Adaptec 1210SA - Serial ATA RAID Controller User`s guide

USER’S GUIDE
ADAPTEC SERIAL ATA RAID 1210SA
Adaptec Serial ATA RAID 1210SA
User’s Guide
R
Copyright
© 2003 Adaptec, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any
means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the
prior written consent of Adaptec, Inc., 691 South Milpitas Blvd., Milpitas, CA 95035.
Trademarks
Adaptec, Adaptec Storage Manager, HostRAID, and the Adaptec logo are
trademarks of Adaptec, Inc., which may be registered in some jurisdictions.
Windows 2000 and Windows XP are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the US
and other countries, used under license.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Changes
The material in this document is for information only and is subject to change
without notice. While reasonable efforts have been made in the preparation of this
document to assure its accuracy, Adaptec, Inc. assumes no liability resulting from
errors or omissions in this document, or from the use of the information contained
herein.
Adaptec reserves the right to make changes in the product design without
reservation and without notification to its users.
Disclaimer
IF THIS PRODUCT DIRECTS YOU TO COPY MATERIALS, YOU MUST HAVE
PERMISSION FROM THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OF THE MATERIALS TO AVOID
VIOLATING THE LAW WHICH COULD RESULT IN DAMAGES OR OTHER
REMEDIES.
ii
Adaptec Customer Support
If you have questions about installing or using your Adaptec product, check this
document first—you will find answers to most of your questions here. If you need
further assistance, use the support options listed below.
Technical Support Identification (TSID) Number
■
Before contacting Technical Support, you need your unique 12-digit TSID
number. The TSID number identifies your product and support status.
■
The TSID number is included on two white, bar-coded labels, like the example
below.
■
If you register by mail, affix one copy of the TSID label to the registration card,
which may be contained on the CD. Also affix a copy of the TSID label to the CD
jacket so that you don’t lose it.
Support Options
■
Search the Adaptec Support Knowledgebase (ASK) at ask.adaptec.com for
articles, troubleshooting tips, and frequently asked questions for your product.
■
For support via Email, submit your question to Adaptec’s Technical Support
Specialists at ask.adaptec.com.
North America
■
Visit our Web site at www.adaptec.com.
■
For information about Adaptec’s support options, call +1 408-957-2550,
24 hours per day, 7 days per week. To speak with a Technical Support Specialist,
■
For Hardware products call +1 408-934-7274,
Monday to Friday, 3:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Pacific Time.
■
For RAID and Fibre Channel products call +1 321-207-2000 ,
Monday to Friday, 3:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Pacific Time.
To expedite your service, have your computer in front of you.
■
To order Adaptec products, including accessories and cables, call +1 408-957-7274.
Or, you can order cables online at www.adaptec.com/buy-cables.
iii
Europe
■
Visit our Web site at www.adaptec-europe.com.
■
German: To speak with a Technical Support Specialist, call +49 89 43 66 55 22,
Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 17:00, CET. For support via e-mail, submit your
question to Adaptec’s Technical Support Specialists at ask-de.adaptec.com.
■
French: To speak with a Technical Support Specialist, call +49 89 43 66 55 33,
Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 17:00, CET. For support via e-mail, submit your
question to Adaptec’s Technical Support Specialists at ask-fr.adaptec.com.
■
English: To speak with a Technical Support Specialist, call +49 89 43 66 55 44,
Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 17:00, GMT. For support via e-mail, submit your
question to Adaptec’s Technical Support Specialists at ask.adaptec.com.
■
You can order Adaptec cables online at www.adaptec.com/buy-cables.
Japan
■
Visit our Web site at www.adaptec.co.jp.
■
To speak with a Technical Support Specialist, call +81 3 5308 6120
Monday–Friday, 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M and 1:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M.
iv
Regulatory Compliance Statements
Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference Statement
WARNING: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and
can radiate radio frequency energy, and if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is
no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. However, if this
equipment does cause interference to radio or television equipment reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
■ Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
■ Increase the separation between equipment and receiver.
■ Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.
■ Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help.
■ Use a shielded and properly grounded I/O cable and power cable to ensure compliance of
this unit to the specified limits of the rules.
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference and (2) this device must accept
any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Adaptec, Inc.
AAR-1210SA
Tested to Comply
With FCC Standards
FOR HOME OR OFFICE USE
European Union Compliance Statement
This Information Technology Equipment has been tested and found to comply with
EMC Directive 89/336/EEC, as amended by 92/31/EEC and 93/68/EEC, in
accordance with:
■ EN55022 (1998) Emissions
■ EN55024 (1998) Immunity:
–
–
–
–
–
–
EN61000-4-2 (1998) Electrostatic discharge: ±4 kV contact, ±8 kV air
EN61000-4-3 (1998) Radiated immunity
EN61000-4-4 (1995) Electrical fast transients/burst: ±1 kV AC, ±0.5 kV I/O
EN61000-4-5 (1995) Surges ±1 kV differential mode, ±2 kV common mode
EN61000-4-6 (1996) Conducted immunity: 3 V
EN61000-4-11 (1994) Supply dips and variation: 30% and 100%
In addition, all equipment requiring U.L. listing has been found to comply with EMC
Directive 73/23/EEC as amended by 93/68/EEC in accordance with EN60950 with
amendments A1, A2, A3, A4, A11.
Australian/New Zealand Compliance Statement
This device has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital
device, pursuant to the Australian/New Zealand standard AS/NZS 3548 set out by
the Spectrum Management Agency.
v
Canadian Compliance Statement
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian InterferenceCausing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur
le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
Japanese Compliance (Voluntary Control Council Initiative)
This equipment complies to class B Information Technology equipment based on
VCCI (Voluntary Control Council for Interface). This equipment is designed for home
use but it may causes radio frequency interference problem if used too near to a
television or radio. Please handle it correctly per this documentation.
vi
Contents
1
Introduction
Read this First 1-1
System Requirements 1-2
Operating System Compatibility 1-2
Storage Requirements 1-2
Motherboard Compatibility 1-2
Device Compatibility 1-2
Kit Contents 1-3
Adaptec 1210SA Controller 1-3
About the Documentation 1-4
Installing the Adobe Acrobat Reader 1-4
Controller Features 1-5
Overview of the Installation Process 1-5
Storage Management Software Overview 1-6
Safety Information 1-7
Notes and Cautions 1-7
Electrostatic Discharge 1-7
2
Installing the Controller
Overview 2-1
Installing the Controller 2-2
Checking Your Controller and Devices
Determining the Boot Controller 2-3
3
2-3
Installing the Driver
Installing the Driver in a New Windows System 3-2
Installing the Driver in an Existing Windows System 3-4
Installing Red Hat Linux 7.3 or 8.0 3-6
Installing or Updating the Driver in an Existing Linux
System 3-9
Installing SuSE Linux 8.0 or 8.1 3-9
Installing the Driver in a New Linux System 3-9
vii
Contents
Installing or Updating the Driver in an Existing Linux
System 3-11
4
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser
Edition
Overview 4-1
Supported Browsers 4-2
Custom and Compact Installations 4-2
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on Windows 4-3
Configuring Internet Browsers on Windows 4-4
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on Linux 4-7
5
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser
Edition
Overview 5-2
Architecture Overview 5-3
Logging In 5-4
Installing a Security Certificate 5-6
Registering Your Software 5-6
The Basics 5-7
Pop-Up Tool Tips 5-8
Physical Devices 5-8
Logical Devices 5-10
Creating an Array 5-11
Advanced Options 5-12
Deleting Arrays 5-15
Modifying Arrays 5-15
User Interface Options 5-16
Viewing Events 5-17
Event Viewer 5-17
Event Notification 5-17
Getting Help 5-19
Displaying and Modifying Properties 5-19
Controller Properties 5-19
Channel or Port Properties 5-20
Physical Device Properties 5-21
viii
Contents
Enclosure Properties 5-22
Logical Device Properties 5-23
Viewing and Creating Tasks 5-24
Task Viewer 5-24
New Tasks 5-25
A
BIOS Utilities
What is ARC? A-1
Using the ACU A-2
Managing Arrays A-2
Creating Arrays A-4
Initializing Disk Drives A-6
Using SATASelect A-7
Starting and Exiting SATASelect A-7
Using the SATASelect Menus A-7
Using the CCU A-8
Using the SATA Configuration Utility A-9
Using the Disk Utilities A-10
B
Supported RAID Types
RAID 0
RAID 1
C
B-2
B-2
Specifications
Glossary
ix
1
Introduction
In this Chapter...
Read this First
1-1
System Requirements
1-2
Kit Contents
1-3
About the Documentation
1-4
Controller Features
1-5
Overview of the Installation Process
1-5
Storage Management Software Overview
1-6
Safety Information
1-7
Read this First
Read this chapter before you begin installing your new Adaptec
Serial ATA RAID 1210SA controller. This is a guide to the rest of the
document, providing a summary of the installation process.
1-1
Introduction
System Requirements
The following system requirements are presented:
■
Operating system compatibility
■
Storage requirements for drivers and software
■
Motherboard compatibility.
■
Device compatibility (for Serial ATA)
Operating System Compatibility
■
Microsoft Windows® 2000 and Windows XP®
■
Linux
■
Red Hat 7.3 and 8.0
■
SuSE 8.0 and 8.1
Note: For the latest Linux compatibility information, visit
www.adaptec.com.
Storage Requirements
Device drivers and storage management software require
approximately 20 MB of disk space.
Motherboard Compatibility
The controller can be installed in a universal PCI slot and requires a
motherboard and BIOS that:
■
Complies with the PCI Local Bus Specification, Revision 2.2.
■
Provides large memory-mapped address ranges.
Device Compatibility
The Adaptec 1210SA supports up to two Serial ATA hard drives
only, using two Serial ATA cables supplied in this kit.
1-2
Introduction
Kit Contents
Your Adaptec controller kit includes:
■
Adaptec 1210SA controller (see below)
■
Adaptec Serial ATA RAID 1210SA Quick Installation Guide
■
Installation CD
■
Low-profile bracket
■
Two Serial ATA interface cables
■
Warranty card
■
Technical Support ID (TSID) label (see page iii for details)
Adaptec 1210SA Controller
The Adaptec 1210SA controller is shown below. Note the position
of the Serial ATA interface connectors necessary for attaching the
Serial ATA hard drives.
Connector for Serial ATA drive 1
Connector for Serial ATA drive 0
1-3
Introduction
About the Documentation
The documentation set for this kit includes:
■
Adaptec Serial ATA RAID 1210SA Quick Installation Guide—This
printed guide contains the essential information for installing
the controller in most situations.
