Classe Audio CA-M400 - MANUEL 2 User`s manual

User’s Manual
PORTÉGÉ M400
PMR300132EN0
PMR300132EN0
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Copyright
© 2006 by TOSHIBA Corporation. All rights reserved. Under the copyright
laws, this manual cannot be reproduced in any form without the prior
written permission of TOSHIBA. No patent liability is assumed, with respect
to the use of the information contained herein.
TOSHIBA PORTÉGÉ M400 Portable Personal Computer User’s Manual
First edition February 2006
Copyright authority for music, movies, computer programs, data bases and
other intellectual property covered by copyright laws belongs to the author
or to the copyright owner. Copyrighted material can be reproduced only for
personal use or use within the home. Any other use beyond that stipulated
above (including conversion to digital format, alteration, transfer of copied
material and distribution on a network) without the permission of the
copyright owner is a violation of copyright or author’s rights and is subject
to civil damages or criminal action. Please comply with copyright laws in
making any reproduction from this manual.
Disclaimer
This manual has been validated and reviewed for accuracy. The
instructions and descriptions it contains are accurate for the TOSHIBA
PORTÉGÉ M400 Portable Personal Computer at the time of this manual’s
production. However, succeeding computers and manuals are subject to
change without notice. TOSHIBA assumes no liability for damages incurred
directly or indirectly from errors, omissions or discrepancies between the
computer and the manual.
Trademarks
IBM is a registered trademark and IBM PC is a trademark of International
Business Machines Corporation.
Intel, Intel SpeedStep, Intel Core and Centrino are trademarks or registered
trademarks of Intel Corporation.
Windows and Microsoft are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Photo CD is a trademark of Eastman Kodak.
Sonic RecordNow! is a registered trademark of Sonic Solutions.
Bluetooth is a trademark owned by its proprietor and used by TOSHIBA
under license.
i.LINK is trademark and registered trademark of Sony Corporation.
InterVideo and WinDVD are registered trademarks of InterVideo Inc.
WinDVD Creator is trademark of InterVideo Inc.
Other trademarks and registered trademarks not listed above may be used
in this manual.
User’s Manual
ii
PORTÉGÉ M400
EU Declaration of Conformity
This product is labelled with the CE Mark in accordance with the related
European Directives, notably Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive
89/336/EEC for the notebook and the electronic accessories including the
supplied power adapter, the Radio Equipment and Telecommunications
Terminal Equipment Directive 99/5/EC in case of implemented
telecommunication accessories and the Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC
for the supplied power adapter.
CE Marking is the responsibility of TOSHIBA EUROPE GmbH,
Hammfelddamm 8,
41460 Neuss, Germany, phone +49-(0)-2131-158-01.
For a copy of the related CE Declaration of Conformity please refer to the
following website: http://epps.toshiba-teg.com.
This product and the supplied accessories are designed to observe the
related EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) and safety standards.
However, TOSHIBA cannot guarantee that this product still observes these
EMC standards if accessories or cables not manufactured / distributed by
TOSHIBA are connected or implemented. To avoid EMC problems in
general, the following advice should be observed:
■ Only CE marked accessories should be connected / implemented.
■ Only best shielded cables should be connected.
Working environment
This product was designed to fulfill the EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility)
requirements for "residential, commercial and light industry environments".
The following environments are not approved:
■ Industrial Environments (e.g. environments with a mains
voltage of 380V).
In the following environments the use of this product can be restricted:
■ Medical Environments: This product is not certified as a medical
product according to the Medical Product Directive 93/42/EEC, but
can be used in office areas where the use is not restricted. Please
disable the wireless LAN or Bluetooth hardware in such areas as
long this feature is not official supported by the operator of the
related medical facility.
■ Vehicle Environments: Please read the operator’s manual of the
vehicle manufacturer for further restrictions of use.
■ Aircraft Environments: Please follow the advice of the flight
personnel regarding restrictions of use.
User’s Manual
iii
PORTÉGÉ M400
Any consequences resulting from the use of this product in working
environments that are not approved or the use is restricted are not the
responsibility of TOSHIBA Corporation. The consequences of the use of
this product in those working environments may be:
■ Interference with other devices or machines in the nearby
surrounding area
■ Malfunction of or data loss from this product caused by disturbances
generated by other devices or machines in the nearby surrounding
area
Furthermore, for general safety reasons, the use of this product in
environments with explosive atmospheres is not permitted.
Modem warning notice
Conformity Statement
The equipment has been approved to [Commission Decision "CTR21"] for
pan-European single terminal connection to the Public Switched Telephone
Network (PSTN).
However, due to differences between the individual PSTNs provided in
different countries/regions the approval does not, of itself, give an
unconditional assurance of successful operation on every PSTN network
termination point.
In the event of problems, you should contact your equipment supplier in the
first instance.
Network Compatibility Statement
This product is designed to work with, and is compatible with the following
networks. It has been tested to and found to conform with the additional
requirements conditional in EG 201 121.
Germany
Greece
Portugal
Spain
Switzerland
All other
countries/regions
ATAAB AN005,AN006,AN007,AN009,AN010 and
DE03,04,05,08,09,12,14,17
ATAAB AN005,AN006 and GR01,02,03,04
ATAAB AN001,005,006,007,011 and
P03,04,08,10
ATAAB AN005,007,012, and ES01
ATAAB AN002
ATAAB AN003,004
Specific switch settings or software setup are required for each network,
please refer to the relevant sections of the user guide for more details.
The hookflash (timed break register recall) function is subject to separate
national type approvals. It has not been tested for conformity to national
type regulations, and no guarantee of successful operation of that specific
function on specific national networks can be given.
User’s Manual
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Description on Laser specification
The optical drive, such as a DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive or DVD Super
Multi drive, that is used in this computer is equipped with a laser device.
A classification label with the following sentence is affixed to the surface of
the drive.
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
LASER KLASSE 1
LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE
APPAREIL A LASER DE CLASSE 1
KLASS 1 LASER APPARAT
The drive with the above label is certified by the manufacturer that the drive
complies with the requirement for laser product on the date of
manufacturing pursuant to article 21 of Code of Federal Regulations by the
United States of America, Department of Health & Human Services, Food
and Drug Administration.
In other countries, the drive is certified to comply with the requirement
pursuant to IEC 825 and EN60825 on class 1 laser product.
Depending on model, this computer is equipped with one of the optical
drives from the following list:
User’s Manual
Manufacturer
Type
MATSUSHITA
UJDA765
MATSUSHITA
UJ-822
MATSUSHITA
UJ-842
v
Preface
Congratulations on your purchase of the PORTÉGÉ M400 computer. This
powerful notebook computer provides excellent expansion capability,
including multimedia devices, and it is designed to provide years of reliable,
high-performance computing.
This manual tells how to set up and begin using your PORTÉGÉ M400
computer. It also provides detailed information on configuring your
computer, basic operations and care, using optional devices and
troubleshooting.
If you are a new user of computers or if you’re new to portable computing,
first read over the Introduction and The Grand Tour chapters to familiarize
yourself with the computer’s features, components and accessory devices.
Then read Getting Started for step-by-step instructions on setting up your
computer.
If you are an experienced computer user, please continue reading the
preface to learn how this manual is organized, then become acquainted
with this manual by browsing through its pages. Be sure to look over the
Special features section of the Introduction, to learn about features that are
uncommon or unique to the computer and carefully read HW Setup.
If you are going to install PC cards or connect external devices such as a
monitor, be sure to read Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Manual contents
This manual is made up of the following.
Chapter 1, Introduction, is an overview of the computer’s features,
capabilities, and options.
Chapter 2, The Grand Tour, identifies the components of the computer and
briefly explains how they function.
Chapter 3, Getting Started, provides a quick overview of how to begin
operating your computer and gives tips on safety and designing your work
area.
Chapter 4, Operating Basics, This chapter describes the basic operations
of your computer and precautions when using it, as well as the handling of
CD/DVD.
Chapter 5, The Keyboard, describes special keyboard functions including
the keypad overlay and hot keys.
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes, gives details on the computer’s
power resources and battery save modes and how to set a password.
Chapter 7, HW Setup, explains how to configure the computer using the
HW Setup program and TPM.
Chapter 8, Optional Devices, describes the optional hardware available.
Chapter 9, Troubleshooting, provides helpful information on how to perform
some diagnostic tests, and suggests courses of action if the computer
doesn’t seem to be working properly.
Chapter 10, Legal Footnotes, provides Legal Footnotes information related
to your computer.
The Appendixes provide technical information about your computer.
The Glossary defines general computer terminology and includes a list of
acronyms used in the text.
The Index quickly directs you to the information contained in this manual.
Conventions
This manual uses the following formats to describe, identify, and highlight
terms and operating procedures.
Abbreviations
On first appearance, and whenever necessary for clarity, abbreviations are
enclosed in parentheses following their definition. For example: Read Only
Memory (ROM). Acronyms are also defined in the Glossary.
Icons
Icons identify ports, dials, and other parts of your computer. The indicator
panel also uses icons to identify the components it is providing information
on.
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Keys
The keyboard keys are used in the text to describe many computer
operations. A distinctive typeface identifies the key top symbols as they
appear on the keyboard. For example, Enter identifies the Enter key.
Key operation
Some operations require you to simultaneously use two or more keys. We
identify such operations by the key top symbols separated by a plus sign
(+). For example, Ctrl + C means you must hold down Ctrl and at the same
time press C. If three keys are used, hold down the first two and at the
same time press the third.
ABC
When procedures require an action such as
clicking an icon or entering text, the icon’s name
or the text you are to type in is represented in the
type face you see to the left.
Display
S
User’s Manual
ABC
Names of windows or icons or text generated by
the computer that appear on its display screen
are presented in the type face you see to the left.
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Messages
Messages are used in this manual to bring important information to your
attention. Each type of message is identified as shown below.
Pay attention! A caution informs you that improper use of equipment or
failure to follow instructions may cause data loss or damage your
equipment.
Please read. A note is a hint or advice that helps you make best use of
your equipment.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which could result in death or
serious injury, if you do not follow instructions.
User’s Manual
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PORTÉGÉ M400
User’s Manual
x
General Precautions
TOSHIBA computers are designed to optimize safety, minimize strain and
withstand the rigors of portability. However, certain precautions should be
observed to further reduce the risk of personal injury or damage to the
computer.
Be certain to read the general precautions below and to note the cautions
included in the text of the manual.
Stress injury
Carefully read the Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort. It contains
information on prevention of stress injuries to your hands and wrists than
can be caused by extensive keyboard use. Chapter 3, Getting Started, also
includes information on work space design, posture and lighting that can
help reduce physical stress.
Heat injury
■ Avoid prolonged physical contact with the computer. If the computer is
used for long periods, its surface can become very warm. While the
temperature will not feel hot to the touch, if you maintain physical
contact with the computer for a long time (if you rest the computer on
your lap, or if you keep your hands on the palm rest, for example) your
skin might suffer low-heat injury.
■ If the computer has been used for a long time, avoid direct contact with
the metal plate supporting the I/O ports. It can become hot.
■ The surface of the AC adaptor can become hot when in use. This
condition does not indicate a malfunction. If you need to transport the
AC adaptor, disconnect it and let it cool before moving it.
■ Do not lay the AC adaptor on a material that is sensitive to heat. The
material could be damaged.
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Pressure or impact damage
Do not apply heavy pressure to the computer or subject it to strong impact.
Excessive pressure or impact can cause damage to computer components
or otherwise cause malfunctions.
PC card overheating
Some PC cards can become hot with prolonged use. Overheating of a PC
card can result in errors or instability in the PC card operation. Also be
careful when you remove a PC card that has been used for a long time.
Mobile phones
Use of mobile phones can interfere with the audio system. Computer
operation is not impaired but it is recommended that a distance of 30 cm be
maintained between the computer and a mobile phone in use.
User’s Manual
xii
Table of Contents
Preface
General Precautions
Chapter 1
Introduction
Equipment checklist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Special features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Utilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17
Chapter 2
The Grand Tour
Front with the display closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Left side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Right side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Back side. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Underside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Front with the display open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
System indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Keyboard indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
USB floppy disk drive (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
Optical media drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
AC adaptor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Chapter 3
Getting Started
Setting up your work space. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Operating the computer in Tablet mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Connecting the AC adaptor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Opening the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Turning on the power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Starting up for the first time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Turning off the power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Restarting the computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Restoring your preinstalled software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Chapter 4
Operating Basics
Using the Touch Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Using the Tablet PC Pen and Reserve Pen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Changing to the Tablet mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Changing the screen orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Using Accelerometer Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Changing to the laptop mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Using the Fingerprint Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Using the USB floppy disk drive (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20
Changing Ultra Slim Bay modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Using optical media drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23
Writing CDs on DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Super Multi drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
Media care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38
Sound System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-39
Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-41
Wireless communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44
LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48
Cleaning the computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49
Moving the computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-50
Using the Hard Disk Drive (HDD) Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-51
Heat dispersal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-53
Chapter 5
The Keyboard
Typewriter keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Function keys: F1 … F12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soft keys: Fn key combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows special keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keypad overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating ASCII characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 6
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-3
5-7
5-7
5-9
Power and Power-Up Modes
Power conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Power indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Battery types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Care and use of the battery pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Replacing the battery pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
TOSHIBA Password Utility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
Tablet mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Power-up modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Panel power on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
System Auto Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
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PORTÉGÉ M400
Chapter 7
HW Setup
Accessing HW Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
HW Setup window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Configuring the Execute-Disable Bit Capability and TPM . . . . . . . . 7-8
Chapter 8
Optional Devices
PC card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Bridge media slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Memory expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Battery Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
Universal AC Adaptor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
Slice Expansion Battery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Battery Charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
HDD Kit (Serial-ATA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Ultra Slim Bay HDD Adaptor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
USB FDD Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
Tablet PC Pen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
Reserve Pen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
External monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21
i.LINK (IEEE1394) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-23
Security lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24
Chapter 9
Troubleshooting
Problem solving process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Hardware and system checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
TOSHIBA support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-20
Chapter 10
Legal Footnotes
CPU*1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory (Main System)*2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Life*3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HDD Drive Capacity*4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LCD*5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Graphics Processor Unit ("GPU")*6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wireless LAN*7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-applicable Icons*8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy Protection*9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Images*10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A
10-1
10-2
10-2
10-2
10-3
10-3
10-3
10-3
10-3
10-3
Specifications
Physical Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Appendix B
Display Controller and Modes
Display controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Video modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
User’s Manual
xv
PORTÉGÉ M400
Appendix C
Wireless LAN
Card Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Radio Characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Supported Frequency Sub-bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Appendix D
TOSHIBA RAID
Windows Manual Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2
Starting, Modifying and Ending the BIOS Setup Program . . . . . . . . D-4
Appendix E
Bluetooth wireless technology Interoperability
Bluetooth wireless technology and your Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3
Regulatory statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3
Appendix F
AC Power Cord and Connectors
Certification agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1
Appendix G
TOSHIBA Anti-theft Protection Timer
Appendix H
If your computer is stolen
Glossary
Index
User’s Manual
xvi
Chapter 1
Introduction
This chapter provides an equipment checklist, and it identifies the
computer’s features, options and accessories.
Some of the features described in this manual may not function properly if
you use an operating system that was not preinstalled by TOSHIBA.
Equipment checklist
Carefully unpack your computer. Save the box and packing materials for
future use.
Hardware
Check to make sure you have all the following items:
■ PORTÉGÉ M400 Portable Personal Computer
■ AC adaptor and power cord (2-pin plug or 3-pin plug)
■ Tablet PC Pen
■ Reserve Pen (Provided with some models)
■ The Tablet PC Pen is included in the accessory tray of the product
when purchased together with spare pen tips and a tip removal tool.
■ For some models, a Reserve Pen is also included in the accessory tray
of the product when purchased.
User’s Manual
1-1
Introduction
Software
Microsoft ® Windows XP Tablet PC Edition
■ The following software is preinstalled:
■ Microsoft® Windows XP Tablet PC Edition
■ Microsoft Internet Explorer
■ TOSHIBA Utilities
■ TOSHIBA SD Memory Boot Utility
■ DVD Video Player
■ TOSHIBA TouchPad On/Off Utility
■ TOSHIBA Power Saver
■ TOSHIBA Mobile Extension
■ TOSHIBA Assist
■ TOSHIBA ConfigFree
■ TOSHIBA Zooming Utility
■ TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool
■ TOSHIBA Controls
■ TOSHIBA Mic Effect
■ TOSHIBA Password Utility
■ TOSHIBA Rotation Utility
■ TOSHIBA Accelerometer Utilities
■ TOSHIBA Tablet Access Code Logon Utility
■ Fingerprint utility
■ TOSHIBA Wireless Key Logon
■ Online manual
■ Product Recovery DVD-ROM
Documentation
■ PORTÉGÉ M400 Portable Personal Computer User's Manual
■ PORTÉGÉ M400 Quickstart
■ Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition Getting Started manual
■ Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort
■ Warranty information
If any of the items are missing or damaged, contact your dealer
immediately.
User’s Manual
1-2
Introduction
Features
The computer uses TOSHIBA’s advanced Large Scale Integration (LSI),
Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology
extensively to provide compact size, minimum weight, low power usage,
and high reliability. This computer incorporates the following features and
benefits:
Processor
Built-in
The computer is equipped with one of the
following Intel® processors.
Intel® Core™ Duo Processor, which incorporates
a 2MB level2 cache memory. It also supports
Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep® Technology.
Intel® Core™ Solo Processor, which incorporates
a 2MB level2 cache memory. It also supports
Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep® Technology.
Some models in the range are equipped with Intel ® Centrino ® Duo Mobile
Technology, which is based on three separate technologies of Intel ®
Core™ Duo processor, Intel ® PRO/Wireless Network Connection, and
Mobile Intel ® 945 Express Chipset Family.
In addition, some models in the range are equipped with Intel ® Centrino ®
Mobile Technology, which is based on three separate technologies of
Intel® Core™ Solo processor, Intel ® PRO/Wireless Network Connection,
and Mobile Intel® 945 Express Chipset Family.
Legal Footnote (CPU)*1
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding CPU, please refer to
the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
Memory
Slots
256, 512, 1,024 or 2,048 MB memory modules
can be installed in the two memory slots for a
maximum of 4,096 MB system memory.
Video RAM
A maximum of 128 MB of RAM is provided for
video display, with part of the main system
memory being used for Video RAM.
Legal Footnote (Memory (Main System))*2
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding Memory
(Main System), please refer to the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
User’s Manual
1-3
Introduction
Power
Battery pack
The computer is powered by one rechargeable
lithium-ion battery pack.
Slice Expansion
Battery
This battery pack increases your computer's
operating time when main battery pack is also
installed.
Legal Footnote (Battery Life)*3
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding Battery Life, please
refer to the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
RTC battery
The internal RTC battery backs up the Real Time
Clock (RTC) and calendar.
AC adaptor
The AC adaptor provides power to the system
and recharges the batteries when they are low.
It comes with a detachable power cord which will
either have a 2-pin or 3-pin plug enclosure.
Because it is universal, it can receive a range of
AC voltage from 100 to 240 volts; however, the
output current varies among different models.
Using the wrong model can damage your
computer. Refer to the AC adaptor section in
Chapter 2, The Grand Tour.
Disks
Hard disk drive
Available in five sizes.
■ 40.0 billion bytes (37.26 GB)
■ 60.0 billion bytes (55.89 GB)
■ 80.0 billion bytes (74.53 GB)
■ 100.0 billion bytes (93.16 GB)
■ 120.0 billion bytes (111.79 GB)
Part of the space in the hard disk drive is
reserved as administration space.
Legal Footnote (Hard Disk Drive Capacity)*4
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding HDD Drive
Capacity, please refer to the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
User’s Manual
1-4
Introduction
Optical media drive
Computers in this series can be configured with an optical media drive
installed in the Ultra Slim Bay. The available optical media drives are
described below.
User’s Manual
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW
drive
Some models are equipped with a full-size,
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive module that lets you
run CD/DVDs without using an adaptor. It reads
DVD-ROMs at maximum 8 speed and CD-ROMs
at maximum 24 speed. It writes CD-Rs at
maximum 24 speed and CD-RWs at maximum
24 speed. The drive supports the following
formats:
■ CD-R
■ CD-RW
■ DVD-ROM
■ DVD-Video
■ CD-DA
■ CD-Text
■ Photo CD™ (single/multi-session)
■ CD-ROM Mode 1, Mode 2
■ CD-ROM XA Mode 2 (Form1, Form2)
■ Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
■ Addressing Method 2
DVD Super Multi
drive
Some models are equipped with a full-size DVD
Super Multi drive module that lets you record
data to rewritable CD/DVDs as well as run either
12cm (4.72") or 8cm (3.15") CD/DVDs without
using an adaptor. It reads DVD-ROMs at
maximum 8 speed and CD-ROMs at maximum
24 speed. It writes CD-Rs at maximum 24 speed,
CD-RWs at maximum 10 speed, DVD-Rs and
DVD-RWs at maximum 2 speed, DVD+Rs and
DVD+RWs at maximum 2.4 speed and
DVD-RAM at maximum 2 speed. This drive
supports the following formats in addition to the
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive.
■ DVD-R
■ DVD-RW
■ DVD+R
■ DVD+RW
■ DVD-RAM
1-5
Introduction
DVD Super Multi
drive Double Layer
This computer is equipped with a full-size DVD
Super Multi drive module that lets you record
data to rewritable CD/DVDs as well as run 12cm
(4.72") or 8cm (3.15") CD/DVDs. It reads
DVD-ROMs at maximum 8 speed and CD-ROMs
at maximum 24 speed. It writes CD-Rs at up to
24 speed, CD-RWs at up to 16 speed, DVD-Rs
and DVD+Rs at up to 8 speed, DVD-RWs and
DVD+RWs at up to 4 speed, DVD-R DL at up to
2 speed, DVD+R DL at up to 2.4 speed and
DVD-RAM at maximum 3 speed. This drive
supports the following formats in addition to the
DVD Super Multi drive.
■ DVD+R DL
■ DVD-R DL
Display
The computer’s LCD display panel supports high-resolution video graphics.
The LCD screen can be set at a wide range of viewing angles for maximum
comfort and readability.
Built-in
12.1" TFT LCD screen, 16 million colors, with
one of the following resolutions:
■ XGA, 1024 horizontal × 768 vertical pixels
■ SXGA+, 1400 horizontal × 1050 vertical
pixels
Legal Footnote (LCD)*5
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding LCD, please refer to
the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
Graphics controller
The graphics controller maximizes display
performance. Refer to Display Controller and
Modes section in Appendix B for more
information.
Legal Footnote (Graphics Processor Unit ("GPU"))*6
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding Graphics Processor
Unit ("GPU"), please refer to the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
Keyboard
Built-in
User’s Manual
84 keys or 85 keys, compatible with IBM®
enhanced keyboard, embedded numeric overlay,
dedicated cursor control,
and
keys.
Refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard, for details.
1-6
Introduction
Pointing Device
Built-in Touch Pad
A Touch Pad and control buttons in the palm rest
enable control of the on-screen pointer and
scrolling of windows.
Tablet PC Pen
A pen enables data entry directly through the
display screen.
Reserve Pen
Some models in the range include a separate
Reserve Pen which can be used for data entry in
the event that the main Tablet PC Pen is lost or
damaged.
Ports
External monitor
Analog VGA port supports VESA DDC2B
compatible functions.
Universal Serial Bus
(USB 2.0)
The computer has Universal Serial Bus ports that
comply with the USB 2.0 standard.
Docking
This port enables connection of an optional
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator described in
the Options section.
i.LINK™ (IEEE 1394)
This port enables high-speed data transfer
directly from external devices such as digital
video cameras.
Slots
PC card
The PC card slot accommodates a Type II card.
Bridge media
This slot lets you insert SD card, Memory Stick
(Pro), xD picture card and SDIO card devices.
Refer to Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Multimedia
User’s Manual
Sound system
The Windows sound system compatible sound
system provides output to internal speakers and
input from two internal microphones as well as
supports jacks for an external microphone and
headphones.
Headphone jack
A 3.5 mm mini headphone jack enables
connection of stereo headphones.
Microphone jack
A 3.5 mm mini microphone jack enables
connection of a three-conductor mini jack for
monaural microphone input.
1-7
Introduction
Communications
User’s Manual
Modem
An internal modem provides capability for data
and fax communication. It supports V.90 (V.92).
The speed of data transfer and fax depends on
analog telephone line conditions. It has a modem
jack for connecting to a telephone line. Both of
V.90 and V.92 are supported only in USA,
Canada, UK, France, Germany and Australia.
Only V.90 is available in other regions.
LAN
The computer has built-in support for Ethernet
LAN (10 megabits per second, 10BASE-T),
Fast Ethernet LAN (100 megabits per second,
100BASE-TX) and Gigabit Ethernet LAN
(1000 megabits per second, 1000BASE-T).
Bluetooth
Some computers in this series are equipped with
Bluetooth functions. Bluetooth wireless
technology eliminates the need for cables
between electronic devices such as computers
and printers. Bluetooth provides fast, reliable,
and secure wireless communication in a small
space.
Wireless LAN
Some computers in this series are equipped with
a Wireless LAN card that is compatible with other
LAN systems based on Direct Sequence Spread
Spectrum/Orthogonal Frequency Division
Multiplexing radio technology that complies with
the IEEE 802.11 Standard (Revision A, B or G).
■ Theoretical maximum speed: 54Mbps
(IEEE802.11a, 802.11g).
■ Theoretical maximum speed: 11Mbps
(IEEE802.11b).
■ Frequency Channel Selection (5 GHz:
Revision A / 2.4 GHz: Revision B/G).
■ Roaming over multiple channels.
■ Card Power Management.
■ Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) data
encryption, based on 128 bit encryption
algorithm.
■ Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA).
■ Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) data
encryption.
■ Wake-up on Wireless LAN.
1-8
Introduction
■ The values shown above are the theoretical maximums for Wireless
LAN standards. The actual values may differ.
■ The transmission speed over the Wireless LAN and the distance over
which Wireless LAN can reach may vary depending on surrounding
electromagnetic environment, obstacles, access point design and
configuration, and client design and software/hardware configurations.
The transmission rate described is the theoretical maximum speed as
specified under the appropriate standard - the actual transmission
speed will be lower than the theoretical maximum speed.
Legal Footnote (Wireless LAN)*7
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding Wireless LAN,
please refer to the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10.
Wireless
communication
switch
This switch turns the Wireless LAN and
Bluetooth functions on and off.
Ultra Slim Bay
Ultra Slim Bay
Modules
The Ultra Slim Bay is a single-drive bay that
accommodates either a DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW
drive, DVD Super Multi drive or a secondary hard
disk drive. The TOSHIBA Mobile Extension utility
enables the hot insertion of these modules when
you are using a plug and play operating system.
Security
User’s Manual
Security lock slot
Allows the connection of a security lock to anchor
the computer to a desk or other large object.
Ultra Slim Bay latch
The Ultra Slim Bay module is secured into the
computer when the Ultra Slim Bay latch is in its
locked position. In addition, removal of the
module can be prevented by securing the latch in
its locked position with a 'lock screw' (this 'lock
screw' is inserted into the latches unlock position
when the computer is purchased).
1-9
Introduction
Special features
The following features are either unique to TOSHIBA computers or are
advanced features, which make the computer more convenient to use.
User’s Manual
Cross Function
button
Press this button for more than a second to show
the menu screen. This button also functions as
an Enter key.
ESC/Rotation button
Press this button for more than one second to
change the orientation of the screen. This button
also functions as an ESC key.
Windows Security
tablet button
This button performs the same function as the
Ctrl + Alt + Del key sequence to show the
Windows Task Manager.
TOSHIBA Assist
button
Press this button to automatically launch a
predefined application or perform a predefined
function.
TOSHIBA
Presentation button
Press this button to automatically launch a
predefined application or perform a predefined
function. The default setting is Presentation
(Same Image 1024 × 768).
Hot keys
Hot keys are specific key combinations that let
you quickly change the system configuration
directly from the keyboard without running a
system program.
Display automatic
power off
This feature automatically cuts off power to the
computer’s LCD display panel when there is no
keyboard input for a specified time. Power is
restored when any key is pressed. You can
specify the time in the Monitor power off item of
the Basic Setup tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
HDD automatic
power off
This feature automatically cuts off power to the
hard disk drive when it is not accessed for a
specified time. Power is restored when the hard
disk is accessed. You can specify the time in the
HDD power off item of the Basic Setup tab in
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
System automatic
Standby/Hibernation
This feature automatically shuts down the system
into either Standby Mode or Hibernation Mode
when there is no input or hardware access for a
specified time. You can specify the time and
select either the System Standby or System
Hibernation item of the Basic Setup tab in
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
1-10
Introduction
User’s Manual
Keypad overlay
A ten-key pad is integrated into the keyboard.
Refer to the Keypad overlay section in Chapter 5,
The Keyboard, for instructions on using the
keypad overlay.
Power on password
Two levels of password security, supervisor and
user, are available to prevent unauthorized
access to your computer.
Instant security
A hot key function blanks the LCD screen and
disables the computer providing data security.
Intelligent power
supply
A microprocessor in the computer’s intelligent
power supply detects the battery’s charge and
calculates the remaining battery capacity. It also
protects electronic components from abnormal
conditions, such as voltage overload from an AC
adaptor. You can monitor remaining battery
capacity by using the Battery remaining item in
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Battery save mode
This feature lets you save battery power. You can
specify the Power Save Mode in the Profile item
in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Panel power on/off
This feature turns power to the computer off
when the computer’s LCD display panel is closed
and turns it back on when the computer’s LCD
display panel is opened. You can specify the
setting in the When I close the lid item of the
Setup Actions tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Low battery
automatic
hibernation
When battery power is exhausted to the point that
computer operation cannot be continued, the
system automatically enters Hibernation and
shuts down. You can specify the setting in the
Setup Actions tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Heat dispersal
To protect from overheating, the CPU has an
internal temperature sensor. If the computer’s
internal temperature rises to a certain level, the
cooling fan is turned on or the processing speed
is lowered. Use the Cooling Method item of the
Basic Setup tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
1-11
Introduction
Optical Drive Power
Clicking on the Optical Drive Power icon in the
taskbar will turn the power to the optical media
drive on or off. If the Optical Drive Power is set to
off, the disc tray will not open even if the eject
button is pushed - in this instance the power to
the drive can be turned on by again clicking the
Optical Drive Power icon.
HDD Protection
Using the acceleration sensor built in the
computer, the HDD Protection function detects
vibrations and shocks, and automatically moves
the hard disk drive's read/write head to a safe
position to reduce the risk of damage that could
be caused by head-to-disk contact. Refer to the
Using the Hard Disk Drive (HDD) Protection
section in Chapter 4, Operating Basics, for
details.
The HDD Protection function does not guarantee that the hard disk drive
will not be damaged.
User’s Manual
Hibernation
This feature lets you turn off the power without
exiting from your software. The contents of main
memory are saved to the hard disk so that when
you next turn the power on again, you can
continue working right where you left off. Refer to
the Turning off the power section in Chapter 3,
Getting Started, for details.
Standby
If you have to interrupt your work, you can turn off
the power without exiting from your software.
Data is maintained in the computer’s main
memory. When you turn on the power again, you
can continue working right where you left off.
1-12
Introduction
Utilities
This section describes preinstalled utilities and tells how to start them. For
details on usage and operation, refer to each utility’s online manual, help
files or readme.txt files.
User’s Manual
TOSHIBA Power
Saver
To access the power management program, click
start, click Control Panel, click Performance
and Maintenance and click the TOSHIBA
Power Saver icon.
HW Setup
This program lets you customize your hardware
settings according to the way you work with your
computer and the peripherals you use. To access
this utility, click start, click Control Panel, click
Printers and Other Hardware and click the
TOSHIBA HWSetup icon.
TOSHIBA Controls
This utility allows you to customize the functions
of the TOSHIBA Presentation button (default
setting is the simultaneous display on LCD and
CRT with resolution of 1024 × 768) and the
TOSHIBA Assist button (default setting is to
launch the TOSHIBA Assist application)
Fingerprint utility
This product has a fingerprint utility installed for
the purpose of enrolling and recognizing
fingerprints. By enrolling the ID and password to
the fingerprint authentication device, it is no
longer necessary to input the password from the
keyboard. Just by swiping the finger against the
fingerprint sensor, the following functions will be
enabled:
■ Logon to Windows and access a securityenabled homepage through IE (Internet
Explorer).
■ Files and folders can be encrypted/decrypted
and third party access to them prevented.
■ Disable the password-protected screen-saver
when returning from power-saving (standby)
mode.
■ Power-on Security and Single Sign-on
feature.
■ Authentication of the User Password and
Hard Disk Drive Password when booting up
the computer.
TOSHIBA Wireless
Key Logon
This utility is intended to improve the process of
logging on to either the computer and/or
Windows through the use of a Bluetooth-ready
cellular phone.
1-13
Introduction
DVD Video Player
The DVD Video Player is used to play DVDVideo. It has an on-screen interface and
functions. Click start, point to All Programs,
point to InterVideo WinDVD, then click
InterVideo WinDVD.
Bluetooth Stack for
Windows by Toshiba
This software enables communication between
remote Bluetooth devices.
Bluetooth cannot be used in models that do not have a Bluetooth module
installed.
User’s Manual
TOSHIBA SD
Memory Boot Utility
The TOSHIBA SD memory boot utility allows you
to create a bootable SD memory card to start the
system. You can access the TOSHIBA SD
Memory Boot Utility from the menu bar by
clicking start, point to All Programs, point to
TOSHIBA, point to Utilities and click SD
Memory Boot Utility.
TOSHIBA Zooming
Utility
This utility allows you to enlarge or reduce the
icon size on the desktop or the application
window.
RecordNow! Basic
for TOSHIBA
You can create CD/DVDs in several formats
including audio CDs that can be played on a
standard stereo CD player and data CD/DVDs to
store the files and folders on your hard disk drive.
This software can be used on models equipped
with a DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive or a DVD
Super Multi drive.
TOSHIBA Assist
TOSHIBA Assist is a graphical user interface that
provides easy access to help and services. It is
the default function launched by the TOSHIBA
Assist button.
TOSHIBA PC
Diagnostic Tool
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool displays the basic
information on the computer's configuration and
allows some of the built-in devices functionality to
be tested. To start TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool,
click start, point to All Programs, point to
TOSHIBA, point to Utilities and click
PC Diagnostic Tool.
TOSHIBA Mobile
Extension
This utility enhances the function of your
computer when docking to an optional TOSHIBA
Express Port Replicator. To access the utility,
select TOSHIBA Mobile Extension from the
TOSHIBA Assist application.
1-14
Introduction
TOSHIBA ConfigFree TOSHIBA ConfigFree is a suite of utilities to
allow easy control of communication devices and
network connections. TOSHIBA ConfigFree also
allows you to find communication problems and
create profiles for easy switching between
locations and communication networks. To start
ConfigFree, click start, point to All Programs,
point to TOSHIBA, point to Networking and click
ConfigFree.
TOSHIBA TouchPad
On/Off Utility
This utility allows you to disable/enable the Touch
Pad using the Fn + F9 Hot key.
TOSHIBA Mic Effect
The TOSHIBA Mic Effect utility provides you with
Echo Canceller and Microphone Array functions.
For more instructions for this software, click
start, point to All Programs, point to TOSHIBA,
point to Utilities and click TOSHIBA Mic Effect
Help.
TOSHIBA RAID
Utility
The TOSHIBA RAID Utility is used to create or
manage RAID arrays when multiple hard drives
are installed.
To start the utility, click start, point to All
Programs, point to TOSHIBA, point to RAID and
click RAID Console.
TOSHIBA Password
Utility
This utility lets you set a password that restricts
access to the computer.
TOSHIBA
Accessibility
This utility lets you make the Fn key sticky, that
is, you can press it once, release it, and they
press an "F number" key. The Fn key remains
active until another key is pressed.
DLA for TOSHIBA
DLA (Drive Letter Access) is the packet writing
software which provides the function to write files
and/or folders to DVD-RW, CD-RW and
DVD+RW discs via a drive letter like a floppy disk
or other removable disks.
TOSHIBA Hotkey
Utility for Display
Devices
This utility allows you to select the display device
as well as change the display resolution on that
device. Press the Fn + F5 Hot key to change the
active display device and press the Fn + Space
Hot key to change the display resolution.
TOSHIBA SD
The TOSHIBA SD Memory Card Format utility
Memory Card Format allows you to format an SD memory card by the
SD standard format.
User’s Manual
1-15
Introduction
User’s Manual
CD/DVD Drive
Acoustic Silencer
This utility allows you to configure the read speed
of the CD drive. You can either configure Normal
Mode, which operates the drive at its maximum
speed for quick data access, or Quiet Mode
which runs it at single speed for CD audio
playback and which lessens operational noise.
This utility has no effect when access DVD
media.
TOSHIBA
Accelerometer
Utilities
When TOSHIBA Accelerometer Utilities is
enabled, you can invoke the Start menu, switch
active windows or launch predefined applications
by shaking the computer vertically or horizontally,
or by tilting it.
You can start TOSHIBA Accelerometer Utilities
by clicking start, click All Programs, click
TOSHIBA, click Tablet PC and Setup for
TOSHIBA Accelerometer Utilities.
TOSHIBA Tablet
Access Code Logon
Utility
If a Windows password has been set, you can
logon to the operating system by entering a
handwriting signature into the dialog box using
the Tablet PC Pen when prompted.
TOSHIBA Rotation
Utility
This utility controls the screen orientation setting
for both PC mode and Tablet mode.
You can set four types of orientation setting:
■ Primary landscape
■ Primary portrait
■ Secondary landscape
■ Secondary portrait.
The default setting of PC mode is Primary
Landscape while that for Tablet mode is Primary
Portrait.
To start TOSHIBA Rotation Utility, Click start,
click All Programs, click TOSHIBA, click Tablet
PC and Rotation Utility.
1-16
Introduction
Options
You can add a number of options to make your computer even more
powerful and convenient to use. The following options are available:
User’s Manual
DDR2-533/667
Memory Kit
A 256, 512 or 1,024 MB memory module can
easily be installed in the computer.
DDR2-667 2 GB
Memory Kit
A 2,048 MB memory module (DDR2-667) can
easily be installed in the computer.
USB Floppy Disk
Drive Kit
The USB floppy disk drive accommodates either
3 1/2" 1.44-megabyte or 720-kilobyte floppy
disks through connection to a USB port. Please
note that you cannot format 720-kilobyte floppy
disks under Windows XP, but you are able to use
disks that have been previously formatted.
Universal
AC Adaptor
If you use your computer at more than one site
frequently, it may be convenient to purchase an
additional AC adaptor for each site so you will not
have to carry the adaptor with you.
Battery Pack
An additional battery pack can be purchased
from your TOSHIBA dealer. Use it as a spare or
replacement.
Slice Expansion
Battery
This battery pack increases your computer's
operating time when a main battery pack is also
installed. It is connectable to the Docking Port of
the computer.
Battery Charger
The battery charger lets you charge extra
batteries outside the computer.
Hard Disk Drive Kit
You can increase your computer's data storage
capacity with additional hard disk drives.
They are available in the following size:
■ 80.0 billion bytes (74.53 GB)
■ 100.0 billion bytes (93.16 GB)
TOSHIBA Express
Port Replicator
The TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator provides
the ports available on the computer in addition to
a digital visual interface (DVI) port, external
monitor port, four Universal Serial Bus ports
(USB 2.0) and a LAN jack.
