCSI – EqualLogic)
For 500 or more users on EqualLogic, the Storage layers are separated into discrete arrays.
The drawing below depicts a 3000 user build where the network fabrics are separated for
LAN and iSCSI traffic. Additional 6110XS arrays are added for tier 1 as the user count scales,
just as the tier 2 array models change also based on scale. The 4110E, 4110X, and 6510E are
tier 2 array options. The addition of a NAS head is recommended above 1000 users as well as
when optionally when providing high availability to file share services.
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.2.2.1
Shared Tier 1 Rack – Network Architecture (iSCSI)
In the Shared tier 1 architecture for rack servers, a single PowerConnect or Force10 switch
can be shared among all network connections for both Management and Compute, up to
1000 users. Over 1000 users DVS recommends separating the network fabrics to isolate
iSCSI and LAN traffic and making each stack redundant. Both Management and Compute
servers connect to all VLANs in this model. All ToR traffic has designed to be layer 2/
switched locally, with all layer 3 / routable VLANs routed through a core or distribution
switch. The following diagrams illustrate the server NIC to ToR switch connections, vSwitch
assignments, as well as logical VLAN flow in relation to the core switch.
5.2.2.2
Shared Tier 1 Rack Scaling Guidance (iSCSI)
Shared Tier 1 HW scaling (Rack – iSCSI)
User
Scale
ToR
LAN
ToR 10Gb
iSCSI
EQL
T1
EQL
T2
EQL
NAS
0-500
S55
S4810
6110XS
-
-
500-1000
S55
S4810
6110XS
4110E
0-1000 (HA)
S55
S4810
6110XS
4110E
NX3300
0-3000
S55
S4810
6110XS
4110X
NX3300
3000-6000
S55
S4810
6110XS
6510E
NX3300
6000+
S60
S4810
6110XS
6510E
NX3300
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.2.3
Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Rack – 1000 Users (FC – Compellent)
Utilizing Compellent storage for shared tier 1 provides a FC solution where tier 1 and tier 2
are functionally combined in a single array. Tier 2 functions (user data + Management VMs)
can be removed from the array if you have another solution in place. Doing this should net
an additional 30% resource capability per Compellent array for user desktop sessions.
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.2.4 Shared Tier 1 – Rack (FC – Compellent)
FC is also supported in this model with discrete Compellent SC8000 arrays in tier 1 and tier
2. The Brocade 6510 is the FC switch of choice using 8Gb along with 8Gb FC IO cards in
the Compellent array.
5.2.4.1 Shared Tier 1 Rack – Network Architecture (FC)
In the Shared tier 1 architecture for rack servers using FC, a separate switching infrastructure
is required for FC. Management and compute servers will both connect to shared storage
using FC. Both management and compute servers connect to all network VLANs in this
model. All ToR traffic has designed to be layer 2/ switched locally, with all layer 3 / routable
VLANs routed through a core or distribution switch. The following diagrams illustrate the
server NIC to ToR switch connections, vSwitch assignments, as well as logical VLAN low in
relation to the core switch.
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.2.4.2
Shared Tier 1 Rack Scaling Guidance (FC)
Shared Tier 1 HW scaling (Rack - FC)
User
Scale
LAN
Network
FC
Network
0-1000
S55
6510
0-1000 (HA)
S55
1000-6000
6000+
CML
T2
CML
NAS
15K SAS
-
-
6510
15K SAS
NL SAS
FS8600
S55
6510
15K SAS
NL SAS
FS8600
S60
6510
15K SAS
NL SAS
FS8600
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CML
T1
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DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.3
5.3.1
Shared Tier 1 (SAN) Blade
Shared Tier 1 – Blade – 500 users (iSCSI – EqualLogic)
As is the case in the Shared tier 1 model using rack servers, blades can also be used in a 500
user bundle by combing tier 1 and tier 2 on a single 6110XS array. Above 500 users, tier 1 and
tier 2 storage should be separated into discrete arrays.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
26
DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.3.2
Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Blade (iSCSI – EqualLogic)
Above 1000 users the Storage tiers need to be separated. At this scale we also separate
LAN from iSCSI switching as well as add load balancing and NAS for SMB file shares. The
drawing below depicts a 3000 user solution:
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
27
DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.3.2.1
Shared Tier 1 Blade – Network Architecture (iSCSI)
In the Shared tier 1 architecture for blades, only iSCSI is switched through a ToR switch.
There is no need to switch LAN ToR since the M6348 in the chassis supports LAN to the
blades and can be uplinked to the core directly. The M6348 has 16 external ports per switch
that can be optionally used for DRAC/ IPMI traffic. For greater redundancy, a ToR switch
used to support DRAC/IPMI can be used outside of the chassis. Both Management and
Compute servers connect to all VLANs in this model. The following diagram illustrates the
server NIC to ToR switch connections, vSwitch assignments, as well as logical VLAN flow in
relation to the core switch.
5.3.2.2
Shared Tier 1 Blade Scaling Guidance (iSCSI)
Shared Tier 1 HW scaling (Blade - iSCSI)
User
Scale
Blade
LAN
Blade
iSCSI
ToR 10Gb
iSCSI
EQL
T1
EQL
T2
EQL
NAS
0-500
M6348
8024-K
S4810
6110XS
-
-
500-1000
M6348
8024-K
S4810
6110XS
4110E
-
0-1000 (HA)
M6348
8024-K
S4810
6110XS
4110E
NX3300
0-3000
M6348
8024-K
S4810
6110XS
4110X
NX3300
3000-6000
M6348
8024-K
S4810
6110XS
6510E
NX3300
6000+
M6348
8024-K
S4810
6110XS
6510E
NX3300
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
28
DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.3.3
Shared Tier 1 (SAN) – Blade (FC – Compellent)
FC is again an option in Shared tier 1 using blades. There are a few key differences
using FC with blades instead of iSCSI: Blade chassis interconnects FC HBAs in the
servers, and there are FC IO cards in the Compellent arrays. ToR FC switching is
