-
POSTED 6-27-' 04
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INTRODUCTION
Better pictures are easicr r,vith this distinguished trvinlens reflex camera. Its extra-bright ground-glassfinder,
a result of the built-in Kodak Ektalite Field Lens, located underneath and in contact with the ground glass.
makesit easy to composeand focus your pictures . - - its
shutter gets that action
fast-shooting,flash-s,vnchronized
shot " . . its 4-element .//3.5 Anastar lensesassure negatives of superb definition.
Your photofinisher makes oversized prints from the
2lx2r/a-inch negativesat a cost little more than that
of contact prints,
/a//a / (onlan/r
I!:_1*r
o Picture taking with the l(odak l(eflex lI uamera
is easy.But if you would like to make sure of getting
good results everv time, right from the start,
spend a few minutes getting acquainted with your
camera before you load it with film.
o Then before your vacation or any important
event, why not make some trial shots just to be
sure that you understand your camera and know
that your equipment is operating properly. Your
dealer will be glad to check your results and offer
tips to improve your technique so that you won't
miss that "important shot."
o Your Kodak Reflex II Camera comes to you
complete in its attractive leather field case. To re*orri the case,lift the glove fastenerswhich hold the
front, then unscrew the Iarge knurled nut on the
bottom of the case.In order that camera Parts may
be pointed out more clearly, most of the illustrations which follow show the camera removed from
its case.
T. M. REG. U. S. PAT.
OFF.
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Shutter_Speed
7
Lens Opening
I
Focus
l0
Films
t2
t.**
t4
I:lilg ll:
eidure
20
Doylight ExposureTqble
22
Flosh
23
lt":t =-t.
25
Flood ExposureToble
26
Flood
27
Suggestions
,_
Accessories
30
.
34
3
Ji, finla,r
Probably the first thing you'll
want to do is open the finder
hood and look through the
finder. Just press the HooD
LATcH and the panels of the
hood will spring into position.
When the camera is not in use,
the panels are easily folded up,
first the sides, then the back and front.
To bring the image int6 focus, turn the focusing ring
on either of the twin lensesuntil the subject seen in the
finder is sharp. A flick of your thumb brings the uecNrrrBn into place over the center.of the image; with it you
can focus critically on the finest detail.
. The camera should usually be held so that it is cradled
in the left hand as shown in the illustrations. Besides
supporting the camera, focusing, cocking and tripping
the shutter can all be accomplished with the left hand.
This one-handed operation is a feature of the camera
which leaves the other hand free, for example, to hold
an extension flash.
For most pictures you will want to use the reflex finder
because it is so easy to compose your picture on the
ground glass,including just what you want on the negative. But sometimes, for example when you're taking
4
pictures of sports, you will want to
use the camera at eye level. To do
this, first open the hood; then
swing the magnifier up out of the
way and push in the center part of
the front panel. Now the front and
back panels of the hood form an
open-frame direct view finder.
When you use the camera at eye
level, you can hold it either as
shown in the lower illustration, or
if you want the taking lens to be
still higher, you can hold it upside
down. In either case, hold the
carrrera so that the front and rear
frames are superimposed. This will
center the eye correctly in the
finder.
To take pictures over the heads
eof a crowd, use the reflex finder
.and
hold the camera upside down.
For "fast shooting,?' the camera
may be held as in the illustrations,
but with the fingers of the right
hand grasping the winding knob,
ready to, advance the film. The
first finger will be in position to
press up the releaseknob.
FOR ANY PICTURE
S H U T T E RS P E E D
The length of time the shutter is open to
admit light to the film is controlled by
PoINTER
e. Any
settingthe snurrBR sPEED
one of sevenshutter speeds,11340,71100,
1,125,
1,11,0,
1.150,
U5, and 1/2 secondcan
be selected. Note that each setting gives
an exposure time about twice as longand therefore lets in about twice as much
light-as the one preceding it. Of course
this does not apply to 1/300.
A SHUTTERSPEED
B L E N SO P E N I N G
c Focus
iq;
ffi
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"B" settings permit you to
The "Ti' ond
keep the shutter open for much longer
times. You'll find more obout them on
poge 29.