Tablet PC Pen
Additional Tablet PC Pens can be purchased
from your TOSHIBA dealer for use as spare
items (spare pen tips and a tip draw-out tool are
included).
1-17
Introduction
User’s Manual
Reserve Pen
Additional Reserve Pens can be purchased from
your TOSHIBA dealer for use in the event the
main pen becomes lost or damaged. The
Reserve Pen is stored inside the computer.
External DVD-ROM /
CD-R/RW Drive
This drive is a DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW Drive that
connects via one of the computer's USB ports.
You can buy this module from your TOSHIBA
dealer.
External DVD Super
Multi Drive
This drive is a DVD Super Multi Drive that
connects via one of the computer's USB ports.
You can buy this module from your TOSHIBA
dealer.
Bluetooth USB
Adaptor
When connected to one of the computer's USB
ports, the Bluetooth USB adaptor allows wireless
communications to be carried out with Bluetoothcompatible equipment.
You can buy this adaptor from your TOSHIBA
dealer.
Wireless Optical
Mouse with
Bluetooth
Technology
The Bluetooth Wireless Mouse is an optical
mouse that is compatible with the Bluetooth
wireless standard.
You can buy this mouse from your TOSHIBA
dealer.
Wireless Stereo
Headset with
Bluetooth
Technology
The Bluetooth Wireless Stereo Headset provides
stereo headphones that are compatible with the
Bluetooth wireless standard.
You can buy this option from your TOSHIBA
dealer.
Security lock
A slot is available to attach a security cable to the
computer to deter theft.
1-18
Introduction
Ultra Slim Bay options
The following modules can be installed in the Ultra Slim Bay. All other
modules are options.
User’s Manual
Ultra Slim Bay Hard
Disk Drive Adaptor
An adaptor lets you install an optional hard disk
drive described in Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Ultra Slim Bay
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW
Drive Kit
Refer to the Features section for details.
Ultra Slim Bay DVD
Super Multi (Double
Layer) Drive Kit
Refer to the Features section for details.
Hard Disk Drive Kit
(Serial-ATA)
You can increase your computer’s data storage
capacity with either an additional 80.0 billion
bytes (74.53 GB) or 100.0 billion bytes
(93.16 GB) hard disk drive installed in the
Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor.
1-19
Chapter 2
The Grand Tour
This chapter identifies the various components of your computer. Become
familiar with each component before you operate the computer.
Legal Footnote (Non-applicable Icons)*8
For more information on the Legal Footnote regarding Non-applicable
Icons, please refer to the Legal Footnotes section in Chapter 10. Click the
*8.
Front with the display closed
The following figure shows the computer’s front with its LCD display panel
in the closed position.
System indicators
Microphone jack
Wireless communication switch
Headphone jack
Display latch
Volume control
Microphones
Front of the computer with LCD display panel closed
User’s Manual
System indicators
These LEDs let you monitor the status of various
computer functions. Details are given in the
System indicatorssection.
Wireless
communication
switch
Slide this switch to the left to turn off Wireless
LAN and Bluetooth functions. Slide it to the right
to turn on the functions.
2-1
The Grand Tour
■ Turn WiFi and Bluetooth functionalities off when near a person who
may have a cardiac pacemaker implant or other medical electric
device. Radio waves may affect pacemaker or medical device
operation, possibly resulting in serious injury. Follow the instruction of
your medical device when using any WiFi or Bluetooth functionality.
■ Always turn off WiFi or Bluetooth functionality if the PC is near
automatic control equipment or appliances such as automatic doors or
fire detectors. Radio waves can cause malfunction of such equipment,
possibly resulting in serious injury.
■ Do not use the WiFi or Bluetooth functionalities near a microwave oven
or in areas subject to radio interference or magnetic fields. Interference
from a microwave oven or other source can disrupt WiFi or Bluetooth
operation.
User’s Manual
Microphones
The built-in microphones let you record sound
into your applications. Refer to the Sound
System section in Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Microphone jack
A 3.5 mm mini microphone jack enables
connection of a three-conductor mini jack for
monaural microphone input.
Headphone jack
A 3.5 mm mini headphone jack enables
connection of stereo headphones.
Volume control
Use this dial to adjust the volume of the stereo
speakers and the stereo headphones.
Display latch
This latch secures the LCD panel in its closed
position. Push the latch to open the display.
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The Grand Tour
Left side
The following figure shows the computer’s left side.
Cooling vents
Security lock slot
Universal Serial bus (USB 2.0)
ports
i.LINK (IEEE1394) port
PC card eject button
PC card slot
The left side of the computer
Cooling vents
Cooling vents help CPU keep from overheating.
Do not block the cooling vents. Keep foreign metal objects, such as
screws, staples and paper clips, out of the cooling vents. Foreign metal
objects can create a short circuit, which can cause damage and fire,
possibly resulting in serious injury.
Security lock slot
A security cable attaches to this slot. The
optional security cable anchors your computer to
a desk or other large object to deter theft.
Universal Serial Bus
(USB 2.0) ports
Two Universal Serial Bus ports are on the left
side. The ports comply with the USB 2.0
standard.
Keep foreign metal objects, such as screws, staples and paper clips, out of
the USB connectors. Foreign metal objects can create a short circuit,
which can cause damage and fire, possibly resulting in serious injury.
Operation of all functions of all USB devices has not been confirmed.
Some functions might not execute properly.
PC card slot
The PC card slot can accommodate a Type II
card. The slot supports 16-bit PC cards and
CardBus PC cards.
PC card eject button
This button is used to remove a PC card from the
PC card slot.
Keep foreign metal objects, such as screws, staples and paper clips, out of
the PC Card slot. Foreign metal objects can create a short circuit, which
can cause damage and fire, possibly resulting in serious injury.
User’s Manual
2-3
The Grand Tour
i.LINK (IEEE1394)
port
This port allows you to connect an external
device, such as a digital video camera for highspeed data transfer.
Right side
The following figure shows the computer’s right side.
Tablet PC Pen
Tablet PC Pen Slot
Bridge media slot
Bridge media slot indicator
Ultra Slim Bay
The right side of the computer
Tablet PC Pen slot
The Tablet PC Pen slot provides storage for the
Tablet PC Pen.
Tablet PC Pen
The Tablet PC Pen is stored within the right side
of the computer and enables direct data entry
through the display screen. Refer to the Using
the Tablet PC Pen and Reserve Pen section in
Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Bridge media slot
This slot lets you insert an SD card, Memory
Stick (Pro), xD picture card or SDIO card device.
Refer to Chapter 8, Optional Devices .
Keep foreign metal objects, such as screws, staples and paper clips, out of
the Bridge Media Slot. Foreign metal objects can create a short circuit,
which can cause damage and fire, possibly resulting in serious injury.
User’s Manual
Bridge media slot
indicator
The Bridge media slot indicator glows green
when the computer is accessing the device
media installed in the Bridge media slot.
Ultra Slim Bay
A DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive, DVD Super Multi
drive or Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor
can be installed in the Ultra Slim Bay.
2-4
The Grand Tour
Back side
The following figure shows the computer’s back side.
DC IN 15V jack
USB port
LAN active indicator
(orange)
External monitor port
Modem jack
Link indicator (green)
LAN jack
The back side of the computer
DC IN 15V jack
The AC adaptor connects to this jack. Use only
the model of AC adaptor that comes with the
computer. Using the wrong adaptor can damage
your computer.
Universal Serial Bus
(USB 2.0) port
The Universal Serial Bus port is on the back side.
Refer to Right side section, for details.
External monitor
port
This external monitor port lets you connect an
external video display.
Modem jack
The modem jack lets you use a modular cable to
connect the modem directly to a telephone line.
■ Connection to any communication line other than an analog phone line
could cause a PC system failure.
■ Connect the built-in modem only to ordinary analog phone lines.
■ Never connect the built-in modem to a digital line (ISDN).
■ Never connect the built-in modem to the digital connector on a
public telephone or to a digital private branch exchange (PBX).
■ Never connect the built-in modem to a key telephone system for
residences or offices.
■ Never operate your PC on AC power during a thunderstorm. If you see
lightning or hear thunder, immediately turn off the PC. An electric surge
caused by the storm, may result in a system failure, loss of data or
hardware damage.
User’s Manual
2-5
The Grand Tour
LAN jack
This jack lets you connect to a LAN. The adaptor
has built-in support for Ethernet LAN (10
megabits per second, 10BASE-T), Fast Ethernet
LAN (100 megabits per second, 100BASE-TX)
and Gigabit Ethernet LAN (1000 megabits per
second, 1000BASE-T). The LAN has two
indicators. Refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics,
for details.
■ Do not connect any cable other than a LAN cable to the LAN jack.
It could cause damage or malfunction.
■ Do not connect the LAN cable to a power supply. It could cause
damage or malfunction.
Link indicator
(green)
This indicator glows green when the computer is
connected to a LAN and the LAN is functioning
properly.
LAN active indicator
(orange)
This indicator glows orange when data is being
exchanged between the computer and the LAN.
Underside
The following figure shows the underside of the computer. Make sure the
display is closed before turning over your computer.
Ultra Slim Bay
Notches
Reserve Pen
Ultra Slim Bay
lock screw
Docking
port
Ultra Slim Bay
latch
Battery
release
latch
Battery lock
Battery pack
Hard disk drive
Hard Disk Drive
Cover Screws
The underside of the computer
User’s Manual
2-6
The Grand Tour
Ultra Slim Bay
See the Right side section in this chapter for
details.
Ultra Slim Bay latch
Slide the latch to release or secure the Ultra Slim
Bay ejector.
Be sure to lock the Ultra Slim Bay latch before you transport or carry the
computer.
User’s Manual
Notches
Notches on the computer engage hooks on the
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator to ensure a
secure connection.
Reserve Pen
The Reserve Pen is contained in the recess on
the underside of the computer and enables data
entry directly through display screen in addition
to the main Tablet PC Pen. Refer to the Using the
Tablet PC Pen and Reserve Pen section in
Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Hard Disk Drive
Cover Screws
Two screws secure the hard disk drive cover.
Hard disk drive
This area contains the hard disk drive pack which
can be removed and reinstalled if required. For
more information on how to remove or reinstall
the HDD Kit (Serial-ATA), refer to the section in
Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Battery pack
The battery pack powers the computer when the
AC adaptor is not connected. For detailed
information on the battery pack, refer to
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
Battery lock
Slide the battery lock to release the battery pack
for removal.
Battery release latch
Slide and hold this latch to release the battery
pack for removal.
For detailed information on removing the battery
pack, refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up
Modes.
2-7
The Grand Tour
Ultra Slim Bay lock
screw
One screw secures the Ultra Slim Bay latch.
Docking port
This port enables connection of an optional
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator and a Slice
Expansion Battery described in Chapter 8,
Optional Devices.
Keep foreign objects out of the docking port. A pin or similar object can
damage the computer's circuitry. A plastic shutter protects the connector.
Front with the display open
This section shows the computer with the LCD display panel open. Refer to
the appropriate illustration for details. To open the display, push the display
latch on the front of the LCD display panel and lift up. Position the LCD
display panel at a comfortable viewing angle.
TOSHIBA Assist button
Display screen
TOSHIBA Presentation button
Fingerprint Sensor
ESC/Rotation
button
Stereo speaker (Right)
LCD Sensor switch
(Not shown)
Cross Function
button
Power button
Touch Pad
control buttons
Windows Security tablet
button
Stereo speaker
(Left)
Display hinge
Touch Pad
The front of the computer with the LCD panel open
Display hinge
User’s Manual
The display hinge holds the LCD display panel at
easy-to-view angles.
2-8
The Grand Tour
User’s Manual
Display screen
The LCD screen displays high-contrast text and
graphics. The available resolution depends on
the model. With XGA, you can change the
resolution between 800 × 600 and 1024 × 768
pixels. With SXGA+, between 800 × 600 and
1400 × 1050 pixels. Refer to Display Controller
and Modes section in Appendix B.
When the computer operates on the AC adaptor
the LCD screen’s image will be somewhat
brighter than when it operates on battery power.
The lower brightness level is intended to save
battery power.
Stereo speakers
The speakers emit sound generated by your
software as well as audio alarms, such as low
battery condition, generated by the system.
Touch Pad
A Touch Pad located in the center of the palm
rest is used to control the on-screen pointer.
Refer to the Using the Touch Pad section in
Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Touch Pad control
buttons
Control buttons below the Touch Pad let you
select menu items or manipulate text and
graphics designated by the on-screen pointer.
Power button
Slide the power button to turn the computer’s
power on and off.
Cross Function
button
This button functions the same as the Enter key
when tapped, or shows the menu screen when
pressed for more than a second.
ESC/Rotation button
This button functions the same as the ESC key
when tapped, or changes the orientation of the
screen when pressed for more than a second.
Windows Security
tablet button
This button functions the same as the Ctrl + Alt +
Del keys to show Windows Task Manager.
TOSHIBA Assist
button
Press this button to launch the TOSHIBA Assist
utility (default) or some other predefined
application.
When the computer is switched off, or is in
standby or hibernation mode, press this button to
start the computer and launch the assigned
application.
You can specify the function of the TOSHIBA
Assist button in the TOSHIBA Controls
properties.
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The Grand Tour
TOSHIBA
Presentation button
Press this button to display the same image on
both internal and external monitors, or to use
multi-monitor display (Windows XP Only).
The default setting is "Presentation (Same Image
1024 × 768)" - this means the same image will be
displayed on both internal and external monitors
with a resolution of 1024 × 768 pixels.
"When using the "Presentation (Different Image)"
setting, you can use the internal and external
monitors in wide screen mode (Windows XP
only).
Pressing this button again changes to single
display mode on the internal monitor only.
You can specify the function of the TOSHIBA
Presentation button in the TOSHIBA Controls
properties.
Fingerprint Sensor
Just by swiping the finger against the fingerprint
sensor, the following functions will be enabled:
■ Logon to Windows and access a securityenabled homepage through IE (Internet
Explorer).
■ Files and folders can be encrypted/decrypted
and third party access to them prevented.
■ Disable the password-protected screen-saver
when returning from power-saving (standby)
mode.
■ Power-on Security and Single Sign-on feature.
■ Authentication of the User Password and Hard
Disk Drive Password when booting up the
computer.
LCD Sensor switch
This switch senses when the computer’s LCD
display panel is closed or opened and activates
the Panel Power Off/On feature. When you close
the LCD display panel the computer enters
Hibernation Mode and shuts down. When you
open the computer's LCD display panel the
computer starts in Hibernation Mode. Use the
TOSHIBA Power Saver Utility to enable or
disable this feature. The default is "enabled".
Refer to the TOSHIBA Power Saver Utility and
Panel Power Off/On items in Chapter 1, Special
features, for details on settings.
Do not put a magnetic object close to the switch. The computer will
automatically enter Hibernation Mode and shut down even if the Panel
Power Off feature is disabled.
User’s Manual
2-10
The Grand Tour
System indicators
LEDs beneath icons, light when various computer operations are in
progress.
System indicators
User’s Manual
DC IN
The DC IN indicator glows green when DC power
is supplied from the AC power adaptor. If the
adaptor’s output voltage is abnormal or if the
power supply malfunctions, this indicator flashes
orange.
Power
The Power indicator glows green when the
computer is on. If you select Standby from the
Shut Down Windows menu, this indicator
flashing (one second on, two seconds off) while
the computer shuts down.
Battery
The Battery indicator shows the condition of the
battery’s charge: Green indicates full charge,
orange indicates battery charging and flashing
orange indicates a low battery charge. Refer to
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
Secondary battery
The Secondary battery indicator shows the
condition of the charge of a Slice Expansion
Battery. Green means fully charged and orange
means being charged. Refer to Chapter 6, Power
and Power-Up Modes.
HDD
The HDD indicator glows green when the
computer is accessing the built-in or Ultra Slim
Bay hard disk drive.
Wireless
communication
The Wireless communication indicator glows
when the Bluetooth and wireless LAN functions
are turned on.
2-11
The Grand Tour
Keyboard indicators
The figures below show the positions of the keypad overlay indicators and
the Caps Lock indicator.
When the Arrow mode indicator glows the keypad overlay lets you control
the cursor.
When the Numeric mode indicator glows the keypad overlay lets you enter
numbers.
When the Caps Lock indicator glows the keyboard is in all-caps mode.
Caps Lock indicator
Caps Lock indicator
Caps Lock
This indicator glows green when the alphabet
keys are locked in uppercase.
Arrow mode
indicator
Numeric mode
indicator
Keypad overlay indicators
User’s Manual
Arrow mode
When the Arrow mode indicator lights green,
you can use the keypad overlay (gray labeled
keys) as cursor keys. Refer to the Keypad
overlay section in Chapter 5, The Keyboard.
Numeric mode
You can use the keypad overlay (gray labeled
keys) for numeric input when the Numeric mode
indicator lights green. Refer to the Keypad
overlay section in Chapter 5, The Keyboard.
2-12
The Grand Tour
USB floppy disk drive (optional)
The USB floppy disk drive accommodates 1.44-megabyte or 720-kilobyte
floppy disks and connects to the USB port.
USB connector
Disk-In-Use Indicator
Floppy disk slot
Eject button
USB floppy disk drive
USB connector
Insert this connector into one of the USB ports of
your computer.
Disk-In-Use Indicator This indicator lights when the floppy disk is being
accessed.
Floppy disk slot
Insert a floppy disk in this slot.
Eject button
When a floppy disk is fully seated in the drive, the
eject button pops out. To remove a floppy disk,
push in the eject button and the floppy disk pops
out partially for removal.
Check the Disk-In-Use indicator when you use the USB floppy disk drive.
Do not press the eject button or turn off the computer while the light is
glowing. Doing so could destroy data and damage the floppy disk or the
drive.
■ The USB floppy disk drive should be placed on a flat, horizontal
surface. Do not set the drive on an incline greater than 20o while it is
operating.
■ Do not set anything on top of the floppy disk drive.
User’s Manual
2-13
The Grand Tour
Optical media drives
The computer is installed with either a DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW or a DVD
Super Multi drive. An ATAPI interface controller is used for CD/DVD-ROM
operation. When the computer is accessing a CD/DVD, an indicator on the
drive glows.
For information on loading and unloading discs refer to the Using optical
media drives section in Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Region codes for DVD drives and media
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW, DVD Super Multi drives and their associated media
are manufactured according to the specifications of six marketing regions.
When you purchase DVD-Video, make sure it matches your drive,
otherwise it will not play properly.
Code
Region
1
Canada, United States
2
Japan, Europe, South Africa, Middle East
3
Southeast Asia, East Asia
4
Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central
America, South America, Caribbean
5
Russia, Indian Subcontinent, Africa, North Korea,
Mongolia
6
China
Writable discs
This section describes the types of writable CD/DVD discs. Check the
specifications of your drive to see the types of discs it can write. Use
RecordNow! to write compact discs. Refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
CDs
■ CD-R discs can be written only once. The recorded data cannot be
erased or changed.
■ CD-RW discs including multi speed CD-RW discs, high-speed CD-RW
discs and ultra-speed CD-RW discs can be recorded more than once.
DVDs
■ DVD-R and DVD+R discs can be written only once. The recorded data
cannot be erased or changed.
■ DVD-RW, DVD+RW and DVD-RAM discs can be recorded more than
once.
User’s Manual
2-14
The Grand Tour
Formats
The drives support the following formats:
■
■
■
■
■
CD-ROM
DVD-ROM
CD-DA
Photo CD™ (single/multi-session)
CD-ROM XA Mode 2 (Form1, Form2)
■
■
■
■
■
DVD -Video
CD-Text
CD-ROM Mode 1, Mode 2
Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
Addressing Method 2
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive
The full-size DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive module lets you record data to
rewritable CDs as well as run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8 cm (3.15") CD/DVDs
without using an adaptor.
The read speed is slower at the center of a disc and faster at the outer
edge.
DVD read
8 speed (maximum)
CD read
24 speed (maximum)
CD-R write
24 speed (maximum)
CD-RW write
24 speed (maximum, Ultra-speed media)
DVD Super Multi drive
The full-size DVD Super Multi drive module lets you record data to
rewritable CDs as well as run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8 cm (3.15") CD/DVDs
without using an adaptor.
The read speed is slower at the center of a disc and faster at the outer
edge.
DVD read
8 speed (maximum)
DVD-R write
2 speed (maximum)
DVD-RW write
2 speed (maximum)
DVD+R write
2.4 speed (maximum)
DVD+RW write
2.4 speed (maximum)
DVD-RAM write
2 speed (maximum)
CD read
24 speed (maximum)
CD-R write
24 speed (maximum)
CD-RW write
10 speed (maximum, Ultra-speed media)
User’s Manual
2-15
The Grand Tour
DVD Super Multi drive Double Layer
The full-size DVD Super Multi drive module lets you record data to
rewritable CD/DVDs as well as run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8cm (3.15")
CD/DVDs without using an adaptor.
The read speed is slower at the center of a disc and faster at the outer
edge.
DVD read
8 speed (maximum)
DVD-R write
8 speed (maximum)
DVD-R DL write
2 speed (maximum)
DVD-RW write
4 speed (maximum)
DVD+R write
8 speed (maximum)
DVD+R DL write
2.4 speed (maximum)
DVD+RW write
4 speed (maximum)
DVD-RAM write
3 speed (maximum)
CD read
24 speed (maximum)
CD-R write
24 speed (maximum)
CD-RW write
16 speed (maximum, Ultra-speed media)
AC adaptor
The AC adaptor can automatically adjust to any voltage ranging from 100 to
240 volts and to a frequency of either 50 or 60 hertz, enabling you to use
this computer in almost any country/region. The adaptor converts AC
power to DC power and reduces the voltage supplied to this computer.
To recharge the battery, simply connect the AC adaptor to a power source
and the computer. Refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes for
details.
The AC adaptor (2-pin plug)
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2-16
The Grand Tour
The AC adaptor (3-pin plug)
■ The Universal AC Adaptor and power cord bundled with this product
may differ depending on the product model. Depending on the model, a
2-pin plug or 3-pin plug set of the above may be bundled.
■ Do not use a 3-pin to 2-pin conversion plug.
■ The supplied power cord conforms to safety rules and regulations in
the region the product is bought and should not be used outside this
region. For use in other regions, please buy power cords that conform
to safety rules and regulations in the particular region.
Always use the Toshiba AC adaptor that was provided with your PC and
the Toshiba Battery Charger (that may have been provided with your PC),
or use Toshiba recommended alternate models to avoid any risk of fire or
other damage to the PC. Use of an incompatible AC adaptor or Battery
Charger could cause fire or damage to the PC possibly resulting in serious
injury.
User’s Manual
2-17
Chapter 3
Getting Started
This chapter provides basic information to get you started using your
computer. It covers the following topics:
■ Setting up your work space - for your health and safety
Be sure also to read Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort. This guide,
which is included with the computer, explains product liability.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Connecting the AC adaptor
Opening the display
Turning on the power
Starting up for the first time
Turning off the power
Restarting the computer
Restoring the preinstalled software
All users should be sure to read the section Starting up for the first time.
Setting up your work space
Establishing a comfortable work site is important for you and your
computer. A poor work environment or stressful work habits can result in
discomfort or serious injury from repetitive strain to your hands, wrists or
other joints. Proper ambient conditions should also be maintained for the
computer’s operation. This section discusses the following topics:
■ General conditions
■ Placement of the computer
■ Seating and posture
■ Lighting
■ Work habits
User’s Manual
3-1
Getting Started
General conditions
In general, if you are comfortable, so is your computer, but read the
following to make sure your work site provides a proper environment.
■ Select a work area that has:
■ a well-designed and functioning ventilation system that does not
forcefully direct air on you
■ good air circulation
■ a comfortable ambient temperature and relative humidity.
■ Never place your PC where it will be exposed to excess heat, such as in
direct sunlight, an unventilated vehicle or near a heater. This may result
in a system failure, malfunction, loss of data or damage to the PC.
■ Never place your PC in a location where it will be exposed to extremely
low temperatures. This may result in a system failure, malfunction or
loss of data.
■ Never subject your PC to sudden temperature variations. This may
result in condensation, causing a system failure, malfunction or loss of
data.
■ Do not expose your PC to dusty environments. If dust gets inside the
PC, it could cause a system failure, malfunction or loss of data. If dust
contaminates the PC, do not turn on the power. Take it to an authorized
Toshiba service provider before you use it.
■ Never place your PC near an object that generates a magnetic field,
such as a speaker or TV. Do not wear magnetic bracelets while using
your PC. Exposure to magnetic fields can cause system failure,
malfunction or loss of data.
■ Never place a heavy object on the PC and be careful not to drop a
heavy object onto the PC. It could damage the PC or cause system
failure.
■ Never use benzene, thinner or other chemicals when cleaning the PC,
AC adaptor, or storage device. The use of benzene, thinner or other
chemicals may result in deterioration, deformation or discoloration of
those items and the loss of data.
■ Make sure the AC power cord connects to an outlet that is close to the
computer and easily accessible.
■ The temperature should be 5 to 35 degrees Centigrade (41 to
95 degrees Fahrenheit) and the relative humidity should be 20 to
80 percent.
■ Keep the computer free of dust, moisture, and exposure to direct
sunlight.
■ Some parts of the computer, including data storage media, can be
damaged by magnets. Do not place the computer near magnetic
objects or bring magnetic objects close to the computer. Be careful of
objects, such as stereo speakers, that produce strong magnetic fields
during operation. Also, be careful with metal objects, such as bracelets,
which can be inadvertently magnetized.
■ Do not operate the computer in close proximity to a mobile phone.
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Getting Started
■ Leave ample ventilation room for the fan. Do not block the vents.
■ If the PC interferes with radio equipment, turn the PC power off
immediately. Such interference could cause equipment malfunction.
■ Never place your PC on a shaky table, uneven, tilted surface or other
unstable location. Your PC may fall, causing damage to the PC or
possibly injury.
■ Never leave the power to your PC on continuously for more than
24 hours. Turn the power off when this product is not in use.
■ Always avoid abrupt changes of temperature or humidity.
■ Never place close to heat radiating appliances such as a heater.
■ Never place close to corrosive chemicals.
■ Never place close to magnetic field radiating appliances such as a
stereo speaker.
■ Always place this product on a flat surface.
■ Provide a sufficient space behind the PC to allow easy adjustment of
the display panel.
■ Always provide sufficient space around the PC to ensure adequate
ventilation.
■ Always provide sufficient space for operating a mouse and other
peripheral devices.
Placement of the computer
Position the computer and peripheral devices to provide comfort and safety.
■ Position your LCD display panel or place your monitor in an appropriate
position to help reduce awkward postures and overhead glare. For
example:
■ Position LCD directly in front of you and at a comfortable distance
away.
■ Position LCD so the top of the screen is at or slightly below eye
level. A display screen that is too high or too low can cause
awkward postures and possibly fatigue muscles that support the
head.
■ Rest your eyes periodically by focusing on objects that are farther
away.
■ If you use a paper holder, set it at about the same height and distance
as the computer.
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Getting Started
Seating and posture
Maintain a comfortable working posture when using your PC where your
body joints are naturally aligned to reduce stress on different parts of your
body. Consider the following:
Below eye level
90°angles
Foot rest
Posture and positioning of the computer
■ Keep hands, wrists, and forearms straight, in-line and roughly parallel to
the floor.
■ Keep head level, or bent slightly forward, forward facing, and balanced.
Generally the head is in-line with the torso.
■ Keep shoulders relaxed and let upper arms hang normally at the side of
the body.
■ Keep elbows in close to the body and bent.
■ Keep feet fully supported by floor or foot rest.
■ Keep back fully supported with appropriate lumbar support when sitting
vertical or leaning back slightly.
■ Keep thighs and hips supported by a well-padded seat cushion and
generally parallel to the floor.
■ Keep knees about the same height as the hips with the feet slightly
forward.
Lighting
Select the right level of illumination and place your PC appropriately to
minimize glare from overhead lights, desk lamps and windows. Glare on
the LCD or monitor may cause eye strain, eye fatigue or headaches.
Consider the following suggestions regarding lighting your work
environment:
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Getting Started
■ Position the PC so that the light source does not shine or reflect directly
onto the display or shine or reflect directly into the eyes of the user.
■ Shield the PC from direct light by using tinted windows or by installing
blinds or a screen.
■ Use soft, indirect lighting.
■ Adjust the display panel to provide maximum visibility.
Work habits
A key to avoiding discomfort or injury from repetitive strain is to vary your
activities. If possible, schedule a variety of tasks into your workday. If you
must spend long periods at the computer, finding ways to break up the
routine can reduce stress and improve your efficiency.
■ Sit in a relaxed posture. Good positioning of your chair and equipment
as described earlier can reduce tension in your shoulders or neck and
ease back strain.
■ Vary your posture frequently.
■ Occasionally stand up and stretch or exercise briefly.
■ Exercise and stretch your wrists and hands a number of times during
the day.
■ Frequently, look away from the computer and focus your eyes on a
distant object for several seconds, for example 30 seconds every
15 minutes.
■ Take frequent short breaks instead of one or two long breaks, for
example, two or three minutes every half hour.
■ When you use a PC, rest your eyes periodically and relax or stretch
your muscles to avoid strain. If you experience discomfort while
operating the PC, stop immediately and rest. Continuous operation for
long periods without adequate rest may cause pain in the arms, wrists,
hands, back, neck or other parts of the body. If pain persists despite
rest, consult your doctor.
A number of books are available on ergonomics and repetitive strain injury
or repetitive stress syndrome. For more information on these topics or for
pointers on exercises for such stress points as hands and wrists, please
check with your library or book vendor. Also refer to the computer’s
Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort.
Strategic Rest Breaks
Take short, strategically spaced rest breaks to avoid eye strain and body
discomforts.
Other Things to Note
■ Never turn off the power while an application is running. Doing so could
cause loss of data.
■ Use a virus-check program and make sure it is updated regularly.
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Getting Started
■ Never turn off the power, disconnect an external storage device or
remove storage media during data read/write. Doing so can cause data
loss.
■ Never format storage media without checking its content. Formatting
destroys all stored data.
■ It is a good idea to periodically back up the internal hard disk or other
main storage device to external media. General storage media is not
durable or stable over long periods of time and under certain conditions
may result in data loss.
■ Before you install a device or application, save any data in memory to
the hard disk drive or other storage media. Failure to do so may result in
the loss of data.
Operating the computer in Tablet mode
Change to "The TOSHIBA PORTÉGÉ M400 computer can be used in two
ways, as an ordinary laptop PC and as a Tablet PC. You can use the
computer as Tablet PC, operated with the supplied Tablet PC Pen, by
turning the LCD display panel through 180 degrees and closing it. This
manual calls the use as an ordinary laptop PC 'laptop mode', and the use
as a Tablet PC 'Tablet mode'. Refer to Changing to the Tablet mode
section in Chapter 4, Operating Basics for details on changing the mode.
When operating the computer in tablet mode, follow the instructions below.
Operating the computer in tablet mode
■ Hold the computer firmly on your forearm. Do not block the vent.
■ Remove the AC adaptor from the computer when using it in tablet mode
held in your forearm.
■ Do not use the computer while walking or driving a car.
■ Change to laptop mode and turn off the computer before carrying it. Do
not carry the computer with power on or in stand by state. Do not carry
the computer while the disk activity LED is glowing.
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Getting Started
■ Do not expose the computer to rapid temperature changes (such as
would be the case if you brought the PC from a cold environment into a
warm room). When rapid temperature changes are unavoidable, leave
the computer for around two hours before turning it on to prevent the
formation of condensation.
■ Remove all external peripheral devices and their connection cables
from the computer before carrying.
■ Do not drop the computer or apply excessive impact to it. Do not leave
the computer in a car or similar environment where it is exposed to
direct sunlight.
■ Do not put the computer in a bag when it is in tablet mode.
■ The display panel works as a touch sensitive digitizer screen. However,
the outer edges of the screen may be less sensitive. Please keep the
Tablet PC Pen inside the display area when you use it near the edges of
the display panel. The position of the pen may not be recognized if you
move the Tablet PC Pen too fast towards the outer edge. Please be
sure to slide the Tablet PC Pen slowly in areas near the edges of the
screen.
Use the Tablet PC Pen in the areas enclosed by the dotted line as
shown in the following figure.
Use area of a Tablet PC Pen
Do not block the vent of the computer when holding it. If you continue to
expose your skin to the hot air expelled from the vent for a long time, your
skin might suffer low temperature injury.
Connecting the AC adaptor
Attach the AC adaptor when you need to charge the battery or you want to
operate from AC power. It is also the fastest way to get started, because
the battery pack will need to be charged before you can operate from
battery power.
The AC adaptor can be connected to any power source supplying from 100
to 240 volts and 50 or 60 hertz. For details on using the AC adaptor to
charge the battery pack, refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
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Getting Started
■ Always use the Toshiba AC adaptor that was provided with your
PC and the Toshiba Battery Charger (that may have been provided
with your PC), or use Toshiba recommended alternate models to avoid
any risk of fire or other damage to the PC. Use of an incompatible
AC adaptor or Battery Charger could cause fire or damage to the
PC possibly resulting in serious injury.
■ Use only the AC adaptor supplied with your computer or an equivalent
adaptor that is compatible. Use of any incompatible adaptor could
damage your computer. TOSHIBA assumes no liability for any damage
caused by use of an incompatible adaptor.
■ Never plug the AC adaptor or Battery Charger into a power source that
does not correspond to both the voltage and the frequency specified on
the regulatory label of the unit. Failure to do so could result in a fire or
electric shock, possibly resulting in serious injury.
■ Always use or purchase power cables that comply with the legal
voltage and frequency specifications and requirements in the country of
use. Failure to do so could result in a fire or electric shock, possibly
resulting in serious injury.
■ The supplied power cord conforms to safety rules and regulations in
the region the product is bought and should not be used outside this
region. For use in other regions, please buy power cords that conform
to safety rules and regulations in the particular region.
■ Do not use a 3-pin to 2-pin conversion plug.
■ When you connect the AC adaptor to the computer, always follow the
steps in the exact order as described in the User’s Manual. Connecting
the power cable to a live electrical outlet should be the last step
otherwise the adaptor DC output plug could hold an electrical change
and cause an electrical shock or minor bodily injury when touched.
As a general safety precaution, avoid touching any metal parts.
■ Never place an AC adaptor on a wooden surface, furniture, or any
other surface that could be marred by exposure to heat since the
AC adaptor's surface temperature increases during normal use.
■ Always place the PC on a suitable heat-insulating material to prevent
possible heat damage.
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Getting Started
1. Connect the power cord to the AC adaptor.
Connecting the power cord to the AC adaptor (2-pin plug)
Connecting the power cord to the AC adaptor (3-pin plug)
The Universal AC Adaptor and power cord bundled with this product may
differ depending on the product model. Depending on the model, a 2-pin
plug or 3-pin plug set of the above may be bundled.
2. Connect the AC adaptor’s DC output plug to the DC IN 15V jack on the
back of the computer.
DC IN 15V jack
Connecting the adaptor to the computer
3. Plug the power cord into a live wall outlet. The Battery and DC IN
indicators on the front of the computer should glow.
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Getting Started
Opening the display
The computer’s LCD display panel can be opened in a wide range of
angles for optimal viewing.
1. Push the display latch on the front of the computer to unlatch the
display panel.
2. While holding down the palm rest with one hand so that the main body
is not raised, lift the panel slowly. Adjust the angle of the panel to
provide optimal clarity.
Use reasonable care when opening and closing the LCD display panel.
Opening it vigorously or slamming it shut could damage the computer.
LCD display panel
Display latch
Opening the LCD display panel
Turning on the power
This section describes how to turn on the power.
The Power button LED indicates the status. Refer to the Power indicators
section in Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
■ After you turn on the power for the first time, do not turn it off until you
have set up the operating system. Refer to the section Starting up for
the first time.
■ If the USB floppy disk drive is connected, make sure it is empty. If a
floppy disk is in the drive, press the eject button and remove the floppy
disk.
1. Open the computer’s LCD display panel.
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Getting Started
2. Slide and hold the computer’s power button.
Power button
Turning on the power
Starting up for the first time
When you first turn on the power, the computer’s initial screen is the
Microsoft Windows XP Startup Screen Logo. Follow the on-screen
directions for each screen. During setup, you can click the Back button to
return to the previous screen.
Be sure to read the Windows End User License Agreement
display carefully.
Turning off the power
The power can be turned off in one of the following modes: Shut down
(Boot), Hibernation or Standby Mode.
Shut Down mode (Boot mode)
When you turn off the power in Shut Down mode no data is saved and the
computer will boot to the operating system’s main screen.
1. If you have entered data, save it to the hard disk or to a storage media.
2. Make sure all disk (disc) activity has stopped, then remove the
CD/DVDs or floppy disk.
■ Make sure the hard disk drive and Ultra Slim Bay module indicators are
off. If you turn off the power while a disk (disc) is being accessed, you
can lose data or damage the disk.
■ Never turn off the power while an application is running. Doing so could
cause loss of data.
■ Never turn off the power, disconnect an external storage device or
remove storage media during data read/write. Doing so can cause data
loss.
3. Click start then click Turn Off Computer. From the Turn Off
Computer menu select Turn Off.
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Getting Started
4. Turn off the power to any peripheral devices.
Do not turn the computer or devices back on immediately. Wait a moment
to let all capacitors fully discharge.
Standby Mode
If you have to interrupt your work, you can turn off the power without exiting
from your software. Data is maintained in the computer’s main memory.
When you turn on the power again, you can continue working right where
you left off.
■ When the AC adaptor is connected, the computer will go into Standby
Mode according to the settings in the TOSHIBA Power Saver utility.
■ To restore operation from Standby Mode, slide the power button or
press any key. The latter action only works on the internal keyboard if
the Wake-up on Keyboard option is enabled in HW Setup.
■ If the computer automatically enters Standby Mode while a network
application is active, the application might not be restored when the
computer wakes up from Standby.
■ To prevent the computer from automatically entering Standby Mode,
disable Standby in TOSHIBA Power Saver. That action, however, will
nullify the computer’s Energy Star compliance.
■ Before entering Standby Mode, be sure to save your data.
■ Do not install or remove a memory module while the computer is in
Standby Mode. The computer or the module could be damaged.
■ Do not remove the battery pack while the computer is in Standby Mode
(unless the computer is connected to an AC power source). Data in
memory will be lost.
■ If you carry the computer on board an aircraft or into a hospital, be sure
to shut down the computer in Hibernation Mode or in shutdown mode
to avoid radio signal interference.
Benefits of standby
The standby feature provides the following benefits:
■ Restores the previous working environment more rapidly than does
hibernation.
■ Saves power by shutting down the system when the computer receives
no input or hardware access for the duration set by the System Standby
feature.
■ You can use the panel power off feature.
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Getting Started
Executing standby
You can also enable Standby by pressing Fn + F3. See Chapter 5, The
Keyboard, for details.
You can enter Standby Mode in one of three ways:
1. Click start, click Turn Off Computer and click Stand By.
2. Close the computer’s LCD display panel. This feature must be enabled.
Refer to the Setup Actions tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver Utility located
within the Control Panel application (open Performance and
Maintenance and then open TOSHIBA Power Saver).
3. Slide the power button. This feature must be enabled. Refer to the
Setup Actions tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver Utility located within the
Control Panel application (open Performance and Maintenance and
then open TOSHIBA Power Saver).
When you turn the power back on, you can continue where you left when
you shut down the computer.