■
Adaptec Serial ATA RAID 1210SA User’s Guide (this guide)
■
Release Notes—Before beginning your installation, review the
release notes associated with the Adaptec 1210SA controller,
software, and documentation. To read this information, select
Release Notes from the View Documentation list or open the
Readme file in the root directory of the CD using a text editor. For
the latest updates, visit www.adaptec.com.
These documents are also available at www.adaptec.com. The
documents available from the Web site may be more recent
versions than those on the CD. Check the revision letter on the back
page of the guide.
Installing the Adobe Acrobat Reader
The Adaptec installation CD contains Windows and Linux versions
of Adobe Acrobat Reader. (You can also download the Reader free
at www.adobe.com.) You need the Reader to view Portable
Document Format (PDF) documents such as the Adaptec Serial ATA
RAID 1210SA User’s Guide, which is included in the Adaptec
installation CD.
To install the reader on:
■
Windows—Insert the Adaptec installation CD and wait for the
Autorun. If the CD does not start automatically, browse to the
root of the CD and click Autorun. Then, select the appropriate
option.
■
Linux—Browse to <CD mount point>/packages/Acrobat_Reader/Linux.
To view this location, you need to use the full path. If the path gets
truncated, you may not see the correct location.
1-4
Introduction
Controller Features
The Adaptec 1210SA supports the following features:
■
RAID levels 0, 1 and simple volume using Adaptec’s HostRAID
technology.
■
PCI Local Bus Specification, Revision 2.2 with PCI clock speeds
up to 66 MHz.
■
Operating system independent configuration and RAID
creation using Adaptec RAID Configuration (ARC).
■
Easy array configuration and status using Adaptec Storage
Manager – Browser Edition.
■
Flash ROM for easy upgrades of controller BIOS and ARC.
■
Event logging and broadcasting, including messaging for
alphanumeric pagers.
Overview of the Installation Process
The following steps provide an overview of the process of
installing, setting-up, and configuring the controller:
1 Read and understand this entire chapter.
2 Install and configure the controller and hard drives according to
the instructions in Chapter 2, Installing the Controller.
3 In Chapter 3, Installing the Driver, the procedure depends on the
needs of your system:
In a new system...
a Build the array.
b Install the controller driver at the beginning of the operating
system installation.
In an existing system...
a Install the controller driver.
b Build the array.
Note: Visit www.adaptec.com for the most recent driver
downloads.
1-5
Introduction
4 Install Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition as
described in Chapter 4, Installing Adaptec Storage Manager –
Browser Edition.
5 Register your controller at register.adaptec.com.
Storage Management Software Overview
The Adaptec 1210SA includes the following software tools to
manage your storage subsystem:
■
Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition—Browser-based
storage management software that provides all of the creation,
management, and data logging needed to manage arrays.
Arrays may be set up and managed on systems using the
following operating systems:
■
Windows 2000 and Windows XP
■
Red Hat Linux 7.3 and 8.0
■
SuSE Linux 8.1 and 8.0
For details, see Chapters 4 and 5.
■
Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility (ARC)—Part of the
controller’s built-in BIOS code. You start ARC by pressing
Ctrl+A during BIOS startup. For details, see Appendix A, BIOS
Utilities.
■
Array Configuration Utility (ACU)—A DOS application used
to create, configure, and manage arrays. For details, see
Appendix A, BIOS Utilities.
1-6
Introduction
Safety Information
To ensure you personal safety, as well as the safety of you equipment:
■
Keep your work area and the computer clean and clear of debris.
■
Before opening the system cabinet, unplug the power cord.
Notes and Cautions
This User’s Guide uses notes and cautions that emphasize important
information, as described below:
Note: Emphasizes important information that, if ignored,
would not result in injury, property damage, or data loss.
!
Caution: Emphasizes important information that, if ignored,
could cause equipment failure or loss of data.
Electrostatic Discharge
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) is a natural by-product of human
activity. ESD is produced by materials that accumulate and retain
electrical charges which are transferred to people or other objects
upon contact.
!
Caution: ESD can damage electronic components when they
are improperly handled and can result in total or intermittent
failures. Always follow ESD-prevention procedures when
removing and replacing components.
To prevent ESD damage:
■
Use an ESD wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes skin
contact. Connect the equipment end of the strap to an
unpainted metal surface on the chassis. If a wrist strap is not
available, ground yourself by touching the metal chassis before
handling the controller or any other part of the computer.
1-7
Introduction
■
Avoid touching the controller against your clothing. The wrist
strap protects components from ESD voltages present on the
body only. ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.
■
Handle your controller by its bracket or edges only. Avoid
touching the printed circuit board or the connectors.
■
When you need to put your controller down, use an antistatic
surface such as the bag supplied in your kit.
■
If you plan to return the controller to Adaptec, put it back in its
antistatic bag immediately.
1-8
2
Installing the Controller
In this Chapter...
Overview
2-1
Installing the Controller
2-2
Checking Your Controller and Devices
2-3
Determining the Boot Controller
2-3
Overview
To install the controller and drives, all you need is one or two of
each the following:
■
Serial ATA hard disk drives
■
Serial ATA cables (supplied in this kit)
Configuration of Serial ATA devices is simple for the following
reasons:
■
There are no jumpers or switches to set on the controller or hard
drives.
■
The cable ends are identical, so you don’t need to worry about
which end to attach to the controller and which to the drive.
■
The interface cable connectors, controller connectors, and hard
drive connectors are all keyed so that you can insert them in
only one direction.
2-1
Installing the Controller
Installing the Controller
To install the controller in the system cabinet:
1 Shut down your computer and disconnect the power cord.
2 Open the computer cabinet and identify an unused PCI slot.
3 If your computer accepts low-profile brackets only, install the
low-profile bracket supplied with your kit.
4 Identify an unused PCI slot and remove the slot cover, as
illustrated below.
5 Install the controller in the PCI slot and secure the controller
bracket to the host system cabinet.
6 If you have not already installed your Serial ATA hard drives,
do so now.
7 Use the cables supplied with your kit to connect your controller
to the Serial ATA hard drives.
The connectors at each end of a cable are the identical; therefore,
it does not matter which end you connect to your controller or
hard drive. Also, the connectors are keyed so that they only fit
the connector in one direction. Do not try to force a cable on to
the controller or a drive. If the connector does not slide on
easily, try reversing it.
8 Close the computer cabinet and re-attach the power cord.
2-2
Installing the Controller
Checking Your Controller and Devices
Now that you have installed your Adaptec 1210SA controller and
connected your Serial ATA hard drives, you are ready to use the
Adaptec RAID Configuration (ARC) utility to check your
controller and devices, as described below:
1 Turn on your computer.
2 When prompted, enter the ARC utility by pressing Ctrl+A.
3 If your drives have already been used in another system (even if
not part of an array), select Disk Utilities and format the drive.
Otherwise, skip to the Step 4.
Note: If a drive appears to be missing, power down the
computer and check the connections.
4 Select SATASelect to verify the hardware configuration of the
controller and the drives.
Verify that all drives and controllers are shown. If anything
appears to be missing, power down the computer and check the
connections.
Determining the Boot Controller
Your Adaptec 1210SA is a bootable controller. If your computer
already contains a bootable hard drive with an installed operating
system, you can set up your computer to boot a second operating
system from the new controller.
To add a second bootable controller, you may need to enter Setup
and change the hard disk boot sequence so that the Adaptec 1210SA
heads the list. If Setup does not allow this change, your system BIOS
may not be configurable to allow the Adaptec 1210SA controller to
act as a second boot device.
2-3
3
Installing the Driver
This chapter describes installing the driver and setting up the new
array for the drives attached to your controller. Before you get
started, you need to select from the following scenarios for
installing the controller driver on Windows or Linux systems:
■
Installing the Driver in a New Windows System on page 3-2
■
Installing the Driver in an Existing Windows System on page 3-4
■
Installing Red Hat Linux 7.3 or 8.0 on page 3-6
■
Installing SuSE Linux 8.0 or 8.1 on page 3-9
Note: Visit www.adaptec.com for the most recent driver
downloads.
3-1
Installing the Driver
Installing the Driver in a New Windows System
In this scenario, you are installing the controller in a new system
that has no operating system. To install the driver:
1 Install and configure the controller and hard disk drives
according to the instructions in Chapter 2, Installing the
Controller.
2 Create a driver disk:
a Enter system setup and verify that your system is set to boot
from the CD-ROM drive. See your system documentation
for details.
b Insert the Adaptec installation CD and restart your system
from the CD. Follow instructions and respond to prompts as
needed to boot and get to the Main Menu.
c From the Main Menu, select Create Driver Disk(s)
d Click on the appropriate driver disk option and then click
OK.
e When prompted, insert a floppy disk and click OK.
f
The system formats the disk and writes the appropriate
information to it.
g When prompted, remove and label the driver disk. Then,
click OK.
3 Restart the computer.
4 If creating an array, proceed to Step 5. For a simple volume, skip
to Step 15.
5 Press Ctrl-A when prompted to enter the Adaptec RAID
Configuration (ARC) utility. You will use ARC to create the
array and logical drive that you will use to install Windows.
(For more details about the ARC utility, see Appendix A.)
6 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility
(ACU).
7 From the ACU menu, select Create Array.
3-2
Installing the Driver
8 Select the drives for the new array and press Insert.
Note: If your drives are shown in gray and cannot be used,
they probably need to be initialized. See Initializing Disk
Drives on page A-6 for details.
9 Press Enter when both drives for the new array are selected.
The Array Properties menu is displayed.
10 In the Array Properties menu, select an array type and press
Enter. The available selections are RAID 0 and RAID 1. Each of
these array types requires two drives. (For a description of these
array types, see Appendix B.)
Note: Once the array is created and its properties are
assigned, you cannot change the array properties using
the ACU. Instead, use Adaptec Storage Manager - Browser
Edition.
11 Optional—Type in a label for the array and press Enter.
12 RAID 0 only—Select the desired stripe size. Available stripe
sizes are 16, 32, and 64 KB (default).
Note: Adaptec recommends that you do not change the
default.
13 Select between the different creation methods for RAID 0 or
RAID 1. (For more details about the creation methods, see
Appendix A.)
RAID 0—Select No Init (default), or Migrate
RAID 1—Select Build (default), Clear, or Quick Init
14 When the array is finished building, insert the Windows setup
CD. Then, restart the system.
3-3
Installing the Driver
15 Press F6 when prompted to install a third-party driver.
Note: When F6 is active, a prompt appears at the bottom of
the screen. Press F6 immediately—you only have
5 seconds. If you miss your chance, restart this Windows
installation to complete it correctly. Otherwise, Windows
will not recognize your controller.