You con hold the comero in your
h o n d s f o r e x p o s u r e so f l / 3 0 0 , 1 / 1 0 0 ,
1 1 5 0 ,o r 1 1 2 5 s e c o n d .F o r l o n g e r e x posures,the comero must be ploced on
o tripod or some other firm support.
7
B ,.r", opENrNG
The size of the opening in
the lens through which the
Iight passesis controlled by
setting the LENs opENrNc
PoTNTER s.
This
reeulat
the amount of light whi
will reach the fiIm at an
given sh
The openingislargest when the pointer isatl3.5. From
Jl4 to J122, each smaller opening (larger number) admits
half as much light as the preceding opening. Thus, if the
correct exposureis 1/50 secondatlf/l 1, then the exposure
forl8 should be 1/100 second,and for f 116,1125second.
The exposure for the average outdoor subject, when
the sun is shining, isJl17 and 1/50 second with Kodak
Plus-X Panchromatic or Verichrome Film. Remember
this basic exposure-many of your pictures will fit this
situation. See pages 18 and 19.
DEPTHOF FIETD
Depth of field is the distance from the nearest to the
farthest point that is in sharp focus when you're taking a
picture. The depth-of-field scale will help you figure
thesedistances.The scaleis used like this:
on each side
to thelensopenings
The figures corresponding
of the INDEx MARK are used with the DISTANcEscALE as a
scale to tell the nearest and farthest dis-
FOCUS
depth-of-field
The adjustmentof the lens
tances which will be in sharp focus.
for the distance between it
and the subject is controlled
by turning the rocusrNc RrNc
c. Turn
l0
the ring until
the
image of the strbject in the finder is sharp. The irnage
formed on the film will automatically be in perfect focus.
To make sure that you've focused the camera correctly,
bring the magnifier into place over the center of the
finder image. Always use the magnifier fbr extremely
critical work.
lf you ore using the direct view finder, estimote the
comero-to-subiectdistonce os closely os possible ond
turn the FINDER
FOCUSING
RINGuntil this distonce is ot
the index mork. In some coses you moy be oble to
pre-focus on the ground gloss ond then use the eyelevel finder to cotch the oction ot the proper instont.
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Focus the lens.
opposite the figures corresponding to the lens
opening used, read on the distance scale the nearest and
farthest distances that will be in sharp focus.
The smaller th'e opening, the greater the range of
Then
sharpness in the negative. For example, if the camera is
focused for 10 feet and J13.5 is used, everything from
about 9 feet to 11 feet will be sharp' AtJll'1, however,
feet to 15 feet will be sharp.
everything from aboutTrf
il
We7,h,9/a//J7trsa?
The type of film to use will depend on the kinds of
subjects you intend to photograph, the light conditions
under which you will work, and, in many cases, the
particular effect you may desire. The various types of
Kodak Films describedon thesepagescover any picturetaking situation you will encounter.
KODAK VERICHROME
FIIM
An all-purpose film, suitable for general outdoor use.
High in speed, it has excellent latitude to help you get a
good negative even if you misjudge the exposure slightlv.
Orthochromatic sensitivity makes this film especially
suitable for flash pictures of near-by people. 12 exposures.
v620.
KODAK PIUS-XPANCHROMATIC
FILM
Combined high speed and fine grain make PIus-X ideal
for general outdoor work and for well-lighted indoor
subjects. The low graininess permits considerable enIargement, and balanced panchromatic sensitivity assures
good rendering of colors in tones of black and white. 12
exposures.PX620.
KODAK EKTACHROME
FIIM
This film produces full-color transparencies for projecting and viewing, or you can have Kodachrome 3X Prints
t2
made. 12 exposures.E620. It is not processedby the
Eastman Kodak Company but by the photographer
with the special chemicals supplied in convenient kits.
See your dealer for more information.