■ When the computer is shut down in Standby Mode, the power indicator
will blink orange.
■ If you are operating the computer on battery power, you can lengthen
the operating time by shutting down in Hibernation Mode. Standby
Mode consumes more power.
Standby limitations
Standby will not function under the following conditions:
■ Power is turned back on immediately after shutting down.
■ Memory circuits are exposed to static electricity or electrical noise.
Hibernation Mode
The Hibernation Mode feature saves the contents of memory to the hard
disk when the computer is turned off. The next time the computer is turned
on, the previous state is restored. The Hibernation Mode feature does not
save the status of any peripheral devices.
■ Save your data. While entering Hibernation Mode, the computer saves
the contents of memory to the hard disk drive. However, for safety
sake, it is best to save your data manually.
■ Data will be lost if you remove the battery or disconnect the AC adaptor
before the save is completed. Wait for the HDD indicator to go out.
■ Do not install or remove a memory module while the computer is in
Hibernation Mode. Data will be lost.
Benefits of Hibernation Mode
The Hibernation Mode feature provides the following benefits:
■ Saves data to the hard disk when the computer automatically shuts
down because of a low battery.
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Getting Started
For the computer to shut down in Hibernation Mode, this feature must be
enabled in two places: the Hibernate tab in Power Options and Setup
Actions tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
If you do not configure this feature, the computer will shut down in Standby
Mode - if battery power becomes depleted, data saved in Standby Mode
will be lost.
■ You can return to your previous working environment immediately when
you turn on the computer.
■ Saves power by shutting down the system when the computer receives
no input or hardware access for the duration set by the System
hibernate feature.
■ You can use the panel power off feature.
Starting Hibernation Mode
You can also enable Hibernation Mode by pressing Fn + F4. Refer to
Chapter 5, The Keyboard, for details.
To enter Hibernation Mode, follow the steps below.
1. Click start.
2. Select Turn Off Computer.
3. Open the Turn Off Computer dialog box.
4. Click Hibernate.
Automatic Hibernation
The computer will enter Hibernate mode automatically when you slide the
power button or close the lid. First, however, make the appropriate settings
according to the steps below.
1. Click start and open the Control Panel.
2. Open Performance and Maintenance and open Power Options.
3. Select the Hibernate tab in the Power Options Properties,
select the Enable hibernation check box and click the Apply button.
4. Open TOSHIBA Power Saver.
5. Select the Advanced tab.
6. Enable the desired Hibernation settings for When I slide the power
button and When I close the lid.
7. Click the OK button.
Data save in Hibernation Mode
When you turn off the power in Hibernation Mode, the computer takes a
moment to save current memory data to the hard disk. During this time, the
HDD indicator will light.
After you turn off the computer, and the content of memory has been saved
to the hard disk, turn off the power to any peripheral devices.
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Getting Started
Do not turn the computer or devices back on immediately. Wait a moment
to let all capacitors fully discharge.
Restarting the computer
Certain conditions require that you reset the system. For example, if:
■ You change certain computer settings.
■ An error occurs and the computer does not respond to your keyboard
commands.
■ There are three ways to reset the computer system:
1. Click start then click Turn off computer. From the Turn off
computer menu select Restart.
2. Press Ctrl + Alt + Del to display the Windows Task Manager,
then select Shut Down and Restart.
3. Slide the power button and hold it down for five seconds. Wait 10 to
15 seconds, then turn the power on again by sliding the power button.
Restoring your preinstalled software
If preinstalled files are damaged, use your Product Recovery DVD-ROM to
restore them. To restore the operating system and all preinstalled software,
follow the steps below.
When sound is muted by the Fn + Esc key, turn it on before starting the
restore procedure. Refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard, for details.
When you reinstall the Windows operating system, the hard disk will be
reformatted and all data will be lost.
1. Load the Recovery Media in the optional optical media drive and turn off
the computer’s power.
2. Hold down the F12 key and turn on the power. When In Touch
with Tomorrow TOSHIBA appears, release the F12 key.
3. Use the left or right cursor key to select the CD-ROM icon in the display
menu.
4. Follow the on-screen instructions.
Restoring TOSHIBA utilities and drivers
If Windows is working properly, individual drivers or applications can be
separately restored. The TOSHIBA Tools & Utilities folder (C:\TOOLSCD)
contains drivers and applications, which are included with your computer
system. If your system drivers or applications have become damaged in
some way, you can reinstall most of the components from this folder.
Create a copy of this folder to an external media for more convenience.
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Getting Started
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3-16
Chapter 4
Operating Basics
This chapter describes the basic operations of your computer and
precautions when using it, as well as the handling of CD/DVD.
Using the Touch Pad
To use the Touch Pad, simply touch and move your fingertip across it in the
direction you want the on-screen pointer to go.
Touch Pad
Touch Pad
control buttons
Touch Pad and Touch Pad control buttons
Two buttons below the Touch Pad are used like the buttons on a mouse
pointer. Press the left button to select a menu item or to manipulate text or
graphics designated by the pointer. Press the right button to display a menu
or other function depending on the software you are using.
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Operating Basics
You can also tap the Touch Pad to perform functions similar to those of the
left button.
Click: Tap once
Double-click: Tap twice
Drag and drop: Tap to select the material you want to move. Leave your
finger on the Touch Pad after the second tap and move the material.
Using the Tablet PC Pen and Reserve Pen
You can use the Tablet PC Pen to execute actions and enter data. Hold the
Tablet PC Pen in a natural position and tap, press or trace on the screen
lightly. Before you begin using your computer for the first time, you will need
to calibrate the Tablet PC Pen.
Some computers in this series are equipped with a Reserve Pen.
Eraser button
Pen button
Pen point
Pen button
Pen point
The Tablet PC Pen (left) and Reserve Pen (right)
User’s Manual
Eraser button
You can use this button as an eraser when using
a graphics software application. Text based
software applications enable you to select and
delete characters with a one-touch action.
Pen button
Provides the same function as clicking the right
Touch pad control button.
Pen point
Provides the same function as clicking the left
Touch pad control button.
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Operating Basics
Observe the following precautions on the handling of the Tablet PC Pen.
■ Do not tap or press the Tablet PC Pen forcefully against the display as
this could damage the Tablet PC Pen and the screen itself.
■ Avoid using or keeping the Tablet PC Pen in areas where the
temperature can change rapidly or in places, such as a car, where the
Tablet PC Pen is exposed to direct sunlight. Store the Tablet PC Pen
without any pressure being applied to the buttons as this may cause a
malfunction or characteristic deterioration.
■ The Tablet PC Pen is composed of precision parts. Do not drop the
Tablet PC Pen. Strong impact causes a malfunction or characteristic
deterioration.
■ Do not apply excessive force to the Tablet PC Pen point and the side
switch. Excessive force applied to these parts causes short life or
characteristic deterioration (Allowable force to pen point, Eraser button,
Pen button: less than 1 kg, for less than 30 seconds).
■ Avoid water entering the Tablet PC Pen or condensation forming within
it as either condition will cause a malfunction.
■ Do not disassemble the Tablet PC Pen. It causes maladjustment or
short life.
■ Do not stain the Tablet PC Pen with cosmetics or chemicals as this will
cause a deterioration in appearance. Use a glass wiping cloth or dry
cloth to clean the Tablet PC Pen. Do not use volatile liquids such as
alcohol, thinner or petroleum benzine to clean the Tablet PC Pen.
■ Do not apply excessive force to the Tablet PC Pen point as a bent or
deformed pen point will cause a malfunction.
■ Keep the small parts of the Tablet PC Pen, such as the pen point or the
knob of the side switch, away from infants and small children to prevent
them from swallowing them.
■ Do not use a ball point pen instead of the Tablet PC Pen delivered with
the product.
■ Do not use a broken pen tip. The lead cannot be replaced if it is worn
(use the Reserve Pen only).
TOSHIBA is not liable for any problems arising on the products due to the
use of the Tablet PC Pen in an environment where the above conditions
are not satisfied or because of its use by unspecified number of users.
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Operating Basics
Removing the Tablet PC Pen
Remove the Tablet PC Pen as described below.
1. Gently push the Tablet PC Pen towards the middle of the computer.
The pen will then protrude slightly from the side.
Tablet PC Pen slot
Tablet PC Pen
Tablet PC Pen slot
Tablet PC Pen slot
Removing the Tablet PC Pen
2. Pull the Tablet PC Pen to remove it from the Tablet PC Pen slot.
Inserting the Tablet PC Pen
The Tablet PC Pen is included in the accessory tray when purchased.
Remove the Tablet PC Pen from the carton and install it to the computer as
follows:
1. The Tablet PC Pen and the Reserve Pen are different in shape.
The Tablet PC Pen and the Reserve Pen are different in shape. Do not
insert the Reserve Pen into the Tablet PC Pen slot.
Tablet PC Pen slot
Tablet PC Pen
Inserting the Tablet PC Pen
Pen actions
You can use the Tablet PC Pen to enter data, start programs, move objects
and execute other actions.
Single tap
Lightly tap the tip of the Tablet PC Pen on an object and lift it immediately to
execute an action. A single tap is similar to clicking the left touch pad
control button.
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Operating Basics
Double tap
Lightly tap the tip of the Tablet PC Pen twice on an object and lift it
immediately to execute an action. A double-tap is similar to double-clicking
the left touch pad control button.
Press and hold
Touch the tip of the Tablet PC Pen to the display screen and hold it there to
display a pop-up menu or other action. Press and hold is similar to clicking
the right touch pad control button.
Drag
Touch the Tablet PC Pen to the screen. Without lifting the Tablet PC Pen,
drag it across the screen to select text or objects.
Drag and drop
Touch the Tablet PC Pen to the screen to select an object. Without lifting
the Tablet PC Pen, drag it across the screen. Lift the Tablet PC Pen to drop
the object to a new location.
Replacing the pen tip
1. To replace the pen tip, pinch the tip with a draw-out tool and pull it out.
Draw-out tool
Pen tip
Replacing the pen tip
2. Insert a new tip into the Tablet PC Pen, flat end first, and press it to seat
it securely.
■ A short and worn pen point is difficult to pull out. Replace the pen point
with a refill before it becomes too short to remove.
■ It is recommended that you keep another pen set as a spare. You can
buy replacement pen sets from your TOSHIBA authorized dealer.
Do not continue to use a broken pen tip as this may result in scratching of
the LCD display panel. When the pen tip breaks replace it with one of the
refills delivered with the Tablet PC Pen. When these refills have run out,
you can purchase a new pen set from a TOSHIBA authorized dealer.
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Operating Basics
Removing the Reserve Pen case
To remove the Reserve Pen case, follow the steps below.
1. Save your work.
2. Turn the computer’s power off. Make sure the Power indicator is off.
3. Remove all cables connected to the computer.
4. Close the LCD display panel and turn the computer upside down.
5. Slide and then lift out the Reserve Pen case.
Push lightly at the point shown by the arrow using an object with a thin tip.
Reserve Pen case
Reserve Pen
case slot
Removing the Reserve Pen case
Inserting the Reserve Pen case
To insert the Reserve Pen case, follow the steps below.
1. Insert the Reserve Pen case into the Reserve Pen case slot on the
computer and slide it until it locks.
Reserve Pen case
Reserve Pen
case slot
Inserting the Reserve Pen case
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Storing and Removing the Reserve Pen from the Reserve Pen case
Follow the procedures below to remove the Reserve Pen from the Reserve
Pen case.
Removing the Reserve Pen from the Reserve Pen case
1. Lift the Reserve Pen up from the Reserve Pen case by its end.
Reserve Pen
Reserve Pen case
Removing the Reserve Pen from the Reserve Pen case
Storing the Reserve Pen in the Reserve Pen case
1. Insert the tip of the Reserve Pen into the Reserve Pen case holder and
press down.
Reserve Pen
Reserve Pen case
Reserve Pen case
holder
Storing the Reserve Pen in the Reserve Pen case
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Changing to the Tablet mode
To change from laptop mode to the Tablet mode, follow the instructions
below.
Changing to the Tablet mode (1)
■ Place the computer on a stable, flat surface such as a desktop and
rotate the LCD display panel slowly, holding the panel at its lower
part. The LCD display panel is designed not to rotate more than
180 degrees. Rotating the LCD display panel more than 180 degrees
with an excessive force will damage the panel and the computer.
■ To change from Laptop Mode to Tablet Mode you must rotate the
display panel 180 degrees clockwise.
Tablet mode icon
Turn the LCD display panel to the direction
indicated by the Tablet mode icon.
To change from Tablet Mode to Laptop Mode you must rotate the display
panel 180 degrees counter-clockwise.
Laptop mode icon
Turn the LCD display panel to the direction
indicated by the laptop mode icon.
1. Open the LCD display panel to the upright position. Check that the
angle of the keyboard and the LCD display panel is 90 degrees.
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2. Rotate the LCD display panel clockwise slowly.
Changing to the Tablet mode (2)
Do not apply excessive rotating force to the LCD display panel. It causes
damage of the LCD display panel.
3. Turn the display latch 180 degrees to its down position.
4. Close the LCD display panel slowly with display surface facing
upwards.
Display latch
Changing to the Tablet mode (3)
5. Insert the display latch in the slit.
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6. Press the LCD display panel downward softly.
Display latch
Slit
Changing to the Tablet mode (4)
Changing the screen orientation
The orientation of the computer screen can be changed to one of the
following four display modes:
Primary portrait
Secondary portrait
Primary landscape
Secondary landscape
Four display modes
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■ Execute the following applications on Primary landscape:
■ 3D game software
■ 3D screen saver
■ Playback of a motion picture as would be the case using
DVD-Video playback on the computer connected to an external
DVD-ROM Drive.
■ The screen cannot automatically rotate in the following cases.
You should first quit the running application and then rotate the screen:
■ Running of an application that changes the screen resolution
dynamically, such as a game that is running in full-screen mode.
■ DOS prompt in full-screen mode.
■ Running of 3D screen saver.
■ Do not play 3D game software or replay DVD-Video in a display mode
other than Primary landscape. an abnormality will appear on the
Windows screen display when you replay a DVD-Video in a mode other
than Primary landscape because DVD playback software can boot only
in the Primary landscape mode.
■ An abnormality will appear on the Windows screen display when you
change from Tablet Mode to Laptop Mode while a 3D screen saver is
running. In this case, press any key while in Laptop Mode to deactivate
the 3D screen saver.
Method 1: Changing the screen orientation using TOSHIBA
Accelerometer Utilities and TOSHIBA Rotation Utility
When the TOSHIBA Accelerometer Utilities and TOSHIBA Rotation Utility
are running, changes in the orientation of the top and bottom of the screen
is automatically recognized by pressing ESC/Rotation button for more than
a second.
Method 2: Changing the screen orientation using Cross Function
Button
1. Press the Cross Function Button for more than one second. The
TOSHIBA Tablet Menu will appear.
2. Select the Internal Monitor icon in Toshiba Shortcut using the Cross
Function Button and then press then Cross Function Button.
3. Select the rotation angle using Cross Function Button and then press
the Cross Function Button.
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Method 3: Changing the screen orientation using Task Bar
1. Right click "Change tablet and pen settings" icon in the Task Bar.
Click "Change screen orientation" from the menu.
The screen orientation is set to change in the following order when
purchased.
You can change the above sequence through the following procedure:
1. Double click Change tablet and pen settings icon in the Task Bar.
2. Click Change button in Display tab.
3. Select "changing the screen" from the Screen Orientation pull down
menu and change the screen.
You can set the orientation of the desktop screen just after rotating the
display from [Start] - [All Programs] - [TOSHIBA] - [Tablet PC] [TOSHIBA Rotation Utility].
Using Accelerometer Utilities
When you shake the computer:
■ Do not shake the computer too strongly as this may cause the
computer to be dropped or hit those people or items around you.
■ Avoid using the computer in crowded places. (e.g. in commuter trains
or in busy streets)
■ This may cause injury to children or adults, or damage to the computer.
When the HDD protection function is turned on and the Tilt function
(function to start applications, etc. by waving the computer vertically or
horizontally) is used, the HDD protection message may be displayed on
the screen. Turn off the HDD protection function in order to stop such
messages from displaying.
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It is safer if you hold the computer with both hands horizontally as shown in
the below example.
The computer is shaken
horizontally.
The computer is shaken
perpendicularly.
Shake the computer
Changing to the laptop mode
To change the operating mode to the Laptop Mode, follow the instructions
below.
1. Press the Display latch and raise the display to the upright position
carefully.
2. Rotate the display counter-clockwise slowly.
3. Turn the display latch toward you ready for the next closing of the
display.
Using the Fingerprint Sensor
This product has a fingerprint utility installed for the purpose of enrolling
and recognizing fingerprints. By enrolling the ID and password to the
fingerprint authentication device, it is no longer necessary to input the
password from the keyboard. Just by swiping the finger against the
fingerprint sensor, the following functions will be enabled:
■ Logon to Windows and access a security-enabled homepage through
IE (Internet Explorer).
■ Files and folders can be encrypted/decrypted and third party access to
them prevented.
■ Disable the password-protected screen-saver when returning from
power-saving (standby) mode.
■ Power-on Security and Single Sign-on feature.
■ Authentication of the User Password and Hard Disk Drive Password
when booting up the computer.
To "swipe" refers to the action of reading a fingerprint using the fingerprint
sensor.
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Points to note about the Fingerprint Sensor
Failure to follow these guidelines might result in (1) damage to the sensor
or cause sensor failure, (2) finger recognition problems, or lower finger
recognition success rate.
■ Do not scratch or poke the sensor with your nails or any hard or sharp
objects.
■ Do not press the sensor strongly.
■ Do not touch the sensor with a wet finger or any wet objects. Keep
sensor surface dry and free of water vapor.
■ Do not touch the sensor with a soiled finger. Minute foreign particles on
a soiled or dirty finger may scratch the sensor.
■ Do not paste stickers or write on the sensor.
■ Do not touch the sensor with a finger or any object that has a build-up of
static electricity on it.
Observe the following before you place your finger on the sensor whether
for fingerprint enrollment/registration or recognition.
■ Wash and dry your hands thoroughly.
■ Remove static electricity from your fingers by touching any metal
surface. Static electricity is a common cause of sensor failures,
especially when the weather is dry.
■ Clean the sensor with a lint-free cloth. Do not use detergent to clean the
sensor.
■ Avoid the following finger conditions for enrollment or recognition as
they may result in fingerprint enrollment errors or a drop in the
fingerprint recognition success rate
■ Soaked or swollen finger (e.g. after taking bath)
■ Injured finger
■ Wet finger
■ Soiled or oily finger
■ Extremely dry skin condition on finger
Observe the following to improve the fingerprint recognition success rate.
■ Enroll two or more fingers.
■ Enroll additional fingers if recognition failure occurs often using enrolled
fingers.
■ Check your finger condition. Changed conditions, such as injured,
rough, extremely dry, wet, soiled, dirty, oily, soaked, swollen fingers,
may lower the recognition success rate. Also if the fingerprint is worn
down or the finger becomes thinner or fatter, the recognition success
rate may be lowered.
■ The fingerprint for each finger is different and unique. Please ensure
that only the registered or enrolled fingerprint or fingerprints are used
for identification.
■ Check sliding position and speed (see the drawing and information on
the following pages).
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How to Delete the Fingerprint Data
Saved fingerprint data is stored in non-volatile memory inside the
fingerprint sensor. If you hand over the computer to others, or dispose of it,
it is recommended that you perform the following operations.
1. Click start, point to All Programs, point to Protector Suite QL and
click Control Center.
2. The Protector Suite Software screen is displayed.
3. Click Fingerprints and click Delete.
4. Click Settings and click Fingerprint Storage Inspector.
5. The Fingerprint Storage Inspector screen is displayed. If other
fingerprint data is still displayed on the list. Select all fingerprint data
and click remove.
6. Check whether all fingerprint data was deleted on the fingerprint
Storage inspector screen.
Fingerprint Sensor Limitations.
■ The fingerprint sensor compares and analyzes the unique
characteristics in a fingerprint.
■ A warning message will be displayed when recognition is abnormal or
recognition is not successful within a fixed duration.
■ The recognition success rate may differ from user to user.
■ Toshiba does not guarantee that this fingerprint recognition technology
will be error-free.
■ Toshiba does not guarantee that the fingerprint sensor will recognize
the enrolled user or accurately screen out unauthorized users at all
times. Toshiba is not liable for any failure or damage that might arise out
of the use of this fingerprint recognition software or utility.
The following illustrations show the correct way to slide your finger over the
recognition sensor.
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Align your fingertip with the sensor as shown in the drawing and Swipe
Points to note about the Fingerprint Utility
Backups for saved fingerprint data and saved information in the
PasswordBank can be performed in Import or Export User Data under
Fingerprint Software Management. However, encrypted files cannot be
backed within Mysafe using this function. Instead it is recommended that
you backup encrypted files to external media using standard methods such
as the file copy process within Windows XP.
If Windows XP’s file encryption function EFS (Encryption File System) is
used to encrypt a file, the file cannot be further encrypted using the
encryption function of this software.
If the fingerprint sensor and Trusted Platform Module (TPM) security are
used as identification devices, install and configure the Infineon TPM
Professional package first before configuring the fingerprint utility. Please
refer to the TPM (Trusted Platform Module) Installation Guide for the
installation and configuration methods for TPM.
In the help file, it is stated that this software's PasswordBank function can
be used for the Internet and general applications. However, the Internet
PasswordBank function in the fingerprint utility provided in this computer
can only be used with IE (Internet Explorer).
Set Up Procedure
Please use the following procedure when first using fingerprint
authentication.
Fingerprint Registration
Enroll the required authentication data using the "User Enrollment" Wizard.
■ The fingerprint authentication uses the same Windows logon ID and
password. If the Windows logon password has not been setup, please
do so before registration.
■ Up to 21 fingerprint patterns can be registered on this sensor.
1. Click start, point to All Programs, point to Protector Suite QL and
click User Enrollment Wizard.
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You can also start User Enrollment Wizard using the following method.
■ Click the Protector Suite QL icon in the Task Bar.
■ Swipe your finger across the Fingerprint Sensor.
2. Click Next.
3. The User’s Password screen is displayed. Ensure the same Windows
logon username is displayed before entering a password into the Enter
your password field. Click Next.
4. The Hints for Fingerprint Enrollment screen is displayed.
Confirm the message and that there is a checkmark in Run Interactive
Tutorial, and click Next.
5. The Correct Swipe Procedure screen is displayed. Confirm the
message and click Next.
6. The Scanning Practice screen is displayed.
You can practice swiping your finger and when you have finished
practicing swiping your finger, click Next.
7. The User’s Fingers screen is displayed. Based on the illustration,
select the finger to be recognized, and then click Next. Previously
enrolled fingerprints would have green check marks. The fingerprint
being enrolled now would have a red check mark. If any of the
previously enrolled fingerprints is selected again, the latest information
will be enrolled and previous information over-written.
8. The Advanced Security screen is displayed.
Select whether to enable the security function, and click Next.
9. The Finalization screen is displayed. Click Finish. This completes the
fingerprint registration process.
Window Logon via Fingerprint Authentication
In place of the usual Windows logon by ID and password, fingerprint
authentication also allows logon to Windows.
This is useful especially when many users are using the same computer as
it allows the user selection screen to be skipped.
Fingerprint Authentication Procedure
1. Start up the computer.
2. The Logon Authorization screen is displayed. Choose any of the
enrolled fingers and swipe the fingerprint on the sensor.
If authentication is successful, the user will be logged on to Windows.
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If the fingerprint authentication fails, please logon using the Windows logon
password.
Please logon using the Windows logon password if the fingerprint
authentication failed for three consecutive tries. To logon using the
Windows logon password, enter the Windows logon password at the
"Welcome" screen as normal.
A warning message will be displayed when authentication is abnormal or
authentication is not successful within a fixed duration.
Fingerprint Power-on Security
General
The fingerprint authentication system can be used to replace the keyboardbased User/BIOS Password authentication system when booting up.
If you do not want to use the fingerprint authentication system for password
authentication when booting up, but prefer to use the keyboard-based
system instead, press the BkSP (backspace) key or the ESC/Rotation
button when the Fingerprint Power-on Security screen is displayed. This
will switch the password input screen to the keyboard-based one.
■ It is necessary to register the User Password before using the
Fingerprint Power-on Security and its extended function, the
Fingerprint Single Sign-on Feature. Please use TOSHIBA Password
Utility to register the User Password.
■ If you fail fingerprint authentication more than five times, you must
enter the User Password or Supervisor Password manually to start the
computer.
■ When swiping, please do it slowly and at a constant speed. If this does
not improve the authentication rate, please adjust the speed.
■ If there are any changes in the environment or settings related to
authorization, you will be required to provide authorization information
such as a User Password or Hard Disk Drive password.
How to Enable Fingerprint Power-on Security Settings
It is necessary to first enroll your fingerprint with the Protector Suite QL
application prior to enabling and configuring the Fingerprint Power-on
Security System. Check that your fingerprint is enrolled before configuring
the settings. See Manual for Fingerprint Registration/Enrollment
instructions.
1. Swipe your finger across the Fingerprint Sensor.
2. MENU appears in the lower right corner of the screen. Swipe (*) your
finger on the Fingerprint Sensor, and select Control Center from the
MENU items.
(*). It is recommended that the keyboard cursor keys (movement) and enter
key (selection) or the directional pad be used when selecting an Item from
the Menu in laptop or landscape modes.
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3. The Fingerprint Software Management screen is displayed. Click
Settings and click Power-on Security.
4. The Protector Suite Settings screen is displayed. Place a checkmark
in Allow power-on security single sign-on within Enable logon support
and click OK.
Fingerprint Single Sign-on Feature
General
This is a feature that allows the user to complete the authentication for both
the User/BIOS Password (and optionally the hard disk drive Password) and
logging onto Windows using only one fingerprint authentication when
booting up. It is necessary to register the User/BIOS Password and
Windows Logon Password before using the Fingerprint Power-on Security
and this Fingerprint Single Sign-on Feature. Please use the TOSHIBA
Password Utility to register your User/BIOS Password. If Windows Logon is
not the default for your system, see Manual to register your Windows
Logon Password.
Only one fingerprint authentication is required to replace the User/BIOS
Password (and, if selected, the hard disk drive Password) and the Windows
Logon Password.
How to Enable Fingerprint Single Sign-on Feature
It is necessary to first enroll your fingerprint with the Protector Suite QL
application prior to enabling and configuring the How to Enable Fingerprint
Single Sign-on Feature. Check that the fingerprint is enrolled before
configuring the settings. See Manual for Fingerprint
Registration/Enrollment instructions.
1. Swipe your finger across the Fingerprint Sensor.
2. MENU appears in the lower right corner of the screen. Swipe (*) your
finger on the Fingerprint Sensor, and select Control Center from the
MENU items.
(*). It is recommended that the keyboard cursor keys (movement) and enter
key (selection) or the directional pad be used when selecting an Item from
the Menu in laptop or landscape modes.
3. The Fingerprint Software Management screen is displayed. Click
Settings and click System Settings.
4. The Power-on Security screen is displayed. Place a checkmark in
Allow power-on security single sign-on within Enable logon support and
click OK.
Fingerprint utility limitations
TOSHIBA does not guarantee that the Fingerprint utility technology will be
completely secure or error-free. TOSHIBA does not guarantee that the
Fingerprint utility will accurately screen out unauthorized users at all times.
TOSHIBA is not liable for any failure or damage that might arise out of the
use of the fingerprint software or utility.
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How to Swipe the Finger
Using the following steps when swiping fingers for fingerprint registration or
authentication will help to minimize authentication failures:
1. Align the first joint of the finger to the center of the sensor. Lightly touch
the sensor and swipe finger levelly towards you when in portrait mode,
and sideways when in either landscape mode or Laptop mode.
While lightly touching the sensor, swipe the finger towards you when in
portrait mode, and sideways when in either landscape mode or Laptop
mode until the sensor surface becomes visible.
■ Avoid swiping with the finger stiff or pressed-on too hard
Fingerprint reading may fail if the center of the fingerprint is not
touching on the sensor, or when finger is swiped while pressing hard.
Make sure that the center of the fingerprint is touching the sensor
before swiping.
■ Always confirm the center of the fingerprint whirl so that it is swiped
along the centerline of the sensor.
■ When fingerprint reading is not successful
There is a possibility of authentication failures if the finger is swiped too
quickly or too slowly. Follow the onscreen instructions to adjust the
speed of the swipe.
Using the USB floppy disk drive (optional)
The USB floppy disk drive accommodates 1.44-megabyte or 720-kilobyte
floppy disks and connects to the USB port. Refer to Chapter 2, The Grand
Tour, for more information. It is supplied as standard with some models and
as an option with others.
Connecting the USB floppy disk drive
To connect the drive, plug the floppy disk drive’s USB connector into a
computer’s USB port.
Make sure the connector is back side up and properly aligned with the
socket. Do not try to force the connection, doing so can damage the
connecting pins.
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USB connector
USB port
Connecting the USB floppy disk drive
If you connect the USB floppy disk drive after turning on the computer, it
will take about 10 seconds for the computer to recognize the drive. Do not
disconnect and reconnect before 10 seconds has elapsed.
Disconnecting USB floppy disk drive
When you have finished using the USB floppy disk drive, follow the
procedures below to disconnect it:
1. Wait for the indicator light to go out to make sure all floppy disk activity
has stopped.
If you disconnect the USB floppy disk drive or turn off the power while the
computer is accessing the drive you may lose data or damage the floppy
disk or the drive.
2. Click the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the Task Bar.
3. Click USB floppy disk drive device that you want remove.
4. Pull the floppy disk drive’s USB connector out of the computer’s USB
port.
Changing Ultra Slim Bay modules
This section explains how to change modules in the Ultra Slim Bay. The
illustrations show replacement of the optical media drive with the Ultra Slim
Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor. Therefore, the text refers to those modules.
However, the procedures are the same for any of the modules: DVD-ROM /
CD-R/RW drive, DVD Super Multi drive and Hard Disk Drive adaptor.
To avoid injury, do not put your hand into the Ultra Slim Bay slot.
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The TOSHIBA Mobile Extension is preinstalled to support hot swapping
under Windows. Refer to Chapter 1, Introduction for information on using
this utility to change modules while the computer’s power is on.
Removing a module
Remove the Ultra Slim Bay module as described below.
1. Wait for the indicator light to go out to make sure all disk activity has
stopped.
2. Turn the computer upside down.
Wait for all disk indicators to go out before you turn over the computer.
Lay the computer down gently as shock can damage the hard disk drive or
other components.
3. Remove the screw near the icon that holds the Ultra Slim Bay in place.
4. Make sure the screw in the Ultra Slim Bay lock screw is set in the hole
to the unlock position.
5. Slide the Ultra Slim Bay latch to the unlock position.
6. Grasp the optical media drive and slide it out.
The optical media drive and other Ultra Slim Bay modules can become hot
with use. Be careful when removing the module.
Store the DVD Super Multi drive unit in the Ultra Slim Bay Case when
removing it from the computer or transporting it.
Lock screw
Ultra Slim Bay latch
Optical media drive
Removing the optical media drive
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Inserting a module
Insert the Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor as described below.
1. Insert the Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor in the computer as
shown below and press until the ejector mechanism clicks.
2. If you want to lock the Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor, place the
Ultra Slim Bay lock screw in the hole for its lock position.
Lock screw
Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive
adaptor
Inserting the Ultra Slim Bay Hard Disk Drive adaptor
Using optical media drives
The text and illustrations in this section refer primarily to the optical media
drive. However, operations are the same for other optical drives in the Ultra
Slim Bay. The full-size drive provides high-performance execution of
CD/DVD-ROM-based programs. You can run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8 cm
(3.15") CD/DVDs without an adaptor. An ATAPI interface controller is used
for CD/DVD-ROM operation. When the computer is accessing a CD/DVDROM, an indicator on the drive glows and the Ultra Slim Bay indicator
glows.
Use the WinDVD application to view DVD-Video discs.
If you have a DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive, refer also to the Writing CDs on
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive section for precautions on writing to CDs.
If you have a DVD Super Multi drive, refer also to the Writing CD/DVDs on
DVD Super Multi drive section for precautions on writing to CDs/DVDs.
When the power of the optical media drive is off, pressing the Fn + Tab
keys will turn the power of the optical media drive on. Furthermore, it is
possible to set it to turn the power of the optical media drive on and eject
the tray at the same time.
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Loading discs
To load CD/DVDs, follow the steps below.
1. When the computer’s power is on, press the eject button to open
the disc tray slightly.
Eject button
Pressing the eject button
2. Grasp the disc tray gently and pull until it is fully opened.
Disc tray
Pulling the disc tray open
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3. Lay the CD/DVD, label side up, in the disc tray.
Laser lens
Inserting a CD/DVD
When the disc tray is fully opened, the edge of the computer will extend
slightly over the CD/DVD tray. Therefore, you will need to turn the CD/DVD
at an angle when you place it in the disc tray. After seating the CD/DVD,
however, make sure it lies flat.
■ Do not touch the laser lens or any portion of its surrounding casing as
this could cause misalignment.
■ Prevent foreign objects from entering the drive. Check the surface of
the disc tray, especially the area behind the front edge of the disc tray,
to make sure there are no such objects before closing the drive.
4. Press gently at the center of the CD/DVD until you feel it click into
place. The CD/DVD should lie below the top of the spindle, flush with
the spindle base.
5. Push the center of the disc tray to close it. Press gently until it locks into
place.
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If the CD/DVD is not seated properly when the disc tray is closed, the
CD/DVD might be damaged. Also, the disc tray might not open fully when
you press the eject button.
Closing the CD/DVD disc tray
Removing discs
To remove the CD/DVD, follow the steps below.
Do not press the eject button while the computer is accessing the media
drive. Wait for the Ultra Slim Bay indicator to go out before you open the
disc tray. Also, if the CD/DVD is spinning when you open the disc tray, wait
for it to stop before you remove it.
1. To pop the disc tray partially open, press the eject button. Gently pull
the disc tray out until it is fully opened.
When the disc tray pops open slightly, wait a moment to make sure the
CD/DVD has stopped spinning before pulling the disc tray fully open.
2. The CD/DVD extends slightly over the sides of the disc tray so you can
grasp it. Gently lift out the CD/DVD.
Removing a CD/DVD
3. Push the center of the disc tray to close it. Press gently until it locks into
place.
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How to remove CD/DVD when the disc tray will not open
Pressing the eject button will not open the disc tray when the computer
power is off. If the power is off, you can open the disc tray by inserting a
slender object (about 15 mm) such as a straightened paper clip into the
eject hole just to the right of the eject button.
Diameter 1.0mm
Eject hole
Manual release with the eject hole
Turn off the power before you use the eject hole. If the CD/DVD is spinning
when you open the disc tray, the CD/DVD could fly off the spindle and
cause injury.
Writing CDs on DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive
Depending on the type of drive installed, you may be able to write CDs.
The DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive lets you write as well as read CD-ROMs.
Observe the precautions in this section to ensure the best performance for
writing CDs. For information on loading and unloading CDs refer to the
Using optical media drives section.
■ Refer to the Writable discs, Chapter 2 for the details about the types of
writable CD/DVD discs.
■ Do not turn off the power of the optical media drive while the computer
is accessing the drive. If you turn off the power, you may lose data.
■ When the power of the optical media drive is off, the disc tray will not
open even if the eject button is pushed. Use the optical drive power to
turn the power of the optical media drive on. Refer to Chapter 1,
Special features.
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When writing to media using an optical drive, always connect the AC
adaptor to a power plug socket. If data is written while powered by the
batteries, writing may sometimes fail due to low battery power and data
loss may occur.
Before writing or rewriting
Please observe the following points when you write or rewrite the data.
■ We recommend the following manufacturers of CD-R and CD-RW
media. Media quality can affect write or rewrite success rates.
CD-R:
TAIYO YUDEN CO., LTD.
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
Multi-Speed and High-Speed CD-RW:
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
Ultra-Speed CD-RW:
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
TOSHIBA has confirmed the operation of CD-R and CD-RW media of the
manufacturers above. Operation of other media cannot be guaranteed.
■ The actual number of rewrites to CD-RW mdeia is affected by the
quality of the disc and the way it is used.
■ Be sure to connect the AC adaptor when you write or rewrite.
■ Be sure to close all other software programs except the writing
software.
■ Do not run software such as a screen saver which can put a heavy load
on the CPU.
■ Operate the computer at full power. Do not use power-saving features.
■ Do not write while virus check software is running. Wait for it to finish,
then disable virus detection programs including any software that
checks files automatically in the background.
■ Do not use hard disk utilities, including those intended to enhance hard
disk drive access speeds. They may cause unstable operation and
damage data.
■ Write from the computer's hard disk drive to the CD. Do not try to write
from shared devices such as a LAN server or any other network device.
■ Writing with software other than Sonic RecordNow! has not been
confirmed. Therefore, operation with other software cannot be
guaranteed.
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When writing or rewriting
Note the following when you write or rewrite a CD-R or CD-RW.
■ Always copy data from the hard disk drive to the optical media. Do not
use cut-and-paste as the original data will be lost if there is a write error.
■ Do not perform any of the following actions:
■ Change users in the Windows XP operating system.
■ Operate the computer for any other function, including use of a
mouse or Touch Pad, closing/opening the LCD panel.
■ Start a communication application such as a modem.
■ Apply impact or vibration to the computer.
■ Install, remove or connect external devices, including the following:
PC card, SD card, Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro, xD picture card,
USB devices, external monitor, i.LINK devices, optical digital
devices.
■ Open the optical media drive.
■ Remove the optical media drive from the Ultra Slim Bay.
■ If the media is poor in quality, dirty or damaged, writing or rewriting
errors may occur.
■ Set the computer on a level surface and avoid places subject to
vibration such as airplanes, trains or cars. Do not use an unstable
surface such as a stand.
■ Keep mobile phones and other wireless communication devices away
from the computer.
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Super Multi drive
You can use the DVD Super Multi drive to write data to either CD-R/RW or
DVD-R/-RW/+R/+RW/-RAM discs. The following applications for writing are
provided: RecordNow!, and DLA licensed by Sonic Solutions, and
InterVideo’s WinDVD Creator Platinum.
■ Refer to the Writable discs, Chapter 2 for the details about the types of
writable CD/DVD discs.
■ Do not turn off the power of the while the computer is accessing the
drive. If you turn off the power, you may lose data.
■ When the power of the optical media drive is off, the disc tray will not
open even if the eject button is pushed. Use the Optical Drive Power
icon to turn the power to the drive on. Refer to Chapter 1, Special
features.
When writing to media using an optical drive, always connect the AC
adaptor to a power plug socket. If data is written while powered by the
batteries, writing may sometimes fail due to low battery power and data
loss may occur.
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Important message
Before you write or rewrite to CD-R/RW or DVD-R/-RW/+R/+RW/-RAM
discs, read and follow all setup and operating instructions in this section.
If you fail to do so, the DVD Super Multi drive may not function properly,
and you may fail to write or rewrite, lose data or incur other damage.
Disclaimer
TOSHIBA does not bear responsibility for the following:
■ Damage to any CD-R/RW or DVD-R/-RW/+R/+RW/-RAM disc that may
be caused by writing or rewriting with this product.
■ Any change or loss of the recorded contents of CD-R/RW or
DVD-R/-RW/+R/+RW/-RAM disc that may be caused by writing or
rewriting with this product, or for any business profit loss or business
interruption that may be caused by the change or loss of the recorded
contents.
■ Damage that may be caused by using third party equipment or
software.