optional if a suitable FC infrastructure is already in place.
5.3.3.1
Shared Tier 1 Blade – Network Architecture (FC)
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
29
DVS Enterprise – VMware Horizon View 5.2 Reference Architecture
5.3.3.2
Shared Tier 1 Blade Scaling Guidance (FC)
Shared Tier 1 HW scaling (Blade - FC)
User
Scale
Blade
LAN
Blade
FC
ToR
FC
CML
T1
CML
T2
CML
NAS
0-500
8024-K
5424
6510
15K SAS
-
-
500-1000
8024-K
5424
6510
15K SAS
-
-
0-1000 (HA)
8024-K
5424
6510
15K SAS
NL SAS
FS8600
1000-6000
8024-K
5424
6510
15K SAS
NL SAS
FS8600
6000+
8024-K
5424
6510
15K SAS
NL SAS
FS8600
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
30
6
Dell Wyse Cloud Clients
Dell Wyse Cloud Client devices and software provide superior security, reliability and energy
efficiency when compared to a traditional PC. Dell Wyse desktop devices and software help
streamline the delivery of VMware Horizon View 5.2 infrastructure to millions of users
around the world. Thin Clients create a more secure environment that minimizes or
eliminates exposure to data loss, viruses and malware. By utilizing thin clients as the access
device for end user, deployments can benefit from centralized management and complete
control of all endpoints. Since thin clients eliminate components with high failure rates,
deployments can deliver reduced costs and improved reliability over the life of a desktop
virtualization deployment.
6.1
Dell Wyse P25
Experience uncompromised computing, with the benefits of secure, centralized
management. The Dell Wyse P25 PCoIP zero client for VMware Horizon View 5.2 is a
secure, easily managed zero client that provides outstanding graphics performance
for advanced applications such as CAD, 3D solids modeling, video editing and
advanced worker-level office productivity applications. Smaller than a typical
notebook, this dedicated zero client is designed specifically for VMware Horizon
View 5.2. It features the latest processor technology from Teradici to process the
PCoIP protocol in silicon, and includes client-side content caching to deliver the
highest level of performance available over 2 HD displays in an extremely compact,
energy-efficient form factor. The Dell Wyse P25 delivers a rich user experience while
resolving many of the challenges of provisioning, managing, maintaining and
securing enterprise desktops.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
31
Dell Wyse P25 and Display Recommendations
Click HERE for more information on the Dell Wyse P25.
Display recommendations for the P25 Zero Client are listed below
The P2412H shown above supports 1920x1080, VGA, DVI and USB. Other options include the E2213
with 1680x1050, VGA and DVI, and the E1913 with 1440x900, VGA and DVI.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
32
6.2
Dell Wyse Z50D
Designed for power users, the new Dell Wyse Z50D is the highest performing thin client on
the market. Highly secure and ultra-powerful, the Z50D combines Dell Wyse-enhanced
SUSE Linux Enterprise with a dual-core AMD 1.6 GHz processor and a revolutionary unified
engine for an unprecedented user experience. The Z50D eliminates performance
constraints for high-end, processing-intensive applications like computer-aided design,
multimedia, HD video and 3D modeling. Scalable enterprise-wide management provides
simple deployment, patching and updates. Take a unit from box to productivity in minutes
with auto configuration.
Dell Wyse Z50D and Display Recommendations
Click HERE for more information on the Dell Wyse Z50D.
Display recommendations for the Z50D are listed below
The P2212H shown above supports 1920x1080, VGA, DVI and USB. Another option includes the E2213 with
1680x1050, VGA and DVI.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
33
6.3
Dell Wyse D50D
Designed for power users, the new Dell Wyse D50D is a high performance thin client
based on Dell Wyse-enhanced SUSE Linux. Highly secure and powerful, the D50D
combines Dell Wyse-enhanced SUSE Linux Enterprise with a dual-core AMD 1.4 GHz
processor and a revolutionary unified engine for an outstanding user experience. The
D50D addresses the performance challenges of high-end, processing-intensive
applications like computer-aided design, multimedia, HD video and 3D modeling.
Scalable enterprise-wide management provides simple deployment, patching and
updates. Take a unit from box to productivity in minutes with auto configuration.
Delivering outstanding processing speed and power, security and display
performance, the D50D offers a unique combination of performance, efficiency, and
affordability.
Dell Wyse D50D and Display Recommendations
Click HERE for more information on the Dell Wyse D50D.
Display recommendations for the D50D are listed below
The P2212H shown above supports 1920x1080, VGA, DVI and USB. Another option includes the E2213
with 1680x1050, VGA and DVI.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
34
Dell DVS VMware Horizon View Solution New
Feature Sets
7
7.1
Branch Office Deployments
Executive Summary
Remote branch office deployments are architected in a fashion to support the best
end user experience at a remote/branch office while providing optimized access back
to Data Center resources such as internal intranet websites, mail exchanges services,
CIFS shares, SharePoint, etc. These technologies include WAN OP appliances from
Dell SonicWALL WXA appliances. This architecture will facilitate local VDI compute
resources to the remote branch office with WANOP appliances to facilitate optimized
access to applications accessing remote data or services.
Introduction
Supporting users at branch offices can create a large challenge for IT to properly
support from both infrastructure management and the fact that there may not be IT
staff onsite. In addition, providing the end-users with the highest quality desktop
experience and application performance is a must. Centralizing the management of
the infrastructure will ensure easier management and enforce compliance.
Branch office deployments have had many difficulties that are mitigated here:




Presentation traffic has not been optimal for deployments of remote desktop directly
back to the Data Center.
Application performance has been slow or degraded due WAN latency.
Difficult to support for IT due to remoteness of environment or lack of local IT staff.
Large WAN bandwidth requirements for some deployments.
Architecture
Actual desktops are located on premise at the Branch office. So connection to the
desktop and its “presentation” traffic are localized. Initial desktop broker connection
to VCS redirects View client to local desktop connection so PCoIP traffic is all internal
at branch office. Once connected even if WAN connection is compromised, then
desktop and its connection still persist.
The applications used inside the desktop context will take advantage of the Dell
SonicWALL Firewall/WXA WANOP devices to optimize the connection back to the
Data Center resources. In this manner the desktop PCoIP traffic that results in the
presentation of the desktop is optimized since the traffic is local to the branch office
and the applications that run in the desktop also have their data path optimized.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
35
The architecture diagram below provides visualization:
The next diagram shows how the initial connection is made to Data Center VCS
Broker server. This is a relatively lightweight connection that checks authentication
and then directs the PCoIP connection to the appropriate desktop. In this case the
desktop is local to the end user. Once this desktop connection is made if the WAN
link to the Data Center is lost the connection persists from the View client to the local
branch office desktop.
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36
7.2 Microsoft Lync 2013 Enablement
7.2.1 Microsoft Lync 2013 Overview and Architecture
Specifically Microsoft Lync 2013 has been optimized by VMware for PCoIP. A DVC
channel is facilitated via PCoIP and a point to point redirect occurs on Lync 2013
plug-in enabled clients (Windows only) that keeps valuable VDI compute host
resources from being consumed.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
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DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
38
7.7
AS 50, 200, 800, and 1000 (IOA and MSL)
Discussion on the merits and pieces of the AS Stacks (this section will be updated
post RTS) along with description information
7.8
Win8 characterization and testing
Executive Summary
This document is the test architecture and results document for testing conducted
on the impact of Windows 8 on VMware Horizon View 5.2. It contains the testing
methodology and results. Based on the functional details of Windows 8, the impact
on Compute host local Tier1 storage and sizing for basic, standard and premium
users will be determined as a result of this testing.
VMware Horizon View 5.2
Horizon View 5.2 leverages a new vSphere capability that implements a new disk
format for VMs on VMFS that allow for grain reduction size & more efficiently
utilization of allocated blocks by filling it with real data. Unused space is reclaimed
and View Composer desktops stay small. It also supports Windows 8 virtual desktops
as guest OS and Client. Horizon View Storage Accelerator optimizes storage load by
caching common image blocks when reading virtual desktop images. Space Efficient
Disks continuously reduce the storage needed per desktop. Both these technologies
improve storage capacity and utilization, thereby reducing costs of additional
hardware.
Configuration
Below is the Solution Software Configuration. For additional configuration information
see the reference architecture document.
Solution Configuration –
Software Components
VMware vCenter
VMware Horizon View
Hypervisor
Microsoft SQL Server
Windows 8 Enterprise (32 bit)
Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
Description/Version
Version 5.1 U1
Version 5.2
VMware ESXi 5.1 U1
Version 2008 R2
VDI Clients for characterization tests
Login VSI launchers
VMs for hosting VMware View, vCenter Server,
MSSQL server and other infrastructure VMs.
39
Below is the Solution Hardware Configuration. For additional configuration
information see the reference architecture document.
Solution Configuration - Hardware Components:
Description
VMware
Compute
Host
For ESXi
Environment 10 x
146 GB drives will
be configured on
RAID 10
1 x Dell PowerEdge R720 Server:






VMware
Management
Host
ESXi 5.1
Intel-(R)-Xeon- (R) CPU E52690 @ 2.9 GHZ
196 GB @ 1600 MHZ
10 x 146GB 15K SAS internal
disk drives
Broadcom BCM5720 1 GbE
NIC
PERC H710P RAID Controller
1 x Dell PowerEdge R710 Server:





VMware ESXi 5.1
2 x HexCore Intel®
Xeon® X5670 2.9 GHz
Processors
96 GB RAM @ 1333 MHZ
8 x 146GB 15K SAS
internal disk drives
1 x Broadcom 5709 1GbE
NIC, Quad-Port
This host will be
hosting the
Windows 8 VDI
desktops.
For ESXi Environment 8 x 146
GB drives will be configured
on RAID 10
Each VM will host the
following workloads on
Windows server 2008 R2 SP1:




Test
Management
Server (Login
VSI
Infrastructure
Mgmt Server)
1x Dell PowerEdge R710 servers:






VMware ESXi 5.1
2 x HexCore Intel®
Xeon® X5670 2.9 GHz
Processors
96 GB RAM @ 1333 MHZ
2 x 146GB 15K SAS
internal disk drives
1 x Broadcom 5709 1GbE
NIC, Quad-Port
Login VSI version 3.7
VMware ESXi 5.1 will be
installed on the Test Mgmt
R710 server.
Test Infrastructure VMs will be
created on this server.
The VMs are loaded with the
Windows 2008 R2 SP1
operating system.
Each VM will host the
following workloads:



Test Launcher
Server [VDI
Workload
Generator]
1x Dell PowerEdge R710 servers:


DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
VMware ESXi 5.1
Intel-(R)-Xeon- (R) CPU
X5670 @ 2.9 GHz
VMware vCenter
VMware View
Connection Server
Microsoft SQL server
(View Connection
Server and vCenter
Database)
File Server
Domain Controller
(test1.com)
Stratusphere Hub (5.3.1)
McAfee
VMware ESXi 5.1 will be
installed on the Test Mgmt
R710 server.
Login VSI launchers will be
40