FIIM
KODAK SUPER.XX
PANCHROMATIC
Because of its very high speed, particularly under artificial light, this film is the Iogical choice for making
snapshotswith flood lamps. Indoors or out, it's the film
to use when the light-is poor or you need a high shutter
speed to stop fast action. Fully panchromatic. 72 exposures.XX620.
KODACOTOR FIIM
Here is an easy-to-usefilm that produces color negatives
when developed. It is available in Daylight Type for
outdoors-and Type A for indoors with flash or flood
light. Blue flash lamps can be used with Daylight Type
film, either as the main light source, or to fill in shadows.
Processing'to a color negative is included in the film
,,price. 12 exposures.C620.
'XOOACOTOR PRINTS AND ENTARGEMENTS
If you want inexpensive full-color prints or enlargements for your photo album, wallet, or to frame for that
favorite spot on the mantel, Kodacolor is the film for you.
After your filrrr-_
has been bxposed,simply return it to your
dealer and he will send it to Kodak for processing.
Kodacolor Prints and Enlargements are made from
these negatives-and at a low cost.
l3
/,nu/nvold Ylo/no/nv
Look
to see if
"0"
appears in
the
ExposuRE
If any figure but zero is visible,
push up the nBrBesE KNoB and hold it rvhile you
"0"
turn the couNTER KNoB counterclockwise until
just appears in the ExposuRE couNTER. When
"0"
appears, the camera is ready to be loaded.
couNTER window.
To open the back of the camera,
push the two
knurled buttons at the top of the back toward each
other and swing the back out.
N EVERLOAD OR UN LOAD
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UsEONE OF THEKODAK 620 ROIL FILMS
Poges l2
ond 13 will help you decide which one.
Insert the roll of film in the recess at the lower
front of the camera. The spool must be inserted so
that when the protective paper is drawn off, the
colored side of the paper will be turned toward
you and the black side toward the lens.
Break the seal on the roll of film and pass the
paper oaer the top of the two rollers. Thread the
end into the longer slot in the empty take-up spool
as far as it will so.
I N B R I G H TD I R E C TL I G H T
l5
..f-'
,!ti/
i#
'" '':i
,i'.
Turn the winding knob once or twice to bind the
paper on the spool, making sure it is started straight.
Then closethe back by pushing it in until the latch
buttons snap outward. Set the dial on the winding
knob to show the kind of film in the camera.
To wind the first section of film into place, first
draw back the slide which covers the red lvindow
on the back of the camera. Thg letter C on the
slide is visible in the window when the slide is
closed. This is a spring slide and must be held
while the winding knob is turned. Turn the knob
until a smali hand or arrow appears in the
red window; then continue winding slowly until
the figure "1" just enters the window.
Turn the couNTER KNoB until it locks. The
figure "1" will then appear in the ExposuREcouNrnn. It will not again be necessaryto uncover the
red window for exposure number reference.
After each picture, press up the RELEAsErNos Dzl
do not hold it; then turn the winding knob until
it locks. The new'exposure number will show in
the exposure counter. Form the habit of rvinding
the film ahead after each exposure so that a new
section of film will be in place.
When the twelfth exposure has been made,
press the release knob and turn the winding
knob until the end of the protective paper passes
the window.
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In subdued light, open the back
of the camera. To remove the
exposed roll, press the end of
the spool opposite the winding
knob outward toward the side
of the camera. Fold the end of
-'Jhe
protective paper under and
fasten it with the sticker.
Remove the empty spool and place it in the winding
end of the camera. Turn the winding knob until the
key engagesthe slot in the end of the spool; then reload
the camera with a new roll of film.
IMPORTANT: After removing the film, do nol wind it righrly with o
twisting motion os lhis moy scrotch the film.
17
?
sla//J uso
W,eorforuna
Here is o question you'll osk. yourself every time you
toke o picture. The onswer is mode eosy by the foct
thot most common subiects con be clossified into one
t
It
of the four bosic groups described below. The expos u r e s g i v e n o r e f o r K o d o k P l u s - X P o n c h r o m o t i co r
Verichrome Film under bright sun conditions;informotion on the exposures for other light conditionsis given
in convenientform in the toble on poge 22 ond on the
Snopshot ond Flosh Kodoguide.