Given the technological limitations of current optical disc writing drives, you
may experience unexpected writing or rewriting errors due to disc quality or
problems with hardware devices. Also, it is a good idea to make two or
more copies of important data, in case of undesired change or loss of the
recorded contents.
Before writing or rewriting
■ Based on TOSHIBA's limited compatibility testing, we suggest the
following manufacturers of CD-R/RW and DVD-R/+R/-RW/+RW/-RAM
disc. However, in no event does TOSHIBA guarantee the operation,
quality or performance of any disc. Disc quality can affect write or
rewrite success rates.
CD-R:
TAIYO YUDEN CO., LTD.
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
CD-RW: (Multi-Speed and High-Speed)
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
CD-RW: (Ultra-Speed)
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
DVD-R:
DVD Specifications for Recordable Disc for General Version 2.0
TAIYO YUDEN CO., LTD.
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.
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DVD-R DL: (Double Layer supported model only)
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
DVD+R:
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
DVD+R DL: (Double Layer supported model only)
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
DVD-RW:
DVD Specifications for Recordable Disc for Version 1.1 or version
1.2
VICTOR COMPANY OF JAPAN.LIMITED
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
DVD+RW:
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
DVD-RAM:
DVD Specifications for DVD-RAM Disc for Version 2.0, Version 2.1
or Version 2.2
Hitachi Maxell Ltd.
■ This drive cannot use discs that allow writing faster than 8 speed
(DVD-R, DVD+R), 4 speed (DVD-RW, DVD+RW), 5 speed
(DVD-RAM), 2.4 speed (DVD-R DL), 2 speed (DVD-R DL).
■ 2.6GB and 5.2GB DVD-RAM media cannot be read from or written to.
■ Some types and formats of DVD-R DL and DVD+R DL discs may be
unreadable.
■ If the disc is poor in quality, dirty or damaged, writing or rewriting errors
may occur. Be careful to check the disc for dirt or damage before you
use it.
■ The actual number of rewrites to CD-RW, DVD-RW, DVD+RW or
DVD-RAM is affected by the quality of the disc and the way it is used.
■ There are two types of DVD-R discs: authoring and general use discs.
Do not use authoring discs. Only general use discs can be written to by
a computer drive.
■ You can use DVD-RAM discs that can be removed from a cartridge and
DVD-RAM discs designed without a cartridge.
■ Other DVD-ROM drives for computers or other DVD players may not be
able to read DVD-R/-RW or DVD+R/+RW discs.
■ Data written to a CD-R/DVD-R/DVD+R disc cannot be deleted either in
whole or in part.
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■ Data deleted (erased) from a CD-RW, DVD-RW, DVD+RW and
DVD-RAM disc cannot be recovered. Check the content of the disc
carefully before you delete it. If multiple drives that can write data to
discs are connected, be careful not to delete data from the wrong drive.
■ In writing to a DVD-R/-RW, DVD+R/+RW or DVD-RAM disc, some disc
space is required for file management, so you may not be able to write
the full capacity of the disc.
■ Since the disc is based on the DVD standard, it might be filled with
dummy data if the written data is less than about 1 GB. Even if you write
only a small amount of data, it might take time to fill in the dummy data.
■ DVD-RAM formatted by FAT32 cannot be read in Windows 2000
without DVD-RAM Driver Software.
■ When multiple drives that can write data to discs are connected, be
careful not to write to the wrong drive.
■ Be sure to connect the AC adaptor before you write or rewrite.
■ Before you enter standby/Hibernation Mode, be sure to finish
DVD-RAM writing. Writing is finished if you can eject DVD-RAM media.
■ Be sure to close all other software programs except the writing
software.
■ Do not run software such as a screen saver, which can put a heavy load
on the CPU.
■ Operate the computer in full-power mode. Do not use power-saving
features.
■ Do not write while virus check software is running. Wait for it to finish
and then disable virus detection programs including any software that
checks files automatically in the background.
■ Do not use hard disk utilities, including those intended to enhance hard
disk drive access speed. They may cause unstable operation and data
damage.
■ CD-RW (Ultra Speed +) media is not supported. If used, data may be
lost or damaged.
■ Write from the computer’s hard disk drive to the CD/DVD. Do not try to
write from shared devices such as a LAN server or any other network
device.
■ Writing with software other than RecordNow! and InterVideo WinDVD
Creator Platinum are not recommended.
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When writing or rewriting
Please observe/consider the following when you write or rewrite to a
CD-R/RW, DVD-R/-RW/-RAM or DVD+R/+RW disc.
■ Do not perform any of the following actions when writing or rewriting:
■ Change users in the Windows XP operating system.
■ Operate the computer for any other function, including using a
mouse or Touch Pad or closing/opening the LCD panel.
■ Start a communication application such as a modem.
■ Apply impact or vibration to the computer.
■ Install, remove or connect external devices, including the following:
PC card, SD card, Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro, xD picture card,
USB devices, external monitor, i.LINK devices, optical digital
devices.
■ Use the Audio/Video control button to reproduce music or voice.
■ Open the optical media drive.
■ Remove the optical media drive from the Ultra Slim Bay.
■ Do not use shut down/log off and standby/hibernation while writing or
rewriting.
■ Make sure writing or rewriting is completed before going into
standby/hibernation. Writing is completed if you can open the
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW or DVD Super Multi drive tray.
■ Set the computer on a level surface and avoid places subject to
vibration such as airplanes, trains, or cars. Do not use an unstable
surface such as a stand.
■ Keep mobile phones and other wireless communication devices away
from the computer.
■ Always copy data from the hard disk drive to the optical media. Do not
use cut-and-paste. The original data will be lost if there is a write error.
RecordNow! Basic for TOSHIBA
Note the following limitations when you use RecordNow!:
■ DVD-Video cannot be created using RecordNow!.
■ DVD-Audio cannot be created using RecordNow!.
■ You cannot use RecordNow!'s "Audio CD for Car or Home CD Player"
function to record music to DVD-R/-RW or DVD+R/+RW discs.
■ Do not use the "Exact Copy" function of RecordNow! to copy
DVD-Video and DVD-ROM with copyright protection.
■ DVD-RAM disc cannot be backed up with the "Exact Copy" function of
RecordNow!.
■ You cannot back up a CD-ROM or CD-R/RW to DVD-R/-RW or
DVD+R/+RW using the "Exact Copy" function of RecordNow!.
■ You cannot back up DVD-ROM, DVD-Video, DVD-R/-RW or
DVD+R/+RW to CD-R/RW using the "Exact Copy" function of
RecordNow!.
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■ RecordNow! cannot record in packet format.
■ You might not be able to use the "Exact Copy" function of RecordNow!
to back up a DVD-R/-RW or DVD+R/+RW disc that was made with
other software on a different DVD-R/-RW or DVD+R/+RW recorder.
■ If you add data to a DVD-R and DVD+R disc that you have already
recorded to, you might not be able to read the added data under some
circumstances. It cannot be read in 16-bit operating systems, such as
Windows 98SE and Windows Me. In Windows NT4, you will need
Service Pack 6 or later to read added data while in Windows 2000,
you will need Service Pack 2 or later to read it. Some DVD-ROM and
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drives cannot read added data regardless of the
operating system.
■ RecordNow! does not support recording to DVD-RAM discs. To record
to a DVD-RAM disc, use Explorer or a similar utility.
■ When you back up a DVD disc, be sure the source drive supports
recording to DVD-R/-RW or DVD+R/+RW discs. If the source drive
does not support recording to DVD-R/-RW or DVD+R/+RW discs,
it might not be backed up correctly.
■ When you back up a DVD-R, DVD-RW, DVD+R or DVD+RW, be sure to
use the same type of disc.
■ You cannot partially delete any data written to a CD-RW, DVD-RW or
DVD+RW disc.
Data Verification
To verify that data is written or rewritten correctly, follow the steps below
before you write or rewrite a Data CD/DVD.
1. Click the Options button (
) on the RecordNow! Console to open
the Options panels.
2. Select Data from the left-hand menu.
3. Mark the Verify data written to the disc after burning check box in the
Data Options.
Click the OK button.
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DLA for TOSHIBA
Note the following limitations when you use DLA:
■ This software supports only rewritable discs (DVD+RW, DVD-RW, and
CD-RW). It does not support DVD+R, DVD-R, and CD-R discs that are
not rewritable.
■ DLA does not support formatting and writing to a DVD-RAM disc - these
functions are performed by DVD-RAM Driver Software. Even if the DLA
Format menu appears when inserting a DVD-RAM disc and rightclicking the drive icon in Windows Explorer, you should use the
'DVDForm' command to format this disc. You can run 'DVDForm' by
clicking the Start button on the taskbar to display the Start menu and
then selecting 'All Programs', 'DVD-RAM', 'DVD-RAM Driver' and
'DVDForm' sequentially.
■ Do not use any discs that have been formatted with packet writing
software other than DLA. Similarly, do not use any discs that have been
formatted with DLA with any packet writing software other than DLA.
When using a disc you are not familiar with, format it by selecting
"Full Format" before using it.
■ Do not use the cut-and-paste function for files and folders. A file or
folder that has been cut may be lost if writing fails due to an error on the
disc.
■ When writing any setup files for an application to a disc formatted by
DLA, and attempting to start Setup from this disc, an error may occur. In
this case, please copy the files to your hard disk and then run Setup
from there.
When using WinDVD Creator Platinum
You can record video back to your digital camcorder via i.LINK (IEEE 1394)
using WinDVD Creator Platinum. However, there is a case where its
playback sound appears choppy - in this instance please follow the
instructions below:
1. Click start and select the Control Panel.
2. Click the Performance and Maintenance icon in the Control Panel.
3. Click the System icon in the Performance and Maintenance window.
4. Click the Advanced tab in the System Properties window.
5. Click the Settings icon in the "Performance" section.
6. Click the Advanced tab in the Performance Options window.
7. Click the Change icon in the "virtual memory" section.
8. Select the Custom size button in the Virtual Memory window.
9. Specify much higher values for "Initial size" and "Maximum size."
10. Click the Set button in the Virtual Memory window.
11. Click the OK button in the Virtual Memory window.
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How to make a DVD-Video
Simplified steps for making a DVD-Video from video data captured from a
DV-Camcorder:
1. Click [Start] - [All Programs] - [InterVideo WinDVD Creator2] [InterVideo WinDVD Creator] to launch WinDVD Creator.
2. Click [Capture] button then capture the video data from the
DV-Camcorder via IEEE1394.
3. Click [Edit] button then drag the video clips from [Video Library] tab to
the edit track.
4. Click [Make Movie] button in the top bar.
5. Double Click the Right arrow button icon in the center of right side.
6. Put a blank DVD-R/+R disc or an erased DVD-RW/+RW disc in the
drive.
7. Click [Start] to record to the disc.
8. When recording is finished, the tray opens.
How to learn more about InterVideo WinDVD Creator
Please refer to the on-line Help for additional InterVideo WinDVD Creator
information.
Important information for use
Note the following limitations when you write to a video DVD:
1. Editing digital video
■ Log in with Administrator rights to use WinDVD Creator.
■ Make sure that your computer is running on AC power when using
WinDVD Creator.
■ Operate the computer at Full Power. Do not use power-saving
features.
■ While you are editing a DVD-Video, you can display previews.
However, if another application is running, the preview might not
display properly.
■ WinDVD Creator cannot show video on the external monitor when in
simultaneous mode.
■ WinDVD Creator cannot edit or play copy protected content.
■ Do not change display settings while using WinDVD Creator.
■ Do not enter standby/Hibernation Mode while using WinDVD
Creator.
■ Do not operate WinDVD Creator immediately after turning on the
computer. Please wait until all disk/disc drive activity has stopped.
■ When recording to a DV-Camcorder, to ensure you capture all of
your data, let the camcorder record for a few seconds before you
begin recording your actual data.
■ CD recorder, JPEG functions, DVD-Audio, mini DVD and Video CD
functions are not supported in this version.
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■ While recording video to DVD or tape, please close all other
programs.
■ Do not run software like a screen saver because it can put a heavy
load on the CPU.
■ Do not run communication applications like a modem or a LAN.
2. Before recording the video to DVD
■ When you record to DVD discs, please use only media
recommended by TOSHIBA.
■ Do not set the working drive to a slow device like a USB 1.1 hard
disk drive or it will fail to write the DVD.
■ Do not perform any of the following actions:
■ Operate the computer for any other function, including using a
mouse or Touch Pad or closing/opening the LCD panel.
■ Bump or cause vibration to the computer.
■ Use the Mode control button and Audio/Video control button to
reproduce music or voice.
■ Open the optical media drive.
■ Install, remove or connect external devices, including the
following:
PC card, SD card, Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro, xD picture
card, USB devices, external monitor, i.LINK devices, optical
digital devices.
■ Please verify your disc after recording important data.
■ DVD-R/+R/-RW discs cannot be written in VR format.
■ WinDVD Creator cannot export to DVD-Audio, VideoCD or miniDVD
format.
■ WinDVD Creator can write DVD-RAM/+RW in VR format, but the
disc may only play on your computer.
■ When writing to a DVD disc, WinDVD Creator requires 2GB or more
of disk space for every one hour of video.
■ When you make a fully recorded DVD, the chapter sequence may
not play correctly.
3. About Disc Manager
■ WinDVD Creator can edit one play list on a disc.
■ WinDVD Creator might show a different thumbnail than you
previously set in CE (Consumer Electronics) DVD-RAM recorder.
■ Using the Disc Manager, you can edit DVD-VR format on
DVD-RAM, DVD+VR format on DVD+RW, and DVD-Video format
on DVD-RW.
4. About recorded DVDs
■ Some DVD-ROM drives for personal computers or other DVD
players may not be able to read DVD-R/+R/-RW/+RW/-RAM discs.
■ When playing your recorded disc on your computer, please use the
WinDVD software application.
■ If you use an over-used rewritable disc, the full formatting might be
locked. Please use a brand new disc.
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Media care
This section provides tips on protecting data stored on your CD/DVDs and
floppy disks.
Handle your media with care. The following simple precautions will
increase the lifetime of your media and protect the data stored on them:
CD/DVDs
1. Store your CD/DVDs in the container they came in to protect them and
keep them clean.
2. Do not bend the CD/DVD.
3. Do not write on, apply a sticker to, or otherwise mar the surface of the
CD/DVD that contains data.
4. Hold the CD/DVD by its outside edge or the edge on the center hole.
Fingerprints on the surface can prevent the drive from properly reading
data.
5. Do not expose to direct sunlight, extreme heat or cold. Do not place
heavy objects on your CD/DVDs.
6. If your CD/DVDs become dusty or dirty, wipe them with a clean dry
cloth. Wipe from the center out, do not wipe in a circular direction
around the CD/DVD. If necessary, use a cloth dampened in water or a
neutral cleaner. Do not use benzine, thinner or similar cleaner.
Floppy disks
1. Store your floppy disks in the container they came in to protect them
and keep them clean. If a floppy disk is dirty, do not use cleaning fluid.
Clean it with a soft damp cloth.
2. Never open the shutter or touch the magnetic surface of your floppy
disk. You could permanently damage it and lose data.
3. Always handle floppy disks with care, to prevent the loss of stored data.
Always apply the floppy disk label in the correct location. Never apply a
new label on top of an existing one. The label could come loose and
damage the floppy drive.
4. Never use a pencil for writing on a floppy disk label. Pencil lead dust
could cause a system malfunction. Always use a felt-tipped pen. When
writing a title on a label, first write on the label, then apply the label to
the floppy disk.
5. Never put a floppy disk in a location where water or other liquid may
contact it or where it is excessively damp. It could cause data loss.
Never use a wet or damp floppy disk. It could damage the floppy disk
drive or other devices.
6. Data may be lost if the floppy disk is twisted; bent; or exposed to direct
sunlight, extreme heat or cold.
7. Do not place heavy objects on your floppy disks.
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8. Do not eat, smoke, or use erasers near your floppy disks. Foreign
particles inside the floppy disk’s jacket can damage the magnetic
surface.
9. Magnetic energy can destroy the data on your floppy disks. Keep your
floppy disks away from speakers, radios, television sets and other
sources of magnetic fields.
Sound System
This section describes audio controls including sound levels and power
management.
Volume Control
The Volume Control utility lets you control the audio volume in Windows for
both playback and recording.
■ To launch Volume Control for playback, click start, point to All
Programs, point to Accessories, point to Entertainment and click
Volume Control.
■ To launch Recording Control, click Options, point to Properties,
choose Recording and click OK.
■ To view details of the Volume Control, click Help on the Volume Control.
Microphone level
The change the microphone gain, follow the steps below.
1. Click start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to
Entertainment and click Volume Control.
2. Click Options and point to Properties.
3. Select Recording and click OK.
4. Click Options and select Advanced Controls.
5. Click Advanced.
6. Check the Microphone Boost checkbox.
SigmaTel Control Panel
SigmaTel Control Panel lets you control some of the audio settings. Follow
the steps below to launch the SigmaTel Control Panel:
1. Click start and click Control Panel.
2. If you are viewing the Control Panel in Category View, click on Switch
to Classic View.
3. Double-click the SigmaTel Audio icon.
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Volume control
To adjust the audio volume in Windows for both playback and recording,
click the Levels tab.
To hear the voice from a microphone or the analog sound from the line
input, disable the Mute button in the Input Monitor, and then disable the
Audio power management function described below.
Audio power management
The audio controller can be powered down when the audio function is not
used. To disable audio power management, follow the steps below.
1. Click the Advanced tab.
2. Check the Enable Power Management check box.
3. Input a time in Time to Power Saving State.
If the Enable Power Management check box is not checked, the audio
controller will always be in operation.
Graphic equalizer
Adjust the equalizer settings to enhance sound quality.
TOSHIBA Mic Effect
TOSHIBA Mic Effect provides you with a hands-free environment for
holding mutual communication via the Internet Protocol or Local Area
Network. If you wish to communicate with someone on your computer, you
can use a messenger application. However, with such an application, you
would hear your own voice returning to you as echo during the
communication if you did not use a headset system or headphone.
TOSHIBA Mic Effect will reduce these echoes generated on your computer.
TOSHIBA Mic Effect also provides you the Microphone Array. The
Microphone Array function eliminates sounds and noise originating outside
the range by specifying the target range and direction of the microphone
input.
For more instructions for this software, click start, point to All Programs,
point to TOSHIBA, point to Utilities and click TOSHIBA Mic Effect Help.
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Modem
Click the icon with the secondary mouse button to display the properties
menu on the screen.
■ Connection to any communication line other than an analog phone line
could cause a PC system failure.
■ Connect the built-in modem only to ordinary analog phone lines.
■ Never connect the built-in modem to a digital line (ISDN).
■ Never connect the built-in modem to the digital connector on a
public telephone or to a digital private branch exchange (PBX).
■ Never connect the built-in modem to a key telephone system for
residences or offices.
■ Never operate your PC on AC power during a thunderstorm. If you see
lightning or hear thunder, immediately turn off the PC. An electric surge
caused by the storm, may result in a system failure, loss of data or
hardware damage.
Region selection
Telecommunication regulations vary from one region to another, so you will
need to make sure the internal modem’s settings are correct for the region
in which it will be used.
The built-in modem can be used only in specified countries and regions.
Using the modem in an area not specified for use may cause a system
failure. Check the specified areas carefully before using it.
To select a region, follow the steps below.
1. Click start, point to All Programs, point to TOSHIBA, point to
Networking and click Modem Region Select.
Do not use the Country/Region Select function in the Modem setup utility
in the Control Panel if the function is available. If you change the
Country/Region in the Control Panel, the change may not take effect.
2. The Region Selection icon will appear in the Windows Task Bar.
3. Click the icon with the primary mouse button to display a list of regions
that the modem supports. A sub menu for telephony location
information will also be displayed. A check will appear next to the
currently selected region and telephony location.
4. Select a region from the region menu or a telephony location from the
sub-menu.
■ When you click a region it becomes the modem’s region selection,
and the New Location for telephony will be set automatically.
■ When you select a telephony location, the corresponding region is
automatically selected and it becomes the modem’s current region
setting.
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Properties menu
Click the icon with the secondary mouse button to display properties menu
on the screen.
Setting
You can enable or disable the following settings:
AutoRun Mode
The Region Select utility starts automatically when you start up the
operating system.
Open the Dialing Properties dialog box after selecting region.
The dialing properties dialog box will be displayed automatically after you
select the region.
Location list for region selection.
A submenu appears displaying location information for telephony.
Open dialog box, if the modem and Telephony Current
Location region code do not match.
A warning dialog box is displayed if current settings for region code and
telephony location are incorrect.
Modem Selection
If the computer cannot recognize the internal modem, a dialog box is
displayed. Select the COM port for your modem to use.
Dialing Properties
Select this item to display the dialing properties.
If you are using the computer in Japan, the Telecommunications Business
Law requires that you select Japan region mode. It is illegal to use the
modem in Japan with any other selection.
Connecting
To connect the modular cable, follow the steps below.
Use a modular cable (optional) to connect the modem to the telephone
system. Connect the end of the modular cable with the core to the
computer.
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■ Connection to any communication line other than an analog phone line
could cause a PC system failure.
■ Connect the built-in modem only to ordinary analog phone lines.
■ Never connect the built-in modem to a digital line (ISDN).
■ Never connect the built-in modem to the digital connector on a
public telephone or to a digital private branch exchange (PBX).
■ Never connect the built-in modem to a key telephone system for
residences or offices.
■ Never operate your PC on AC power during a thunderstorm. If you see
lightning or hear thunder, immediately turn off the PC. An electric surge
caused by the storm, may result in a system failure, loss of data or
hardware damage.
1. Plug one end of the modular cable into the computer’s modem jack.
2. Plug the other end of the modular cable into a telephone jack.
Telephone jack
Modem jack
Modular cable
Connecting the internal modem
Do not pull on the cable or move the computer while the cable is
connected.
If you use a storage device such as an optical drive or hard disk drive
connected to a 16-bit PC card, you might experience the following modem
problems:
■ Modem speed is slow or communication is interrupted.
■ Skips may occur in sound.
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Disconnecting
To disconnect the internal modular cable, follow the steps below.
1. Pinch the lever on the connector in the telephone jack and pull out the
connector.
2. Disconnect the cable from the computer’s modem jack in the same
manner.
Wireless communications
The computer’s wireless communication function supports both Wireless
LAN and Bluetooth devices.
All models are provided with a wireless communication switch. Some
models are equipped with both Wireless LAN and Bluetooth functions.
Wireless LAN
The Wireless LAN is compatible with other LAN systems based on Direct
Sequence Spread Spectrum / Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing
radio technology that complies with the IEEE802.11 Wireless LAN standard
(Revision A, B or G).
Do not install or remove an optional memory module while Wake-up on
Wireless LAN is enabled.
■ The Wake-up on Wireless LAN function consumes power even when
the system is off. Leave the AC adaptor connected while using this
feature.
■ The Wake-up on Wireless LAN function is effective only when it is
connected with an Access Point. This function becomes invalid when
the connection is broken.
■ Theoretical maximum speed: 54Mbps (IEEE802.11a, 802.11g).
■ Theoretical maximum speed: 11Mbps (IEEE802.11b).
■ Frequency Channel Selection (Revision A: 5 GHz, Revision B/G:
2.4 GHz).
■ Roaming over multiple channels.
■ Card Power Management.
■ Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) data encryption, based on the 128 bit
encryption algorithm.
■ Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA).
■ Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) data encryption.
■ Wake-up on Wireless LAN.
User’s Manual
4-44
Operating Basics
■ The values shown above are the theoretical maximums for Wireless
LAN standards. The actual values may differ.
■ The transmission speed over the wireless LAN, and the distance over
which the wireless LAN can reach, may vary depending on surrounding
electromagnetic environment, obstacles, access point design and
configuration, client design and software/hardware configurations. The
transmission rate described is the theoretical maximum speed as
specified under the appropriate standard - the actual transmission
speed will be lower than the theoretical maximum speed.
Security
■ TOSHIBA strongly recommend that you enable WEP (encryption)
functionality, otherwise your computer will be open to illegal access by
an outsider using a wireless connection. If this occurs, the outsider may
illegally access your system, eavesdrop, or cause the loss or
destruction of stored data.
■ TOSHIBA is not liable for the loss of data due to eavesdropping or
illegal access through the wireless LAN and the damage thereof.
Bluetooth wireless technology (optional)
Bluetooth™ wireless technology eliminates the need for cables between
electronic devices such as desktop computers, printers and mobile phones.
You cannot use the built-in Bluetooth functions and an optional Bluetooth
SD card simultaneously.
Bluetooth wireless technology has the following features:
Worldwide operation
The Bluetooth radio transmitter and receiver operate in the 2.4 GHz band,
which is license-free and compatible with radio systems in most countries
in the world.
Radio links
You can easily establish links between two or more devices. The link is
maintained even if the devices are not within line of sight.
Security
Two advanced security mechanisms ensure a high level of security:
■ Authentication prevents access to critical data and makes it impossible
to falsify the origin of a message.
■ Encryption prevents eavesdropping and maintains link privacy.
User’s Manual
4-45
Operating Basics
Bluetooth™ Stack for Windows® by TOSHIBA
Please note that this software is specifically designed for the following
operating systems:
■ Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Professional
■ Microsoft® Windows® XP
Detailed information regarding the use with these operating systems is
listed below. Please refer also to the electronic information which is
included with each software.
This Bluetooth™ Stack is based on the Bluetooth™ Version
1.1/1.2/2.0+EDR specification. TOSHIBA cannot confirm compatibility
between any PC products and/or other electronic devices that use
Bluetooth™ other than TOSHIBA mobile computers.
Release Notes related to the Bluetooth™ Stack for
Windows® by TOSHIBA
1. Install:
When installing the Bluetooth™ Stack for Windows® by TOSHIBA
software under Windows 2000 or Windows XP, please be aware that it
is not digitally signed.
2. Fax application software:
There is some fax application software that you cannot use on this
Bluetooth™ Stack.
3. Multi User:
On Windows XP, the use of Bluetooth is not supported in a multi-user
environment. This means that, when you use Bluetooth, other users
logged onto the same computer will not be able to use its Bluetooth
functionality.
Product Support:
The latest information regarding Operating System support, Language
Support or available upgrades can be found on our web site
http://www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in Europe or
www.pcsupport.toshiba.com in the United States.
User’s Manual
4-46
Operating Basics
Wireless communication switch
You can enable or disable Wireless LAN and Bluetooth functions, with the
on/off switch. No transmissions are sent or received when the switch is off.
Slide the switch to the right to turn it on and to the left to turn it off.
■ Do not use the Wireless LAN (WiFi) or Bluetooth functionalities near a
microwave oven or in areas subject to radio interference or magnetic
fields. Interference from a microwave oven or other source can disrupt
WiFi or Bluetooth operation.
■ Turn WiFi and Bluetooth functionalities off when near a person who
may have a cardiac pacemaker implant or other medical electric
device. Radio waves may affect pacemaker or medical device
operation, possibly resulting in serious injury. Follow the instruction of
your medical device when using any WiFi or Bluetooth functionality.
■ Always turn off WiFi or Bluetooth functionality if the PC is near
automatic control equipment or appliances such as automatic doors or
fire detectors. Radio waves can cause malfunction of such equipment,
possibly resulting in serious injury.
Wireless communication Indicator
The wireless communication indicator indicates the status of the wireless
communication functions.
Indicator status
Indication
Indicator off
Wireless communication switch is set to off.
Automatic power down because of overheating.
Power malfunction.
Indicator glows
Wireless communication switch is on. Wireless
LAN or Bluetooth is turned on by an application.
If you used the Task Bar to disable the wireless LAN, restart the computer
or perform the following procedure to re-enable it : start, Control Panel,
System, Hardware Device Manager, Network adapters, Intel®
PRO/Wireless 3945BG/3945ABG Network Connection and enable.
User’s Manual
4-47
Operating Basics
LAN
The computer has built-in support for Ethernet LAN (10 megabits per
second, 10BASE-T), Fast Ethernet LAN (100 megabits per second,
100BASE-TX) and Gigabit Ethernet LAN (1000 megabits per second,
1000BASE-T).
This section describes how to connect/disconnect to a LAN.
Do not install or remove an optional memory module while Wake-up on
LAN is enabled.
The Wake-up on LAN function consumes power even when the system is
off. Leave the AC adaptor connected while using this feature.
LAN cable types
The computer must be configured properly before connecting to a LAN.
Logging onto a LAN using the computer’s default settings could cause a
malfunction in LAN operation. Check with your LAN administrator
regarding set-up procedures.
If you are using Gigabit Ethernet LAN (1000 megabits per second,
1000BASE-T), be sure to connect with a CAT5E cable or higher.
You cannot use a CAT3 or CAT5 cable.
If you are using Fast Ethernet LAN (100 megabits per second,
100BASE-TX), be sure to connect with a CAT5 cable or higher.
You cannot use a CAT3 cable.
If you are using Ethernet LAN (10 megabits per second, 10BASE-T), you
can connect with a CAT3 or higher cable.
Connecting LAN cable
To connect the LAN cable, follow the steps below.
■ Connect the AC adaptor before connecting the LAN cable. The AC
adaptor must remain connected during LAN use. If you disconnect the
AC Adaptor while the computer is accessing a LAN, the system may
hang up.
■ Do not connect any other cable to the LAN jack except the LAN cable.
Otherwise, malfunctions or damage may occur.
■ Do not connect any power supplying device to the LAN cable that is
connected to the LAN jack. Otherwise, malfunctions or damage may
occur.
User’s Manual
4-48
Operating Basics
1. Turn off the power to the computer and to all external devices
connected to the computer.
2. Plug one end of the cable into the LAN jack. Press gently until you hear
the latch click into place.
LAN jack
LAN connector
Connecting the LAN cable
3. Plug the other end of the cable into a LAN hub connector. Check with
your LAN administrator before connecting to a hub.
When the computer is exchanging data with the LAN, the LAN Active
indicator glows orange. When the computer is connected to a LAN hub but
is not exchanging data, the Link indicator glows green.
Disconnecting LAN cable
To disconnect the LAN cable, follow the steps below.
Make sure the LAN Active indicator (orange LED) is out before you
disconnect the computer from the LAN.
1. Pinch the lever on the connector in the computer’s LAN jack and pull
out the connector.
2. Disconnect the cable from the LAN hub in the same manner. Check
with your LAN administrator before disconnecting from the hub.
Cleaning the computer
To help ensure long, trouble-free operation, keep the computer free of dust
and use care with liquids around the computer.
■ Be careful not to spill liquids into the computer. If the computer does get
wet, turn the power off immediately and let the computer dry completely
before you turn it on again.
■ Clean the computer using a slightly damp (with water) cloth. You can
use glass cleaner on the LCD display screen. Spray a small amount of
cleaner on a soft, clean cloth and wipe the screen gently with the cloth.
Never spray cleaner directly onto the computer or let liquid run into any
part of it. Never use harsh or caustic chemical products to clean the
computer.
User’s Manual
4-49
Operating Basics
Moving the computer
The computer is designed for rugged durability. However, a few simple
precautions taken when moving the computer will help ensure trouble-free
operation.
■ Before moving the computer, it is recommended that you change the
function of the HDD Protection. Refer to the section, Using the Hard
Disk Drive (HDD) Protection, in this chapter.
■ Make sure all disk activity has ended before moving the computer.
Check the HDD indicator on the computer.
■ If a CD/DVD is in the drives, remove it. Also make sure the disc tray is
securely closed.
■ Turn off the power to the computer.
■ Disconnect the AC adaptor and all peripherals before moving the
computer.
■ Close the LCD display panel. Do not pick up the computer by its display
panel.
■ Before carrying your computer, shut down the computer, disconnect the
power cable and wait until the PC cools down. Failure to follow this
instruction could result in minor injury.
■ Always turn off the power when you move the computer. If the power
button has a lock, set it to the lock position. Also be careful not to
subject the computer to impact. Failure to follow this instruction could
result in damage to computer, computer failure or loss of data.
■ Never transport your computer with PC cards installed. This could
cause damage to your computer and/or PC card, resulting in product
failure.
■ Use a carrying case when transporting the computer.
■ When carrying your computer, be sure to hold it securely so that it does
not fall or hit anything.
■ Do not carry your computer by holding any protruding areas.
User’s Manual
4-50
Operating Basics
Using the Hard Disk Drive (HDD) Protection
This computer has a function for reducing the risk of damage on the hard
disk drive.
Using an acceleration sensor built into the computer, HDD Protection
detects vibration, shocks and similar signs of movement of the computer,
and automatically moves the hard disk drive head to a safe position to
reduce the risk of damage that could be caused by head-to-disk contact.
■ This function does not guarantee that the hard disk drive will not be
damaged.
■ The secondary hard disk drive is not supported by the HDD protection
function.
When vibration is detected, the following message is displayed, and the
icon in the notification area of the taskbar is changed to the protection
state. This message is displayed until the OK button is pressed or 30
seconds pass. When vibration subsides, the icon returns to the normal
state.
HDD Protection Message
Taskbar Icon
State
User’s Manual
Icon
Description
Normal
HDD Protection is enabled.
Protection
HDD Protection is active. The hard disk drive
head is in a safe position.
OFF
HDD Protection is disabled.
4-51
Operating Basics
TOSHIBA HDD Protection Properties
You can change the HDD Protection settings by using the TOSHIBA HDD
Protection Properties window. To open the window, click start, point to All
Programs, point to TOSHIBA, point to Utilities and click HDD Protection
Setting. The window can also be started from the icon on the Taskbar or
from the Control Panel.
TOSHIBA HDD Protection Properties
HDD Protection
You can choose whether to enable or disable HDD Protection.
Detection Level
This function can be set to four levels. The sensitivity levels in which
vibrations, impacts and their similar signs are detected can be set to OFF,
1, 2 and 3 in ascending order. Level 3 is recommended for better protection
of the computer. However, when the computer is used in a mobile
environment or in other unstable conditions, setting the detection level to 3
could result in frequent execution of HDD Protection, which will slow hard
drive reading and writing. Set a lower detection level when the speed of
hard drive reading and writing is a priority.
Different detection levels can be set depending on whether the computer is
used as handheld or mobile usages, or whether it is used in a stable
environment such as on a table in the workplace or at home. By setting
different detection levels for the computer depending on whether it runs
with the AC power (desktop) or with batteries (handheld or mobile usage),
the detection level automatically switches according to the power
connection mode.
User’s Manual
4-52
Operating Basics
Details
To open the Details window, click the Setup Detail button in the TOSHIBA
HDD Protection Properties window.
Details
Detection Level Amplification
When the AC adaptor is disconnected or the lid is closed, HDD Detection
assumes that the computer will be carried and sets the detection level to
the maximum for 10 seconds.
HDD Protection Message
Specify whether to display a message when HDD Protection is active.
■ This function does not work when the computer is starting, in standby,
in hibernation, in transition to hibernation, recovering from hibernation,
or powered off. Be sure to not subject the computer to vibration or
impact while the function is disabled.
■ This function only operates with Windows® XP.
Heat dispersal
To protect from overheating, the CPU has an internal temperature sensor. If
the computer’s internal temperature rises to a certain level, the cooling fan
is turned on or the processing speed is lowered. You can select whether to
control the CPU temperature by turning on the fan first, then if necessary,
lowering the CPU speed. Or, by lowering the CPU speed first, then if
necessary, turning on the fan. Use the Cooling Method item of the Basic
Setup tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
When the CPU temperature falls to a normal range, the fan is turned off
and the CPU operation returns to standard speed.
If the CPU temperature reaches an unacceptably high level with either
setting, the system automatically shuts down to prevent damage. Data in
memory will be lost.
User’s Manual
4-53
Chapter 5
The Keyboard
The computer’s keyboard layouts are compatible with a 101/102-key
enhanced keyboard. By pressing some keys in combination, all the
101/102-key keyboard functions can be executed on the computer.
The number of keys on your keyboard depends on which country/region’s
keyboard layout your computer is configured with. Keyboards for numerous
languages are available.
There are six types of keys: typewriter keys, function keys, soft keys, Hot
keys, Windows special keys and keypad overlay.
Typewriter keys
The typewriter keys produce the upper- and lower-case letters, numbers,
punctuation marks, and special symbols that appear on the screen.
There are some differences, however, between using a typewriter and
using a computer keyboard:
■ Letters and numbers produced in computer text vary in width. Spaces,
which are created by a "space character," may also vary depending on
line justification and other factors.
■ The lowercase l (el) and the number 1 (one) are not interchangeable on
computers as they are on a typewriter.
■ The uppercase O (oh) and the 0 (zero) are not interchangeable.
■ The Caps Lock function key locks only the alphabetic characters in
uppercase while the shift lock on a typewriter places all keys in the
shifted position.
■ The Shift keys, the Tab key, and the BkSp (backspace) key perform the
same function as their typewriter counterparts but also have special
computer functions.
User’s Manual
5-1
The Keyboard
Function keys: F1 … F12
The function keys (not to be confused with Fn) are the 12 keys at the top of
your keyboard. These keys function differently from other keys.
F1 through F12 are called function keys because they execute
programmed functions when pressed. Used in combination with the Fn key,
keys marked with icons execute specific functions on the computer. Refer
to the section, Soft keys: Fn key combinations, in this chapter. The function
executed by individual keys depends on the software you are using.
Soft keys: Fn key combinations
The Fn (function) is unique to TOSHIBA computers and is used in
combination with other keys to form soft keys. Soft keys are key
combinations that enable, disable or configure specific features.
Some software may disable or interfere with soft-key operations. Soft-key
settings are not restored by the Standby feature.
Emulating keys on enhanced keyboard
F1
Esc
~
@
!
1
`
CapsLock
Shift
W
A
E
S
Z
F4
$
4
#
3
2
Q
Tab
F3
F2
%
5
R
D
X
F5
T
C
Y
G
V
U
I
J
N
F8
(
9
8
H
B
F7
*
&
7
^6
F
F6
O
>
.
?
/
Scroll
lock
Pause
Bk Sp
Ins
Home
PgUp
Num
Lock
End
PgDn
7
Home
8
\
Del
9
PgUp
4
5
6
1
End
2
3
PgDn
F12
}
]
,,
,
:
;
PrtSc
SysReq
F11
+
=
{
[
P
L
<
,
F10
_
-
)
0
K
M
F9
Break
/
*.
+
Enter
Shift
Enter
Ctrl
Alt
Alt
Ctrl
0
Ins
.
Del
A 101-key enhanced keyboard layout
The keyboard is designed to provide all the features of the 101-key
enhanced keyboard. The 101/102-key enhanced keyboard has a numeric
keypad and scroll lock key. It also has additional Enter and Ctrl keys to the
right of the main keyboard. Since the keyboard is smaller and has fewer
keys, some of the enhanced keyboard functions must be simulated using
two keys instead of one on the larger keyboard.
Your software may require you to use keys that the keyboard does not
have. Pressing the Fn key and one of the following keys simulates the
enhanced keyboard’s functions.
User’s Manual
5-2
The Keyboard
Press Fn + F10 or Fn + F11 to access the integrated keypad. When
activated, the keys with gray markings on the bottom edge become
numeric keypad keys (Fn + F11) or cursor control keys (Fn + F10). Refer to
the Keypad overlay section in this chapter for more information on how to
operate these keys. The power on default for both settings is off.
Press Fn + F12 (ScrLock) to lock the cursor on a specific line. The power
on default is off.
Press Fn + Enter to simulate Enter on the enhanced keyboard’s numeric
keypad.
Press Fn + Ctrl to simulate the enhanced keyboard’s right Ctrl key.