16 Insert the driver disk you created and wait until prompted to
install a driver.
17 Press S to specify that the driver is on the floppy disk; then,
press Enter.
Windows searches the disk for a suitable driver.
18 When the Adaptec Serial ATA RAID driver is found, press
Enter. Follow the remaining on-screen instructions.
Installing the Driver in an Existing Windows System
In this scenario, you are adding a controller to a system that
already has a Windows operating system. To install the driver:
1 Install and configure your controller and hard disk drives
according to the instructions in Chapter 2, Installing the
Controller.
2 Create a driver disk:
a Insert the Adaptec installation CD and wait for the Autorun
to begin. If the Autorun does not start by itself, browse the
CD and click the Autorun executable.
b When the menu appears, select Create Driver Diskette.
c Enter the number corresponding to the appropriate
operating system, then press Enter.
d Insert a floppy disk when prompted.
The driver disk is formatted and loaded with the
appropriate information.
e Remove and label the disk.
3-4
Installing the Driver
3 Start Windows. Windows launches the Found New Hardware
Wizard, which searches for the controller driver.
4 Insert the driver disk you created. Select the floppy disk drive
as the source, then click Next.
5 If necessary, select the appropriate driver for your operating
system.
6 Click Next as needed to complete the controller installation.
7 Remove the driver disk.
8 Windows 2000 only—Restart the computer.
9 If creating an array, proceed to Step 10. If installing a simple
volume, your installation is complete.
10 Press Ctrl-A when prompted to enter the Adaptec RAID
Configuration (ARC) utility. Use ARC to create the array
containing your new Serial ATA hard drives. (For more details
about the ARC utility, see Appendix A.)
11 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility
(ACU).
12 From the ACU menu, select Create Array.
13 Select the disks for the new array and press Insert.
Note: If your drives are shown in gray and cannot be used,
they probably need to be initialized. See Initializing Disk
Drives on page A-6 for details.
14 Press Enter when both disks for the new array are selected. The
Array Properties menu is displayed.
15 In the Array Properties menu, select an array type and press
Enter. The available selections are RAID 0 and RAID 1. Each of
these array types requires two drives. (For a description of these
array types, see Appendix B.)
Note: Once the array is created and its properties are
assigned, you cannot change the array properties using
the ACU. Instead, use Adaptec Storage Manager-Browser
Edition.
3-5
Installing the Driver
16 Optional—Type in a label for the array and press Enter.
17 RAID 0 only—Select the desired stripe size. Available stripe
sizes are 16, 32, and 64 KB (default).
Note: Adaptec recommends that you do not change the
default.
18 Select between the different creation methods for RAID 0 or
RAID 1. (For more details about the creation methods, see
Appendix A.)
RAID 0—Select No Init (default), or Migrate
RAID 1—Select Build (default), Clear, or Quick Init
While the array begins building, you can exit the ARC utility, allow
the operating system to start up, and use your computer during the
build.
!
Caution: Do not turn off the computer during the build. If you
do, your drives may become unusable.
Installing Red Hat Linux 7.3 or 8.0
Installing the Red Hat Driver in a New Linux System
In this scenario, you are installing the controller in a new Linux
system. To install the driver:
1 Install and configure the controller and hard disk drives
according to the instructions in Chapter 2, Installing the
Controller.
2 Create a driver disk:
a Enter system setup and verify that your system is set to boot
from the CD-ROM drive. See your system documentation
for details.
b Insert the Adaptec installation CD and restart your system
from the CD. Follow instructions and respond to prompts as
needed to boot and get to the Main Menu.
3-6
Installing the Driver
c From the Main Menu, select Create Driver Disk(s)
d Click on the appropriate driver disk option and then click
OK.
e When prompted, insert a floppy disk and click OK.
f
The system formats the disk and writes the appropriate
information to it.
g When prompted, remove and label the driver disk. Then,
click OK.
3 Restart the computer.
4 If creating an array, proceed to Step 5. For a simple volume, skip
to Step 14.
5 Press Ctrl-A when prompted to enter the Adaptec RAID
Configuration (ARC) utility. You will use ARC to create the
array and logical drive that you will use to install Linux. (For
more details about the ARC utility, see Appendix A.)
6 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility
(ACU).
7 From the ACU menu, select Create Array.
8 Select the drives for the new array and press Insert.
Note: If your drives are shown in gray and cannot be used,
they probably need to be initialized. See Initializing Disk
Drives on page A-6 for details.
9 Press Enter when both drives for the new array are selected.
The Array Properties menu is displayed.
3-7
Installing the Driver
10 In the Array Properties menu, select an array type and press
Enter. The available selections are RAID 0 and RAID 1. Each of
these array types requires two drives. (For a description of these
array types, see Appendix B.)
Note: Once the array is created and its properties are
assigned, you cannot change the array properties using
the ACU. Instead, use Adaptec Storage Manager - Browser
Edition.
11 Optional—Type in a label for the array and press Enter.
12 RAID 0 only—Select the desired stripe size. Available stripe
sizes are 16, 32, and 64 KB (default).
Note: Adaptec recommends that you do not change the
default.
13 Select between the different creation methods for RAID 0 or
RAID 1. (For more details about the creation methods, see
Appendix A.)
RAID 0—Select No Init (default), or Migrate
RAID 1—Select Build (default), Clear, or Quick Init
14 When the array is finished building, or if you are continuing
from Step 4, insert the Red Hat CD Disk 1 in the CD-ROM drive
and restart the system.
15 When the Red Hat Welcome screen appears, type expert at the
boot prompt.
16 When prompted, insert the driver disk you created (see Step 2)
and select OK.
17 Follow the prompts to set up your preferred environment.
18 If you intend to install other third-party devices, proceed with
the installation of those devices. Otherwise, select Done.
19 Continue with the Linux installation according to the Red Hat
documentation.
3-8
Installing the Driver
Installing or Updating the Driver in an Existing Linux System
To update the driver in an existing Linux system, type the
following:
rpm -Uvh aar1210-*.*.*-*.i386.rpm
where * is the name of the driver file.
Installing SuSE Linux 8.0 or 8.1
Installing the Driver in a New Linux System
In this scenario, you are installing the controller in a new Linux
system. To install the driver:
1 Install and configure the controller and hard disk drives
according to the instructions in Chapter 2, Installing the
Controller.
2 Create a driver disk:
a Enter system setup and verify that your system is set to boot
from the CD-ROM drive. See your system documentation
for details.
b Insert the Adaptec installation CD and restart your system
from the CD. Follow instructions and respond to prompts as
needed to boot and get to the Main Menu.
c From the Main Menu, select Create Driver Disk(s)
d Click on the appropriate driver disk option and then click
OK.
e When prompted, insert a floppy disk and click OK.
f
The system formats the disk and writes the appropriate
information to it.
g When prompted, remove and label the driver disk. Then,
click OK.
3 Restart the computer.
4 If creating an array, proceed to Step 5. For a simple volume, skip
to Step 14.
3-9
Installing the Driver
5 Press Ctrl-A when prompted to enter the Adaptec RAID
Configuration (ARC) utility. You will use ARC to create the
array and logical drive that you will use to install Linux. (For
more details about the ARC utility, see Appendix A.)
6 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility
(ACU).
7 From the ACU menu, select Create Array.
8 Select the drives for the new array and press Insert.
Note: If your drives are shown in gray and cannot be used,
they probably need to be initialized. See Initializing Disk
Drives on page A-6 for details.
9 Press Enter when both drives for the new array are selected.
The Array Properties menu is displayed.
10 In the Array Properties menu, select an array type and press
Enter. The available selections are RAID 0 and RAID 1. Each of
these array types requires two drives. (For a description of these
array types, see Appendix B.)
Note: Once the array is created and its properties are
assigned, you cannot change the array properties using
the ACU. Instead, use Adaptec Storage Manager - Browser
Edition.
11 Optional—Type in a label for the array and press Enter.
12 RAID 0 only—Select the desired stripe size. Available stripe
sizes are 16, 32, and 64 KB (default).
Note: Adaptec recommends that you do not change the
default.
3-10
Installing the Driver
13 Select between the different creation methods for RAID 0 or
RAID 1. (For more details about the creation methods, see
Appendix A.)
RAID 0—Select No Init (default), or Migrate
RAID 1—Select Build (default), Clear, or Quick Init
14 When the array is finished building, or if you are continuing
from Step 4, insert the SuSE CD Disk 1 in the CD-ROM drive
and restart the system.
15 When the SuSE Installation menu appears, press the Alt key,
then select one option from the Menu and press Enter.
16 When prompted, insert the driver disk you created (see Step 2)
and press any key to continue.
17 Follow the prompts to set up your preferred environment.
18 Continue with the Linux installation according to the SuSE
documentation.
Installing or Updating the Driver in an Existing Linux System
To update the driver in an existing SuSE Linux system, type the
following:
rpm -Uvh aar1210-*.*.*-*.i386.rpm
where * is the name of the driver file.
3-11
4
Installing Adaptec Storage
Manager – Browser Edition
In this Chapter...
Overview
4-1
Supported Browsers
4-2
Custom and Compact Installations
4-2
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on Windows
4-3
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on Linux
4-7
Overview
This chapter discusses the installation procedure for installing
Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition to enable remote and
local management of arrays. For instructions on using this
application, see Chapter 5.
4-1
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Supported Browsers
To run Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition, your
computer must have a Web browser supporting JavaScript and
cookies only. The following versions are supported:
■ On Windows
■ Internet Explorer (IE) 5.0 or later
■ Netscape 7 or later
■ On Linux
■ Adaptec-supplied and installed version of Mozilla
■ Netscape 7 or later
When using Adaptec Storage Manager, you need to log on to your
system with administrator privileges.
Custom and Compact Installations
If you are considering performing a custom or compact
installation, read this section prior to performing the installation. If
not, skip this section. The following setup options are available:
■ Typical (default)—Supports local and remote management;
however, Adaptec SNMP is not included.
■ Custom—For expert users who want to select and install
specific components.The following components are available:
■ Managed System Components—If you choose this selection
only, the installation is the same as a Compact installation.
■ Adaptec Web Server—Installs components allowing
managed systems to communicate with Web browsers.
■ Adaptec Storage Manager Notifier—Installs messaging,
including email and broadcaster capabilities.
■ Adaptec SNMP—Installs components used by SNMP-based
applications. Requires Microsoft SNMP agents to be
installed to function. Not included in a Typical installation.
■ Compact—Installs only the components required on a remotely
managed system. See Managed System Components, above.
Note: When you install Adaptec Storage Manager, you also
install the Command Line Interpreter (CLI), which is needed
for compatibility with other Adaptec controllers.