I
v
rt
I
I
l
BrilliontSubiect
Bright Subiect
Averoge Subiect
Shqded Subiect
Beoch, morine, ond snow scenesi
distont londscopes ond mountoins
without prominenl obiects in the foreground. With bright sun ond Plus-X
or Verichrome Film, the exposure is:
Neor-by people in morine, beoch,
or snow scenes; scenics with foreground obiects. \Mith bright sun
o n d K o d o k P l u s - X P o n c h r o m o t i co r
Verichrome Film, the exposure is:
Neor-by people, gordens, houses,
ond scenes, nof in shode. Use this
clossificolionif in doubt. With bright
sun ond Kodok Plus-X Ponchromofic
or Verichrome Film, lhe.exposure is:
People, gordens, ond olher subiects,
in open shode (lighted by open sky
-not
under trees, porch roof, elc.).
Wirh brighl sun ond Kodok Plus-X
or Verichrome Film, the exposure is:
| /so
f /22
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1/so
f/ r 6
| lso
f/rr
| /so
f/8
/u/nr iln Frclurro
I Set ShutterSpeed
See poge 7
Cock the Shutter
Move
t h e S H U T T E RL E V E R
upword.
ReleoseShutter
2 Set LensOpening
See poge 8
Locotethe Subiect
in the Finder
See poge 4
Focus
Move TheSHUTTER
LEVER
downword.
Hold your breath when you
press* the lever to take the
picture. If the camera is
moved during the exposure,
the picture will be blurred.
After taking a picture, immediately press up the release knob and turn the
winding knob until it locks.
A new section of film will
then be in olace.
See poge I 0
*By using your left hond os shown on poge 5, you con gel o
"squeeze"
oclion on fhe lever which prevenls iorring lhe comero.
21
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No synchronizer is needed to
make flash pictures with the
Reflex II. All that is necessary
is a Kodak Flasholder, an accessory which consists of a
battery case and a reflector.
The synchronization built into
the shutter assuresthat it will
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the flash of the lamp is brightest.
Batteries are not provided with the Kodak Flasholder.
In' order to get good synchronization, you must use
"C"
size batteries (photoflash are best) which test
fresh
at least five amperes. To avoid costly flash failures due
be open when
to weak batteries, get a Kodak B-C Flashpack from
your dealer. The Kodak B-C Flashpack uses a 22)$-volt
battery. (See page 36.)
The Flasholder is attached 1o the tripod socket located
bn the bottom of the camera. The cord fits into the
flash receptacle located on the side opposite the winding
knob. It is advisable to mount the Flasholder on this side
of the camera too, otherwise the connecting cord is apt
to fall in front of the lens. Next, consult the instructions
on the next page and you're ready to take flash pictures.
Comnlete instructions are included with the Flasholder.
23
F T A S HT A B I . E
J
These exposureguide numbers apply with lamps in a 4to 5-inch satin-finished reflector such as that of the Kodak
Flasholder Model B. With other reflectors, check the
manual packed with the flasholder.
All circuit contacts must be clean and bright. If the
lamp base is tarnished, rub it on a rough surface.
SM or 5F flosh lcmps (Closs F):
Insert the flash lamp in the reflector.
Cock the shutter in the usual manner.
Release the shutter. Do not usetheS2nchroni<er
Leaer.
No. 5.or No. 25 flosh lomps (Clqss M):
Insert the flash lamp in the reflector.
Cock the shutter in the usual manner.
Push the SvNcnRoNrzERLBwn toward the shutter
lever as far as it will go. The synchronizer lever
cannot be moved before the shutter is cocked.
4. Releasethe shutter.
Complete exposure information is given in the instructions packed with the Kodak Flasholder and the
table on page 25.
With
I.
2.
3.
With
l.
2.
3.
24
Coulion: Do not inserl o flosh lomp in the reflector if
the shutter is set for "T" ond the shutter blodes ore
open. The lomp will flosh on contoct ond o serious
burn moy result.
lf you prefer, your shutter con be odiusted with the Kodotron
ond similor lomps for speedlomp photogrophy insteod of
lhe setting for Closs F lomps. This odiustment will be mode
by Eostmon Kodok Co. ot o nominol chorge.