Hot keys
Hot keys (Fn + a function or Esc key) let you enable or disable certain
features of the computer.
Sound mute: Pressing Fn + Esc in a Windows environment turns sound
on or off. When you press these hot keys, the current setting will change
and be displayed as an icon.
User’s Manual
5-3
The Keyboard
Instant security: Press Fn + F1 to blank the screen to prevent others from
accessing your data. To restore the screen and original settings, press any
key or press the Touch Pad. If a screensaver password is registered, a
dialog box will appear. Enter the screensaver password and click OK. If no
password is set, the screen will be restored when you press any key or
press the Touch Pad.
Power save mode: Pressing Fn + F2 changes the power save mode.
If you press Fn + F2 in a Windows environment, the settings dialog box for
the Power Save Mode will be displayed. Continue holding down Fn, and
release and press F2 again to toggle between the settings. Release both
Fn and F2 to put the new setting into effect. You can also change this
setting through the Profile options in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Standby: When you press Fn + F3, the computer enters Standby Mode.
Before entering Standby, a dialog box appears asking for your confirmation.
This dialog box will not be displayed in the future if you click the check box.
Hibernation: When you press Fn + F4, the computer enters Hibernation
Mode. Before entering Hibernation, a dialog box appears asking for your
confirmation. This dialog box will not be displayed in the future if you click
the check box.
Display selection: Press Fn + F5 to change the active display device.
When you press these hot keys, a dialog box appears. Only selectable
devices will be displayed. Hold down Fn and press F5 again to change the
device. When you release Fn and F5, the selected device will change. If
you hold down these hot keys for five seconds the selection will return to
the internal LCD.
User’s Manual
5-4
The Keyboard
Internal LCD screen Brightness: Pressing Fn + F6 decreases the LCD
screen brightness in decrements. When you press these hot keys, the
current setting will be displayed for two seconds by an icon. You can also
change this setting through the Screen brightness item of the Basic Setup
tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Internal LCD screen Brightness: Pressing Fn + F7 increases the LCD
screen brightness in increments. When you press these hot keys, the
current setting will be displayed for two seconds by a pop-up icon. You can
also change this setting through the Screen brightness item of the Basic
Setup tab in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
■ The brightness level is always set at the maximum value for about 18
seconds, when the internal LCD screen turns on.
■ LCD screen clarity increases with the brightness level.
Wireless setting: If your computer has both Bluetooth and Wireless LAN
functions, you can press Fn + F8 to select which type of wireless
communication you want to use. When you press these hot keys, a dialog
box will appear. Continue holding down Fn and press F8 to change the
setting. If wireless communication is turned off, Disabled Wireless
Communication Switch will be displayed.
If no wireless communication device is installed, no dialog box will appear.
Touch Pad: Pressing Fn + F9 in a Windows environment enables or
disables the Touch Pad function. When you press these hot keys, the
current setting will change and be displayed as an icon.
User’s Manual
5-5
The Keyboard
LCD screen resolution selection: Press Fn + Space keys to change the
display resolution. Each time when you press these hot keys, the LCD
screen resolution changes as follows: The available resolution depends on
the model. With XGA, you can change the resolution between 800 × 600
and 1024 × 768 pixels. With SXGA+, between 800 × 600 and 1400 × 1050
pixels.
Optical Drive Power: Press the Fn + Tab keys to turn the power of the
optical media drive on or eject the disc tray. A dialog box is displayed when
this hotkey is pressed. To choose between the functions, press the Tab key
while holding down the Fn key. The chosen function is executed when the
Fn + Tab keys are released.
TOSHIBA Zooming Utility (reduce): To reduce the icon size on the
desktop or the application window, press the 1 key while holding down the
Fn key.
TOSHIBA Zooming Utility (enlarge): To enlarge the icon size on the
desktop or the application window, press the 2 key while holding down the
Fn key.
Fn Sticky key
You can use the TOSHIBA Accessibility Utility to make the Fn key sticky,
that is, you can press it once, release it, and then press an "F number" key.
To start the TOSHIBA Accessibility Utility, click start, point to All
Programs, point to TOSHIBA, point to Utilities and click Accessibility.
User’s Manual
5-6
The Keyboard
Windows special keys
The keyboard provides two keys that have special functions in Windows:
Windows logo key activates the start menu and the other, the application
key, has the same function as the secondary mouse button.
This key activates the Windows start menu.
This key has the same function as the secondary mouse button.
Keypad overlay
Your computer’s keyboard does not have an independent numeric keypad,
but its numeric keypad overlay functions like one.
The keys in the center of the keyboard with gray letters make up the
numeric keypad overlay. The overlay provides the same functions as the
numeric keypad on the 101/102-key enhanced keyboard.
Turning on the overlays
The numeric keypad overlay can be used for numeric data input or cursor
and page control.
Arrow mode
To turn on the Arrow mode, press Fn + F10. The Arrow mode indicator
lights. Now try cursor and page control using the keys.
Press Fn + F10 again to turn off the overlay.
User’s Manual
5-7
The Keyboard
Numeric mode
To turn on the Numeric mode, press Fn + F11. The Numeric mode indicator
lights. Now try numeric data entry using the keys.
Press Fn + F11 again to turn off the overlay.
The numeric keypad overlay
Temporarily using normal keyboard (overlay on)
While using the overlay, you can temporarily access the normal keyboard
without turning off the overlay:
1. Hold Fn and press any other key. All keys will operate as if the overlay
was off.
2. Type upper-case characters by holding Fn + Shift and pressing a
character key.
3. Release Fn to continue using the overlay.
Temporarily using overlay (overlay off)
While using the normal keyboard, you can temporarily use the keypad
overlay without turning it on:
1. Press and hold down Fn.
2. Check the keyboard indicators. Pressing Fn turns on the most recently
used overlay. If the Numeric mode indicator lights, you can use the
overlay for numeric entry. If the Arrow mode indicator lights, you can
use the overlay for cursor and page control.
3. Release Fn to return to normal keyboard operation.
User’s Manual
5-8
The Keyboard
Temporarily changing modes
If the computer is in Numeric mode, you can switch temporarily to Arrow
mode by pressing a shift key.
If the computer is in Arrow mode, you can switch temporarily to Numeric
mode by pressing a shift key.
Generating ASCII characters
Not all ASCII characters can be generated using normal keyboard
operation. But, you can generate these characters using their ASCII codes.
With the overlay on:
1. Hold down Alt.
2. Using the overlay keys, type the ASCII code.
3. Release Alt, and the ASCII character appears on the display screen.
With the overlay off:
1. Hold down Alt + Fn.
2. Using the overlay keys, type the ASCII code.
3. Release Alt + Fn, and the ASCII character appears on the display
screen.
User’s Manual
5-9
Chapter 6
Power and Power-Up Modes
The computer’s power resources include the AC adaptor, battery pack and
internal batteries. This chapter gives details on making the most effective
use of these resources including charging and changing batteries, tips for
saving battery power, and power up modes.
Power conditions
The computer’s operating capability and battery charge status are affected
by the power conditions: whether an AC adaptor is connected, whether a
battery pack is installed and what the charge level is for the battery.
Power conditions
AC
adaptor
connected
User’s Manual
Power on
Power off (no operation)
Main Battery
fully charged
• Operates
• No charge
• LED: Battery green
DC IN green
• No charge
• LED: Battery green
DC IN green
Main Battery
partially
charged or no
charge
• Operates
• Charge*1
• LED: Battery orange
DC IN green
• Quick charge*1
• LED: Battery orange
DC IN green
No Main battery
installed
• Operates
• No charge
• LED: Battery off
DC IN green
• No charge
• LED: Battery off
DC IN green
6-1
Power and Power-Up Modes
Power conditions continued
AC
adaptor
connected
AC
adaptor
not
connected
Power on
Power off (no operation)
Secondary
battery fully
charged
• Operates
• No charge
• LED: Secondary
battery green
DC IN green
• No charge
• LED: Secondary
battery green
DC IN green
Secondary
battery partially
charged or no
charge
• Operates
• Charge*2
• LED: Secondary
battery orange
DC IN green
• Quick charge*2
• LED: Secondary
battery orange
DC IN green
No Secondary
battery installed
• Operates
• No charge
• LED: Secondary
battery off
DC IN green
• No charge
• LED: Secondary
battery off
DC IN green
Main battery
charge is above
low battery
trigger point
• Operates
• LED: Battery off
DC IN off
Main battery
charge is below
low battery
trigger point
• Operates
• LED: Battery
flashes orange
DC IN off
Main battery
charge is
exhausted
Computer shuts down *3
No main battery
installed
• No operation *4
• LED: Battery off
DC IN off
User’s Manual
6-2
Power and Power-Up Modes
Power on
AC
adaptor
not
connected
Secondary
battery charge
is above low
battery trigger
point
• Operates
• LED: Secondary
battery off
DC IN off
Secondary
battery charge
is below low
battery trigger
point
• Operates
• LED: Secondary
battery
flashes orange
DC IN off
Secondary
battery charge
is exhausted
Computer shuts down *3
No Secondary
battery is
installed
• No operation *5
• LED: Secondary
battery off
DC IN off
Power off (no operation)
*1 When the Slice Expansion battery is not charging.
*2 When the main battery is not charging.
*3 For the computer to shut down in hibernation mode, the hibernation
feature must be enabled in two places in TOSHIBA Power Saver: the
Hibernate window and the Battery Alarm item of the Alarm window. If a
main battery and a Slice Expansion battery are installed, the computer
does not shut down until the charge in both batteries is exhausted.
*4 When no Slice Expansion battery is installed.
*5 When no main battery is installed.
When batteries are charged, the main battery is charged first. When it is
fully charged, the Slice Expansion battery is charged.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Power indicators
As shown in the above table, the Battery, Secondary battery, DC IN and
Power indicators on the system indicator alert you to the computer’s
operating capability and battery charge status.
Battery indicator
Check the Battery indicator to determine the status of the main battery and
the Secondary battery indicator to determine the status of the Slice
Expansion battery. The following indicator lights indicate the battery status:
Flashing orange
The battery charge is low. The AC adaptor must
be connected to recharge the battery.
Orange
Indicates the AC adaptor is connected and
charging the battery.
Green
Indicates the AC adaptor is connected and the
battery is fully charged.
No light
Under any other conditions, the indicator does
not light.
If the battery pack becomes too hot while it is being charged, the charge
will stop and the Battery indicator will go out. When the battery pack’s
temperature falls to a normal range, charge will resume. This occurs
whether the computer’s power is on or off.
DC IN indicator
Check the DC IN indicator to determine the power status with the AC
adaptor connected:
User’s Manual
Green
Indicates the AC adaptor is connected and
supplying proper power to the computer.
Flashing orange
Indicates a problem with the power supply. Plug
the AC adaptor into another power outlet. If it still
does not operate properly, contact your dealer.
No light
Under any other conditions, the indicator does not
light.
6-4
Power and Power-Up Modes
Power indicator
Check the Power indicator to determine the power status:
Green
Indicates power is being supplied to the computer
and the computer is turned on.
Flashing orange
Indicates power is being supplied to the computer
while the computer is in Standby Mode. The
indicator turns on for one second and off for two
seconds.
No light
Under any other conditions, the indicator does not
light.
Battery types
The computer has three types of batteries:
■ Battery pack
■ Slice Expansion Battery (optional)
■ Real Time Clock (RTC) battery
Battery pack
When the AC adaptor is not connected, the computer’s main power source
is a removable lithium ion battery pack, also referred to in this manual as
the main battery. You can purchase additional battery packs for extended
use of the computer away from an AC power source.
Do not change the battery pack while the AC adaptor is connected.
Before you remove the battery pack, save your data and shut down the
computer, or set the computer to Hibernation Mode. While entering
Hibernation Mode, the computer saves the contents of memory to the hard
disk drive. However, for safety sake, it is best to save your data manually.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
■ The battery pack is a lithium ion battery, which can explode if not
properly replaced, used, handled or disposed of. Dispose of the battery
as required by local ordinances or regulations. Use only batteries
recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
■ Always use the battery pack supplied as an accessory or an
equivalentAlways use the battery pack supplied as an accessory or an
equivalent battery pack specified in the User's Manual. Other battery
packs have different voltage and terminal polarities. Use of nonconforming battery packs could generate smoke or cause fire or
rupture, possibly resulting in serious injury.
■ Always dispose of used battery packs in compliance with all applicable
laws and regulations. Put insulating tape, such as cellophane tape, on
the electrode during transportation to avoid a possible short circuit, fire
or electric shock. Failure to do so could possibly result in serious injury.
■ Do not remove the battery pack while the computer is in Standby Mode.
Data is stored in RAM, so if the computer loses power it will be lost.
When the computer is powered off in Standby Mode, and the AC
adaptor is not connected, the battery pack supplies power to maintain
data and programs in memory. If the battery pack is completely
discharged, Standby Mode will not function and the computer loses all
data in memory.
To ensure that the battery pack maintains its maximum capacity, operate
the computer on battery power at least once a month until the battery pack
is fully discharged. Refer to Extending battery life in this chapter for
procedures. If the computer is continuously operated on AC power through
an AC adaptor for an extended period, more than a month, the battery may
fail to retain a charge. It may not function efficiently over the expected life of
the battery and the Battery indicator may not indicate a low-battery
condition.
Slice Expansion Battery (optional)
The Slice Expansion Battery is included with some models, or can be
purchased separately as an optional accessory.
For detailed information on this battery, refer to Slice Expansion Battery
section in Chapter 8.
■ The Slice Expansion Battery is a lithium ion battery, which can explode
if not properly replaced, used, handled or disposed of. Dispose of the
battery as required by local ordinances or regulations. Use only
batteries recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Real Time Clock (RTC) battery
The Real Time Clock (RTC) battery provides power for the internal real
time clock and calendar. It also maintains the system configuration.
If the RTC battery becomes completely discharged, the system loses this
data and the real time clock and calendar stop working. The following
message appears when you turn on the power:
S
**** RTC battery is low or CMOS checksum is
inconsistent ****
Press [F1] key to set Date/Time.
You can change the Real Time Clock settings by pressing the F1 key. Refer
to Chapter 9 Troubleshooting, for details.
The computer’s RTC battery is a Ni-MH battery and should be replaced
only by your dealer or by a TOSHIBA service representative. The battery
can explode if not properly replaced, used, handled or disposed of.
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Care and use of the battery pack
The battery pack is a vital component of portable computing. Taking proper
care of it will help ensure longer operating time on battery power as well as
a longer life for your battery pack. Follow the instructions in this section
carefully to ensure safe operation and maximum performance.
Safety precautions
Mishandling of battery packs can cause death, serious injury or property
damage. Carefully observe the following advisories:
Warning: Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which could result in
death or serious injury, if you do not follow instructions.
Caution: Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which if not avoided,
may result in moderate or minor injury or property damage.
Note: Provides important information.
Warning
1. Never attempt to dispose of a battery pack by burning or by throwing it
into a fire, and never allow exposure to a heating apparatus (e.g.,
microwave oven). Heat can cause a battery pack to explode and
possibly cause serious injury.
2. Never attempt to disassemble, tamper with or repair a battery pack. The
battery pack could overheat and ignite. Leakage of the caustic alkaline
solution or other electrolytic substances could cause fire, possibly
resulting in death or serious injury.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
3. Never short circuit the battery pack by either accidentally or intentionally
bringing the battery terminals in contact with another conductive object.
This could cause serious injury or a fire, and could also damage the
battery pack. Always wrap the battery pack in plastic (or place it in a
plastic bag) whenever transporting it, to avoid exposing the terminals to
another conductive object which could result in serious injury. Always
cover the metal terminals with insulating tape when disposing of the
battery pack, to prevent accidental short circuiting which could result in
serious injury.
4. Never drive a nail or any other sharp object into the battery pack, hit
battery pack with a hammer or other object or step on it. Doing so could
cause a fire or explosion possibly resulting in serious injury.
5. Never charge the battery pack by a method other than as instructed in
the User's Manual. Doing so could cause a fire or explosion possibly
resulting in serious injury.
6. Never connect the battery pack to a plug socket or a car cigarette plug
socket. The battery pack could rupture or ignite causing a fire or
explosion possibly resulting in serious injury.
7. Never allow a battery pack to become wet. A wet battery pack will
overheat or ignite causing rupture or fire, possibly resulting in death or
serious injury.
8. Never store a battery pack in an area of high humidity. This could cause
a fire or explosion possibly resulting in serious injury.
9. Never expose a battery pack to abnormal shock, vibration or pressure.
The battery pack's internal protective device could fail, causing it to
overheat or ignite resulting in caustic liquid leakage, or explosion or fire,
possibly resulting in death or serious injury.
10. Never subject a battery pack to heat, and never store it or use it near a
heat source. The battery pack could ignite or explode when heated or
burned, possibly resulting in death or serious injury. Subjecting a
battery pack to heat could also cause caustic liquid to leak. It can also
cause failure, malfunction, or loss of stored data.
11. Always use the battery pack supplied as an accessory or an equivalent
battery pack specified in the User's Manual. Other battery packs have
different voltage and terminal polarities. Use of non-conforming battery
packs could generate smoke or cause fire or rupture, possibly resulting
in serious injury.
12. Never allow caustic electrolyte fluid leaked from the battery pack to
contact your eyes, body or clothing. If caustic electrolyte fluid from the
battery pack should contact your eyes, immediately wash your eyes
with large amounts of running water and obtain prompt medical
attention, to help prevent permanent eye damage. If electrolyte fluid
should contact any part of your body, immediately wash it off under
running water to help prevent skin rashes. If electrolyte fluid should
contact your clothes, promptly remove them to help prevent the
electrolyte fluid from contacting your body, possibly resulting in serious
injury.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
13. Always immediately turn the power off and disconnect the power cable
plug from the plug socket if you observe any of the following conditions:
■ Offensive or unusual odor
■ Excessive heat
■ Discoloration
■ Deformation
■ Smoke
■ Other unusual event during use, such as abnormal sound
In such an event, immediately remove the battery pack from the PC. In
some instances, you might have to wait for the PC to cool down before
removing the battery pack, in order to avoid any possible minor injury
due to heat exposure. Do not turn on the PC's power again until an
authorized Toshiba service provider has checked it for safety.
Continued use could cause a fire or rupture possibly resulting in serious
injury or PC failure including but not limited to the loss of data.
14. Always dispose of used battery packs in compliance with all applicable
laws and regulations. Put insulating tape, such as cellophane tape, on
the electrode during transportation to avoid a possible short circuit, fire
or electric shock. Failure to do so could possibly result in serious injury.
15. Make sure the battery is securely installed in the computer before
attempting to charge the battery pack. Improper installation could
generate smoke or fire, or cause the battery pack to rupture.
16. Keep the battery pack out of reach of infants and children. It can cause
injury.
Caution
1. Use only battery packs recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
2. When installing a battery pack or before moving the PC, always make
sure the battery pack is inserted correctly and securely. If the battery
falls out, while you are carrying the PC, you could be injured or the
battery pack could be damaged.
3. Charge the battery pack only in an ambient temperature between 5 and
35 degrees Celsius. Otherwise, the electrolyte solution might leak,
battery pack performance might deteriorate and the battery life might be
shortened.
4. Never continue to use a battery pack after its recharging capability has
become impaired, or after the warning message indicating that the
battery pack power is exhausted has been displayed.
5. Continued use of an exhausted or impaired battery pack could result in
the loss of data or damage to PC.
6. Never install or remove the battery pack without first turning off the
power and disconnecting the AC adaptor. Never remove the battery
pack while the computer is in Standby Mode. Data will be lost.
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6-9
Power and Power-Up Modes
Note
1. Never remove the battery pack while the Wake-up on LAN function is
enabled. Data will be lost. Before you remove a battery pack, disable
the Wake-up on LAN function.
2. Never remove the battery pack while the Wake-up on Wireless LAN
function is enabled. Data will be lost. Before you remove a battery pack,
disable the Wake-up on Wireless LAN function.
3. To ensure the battery pack maintains maximum capacity, operate the
computer on battery power once a week until the battery pack is fully
discharged. Refer to the section Extending battery life in this chapter for
procedures. If the computer is continuously operated on AC power for
an extended period, more than a week, the battery might fail to retain a
charge. It might not function efficiently over the expected life of the
battery pack and the Battery indicator might not indicate a low-battery
condition.
4. After the battery pack is charged, avoid leaving the AC adaptor
connected and the computer turned off for more than a few hours at a
time. Continuing to charge a fully-charged battery pack can damage the
battery.
Charging the batteries
When the power in the battery pack becomes low, the Battery indicator
flashes orange indicating that only a few minutes of battery power remain.
If you continue to use the computer while the Battery indicator flashes, the
computer enables Hibernation Mode (so you don’t lose data) and
automatically turns off.
The computer enters Hibernate mode only if Hibernation is enabled in two
places: the Hibernate tab in Power Options and Setup Actions tab in
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
You must recharge a battery pack when it becomes discharged.
Procedures
To recharge a battery pack while it is installed in the computer, connect the
AC adaptor to the DC IN 15V jack and plug the other end into a working
outlet.
The Battery indicator glows orange when the battery is being charged.
Use only the computer connected to an AC power source or the optional
TOSHIBA Battery charger to charge the battery pack. Never attempt to
charge the battery pack with any other charger.
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6-10
Power and Power-Up Modes
Time
The following table shows the approximate time required to fully charge a
discharged battery.
Charging time (hours)
Battery type
Power on
Power off
Battery pack (4700mAh)
about 3.0 to 13.0
about 3.0
Slice Expansion Battery (4000mAh)
about 3.0 to 10.5
about 3.0
RTC battery
8
Doesn't charge
The charging time when the computer is on is affected by ambient
temperature, the temperature of the computer and how you use the
computer. If you make heavy use of external devices, for example, the
battery might scarcely charge at all during operation. Refer also to the
section Maximizing battery operating time.
Battery charging notice
The battery may not charge right away under the following conditions:
■ The battery is extremely hot or cold. If the battery is extremely hot, it
might not charge at all. To ensure the battery charges to its full capacity,
charge the battery at room temperature of 10° to 30°C (50° to 88°F).
■ The battery is nearly completely discharged. Leave the AC adaptor
connected for a few minutes and the battery should begin charging.
The Battery indicator may show a rapid decrease in battery operating time
when you try to charge a battery under the following conditions:
■ The battery has not been used for a long time.
■ The battery has completely discharged and been left in the computer for
a long time.
■ A cool battery is installed in a warm computer.
In such case, follow the steps below.
1. Fully discharge the battery by leaving it in the computer with the power
on until the power automatically shuts off.
2. Connect the AC adaptor to the DC IN 15V jack of the computer, and the
AC adaptor into power outlet.
3. Charge the battery until the Battery indicator glows green.
Repeat these steps two or three times until the battery recovers normal
capacity.
Leaving the AC adaptor connected will shorten battery life. At least once a
month, run the computer on battery power until the battery is fully
discharged, then recharge the battery.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Monitoring battery capacity
Remaining battery power can be monitored in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
■ Wait at least 16 seconds after turning on the computer before trying to
monitor the remaining operating time. The computer needs this time to
check the battery’s remaining capacity and to calculate the remaining
operating time, based on the current power consumption rate and
remaining battery capacity. The actual remaining operating time may
differ slightly from the calculated time.
■ With repeated discharges and recharges, the battery’s capacity will
gradually decrease. Therefore, an often used, older battery will not
operate for as long as a new battery even when both are fully charged.
In this case, TOSHIBA Power Saver will indicate a 100% charge for
both the old and new battery, but the displayed estimated time
remaining will be shorter for the older battery.
Maximizing battery operating time
A battery’s usefulness depends on how long it can supply power on a
single charge.
How long the charge lasts in a battery depends on:
■ How you configure the computer (for example, whether you enable
battery-power saving options). The computer provides a battery save
mode, which can be set in TOSHIBA Power Saver, to conserve battery
power. This mode has the following options:
■ CPU Processing speed
■ Screen brightness
■ Cooling Method
■ System standby
■ System Hibernation
■ Monitor Power off
■ HDD Power off
■ How often and how long you use the hard disk, optical disc and the
floppy disk drive.
■ How much charge the battery contained to begin with.
■ How you use optional devices, such as a PC card, to which the battery
supplies power.
■ Enabling Standby Mode conserves battery power if you are frequently
turning the computer off and on.
■ Where you store your programs and data.
■ Closing the LCD display panel when you are not using the keyboard
saves power.
■ Operating time decreases at low temperatures.
■ The condition of the battery terminals. Make sure the battery terminals
stay clean by wiping them with a clean dry cloth before installing the
battery pack.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Retaining data with power off
When you turn off your computer with fully charged batteries, the batteries
retain data for the following approximate time periods:
Retention time
Battery type
State and Retention Time
Battery pack (4700mAh)
about 6 days (Standby mode)
about 70 days (Boot mode)
Slice Expansion Battery (4000mAh)
about 5 days (Standby mode)
about 60 days (Boot mode)
RTC battery
30 days
Extending battery life
To maximize the life of your battery pack:
■ At least once a month, disconnect the computer from a power source
and operate it on battery power until the battery pack fully discharges.
Before doing so, follow the steps below.
1. Turn off the computer’s power.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor and turn on the computer’s power. If it
does not turn on go to step 4.
3. Operate the computer on battery power for five minutes. If the
battery pack has at least five minutes of operating time, continue
operating until the battery pack is fully discharged. If the Battery
indicator flashes or there is some other warning to indicate a low
battery, go to step 4.
4. Connect the AC adaptor to the computer and the power cord to a
power outlet. The DC IN indicator should glow green, and the
Battery indicator should glow orange to indicate that the battery
pack is being charged. If the DC IN indicator does not glow, power
is not being supplied. Check the connections for the AC adaptor
and power cord.
5. Charge the battery pack until the Battery indicator glows green.
■ If you have extra battery packs, rotate their use.
■ If you will not be using the system for an extended period, more than
one month, remove the battery pack..
■ Disconnect the AC adaptor when the battery is fully charged.
Overcharging makes the battery hot and shortens life.
■ If you are not going to use the computer for more than eight hours,
disconnect the AC adaptor.
■ Store spare battery packs in a cool dry place out of direct sunlight.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Replacing the battery pack
The battery pack is classified as a consumable item.
The operating life of the battery pack will gradually reduce through
repeated charging and discharging. It will need to be replaced when it
reaches the end of its operating life.
You might also replace a discharged battery pack with a charged spare
when you are operating your computer away from an AC power source.
This section explains how to remove and install the battery pack.
To remove a discharged battery pack, follow the steps below.
■ Do not remove the battery pack while the computer is in Standby Mode.
Data is stored in RAM, so if the computer loses power it will be lost.
■ In Hibernation Mode, data will be lost if you remove the battery pack or
disconnect the AC adaptor before the save is completed. Wait for the
HDD indicator to go out.
■ Do not touch the battery release latch while holding the computer or the
battery pack might fall out due to the unintentional release of the
battery release latch and cause injuries.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Save your work.
Turn the computer’s power off. Make sure the Power indicator is off.
Remove all cables connected to the computer.
Close the LCD display panel and turn the computer upside down.
Slide the battery safety lock towards the release ( ) position to make
the battery release latch movable.
Battery lock
Battery pack
Battery
release latch
Releasing the battery pack (1)
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6-14
Power and Power-Up Modes
6. Slide the battery release latch to free the battery pack for removal, then
slide out the battery pack.
Battery pack
Battery
release latch
Releasing the battery pack (2)
To install a battery pack, follow the steps below.
Do not touch the battery release latch while holding the computer. Or you
may get injured by the dropped battery pack by unintentional release of the
battery release latch.
7. Insert the battery pack.
8. Make sure that the battery pack is securely in place and the battery
safety lock is in the lock position ( ).
Battery pack
Battery lock
Securing the battery pack
9. Return your computer to the upright position.
User’s Manual
6-15
Power and Power-Up Modes
TOSHIBA Password Utility
The TOSHIBA Password Utility provides two levels of password security:
User and Supervisor.
Passwords set in the TOSHIBA Password Utility are different from the
Windows password.
User Password
To start the utility, point to or click the following items:
start -> All Programs -> TOSHIBA -> Utilities ->Password Utility
The User Password dialog box contains two main fields: User
Password and User Token.
User authentication may be required to validate user rights when using
"TOSHIBA Password Utility" to delete or change passwords, or create
tokens, etc.
User Password field
■ Set (button)
Click this button to register a password of up to 50 characters. After a
password is set, you will be prompted to enter it when you start the
computer. Check "Set the same string simultaneously as HDD User
Password" when setting the HDD User Password.
■ After you set the password, a dialog box will be displayed asking
whether you want to save it to a floppy disk or other media. If you forget
the password, you can open the password file on another computer. Be
sure to keep the media in a safe place.
■ When entering the character string to register the password, enter from
the keyboard character by character and do not enter as ASCII code or
copy-and-paste the character string. In addition, ensure that the
registered password is correct by outputting the character string to the
password file.
■ Delete (button)
Click this button to delete a registered password. Before you can delete
a password, you must first enter the current password correctly or insert
a proper token. Please use BIOS Setup to change or delete the HDD
Passwords or to set the HDD Master Password.
■ Change (button)
Click this button to change a registered password. Before you can
change a password, you must first enter the current password correctly
or insert a proper token. Please use BIOS Setup to change or delete
the HDD Passwords or to set the HDD Master Password.
■ Owner String (text box)
You can use this box to associate text with the password. After you
enter text, click Apply or OK. When the computer is started, this text will
be displayed together with the prompt asking you to enter a password.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
■ If you forget your HDD User Password, TOSHIBA will NOT be able to
assist you, and your HDD will be rendered COMPLETELY and
PERMANENTLY INOPERABLE. TOSHIBA will NOT be held
responsible for any loss of any data, any loss of use or access to your
HDD, or for any other losses to you or any other person or organization
that result from the loss of access to your HDD. If you can’t accept this
risk, don’t register the HDD User Password.
■ When setting the HDD Master Password or the password for the Ultra
Slim Bay HDD, save the HDD User Password settings in the BIOS
SETUP Program.
■ When saving the HDD User Password shut down or restart the
computer. If the computer is not shut down or restarted, the saved data
may not be correctly reflected. For more information on shutting down
or restarting the computer, refer to Turning on the power in Chapter 3.
Refer to Starting and Ending the BIOS Setup Program section in Chapter 7
for more information.
User Token field
■ Create (button)
You can use an SD card token, instead of entering the password. After
you have registered a password, insert an SD card in SD card slot and
click Create. You can use an SD card of any capacity, but it must be
formatted correctly.
If an unformatted card or one with an incompatible format is inserted,
you will be prompted to format it with a tool named TOSHIBA SD
Memory Card Format. To start the format tool, point to or click the
following items:
start -> All Programs -> TOSHIBA -> Utilities -> SD Memory
Card Format
When you format an SD Memory card, all data will be deleted. Be sure to
save data on the card to other media before you format the card.
■ Disable (button)
Click this button to invalidate the token. You cannot re-validate old
tokens, but you can use the same SD cards to create new tokens.
After using the token created for authentication, do not leave it inserted in
the SD card slot, ensure that the token is removed from the slot and stored
in a safe location. If the token is left in the slot, there is a danger of theft or
a third party using it for authentication and operating the user's computer
(resulting in extraction, modification or deletion of data) when the user is
not at their desk.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Supervisor Password
If you set a Supervisor Password, some functions might be restricted when
a user logs on with the User Password. To set a Supervisor Password,
execute the file TOSPU.EXE. The file is located at:
C:\Program Files\Toshiba\Windows
Utilities\SVPWTool\TOSPU.EXE
This utility lets you do the following:
■ Register, delete or change the Supervisor Password.
■ Create or invalidate a Supervisor Password token.
This function in the TOSHIBA Password Utility lets you invalidate only
supervisor tokens or all tokens, including user and supervisor tokens.
■ Specify restrictions for general users.
Starting the computer by password
If you have already registered a password, there are three ways to start the
computer:
■ Insert an SD card token before you turn on the computer. The computer
will start normally, without displaying a password prompt.
■ Swipe your fingerprint on the sensor if you have already registered the
fingerprint with the Fingerprint utility and enabled Fingerprint System
Boot Authentication. If you would not like to swipe your finger or cannot
authenticate the fingerprint for some reasons, push the BkSp key to
skip the fingerprint authentication screen. You can try to swipe the
fingerprint up to five times. If you failed fingerprint authentication more
than five times, you must enter the password manually to start the
computer.
■ Please log on with the Tablet PC Pen when in Tablet mode. Refer
toTablet mode section in this chapter.
■ Enter the password manually.
The password is necessary only if the computer was shut down in boot
mode. It is not needed in Standby Mode.
To enter a password manually, follow these steps:
1. Turn on the power as described in Chapter 3, Getting Started.
The following message will appear in the LCD:
S
Password=
2. Enter the Password.
3. Press Enter.
If you enter the password incorrectly three times in a row, the computer
shuts off. In this case, you must turn the computer back on to retry
password entry.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Tablet mode
Enter your password by tapping the on-screen keyboard using the Tablet
PC Pen.
On-screen keyboard
■ The beep sounds when tapping the on-screen keyboard with the Tablet
PC Pen. An * (asterisk) is displayed after "Password =" and one
character is input for every tapping.
Register your password to the computer in the laptop mode using the
standard keyboard. Refer to TOSHIBA Password Utility, in this chapter for
the detail.
Power-up modes
The computer has the following power-up modes:
■ Boot: Computer shuts down without saving data. Always save your
work before you turn the computer off in boot mode.
■ Hibernation: Data in memory is saved to the hard disk drive.
■ Standby: Data is maintained in the computer’s memory.
Refer also to the sections Turning on the power and Turning on the power
in Chapter 3, Getting Started.
Windows utilities
You can configure various settings associated with both Standby Mode and
Hibernation Mode within TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Hot keys
You can use hot keys Fn + F3 to enter Standby Mode and Fn + F4 to enter
Hibernation. Refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard, for details.
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Power and Power-Up Modes
Panel power on/off
You can set up your computer so that power turns off automatically when
you close the display panel. When you open the panel, power will be turned
on in Standby Mode or Hibernation Mode but not in boot mode.
If the panel power off function is enabled and you manually shut down
Windows, do not close the computer’s LCD display panel until the shut
down process has been completed.
System Auto Off
This feature turns the system off automatically if it is not used for a set
duration. The system shuts down in Standby Mode or Hibernation Mode in
Windows.
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6-20
Chapter 7
HW Setup
This chapter explains how to use TOSHIBA HW Setup program to
configure your computer, and provides information on setting up the
Execute-Disable Bit Capability and TPM.
Accessing HW Setup
To run HW Setup, click start, click Control Panel, click Printers and Other
Hardware and select TOSHIBA HWSetup.
HW Setup window
The HW Setup window contains the following tabs: General, Display, Boot
Priority, Keyboard, CPU, LAN, Device Config and USB.
There are also three buttons: OK, Cancel and Apply.
User’s Manual
OK
Accepts your changes and closes the HW Setup
window.
Cancel
Closes the window without accepting your
changes.
Apply
Accepts all your changes without closing the HW
Setup window.
7-1
HW Setup
General
This window displays the BIOS version and contains two buttons: Default
and About.
Default
Return all HW Setup values to the factory
settings.
About
Display the HW Setup version.
Setup
This field displays BIOS Version and date.
Display
This tab lets you customize your computer’s display settings for either the
internal LCD screen or an external monitor.
Power On Display
Lets you select the display to be used when the computer is booted (This
setting is only available on Standard VGA mode and is not available on
Windows Desktop properties).
Auto-Selected
Selects an external monitor if one is connected.
Otherwise, it selects the internal LCD (Default).
LCD + Analog
RGB
Selects both the internal LCD and external
monitor for simultaneous display.
System LCD Only Selects the internal LCD even if the external
monitor is connected.
If the connected external monitor does not support the computer's current
video mode, selecting the LCD + Analog RGB mode will not display any
image on the external monitor.
When Windows starts up, the screen will be displayed on the external
monitor if it was connected when the notebook was previously switched off
and is still connected when the computer is switched on. Otherwise, the
screen will be displayed on the internal LCD.
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7-2
HW Setup
Boot Priority
Boot Priority Options
This option sets the priority for booting the computer. Select from the
following settings:
HDD −> FDD −>
CD-ROM −> LAN
The computer looks for bootable files in the
following order: HDD, floppy disk drive*1,
CD-ROM*2 and LAN (Default).
FDD −> HDD −>
CD-ROM −> LAN
The computer looks for bootable files in the
following order: floppy disk drive*1, HDD,
CD-ROM*2 and LAN.
HDD −> CD-ROM −>
LAN −> FDD
The computer looks for bootable files in the
following order: HDD, CD-ROM*2, LAN and
floppy disk drive*1.
FDD −> CD-ROM −>
LAN −> HDD
The computer looks for bootable files in the
following order: floppy disk drive*1, CD-ROM*2,
LAN and HDD.
CD-ROM −> LAN −>
HDD −> FDD
The computer looks for bootable files in the
following order: CD-ROM*2, LAN, HDD, floppy
disk drive*1.
CD-ROM −> LAN −>
FDD −> HDD
The computer looks for bootable files in the
following order: CD-ROM*2, LAN, floppy disk
drive*1 and HDD.
You can override the settings and manually select a boot device by
pressing one of the following keys while the computer is booting:
U
Selects the USB floppy disk drive.
N
Selects the network.
1
Selects the primary HDD.
2
Selects the secondary HDD.
C
Selects the CD-ROM*2.
M
Selects the USB Memory.
*1
The floppy disk drive will be used to start the computer when there is a
bootable disk contained in the external drive. If SD memory is installed as
well, the external floppy disk drive will be checked first, followed by the SD
memory device itself.
*2 The optical media drive will be used to start the computer when there is a
bootable disk contained in the drive.
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7-3
HW Setup
To change the boot drive, follow the steps below.
1. Hold down F12 and boot the computer.
2. The following menu will be displayed with the following icons: Built-in
HDD, Ultra Slim Bay HDD, CD-ROM, FDD (or SD memory card),
Network (LAN), USB Memory boot.
A bar will appear only under the selected device.
3. Use the left/right cursor keys to highlight the boot device you want and
press Enter.
■ If only a Supervisor Password has been set, the following should be
noted:
■ The boot device menu will appear when the 'Able to run HW Setup'
option has been configured.
■ The boot device menu will not appear when the 'Unable to run HW
Setup' option has been configured.
■ If both a Supervisor Password and a User Password are set, the
following should be noted:
■ The boot device menu will appear when you use either the
Supervisor Password or the User Password to start the computer,
and the 'Able to run HW Setup' option has been configured.
■ The boot device menu will not appear when you use the User
Password to start the computer and the 'Unable to run HW Setup'
option has been configured.
■ The boot device menu will appear when you use the Supervisor
Password to start the computer, even if the 'Unable to run HW
Setup' option has been configured.
The boot device selection methods described above will not change the
boot priority settings that have been configured in HW Setup. In addition, if
you press a key other than one of those listed, or if the selected device is
not installed, the system will continue to boot according to the current and
available settings in HW Setup.
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7-4
HW Setup
HDD Priority Options
If more than one HDD is installed in the computer, this option lets you set
the priority for HDD detection. If the first detected HDD has a boot
command, the system will boot from the HDD.
Built-in HDD 1
-> Built-in
HDD 2 -> USB
(Default)
The priority is set as Built-in HDD 1 -> Built-in
HDD 2 -> USB.
Built-in HDD 2
-> Built-in
HDD 1 -> USB
The priority is set as Built-in HDD 2 -> Built-in
HDD 1 -> USB.