4-2
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on Windows
Note: When installing on a FAT 32 file system, the folder being
installed is automatically hidden.
To install Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition:
1 Verify that a supported browser is installed. See Supported
Browsers on page 4-2 for details.
2 Insert the Adaptec installation CD and wait for the Autorun
executable to start the installation. If this does not occur, browse
the CD and click Autorun.
3 Click Install Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition.
4 Click Next in the Install Shield window.
5 Read the license agreement. If you agree to its terms, click Yes. If
not, click No and terminate the installation.
The Select a Setup Type window appears. It provides three
types of installations: Typical, Compact, and Custom. See Custom
and Compact Installations on page 4-2 for details.
6 Choose a setup type and click Next.
7 When you see the Destination Folder, click Next.
8 When you see the Setup Information, click Next.
The Setup Status window shows progress using a scroll bar.
Before the scroll bar shows the installation is completed,
another window pops up indicating that a security certificate
has been generated.
9 Click OK.
The Root Certificate Store window appears.
10 Click Yes.
The security certificate generated during installation is added to
the Certificate Store. If you click No at this point, you will need
to install the certificate the first time you run Adaptec Storage
Manager.
4-3
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
11 When prompted to restart your computer, accept the default
(Yes) and click Finish.
12 The system restarts to complete the installation.
13 Remove the Adaptec Installation CD before the system restarts;
otherwise, the installation will start again.
Configuring Internet Browsers on Windows
If you are managing a local storage array and your computer uses a
proxy server, you need to configure your browser to enable
Adaptec Storage Manager to bypass the proxy server. Also, if you
are managing remote systems, you need to configure Adaptec
Storage Manager to bypass the proxy server when communicating
with these systems.
The following procedures are described in this section:
■
Configuring Internet Explorer for Local Management on page 4-5
■
Configuring Internet Explorer for Remote Management on page 4-6
■
Configuring Netscape Navigator for Local Management on page 4-6
■
Configuring Netscape Navigator for Remote Management on page 4-6
4-4
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Configuring Internet Explorer for Local Management
When using the High security setting, you must enable the
following settings manually:
■
JavaScript
■
Cookies (not stored)
You do not need to enable the following custom level security
settings for the local Intranet in Internet Explorer 5 and 5.5. Select
Tools > Internet Options to access these settings:
■
Active Scripting
■
Allow per session cookies (not stored)
Note: In Internet Explorer 6.0 there is no security setting for
cookies. Cookie configuration was removed from the
Privacy tab. There is no setting for blocking Intranet cookies.
If you are using a proxy server to access the Internet, you must
bypass the proxy server to access the Adaptec Storage Manager
Web server. To verify whether you are using a proxy server:
1 From Internet Option window, click the Connections tab.
2 Click LAN Settings.
■
If the Use a proxy server box isn’t checked, exit by clicking
OK. You aren’t using a proxy server, so ignore this setting.
■
If the Use a proxy server box is checked, make sure the
Bypass proxy server for local addresses box is also checked.
Then, click the Advanced button. In the Exceptions window,
enter localhost as an entry.
You are now ready to proceed to Chapter 5, Using Adaptec Storage
Manager – Browser Edition.
4-5
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Configuring Internet Explorer for Remote Management
If you know the IP address of the system you want to manage
remotely:
1 Choose Tools > Internet Options > Connections > LAN
Settings.
2 Select Use a proxy server for your LAN > Advanced.
3 In the Exceptions section, type the managed system’s IP
address.
Configuring Netscape Navigator for Local Management
Note: These instructions apply specifically to Version 7 and
may differ in later versions.
To configure Netscape Navigator:
1 Log in to your computer with administrator access.
2 Select Edit > Preferences.
3 In the Preferences window, click the right arrow on the Privacy
and Security line. Ensure that either of the Enable cookies
selections is selected.
4 Select the Advanced line. Ensure that Enable Javascript for
Navigator is checked.
5 Exit Navigator, then restart it. This enables any settings you
have modified.
6 You are now ready to proceed to Chapter 5, Using Adaptec
Storage Manager – Browser Edition.
Configuring Netscape Navigator for Remote Management
If you know the IP address of the system you want to manage
remotely:
1 Choose Edit> Preferences > Advanced> Proxies > Manual
proxy configuration > No Proxy For
2 Type the managed system’s IP address.
4-6
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on Linux
Note: When performing this installation, keep in mind that
Linux is case sensitive.
To install Adaptec Storage Manager on a Linux computer and
configure the desired Internet browser:
1 Insert the Adaptec installation CD.
2 Install the software by typing:
sh <mount-point>/install.sh.
The <mount-point> differs among computers, but
/mnt/cdrom, /media/cdrom, or cdrom usually works.
A Welcome window appears.
3 Click Next.
The License Agreement window appears.
4 Read the license agreement. If you agree to its terms, click
Accept. If not, click Cancel and terminate the installation.
The Choose Setup Type window appears. It provides three
types of installations: Typical, Compact, and Custom. See Custom
and Compact Installations on page 4-2 for details.
5 Choose a setup type and click Next.
The Start Copying window appears.
6 Click Next.
The Running Non-Interactive Setup window displays the files
being loaded onto the system.
7 Click Next when prompted.
A Setup Complete window appears.
8 Click Complete.
A message window appears reminding you that any proxy
servers must be bypassed for the RAID management
application to work.
4-7
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
9 Click OK.
The Shell window you used to launch the installation indicates
that some daemons are being started.
The installation creates a shortcut to Adaptec Storage Manager
in the System tab. This shortcut launches Adaptec Storage
Manager using Mozilla.
Unless the controller driver was installed as part of this
installation, you do not need to restart your computer.
10 Remove the Adaptec installation CD.
Your computer must have a Web browser supporting JavaScript
and cookies. To use Adaptec Storage Manager, you need to log on
to your computer with root privileges.
4-8
5
Using Adaptec Storage Manager –
Browser Edition
In this Chapter...
Overview
5-2
Architecture Overview
5-3
Logging In
5-4
Installing a Security Certificate
5-6
Registering Your Software
5-6
The Basics
5-7
Creating an Array
5-11
Deleting Arrays
5-15
Modifying Arrays
5-15
User Interface Options
5-16
Viewing Events
5-17
Getting Help
5-19
Displaying and Modifying Properties
5-19
Viewing and Creating Tasks
5-24
5-1
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Overview
This chapter describes how to use Adaptec Storage Manager –
Browser Edition to manage arrays. Once you are logged in, you
will find convenient online help to guide you through the details of
creating, configuring, and managing arrays.
Note: Your controller may not support all of the features
described. In most cases if a feature is not supported by your
controller the feature does not appear in the interface.
With Adaptec Storage Manager, you can:
■
Locally manage a system containing a supported Adaptec
RAID controller that has Windows or Linux and a supported
browser.
■
Remotely manage any system containing a supported Adaptec
RAID controller that has Managed System Components (see
Custom and Compact Installations on page 4-2). You can manage a
remote system even if there is no RAID controller on the host
system. Also, you can manage a remote system running Unix or
Netware if it has the ARCPD agent installed.
These same Windows and Linux systems can also be managed
remotely. This can be achieved in two ways:
■
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager on the remote system.
■
Directing the browser on the remote system to the system you
want to manage.
Note: To manage an array remotely from a Linux system,
install Adaptec Storage Manager on the system and use the
Adaptec-supplied version of Mozilla as the browser.
5-2
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Architecture Overview
Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition consists of the three
major components:
■
A supported Web browser, which should already be installed
on the system.
■
The Adaptec Web service which supplies content displayed on
the Web browser.
■
An Adaptec-supplied storage agent.
For a locally managed system, all three components must be
installed on the same system.
To support the remote management configurations described
below, all components must be installed on systems that have a
TCP/IP connection through which other components can be
accessed.
Communication security is ensured because Secure-HTTP
(S-HTTP) or SSL protocols are used to encrypt all transmitted data.
Connection over an Ethernet network, a corporate WAN, or VPN
are supported.
Several remote management configurations are possible:
■
The remote system must contain a browser.
■
The storage agent must always be installed on the system with
the RAID controller installed.
■
The Web service can be installed on the same remote system as
the browser, the system with the RAID controller installed, or a
third system.
5-3
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Logging In
To login:
1 Start Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition.
■
In Windows, click Start > Programs > Adaptec Storage
Manager > Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition.
■
In Linux, click Start > System > Adaptec Storage Manager.
The Login screen, shown below, is presented.
2 Enter the host name or IP address of the system you want to
manage and the username and password you would use to log
into that system.
3 Click Login.
Notes
When running Adaptec Storage Manager for the first time:
■
You need to install a security certificate if you chose not to
during the installation process. For instructions see Installing a
Security Certificate on page 5-6.
■
You are asked to register your software. For instructions see
Registering Your Software on page 5-6.
5-4
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
To log in from any system with a Web browser:
1 Start the Web browser application and type the IP address for
the system you want to access in the address bar and press
Enter. For example, https://10.6.3.14:3513/adaptec.
When connection to the remote system is established, the
System Login screen appears.
Note: If you are using a proxy server to access the Internet,
you must bypass the proxy server to access the Adaptec
Storage Manager Web server. See Configuring Internet
Browsers on Windows on page 4-4 for details.
2 Enter the host name or IP address of the system you want to
manage and the administrative username and password that
you would normally use to log into that system.
3 Click Login.
5-5
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Installing a Security Certificate
If you chose not to install a security certificate when you installed
Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition, you must install the
certificate when you run the application for the first time.
To create the certificate:
1 When the Security Alert window appears, click View Certificate.
2 On the Certificate window that appears, click Install Certificate.
3 On the Certificate Import wizard window that appears, click Next.
The Certificate Import wizard window’s contents change.
4 Accept the default, Automatically select the certificate store,
and click Next.
5 On the root Certificate Store window, click Yes.
Another small Certificate Import wizard window appears.
6 Click OK.
The Certificate window mentioned in Step 2 reappears.
7 Click OK.
You are returned to the Security Alert window from Step 1.
8 Click Yes to finish the creation and storage of the certificate.
Registering Your Software
After installing and creating a security certificate, you are asked to
register the product. If you want click Register Now, your computer
must have an Internet connection. If you need to delay registration,
click Register Later. If you choose Register Later, you will be
prompted to register the application the next time you run it.
5-6
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
The Basics
An example of a typical Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser
Edition screen is shown below.
Note: Depending on your operating system, browser, and
color scheme you may notice some differences between this
illustration and your screen.
At the top of the screen is the header frame. In this area is the name
of the system that you are currently connected to and a number of
buttons that perform various actions or open additional windows.