96 GB RAM @ 1333 MHZ
2 x 146GB 15K SAS
internal disk drives
Broadcom 5709 1GbE
NIC
Login VSI version 3.7
Network
1 x Dell PowerConnect 6248
1Gb Ethernet Switch
Performance
Monitoring
VMware Virtual Center 5.1
created on this server that will
initiate VMware View sessions
from each VM to simulate VDI
workload.
The VMs are loaded with the
Windows 8 Enterprise 32bit
operating system.
Deployment Stack and Test
Stacks configured on same
physical switch.
Performance data will be captured
from VSphere client.
Test results and analysis
The primary focus of the tests is to determine the maximum number of desktops that
can be deployed with Windows 8 using VMware Horizon View 5.2 without
compromising performance. All tests included a single Management server along
with a single Compute Host, for hosting virtual desktops. To determine the density
data all tests were conducted on the compute host. The virtual desktops created
using VMware Horizon View are placed on local Tier 1 storage.

The primary objective of the testing is to determine the CPU, Memory, Disk Latency
and Network impact of integrating Windows 8 on VMware Horizon View 5.2 on to the
VDI stack using the Basic, Standard and Premium task worker.

Determine the performance impact of Windows 8 on the local disk during peak I/O
activity such as boot storms and login storms.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
41
Test: Basic Run (115 Users)
The following validation was done for 115 Basic users on R720 host with 2.9 GHz
processor and 10 146GB 15K disks. Validation was performed using DVS standard
testing methodology using Login VSI to manage the VMware View linked clones and
stratosphere UX and ESXi to deliver performance results. The CPU usage for this test
reached 88.8% thus confirming that the server with this configuration can support up
to 115 basic users.
The graphs below show the CPU, Consumed Memory, Local disk IOPS, Disk Latency,
Network and VDI UX scatter plot results from this validation.
CPU Usage (%)
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
12:25 PM
12:35 PM
12:45 PM
12:55 PM
1:05 PM
1:15 PM
1:25 PM
1:35 PM
1:45 PM
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
CPU Usage (%)
Figure 1
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
42
As seen from the above graph maximum CPU utilization was approximately 88.8%.
After all users started logging in, CPU usage was spiked from 9 to 90 and became
stable at 88% once all users logged in and dropped as the users logged off.
Active Memory (GB)
60
50
40
30
20
Active Memory (GB)
10
12:25 PM
12:35 PM
12:45 PM
12:55 PM
1:05 PM
1:15 PM
1:25 PM
1:35 PM
1:45 PM
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
0
Figure 2
A Spike is evident after all VMs start logging in however active memory is less than 50%
of available memory during the peak of validation activity.
Network (MBps)
7
6
5
4
3
Network (MBps)
2
1
12:25 PM
12:35 PM
12:45 PM
12:55 PM
1:05 PM
1:15 PM
1:25 PM
1:35 PM
1:45 PM
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
0
Figure 3
As seen from the above graph, overall network performance was good.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
43
Login State
Steady State
1400
Local Disk IOPS
1200
1000
800
Average read requests
per second
600
Average write requests
per second
400
200
2:55 PM
2:40 PM
2:25 PM
2:10 PM
1:55 PM
1:40 PM
1:25 PM
1:10 PM
12:55 PM
12:40 PM
12:25 PM
0
Figure 4
A Spike is evident after all VMs start logging in however the read/write activity was
fluctuating from 12:25 PM to 1:35 PM and became stable after all users finished
logging in from 1:40 PM to 2:35 PM. Total Peak IOPS measured during the login state
was 1906 giving an IOPS value of 16.57 per user and total peak IOPS measured during
the steady state (after all users logged in) was 744 giving an IOPS value of 6.46 per
user.
Disk Latency (Milliseconds)
6
5
Read latency
Write latency
3
Queue read latency
2
Kernel write latency
1
Queue write latency
0
Command latency
12:25 PM
12:35 PM
12:45 PM
12:55 PM
1:05 PM
1:15 PM
1:25 PM