EXPOSURE GUIDE NUMBERS: Divide lhe number by the
dislonce in feet from lomp lo subiect to find f-number
Lomp
Shutter
Speed
I
No.5 or No. 25
SM or SF
I Open*
I ond
I speeds
to I /50
Openx
ond
speeds
r/roo
I /50
l / r 0 0 r /300
to 1125
Verichrome |
60
Pfus-X
|
S u p e r - X XI
75
ll0
55
65
95
r40
200
90
ll0
r60
80
100
140
50
45
r00
80
75
l l 0
50
65
90
Kodocolor,
Type A |
*Shulter set of "B" or "T."
CAUTION: Since lomps moy shotter when floshed, the use
of o lronsporent protective screen, such os the Kodok 2-Woy
Floshguord, over the refleclor is recommended. Do not flosh
the lomps in on explosive olmosphere.
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a
color is shorvn in the diagram.
use Kodachrome
Vari-
for
You can
as well as black-and-
white fiIm.. Read about the Kodak
828
Adapter on page 36.
F
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Beam Lights. A good basic lighting
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flexible home lighting
lamps in suitable reflectors such as the Kodak
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ExposureToblefor KodochromeFilm Type A
wilh Two No. 2 Flood Lomps in
Kodok Vori-BeqmLightsSet ot STIIL
6v>
3Vz. feet
I /25 second ot
f 14.5
lo
xShutter set ot "B."
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8 feet
% secondxot
fl8
'|
I feet
I second* ol
fl8
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Don't lay your camera asidejust becausethe light is not
strong enough for snapshots.With longer exposures,you
can make many excellent pictures inside or in deep
shade in the daytime, or of such subjectsas floodlighted
buildings or fires at night. Be sureto place tlu cameraon a
longerthan / 125second.
firm supportsuchas a tripodJorexposures
A night scene like the picture below requires a much
longer exposure than any of the measured intervals provided on the shutter. For short time exposures,set the
shutter speedpointer at "B"; then pressthe shutter lever
down and hold it. The shutter will remain open as long
as the lever is held down. For exposureslonger than
"T"; then press the shut10 seconds,set the pointer at
ter lever down and immediately releaseit. The shutter
will remain open until the lever is again pressed.
A shot iike this is easily made near a window. Place a
large n'hite card, tablecloth, or photographic blotter
n'hereit u'ill reflect lieht from the window to the shadow
side of the subject.
Street scenesat night require a little care to prevent
streaks in the picture from moving bright lights. Close
the shutter or put your hand momentarily in front of the
lens when an automobile approaches.
i'[,il'i,rlt" liit,lr ,i...t.',
,,!t;iii,l! ;,;;' ,,1'
l 6
Cropping
With theKodak ReflexII Camera,youdon't haveto stop
and decide whether you're going to malp
a horizontal
picture or a vertical one. It's easy to compose pleasing
pictures in the square format. Later, when you're making
enlargements, you may feel that the subject would appear
to better advantage in a print
, 1 . ;I . . . , ,
Tell q Story
The best pictures are those which tell a simple story and
tell it at a glance. This is true whether you are making
pictures of people or capturing the beauty of a landscape
scene, and it is this quality which makes pictures of
general appeal.
Pictures of children, for example, are usually better if
they show the child doing something, not just looking
toward the camera. With grown-ups as well, ttre inclusion
of some accessoryto engage the subject's interest is very
often a help in getting a natural, unposed look.
You'll treasure pictures of day-to-day activities around
the home, perhaps including some entirely unposed ones.
But whatever the subject, a moment spent in expressing
an idea will repay you many times in satisfaction with
your finished prints.
30
of different proportions.
When this happens, you'll
find the square negacives
ideally suited to cropping
just as you want them, either
vertically or horizontally.
And most photofinishers will
make cnlargementsfrom the
particular area of the negative you select.