Built-in HDD 1
-> USB ->
Built-in HDD 2
The priority is set as Built-in HDD 1 -> USB ->
Built-in HDD 2.
Built-in HDD 2
-> USB ->
Built-in HDD 1
The priority is set as Built-in HDD 2 -> USB ->
Built-in HDD 1.
USB -> Built-in The priority is set as USB -> Built-in HDD 1 ->
HDD 1 -> Built- Built-in HDD 2.
in HDD 2
USB -> Built-in The priority is set as USB -> Built-in HDD 2 ->
HDD 2 -> Built- Built-in HDD 1.
in HDD 1
■ If a boot command is not found on the first detected HDD, the system
will not boot from the other HDD. It will search the next device in the
boot priority for a boot command.
■ Some modules may not be displayed.
Network Boot Protocol
This feature sets the protocol to remotely boot from the network.
Network Boot Protocol is not displayed for Gigabit Ethernet LAN.
[PXE]Sets PXE as the protocol (Default).
[RPL]Sets RPL as the protocol.
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7-5
HW Setup
USB Memory BIOS Support Type
Set the type of the USB memory as a startup device.
HDD
Set the type of the USB memory to be equivalent
to the HDD (Default).
* Based on the [HDD] order in the [Boot Priority
Options] item. The order with respect to the other
HDD can be set in the [HDD Priority Options]
item.
FDD
Set the type of the USB memory to be equivalent
to the FDD.
* Based on the [FDD] order in the [Boot Priority
Options] item.
Keyboard
Wake-up on Keyboard
When this feature is enabled and the computer is in Standby mode, you
can turn on the computer by pressing any key. It is effective only for the
internal keyboard and only when the computer is in Standby mode.
Enabled
Enables the Wake-up on Keyboard function.
Disabled
Disables the Wake-up on Keyboard function (Default).
CPU
This function lets you set the CPU operating mode.
This option is displayed only for models with an Intel® Core™ Duo
processor and Intel® Core™ Solo processor.
Dynamic CPU Frequency Mode
This option lets you choose from the following settings:
User’s Manual
Dynamically
Switchable
CPU power consumption and clock speed
automatic switching function is enabled. When
the computer is in use, CPU operation is
automatically switched when necessary
(Default).
Always High
CPU power consumption and clock speed
automatic switching function is disabled. The
CPU always runs at its fastest speed.
Always Low
CPU power consumption and clock speed
automatic switching function is disabled. The
CPU always runs at low power consumption and
low speed.
7-6
HW Setup
LAN
Wake-up on LAN
This feature lets the computer’s power be turned on when it receives a
wake-up signal from the LAN.
Enabled
Enables Wake-up on LAN.
Disabled
Disables Wake-up on LAN (Default).
Do not install or remove an optional memory module while Wake-up on
LAN is enabled.
The Wake-up on LAN function consumes power even when the system is
off. Leave the AC adaptor connected while using this feature.
Built-in LAN
This feature enables or disables the Built-in LAN.
Enabled
Enables Built-in LAN functions (Default).
Disabled
Disables Built-in LAN functions.
Device Config
Device Configuration
This option lets you set the device configuration.
All Devices
BIOS sets all devices.
Setup by OS
Operating system sets devices that it can control
(Default).
USB
USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation
Use this option to enable or disable USB keyboard/mouse legacy
emulation. If your operating system does not support USB, you can still use
a USB mouse and keyboard by setting the USB KB/Mouse Legacy
Emulation item to Enabled.
User’s Manual
Enabled
Enables the USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation
function (Default).
Disabled
Disables the USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation
function.
7-7
HW Setup
USB-FDD Legacy Emulation
Use this option to enable or disable USB floppy disk drive legacy
emulation. If your operating system does not support USB, you can still use
a USB floppy disk drive by setting the USB-FDD Legacy Emulation
item to Enabled.
Enabled
Enables the USB floppy disk drive legacy
emulation function (Default).
Disabled
Disables the USB floppy disk drive legacy
emulation function.
Configuring the Execute-Disable Bit Capability and TPM
Some models in this series are configured with Execute-Disable Bit
Capability and TPM. Settings for these features are carried out in the BIOS
setup program.
Notes before using the BIOS Setup
■ In most cases, changes to the system's configuration should be made
within Windows by using applications such as TOSHIBA HW Setup,
TOSHIBA Password Utility, TOSHIBA Power Saver, Windows
Device Manager and so forth. If you make changes to the
configuration through the BIOS setup program, please be aware that
the configuration set through the Windows applications will take priority.
■ Changes to the settings within the BIOS setup program will not be
erased even if the power supply is switched off and the main battery
removed. However, if the built-in Real Time Clock (RTC) battery runs
out of power, most of the settings will revert back to their default values.
However, please note that the following items will not be affected in this
instance:
• Password
• Hard Disk Drive Password
• Security controller
Starting and Ending the BIOS Setup Program
Starting the BIOS Setup Program
1. Switch on your computer while pressing the Esc key.
If "Password =" is displayed, enter either the Supervisor Password, if
one is set, or the User Password and press the Enter key.
Please refer to Chapter 6, the TOSHIBA Password Utility, for details
about the User Password.
The "Check system. Then press [F1] key." message is
displayed.
2. Press the F1 key.
The BIOS setup program will start up.
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7-8
HW Setup
Select either the Execute-Disable Bit Capability or settings in the security
controller to make changes. Please refer to the operating instructions
displayed in the settings screen.
Ending the BIOS Setup Program
Save the changes and end the program.
1. Press the End Key.
The "Are you sure? (Y/N) The changes you made
will cause the system to reboot." message is displayed.
2. Press the Y key.
The configured settings are saved and the BIOS setup program ends.
The computer may reboot depending on the settings that were
modified.
Ending the BIOS Setup Program Halfway
The configuration settings can be terminated halfway without saving any of
the changes made.
1. Press the Esc key.
The "Exit without saving? (Y/N)" message is displayed.
2. Press the Y key.
The BIOS setup program will end.
Core Multi - Processing
The Core Multi-Processing sets the CPU operating mode.
Enabled is Dual Core mode.
Disabled is Single Core mode.
Enabled
Enables Core Multi - Processing functions
(Default).
Disabled
Disables Core Multi - Processing functions.
Virtualization Technology
Virtualization Technology sets enable or disable of the Intel Virtualization
Technology installed in the CPU.
Intel Virtualization Technology is the technique that allows one machine to
operate as multiple virtual machines.
The Disabled command does not allow use of the Intel Virtualization
Technology.
The Enabled command allows use of the Intel Virtualization Technology.
User’s Manual
Enabled
Enables Virtualization Technology.
Disabled
Disables Virtualization Technology (Default).
7-9
HW Setup
Enhanced C-States
This feature enables or disables the Enhanced C-States.
Enabled
This lowers the power consumption (Default).
Disabled
This does not lower the power consumption.
Execute-Disable Bit Capability
This setting, which is displayed on the first page of the setup screen,
configures the Execute-Disable Bit function of the CPU. This function is
specific to Intel processors and, when activated, helps to reduce security
threats to the computer by preventing certain classes of malicious 'buffer
overflow' attacks when combined with a supporting operating system such
as Windows XP.
Available
Makes the processor's Execute-Disable Bit
Capability available for use.
Not Available
Disables the processor's Execute-Disable Bit
Capability so that it is not available for use.
(Default).
System configuration changes, other than changes to this setting, should
be made within Windows by using applications such as TOSHIBA HW
Setup, TOSHIBA Password Utility, TOSHIBA Power Saver, Windows
Device Manager and so forth.
LCD Display Stretch
Select the display function of the LCD. This function is only available on
XGA models.
Enabled
Display modes with low resolution are stretched
and displayed (Default).
Disabled
Display modes with low resolution are not
stretched and displayed in their original state.
Security controller
The security controller settings are available in SYSTEM SETUP (2/2).
TPM
This setting enables or disables the security controller known as TPM
(Trusted Platform Module).
User’s Manual
Enabled
Enables the TPM.
Disabled
Disables the TPM (Default).
7-10
HW Setup
Clear TPM Owner
This setting is used to erase the data in TPM when disposing of the
computer or when the owner of the computer changes, etc. Once this
operation is carried out, the TPM configuration settings are erased, such
that the encrypted data can no longer be decrypted and the files can no
longer be read. Please backup or delete the data as necessary before
carrying out this operation.
The operating procedure is as follows:
1. Move the cursor to the Clear TPM Owner setting and press the Space
key or BkSp key.
2. A message is displayed. Press the Y, E, S, and Enter keys and the
TPM information is erased.
3. The TPM setting changes from being displayed as Enable to Disabled,
and the setting is no longer displayed.
■ System configuration changes other than changes to this setting
should be made in Windows using TOSHIBA HW Setup, TOSHIBA
Password Utility, TOSHIBA Power Saver, Device Manager, etc.
■ When using TPM, please install the Infineon TPM Installation Guide
from the TOSHIBA Application Installer.
Please ensure that the user reads the Infineon TPM Installation
Guide as it contains usage information and notes on using TPM.
Diagnostic Mode
Set whether the BIOS Setup Diagnostic test is enabled.
User’s Manual
Disabled
(Default)
The Diagnostic test is disabled.
Enabled
The Diagnostic test is enabled.
7-11
Chapter 8
Optional Devices
Optional devices can expand the computer’s capabilities and its versatility.
This chapter describes connection or installation of the following devices,
which are available from your TOSHIBA dealer:
Cards/memory
■ PC card
■ Bridge media slot
■ SD card (SD memory card, SDIO card)
■ Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro
■ xD picture card
■ Memory expansion
Power devices
■
■
■
■
Battery Pack
Universal AC Adaptor
Slice Expansion Battery
Battery Charger
Peripheral devices
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
HDD Kit (Serial-ATA)
Ultra Slim Bay HDD Adaptor
USB FDD Kit
Tablet PC Pen
Reserve pen
External monitor
i.LINK (IEEE1394)
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator
Other
■ Security lock
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8-1
Optional Devices
PC card
The computer is equipped with a PC card slot that can accommodate a
Type II card. Any PC card that meets industry standards (manufactured by
TOSHIBA or other vendor) can be installed. The slot supports 16-bit PC
cards, including PC card 16’s multifunction card and CardBus PC cards.
CardBus supports the new standard of 32-bit PC cards. The bus provides
superior performance for the greater demands of multimedia data
transmission.
PC cards can sometimes become hot during PC operation. Before you
remove a PC card always wait for it to cool. You could get burned
removing a hot PC card.
Inserting a PC card
Windows hot-install feature lets you insert PC cards while the computer’s
power is on.
Do not insert a PC card while the computer is in Standby or Hibernation
mode. Some cards might not work properly.
To insert a PC card, follow the steps below:
1. Insert a PC card in the PC card slot.
2. Press gently to ensure a firm connection.
PC card slot
PC card
Inserting the PC card
3. After inserting the PC card, refer to the PC card’s documentation and
check the configuration in Windows to make sure it is appropriate for
your PC card.
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8-2
Optional Devices
Removing a PC card
To remove the PC card, follow the steps below.
1. Open the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the Task Bar.
2. Point to PC card and click.
3. Press the PC card eject button to extend it.
If the PC card is not inserted all the way, the eject button may not cause it
to pop out sufficiently to allows it to be grasped. Be sure to push the PC
card firmly into the computer and slide the eject button again.
4. Press the extended eject button to pop the card out slightly.
5. Grasp the PC card and draw it out.
PC card
eject button
PC card
Removing the PC card
Bridge media slot
This slot lets you insert SD memory card, SDIO card, Memory Stick (Pro)
and xD picture card.
This Bridge media slot supports the following cards.
■ SD card (SD memory card, SDIO card)
■ Memory Stick
■ Memory Stick PRO
■ xD picture card
Precautions on using cards.
Please note that not all cards have been tested and verified to work
correctly. Therefore, it is not possible to guarantee that all cards will
operate properly.
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8-3
Optional Devices
Media care
Observe the following precautions when handling the card.
Card care
■ Do not twist or bend cards.
■ Do not expose cards to liquids or store in humid areas or lay media
close to containers of liquid.
■ Do not touch the metal part of a card or expose it to liquids or let it get
dirty.
■ After using card, return it to its case.
■ The card is designed so that it can be inserted only one way. Do not try
to force the card into the slot.
■ Do not leave an card partially inserted in the slot. Press the card until
you hear it click into place.
Memory card care
■ Set the write-protect switch to the lock position, if you do not want to
record data.
■ Memory cards are consumable items, so make sure you back up
important data.
■ Do not write to an SD card if the battery power is low. Low power could
affect writing accuracy.
■ Do not remove an SD card while read/write is in progress.
For more details on using memory cards, see manuals accompanying the
cards.
SD card
Set the SD-card type SD memory cards and Bluetooth™ SDIO cards in the
Bridge Media slot.
Keep foreign objects out of the Bridge media slot. Never allow metal
objects, such as screws, staples and paper clips, to enter the PC or
keyboard. Foreign metal objects can create a short circuit, which can
cause PC damage and fire, possibly resulting in serious injury.
Inserting an SD card
To insert an SD card, follow the steps below.
1. Insert an SD card in the Bridge media slot.
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8-4
Optional Devices
2. Press gently to ensure a firm connection.
SD card
Bridge media slot
Inserting an SD card
■ Make sure the SD card is oriented properly before you insert it.
■ Do not turn the computer off or switch to Standby Mode or Hibernate
Mode while files are being copied - doing so may cause data to be lost.
Removing an SD card
To remove an SD card, follow the steps below.
1. Open the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the Task Bar.
2. Point to SD card and click.
3. Push in the card and release it to pop the card out slightly.
4. Grasp the card and remove it.
Bridge media
slot indicator
Bridge media slot
SD card
Removing an SD card
■ Make sure the Bridge media slot indicator is out before you remove
the SD card or turn off the computer’s power. If you remove the SD
card or turn off the power while the computer is accessing the SD card
you may lose data or damage the card.
■ Do not remove an SD card while the computer is in Standby or
Hibernation mode. The computer could become unstable or data in the
SD card could be lost.
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8-5
Optional Devices
SD memory card
SD cards let you easily transfer data from devices, such as digital cameras
and Personal Digital Assistants, that use SD card flash-memory. The cards
have a high level of security and copy protection features.
SD memory cards comply with SDMI (Secure Digital Music Initiative),
which is a technology adopted to prevent unlawful copy or playback of
digital music. For this reason, you cannot copy or playback protected
material on another computer or other device. You may not use the
reproduction of any copyrighted material except for your personal
enjoyment.
Formatting an SD card
SD memory cards are sold already formatted in conformity to specific
standards. If you format the SD card again, be sure to format it with the
TOSHIBA SD memory card format utility, not with the format commands
provided within Windows.
In order to run TOSHIBA SD memory card format, click start, point to All
Programs, point to TOSHIBA, point to Utilities and click SD memory card
Format.
The TOSHIBA SD memory card format utility does not format the protected
area of the SD memory card. Should you need to format all areas of the
memory card, including the protected area, you will need to obtain an
appropriate application that applies the copy protection system.
SDIO card
Add the Bluetooth™ wireless communication function to a computer with
the SDIO card.
Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro
The computer is equipped with a Bridge media slot that can accommodate
Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro flash memory cards with various memory
capacities. Memory Stick let you easily transfer data from devices, such as
digital cameras and Personal Digital Assistants, that use Memory Stick
technology.
Keep foreign objects out of the Bridge media slot. Never allow metal
objects, such as screws, staples and paper clips, to enter the PC or
keyboard. Foreign metal objects can create a short circuit, which can
cause PC damage and fire, possibly resulting in serious injury.
■ The slot does not support Magic Gate functions.
■ Memory Stick Duo/PRO Duo and the Memory Stick adaptor are not
compatible with the Bridge media slot. Do not insert Memory Stick
Duo/PRO Duo into the slot. Data may be lost or damaged if you use
any card other than those supported.
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8-6
Optional Devices
Write protection
Memory Stick can be write protected to safeguard your data. To writeprotect a Memory Stick, slide the lock on the back of the Memory Stick to
the lock position.
Inserting a Memory Stick
To insert a Memory Stick, follow the steps below.
1. Insert the Memory Stick into the Bridge media slot.
2. Press gently to ensure a firm connection.
Bridge media
slot indicator
Bridge media slot
Memory Stick
Inserting a Memory Stick
Removing a Memory Stick
To remove a Memory Stick, follow the steps below.
1. Open the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the Task Bar.
2. Point to Memory Stick and click.
3. Push in the card and release it to pop the card out slightly.
4. Grasp the card and remove it.
■ Make sure the Bridge media slot indicator is out before you remove
the Memory Stick or turn off the computer's power. If you remove the
Memory Stick or turn off the power while the computer is accessing the
Memory Stick you may lose data or damage the card.
■ Do not remove a Memory Stick while the computer is in Standby or
Hibernation mode. The computer could become unstable or data in the
Memory Stick could be lost.
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8-7
Optional Devices
xD picture card
The computer is equipped with a Bridge media slot that can accommodate
xD picture cards with various memory capacities. The xD picture card let
you easily transfer data from devices, such as digital cameras that use xD
picture card flash-memory.
Keep foreign objects out of the Bridge media slot. Never allow metal
objects, such as screws, staples and paper clips, to enter the PC or
keyboard. Foreign metal objects can create a short circuit, which can
cause PC damage and fire, possibly resulting in serious injury.
Inserting an xD picture card
To insert an xD picture card, follow the steps below.
1. Insert the xD picture card into the Bridge media slot.
2. Press gently to ensure a firm connection.
Bridge media
slot indicator
Bridge media slot
xD picture card
Inserting an xD picture card
Removing an xD picture card
To remove an xD picture card, follow the steps below.
1. Open the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the Task Bar.
2. Point to xD picture card and click.
3. Push in the card and release it to pop the card out slightly.
4. Grasp the card and remove it.
■ Make sure the Bridge media slot indicator is out before you remove
the xD picture card or turn off the computer's power. If you remove the
xD picture card or turn off the power while the computer is accessing
the xD picture card you may lose data or damage the card.
■ Do not remove an xD picture card while the computer is in Standby or
Hibernation mode. The computer could become unstable or data in the
xD picture card could be lost.
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8-8
Optional Devices
Memory expansion
You can install additional memory in the computer’s memory module slot to
increase the amount of RAM. This section describes how to install and
remove a memory module.
■ Place a mat beneath the computer to prevent scratching or damaging
the computer's lid when installing/replacing the memory module. Avoid
mats made of materials that generate static electricity.
■ When you install or remove a memory module, ensure that you do not
touch any other internal areas of the computer.
■ Use only memory modules approved by TOSHIBA.
■ Do not try to install or remove a memory module under the following
conditions as you can damage the computer and/or the module, and
you risk losing data:
a. The computer is turned on.
b. The computer was shut down using either Standby Mode or
Hibernation mode.
c. Wake-up on LAN is enabled.
d. Wake-up on Wireless LAN is enabled.
■ Be careful not to let screws or other foreign matter fall into the
computer. It could cause malfunction or electric shock.
■ Expansion memory is a precision electronic component that may be
fatally damaged by static electricity. Since the human body can carry
static electricity, it is important that you discharge yourself before
touching or installing any expansion memory modules.To discharge
your body’s static electricity, simply touch any metal close to you with
bare hands.
If you install a memory module that is not compatible with the computer, a
beep will sound when you turn on the power. If the incompatible module is
installed in slot A, there will be a long beep (1 second) followed by one
short beep (0.5 seconds), while if the incompatible module is in slot B, there
will be a long beep followed by two short beeps. In the event both modules
are incompatible, there will be a long beep followed by one short beep, a
pause, and then a long beep followed by two short beeps. In all instances
you should shut down the computer and remove the incompatible
module(s).
Use a point size 1 Phillips screwdriver to remove and fasten the screws.
Use of an incorrect screwdriver can damage the screw heads.
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8-9
Optional Devices
Installing a memory module
There are slots for two memory modules. The procedures are the same for
installing either module.
1. Set the computer to boot mode and turn the computer’s power off.
Make sure the Power indicator is off.
Refer to the Turning on the power section in Chapter 3, Getting Started.
2. Remove AC adaptor and all cables connected to the computer.
3. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack. Refer to
Replacing the battery pack section in Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up
Modes, for details.
4. Turn your computer over.
5. Push the display latch on the front of the computer and open the LCD
display panel.
6. Slip your finger under a notch at the end of the keyboard brace and lift
up to release latches and remove the keyboard brace.
Keyboard brace
Removing the keyboard brace
7. Remove two screws securing the keyboard.
Use a point size 1 Phillips screwdriver.
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8-10
Optional Devices
8. Lift up the back of the keyboard, rotate it toward you and lay in face
down on the palm rest.
■ When you move the keyboard forward, do not touch the keys. Doing so
could cause misalignment. Hold the keyboard by the sides and lay it
gently on the palm rest.
■ The keyboard is connected to the computer by a keyboard ribbon
cable. Be careful not to apply tension to this cable when you lift up the
keyboard. Do not try to disconnect this cable.
Screws
Removing two screws and rotate the keyboard
9. Remove the two screws and take off the memory module cover.
Memory module cover
Screws
Removing the memory module cover
■ Do not touch the connectors on the memory module or on the
computer. Debris on the connectors may cause memory access
problems.
■ The memory module cover will be hot after using the computer for long
periods of time. Exercise caution when removing.
The slot A is reserved for main memory. Use the slot B for expanded
memory. If only one card is installed, use the slot A.
User’s Manual
8-11
Optional Devices
10. Fit the memory module's connectors into the socket at about a
45 degree angle and push the module down until latches on either side
snap into place.
Align the notch of the memory module with that of the memory slot and
gently insert the module into the slot.
Slot A
Slot B
Installing the memory module
11. Screw in the two screws and replace the memory module cover.
Screws
Memory module
cover
Seating the memory module cover
12. Tuck the keyboard ribbon cable into the groove under the palm rest.
Keyboard
ribbon
cable
Tuck the keyboard ribbon cable
User’s Manual
8-12
Optional Devices
Do not bend the keyboard ribbon cable.
13. Insert the tabs on the front of the keyboard into the corresponding
notches on the computer and place the keyboard down.
When seating the keyboard, be sure to connect the circuit board if the
keyboard ribbon cable was pulled out while you were removing the
keyboard.
14. Screw the two screws and secure the keyboard.
Be sure to use all two screws removed in step 7. Make sure no screw was
dropped into the computer. Make sure no foreign matter can be found.
15. Set the keyboard brace into its groove and press down to secure the
latches.
16. Install the battery pack. Refer to Replacing the battery pack section in
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes, for details.
17. Turn your computer over.
18. Turn the power on and make sure the added memory is recognized.
Click start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance
and select the System icon. Open System Properties window and
click General tab.
Removing a memory module
To remove the memory module, make sure the computer is in boot mode
then:
1. Set the computer to boot mode and turn the computer’s power off.
Make sure the Power indicator is off.
2. Remove AC adaptor and all cables connected to the computer.
3. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack. Refer to
Replacing the battery pack section in Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up
Modes, for details.
4. Follow steps 4 through 9 in Installing memory module to remove the
memory module cover.
5. Push the latches to the outside to release the memory module. A spring
will force one end of the memory module up.
User’s Manual
8-13
Optional Devices
6. Grasp the sides of the module and pull it out.
■ If you use the computer for a long time, the memory modules and the
circuits locating close to the memory modules will become hot. In this
case, let them cool to room temperature before you replace them.
Or you will get burnt if you touch any of them.
■ Do not touch the connectors on the memory module or on the
computer. Debris on the connectors may cause memory access
problems.
Latches
Removing the memory module
7. Rotate the keyboard back into place and secure the keyboard brace as
described in the previous section.
8. Install the battery pack. Refer to Replacing the battery pack section in
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes, for details.
9. Turn your computer over.
Battery Pack
You can increase the portability of the computer with additional battery
packs. If you’re away from an AC power source and your battery runs low,
you can replace it with a freshly charged battery. Refer to Chapter 6, Power
and Power-Up Modes.
Universal AC Adaptor
If you frequently transport the computer between different sites such as
your home and office, purchasing an AC adaptor for each location will
reduce the weight and bulk of your carrying load.
User’s Manual
8-14
Optional Devices
Slice Expansion Battery
This battery pack increases your computer's operating time when a main
battery pack is also installed. For details on using the battery pack, follow
the steps below.
Connecting the Slice Expansion Battery
Follow the steps below to connect the Slice Expansion Battery to the
computer
When handling Slice Expansion Battery, be careful not to short circuit the
terminals. Also do not drop, hit or otherwise apply impact; do not scratch or
break the casing and do not twist or bend the latches of it.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Be sure the computer’s power is off and all cables are disconnected.
Lay the computer upside down.
Remove the protective cap from the Slice Expansion Battery.
Open latches on the Slice Expansion Battery and fit a tab on the battery
into the docking port on the underside of the computer
Seating the Slice Expansion Battery
5. Close the latches to secure the Slice Expansion Battery to the computer.
Securing the latches
User’s Manual
8-15
Optional Devices
Disconnecting the Slice Expansion Battery
Follow the steps below to disconnect the Slice Expansion Battery to the
computer.
1. Save your work.
2. Turn the computer’s power off. Make sure the Power indicator is off.
3. Remove all cables connected to the computer.
4. Lay the computer upside down.
5. Push the release latches in the direction of the arrows.
Releasing the latches
6. Lift off the Slice Expansion Battery.
Removing the Slice Expansion Battery
7. Be sure to replace the protective cap before storing the Slice Expansion
Battery.
User’s Manual
8-16
Optional Devices
Battery Charger
The battery charger provides a convenient way to charge battery packs
without requiring the use of your computer. The battery charger holds up to
two battery packs (lithium ion).
HDD Kit (Serial-ATA)
An extra hard disk drive expands the flexibility of your system and lets you
carry your data without carrying the computer.
Use a size 1 Phillips screwdriver.
Removing the hard disk drive pack
To remove the hard disk drive pack, follow the steps below.
1. Set the computer to boot mode and turn off the power.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor and all external cables connected to the
computer.
3. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack. Refer to
Replacing the battery pack section in Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up
Modes, for details.
4. Loosen two screws securing the hard disk drive cover.
5. A small row of ridges marks the latches securing the cover. Press on
these ridges until you hear a click.
6. Press on the arrows and lift the cover up and out to remove it.
Screws
Hard disk
drive cover
Removing the hard disk drive cover
7. Reposition the hard disk drive until it is vertical.
User’s Manual
8-17
Optional Devices
8. With the hard disk drive in a vertical position, lift it straight up and away
from the connector.
Connector
Plastic tab
Hard disk
drive pack
Removing the hard disk drive pack
Installing the HDD Kit (Serial-ATA)
To install the HDD Kit (Serial-ATA), follow the steps below.
1. Move the connector until it is vertical.
2. Hold the hard disk drive vertically with its label on the left.
3. Connect the hard disk drive to the connector.
Ensure that the hard disk drive is connected to the connector in a vertical
position. If the hard disk drive is slanted and connected to the connector, it
might damage the connector.
4. With the connector connected, lower the hard disk drive down to the
storage position.
Connector
Plastic tab
Hard disk
drive pack
Installing the hard disk drive pack
5. Seat the cover and press down until the latches click into place.
6. Secure the cover with two screws.
7. Turn your computer over.
User’s Manual
8-18
Optional Devices
Ultra Slim Bay HDD Adaptor
You can increase your computer’s data storage capacity by installing an
additional 80.0 billion bytes (74.53 GB) and 100.0 billion bytes (93.16 GB)
hard disk drive in the Ultra Slim Bay.
To install a hard disk drive in the Ultra Slim Bay HDD adaptor follow the
steps below.
1. Slide the lock to the unlock position and open the lid.
Lock
Lid
Opening the lid
2. Insert the hard disk drive in the Ultra Slim Bay HDD adaptor and push
forward to ensure a firm connection. Tuck the Plastic tab underneath
the hard disk drive.
Hard disk drive
Inserting the hard disk drive
User’s Manual
8-19
Optional Devices
3. Close the lid and slide the lock to the lock position.
Lid
Closing the lid
For details on inserting the Ultra Slim Bay HDD adaptor in the computer’s
Ultra Slim Bay slot, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
USB FDD Kit
The USB FDD Kit module can be connected to a USB port. For details on
connecting the USB floppy disk drive module, refer to Chapter 4, Operating
Basics.
Tablet PC Pen
Use it as a spare to your computer. Spare pen tip and draw-out tool are
included. Refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes, for the detailed
usage.
Reserve Pen
Supplied pen uses a pen instead of Supplied pen at the time of loss or
breakage. Refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes, for the
detailed usage.
User’s Manual
8-20
Optional Devices
External monitor
An external analog monitor can be connected to the external monitor port
on the computer. The computer supports XGA and SXGA+ video modes.
To connect a monitor, follow the steps below.
1. Turn the computer’s power off.
2. Connect the monitor cable to the external monitor port and tighten the
screws on the left and right hand side.
External
monitor port
Monitor cable
Connecting the monitor cable to the external monitor port
3. Turn the monitor’s power on.
4. Turn the computer’s power on.
When you turn on the power, the computer automatically recognizes the
monitor and determines whether it is color or monochrome.
However, the Windows Desktop appears on a display device that you used
last time to shut down your computer, if the display device exists when you
turn on the power.
To change the display settings, press Fn + F5. If you disconnect the
external monitor before you turn the computer’s power off, be sure to press
Fn + F5 to switch to the internal display. Refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard,
for details on using hot keys to change the display setting.
i.LINK (IEEE1394)
i.LINK (IEEE1394) is used for high-speed data transfer for a range of
compatible devices such as:
■ Digital video cameras
■ Hard disk drives
■ MO drives
■ Optical media drives
i.LINK uses a four-pin connector, which does not carry any electric current.
External devices will need their own power supply to operate.
User’s Manual
8-21
Optional Devices
Precautions
■ Make a back-up of your data before transferring it to the computer.
There is a possibility that the original data will be damaged. There is a
particular risk that some frames will be deleted in the case of digital
video transfer. TOSHIBA assumes no liability for such loss of data.
■ Do not transfer data in areas where static electricity is easily generated
or in areas subjected to electronic noise. Data can be destroyed.
■ If you are transferring data through an IEEE1394 hub, do not connect or
disconnect other devices from the hub during data transfer. There is a
likelihood that data will be damaged. Connect all devices to the hub
before you turn on the computer’s power.
■ You may not use any copyrighted video or music data copied from a
video camera except for your personal enjoyment.
■ If you connect/disconnect an i.LINK device to/from another i.LINK
device that is currently exchanging data with the computer, data frames
might be dropped.
■ Make sure data transfer has ended or turn off the computer, before you:
■ Connect/disconnect an i.LINK device to/from the computer.
■ Connect/disconnect an i.LINK device to/from another i.LINK device
that is connected to the computer.
Connecting
1. Make sure the connectors are properly aligned and plug the i.LINK
(IEEE1394) cable into the computer.
i.LINK (IEEE1394)
port
i.LINK (IEEE1394)
connector
Connecting the i.LINK (IEEE1394) cable into the computer
2. Plug the other end of the cable into the device.
Note the following when you use i.LINK:
■ You may need to install drivers for your i.LINK devices.
■ Not all i.LINK devices have been tested. Therefore, compatibility with all
i.LINK devices cannot be guaranteed.
■ Some devices might not support standby or automatic off functions.
User’s Manual
8-22
Optional Devices
■ Do not connect or disconnect an i.LINK device while it is using an
application or when the computer is automatically shutting it down to
save power. Data might be destroyed.
Disconnecting
1. Open the Safely Remove Hardware icon on the Task Bar.
2. Point to i.LINK (IEEE1394) device and click.
3. Disconnect the cable from the computer then from the i.LINK device.
Refer also to the documentation that came with your i.LINK device.
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator
In addition to the ports available on the computer, the TOSHIBA Express
Port Replicator. The TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator connects directly to
the docking interface on the underside of the computer. The AC adaptor
connects the TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator to a power source.
The computer must be configured properly before connecting to a LAN.
Logging onto a LAN using the computer’s default settings could cause a
malfunction in LAN operation. Check with your LAN administrator
regarding set-up procedures.
■ You must connect the AC adaptor before you connect to a TOSHIBA
Express Port Replicator.
■ When a TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator is connected to the
computer, you can not use the following computer’s ports: LAN jack,
DC IN 15V jack, External monitor port.
■ When connecting an AC Adaptor to the TOSHIBA Express Port
Replicator, use only the AC Adaptor included with TOSHIBA Express
Port Replicator. Do not use the computer’s AC Adaptor.
The following ports and accessories are available on the TOSHIBA
Express Port Replicator.
■ RJ45 LAN jack
■ External monitor port
■ DC IN 15V jack
■ Security lock slot
■ Universal Serial Bus 2.0 port (four)
■ DVI port
User’s Manual
8-23
Optional Devices
Security lock
Security locks enable you to anchor your computer and optional TOSHIBA
Express Port Replicator to a desk or other heavy object to help prevent
unauthorized removal of the computer or TOSHIBA Express Port
Replicator.
The computer has a security lock slot on the left side. Attach one end of a
cable to a desk and the other end to the security lock slot.
1. Turn the computer so the left side faces you.
2. Align the holes for the security lock and attach the lock.
Security lock slot
Security lock
User’s Manual
8-24
Chapter 9
Troubleshooting
TOSHIBA designed the computer for durability. However, should problems
occur, following the procedures in this chapter can help to determine the
cause.
All readers should become familiar with this chapter. Knowing what might
go wrong can help prevent problems from occurring.
Problem solving process
Resolving problems will be much easier if you observe the following
guidelines:
■ Stop immediately when you recognize a problem exists. Further action
may result in data loss or damage. You may destroy valuable problemrelated information that can help solve the problem.
■ Observe what is happening. Write down what the system is doing and
what actions you performed immediately before the problem occurred.
If you have a printer attached, print a copy of the screen using PrtSc.
The questions and procedures offered in this chapter are meant as a guide,
they are not definitive problem solving techniques. Many problems can be
solved simply, but a few may require help from your dealer. If you find you
need to consult your dealer or others, be prepared to describe the problem
in as much detail as possible.
User’s Manual
9-1
Troubleshooting
Preliminary checklist
Consider the simplest solution first. The items in this checklist are easy to
fix and yet can cause what appears to be a serious problem.
■ Make sure you turn on all peripheral devices before you turn on the
computer. This includes your printer and any other external device you
are using.
■ Before you attach an external device, turn the computer off. When you
turn the computer back on it recognizes the new device.
■ Make sure all options are set properly in the setup program.
■ Check all cables. Are they correctly and firmly attached? Loose cables
can cause signal errors.
■ Inspect all connecting cables for loose wires and all connectors for
loose pins.
■ Check that your floppy disk or CD/DVD-ROM is correctly inserted and
that the floppy disk’s write protect tab is correctly set.
Make notes of your observations and keep them in a permanent error log.
This will help you describe your problems to your dealer. If a problem
recurs, the log will help you identify the problem faster.
Analyzing the problem
Sometimes the system gives clues that can help you identify why it is
malfunctioning. Keep the following questions in mind:
■ Which part of the system is not operating properly: keyboard, floppy
disk drives, hard disk drive, optical media drive, display. Each device
produces different symptoms.
■ Is the operating system configuration set properly? Check the
configuration options.
■ What appears on the display screen? Does it display any messages or
random characters? If you have a printer attached, print a copy of the
screen using PrtSc. Look up the messages in the software and
operating system documentation. Check that all connecting cables are
correctly and firmly attached. Loose cables can cause erroneous or
intermittent signals.
■ Do any indicators light? Which ones? What color are they? Do they stay
on or blink? Write down what you see.
■ Do you hear any beeps? How many? Are they long or short? Are they
high pitched or low? Is the computer making any unusual noises? Write
down what you hear.
User’s Manual
9-2
Troubleshooting
Record your observations so you can describe them to your dealer.
Software
Hardware
The problems may be caused by your software or disk. If
you cannot load a software package, the media may be
damaged or the program might be corrupted. Try loading
another copy of the software.
If an error message appears while you are using a software
package, check the software documentation. These
documents usually include a problem solving section or a
summary of error messages.
Next, check any error messages in the operating system
documentation.
If you cannot find a software problem, check your
hardware. First run through the items in the preliminary
checklist above. If you still cannot correct the problem, try
to identify the source. The next section provides checklists
for individual components and peripherals.
Before using a peripheral device or application software that is not an
authorized Toshiba part or product, make sure the device or software can
be used with your PC. Use of incompatible devices may cause injury or
may damage your PC.
Hardware and system checklist
This section discusses problems caused by your computer’s hardware or
attached peripherals. Basic problems may occur in the following areas:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
User’s Manual
System start-up
Self test
Power
Password
Keyboard
Internal LCD display panel
Hard disk drive
DVD-ROM&CD-R/RW drive
DVD Super Multi drive
USB floppy disk drive
PC card
SD card
Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
xD picture card
Pointing Device
Fingerprint Sensor
USB device
Memory expansion
Sound system
External monitor
i.LINK (IEEE1394) device
Modem
LAN
Wireless LAN
Bluetooth
9-3
Troubleshooting
System start-up
When the computer does not start properly, check the following items:
■ Self Test
■ Power Sources
■ Power-on Password
Self test
When the computer starts up, the self test will be run automatically, and the
following will be displayed:
S
In Touch with Tomorrow
TOSHIBA
This message remains on the screen for a few seconds.
If the self test is successful, the computer tries to load the operating
system, depending on how the Boot Priority is set in the TOSHIBA HW
Setup program.
If any of the following conditions are present, the self test failed:
■ The computer stops and does not proceed to display information or
messages except the TOSHIBA logo.
■ Random characters appear on the screen, and the system does not
function normally.
■ The screen displays an error message.
Turn off the computer and check all cable connections. If the test fails
again, contact your dealer.
Power
When the computer is not plugged into an AC outlet, the battery pack is the
primary power source. However, your computer has a number of other
power resources, including an intelligent power supply and a Real Time
Clock battery. These resources are interrelated and any one could affect
apparent power problems. This section provides checklists for AC power
and the battery. If you cannot resolve a problem after following them, the
cause could lie with another power resource. In such case, contact your
dealer.
User’s Manual
9-4
Troubleshooting
Overheating power down
If the computer’s internal temperature becomes too high, the computer will
automatically enter Hibernation or Standby Mode and shut down.
Problem
Procedure
Computer shuts down
and DC IN indicator
blinks orange
Leave the computer off until the DC IN indicator
stops blinking.
It is recommended to leave the computer off until the interior reaches room
temperature even though the DC IN indicator stops blinking.
If the computer has reached room temperature
and still does not start, or if it starts but shuts
down quickly contact your dealer.
Computer shuts down
and its DC IN indicator
is flashing green
Indicates a problem with the heat dispersal
system. Please contact your dealer.
AC power
If you have trouble turning on the computer with the AC adaptor connected,
check the DC IN indicator. Refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes
for more information.
Problem
Procedure
AC adaptor doesn’t
power the computer
(DC IN indicator does
not glow green)
Check the connections. Make sure the cord is
firmly connected to the computer and a power
outlet.
Check the condition of the cord and terminals. If
the cord is frayed or damaged, replace it. If the
terminals are soiled, wipe them with cotton or a
clean cloth.
If the AC adaptor still does not power the
computer, contact your dealer.
User’s Manual
9-5
Troubleshooting
Battery
If you suspect a problem with the battery, check the DC IN indicator as well
as the Battery indicator. For information on indicators and battery
operation see Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
Problem
Procedure
Battery doesn’t power
the computer
The battery may be discharged. Connect the AC
adaptor to charge the battery.