1:35 PM
1:45 PM
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
4
Kernel read latency
Figure 5
As seen from the above graph, overall disk latency is below 20ms which is in
acceptable range.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
44
Figure 6
From the above graph we can see that all 115 sessions registered perfect
performance which is within the acceptable tolerance for this test.
Test: Standard Run (95 Users)
The following validation was done for 95 Standard users on R720 host with 2.9 GHz
processor and 10 146GB 15K disks. Validation was performed using DVS standard
testing methodology using Login VSI to manage the VMware View linked clones and
stratosphere UX and ESXi to deliver performance results. The CPU usage for this test
reached 88.71% thus confirming that the server with this configuration can support
up to 95 standard users.
The graphs below show the CPU, Consumed Memory, Local disk IOPS, Disk Latency,
Network and VDI UX scatter plot results from this validation.
CPU Usage (%)
100
80
60
40
CPU Usage (%)
20
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
3:05 PM
3:15 PM
3:25 PM
3:35 PM
3:45 PM
3:55 PM
4:05 PM
4:15 PM
0
Figure 1
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
45
As seen from the above graph maximum CPU utilization was approximately 87.71%.
After all users started logging in, CPU usage was spiked from 8 to 92 and became
stable between 82-87% once all users logged in and dropped as the users logged off.
Active Memory (GB)
60
50
40
30
Active Memory (GB)
20
10
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
3:05 PM
3:15 PM
3:25 PM
3:35 PM
3:45 PM
3:55 PM
4:05 PM
4:15 PM
0
Figure 2
A Spike is evident after all VMs start logging in however active memory is less than 50%
of available memory during the peak of validation activity.
Network (MBps)
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
4:15 PM
4:05 PM
3:55 PM
3:45 PM
3:35 PM
3:25 PM
3:15 PM
3:05 PM
2:55 PM
2:45 PM
2:35 PM
2:25 PM
2:15 PM
2:05 PM
1:55 PM
Network (MBps)
Figure 3
As seen from the above graph, overall network performance was good.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
46
Login State
Steady State
Local Disk IOPS
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
Average read requests
per second
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
3:05 PM
3:15 PM
3:25 PM
3:35 PM
3:45 PM
3:55 PM
4:05 PM
4:15 PM
Average write requests
per second
Figure 4
A Spike is evident after all VMs start logging in however the read/write activity was
fluctuating from 1:55 PM to 2:55 PM and became stable after all users finished
logging in from 2:56 PM to 2:45 PM. Total Peak IOPS measured during the login state
was 972 giving an IOPS value of 10.23 per user and total peak IOPS measured during
the steady state (after all users logged in) was 578 giving an IOPS value of 6.08 per
user.
Disk Latency (Milliseconds)
6
5
Command latency
4
Kernel read latency
3
Read latency
2
Queue read latency
Kernel write latency
1
Write latency
1:55 PM
2:05 PM
2:15 PM
2:25 PM
2:35 PM
2:45 PM
2:55 PM
3:05 PM
3:15 PM
3:25 PM
3:35 PM
3:45 PM
3:55 PM
4:05 PM
4:15 PM
0
Queue write latency
Figure 5
As seen from the above graph, overall disk latency is below 20ms which is in
acceptable range.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
47
Figure 6
From the above graph we can see that all 95 sessions registered perfect performance
which is within the acceptable tolerance for this test.
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
48
Test: Premium Run (80 Users)
The following validation was done for 80 Premium users on R720 host with 2.9 GHz
processor and 10 146GB 15K disks. Validation was performed using DVS standard
testing methodology using Login VSI to manage the VMware View linked clones and
stratosphere UX and ESXi to deliver performance results. The CPU usage for this test
reached 85.77% thus confirming that the server with this configuration can support
up to 80 standard users.
The graphs below show the CPU, Consumed Memory, Local disk IOPS, Disk Latency,