The action buttons are Logout and Rescan. Selecting Logout will
end your session and return you to the Login screen.
Use the Rescan button to rescan the configuration of the system.
Typically, when a rescan is required, it occurs automatically, for
example, after an array is created.
It is possible for the system configuration to change without
Adaptec Storage Manager being notified. For example, drives
inserted/removed from a non-intelligent enclosure or an enclosure
powered on after you logged in to Adaptec Storage Manager.
The remaining buttons—Events, Options, Help, Properties, and
Tasks—open additional windows that provide more detailed
information, allow you to perform actions or change settings on a
specific aspect of your storage subsystem.
Immediately following the header frame is a controller information
line including the model number of the first Adaptec RAID
controller found in the system and the amount of cache memory (if
any) installed on that controller.
5-7
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Beneath the controller information are Physical Devices and
Logical Devices views that show connected devices and existing
arrays on this controller. Controller information and device views
are repeated for each additional Adaptec RAID controller in the
system.
Select the controller by clicking anywhere on the controller
information. When the controller is selected, the Events, Properties
and Tasks buttons change from blue to amber, indicating that
clicking any of them will display an additional window with
information and options specific to this controller.
Pop-Up Tool Tips
If you position the cursor over a device or button a pop-up tool tip
appears. For buttons, the tips contain helpful information about the
function of the button, while for devices they display additional
information.
Physical Devices
The Physical Devices view displays information about the drives
and enclosures attached to the Adaptec RAID controller. The
devices are shown organized by the channel or port that they are
connected to and shown in numerical order.
The display for each channel includes information on maximum
speed capability, the number of the channel on the controller, and
the number of devices found (excluding the SCSI controller).
Selecting a channel or device will turn the Events, Properties, and
Tasks buttons amber. This indicates that clicking any of these
buttons will display an additional window with information and
options specific to that device or channel.
At the top of the Physical Devices view, grouped to the right of
View, are three view selection buttons. These buttons select the
physical devices connected to this controller are displayed.
5-8
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Changing How Drives are Displayed
By default, the Physical Devices displays a condensed view of the
controller configuration that hides detailed information about the
drives. More information is available by either positioning the
mouse pointer over the device or clicking on the arrowhead to the
left of a row of devices.
The selected display mode button will appear in a lighter shade of
blue than the other two buttons. The default display is the Text
Description View, but in the condensed view used when Adaptec
Storage Manager is loaded, the display is the same in all three
modes.
If you change the display mode by selecting one of the other view
buttons, a yellow arrow flashes to the left of any devices where the
condensed display prevents omits information.
An icon is always the first entry on each device line. The
icon is
used to represent a hard disk drive. If a + symbol appears with the
hard disk drive icon
, the drive is a hot spare. Different icons are
used to represent other devices.
View
is the default display mode and when expanded, will show the
following information about each device:
■
Capacity of the drive
■
Drive manufacturer and model number
■
SCSI drive ID, or Serial ATA port number
When expanded, the Full Size Capacity View button
and the
Relative Size Capacity View button
represent each drive as a
bar. A drive that is not used as part of any array is shaded blue
surrounded by a dotted line.
displays a full-length bar for each drive, regardless of capacity.
displays a bar for each drive, with the largest capacity drive
full-length and the other drives proportional to the drive capacity,
relative to the largest drive.
5-9
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Any part of a drive used in an array is shown as a gray segment
within the bar. Selecting any gray segment will highlight it in
amber and, in the Logical Devices view, highlight the array of
which this segment is a member.
In either the Full Size Capacity View or the Relative Size Capacity
View, a small portion at each end of the drive may be shown in
dark gray.
The segment at the end of the drive may vary in size from drive to
drive because, in addition to the RAID signature, the controller
may also limit the usable capacity of each drive.
This is done because hard disk drives of apparently the same
capacity from different manufacturers, or even different models
from the same manufacturer, actually vary slightly in the true
capacity available. Although, in normal operation this is not an
issue, it can be when assigning hot spares or replacing a failed drive.
If the controller used the maximum capacity of each drive and a
hot spare or replacement drive was just a few megabytes smaller, it
would not be able to replace the failed drive. By rounding drive
capacities down to the nearest 2 MB, this possibility is effectively
eliminated.
Logical Devices
As described earlier, when Adaptec Storage Manager loads, the
Logical Devices view is expanded and you can see the arrays
present on the controller.
At the top of this view are the following buttons: Create, Modify,
and Delete. Each button opens a wizard for the corresponding
function.
Modify allows you to:
■
Change an array from one RAID level to another
■
Expand an array
■
Change the stripe size for a RAID 0
For detailed instructions on using these buttons, see the sections
Creating an Array on page 5-11, Deleting Arrays on page 5-15, and
Modifying Arrays on page 5-15.
5-10
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
The main area of the Logical Devices view is used to display the
arrays on this controller. It defaults to a condensed view of toplevel arrays.
Note: The Options button allows you to display second-level
arrays if your controller supports them.
In this condensed view, the RAID level of each device as well as
whether it is protected by a hot spare, is visible.
If a global hot spare exists, all arrays that the hot spare is large
enough to protect will show as protected.
In the expanded view, the icons for the arrays are arranged
vertically and alongside them are the capacity, name, and type of
array.
Selecting an array by clicking on it will highlight the following in
amber:
■
All the drives or segments that form the array in the Physical
Devices view.
■
Any second-level arrays that form a top-level array in the
Logical Devices view.
■
The Events, Properties, and Tasks buttons in the header frame.
Selecting any of these three buttons displays a new window
with additional information and options specific to that array.
Creating an Array
Before you create an array, make sure that you understand the
different types of arrays supported by your controller, as described
in Appendix B, and the type of arrays that are most appropriate for
your application.
Click Create to open the Create Array wizard. This wizard offers
the following options:
■
Create arrays using default settings.
■
Expand the wizard by clicking Advanced to see additional
options and customize settings.
5-11
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Using the default settings will create an array of the largest
possible capacity on the selected drives, use the default cache
setting and, if appropriate, the default stripe size.
To create an array using default settings:
1 Open the Create Array wizard by clicking Create for the
controller on which you want to create an array.
2 Select the type of array you want to create. Then, click Next.
3 Click the drives you want to include in the array. Selected
drives display an amber check mark.
4 When you have selected two drives, click Next.
5 Now you can accept the default name for the new array or enter
one of your choice. The name you choose must be unique, and
can be up to 15 standard ASCII characters in length.
6 Click Finish. The system creates the new array.
7 Windows 2000 only—
a When you add an array, an Unsafe Removal pop-up
appears—click OK.
b Open the Device Manager and do a rescan to view your new
array.
Advanced Options
Creating an array by clicking Advanced in the Create Array wizard
follows the same basic process as the previous instructions, but at
each step there may be additional options for you to use,
depending on the features supported by the controller.
The Advanced area of the Create Array wizard may offer the
following additional options:
■
Spanned Volumes and RAID Volumes—As described in the
Glossary, a spanned volume concatenates segments from two or
more drives to form a volume, while a RAID volume concatenates
two or more arrays of the same type.
5-12
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
■
Enable or Disable Write Caching—When write caching is
enabled, the controller stores the data in cache memory on the
controller and will accept another write to this array as soon as
the data from the previous write is safely stored in the
controller’s memory.
Since writing data to memory is much faster than writing it to
the drives, enabling write caching can significantly improve
performance. All data stored in the cache will be written to the
drives when it is most efficient for the controller.
!
■
Caution: The default setting for write cache is enabled. This
setting provides the best performance, but in the event of
power failure there is a possibility of data loss.
Enable Or Disable Read Caching—When enabled, the
controller will monitor read accesses to this array to try to
predict where future reads may occur. If it detects a pattern, the
data that seems most likely to be read next is preloaded into the
controller’s cache memory. Since reading data from memory on
the controller is much faster than reading it from the drives, this
significantly improves performance. The default is Enabled.
The Advanced area of the Create Array wizard may offer the
following additional options:
■
Limit Array Capacity—This option allows you to choose the
capacity of the array you are creating. The default is to make the
array the largest possible size with the drives selected. To create
multiple arrays on a single set of drives you must use this
option to limit the size of, at a minimum, the first array.
For example, if you have two 18-GB drives, and you wish to use
them to create two 9-GB RAID 1s, you would use this option to
restrict the size of the first array you create.
Note: The capacity of RAID 1 is limited to the capacity of the
smaller drive.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
■
Stripe Size—For a RAID 0, where data is striped across
multiple drives, stripe size determines how much data is
written on each drive for a given stripe.
Note: Adaptec recommends that you do not change the
stripe size.
For RAID 1 arrays, which need to be initialized, advanced options
allow you to select which method is used to initialize the array and
set the priority of the initialization task.
The Advanced area of the Create Array wizard may offer the
following initialization options:
■
Build—For a RAID 1, the data from the primary drive is copied
to the secondary drive.
The advantages of building an array are that the array is
immediately available for use, and that when the build is
complete, the array operates at maximum performance. The
disadvantages are that building takes some time, for a large
array possibly many hours, and performance is impacted until
the build completes.
■
Clear—In this case, the contents of all the drives are cleared.
The advantages of clearing an array are that the process is much
faster than building and when completed, the array operates at
maximum performance. The disadvantage is that the array is
not accessible until the clear completes.
■
Quick—In this case the array is immediately available. The
advantage of quick initialization is that the array is immediately
available with no on-going build.
■
Initialization Priority—This drop-down list allows you to
adjust the priority of the initialization task. The default is High,
which means that the initialization completes as fast as possible.
The other options are Medium and Low. Depending on what
other tasks are running on the controller, selecting either of
these options lengthen the initialization time.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Deleting Arrays
Note: Deleting an array destroys all the data on the array. Be
sure to back up any data before you proceed.
To delete an array:
1 Click the Delete button on the Logical Devices view.
2 In the Logical Devices view select the array(s) you wish to delete.
3 Click Finish. A warning appears, offering you the opportunity
to verify that you are deleting the correct array.
4 Click Yes if the warning is correct.
5 Windows 2000 only—
a When you delete an array, an Unsafe Removal pop-up
appears—click OK.
b Open the Device Manager and do a rescan to view your
change.
Modifying Arrays
On controllers that support this feature, Modify allows you to
make the following changes to existing arrays:
■
Migrate an array from one RAID level to another
■
Expand the capacity of an array
■
Change the stripe size
Some operating systems, for example Windows 2000 and
Windows XP, support Online Capacity Expansion (OCE). That is,
on completion of an array expansion, the additional capacity can be
used without rebooting the system. Refer to your operating system
documentation for instructions on using the additional capacity.
The following rules apply to migration:
1 The capacity of the new array must match or exceed the
capacity of the current array.