3l
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Action Pictures
Side ond Bock Lighting
Side-lighted pictures, in which the light comes from the
side of the scene, frequently have an illusion of depth
which is very difficult to obtain in a front-lighted picture.
Back-lighted scenes, too, are often more interesting
than pictures taken .of the same subject with the light
behind you. Back lighting outlines foreground objects,
adding life and brilliance to them.
With either side or back lighting, it is important to
shield the camera lens.from direct light. Keep the lens in
shade, or use the Kodak Lens Hood of the Kodak Combination Lens Attachments; see page 34.
The exposure for a back-lighted subject must be increased to secure detail in the shadows. {Jse the next
larger lens opening or the next slower shutter speed.
32
lVhen you photograph a moving subject,the total amount
of light required is the same as that for a stationary subject, but you can make sharp pictures by combining a
high shutter speed with a correspondingly larger lens
opening. Whenever possible,use 1/300 second;the Snapshot and Flash Kodaguide will tell you in a moment what
the lens opening should be. Children and pets should
always be classified as moving subjects.
In various sports and games, the subjects periodically
slow up, or stop momentarily in poditions that suggest
action. If you releasethe shutter at the right instant,,$ou
can capture a world of implied action in your pictures.
Look Beyond the Subiect
The full-size finder of your Kodak Reflex II Camera
makes it easy to composeeach picture to best advantage
and choosean angle of view which eliminates distracting
elementsin the background. For example, you can seeat
a glance a tree which might appear in the print to be
growing out of the subject's head. You can see, too,
prominent horizontal or vertical lines,such as clapboards
on the side of a house, which might detract from the
principal point of interest in the finished picture.
Whatever the background, make sure that it is a setting or frame for your picture, not an intruding element
in the composition.Look beyond the subject;your camera
most certainly will.
33
atmospheric haze in landscapes.Three Kodak Wratten
Filters, the K2, G, and A, are recommended.
With a panchromatic film like Kodak Plus-X, the K2
filter (vellow) gives tone rendering of colors which closely
approximates what is seen by the eye. The G filter (deep
yellow) accentuates the contrast between clouds and sky
and is especially useful with architectural subjectsagainst
a blue sky. The A filter (red) gives an even stronger effect
than the G, frequently producing spectacular results. It
should be used only with Super-XX or Plus-X Film.
Since a filter absorbs some of the light which would
otherwise reach the film, its use requires an increase in
exposure. The filter factor is the number of times the
exposure must be increased.
,ffirrsrsan:s
A-Adopter
Filter
Ring C-Retoining Ring
E-Wrotlen
D-Kodok Polo-Screen F-Adopter
Lens
B-Portro
G-Lens
Ring Insert
The Kodak Comhinofion Lens Artochmenfs permit the
use of a supplementary lens, a Kodak Wratten Filter, a
Kodak Pola-Screen, or a Kodak Lens Hood-either
singly or together. For the Kodak Reflex II Camera,
the basis of the combination is the lft-inch Series VI
Kodak Adapter Ring with its Adapter Ring Insert. The
filter or supplementary lens is held in the Adapter Ring
by either the Adapter Ring Insert or a Kodak Lens
Hood. If both a Portra Lens (three are available, 1 f,
21, and 3*) and a filter are to be used, a Kodak Retaining Ring is also necessary.AII attachments must be
SeriesVI.
Fillers,No accessoryfor o.ridoo. photography with blackand-white films is more useful than a filter to darken the
sky and make white clouds stand out or to penetrate
Hood
i
I
I
J
tr
o
FIITERFACTORSFOR DAYTIGHT
K2
o
b
Kodok Verichrome Film
G
2V2
A
t
,t,
-v
Kodok Plus-X Film
2
-o
Kodqk Super-XX Film
2
;
8
3
8
Kodak Metol Coble Releose No. 5 screws into the
threaded hole in the left side of the shutter. It enables
you to make long exposureswithout jarring the camera.