Network and VDI UX scatter plot results from this validation.
CPU Usage (%)
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
11:35 AM
11:25 AM
11:15 AM
11:05 AM
10:55 AM
10:45 AM
10:35 AM
10:25 AM
10:15 AM
10:05 AM
9:55 AM
9:45 AM
9:35 AM
9:25 AM
CPU Usage (%)
Figure 1
As seen from the above graph maximum CPU utilization was approximately 85.77%
After all users started logging in, CPU usage was spiked from 8 to 89 and became
stable between 82-85% once all users logged in and dropped as the users logged off.
Active Memory (GB)
60
50
40
30
20
Active Memory (GB)
10
11:35 AM
11:25 AM
11:15 AM
11:05 AM
10:55 AM
10:45 AM
10:35 AM
10:25 AM
10:15 AM
10:05 AM
9:55 AM
9:45 AM
9:35 AM
9:25 AM
0
Figure 2
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
49
A Spike is evident after all VMs start logging in however active memory is less than 50%
of available memory during the peak of validation activity.
Network (MBps)
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
11:35 AM
11:25 AM
11:15 AM
11:05 AM
10:55 AM
10:45 AM
10:35 AM
10:25 AM
10:15 AM
10:05 AM
9:55 AM
9:45 AM
9:35 AM
9:25 AM
Network (MBps)
Figure 3
As seen from the above graph, overall network performance was good.
Login State
Steady State
Local Disk IOPS
1400
1200
1000
800
Average read requests
per second
600
400
Average write requests
per second
200
9:25 AM
9:35 AM
9:45 AM
9:55 AM
10:05 AM
10:15 AM
10:25 AM
10:35 AM
10:45 AM
10:55 AM
11:05 AM
11:15 AM
11:25 AM
11:35 AM
0
Figure 4
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
50
A Spike is evident after all VMs start logging in however the read/write activity was
fluctuating from 9:25 AM to 10:15 AM and became stable after all users finished
logging in from 10:16 AM to 11:05 AM. Total Peak IOPS measured during the login
state was 1747 giving an IOPS value of 21.83 per user and total peak IOPS measured
during the steady state (after all users logged in) was 560 giving an IOPS value of 7
per user.
Disk Latency (Milliseconds)
6
5
Command latency
11:35 AM
11:25 AM
11:15 AM
11:05 AM
10:55 AM
10:45 AM
Queue write latency
10:35 AM
0
10:25 AM
Write latency
10:15 AM
1
10:05 AM
Kernel write latency
9:55 AM
2
9:45 AM
Queue read latency
9:35 AM
Kernel read latency
3
9:25 AM
4
Read latency
Figure 5
As seen from the above graph, overall disk latency is below 20ms which is in
acceptable range.
Figure 6
DVS Enterprise Reference Architecture
51
From the above graph we can see that all 80 sessions registered perfect performance
which is within the acceptable tolerance for this test.
Results Summary Table
The summary table below shows the desktop densities and storage IOPS on a per
server basis for Basic, Standard and Premium users.
Server
Density
CPU
Basic
115
88.8%
1906
16.57
744
6.46
Standard
95
88.71%
972
10.23
578
6.08
Premium
80
85.77%
1747
21.83
560
7
Workload
Login State
Login
Steady State Steady State
State IOPS
IOPS per
IOPS
IOPS
per User
User
Sustained IOPS per user can be calculated by taking the sustained IOPS on the ESXi
Server local drive and dividing it by number of users. For basic workload, per user
IOPS will be 744/115 = 6.46 per user. Similarly we can calculate it for standard and
premium workload.
Conclusion
Based on testing conducted the impact on storage was found to be minimal. While
evaluating the desktop density per server, server CPU for windows 8 is very high
compared to Windows 7 which is reducing the user density for each workload. Hence
we can conclude on the basis of this testing that 115 Basic, 95 Standard and 80
Premium user sessions can be supported on the R720 platform with less than 90%
CPU utilization and minimal impact on performance.
8.9
Compellent 6.3 code update
Based on testing customers should take advantage of the performance
improvements as shown below. As seen in graphs below almost linear scaling occurs
out to ~8000 user sessions and the 6.3 code shows huge improvements over the
previous 6.1.2 codebase.
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Test Configuration
Storage Center:





2 - SC8000 Controllers (SCOS 6.3.1)
16 – 8 Gbps FC Front End Ports
16 – 6 Gbps SAS Back end ports
20 – 200 GB SSD drives (19 Active + 1 Hot Spare)
496 – 400 GB 10k Drives (491 Active + 5 Hot Spares)
Servers:

48 – PowerEdge M620 Blades with 320 GB RAM w/ Dual 8-Core Intel Xeon
2.70GHz Processors (2-8Gbps FC ports)

6 – ESXi Clusters with 8 Hosts each
Software and Operating Systems:



Hypervisor: VMware ESXi 5.0
Connection Broker: VMware View 5.1 w/Composer for Linked Clones
Guests: Windows7 1vCPU & 1024 MB RAM
Load Generation:


VMware View Planner 2.1
Load Profile – 20 Second think time (~3.6-4.5 IOPS per guest)
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9 Management
One of the key challenges facing organizations today is the ability to monitor and manage
the entire end user compute environment including; desktops, access policies and service
levels. The DVs Enterprise - Mobile Secure Desktop solution with optionally integrated
vCenter Operations Manager (VCOps), provides an integrated dashboard with intelligent
response on all desktop- related events.
This helps IT admins to provide the right amount of intervention and guidance when the
demands on the virtual infrastructure appear to exceed an expected range of behavior. The
solution can also include vCenter Configuration Manager (vCM) for importing suggested
configurations and to meet required regulatory compliance standards.
A critical aspect to mobile secure desktops and true BYOD support is securely managing and
enabling corporate access. Dell Wyse project Stratus offers simple, secure, cloud-based
management for today’s dynamic IT environment. The integration of Dell Wyse Stratus into
the Mobile Secure Desktop solution provides IT administrators with an intelligent and
dynamic cloud – based console to securely manage and enable corporate access to any
device, including smartphones, tablets, thin clients, zero clients, and PC’s – regardless of
whether the device is owned by the company or by an individual employee.
9.1
Solution Elements
Dell and VMware have jointly validated the Dell DVS Enterprise - Mobile Secure Desktop
offering. This purpose built architecture integrates Dell’s DVS Enterprise solution with VMware
and additional Dell technology partner solutions to meet the need for flexible, mobile and
secure end user computing in today’s dynamic business environment.
9.2
Compliance - VMware vCenter Configuration Manager
A key requirements for many organizations is managing compliance to various government
and industry regulations. vCenter Configuration Manager (vCM) automates critical
configuration and compliance management tasks including configuration data collection,
configuration change execution, configuration reporting, change auditing, and compliance
assessment.
9.3
Cortado ThinPrint
Most of the use cases supported by this solution have a location-aware printing requirement.
Cortado ThinPrint software, provided by VMware, provides the ability to take advantage of
location- aware printing from a wide range of devices.
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9.4
Imprivata OneSign
Imprivata OneSign® provides Single Sign On and strong authentication, permitting users to
access all workstations and applications they are authorized to use. By configuring and
linking multiple instances of virtual appliances at both sites with fault tolerance, during the
site failover, desktop agents can continuously look up the next working instance without
disrupting the workflow. Users easily connect to virtual desktops and applications via
Imprivata OneSign single sign on from the access point all the way through to the EMR
application.
Dell and VMware solutions for mobile, secure access to applications and data:
Dell and VMware have created the Dell DVS Enterprise - Mobile Secure Desktop solution – a
validated architecture that integrates technology from Dell, VMware and the Dell technology
partner ecosystem. The solution leverages Dell server, storage and networking infrastructure,
mobile, wireless and wired networks, VMware Horizon View 5.2 and vSphere, vShield security
services, management and monitoring components to protect data, monitor the
infrastructure and secure access for virtual any end point device.
This solution is optimized for organizations looking to drive higher levels of productivity by
improving end-user access across devices and locations, reduce costs by streamlining
desktop and application management, and enhance security and compliance.
The solution leverages and integrates Dell’s DVS Enterprise end to end desktop virtualization
infrastructure and highly available VMware virtualization platforms, with single sign on,
personal management, and additional high performance industry recognized solutions.
Together, Dell, VMware, and our partners deliver rapid and secure access to high
performance desktops, business applications and corporate data with the Dell DVS
Enterprise - Mobile Secure Desktop solution.
For additional information about how the Dell DVS Enterprise - Mobile Secure Desktop
solution is built and validated, please consult the Dell DVS Enterprise - Mobile Secure
Desktop Reference Architecture at www.dell.com/virtualdesktops or
http://www.vmware.com/solutions/desktop/mobile-secure-desktop/overview.html or
contact your Dell Partner Direct Reseller at www.dell.com/partnerdirect
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10
Reference
VMware references:
•
VMware vSphere Edition Comparisons
•
VMware vSphere Availability Guide
•
VMware vSphere 5.1 documentation
Dell PowerEdge References:
•
Dell PowerEdge M1000e Technical Guide
•
Dell PowerEdge M I/O Aggregator Configuration Quick Reference
Dell EqualLogic references:
•
EqualLogic Technical Content
•
Dell EqualLogic PS Series Architecture Whitepaper
• Configuring iSCSI Connectivity with VMware vSphere 5 and Dell EqualLogic PS
Series
Storage
•
Configuring and Installing the EqualLogic Multipathing Extension Module for
VMware vSphere 5.1, 5.0 and 4.1 and PS Series SANs
•
How to Select the Correct RAID for an EqualLogic SAN
•
Using Tiered Storage in a PS Series SAN
•
Monitoring your PS Series SAN with SAN HQ
Dell Management reference:
Dell Management Plug-In for VMware vCenter references – Solution Brief
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