Battery doesn’t charge
when the AC adaptor
is attached (Battery or
Ultra Slim Bay
indicator does not
glow orange.)
If the battery is completely discharged, it will not
begin charging immediately. Wait a few minutes.
If the battery still does not charge, make sure the
outlet of the AC adaptor is supplying power.
Test it by plugging in an appliance.
Check whether the battery is hot or cold to the
touch. If the battery is too hot or too cold, it will
not charge properly. Let it reach room
temperature.
Unplug the AC adaptor and remove the battery to
make sure the terminals are clean. If necessary
wipe them with a soft dry cloth dipped in alcohol.
Connect the AC adaptor and replace the battery.
Make sure it is securely seated.
Check the Battery indicator. If it does not glow,
let the computer charge the battery for at least 20
minutes. If the Battery indicator glows after 20
minutes, let the battery continue to charge at
least another 20 minutes before turning on the
computer.
If the indicator still does not glow, the battery may
be at the end of its operating life. Replace it.
If you do not think the battery is at the end of its
operating life, see your dealer.
Battery doesn’t power
the computer as long
as expected
If you frequently recharge a partially charged
battery, the battery might not charge to its full
potential. Fully discharge the battery, then try to
charge it again.
Check the power consumption settings in
TOSHIBA Power Saver utility. Consider using a
power saving mode.
User’s Manual
9-6
Troubleshooting
Real Time Clock
Problem
Procedure
The following
message is Displayed
on the LCD screen:
The charge in the RTC battery has run out - you
will need to set the date and time in the BIOS
setup using the following steps:
1. Press F1 key. BIOS setup will boot up.
2. Set the date in System Date.
3. Set the time in System Time.
4. Press End key. Confirmation message will
appear.
5. Press Y key. BIOS setup will terminate and
the computer will be rebooted.
RTC battery is
low or CMOS
checksum is
inconsistent.
Press [F1] key
to set
Date/Time.
Password
Problem
Procedure
Cannot enter
password
Refer to the TOSHIBA Password Utility section in
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
Keyboard
Keyboard problems can be caused by your setup configuration. For more
information refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard.
User’s Manual
Problem
Procedure
Some letter keys
produce numbers
Check that the numeric keypad overlay is not
selected. Press Fn + F10 and try typing again.
Output to screen is
garbled
Make sure the software you are using is not
remapping the keyboard. Remapping involves
reassigning the meaning of each key. See your
software’s documentation.
If you are still unable to use the keyboard,
consult your dealer.
9-7
Troubleshooting
Internal LCD display panel
Apparent LCD problems may be related to the computer’s setup. Refer to
Chapter 7, HW Setup, for more information.
Problem
Procedure
No display
Press hotkeys Fn + F5 to change the display
priority, to make sure it is not set for an external
monitor.
Markings appear on the The marks may have come from contact with the
LCD screen.
keyboard or Touch Pad. Try wiping the LCD
screen gently with a clean dry cloth. If markings
remain, use a good quality LCD screen cleaner,
taking care to ensure you let the LCD screen dry
before closing it.
Problems above
remain unresolved or
other problems occur
Refer to your software’s documentation to
determine if the software is causing the difficulty.
Run the diagnostic test.
Contact your dealer if the problems continue.
Hard disk drive
Problem
Procedure
Computer does not
boot from hard disk
drive
Check if a floppy disk is in the floppy disk drive or
a CD-ROM is in the optical media drive. Remove
any floppy disk and/or CD-ROM and check the
Boot priority. Refer to the Boot Priority section in
Chapter 7, HW Setup.
There may be a problem with your operating
system files. Refer to your operating system
documentation.
Slow performance
Your files may be fragmented. Run Disk
Defragmenter to check the condition of your files
and disk. Refer to your operating system’s
documentation or online HELP for information on
running the Disk Defragmenter.
As a last resort, reformat the hard disk. Then,
reload the operating system and other files.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
User’s Manual
9-8
Troubleshooting
DVD-ROM&CD-R/RW drive
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
You cannot access a
CD/DVD in the drive
Make sure the drive’s disc tray is securely
closed. Press gently until it clicks into place.
Check whether the drive power is on. If the
power is off, click on the Optical Drive Power icon
in the task tray and turn on the power.
Open the disc tray and make sure the CD/DVD is
properly seated. It should lie flat with the label
facing up.
A foreign object in the disc tray could block laser
light from reading the CD/DVD. Make sure there
is no obstruction. Remove any foreign object.
Check whether the CD/DVD is dirty. If it is, wipe it
with a clean cloth dipped in water or a neutral
cleaner. Refer to the Media care section in
Chapter 4 for details on cleaning.
The software or hardware configuration may be
Some CD/DVDs run
correctly, but others do causing a problem. Make sure the hardware
configuration matches your software’s needs.
not
Check the CD/DVD’s documentation.
Check the type of CD/DVD you are using. The
drive supports:
DVD-ROM:
DVD-ROM, DVD-Video
CD-ROM:
CD-DA, CD-Text, Photo CD™
(single/multi-session),
CD-ROM Mode 1, Mode 2,
CD-ROM XA Mode 2
(Form1, Form2),
Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA),
Addressing Method 2
Recordable CD: CD-R, CD-RW
Check the region code on the DVD. It must
match that on the DVD-ROM&CD-R/RW drive.
Region codes are listed in the Optical media
drives section in Chapter 2, The Grand Tour.
User’s Manual
9-9
Troubleshooting
Problem
Procedure
Cannot write correctly
If you have trouble writing, make sure you are
observing the following precautions:
■ Use only media recommended by TOSHIBA.
■ Do not use the mouse or keyboard during
writing.
■ Use only the software supplied with the
computer for recording.
■ Do not run or start other software during
writing.
■ Do not jar the computer during writing.
■ Do not connect/disconnect external devices
or install/remove internal cards during writing.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
DVD Super Multi drive
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
You cannot access
a CD/DVD in the drive
Make sure the drive’s disc tray is securely closed.
Press gently until it clicks into place.
Check whether the drive power is on. If the
power is off, click on the Optical Drive Power icon
in the task tray and turn on the power.
Open the disc tray and make sure the CD/DVD is
properly seated. It should lie flat with the label
facing up.
A foreign object in the disc tray could block laser
light from reading the CD/DVD. Make sure there
is no obstruction. Remove any foreign object.
Check whether the CD/DVD is dirty. If it is, wipe it
with a clean cloth dipped in water or a neutral
cleaner. Refer to the Media care section in
Chapter 4 for details on cleaning.
Some CD/DVDs run
The software or hardware configuration may be
correctly, but others do causing a problem. Make sure the hardware
not
configuration matches your software’s needs.
Check the CD/DVD's documentation.
User’s Manual
9-10
Troubleshooting
Check the type of CD/DVD you are using. The
drive supports:
DVD-ROM:
DVD-ROM, DVD-Video
CD-ROM:
CD-DA, CD-Text, Photo CD™
(single/multi-session),
CD-ROM Mode 1, Mode 2,
CD-ROM XA Mode 2
(Form1, Form2),
Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA),
Addressing Method 2
Check the region code on the DVD. It must
match that on the DVD Super Multi drive. Region
codes are listed in the Optical media drives
section in Chapter 2, The Grand Tour.
USB floppy disk drive (optional)
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
Drive does not operate There may be a faulty cable connection. Check
the connection to the computer and to the drive.
Some programs run
correctly but others do
not
The software or hardware configuration may be
causing a problem. Make sure the hardware
configuration matches your software needs.
You cannot access the
external 3 1/2" floppy
disk drive
Try another floppy disk. If you can access the
floppy disk, the original floppy disk (not the drive)
is probably causing the problem.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
PC card
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Problem
Procedure
PC card error occurs
Reseat the PC card to make sure it is firmly
connected.
Make sure the connection between the external
device and the card is firm.
Check the card’s documentation.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
User’s Manual
9-11
Troubleshooting
SD card
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Problem
Procedure
SD card error occurs
Reseat the SD card to make sure it is firmly
connected.
Check the card’s documentation.
You cannot write to an
SD memory card
Make sure the card is not write protected.
You cannot read a file
Make sure the target file is on the SD memory
card inserted in the slot.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Problem
Procedure
Memory Stick/Memory
Stick Pro error occurs
Reseat the Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro to
make sure it is firmly connected.
Check the card’s documentation.
You cannot write to an
Memory Stick/Memory
Stick Pro
Make sure the Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro is
not write protected.
You cannot read a file
Make sure the target file is on the Memory
Stick/Memory Stick Pro inserted in the slot.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
xD picture card
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
User’s Manual
Problem
Procedure
xD picture card error
occurs
Reseat the xD picture card to make sure it is
firmly connected.
Check the card’s documentation.
You cannot read a file
Make sure the target file is on the xD picture card
inserted in the slot.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-12
Troubleshooting
Pointing device
If you are using a USB mouse, also refer to the USB section in this chapter
and to your mouse documentation.
Touch Pad
User’s Manual
Problem
Procedure
On-screen pointer
does not respond to
Pad operation
The system might be busy. If the pointer is
shaped as an hourglass, wait for it to return to its
normal shape and try again to move it.
Double-tapping does
not work
Try changing the double-click speed setting in
the mouse control utility.
1. Click start, click Control Panel, click
Printers and Other Hardware and select
Mouse icon.
2. Click the Buttons tab.
3. Set the double-click speed as required and
click OK.
The mouse pointer
moves too fast or too
slow
Try changing the speed setting in the mouse
control utility.
1. Click start, click Control Panel, click
Printers and Other Hardware and select
Mouse icon.
2. Click the Pointer Options tab.
3. Set the speed as required and click OK.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
The reaction of Touch
pad is either too
sensitive or not
sensitive enough.
Adjust the touch Sensitivity.
1. Click start and open the Control Panel.
2. Click the Printers and Other Hardware icon.
3. Click the Mouse icon.
4. Click the Advanced tab.
5. Click the Advanced feature settings button.
6. Click Touch Pad tab. Click the Settings
button in the Pointer speed and tapping
settings.
7. Detailed Touch Pad setting is displayed.
8. Move the slide of adjust the pointer speed in
relation to the standard Windows setting.
Click the OK button.
9. Click the OK button on Advanced feature
setting screen.
9-13
Troubleshooting
USB mouse
Problem
Procedure
On-screen pointer
does not respond to
mouse operation
The system might be busy. If the pointer is
shaped as an hourglass, wait for it to resume its
normal shape and try again to move it.
Make sure the mouse is properly connected to
the USB port.
Double-clicking does
not work
Try changing the double-click speed setting in
the mouse control utility.
1. Click start, click Control Panel, click
Printers and Other Hardware and select
Mouse icon.
2. Click the Buttons tab.
3. Set the double-click speed as required and
click OK.
The mouse pointer
moves too fast or too
slow
Try changing the speed setting in the mouse
control utility.
1. Click start, click Control Panel, click
Printers and Other Hardware and select
Mouse icon.
2. Click the Pointer Options tab.
3. Set the speed as required and click OK.
The mouse pointer
moves erratically
The mouse might be dirty. Refer to your mouse
documentation for instructions on cleaning.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Fingerprint Sensor
User’s Manual
Problem
Procedure
Reading of the
fingerprint was not
successful.
Please try again using the correct posture. Align
your fingertip with the sensor as shown in the
drawing and Swipe. Refer to Using the
Fingerprint Sensor in Chapter 4, Operating
Basics.
Try the recognition process again using another
enrolled finger.
The fingerprint cannot
be read due to injuries
to the finger.
Try the recognition process again using another
enrolled finger.
If fingerprints from all the enrolled fingers cannot
be read, please logon by using the keyboard to
input the password for the time being.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-14
Troubleshooting
USB device
Refer also to your USB device’s documentation.
Problem
Procedure
USB device does not
work
Check for a firm cable connection between the
USB ports on the computer and the USB device.
Make sure the USB device drivers are properly
installed. Refer to your Windows XP
documentation for information on checking the
drivers.
If you are using an operating system that does
not support USB, you can still use a USB mouse
and/or USB keyboard. If these devices do not
work, make sure the USB KB/Mouse Legacy
Emulation item in HW Setup is set to Enabled.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Memory expansion
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices, for information on installing
memory modules.
Problem
Procedure
Beep sounds.
(Two beeps, a dash
and a dot, for a
defective memory
module in slot A.
Three beeps, a dash
and two dots for slot B.
When both beeps
sound, both memories
in slot A and B are
defective.)
Make sure the memory module installed in the
memory slot is compatible with the computer.
If an incompatible module has been installed,
follow the steps below.
1. Turn off the computer.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor and all peripheral
devices.
3. Remove the battery pack.
4. Remove the memory module.
5. Install the battery and/or connect the AC
adaptor.
6. Turn on the power.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
User’s Manual
9-15
Troubleshooting
Sound system
Refer also to documentation for your audio devices.
Problem
Procedure
No sound is heard
Adjust the volume control dial.
Check the software volume settings.
Make sure the headphone connection is secure.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Check Windows Device Manager. Make sure the
sound function is enabled and that settings for
I/O address, Interrupt level and DMA are correct
for your software and do not conflict with other
hardware devices that you may have connected
to the computer.
Annoying sound
is heard
You may be experiencing feedback. Refer to
Sound System in Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
External monitor
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices, and to your monitor’s
documentation.
Problem
Procedure
Monitor does not turn
on
Make sure that the external monitor’s power
switch is on. Confirm that the external monitor’s
power cable is plugged into a working power
outlet.
No display
Try adjusting the contrast and brightness controls
on the external monitor.
Press hot keys Fn + F5 to change the display
priority and make sure it is not set for the internal
LCD.
Display error occurs
User’s Manual
Check that the cable connecting the external
monitor to the computer is attached firmly.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-16
Troubleshooting
i.LINK (IEEE1394) device
Problem
Procedure
i.LINK device does not
function
Make sure the cable is securely connected to the
computer and to the device.
Make sure the device’s power is turned on.
Reinstall the drivers. Open the Windows
Control Panel and double-click the Add
Hardware icon. Follow the on-screen
directions.
Restart Windows.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Modem
User’s Manual
Problem
Procedure
Communication
software can’t initialize
modem
Make sure the computer’s internal modem
settings are correct. Refer to Phone and Modem
Properties in the Control Panel.
You can hear a dial
tone but can’t make a
call
If the call is going through a PBX machine, make
sure the communication application’s tone dial
detection feature is disabled.
You can also use the ATX command.
You place a call, but a
connection can’t be
made
Make sure the settings are correct in your
communications application.
After making a call you
can’t hear a ring
Make sure the tone or pulse selection in your
communications application is set correctly.
You can also use the ATD command.
Communication is cut
off unexpectedly
The computer will automatically cut off
communication when connection with the carrier
is not successful for a set time interval. Try
lengthening this time interval.
A CONNECT display is
quickly replaced by NO
CARRIER
Check the error control setting in your
communications application.
You can also use the AT\N command.
Character display
becomes garbled
during a
communication
session
In data transmission, make sure the parity bit and
stop bit settings correspond with those of the
remote computer.
Check the flow control and communication
protocol.
9-17
Troubleshooting
Problem
Procedure
You cannot receive an
incoming call
Check the rings before auto answer setting in
your communications application.
You can also use the ATS0 command.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Problem
Procedure
Cannot access LAN
Check for a firm cable connection between the
LAN jack and the LAN hub.
Wake-up on LAN does
not work
Make sure the AC adaptor is connected. The
Wake-up on LAN function consumes power even
when the system is off.
If problems persist, consult your LAN
administrator.
LAN
Wireless LAN
If the following procedures do not restore LAN access, consult your LAN
administrator. For more information on wireless communication, refer to
Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
Cannot access
Wireless LAN
Make sure the computer’s wireless
communication switch is set to on.
If problems persist, contact your LAN
administrator.
Bluetooth
For more information on wireless communication, refer to Chapter 4,
Operating Basics.
User’s Manual
Problem
Procedure
Cannot access
Bluetooth device
Make sure the computer’s wireless
communication switch is set to on.
9-18
Troubleshooting
Make sure the Bluetooth Manager is running and
the power to the Bluetooth device is turned on.
Make sure no optional Bluetooth PC card and
Bluetooth SD card are installed in the computer.
The built-in Bluetooth function and an optional
Bluetooth PC card cannot operate
simultaneously. If problems persist, contact your
dealer.
Disposing of PC and PC batteries
■ Discard this PC in accordance with ordinances or rules of local
regulations. For further information, contact your local government.
■ This PC contains rechargeable batteries. After repeated use, the
batteries will finally lose their ability to hold a charge and you will need
to replace them. Under certain applicable laws and regulation, it may be
illegal to dispose of old batteries by placing them in the trash.
■ Please be kind to our shared environment. Check with your local
government authority for details regarding where to recycle old batteries
or how to dispose of them properly. This product contains mercury.
Disposal of this material may be regulated due to environmental
considerations. For disposal, reuse or recycling information, please
contact your local government.
■ If your hard disk or other storage media contains sensitive data, you
should be aware that standard deletion procedures do not remove data
from the media. These standard deletion procedures include:
■ Selecting Delete for a target file
■ Putting files in the Recycle Bin and emptying the Recycle Bin
■ Reformatting the media
■ Reinstalling an operating system from the recovery CD-ROM
The procedures above delete only the initial part of the data used for file
management. This makes the file invisible to the operating system, but
the data can still be read by specialized utilities. If you dispose of the
PC, please delete all the data on its hard disk drive. Doing so prevents
unauthorized use of such data. To ensure your data is not used for
unauthorized purposes, you can:
■ Physically destroy the hard disk drive
■ Use a proven specialized utility to overwrite all data
■ Take the hard disk drive to a professional deletion service
All data deletion costs will be borne by you.
User’s Manual
9-19
Troubleshooting
TOSHIBA support
If you require any additional help using your computer or if you are having
problems operating the computer, you may need to contact TOSHIBA for
additional technical assistance.
Before you call
Some problems you experience may be related to software or the operating
system, it is important to investigate other sources of assistance first.
Before contacting TOSHIBA, try the following:
■ Review troubleshooting sections in the documentation for software and
peripheral devices.
■ If a problem occurs when you are running software applications, consult
the software documentation for troubleshooting suggestions. Call the
software company’s technical support for assistance.
■ Consult the dealer you purchased your computer and/or software from.
They are your best sources for current information and support.
Where to write
If you are still unable to solve the problem and suspect that it is hardware
related, write to TOSHIBA at the location listed in the accompanying
warranty booklet or visit www.toshiba-europe.com on the Internet.
User’s Manual
9-20
Chapter 10
Legal Footnotes
This chapter states the Legal Footnotes information applicable to TOSHIBA
computers. In the text in this manual, *XX is used to show which Legal
Footnotes description is related to TOSHIBA computers.
Description(s) related to this computer are marked with a blue *XX in this
manual. Clicking on *XX will display the related description.
CPU*1
Central Processing Unit ("CPU") Performance Legal Footnotes.
CPU performance in your computer product may vary from specifications
under the following conditions:
■ use of certain external peripheral products
■ use of battery power instead of AC power
■ use of certain multimedia, computer generated graphics or video
applications
■ use of standard telephone lines or low speed network connections
■ use of complex modeling software, such as high end computer aided
design applications
■ use of several applications or functionalities simultaneously
■ use of computer in areas with low air pressure (high altitude >1,000
meters or >3,280 feet above sea level)
■ use of computer at temperatures outside the range of 5°C to 30°C
(41°F to 86°F) or >25°C (77°F) at high altitude (all temperature
references are approximate and may vary depending on the specific
computer model - please refer to your PC documentation or visit the
Toshiba website at www.pcsupport.toshiba.com for details).
User’s Manual
10-1
Legal Footnotes
CPU performance may also vary from specifications due to design
configuration.
Under some conditions, your computer product may automatically shutdown. This is a normal protective feature designed to reduce the risk of lost
data or damage to the product when used outside recommended
conditions. To avoid risk of lost data, always make back-up copies of data
by periodically storing it on an external storage medium. For optimum
performance, use your computer product only under recommended
conditions. Read additional restrictions in your product documentation.
Contact Toshiba technical service and support, refer to TOSHIBA support
section in Chapter 9 Troubleshooting for more information.
Memory (Main System)*2
Part of the main system memory may be used by the graphics system for
graphics performance and therefore reduce the amount of main system
memory available for other computing activities. The amount of main
system memory allocated to support graphics may vary depending on the
graphics system, applications utilized, system memory size and other
factors. For PC's configured with 4 GB of system memory, the full system
memory space for computing activities will be considerably less and will
vary by model and system configuration.
Battery Life*3
Battery life may vary considerably depending on product model,
configuration, applications, power management settings and features
utilized, as well as the natural performance variations produced by the
design of individual components. Published battery life numbers are
achieved on select models and configurations tested by Toshiba at the time
of publication. Recharge time varies depending on usage. Battery may not
charge while computer is consuming full power.
After going through many charge and discharge cycles, the battery will lose
its ability to perform at maximum capacity and will need to be replaced.
This is a normal phenomenon for all batteries. To purchase a new battery
pack, see the accessories information that is shipped with your computer.
HDD Drive Capacity*4
1 Gigabyte (GB) means 109 = 1,000,000,000 bytes using powers of 10.
The computer operating system, however, reports storage capacity using
powers of 2 for the definition of 1 GB = 230 = 1,073,741,824 bytes, and
therefore shows less storage capacity. Available storage capacity will also
be less if the product includes one or more pre-installed operating systems,
such as Microsoft Windows and/or pre-installed software applications, or
media content. Actual formatted capacity may vary.
User’s Manual
10-2
Legal Footnotes
LCD*5
Over a period of time, and depending on the usage of the computer, the
brightness of the LCD screen will deteriorate. This is an intrinsic
characteristic of LCD technology.
Maximum brightness is only available when operating in AC power mode.
The screen will dim when the computer is operated on battery power and
you may not be able to increase the brightness of the screen.
Graphics Processor Unit ("GPU")*6
Graphics processor unit ("GPU") performance may vary depending on
product model, design configuration, applications, power management
settings and features utilized. GPU performance is only optimized when
operating in AC power mode and may decrease considerably when
operating in battery power mode.
Wireless LAN*7
The transmission speed over the wireless LAN and the distance over which
wireless LAN can reach may vary depending on surrounding
electromagnetic environment, obstacles, access point design and
configuration, and client design and software/hardware configurations.
[54Mbps is the theoretical maximum speed under the IEEE802.11 (a/b/g)
standard.] The actual transmission speed will be lower than the theoretical
maximum speed.
Non-applicable Icons*8
Certain notebook chassis are designed to accommodate all possible
configurations for an entire product series. Therefore, please be aware that
your selected model may not have all the features and specifications
corresponding to all of the icons or switches shown on the notebook
chassis.
Copy Protection*9
Copy protection technology included in certain media may prevent or limit
recording or viewing of the media.
Images*10
All images are simulated for purposes of illustration.
User’s Manual
10-3
Appendix A
Specifications
This appendix summarizes the computer’s technical specifications.
Physical Dimensions
User’s Manual
Weight (typical)
2.18 kilograms, configured with: 12.1"XGA,
512MB RAM, 40GB HDD, DVD-ROM&CD-R/RW
drive, modem, LAN, Wireless LAN, 6cell battery
pack, Table PC Pen.
Weight will vary with other configurations. Above
weights are measured at specific criteria. They
are not guaranteed as the maximum weight of
the actual product.
Size
295 (w) × 249 (d) × 38.9 (h) millimeters (not
including parts that extend beyond the main
body)
A-1
Specifications
Environmental Requirements
Conditions
Ambient temperature
Relative humidity
Operating
5°C (41°F) to 35°C (95°F)
20% to 80%
Non-operating
-20°C (-4°F) to 65°C (149°F) 10% to 90%
Thermal Gradient
20°C per hour maximum
Wet-bulb
temperature
26°C maximum
Conditions
Altitude (from sea level)
Operating
-60 to 3,000 meters
Non-operating
-60 to 10,000 meters
maximum
Power Requirements
AC adaptor
100-240 volts AC
50 or 60 hertz (cycles per second)
Computer
15 VDC
5.0 amperes
Built-in Modem
Network control unit (NCU)
Type of NCU
AA
Type of line
Telephone line (analog only)
Type of dialing
Pulse
Tone
Control command
AT commands
EIA-578 commands
Monitor function
Computer’s speaker
Communication specifications
Communication
system
User’s Manual
Data:
Fax:
Full duplex
Half duplex
A-2
Specifications
Network control unit (NCU)
Communication
protocol
User’s Manual
Data
ITU-T-Rec
(Former CCITT)
Bell
Fax
ITU-T-Rec
(Former CCITT)
V.21/V.22/V.22bis/V.32
V.32bis/V.34/V.90
103/212A
V.17/V.29/V.27ter
V.21 ch2
Communication
speed
Data transmission and reception
300/1200/2400/4800/7200/9600/12000/14400/
16800/19200/21600/24000/26400/28800/31200/
33600 bps
Data reception only with V.90
28000/29333/30666/32000/33333/34666/36000/
37333/38666/40000/41333/42666/44000/45333/
46666/48000/49333/50666/52000/53333/54666/
56000 bps
Fax
2400/4800/7200/9600/12000/14400 bps
Transmitting level
-10 dBm
Receiving level
-10 to -40 dBm
Input/output
impedance
600 ohms ±30%
Error correcting
MNP class 4 and ITU-T V.42
Data compression
MNP class 5 and ITU-T V.42bis
Power supply
+3.3V (supplied by computer)
A-3
Appendix B
Display Controller and Modes
Display controller
The display controller interprets software commands into hardware
commands that turn particular parts on the screen on or off.
The display controller supports VGA, SVGA and XGA modes on the
internal LCD display panel.
Two models are available:
■ 12.1" XGA, 1024 horizontal × 768 vertical pixels
■ 12.1" SXGA+, 1400 horizontal × 1050 vertical pixels
Because of the LCD’s increased resolution, lines may appear broken in
DOS mode.
A high-resolution external monitor connected to the computer can display
up to 2048 horizontal and 1536 vertical pixels at up to 16M colors.
The display controller also controls the video mode, which uses industry
standard rules to govern the screen resolution and the maximum number of
colors that can be displayed on screen.
Software written for a given video mode will run on any computer that
supports the mode.
The computer’s display controller supports all XGA and SXGA modes, the
most widely used industry standards.
Video modes
The computer supports video modes defined in the tables below. If your
application offers a selection of mode numbers that do not match the
numbers on the table, select a mode based on mode type, resolution,
character matrix, number of colors and refresh rates. Also, if your software
supports both graphics and text modes, the screen display may appear to
operate faster using a text mode.
User’s Manual
B-1
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (VGA)
Video mode
Type
Resolution
Character
matrix
(pels)
Colors
Scanning
frequency
Vertical (Hz)
0, 1
VGA Text
40 × 25
Characters
8×8
16 of 256K
70
2, 3
VGA Text
80 × 25
Characters
8×8
16 of 256K
70
0*, 1*
VGA Text
40 × 25
Characters
8 × 14
16 of 256K
70
2*, 3*
VGA Text
80 × 25
Characters
8 × 14
16 of 256K
70
0+, 1+
VGA Text
40 × 25
Characters
9 × 16
16 of 256K
70
2+, 3+
VGA Text
80 × 25
Characters
9 × 16
16 of 256K
70
4, 5
VGA Grph
320 × 200 Pels
8×8
4 of 256K
70
6
VGA Grph
640 × 200 Pels
8×8
2 of 256K
70
7
VGA Text
80 × 25
Characters
9 × 14
Mono
70
7+
VGA Text
80 × 25
Characters
9 × 16
Mono
70
User’s Manual
B-2
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (VGA) continued
Video mode
Type
Resolution
Character
matrix
(pels)
Colors
Scanning
frequency
Vertical (Hz)
D
VGA Grph
320 × 200 Pels
8×8
16 of 256K
70
E
VGA Grph
640 × 200 Pels
8×8
16 of 256K
70
F
VGA Grph
640 × 350 Pels
8 × 14
Mono
70
10
VGA Grph
640 × 350 Pels
8 × 14
16 of 256K
70
11
VGA Grph
640 × 480 Pels
8 × 16
2 of 256K
60
12
VGA Grph
640 × 480 Pels
8 × 16
16 of 256K
60
13
VGA Grph
320 × 200 Pels
8×8
256 of 256K
70
User’s Manual
B-3
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (XGA model)
Resolution
LCD colors
CRT colors
Vertical
frequency (Hz)*
640 × 480
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
800 × 600
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1024 × 768
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1280 × 1024
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1600 × 1200
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1920 × 1440
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
2048 × 1536
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
* Only External Monitor can perform change of Vertical frequency (Hz).
Noise may appear if the screen is displayed in high resolution mode on a
simultaneous display or multi-monitor display while running 3D
applications, during DVD playback or so on. Reduce the resolution until the
screen is displayed properly in such cases.
User’s Manual
B-4
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (XGA model) continued
Resolution
LCD colors
CRT colors
Vertical frequency
(Hz)*
640 × 480
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
800 × 600
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1024 × 768
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1280 × 1024
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1600 × 1200
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1920 × 1440
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
2048 × 1536
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
* Only External Monitor can perform change of Vertical frequency (Hz).
Noise may appear if the screen is displayed in high resolution mode on a
simultaneous display or multi-monitor display while running 3D
applications, during DVD playback or so on. Reduce the resolution until the
screen is displayed properly in such cases.
User’s Manual
B-5
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (XGA model) continued
Resolution
LCD colors
CRT colors
Vertical
frequency (Hz)*
640 × 480
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
800 × 600
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1024 × 768
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1280 × 1024
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1600 × 1200
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1920 × 1440
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
2048 × 1536
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
* Only External Monitor can perform change of Vertical frequency (Hz).
Noise may appear if the screen is displayed in high resolution mode on a
simultaneous display or multi-monitor display while running 3D
applications, during DVD playback or so on. Reduce the resolution until the
screen is displayed properly in such cases.
User’s Manual
B-6
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (SXGA+ model)
Resolution
LCD colors
CRT colors
Vertical
frequency (Hz)*
640 × 480
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
800 × 600
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1024 × 768
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1280 × 1024
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1400 × 1050
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1600 × 1200
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
100
1920 × 1440
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
85
2048 × 1536
(Virtual with LCD
only)
256/256K
256/256K
60
75
* Only External Monitor can perform change of Vertical frequency (Hz).
Noise may appear if the screen is displayed in high resolution mode on a
simultaneous display or multi-monitor display while running 3D
applications, during DVD playback or so on. Reduce the resolution until the
screen is displayed properly in such cases.
User’s Manual
B-7
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (SXGA+ model) continued
Resolution
LCD colors
CRT colors
Vertical frequency
(Hz)*
640 × 480
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
800 × 600
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1024 × 768
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1280 × 1024
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1400 × 1050
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1600 × 1200
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
100
1920 × 1440
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
85
2048 × 1536
(Virtual with LCD
only)
64K/64K
64K/64K
60
75
* Only External Monitor can perform change of Vertical frequency (Hz).
Noise may appear if the screen is displayed in high resolution mode on a
simultaneous display or multi-monitor display while running 3D
applications, during DVD playback or so on. Reduce the resolution until the
screen is displayed properly in such cases.
User’s Manual
B-8
Display Controller and Modes
Table: Video modes (SXGA+ model) continued
Resolution
LCD colors
CRT colors
Vertical frequency
(Hz)*
640 × 480
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
800 × 600
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1024 × 768
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1280 × 1024
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1400 × 1050
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1600 × 1200
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
100
1920 × 1440
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
85
2048 × 1536
(Virtual with LCD
only)
16M/16M
16M/16M
60
75
* Only External Monitor can perform change of Vertical frequency (Hz).
Noise may appear if the screen is displayed in high resolution mode on a
simultaneous display or multi-monitor display while running 3D
applications, during DVD playback or so on. Reduce the resolution until the
screen is displayed properly in such cases.
User’s Manual
B-9
Appendix C
Wireless LAN
Card Specifications
Form Factor
PCI Express Mini Card
Compatibility
■ IEEE 802.11 Standard for Wireless LANS
■ Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity) certified by the Wi-Fi
Alliance. The ‘Wi-Fi CERTIFIED’ logo is a
certification mark of the Wi-Fi Alliance.
Network Operating
System
■ Microsoft Windows® Networking
Media Access
Protocol
■ CSMA/CA (Collision Avoidance) with
Acknowledgment (ACK)
Data Rate
■ Theoretical maximum speed: 54Mbps
(IEEE802.11a/IEEE802.11g: 11b/g, 11a/b/g combo
type)
■ Theoretical maximum speed: 11Mbps (IEEE802.11b)
User’s Manual
C-1
Wireless LAN
Radio Characteristics
Radio Characteristics of Wireless LAN Cards may vary according to:
■ Country/region where the product was purchased
■ Type of product
Wireless communication is often subject to local radio regulations.
Although Wireless LAN wireless networking products have been designed
for operation in the license-free 2.4GHz and 5GHz band, local radio
regulations may impose a number of limitations to the use of wireless
communication equipment.
Refer to the sheet "Information to the User" for regulatory information that
may apply in your country/region.
R-F Frequency
■ Band 5GHz (5150-5850 MHz) (Revision A)
■ Band 2.4GHz (2400-2483.5 MHz) (Revision
B, G)
Modulation
Technique
■ DSSS-CCK, DSSS-DQPSK, DSSS-DBPSK
(Revision B)
■ OFDM-BPSK, OFDM-QPSK, OFDM-16QAM,
OFDM-64QAM (Revision A, G)
The range of the wireless signal is related to the transmit rate of the
wireless communication. Communications at lower transmit range may
travel larger distances.
■ The range of your wireless devices can be affected when the antennas
are placed near metal surfaces and solid high-density materials.
■ Range is also impacted due to "obstacles" in the signal path of the radio
that may either absorb or reflect the radio signal.
Supported Frequency Sub-bands
Subject to the radio regulations that apply in the countries/regions, your
Wireless LAN card may support a different set of 5 GHz/2.4 GHz channels.
Consult your Authorized Wireless LAN or TOSHIBA Sales office for
information about the radio regulations that apply in the countries/regions.
User’s Manual
C-2
Wireless LAN
Wireless IEEE 802.11 Channels Sets (Revision B and G)
Frequency Range
Channel ID
2400-2483.5 MHz
1
2412
2
2417
3
2422
4
2427
5
2432
6
2437
7
2442
8
2447
9
2452
10
2457*1
11
2462
12
2467*2
13
2472*2
*1 Factory-set default channels
*2 Refer to the sheet Approved Countries/Regions for use for the
countries/regions that in which these channels can be used. When
installing Wireless LAN cards, the channel configuration is managed as
follows:
■ For wireless clients that operate in a Wireless LAN Infrastructure, the
Wireless LAN card will automatically start operation at the channel
identified by the Wireless LAN Access Point. When roaming between
different access points the station can dynamically switch to another
channel if required.
■ For Wireless LAN cards installed in wireless clients that operating in a
peer-to-peer mode, the card will use the default channel 10.
■ In a Wireless LAN Access Point, the Wireless LAN card will use the
factory-set default channel (printed in bold), unless the LAN
Administrator selected a different channel when configuring the
Wireless LAN Access Point device.
User’s Manual
C-3
Wireless LAN
Wireless IEEE 802.11 Channels Sets (Revision A)
Frequency Range
Channel ID
User’s Manual
5150-5850 MHz
36
5180
40
5200
44
5220
48
5240
52
5260
56
5280
60
5300
64
5320
100
5500
104
5520
108
5540
112
5560
116
5580
120
5600
124
5620
128
5640
132
5660
136
5680
140
5700
149
5745
153
5765
157
5785
161
5805
165
5825
C-4
Appendix D
TOSHIBA RAID
TOSHIBA RAID provides the RAID function.
2 hard disk drives can be used to construct a RAID configuration (RAID-1:
mirroring).
When using RAID-1 (mirroring), the data is stored on 2 HDDs so that even
if there are problems with one of the hard disk drive, the other hard disk
drive can be used to recover the data.
Please refer to the TOSHIBA RAID help for details.
■ By changing this setting you are reconfiguring your hard disk.
In which case, all data and programs in the hard disk, including the
operating system (e.g. Windows), will be erased.
If you have not yet done so, launch the Recovery Disc Creator and
create the recovery discs now.
If you have data on the hard drive that you wish to keep, make a
backup of that data onto external media (such as a CD) now.
You will not be able to create recovery discs, nor access any data from
the hard disk after reconfiguring your hard disk.
■ A power-on password can help restrict access to your data.
It can also help restrict access to System Setup, where some of your
computer's configuration settings are kept.
If you do not have a power-on password set, someone with access to it
could (i) set a power-on password, locking you out of your own
computer, or (ii) change your configuration settings, which could result
in data loss.
We recommend that you consider using a power-on password.
User’s Manual
D-1
TOSHIBA RAID
Windows Manual Setup
Use the following procedures when manually setting up Windows.
Before Setting Up Windows
Before setting up Windows, create the TOSHIBA RAID Driver Disk and
configure the BIOS setup program.
Creating the TOSHIBA RAID Driver Disk
1. Connect the USB floppy disk drive and insert a floppy disk.
2. From the start menu, select TOSHIBA Application Installer and click
the Next button.
3. Select the TOSHIBA RAID Driver and click the Install button.
4. Specify the folder and click the Unzip button.
The driver file will be copied to the floppy disk.
Configuring the BIOS Setup Program
In the RAID ARRAY setting of the BIOS setup program, set the built-in HDD
to 1RAID-0.
It is not necessary to change the setting if it has already been set as such.
Refer to the Starting, Modifying and Ending the BIOS Setup Program, in
this chapter.
Windows Setup Procedure
1. Insert the Windows Setup CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive and boot up.
The Windows Setup program will start.
2. When the message "Press F6 if you need to install a
third party SCSI or RAID driver" appears on the screen,
press the F6 key.
3. When the message "Setup will load support for the
following mass storage device(s):" appears on the
screen, press the S key and install the TOSHIBA RAID Driver using the
TOSHIBA RAID Driver Disk that was created.
4. Follow the onscreen instructions to continue Windows setup.
■ Please use only hard disk drives supported by the computer. Correct
operations cannot be guaranteed if other hard disk drives are used.
■ The following types of applications might not work correctly:
■ Applications that directly access the hardware and read/write to the
hard disk drive.
■ Using an OS such as Linux to run applications that read/write to the
hard disk drive.
User’s Manual
D-2
TOSHIBA RAID
■ Boot menu
When 2 hard disk drives are connected, it is possible to select which
hard disk drive to boot from in the boot menu. However, if a RAID
configuration is used, the 2 hard disk drives are recognized as 1 drive
and there is no change in the boot configuration no matter which hard
disk drive is selected.
■ When using a RAID-1 (mirroring) configuration, the additional hard disk
drive’s capacity must be equal to or more than the capacity of the
existing hard disk drive.
■ The hard disk drives used in the RAID configuration should not be
removed and used in other computers.
■ When using the RAID-1 (mirroring) configuration, the OS recognizes
the lesser capacity of the 2 hard disk drives.
For example, if a 60 GB and an 80 GB hard disk drive are used in the
mirroring configuration, the OS will recognize the capacity as a 60 GB
hard disk drive.
The additional 20 GB capacity (over the 60 GB hard disk drive) of the
80 GB hard disk drive cannot be used.
■ If a hard disk drive had been replaced, execute the rebuild command
and rebuild the RAID-1 (mirroring) configuration.