Kodok Eye-Level Tripod. This tripod provides a lightrveight, sturdy support for your camera. The tripod
35
31
www.orphancameras.com
button
into the tripod socket in the base of
screw fits directly
your camera. The use of the Kodak
Head is recommended for maximum
Turn-Tilt
Tripod
information.
facility in changing
Kodok
If you
Adapter,
828
want
to use Kodak
The Kodok B-C Floshpack oflers a batterymethod
of
flashing lamps. It provides more than enough
energv for accurate synchronization
pendable
In
and
lamp
addition,
de-
firins.
you'll
be
to use the same
o
battery for one year or
more. Ask your dealer
{
able
to shorr' 1-ou the unit.
The Kodok Flosh,older
ModelB is a highlv
burned-out
The
Kodak
Flasholder
exposure
Extension
Unit
work.
sturdy, pocket-size edition containi.g picture-taking information for
still pictures with black-and-white
and color films. It has 32 pages of
easv-to-use dial computers, tables,
and brief text. Index tabs lead you
directlv to such subjectsas exposure,
filters, Jighting, and many others.
Film are available in the 828 size.
condenser
releases the
The Kodok Master Photogvide is a
828
or color films with your Kodak Reflex II
Camera, ask your dealer to show you this kit. It includes
a vie'rv finder mask, film mask, two 828 spool adapters.
Film and
and an 828 film spool. Both Kodachrome
Kodacolor
quickly
N{odel B is also available for multiple-flash
the position of the camera on the tripod.
black-and-white
on the back
lamps. A decal on the reflector gives instant
i
&,
The Kodqk Ektalux Flasholder is brilliantly adapted for
all types of flash picture-taking. It's ideal for your
Reflex II Camera. The built-in B-C (battery-condenser)
s)'stemassuresdependableflashing.The magnesiumconstruction of the pistol-grip handle makes it light and
durable. The Ektalux usesboth midget and mediumbaselamps. Two-way focus of the midget lamps provides
uniform and concentrated lighting. The reflector is removable for easy packing. In addition, as many as six
extensionunits can be used.Accessoriesthat greatly expand the versatility of your flash work are also available.
e f f ic i e n t , l i g h t w e i g h t y e t
rugged
accessory
flash rvork. An
for
e.iector
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
o Rochester4, N. Y.
36
PRTNTED t" t"t
srArEs oF AMERT.A
-:l-l]t"
DETAI lS-fodck
Reflex.llComero
FILM
Nacetrve Stzn-2t7/ x 2t1 inches.
620; 12 exposures for black-and-white
Frr.M Srze-Kodak
and color films.
I.ENSES
Kopa.r ANeSran - B}rnm J | 3.5 Lumeni<ed twin lenses.
L B N sO p r r q r N c s - c l i c k s t o p s , / 1 3 . 5 , 4 , 5 . 6 , B , 1 1 , X 6 , 2 2 .
VI-1$-inch
CovrnrNerroN Lews'drrecnurNrs-Series
Kodak Adapter Ring.
SHUITER
retard, cocking type.
Fresn Koneuerrc-gear-train
Setnos-l /2, 1.I 5, 1fi A, 1I 25, 1 I 50, 1fl A0, t | 300, "T," and "8."
(ssB45B*sirrgle levet to cock and release.
for Class F and Class M lamps (used
Fresn-Adjustable
with Kodak Flasholder).
FOCUSTNGAND YrgtYnVG
glass plus Kodak Ektalite Field
F6susrNc ScneBN-ground
.[.ens fonunsurpassed image brilliance; image 2]6 x2]6.
M;\cwrnrnn-.:-built into hood; pagnifies about 4 times'
top of viewiig-lens mount'; shows both
Focu}lxc ScRrn-on
distance and depth of field,
feet to infinity.
FocusrNc ReNcB -3tl
Eve-Lrver F,rNoBn-hood can be converted to direct, frame
finder.
FILTTOPERAIION
automatic film stop; exposure numFrru AnvaNcc-with
bers in.counter actuated by metering device.
coNsrRUcnoN
Boov-die-cast
aluminum alloy.
'soc!et. Keep
SBnra., Nur'rge,n-in rim. around tripod
record of this number with your personal papers.
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a