2 If the capacity and/or RAID type of the new array requires
greater total drive capacity than the current array, the additional
capacity must be on drives that are not already used in the
current array.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
To modify an array:
1 Click Modify.
2 Select the array that you wish to modify.
3 Select the RAID level that you want to migrate the array to, or if
you want to expand the capacity of the existing array, select the
current RAID level.
4 If necessary, select the additional drive(s) required for capacity
expansion, or necessary to support the new RAID level.
Optionally, click Advanced to adjust the priority for the task.
5 Click Finish.
User Interface Options
Click Options to modify the user interface. Changes take place
immediately when you make a new selection in one of the dropdown lists.
You can make changes in the following areas:
■
Second-Level Arrays—The default is to hide second-level
arrays in the Logical Devices view. You can choose to display
second-level arrays.
■
Background Update Frequency—This option controls how
frequently the Web server is polled for updated configuration
information. The default is 30 seconds. Other choices are
15 seconds, 1 minute, and 5 minutes.
■
Highlight on Mouseover—As you move the cursor, you may
notice that an amber box surrounds the controller, channel,
device, or array. This effect can be disabled by selecting No in
the drop-down list for Highlight on mouseover.
■
Popup Tool Tips—As you move the mouse cursor around the
screen, you may notice that if you position the cursor over a
device or button a popup tool tip appears. For buttons, the tips
contain helpful information about the function of the button,
although for devices they display additional information.
Tool tips are enabled by default and appear after a brief delay.
You can either disable the tool tips or have them pop up
immediately.
Close the window by clicking the X in the top right corner.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Viewing Events
The Events button allows you to view events and configure event
notification for all supported controllers in the system.
Event Viewer
The following information is available for each event:
■
Date and time of the event
■
Severity of the event
■
Brief description
The Event Filter Threshold default is All which displays all levels
of event available to your controller.
A drop-down list is provided that lets you choose to view either
critical and warning level events only (Warning), or critical events
only (Critical).
At the bottom of the screen is a Clear Log button to clear the event log.
Event Notification
A notifier service is included, enabling controller events to be
added to the system event log. This service can display on-screen
popup alert messages as well as notify users, through e-mail, of
controller events. The default is Running.
Notifier Service Event Levels
Most Adaptec controllers support three event levels:
■
Critical
■
Warning
■
Informational (This level may not be supported by your
controller.)
The level(s) of events entered in the system log and received by
each user is configured independently.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Enabling and Configuring the Notifier Service
Before you begin to configure e-mail notification you need to have
the following information available:
■
The SMTP mail server host name or IP address.
■
The port that SMTP mail server is configured to use. The default
is 25, which is the default for most SMTP mail server packages.
If you are unsure of the default for you server, ask your e-mail
administrator.
■
The SMTP e-mail address to which all returned e-mail should
be forwarded. SMTP e-mail addresses take the form
myname@companyname.com.
■
The SMTP e-mail address of all users that need to receive event
notifications.
Configuring Event Notification
To configure event notification:
1 Use the System Log pull-down to select the level of events to be
added to the system event log.
2 Use the Popup Alerts pull-down to select the level of events
that trigger a popup message. Or, select the Sound On box to be
notified by a system sound.
To configure e-mail event notification:
3 In SMTP Server type the address of SMTP mail server host
name or IP address.
4 In port # type the port number that the SMTP mail server is
configured to use.
5 In Bounce Mail type the e-mail address where all returned
e-mail should be sent.
6 Type in the e-mail address of a user you want to receive
notifications. Select the level of events you want that user to
receive. If you wish to add more users, repeat the steps above.
Note: If you need to notify more than the three allocated users,
Adaptec recommends that you create an e-mail group address
to be notified.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Applying Changes
The Event Notification tab allows you to make changes. If you
have selected a modifiable field, select Apply or Cancel to save
your changes.
Getting Help
Click Help to open a screen with the following tabs: This
Application, Technical Support, and Sales.
Click This Application tab to view information about the name
and version of the application, as well as a link to the online help.
Click the Technical Support tab for the link to Adaptec’s Technical
Support Web site.
Click the Sales tab to find telephone numbers and an e-mail
address for Adaptec Sales, as well as links to Adaptec’s Online
Store and Product Information Web sites.
Displaying and Modifying Properties
Click Properties to see additional details about the components
displayed on your screen. To see properties about a particular
controller, channel, device, or array, select that item before clicking
Properties.
If Properties is amber, clicking on it will open a window with
further information and options about the item selected. If
Properties is blue, clicking on it will display the hostname of the
system you are connected to.
Controller Properties
To view or modify controller properties, select a controller and then
click Properties to display a dialog window with the following
tabs: Controller Info, Alarm, Battery, and Details.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Controller Info
Lists the following information about the selected controller:
■
Model—Adaptec model number. This is also displayed on the
main screen for each controller.
■
Serial number—A number that uniquely identifies your
controller.
■
Host bus—The type and the number of the bus to which this
controller is connected.
■
Memory size— Not available for Adaptec 1210SA.
■
Cache size—Not available for Adaptec 1210SA.
■
Number of channels/ports—The number of channels (SCSI or
ATA) or ports (SATA) on this controller.
Details
This window lists details of some components for this controller:
■
Monitor, Kernel, BIOS versions—These are the version
numbers of the different software components loaded on the
controller. For some controllers, not all three components are
present.
■
Hardware version—The revision level of the controller
hardware.
■
Processor type and speed—Not available for Adaptec 1210SA.
Channel or Port Properties
To view channel or port properties, select a channel or port and
then click Properties to display a dialog box with a single tab
containing the following information:
■
Channel/Port Type—Indicates whether the selected channel, or
port, is SCSI, ATA or Serial ATA.
■
Max data rate—The highest rate at which this channel can
transfer data, for example, 320 MB/sec.
5-20
Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Physical Device Properties
If you select a device on a channel (other than an enclosure) and
then select Properties, a window with Drive Info, Capacity, LED,
and S.M.A.R.T. tabs appear.
Drive Info
■
Status—This field appears only for disk drives and it indicates
the current status of the drive. Possible values are: Optimal,
Failed, Phantom (not physically found), S.M.A.R.T. Warning,
Unknown and Missing.
■
Type—The class of device; for example: disk drive, CD-ROM,
scanner, or printer.
■
Product—The name given to this device by its vendor.
■
Vendor—The manufacturer of this device.
■
Revision—The version number information stored on the
device.
■
Data Rate—The data transfer speed negotiated between the
controller and this device.
■
SCSI ID, LUN—For devices on a SCSI channel the SCSI ID and
LUN of the device are reported. These do not apply for ATA
and Serial ATA devices and will always return 0.
Capacity
The Capacity tab appears only for disk drives and when selected,
displays a summary view listing the reserved, used, available, and
total capacities of the drive.
The capacities are reported in both the number of 512-byte blocks
(shown in both decimal and hexadecimal values) and capacity in
Kilobytes, Megabytes, or Gigabytes.
Selecting the detailed option shows information for all segments on
the drive. In this view, the following information is displayed for
each segment:
■
Number of the segment
■
Start and end blocks
■
Segment size and type
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
Type indicates how the segment is used. The first and last segments
may be reserved. The controller may store the RAID signature at
either the beginning or end of the drive. The end of the drive is
where the capacity may be rounded down to the nearest 2 MB.
If this segment is a component of an array, type indicates the array
level the segment is used in. If the segment is not used in an array,
and is not a reserved area, it will be shown as available.
Detailed view defaults to displaying the numbers of the start and
end blocks of each segment in decimal values. A drop-down list is
provided to allow you to display these numbers in either
hexadecimal or capacity.
S.M.A.R.T.
For hard disk drives that support S.M.A.R.T. predictive failure
reporting, this additional tab will appear with the following
entries:
■
Enabled—indicates if S.M.A.R.T. reporting is enabled on this
device.
■
Predictive failure occurred—indicates if this device has
reported a predictive failure.
LED
This tab appears on hard disk drives, and has two buttons, Blink
LED and Unblink All.
■
Blink LED—Clicking this button will cause the activity LED of
the selected drive to blink. Use this to identify the drive. The
activity LED will continue to blink until you click Unblink All.
■
Unblink All—Clicking this button cancels the effect of the
Blink LED button for all drives.
Enclosure Properties
Selecting an enclosure and clicking Properties will open a screen
with the following tabs: General, Fans, PSU, Temperature,
Devices and Speaker.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
General
The General tab includes the following information:
■
Vendor—The manufacturer of the enclosure.
■
Product—The name given to this enclosure by its vendor.
■
Revision—The version number information stored on the
enclosure.
■
Status Summary—This provides an overview of the status of
the fans, PSU(s), and temperature sensors in the enclosure.
Further detail on each component is available on the relevant tab.
Fans and PSU
The Fans and PSU (Power Supply Units) tabs contain a table
listing, by number, all the fans/PSUs in the enclosure and their
status.
Temperature
The Temperature tab contains a table listing all of the temperature
sensors in the enclosure by number. For each sensor the current
temperature and status is displayed.
You can select whether temperatures are displayed in Fahrenheit or
Celsius.
Devices
The Devices tab contains a table listing the slots in the enclosure by
number. For each slot the SCSI ID of any device present is listed,
along with that device’s current status.
Speaker
The Speaker tab indicates whether the enclosure is equipped with
a speaker.
For enclosures with a speaker a Silence Alarm button will also be
present to allow you to turn off the speaker in the event of a failure.
Logical Device Properties
Selecting a logical device and clicking Properties will open a screen
with the following tabs: Logical Drive and Cache Settings.
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Logical Drive
The Logical Drive tab includes the following information:
■
Status—Possible values are quick init, impacted, degraded, failed,
and offline.
■
Array name—This is a modifiable field that displays the name
assigned to this array at creation. You can click in the array
name field and rename the array using any unique combination
of up to 15 standard ASCII characters.
■
Type—The RAID level or volume type of the selected array.
■
Capacity—The physical capacity of the selected array in
Gigabytes with the number of blocks in parenthesis.
■
Stripe Size—Where applicable, the stripe size of the selected
array.
■
Hot spare—Indicates, for redundant arrays, if a hot spare
protects the selected array.
■
Logical drive number—A number assigned to the selected
array by the controller. This number is only used by the
controller.
Viewing and Creating Tasks
The Tasks button has a window which contain two tabs: Task
Viewer and New Task.
Task Viewer
Displays details of current and scheduled tasks for the system or
the selected controller, channel, array or drive.
It is only possible to create tasks for arrays or drives. If you select
Tasks for a channel, controller, or the system, all relevant tasks are
displayed.