■ Implementing the media checking schedule
Media checks should be carried out regularly to ensure even more
stable operation of the RAID configuration and to make it easier for
maintenance and repair measures to be carried out in case of hard disk
drive failures.
For RAID-1 with data redundancy, if a hard disk drive failure occurs, the
hard disk drive is replaced and its data reconstructed from the other
hard disk drive which did not fail.
If there are bad blocks, etc., in the hard disk drive that did not fail, it is
possible that portion of data might not be recovered and system down
might occur.
An effective way to ensure that such situations do not happen is to
carry out RAID-1 media checks regularly.
The TOSHIBA RAID utility is set as default to carry out media checks
every month on the third Wednesday from noon.
User’s Manual
D-3
TOSHIBA RAID
Starting, Modifying and Ending the BIOS Setup Program
Starting the BIOS Setup Program
1. Switch on your computer while pressing the Esc key.
If Password = is displayed, enter the User Password and press the
Enter key.
Please refer to Chapter 6, the TOSHIBA Password Utility, for details
about the User Password.
The "Check system. Then press [F1] key." message is
displayed.
2. Press the F1 key.
The BIOS setup program will start up.
Modifying the BIOS
1. Select the RAID ARRAY setting in the SYSTEM SETUP (3/3) screen.
Please refer to the operating instructions displayed in the settings screen.
2. The settings are explained as follows. Modify the settings as necessary.
Current State
Shows the current hard disk status.
Create State
Modify the hard disk configuration. (Modifications
are made with this setting).
Built-in HDD
Status of the connected hard disk.
Second HDD
Status of the second hard disk.
Configuration status and settings
User’s Manual
JBOD
No RAID settings. Windows cannot be installed
in this disk except for using recovery CD/DVD.
1RAID-0
Including RAID settings. Windows can be
installed in this disk.
2RAID-0
Set to RAID-0 for 2 hard disks. This cannot be
set in this computer (Current State Only).
RAID-1
Set to RAID-1 for 2 hard disks (Current State
Only).
UNKNOWN
A RAID status except for the above status and
settings (Current State Only).
No Drive
No hard disks connected (Current State Only).
D-4
TOSHIBA RAID
3. The Execute Creation message is displayed once the configuration is
modified. Move the cursor to the appropriate location and press the
space bar to continue.
Pressing the Home key will revert the modified Create State settings back
to the Current State settings.
4. The following message will be displayed. Follow the instructions and
press the keys in the order of 1, 2, 3, 4, [Enter].
S
Warning: If you change the RAID array, you
will need to install the OS again. Are you
sure? All data on the HDD(s) will be
destroyed. Do you really want to do this?
If "Yes", please type the key string which
is written in the manual.
Ending the BIOS Setup Program
Save the changes and end the program.
1. Press the End key.
The "Are you sure? (Y/N) The changes you made
will cause the system to reboot." message is displayed.
2. Press the Y key.
The configured settings are saved and the BIOS setup program ends.
The computer may reboot depending on the settings that were
modified.
User’s Manual
D-5
Appendix E
Bluetooth wireless technology
Interoperability
Bluetooth™ Cards from TOSHIBA are designed to be interoperable with
any product with Bluetooth wireless technology that is based on Frequency
Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) radio technology, and is compliant to:
■ Bluetooth Specification Ver2.0+EDR, as defined and approved by The
Bluetooth Special Interest Group.
■ Logo certification with Bluetooth wireless technology as defined by The
Bluetooth Special interest Group.
User’s Manual
E-1
Bluetooth wireless technology Interoperability
■ Bluetooth wireless technology is a new innovative technology, and
TOSHIBA has not confirmed compatibility of its Bluetooth™ products
with all computers and/or equipment using Bluetooth wireless
technology other than TOSHIBA portable computers.
Always use Bluetooth™ Cards from TOSHIBA in order to enable
wireless networks over two or more (up to a total of seven) TOSHIBA
portable computers using these cards. Please contact TOSHIBA PC
product support on Web site
http://www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in Europe
or
http://www.pc.support.global.toshiba.com in the United States for more
information.
■ When you use Bluetooth™ Cards from TOSHIBA close to 2.4 GHz
Wireless LAN devices, Bluetooth transmissions might slow down or
cause errors. If you detect certain interference while you use
Bluetooth™ Cards from TOSHIBA, always change the frequency, move
your computer to the area outside of the interference range of 2.4 GHz
Wireless LAN devices (40 meters/43.74 yards or more) or stop
transmitting from your computer. Please contact TOSHIBA PC product
support on Web site
http://www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in Europe
or
http://www.pc.support.global.toshiba.com in the United States for more
information.
■ Bluetooth™ and Wireless LAN devices operate within the same radio
frequency range and may interfere with one another. If you use
Bluetooth™ and Wireless LAN devices simultaneously, you may
occasionally experience a less than optimal network performance or
even lose your network connection.
If you should experience any such problem, immediately turn off either
one of your Bluetooth™ or Wireless LAN.
Please contact TOSHIBA PC product support on web site
http://www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in Europe
or
http://www.pc.support.global.toshiba.com in the United States for more
information.
User’s Manual
E-2
Bluetooth wireless technology Interoperability
Bluetooth wireless technology and your Health
The products with Bluetooth wireless technology, like other radio devices,
emit radio frequency electromagnetic energy. The level of energy emitted
by devices with Bluetooth wireless technology however is far much less
than the electromagnetic energy emitted by wireless devices like for
example mobile phones.
Because products with Bluetooth wireless technology operate within the
guidelines found in radio frequency safety standards and
recommendations, TOSHIBA believes Bluetooth wireless technology is
safe for use by consumers. These standards and recommendations reflect
the consensus of the scientific community and result from deliberations of
panels and committees of scientists who continually review and interpret
the extensive research literature.
In some situations or environments, the use of Bluetooth wireless
technology may be restricted by the proprietor of the building or responsible
representatives of the organization. These situations may for example
include:
■ Using the equipment with Bluetooth wireless technology on board of
airplanes, or
■ In any other environment where the risk of interference to other devices
or services is perceived or identified as harmful.
If you are uncertain of the policy that applies on the use of wireless devices
in a specific organization or environment (e.g. airports), you are
encouraged to ask for authorization to use the device with Bluetooth
wireless technology prior to turning on the equipment.
Regulatory statements
General
This product complies with any mandatory product specification in any
country/region where the product is sold. In addition, the product complies
with the following.
European Union (EU) and EFTA
This equipment complies with the R&TTE directive 1999/5/EC and has
been provided with the CE mark accordingly.
User’s Manual
E-3
Appendix F
AC Power Cord and Connectors
The power cord’s AC input plug must be compatible with the various
international AC power outlets and the cord must meet the standards for
the country/region in which it is used. All cords must meet the following
specifications:
Length:
Minimum 2 meters
Wire size:
Minimum 0.75 mm2
Current rating:
Minimum 2.5 amperes
Voltage rating:
125 or 250 VAC
(depending on country/region’s power standards)
Certification agencies
U.S. and Canada: UL listed and CSA certified
No. 18 AWG, Type SVT or SPT-2
Australia:
AS
Japan:
DENANHO
Europe:
User’s Manual
Austria:
OVE
Italy:
IMQ
Belgium:
CEBEC
The Netherlands:
KEMA
Denmark:
DEMKO
Norway:
NEMKO
F-1
AC Power Cord and Connectors
Finland:
FIMKO
Sweden:
SEMKO
France:
LCIE
Switzerland:
SEV
Germany:
VDE
United Kingdom:
BSI
In Europe, two conductors power cord must be VDE type, H05VVH2-F or
H03VVH2-F and for three conductors power cord must be VDE type,
H05VV-F.
For the United States and Canada, two pin plug configuration must be a
2-15P (250V) or 1-15P (125V) and three pin plug configuration must be
6-15P (250V) or 5-15P (125V) as designated in the U.S. National Electrical
code handbook and the Canadian Electrical Code Part II.
The following illustrations show the plug shapes for the U.S.A. and Canada,
the United Kingdom, Australia and Europe.
USA
United Kingdom
UL approved
BS approved
Australia
Europe
AS approved
Approved by the
appropriate agency
Canada
CSA approved
User’s Manual
F-2
Appendix G
TOSHIBA Anti-theft Protection Timer
This feature allows you to set up a timer-activated BIOS password that will
prevent unauthorised system access in the event of theft.
When the time limit is exceeded, you are required to provide the Password
or fingerprint authentication for the BIOS and Hard Disk Drive to gain
access to the system.
To set permissions and limits for the TOSHIBA Anti-theft Protection Timer
please use the TOSHIBA Password Utility.
The settings can only be activated or modified by a user with supervisor
authority. If the supervisor password is not set, click on the Set button in
Supervisor Password from the supervisor tab in TOSHIBA Password
Utility and set the password on the dialog screen that appears.
Then, click on the Set button in TOSHIBA Anti-theft Protection Timer.
Take the following action if the set limit is exceeded.
■ If the Supervisor Password is registered but the User Password is not,
enter the Supervisor Password to boot up the computer.
■ If both the Supervisor Password and the User Password are registered,
enter either the Supervisor Password, the User Password or the
fingerprint authentication to boot up the computer.
■ The limit counts the number of days from the last time Windows is
logged on till the next time the computer is booted up. The range can
be set from 1 to 28 days.
■ Authentication is required if the computer’s clock is significantly
modified.
■ If the Supervisor Password is deleted, this function becomes disabled.
User’s Manual
G-1
Appendix H
If your computer is stolen
Always take care of your computer and try to prevent it from being stolen.
You are the owner of a valuable technical device, which may be highly
attractive to thieves, so please do not leave it unattended in a public place.
To further help protect against theft, security cables can be bought for use
with your notebook when it is being used at home or in the office.
Make a note of your computer’s machine type, model number, and serial
number, and put it in a safe place. You will find this information on the
underside of your notebook. Please also keep the receipt of the computer
you purchased.
Should your computer be stolen, however, we’ll help you try to find it.
Before contacting TOSHIBA, please prepare the following information
which is necessary to uniquely identify your computer:
■ In which country was your computer stolen?
■ What type of machine do you have?
■ What was the model number (PA number)?
■ What was the serial number (8 digits)?
■ When was it stolen, i.e. date?
■ What is your address, phone, and fax number?
To register the theft on paper, please follow these procedures:
■ Fill in the TOSHIBA Theft Registration form (or a copy of it) below.
■ Attach a copy of your receipt showing where your computer was
purchased.
■ Either fax or send the receipt and registration form to the address
below.
User’s Manual
H-1
If your computer is stolen
To register the theft online, please follow these procedures:
■ Visit www.toshiba-europe.com on the Internet. In the product area,
choose Computer Systems.
■ In the Computer Systems page, open the Support & Downloads menu
and choose the Stolen Units Database option.
Your entries are used to track your computer at our service points.
TOSHIBA Theft Registration
Send to:
Fax number:
TOSHIBA Europe GmbH
Technical Service and Support
Leibnizstr. 2
93055 Regensburg
Germany
+49 (0) 941 7807 921
Country stolen:
Machine type:
(e.g. PORTÉGÉ M400)
Model number:
(e.g. PSA50 YXT)
Serial number:
(e.g. 12345678G)
Date stolen:
Year
Month
Day
Owner’s details
Last name, first name:
Company:
Street:
Postal Code/City:
Country:
Phone:
Fax:
User’s Manual
H-2
Glossary
The terms in this glossary cover topics related to this manual.
Alternate naming is included for reference.
Abbreviations
AC: alternating current
AGP: accelerated graphics port
ANSI: American National Standards Institute
APM: advanced power manager
ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange
BIOS: basic input output system
CD-ROM: Compact Disc-Read Only Memory
CD-RW: Compact Disc-ReWritable
CMOS: complementary metal-oxide semiconductor
CPU: central processing unit
CRT: cathode ray tube
DC: direct current
DDC: display data channel
DMA: direct memory access
DOS: disk operating system
DVD: digital versatile disc
DVD-R: Digital Versatile Disc-Recordable
DVD-RAM: Digital Versatile Disc-Random Access Memory
DVD-R DL: Digital Versatile Disc Recordable Dual Layer
DVD-ROM: Digital Versatile Disc-Read Only Memory
DVD-RW: Digital Versatile Disc-ReWritable
DVD+R DL: Digital Versatile Disc Recordable Double Layer
ECP: extended capabilities port
FDD: floppy disk drive
FIR: fast infrared
HDD: hard disk drive
IDE: integrated drive electronics
I/O: input/output
IrDA: Infrared Data Association
User’s Manual
Glossary--1
Glossary
IRQ: interrupt request
KB: kilobyte
LCD: liquid crystal display
LED: light emitting diode
LSI: large scale integration
MB: megabyte
MS-DOS: Microsoft Disk Operating System
OCR: optical character recognition (reader)
PCB: printed circuit board
PCI: peripheral component interconnect
RAM: random access memory
RGB: red, green, and blue
ROM: read only memory
RTC: real time clock
SCSI: small computer system interface
SIO: serial input/output
SXGA+: super extended graphics array plus
TFT: thin-film transistor
UART: universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter
USB: Universal Serial Bus
UXGA: ultra extended graphics array
VESA: Video Electronic Standards Association
VGA: video graphics array
VRT: voltage reduction technology
WXGA: wide extended graphics array
XGA: extended graphics array
User’s Manual
Glossary--2
Glossary
A
adaptor: A device that provides an interface between two dissimilar
electronic devices. For example, the AC adaptor modifies the power
from a wall outlet for use by the computer. This term also refers to
the add-in circuit cards that control external devices, such as video
monitors and magnetic tape devices.
allocate: To assign a space or function for a specific task.
alphanumeric: Keyboard characters including letters, numbers and other
symbols, such as punctuation marks or mathematical symbols.
alternating current (AC): Electric current that reverses its direction of flow
at regular intervals.
analog signal: A signal whose characteristics such as amplitude and
frequency vary in proportion to (are an analog of) the value to be
transmitted. Voice communications are analog signals.
ANSI: American National Standards Institute. An organization established
to adopt and define standards for a variety of technical disciplines.
For example, ANSI defined the ASCII standard and other
information processing requirements.
antistatic: A material used to prevent the buildup of static electricity.
application: A group of programs that together are used for a specific task
such as accounting, financial planning, spreadsheets, word
processing and games.
ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange. ASCII code is
a set of 256 binary codes that represent the most commonly used
letters, numbers, and symbols.
async: Short for asynchronous.
asynchronous: Lacking regular time relationship. As applied to computer
communications, asynchronous refers to the method of transmitting
data that does not require a steady stream of bits to be transmitted
at regular time intervals.
B
backup: A duplicate copy of files kept as a spare in case the original is
destroyed.
batch file: A file that can be executed from the system prompt containing a
sequence of operating system commands or executable files.
binary: The base two number system composed of zeros and ones (off or
on), used by most digital computers. The right-most digit of a binary
number has a value of 1, the next a value of 2, then 4, 8, 16, and so
on. For example, the binary number 101 has a value of 5. See also
ASCII.
BIOS: Basic Input Output System. The firmware that controls data flow
within the computer. See also firmware.
User’s Manual
Glossary--3
Glossary
bit: Derived from "binary digit," the basic unit of information used by the
computer. It is either zero or one. Eight bits is one byte. See also
byte.
board: A circuit board. An internal card containing electronic components,
called chips, which perform a specific function or increase the
capabilities of the system.
boot: Short for bootstrap. A program that starts or restarts the computer.
The program reads instructions from a storage device into the
computer’s memory.
bps: Bits per second. Typically used to describe the data transmission
speed of a modem.
buffer: The portion of the computer’s memory where data is temporarily
stored. Buffers often compensate for differences in the rate of flow
from one device to another.
bus: An interface for transmission of signals, data or electric power.
byte: The representation of a single character. A sequence of eight bits
treated as a single unit; also the smallest addressable unit within the
system.
C
cache memory: High speed memory which stores data that increases
processor speed and data transfer rate. When the CPU reads data
from main memory, it stores a copy of this data in cache memory.
The next time the CPU needs that same data, it looks for it in the
cache memory rather than the main memory, which saves time. The
computer has two cache levels. Level one is incorporated into the
processor and level two resides in external memory.
capacity: The amount of data that can be stored on a magnetic storage
device such as a floppy disk or hard disk. It is usually described in
terms of kilobytes (KB), where one KB = 1024 bytes and megabytes
(MB), where one MB = 1024 KB.
card: Synonym for board. See board.
CardBus: An industry standard bus for 32-bit PC cards.
CD-ROM: A Compact Disc-Read Only Memory is a high capacity disc that
can be read from but not written to. The CD-ROM drive uses a laser,
rather than magnetic heads, to read data from the disc.
CD-R: A Compact Disc-Recordable disc can be written once and read
many times. See also CD-ROM.
CD-RW: A Compact Disc-ReWritable disc can be rewritten many times.
See also CD-ROM.
character: Any letter, number, punctuation mark, or symbol used by the
computer. Also synonymous with byte.
chassis: The frame containing the computer.
chip: A small semiconductor containing computer logic and circuitry for
processing, memory, input/output functions and controlling other
chips.
User’s Manual
Glossary--4
Glossary
CMOS: Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor. An electronic circuit
fabricated on a silicon wafer that requires very little power.
Integrated circuits implemented in CMOS technology can be tightly
packaged and are highly reliable.
cold start: Starting a computer that is currently off (turning on the power).
COM1, COM2, COM3 and COM4: The names assigned to the serial and
communication ports.
commands: Instructions you enter at the terminal keyboard that direct the
actions of the computer or its peripheral devices.
communications: The means by which a computer transmits and receives
data to and from another computer or device. See parallel interface;
serial interface.
compatibility: 1) The ability of one computer to accept and process data in
the same manner as another computer without modifying the data or
the media upon which it is being transferred.
2) the ability of one device to connect to or communicate with
another system or component.
components: Elements or parts (of a system) which make up the whole
(system).
computer program: A set of instructions written for a computer that enable
it to achieve a desired result.
computer system: A combination of hardware, software, firmware, and
peripheral components assembled to process data into useful
information.
configuration: The specific components in your system (such as the
terminal, printer, and disk drives) and the settings that define how
your system works. You use the HW Setup program to control your
system configuration.
control keys: A key or sequence of keys you enter from the keyboard to
initiate a particular function within a program.
controller: Built-in hardware and software that controls the functions of a
specific internal or peripheral device (e.g. keyboard controller).
co-processor: A circuit built into the processor that is dedicated to
intensive math calculations.
CPS: Characters Per Second. Typically used to indicate the transmission
speed of a printer.
CPU: Central Processing Unit. The portion of the computer that interprets
and executes instructions.
CRT: Cathode Ray Tube. A vacuum tube in which beams projected on a
fluorescent screen-producing luminous spots. An example is the
television set.
cursor: A small, blinking rectangle or line that indicates the current position
on the display screen.
User’s Manual
Glossary--5
Glossary
D
data: Information that is factual, measurable or statistical that a computer
can process, store, or retrieve.
data bits: A data communications parameter controlling the number of bits
(binary digits) used to make up a byte. If data bits = 7 the computer
can generate 128 unique characters. If data bits = 8 the computer
can generate 256 unique characters.
DC: Direct Current. Electric current that flows in one direction. This type of
power is usually supplied by batteries.
default: The parameter value automatically selected by the system when
you or the program do not provide instructions. Also called a preset
value.
delete: To remove data from a disk or other data storage device.
Synonymous with erase.
device driver: A program that controls communication between a specific
peripheral device and the computer. The CONFIG.SYS file contains
device drivers that MS-DOS loads when you turn the computer on.
dialog box: A window that accepts user input to make system settings or
record other information.
disk drive: The device that randomly accesses information on a disk and
copies it to the computer’s memory. It also writes data from memory
to the disk. To accomplish these tasks, the unit physically rotates the
disk at high speed past a read-write head.
disk storage: Storing data on magnetic disk. Data is arranged on
concentric tracks much like a phonograph record.
display: A CRT, LCD, or other image producing device used to view
computer output.
documentation: The set of manuals and/or other instructions written for
the users of a computer system or application. Computer system
documentation typically includes procedural and tutorial information
as well as system functions.
DOS: Disk Operating System. See operating system.
driver: A software program, generally part of the operating system, that
controls a specific piece of hardware (frequently a peripheral device
such as a printer or mouse).
DVD-R (+R, -R): A Digital Versatile Disc-Recordable disk can be written
once and read many times. The DVD-R drive uses a laser to read
data from the disc.
DVD-RAM: A Digital Versatile Disc-Random Access Memory is a highcapacity, high performance disc that lets you store large volumes of
data. The DVD-ROM drive uses a laser to read data from the disc.
DVD-R DL: A disc having two layers on one side with the DVD-R storage
capacity about 1.8 times larger than before. The DVD-RW drive
uses a laser to read data from the disc.
User’s Manual
Glossary--6
Glossary
DVD-ROM: A Digital Versatile Disc-Read Only Memory is a high capacity,
high performance disc suitable for play back of video and other highdensity files. The DVD-ROM drive uses a laser to read data from the
disc.
DVD-RW (+RW, -RW): A Digital Versatile Disc-ReWritable disc can be
rewritten many times.
DVD+R DL: A disc having two layers on one side with the DVD+R storage
capacity about 1.8 times larger than before. The DVD-RW drive
uses a laser to read data from the disc.
E
echo: To send back a reflection of the transmitted data to the sending
device. You can display the information on the screen, or output it to
the printer, or both. When a computer receives back data it
transmitted to a CRT (or other peripheral device) and then
retransmits the data to printer, the printer is said to echo the CRT.
erase: See delete.
escape: 1) A code (ASCII code 27), signaling the computer that what
follows are commands; used with peripheral devices such as
printers and modems.
2) A means of aborting the task currently in progress.
escape guard time: A time before and after an escape code is sent to the
modem which distinguishes between escapes that are part of the
transmitted data, and escapes that are intended as a command to
the modem.
execute: To interpret and execute an instruction.
Extended Capability Port: An industry standard that provides a data
buffer, switchable forward and reverse data transmission, and run
length encoding (RLE) support.
F
fast infrared: An industry standard that enables cableless infrared serial
data transfer at speeds of up to 4 Mbps.
file: A collection of related information; a file can contain data, programs, or
both.
fingerprint sensor: The fingerprint sensor compares and analyzes the
unique characteristics in a fingerprint.
firmware: A set of instructions built into the hardware which controls and
directs a microprocessor’s activities.
floppy disk: A removable disk that stores magnetically encoded data.
floppy disk drive (FDD): An electromechanical device that reads and
writes to floppy disks.
Fn-esse: A TOSHIBA utility that lets you assign functions to hot keys.
folder: An icon in Windows used to store documents or other folders.
User’s Manual
Glossary--7
Glossary
format: The process of readying a blank disk for its first use. Formatting
establishes the structure of the disk that the operating system
expects before it writes files or programs onto the disk.
function keys: The keys labeled F1 through F12 that tell the computer to
perform certain functions.
G
gigabyte (GB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 megabytes. See also
megabyte.
graphics: Drawings, pictures, or other images, such as charts or graphs, to
present information.
H
hard disk: A non-removable disk usually referred to as drive C. The factory
installs this disk and only a trained engineer can remove it for
servicing. Also called fixed disk.
hard disk drive (HDD): An electromechanical device that reads and writes
a hard disk. See also hard disk.
hardware: The physical electronic and mechanical components of a
computer system: typically, the computer itself, external disk drives,
etc. See also software and firmware.
hertz: A unit of wave frequency that equals one cycle per second.
hexadecimal: The base 16 numbering system composed of the digits 0
through 9 and the letters A, B, C, D, E, and F.
host computer: The computer that controls, regulates, and transmits
information to a device or another computer.
hot key: The computer’s feature in which certain keys in combination with
the extended function key, Fn, can be used to set system
parameters, such as speaker volume.
HW Setup: A TOSHIBA utility that lets you set the parameters for various
hardware components.
I
icon: A small graphic image displayed on the screen or in the indicator
panel. In Windows, an icon represents an object that the user can
manipulate.
i.LINK (IEEE1394): This port enables high-speed data transfer directly from
external devices such as digital video cameras.
infrared port: A cableless communications port capable of using infrared
signals to send serial data.
input: The data or instructions you provide to a computer, communication
device or other peripheral device from the keyboard or external or
internal storage devices. The data sent (or output) by the sending
computer is input for the receiving computer.
User’s Manual
Glossary--8
Glossary
instruction: Statements or commands that specify how to perform a
particular task.
interface: 1) Hardware and/or software components of a system used
specifically to connect one system or device to another.
2) To physically connect one system or device to another to
exchange information.
3) The point of contact between user, the computer, and the
program, for example, the keyboard or a menu.
interrupt request: A signal that gives a component access to the
processor.
I/O: Input/output. Refers to acceptance and transfer of data to and from a
computer.
I/O devices: Equipment used to communicate with the computer and
transfer data to and from it.
IrDA 1.1: An industry standard that enables cableless infrared serial data
transfer at speeds of up to 4 Mbps.
J
jumper: A small clip or wire that allows you to change the hardware
characteristics by electrically connecting two points of a circuit.
K
K: Taken from the Greek word kilo, meaning 1000; often used as equivalent
to 1024, or 2 raised to the 10th power. See also byte and kilobyte.
KB: See kilobyte.
keyboard: An input device containing switches that are activated by
manually pressing marked keys. Each keystroke activates a switch
that transmits a specific code to the computer. For each key, the
transmitted code is, in turn, representative of the (ASCII) character
marked on the key.
kilobyte (KB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 bytes. See also byte
and megabyte.
L
level 2 cache: See cache.
Light Emitting Diode (LED): A semiconductor device that emits light when
a current is applied.
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD): Liquid crystal sealed between two sheets of
glass coated with transparent conducting material. The viewing-side
coating is etched into character forming segments with leads that
extend to the edge of the glass. Applying a voltage between the
glass sheets alters the brightness of the liquid crystal.
User’s Manual
Glossary--9
Glossary
LSI: Large Scale Integration.
1) A technology that allows the inclusion of up to 100,000 simple
logic gates on a single chip.
2) An integrated circuit that uses large scale integration.
M
main board: See motherboard.
megabyte (MB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 kilobytes. See also
kilobyte.
megahertz: A unit of wave frequency that equals 1 million cycles per
second. See also hertz.
menu: A software interface that displays a list of options on the screen.
Also called a screen.
microprocessor: A hardware component contained in a single integrated
circuit that carries out instructions. Also called the central processing
unit (CPU), one of the main parts of the computer.
mode: A method of operation, for example, the boot mode, Standby Mode
or the Hibernation Mode.
modem: Derived from modulator/demodulator, a device that converts
(modulates) digital data for transmission over telephone lines and
then converts modulated data (demodulates) to digital format where
received.
monitor: A device that uses rows and columns of pixels to display
alphanumeric characters or graphic images. See also CRT.
motherboard: A name sometimes used to refer to the main printed circuit
board in processing equipment. It usually contains integrated circuits
that perform the processor’s basic functions and provides
connectors for adding other boards that perform special functions.
Sometimes called a main board.
MP3: An audio compression standard that enables high-quality
transmission and real-time playback of sound files.
N
non-system disk: A formatted floppy disk you can use to store programs
and data but you cannot use to start the computer. See system disk.
nonvolatile memory: Memory, usually read-only (ROM), that is capable of
permanently storing information. Turning the computer’s power off
does not alter data stored in nonvolatile memory.
numeric keypad overlay: A feature that allows you to use certain keys on
the keyboard to perform numeric entry, or to control cursor and page
movement.
User’s Manual
Glossary--10
Glossary
O
OCR: Optical Character Recognition (reader). A technique or device that
uses laser or visible light to identify characters and input them into a
storage device.
online state: A functional state of a peripheral device when it is ready to
receive or transmit data.
operating system: A group of programs that controls the basic operation
of a computer. Operating system functions include interpreting
programs, creating data files, and controlling the transmission and
receipt (input/output) of data to and from memory and peripheral
devices.
output: The results of a computer operation. Output commonly indicates
data.
1) printed on paper, 2) displayed at a terminal, 3) sent through the
serial port of internal modem, or 4) stored on some magnetic media.
P
parallel interface: Refers to a type of information exchange that transmits
information one byte (8 bits) at a time. See also serial interface.
parity: 1) The symmetrical relationship between two parameter values
(integers) both of which are either on or off; odd or even; 0 or 1.
2) In serial communications, an error detection bit that is added to a
group of data bits making the sum of the bits even or odd. Parity can
be set to none, odd, or even.
password: A unique string of characters used to identify a specific user.
The computer provides various levels of password protection such
as user, supervisor and eject.
pel: The smallest area of the display that can be addressed by software.
Equal in size to a pixel or group of pixels. See pixel.
peripheral component interconnect: An industry standard 32-bit bus.
peripheral device: An I/O device that is external to the central processor
and/or main memory such as a printer or a mouse.
pixel: A picture element. The smallest dot that can be made on a display or
printer. Also called a pel.
plug and play: A capability with Windows that enables the system to
automatically recognize connections of external devices and make
the necessary configurations in the computer.
port: The electrical connection through which the computer sends and
receives data to and from devices or other computers.
Power Saver Utility: A TOSHIBA utility that lets you set the parameters for
various power-saving functions.
printed circuit board (PCB): A hardware component of a processor to
which integrated circuits and other components are attached. The
board itself is typically flat and rectangular, and constructed of
fiberglass, to form the attachment surface.
User’s Manual
Glossary--11
Glossary
program: A set of instructions a computer can execute that enables it to
achieve a desired result. See also application.
prompt: A message the computer provides indicating it is ready for or
requires information or an action from you.
R
Radio frequency interference (RFI) shield: A metal shield enclosing the
printed circuit boards of the printer or computer to prevent radio and
TV interference. All computer equipment generates radio frequency
signals. The FCC regulates the amount of signals a computing
device can allow past its shielding. A Class A device is sufficient for
office use. Class B provides a more stringent classification for home
equipment use. TOSHIBA portable computers comply with Class B
computing device regulations.
Random Access Memory (RAM): High speed memory within the
computer circuitry that can be read or written to.
restart: Resetting a computer without turning it off (also called "warm boot"
or "soft reset"). See also boot.
RGB: Red, green, and blue. A device that uses three input signals, each
activating an electron gun for a primary additive color (red, green,
and blue) or port for using such a device. See also CRT.
RJ11: A modular telephone jack.
RJ45: A modular LAN jack.
ROM: Read Only Memory: A nonvolatile memory chip manufactured to
contain information that controls the computer’s basic operation.
You cannot access or change information stored in ROM.
S
SCSI: Small Computer System Interface is an industry standard interface
for connection of a variety of peripheral devices.
SD card: Secure Digital cards are flash memory widely used in a variety of
digital devices such as digital cameras and Personal Digital
Assistants.
serial communications: A communications technique that uses as few as
two interconnecting wires to send bits one after another.
serial interface: Refers to a type of information exchange that transmits
information sequentially, one bit at a time. Contrast: Parallel
interface.
SIO: Serial Input/Output. The electronic methodology used in serial data
transmission.
soft key: Key combinations that emulate keys on the IBM keyboard,
change some configuration options, stop program execution, and
access the numeric keypad overlay.
User’s Manual
Glossary--12
Glossary
software: The set of programs, procedures and related documentation
associated with a computer system. Specifically refers to computer
programs that direct and control the computer system’s activities.
See also hardware.
stop bit: One or more bits of a byte that follow the transmitted character or
group codes in asynchronous serial communications.
subpixel: Three elements, one red, one green and blue (RGB), that make
up a pixel on the color LCD. The computer sets subpixels
independently, each may emit a different degree of brightness. See
also pixel.
synchronous: Having a constant time interval between successive bits,
characters or events.
system disk: A disk that has been formatted with an operating system. For
MS-DOS the operating system is contained in two hidden files and
the COMMAND.COM file. You can boot a computer using a system
disk. Also called an operating system disk.
T
terminal: A typewriter-like keyboard and CRT display screen connected to
the computer for data input/output.
TFT display: A liquid crystal display (LCD) made from an array of liquid
crystal cells using active-matrix technology with thin film transistor
(TFT) to drive each cell.
Touch Pad: A pointing device integrated into the TOSHIBA computer palm
rest.
TTL: Transistor-transistor logic. A logic circuit design that uses switching
transistors for gates and storage.
U
Universal Serial Bus: This serial interface lets you communicate with
several devices connected in a chain to a single port on the
computer.
V
VGA: Video Graphics Array is an industry standard video adaptor that lets
you run any popular software.
volatile memory: Random access memory (RAM) that stores information
as long as power is supplied to the computer.
User’s Manual
Glossary--13
Glossary
W
warm start: Restarting or resetting a computer without turning it off.
window: A portion of the screen that can display its own application,
document or dialog box. Often used to mean a Microsoft Windows
window.
Wireless LAN: Local Area Network (LAN) through wireless
communication.
write protection: A method for protecting a floppy disk from accidental
erasure.
User’s Manual
Glossary--14
Index
A
AC adaptor 4
additional 17, 14
connecting 7
Anti-theft Protection Timer 1
ASCII characters 9
B
Battery
charging 10
extending life 13
indicator 11, 4
location 6
monitoring capacity 12
real time clock 4, 7
safety precautions 7
save mode 11
types 5
Battery charger 17
Battery pack 4, 7
additional 14
replacing 14
Bluetooth 8, 45
Bluetooth Stack for Windows by
Toshiba 14
problems 18
Boot Priority 3
Bridge media slot 7, 4
C
Cache memory 3
Cleaning the computer 49
Cooling vents 3
D
Display 6
automatic power off 10
brightness decrease 5
brightness increase 5
controller 1
hinge 8
opening 10
screen 9
DLA for TOSHIBA 15, 35
Docking interface 7, 8
Documentation list 2
DVD Super Multi drive 5
location 4
problems 10
using 23
writing 29
DVD-ROM / CD-R/RW drive
using 23
writing 27
DVD-ROM&CD-R/RW drive 5
location 4
problems 9
E
Environment 1
Equipment checklist 1
Equipment setup
general conditions 2
placement 3
Ergonomics
lighting 4
seating and posture 4
work habits 5
External monitor 7, 5, 21
problems 16
DC IN indicator 11, 4
User’s Manual
Index-1
PORTÉGÉ M400
F
Fingerprint Sensor
location 8
problems 14
using 13
Floppy disk care 38
Fn + Ctrl (enhanced keyboard simulation) 3
Fn + Enter 3
Fn + Esc (sound mute) 3
Fn + F1 (instant security) 4
Fn + F10 (Arrow mode) 3
Fn + F11 (Numeric mode) 3
Fn + F12 (ScrLock) 3
Fn + F2 (power save mode) 4
Fn + F3 (standby) 4
Fn + F4 (hibernation) 4
Fn + F5 (display selection) 4
Fn + F6 (internal LCD screen brightness
decreases) 5
Fn + F7 (internal LCD screen brightness increases) 5
Fn + F8 (wireless setting) 5
Fn + F9 (Touch Pad) 5
Fn + space (LCD screen resolution selection) 6
Fn + Tab (Optical media drive power icon) 6
Function keys 2
G
Graphics controller 6
H
Hard disk drive 4
automatic power off 10
Installing 18
Removing 17
HDD indicator 11
HDD Protection 12
Heat dispersal 11, 53
Hibernation 12, 4
Hot keys 10
display selection 4
instant security 4
Internal LCD screen brightness decrease 5
Internal LCD screen brightness in-
User’s Manual
crease 5
power save mode 4
sound mute 3
standby 4
wireless setting 5
HW Setup 13
accessing 1
Boot priority 3
CPU 6
device config 7
display 2
general 2
keyboard 6
LAN 7
USB 7
window 1
I
i.LINK 7, 4, 21
connecting 22
disconnecting 23
precautions 22
problems 17
Indicators 11, 4
K
Keyboard 6, 1
emulating enhanced keyboard 2
Fn Sticky key 6
Function keys F1...F12 2
Hot keys 3
problems 7
typewriter keys 1
Windows special keys 7
Keypad overlay 11, 7
Arrow mode 7
Numeric mode 8
temporarily using normal keyboard
(overlay on) 8
temporarily using overlay (overlay off)
8
turning on the overlays 7
L
LAN 8, 48
cable types 48
connecting 48
Index-2
PORTÉGÉ M400
disconnecting 49
jack 6
LAN active indicator 6
Link indicator 6
problems 18
M
Media care 38, 4
Card care 4
CD/DVDs 38
floppy disks 38
Memory card care 4
Memory 3
expansion 17, 9
installing 10
problems 15
Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro 6
inserting 7
problems 12
removing 7
Modem 8, 41
connecting 42
disconnecting 44
jack 5
problems 17
properties menu 42
region selection 41
Moving the computer 50
P
Password
power on 11
problems 7
starting the computer by 18
Supervisor 18
user 16
PC card 7, 2
inserting 2
location of slot 3
problems 11
removing 3
Pointing Device
Reserve Pen 7, 2
Tablet PC Pen 2
Touch Pad 7, 9, 1
Touch Pad control buttons 9, 1
Touch Pad location 8
User’s Manual
using 1
Ports
Docking 7
external monitor 7
i.LINK 7
USB 7
Power
button location 8
conditions 1
hibernation mode 13
indicators 4
panel on/off 11, 20
shut down mode (boot mode) 11
standby mode 12
system auto off 20
turning off 11
turning on 10
Problems
AC power 5
Analyzing symptoms 2
Battery 6
Bluetooth 18
DVD Super Multi drive 10
DVD-ROM&CD-R/RW drive 9
External monitor 16
Fingerprint sensor 14
Hard disk drive 8
Hardware and system checklist 3
i.LINK 17
Internal LCD display panel 8
Keyboard 7
LAN 18
Memory expansion 15
Memory Stick/Memory Stick Pro 12
Modem 17
Overheating power down 5
Password 7
PC card 11
Pointing device 13
Power 4
Real Time Clock 7
SD card 12
Self test 4
Sound system 16
System start-up 4
TOSHIBA support 20
USB 15
Index-3
PORTÉGÉ M400
USB floppy disk drive 11
USB mouse 14
Wireless LAN 18
xD picture card 12
Processor 3
R
RecordNow! 14, 33
Restarting the computer 15
S
SD card 4
formatting 6
inserting 4
problems 12
removing 5
SD memory card 6
SDIO card 6
Security lock 18
attaching 24
location 3
Slice Expansion battery pack 17, 6
Soft keys
enhanced keyboard 2
Enter 3
right Ctrl key 3
ScrLock 3
Sound system 39
headphone jack 7, 2
microphone 2
microphone jack 7, 2
mute hot keys 3
problems 16
Stereo speakers 9
volume control 2
Standby 12
setting 12
System automatic 10
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool 14
TOSHIBA Power Saver 13
TOSHIBA Presentation button 10
TOSHIBA SD Memory Boot Utility 14
TOSHIBA Theft Registration 2
TOSHIBA Zooming Utility 14
TV 21
U
Ultra Slim Bay 4
changing modules 21
HDD adaptor (Black) 19
location of slot 4
options 19
USB 7
location 5
problems 15
USB floppy disk drive
problems 11
using 20
V
Video modes 1
Video RAM 3
Volume control 2
W
Wireless communication 44
indicator 11, 47
Wireless communication switch 9, 1, 47
Wireless LAN 8, 44
problems 18
X
xD picture card 8
inserting 8
removing 8
T
TOSHIBA Assist 14
TOSHIBA Assist button 10
TOSHIBA ConfigFree 15
TOSHIBA Controls 13
TOSHIBA Express Port Replicator 17, 23
TOSHIBA Mic Effect 15
TOSHIBA Mobile Extension 14
User’s Manual
Index-4