Systems and method for lighting aisles

US 20140097759Al
(19) United States
(12) Patent Application Publication (10) Pub. No.: US 2014/0097759 A1
Verfuerth et al.
(54)
(43) Pub. Date:
SYSTEMS AND METHOD FOR LIGHTING
AISLES
(60)
Apr. 10, 2014
Provisional application No. 61/466,411, ?led on Mar.
22, 2011.
(71) Applicant: Orion Energy Systems, Inc.,
Manitowoc, WI (US)
Publication Classi?cation
(51)
(72) Inventors: Neal R. Verfuerth, Manitowoc, WI
(US); Tony Freeman, DePere, WI (US);
Int. Cl.
H053 37/02
(2006.01)
(52) US, Cl,
Jason Rasner, DePere, WI (U S)
CPC .................................... .. H05B 37/02 (2013.01)
USPC
......................................... .. 315/152; 315/158
(21) Appl.No.: 14/101,151
(57)
(22)
Flled:
Dec' 9’ 2013
A lighting ?xture for lighting in a building includes process
.
(63)
ABSTRACT
.
ing electronics. The processing electronics are con?gured to
Related U's' Apphcatlon Data
Continuation of application No. 13/296,058, ?led on
Nov. 14, 2011, now Pat. No. 8,604,701.
cause the lighting ?xture to provide increasing levels of illu
mination in response to state changes associated With sensed
motion in the building.
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Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 1 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
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Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 2 0f 11
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Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 3 0f 11
Processing Electronics
Sensor Circuit
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Controller
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Wirelelss
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Logic Module
Memory
US 2014/0097759 A1
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User Interface "'__ 408
Module
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Control Logic ’
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FIG. 4
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 4 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
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Receive Signal(s) from Sensor Coupled to
First Zone I Controller
602
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Circuitry of First Controller Determines
Whether Signals Represent Event for Action
604
in Zone I
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+
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Circuitry of First Controller Transmits
_ _ _ _ _ _QFE _ _ _ |
Command or Indication of the Event with
606
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Zone I Identifier
FIG. 5
y
Transmission Received by Zone II Controller
and the Zone II Controller Determines that
608
the Transmission is for Another Zone (Zone II _/
600
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Controller Does Not Act on Received
Transmission)
_
6
-
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Controller Configured as a Relay Node
614
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second zone | controner
Retransmits command or
'ndication
_
Transmission Received By Second Zone I
4—
v
Circuitry of Second Zone I Controller Inspects
Received Transmission and Acts on the
Information of the Transmission When it
Discovers that Its Stored Zone Identifier
Matches the Received Zone Identifier
612
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Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 5 0f 11
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US 2014/0097759 A1
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Production Area of
Building
A22
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High Traffic Work Area of Building
FIG. 7
B“"d'"9 Entrance
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 6 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
802 J T1 Through T5 Initially = 0 |
FIG. 8
804
Begin / Repeat Loop
806
ocal Motion Detected?
830
Yes
(a) Relay R1 On to Provide ‘Dim’ Illum.
Decrement T4
by One if T4 is
Not Zero
(b) Reset T1 = 90s.
(0) Transmit Zone Motion Message
(d) Reset T5 = 35
810
Sust.
Motion Rec’d and
T5>0$?
Reset T4 = 2s
814
Reset T3 = 6s
Reset T4 = 25
v
(a) Relay R2 On to Provide ‘High’ Illum.
(b) Reset T2 = 30s
(0) Transmit Sustained Motion Msg.
Yes
Zone Motion
Received?
836
V
(a) Relay R1 On to Provide ‘Dim‘ Illum.
(b) Reset T1 = 90s
(0) Re-Transmit Zone Motion Message
820
Decrement all Non-Zero Timers
Other than T4 by One
1
826
822
Deactivate Relay R1 to
Provide No Illumination
824
Deactivate Relay R2 to
Reduce From High
Illumination Level
Yes
No
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 7 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
902
Relay R1 On to Provide ‘Dim’ Illumination
J
Set T1 = O
—>|
Begin/Repeat Loop
I4—
\ 904
No
_
Local Motion Detected?
Yes
908
a) Relay R1 On to Provide ‘Dim’ Illumination
Zone Motion
Received?
b) Reset T1 = 30m
c) Transmit/Retransmit Local Motion Message
Decrement T1 By One Minute
910/
912
No
Yes
914
\ Deactivate Relay R1 to Provide
No Illumination
900 j
FIG. 9
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 8 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
Relay R1 On to Provide ‘Dim‘ Illumination
1004\
+
Begin/Repeat Loop
I4—
1022_“\\
1006
Decrement T4
by One if T4 is
Not Zero
1024
N0
Local Motion Detected?
Yes
Zone Motion
Received?