When Adaptec Storage Manager is installed, a scheduled task is
created to perform a weekly background consistency check of all
hot spares in the system. This task can be seen by clicking Tasks
when nothing is selected.
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Using Adaptec Storage Manager – Browser Edition
New Tasks
Allows you to create new tasks for an array or a drive. New Tasks
can either be run immediately, or scheduled to run at a later time.
Available tasks are Verify, Verify with Fix, and Clear. Each task is
described below.
■
■
Drive
■
Verify—Performs a test of the entire drive to ensure that
there are no problems. Any bad blocks found are not
repaired.
■
Verify with Fix—Performs a test of the entire drive to ensure
that there are no problems. Any bad blocks found are
repaired.
■
Clear—Erases all data on the drive. Any data previously on
the drive is not recoverable, and if all or part of the drive is
used in an array, data integrity of the array is compromised.
Array
■
Verify—Performs a test of the entire array to ensure that
data is consistent. Any inconsistency found is not repaired.
■
Verify with Fix—Performs a test of the entire array to ensure
that data is consistent. Any inconsistency found is repaired.
■
Clear—Erases all data on the array. Any data previously on
the array is not recoverable.
To create a task:
1 Select the array or drive you want the task to run on.
2 Click Tasks.
3 Select New Tasks.
4 Select the type of task from the drop-down list.
5 Select the priority for the task. The default is High.
6 If you want the task to start immediately, click OK. Or, if you
want to schedule the task for later, select Schedule.
If you select Schedule, additional options will appear that will
allow you to see the day of week and time you want the task to
start, as well as the time format. Once you have selected the
time and day, click OK.
5-25
A
BIOS Utilities
In this Chapter...
What is ARC?
A-1
Using the ACU
A-2
Using SATASelect
A-7
Using the CCU
A-8
Using the SATA Configuration Utility
A-9
Using the Disk Utilities
A-10
What is ARC?
The Adaptec RAID Configuration (ARC) utility is an embedded
BIOS utility that includes:
■
Array Configuration Utility (ACU)—Enables the creation,
configuration, and management of arrays.
■
SATASelect Utility—Enables changing Serial ATA (SATA)
device and controller settings.
■
Controller Configuration Utility (CCU)—Allows you to
modify controller BIOS boot and display options.
■
SATA Configuration Utility—Enables you to modify the SATA
channel interface definitions and SATA device configuration
options.
■
Disk Utilities—For formatting and verifying disks
A-1
BIOS Utilities
To run ARC, press Ctrl+A when prompted by the following
message during the system startup:
Press <Ctrl><A> for Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
If your computer contains two or more Adaptec 1210SA
controllers, a list of controllers is displayed. Use the arrow keys to
select the controller you want to configure and press Enter.
The ARC menu presents the following options:
■
Array Configuration Utility (ACU)
■
SATASelect utility
■
Disk utilities
To highlight an option within ARC, use the arrow keys; to select an
option, press Enter; to return to the previous menu at any time,
press Esc.
Using the ACU
The Array Configuration Utility (ACU) enables you to create, manage,
and delete arrays from the controller’s BIOS, and initialize drives.
Managing Arrays
Use the Manage Arrays option to view array properties and
members, and delete arrays. The following sections describe these
operations in greater detail.
Viewing Array Properties
To view the properties of an existing array:
1 At the BIOS prompt, press Ctrl+A.
2 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility (ACU).
3 From the ACU menu, select Manage Arrays.
4 From the List of Arrays dialog box, select the array you want to
view and press Enter.
The Array Properties dialog box appears, showing detailed
information on the array. The physical disks associated with the
array are displayed here.
5 Press Esc to return to the previous menu.
A-2
BIOS Utilities
Deleting Arrays
!
Caution: Back up the data on an array before you delete it.
Otherwise, all data on the array is lost. Deleted arrays cannot
be restored.
To delete an existing array:
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility (ACU).
3 From the ACU menu, select Manage Arrays.
4 Select the array you wish to delete and press Delete.
5 In the Array Properties dialog box, select Delete and press
Enter. The following prompt is displayed:
Warning!! Do you want to delete the array?(Yes/No):
6 Press Yes to delete the array or No to return to the previous
menu.
7 Press Esc to return to the previous menu.
A-3
BIOS Utilities
Creating Arrays
Before creating arrays, make sure the disks for the array are
connected and installed in your system. Note that disks with no
usable space, or disks that are uninitialized are shown in gray and
cannot be used. See Initializing Disk Drives on page A-6.
To create an array:
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility (ACU).
3 From the ACU menu, select Create Array.
4 Select the disks for the new array and press Insert. To deselect
any disk, highlight the disk and press Delete.
5 Press Enter when both disks for the new array are selected. The
Array Properties menu displays.
Assigning Array Properties
Note: Once the array is created and its properties are assigned,
you cannot change the array properties using the ACU.
Instead, use Adaptec Storage Manager - Browser Edition. (See
Chapter 5 for details.)
To assign properties to the new array:
1 In the Array Properties menu, select an array type and press
Enter. Note that only the available array types, RAID 0 and RAID
1, are displayed. Each of these types requires two drives. (For a
description of the supported array types, see Appendix B.)
2 Type in an optional label for the array and press Enter.
3 For RAID 0, select the desired stripe size. Available stripe sizes
are 16, 32, and 64 KB (default).
Note: Adaptec recommends that you do not change the
default.
A-4
BIOS Utilities
4 Create RAID via allows you to select between the different
creation methods for RAID 0 and RAID 1. The following table
gives examples of when each is appropriate.
RAID
level
Create via
RAID 0
No Init
When appropriate
Creating a RAID 0 on new drives.
Creating a RAID 0 from one new drive and
one drive with data you wish to preserve.
RAID 0
Migrate
RAID 1
Build1
Any time you wish to create a RAID 1, but
especially if you have data on one drive that
you wish to preserve.
RAID 1
Clear
Creating a RAID 1 on new drives, or when
you want to ensure that the array contains
no data after creation.
RAID 1
Quick
Init
Fastest way to create a RAID 1. Appropriate
when using new drives.
1
1 If you select Migrate for RAID 0, or Build for RAID 1, you will be asked to select the
source drive. The contents of the source drive will be preserved. However, the data
on the new drive will be lost.
Notes:
■
Before adding a new drive to an array, back up any data
contained on the new drive. Otherwise, all data will be lost.
■
If you stop the Build or Clear process on a RAID 1 from ACU
you can only restart it from Adaptec Storage Manager Browser Edition. (See Chapter 5 for details.)
■
A RAID 1 created using the Quick Init option may return
some data miscompares if you later run a consistency check.
This is normal and is not a cause for concern.
■
The ACU allows you to use drives of different sizes in a
RAID 1. If you choose the smaller drive as the second drive,
you will be warned about the risk of data loss.
!
Caution: Do not interrupt the creation of a RAID 0 using the
Migrate option. If you do, there is no way to restart, and
no way to recover the data that was on the source drive.
5 When you are finished, press Done.
A-5
BIOS Utilities
Initializing Disk Drives
If an installed disk does not appear in the disk selection list for
creating a new array or if it appears grayed out, you may have to
initialize it before you can use it as part of an array. Drives attached
to the controller must be initialized before they can be used in an
array.
!
Caution: Initializing a disk overwrites the partition table on the
disk and makes any data on the disk inaccessible. If the drive
is used in an array, you may not be able to use the array again.
Do not initialize a disk that is part of a boot array. To
determine which disks are associated with a particular array,
see Viewing Array Properties on page A-2.
To initialize drives:
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 From the ARC menu, select Array Configuration Utility (ACU).
3 Select Initialize Drives.
4 Use the up and down arrow keys to highlight the disk you wish
to initialize and press Insert.
5 Repeat Step 4 so that both drives to be initialized are selected.
6 Press Enter.
7 Read the warning message and ensure that you have selected
the correct disk drives to initialize. Type Y to continue.
A-6
BIOS Utilities
Using SATASelect
The SATASelect utility enables you to change device and controller
settings without opening the system chassis or handling the card.
Starting and Exiting SATASelect
To start SATASelect:
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you
want to configure and press Enter.
3 From the ARC menu, select SATASelect.
The Controller Configuration and SATA Configuration menu
options are displayed.
To exit SATASelect, press Esc until a message prompts you to exit.
(If you changed any settings, you are prompted to save the changes
before you exit.) Choose Yes to exit and reboot the system. Any
changes you made take effect after the system boots.
Using the SATASelect Menus
To select a SATASelect menu option, use the arrow keys to move the
cursor and press Enter.
A-7
BIOS Utilities
Using the CCU
To access the Controller Configuration Utility (CCU):
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you
want to configure and press Enter.
3 From the ARC menu, select SATASelect.
The Controller Configuration and SATA Configuration menu
options are displayed.
4 Select Controller Configuration.
You can modify the following Controller Interface options:
■
Runtime BIOS—Enables or disables the controller’s
runtime BIOS. The BIOS must be enabled if you want to boot
from the controller.
If Runtime BIOS is enabled and the Array-based BBS
Support option is disabled, the controller BIOS is enabled
and will post the first array (or drive) attached to the
controller as a bootable hard disk drive.
The default is Enabled.
■
Array-Based BBS Support—If Runtime BIOS, and this
option are enabled, all devices (array or drives) on each
controller in the system are posted as BBS devices.
In a BBS-enabled system, if array-based BBS support is
enabled, the Hard Drive Boot order menu includes entries
for all arrays (or drives) connected to the installed RAID
controllers.
The default is Enabled.
■
Physical Drives Display during POST— The default is
Disabled.
A-8
BIOS Utilities
Using the SATA Configuration Utility
The SATA Configuration utility enables you to modify the SATA
Channel Interface options and SATA Device Configuration options.
To access the SATA Configuration utility:
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you
want to configure and press Enter.
3 From the ARC menu, select SATASelect.
The Controller Configuration and SATA Configuration menu
options are displayed.
4 Choose SATA Configuration.
5 The Select SATA Channel menu is displayed. Select the
appropriate channel from this menu.
You can modify the following SATA Device Configuration
options:
■
Write Cache—Enables or disables write cache on the drive.
Write cache enabled provides maximum performance.
■
DMA—Enables or disables the use of Direct Memory Access
(DMA) mode for the drive. Enabled provides maximum
performance.
■
SMART—Enables or disables the predictive failure feature
of the disk drive. When enabled the SMART status of the
drive (Healthy or Failed) will be displayed along with the
physical drive display during POST. If the drive does not
support SMART the SMART status is not displayed.
■
Allow Read Ahead—Enables or disables the read ahead
cache algorithm on the drive. Enabled provides maximum
performance under most circumstances.
Default setting for all options is Enabled.
A-9
BIOS Utilities
Using the Disk Utilities
The Disk Utilities enable you to low-level format or verify the
media of your Serial ATA hard disks.
To access the disk utilities:
1 Turn on your computer and press Ctrl+A when prompted to
access the ARC utility.
2 If multiple controllers are installed, select the controller you
want to configure and press Enter.
3 From the ARC menu, select Disk Utilities.
4 Select the desired disk and press Enter.
You are offered the following options:
■
Format Disk—Simulates a format of the hard drive by
writing zeros to the entire disk.
Serial ATA drives are formatted at the factory and do not
need to be formatted again.
!
■
Caution: Formatting destroys all data on the drive. Be
sure to back up your data before performing this
operation.
Verify Disk Media—Scans the media of a disk drive for
defects. Any errors found are corrected.
A-10
B
Supported RAID Types
RAID is an acronym for Redundant Array of Independent Disks.
The goal of RAID is to provide better performance and reliability
from combinations of disk drives than possible with the same total
storage space without RAID.
When creating RAIDs, select drives of equal capacity and
performance. Otherwise, the RAID tends to be limited in capacity
and performance to that of the smallest and slowest drive.
The Adaptec 1210SA supports up to two drives; therefore, only
RAID 0 and RAID 1 arrays are supported. These array types are
described below.
In addition to RAID capability, the Adaptec 1210SA supports a
simple volume configuration, which consists of a single drive that
is not part of an array. Such a drive is automatically configured as a
simple volume. The controller supports up to two simple volumes.
B-1
Supported RAID Types
RAID 0
A RAID 0 is created by striping data across two or more disk drives.
This striping scheme creates no redundancy to protect the data.
However, because the drives share load equally, RAID 0 provides the
best read and write performance of any RAID type.
RAID-0
RAID 1
Data 0
Data 1
Data 0
Data 0
Data 2
Data 3
Data 1
Data 1
Data 4
Data 5
Data 2
Data 2
Data 6
Data 7
Data 3
Data 3
RAID 1
A RAID 1 array is created by copying, or mirroring, all data from one
drive onto a second drive. This mirroring provides redundancy,
ensuring that if one drive fails no data is lost. Redundancy also
means that only half of the total capacity is available.
RAID 1 offers no write performance advantage over a simple
volume configuration. However, because the drives share read load
equally, RAID 1 provides improved read performance.
B-2
C
Specifications
DC Power Requirements
Voltage
5 V ± 10%
Ripple and noise
50 mV peak-to-peak maximum
Current Requirements
Adaptec 1210SA
1 A maximum
Environmental Specifications
Ambient temperature
0 °C to 50 ° C
Relative humidity
10% to 90%, noncondensing
Altitude
up to 3,000 meters
Note: Forced airflow is recommended, but not required.
C-1
Glossary
A
activity
See task.
ACU
Array Configuration Utility. An application used to create, configure,
and manage arrays from the controller’s BIOS or MS-DOS.
array
A logical disk created from available space and made up of one or
more segments on one or more physical disks. Arrays are typically
used to provide data redundancy or enhanced I/O performance.
See also container, segment, volume, spanned volume, RAID 0, RAID 1.
Also known as a container.
array initialization
See initialize.
ATA
AT Bus Attachment. Standard parallel interface to IDE hard disks
typically used in desktop computers and some entry-level servers.
Serial ATA (SATA), is a successor to parallel ATA, which is
sometimes referred to as PATA.
available space/segment
Unused space on an initialized disk from which logical devices
(arrays) are created. When an array is deleted, the space that it used
is returned to the available space pool.
Glossary-1
Glossary
B
bad segment
Segment that is in an unknown state.
background consistency check
Option that forces the controller to constantly check all portions of
disks used by all arrays to see if the disks can return data from the
blocks. See also consistency check command.
bootable array
Array configured as the boot device.
build
Background initialization of a redundant array. The array is
accessible throughout. RAID 1 copies the contents of the primary
drive to a secondary drive. See also clear.
bus
See channel.
C
cache
Fast-access memory on the controller that serves as intermediate
storage for data that is read from, or written to, drives.
capacity
Total usable space available in megabytes or gigabytes.
channel
Any path, or bus, used for the transfer of data and the control of
information between storage devices and a RAID controller. For
Serial ATA channels, each channel has a single drive capacity.
chunk
See stripe.
Glossary-2
Glossary
clear
Foreground initialization of a fault-tolerant array. A clear operation
zeros all blocks of the array. The array is not accessible until the
clear task is complete.
concatenation
Joining of physical or logical drives in sequential order.
consistency check command
Command that reads all the blocks of a RAID 1 to determine if the
blocks are consistent. Any inconsistent blocks are fixed.
container
See array.
D
dead partition
See failed.
dedicated hot spare
Component that can take the place of a failed component only on
the fault-tolerant array to which it is explicitly assigned.
degraded
A redundant (for example, a RAID 1) array in which one or more
members have failed. The data is intact but redundancy has been
compromised. Any further failure would cause the array to fail and
result in data loss.
dirty data
Data that has been written to a cache but which has not been
“flushed” out to its final destination.
disk
Physical disk drive. Randomly accessible, re-writable data storage
device. Also called hard disk.
Glossary-3
Glossary
disk ID
Unique disk identifier that consists of the channel number, SATA
ID. For example, (channel:ID:LUN) 1:04:0. See also channel.
drive LED
Disk indicator LED that illuminates during read or write
operations.
E
event
Notification or alert from the system, indicating that a change has
occurred.
event log
File used to maintain information about prior controller activities
or errors.
event notification
Process for transmitting events.
F
failed
State of a non-redundant array that has suffered a single drive
failure, or a redundant array that has suffered multiple drive
failures. A failed array is inaccessible and data is lost.
failed segment
A segment that is no longer usable by an array because it is either
logically bad and therefore no longer needed, or physically
damaged.
fault-tolerant array
Refers to an array that can continue to function after a disk drive
failure without loss of data. Fault tolerant, or redundant arrays,
include RAID 1 arrays. See also Redundant.
Glossary-4
Glossary
foreign disk
Disk that has previously been initialized on another Adaptec RAID
controller. The RAID signature on the disk allows the RAID
controller to identify whether or not the disk was initialized on the
controller it is currently connected to.
H
hard disk drive
Basic unit of nonvolatile, nonremovable, magnetic storage media.
See also disk.
hot swap
To remove a component from a system and install a new
component while the power is on and the system is running.
I
impacted
An impacted array is one which has been created but for some
reason the initial build operation did not complete. All member
drives are present and operational, and all data written to the array
is protected. To optimize the array, run a Verify with Fix Task.
initialize
Process of preparing a disk for use by the controller. When a disk is
initialized, the controller records the RAID signature on the disk.
initialized array
An array that is ready for data reads and writes. Arrays can be
initialized by build or clear.
L
legacy disk
Disk that contained a valid partition table when connected to the
controller. The controller manages the disk as a legacy disk array
where there is a one-to-one logical-to-physical mapping of array to
disk.
Glossary-5
Glossary
logical device
Volume comprised of space from one or more physical drives and
presented to the operating system as if it were a single storage unit.
low-level format
Process performed by the drive firmware that completely cleans
any data off the hard disk.
M
migration
See reconfiguration.
mirrored array/mirroring
See RAID 1.
monitoring
Process of receiving, displaying, and logging system events.
O
offline array
Array that can no longer be accessed.
optimal
The state of an array when it is fully operational. For redundant
arrays, the entire array is protected.
P
partition
See segment.
phantom object
Object that represents a component that cannot be configured by
the controller management software; for example, a missing drive.
Glossary-6
Glossary
Q
quick init
An array initialized using the Quick Init option is available
immediately, with no on-going background controller activity. All
data written to an array that has been quick initialized is protected.
R
RAID
Redundant Array of Independent Disks (alternative definition
Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks).
RAID 0
A single-level array consisting of two or more equal-sized segments
residing on different disks. RAID 0 distributes data evenly across
its respective drives in equal-sized sections called stripes. RAID 0
arrays are not redundant.
RAID 1
Single-level array consisting of two equal segments residing on
two different drives. Provides redundancy by storing identical
copies on two drives.
See also mirrored array/mirroring.
RAID signature
The area on each disk reserved for use by the RAID controller.
RAID volume
Concatenates two or more arrays of the same type.
rebuild
Background regeneration of redundant data on a RAID 1.
reconfiguration
Process of expanding an array or migrating an array from one
RAID type to another; changing the stripe size of a RAID 0, or
moving a logical device’s segments to other disks.
Glossary-7
Glossary
redundant
The ability of an array to maintain operability when one or more
hardware failures occur. RAID 1 is redundant. In the event of a
drive failure, redundant arrays can be restored to normal operation
by replacing the failed drive and rebuilding the array.
rescan
Process of updating the current screen to show all currently
available resources.
S
segment
Reserved area on a physical disk that is a by-product of array
creation or fault-tolerant array operation. In other words, when the
software creates an array, it automatically converts space into
segments. A segment is always part of a logical device and cannot
be used by more than one logical device at a time.
Serial ATA (SATA)
A successor to ATA that uses a serial, instead of parallel, interface.
simple volume
A volume made up of disk space from a single disk. It can consist
of a single region on a disk or concatenated, multiple regions of the
same disk.
single-level array
Array created from one or more segments. See also volume, spanned
volume, RAID 0, RAID 1.
snapshot
Instantaneous read-only copy of an array at a precise point in time.
spanned volume
A simple volume that spans two or more drives.
Glossary-8
Glossary
stripe
Contiguous set of data distributed across all the disks in an array. A
striped array distributes data evenly across all members in equalsized sections called stripes.
stripe size
The amount of data in each section of a striped array.
striped array
See RAID 0.
T
task
An operation that occurs only on the RAID controller,
asynchronous to all other operations; for example, initializing a
disk or verifying an array. Some tasks can take an extended period
of time, particularly if the RAID controller is also performing
intensive data I/O while the task is running.
V
verify
Low-level check that a drive, logical device, or hot spare is good. In
a RAID 1, verify is a low-level check that contents of both members’
segments are consistent and, optionally, corrects errors while
assuming that the master drive is correct. In a simple volume, verify
performs a low-level check that the whole drive can be read.
volume
See simple volume, spanned volume.
Glossary-9
R
Adaptec, Inc.
691 South Milpitas Boulevard
Milpitas, CA 95035 USA
©2003 Adaptec, Inc.
All rights reserved. Adaptec and the Adaptec logo
are trademarks of Adaptec, Inc. which may be
registered in some jurisdictions.
Part Number: 513587-06, Ver. AB JG 05/03