1008
a) Relay R1 On to Provide ‘Dim’ Illumination
b) Reset T1 = 30m
c) Transmit Local Motion Message
1010
Reset T3 = 5m
Reset T4 = 2m
/
1012
Task Zone Motion Check
K— 1014
a) Relay R2 On to Provide ‘High’ Illumination
b) Reset T3 = 5m, T4 = 2m, T2 = 5m
0) Transmit Sustained Zone Motion Message
¢
K1016
Decrement T1, T2, T3 By One Minute
1030
Deactivate Relay R1 to Provide
No Illumination
103'
\ Deactivate Relay R2 to Reduce
From High Illumination Level
1000}
FIG. 10
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 9 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
1102
|
Set T1 and T2 = 0
—>|
Begin/Repeat Loop
.
Local Motion Detected?
hi
No
1108
J
a) Relay R2 On to Provide ‘High’ Illumination
b) Reset T1 = 30m and T2 = 15m
c) Transmit Local Motion Message
1
Decrement T1, T2 By One (if T1, T2 not 0)
1114
Deactivate Relay R1 to Provide
No Illumination
1120
Deactivate Relay R2 to Reduce
From High Illumination Level
and Activate Relay R1 to
Provide Dim Illumination
1100
FIG. 11
J10
<—
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 10 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
Set Setting Value (e.g., 7)
Set Duty Cycle Timer (e.g., 24 hours) \1202
Set Duty Cycle Counter = O
—>|
Begin/Repeat Loop
1‘1204
1206
Motion Detected?
1208
Is Duty Cycle
Timer > 0?
1210
Increment Duty Cycle
Counter
1214
a) Start Duty Cycle Timer from 24 hrs.
b) Reset Duty Cycle Counter to O
Is Duty Cycle
Counter <= Setting
Value?
Yes
1224
1216
\
\ Activate Motion Mode (e.g.,
y
Continue to R8
Turn Lights On)
Strike Violation
Module
1218\
+
—>| DecrementDutyCycleTimer
I
Deactivate Motion Mode
1200}
(e.g., Turn Lights orr)
FIG_ 12
Patent Application Publication
Apr. 10, 2014 Sheet 11 0f 11
US 2014/0097759 A1
1224
Enter Re-Strike Violation
Module
1308
a) Turn Lights On
Return to Normal
Control, Reset On
Time and Re-Strike
Timer to 0 hrs., Re
Strike Violation Count
to 0
1320
First Re-Strike
Violation?
b) Start Re-Strike
Violation Timer (8 hrs.)
Yes
0) Set Re-Strike Violation
Counter = 1
| Increment Re-StrikeViolation Count |
1330
Re-Strike
iolation Count =
9
Set Lamp On-Time =
1334
1 hour
Set Lamp On-Time = 2
hours
ls Re-Strike
Timer > 0?
Reset On-Time to Zero
1316
\
Decrement Re-Strike Violation Timer and On-Time
Timer
—>|
Return to Step 1204 of Duty Cycle Process
N
1318
1300}
FIG. 13
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
SYSTEMS AND METHOD FOR LIGHTING
AISLES
[0008]
[0009]
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT
APPLICATIONS
[0001]
This application is a continuation of and claims
bene?t to prior US. patent application Ser. No. 13/296,058,
?led Nov. 14, 201 1, which claims the bene?t of and priority to
US. Provisional Application No. 61/466,411, ?led Mar. 22,
2011. The entirety of US. patent application Ser. No. 13/296,
058, and Provisional Application No. 61/466,411 are incor
porated herein by reference.
FIGS. 1A-C illustrate three different states of a
lighting ?xture, according to an exemplary embodiment;
FIG. 2A is a perspective overhead view of a lighting
?xture, according to an exemplary embodiment;
[0010] FIG. 2B is a block diagram of a facility lighting
system for use with the lighting ?xtures of FIGS. 1A-C and
FIG. 2, according to an exemplary embodiment;
[0011]
FIG. 3 is a detailed block diagram of the controller
of the facility lighting system of FIG. 2B, according to an
exemplary embodiment;
[0012]
FIG. 4 is a detailed block diagram of the control
computer of the facility lighting system of FIG. 2B, according
BACKGROUND
to an exemplary embodiment;
[0013] FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary control activity for a
[0002] Warehouses, retail stores, manufacturing plants, or
other types of buildings (or outdoor spaces) are often orga
to an exemplary embodiment;
[0014] FIG. 6 is a ?ow chart of a process for controlling
nized to include aisles. It is challenging and dif?cult to light
aisles for energy ef?ciency and so that workers using the
aisles have proper lighting (e.g., enough for the task to be
multiple lighting ?xtures in a zone based on sensor input,
completed by the workers).
be organized within a building having a facility lighting sys
tem, according to an exemplary embodiment;
SUMMARY
system of controllers for a facility lighting system, according
according to an exemplary embodiment;
[0015]
[0016]
FIG. 7 illustrates how different lighting zones may
FIG. 8 is a ?ow chart of a process for providing an
[0003] One embodiment of the invention relates to a light
ing ?xture for energy ef?cient aisle lighting in a building. The
aisle lighting mode of operation using a lighting ?xture con
troller and a system of similarly con?gured lighting ?xtures
lighting ?xture includes processing electronics con?gured to
in a zone, according to an exemplary embodiment;
[0017] FIG. 9 is a ?ow chart of a process for providing an
cause the lighting ?xture to provide increasing levels of illu
mination in response to state changes associated with sensed
motion in the building. The state changes include (a) a tran
energy saving ‘general’ mode of operation using a lighting
?xture controller and a system of similarly con?gured light
sition from a no motion state to a local motion state (i.e.,
ing ?xtures in a zone, according to an exemplary embodi
transient motion); and (b) a transition from the local motion
state (i.e., transient motion) to a sustained motion state.
ment;
[0004] Another embodiment of the invention relates to a
system for energy ef?cient lighting of an aisle in a building.
energy saving ‘task’ mode of operation using a lighting ?x
ture controller and a system of similarly con?gured lighting
The system includes a plurality of lighting ?xtures, wherein
each of the plurality of lighting ?xtures includes a motion
sensor, transceiver, and processing electronics. The process
ing electronics for each lighting ?xture are con?gured to
cause the respective lighting ?xture to provide increasing
?xtures in a zone, according to an exemplary embodiment;
[0019] FIG. 11 is a ?ow chart ofa process for providing a
levels of illumination in response to state change associated
with motion sensed by the motion sensor. The state changes
[0018]
FIG. 10 is a ?ow chart ofa process for providing an
‘step dimming’ mode of operation using a lighting ?xture
controller and a system of similarly con?gured lighting ?x
tures in a zone, according to an exemplary embodiment;
[0020] FIG. 12 is a ?ow chart of a process for tracking and
controlling lighting ?xture duty cycle where the lighting ?x
include (a) a transition from a no motion state to a local
ture is con?gured to transition (e.g., turn on and off, change
motion state and (b) a transition from the local motion state to
brightness levels) during the day according to motion-based
a sustained motion state.
control, according to an exemplary embodiment; and
[0005] Another embodiment of the invention relates to a
method for providing energy ef?cient lighting of an aisle in a
building. The method includes using a motion sensor and
controlling lighting ?xture re-strike violation rules where the
lighting ?xture is con?gured to transition (e.g., turn on and
processing electronics coupled to a ?rst lighting ?xture to
distinguish between transient motion and sustained motion.
The method further includes at the ?rst lighting ?xture, tran
motion-based control, according to an exemplary embodi
[0021]
off, change brightness levels) during the day according to
ment.
sitioning from a transient motion state to a sustained motion
state in response to a determination of sustained motion. The
method further includes at the ?rst lighting ?xture, transition
ing from a no motion state to a local motion state in response
to a determination of local motion.
[0006]
Alternative exemplary embodiments relate to other
features and combinations of features as may be generally
recited in the claims.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
[0007]
FIG. 13 is a ?ow chart ofa process for tracking and
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
[0022] Before turning to the ?gures, which illustrate the
exemplary embodiments in detail, it should be understood
that the application is not limited to the details or methodol
ogy set forth in the description or illustrated in the ?gures. It
should also be understood that the terminology is for the
purpose of description only and should not be regarded as
limiting.
[0023]
Referring generally to the Figures, a system of light
The disclosure will become more fully understood
ing ?xtures is con?gured to control an aisle, set of aisles, or
from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction
with the accompanying ?gures, wherein like reference
provides for adequate worker lighting. While the systems and
numerals refer to like elements, in which:
methods described herein are described with reference to
other building spaces in a manner that saves energy and
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
aisle lighting, in some embodiments the systems and methods
may also be applied to any type of building space where a
distinction between a transient motion state and a sustained
[0027] Referring now to FIG. 2A, a perspective overhead
view of an exemplary lighting ?xture 200 is illustrated,
according to an exemplary embodiment. Lighting ?xture 200
motion state may be bene?cial. For example, each building
does not include an LED section such as that shown in FIGS.
space (e.g., rack aisles, speci?c production spaces, o?ice,
storage, shipping, receiving, hallway/traf?c, etc.) may be
organized into one of three categories (general, task, aisle). In
ture or a plurality of lighting ?xtures are used to transition
1A-1C, but lighting ?xture 200 can provide at least the same
three lighting states (i.e., low/off light associated with a no
motion state, medium/intermediate illumination associated
with a transient motion state, and a relatively high level of
illumination associated with a sustained motion state) by
?xtures from state-to-state automatically and without reli
step-dimming its HIF ballast 202 and lamps 208.
ance on live user input or a centralized controller. Advanta
[0028] Lighting ?xture 200 is shown to include a frame 206
that holds the ballast 202 and a plurality of lamps 208. Frame
an exemplary embodiment, motion sensed by a lighting ?x
geously, many of the embodiments described herein can
therefore operate without 100% reliance/uptime on data com
munication networks or links from the furthest sensors or
lighting ?xtures in the building back to a centralized control
ler.
[0024] Each lighting ?xture includes processing electron
ics for causing the lighting ?xture to provide increasing levels
of illumination in response to state changes associated with
sensed motion nearby the ?xture. In an exemplary embodi
ment, the processing electronics are con?gured to effect at
least three states: (1) a no motion state wherein the lighting
?xture is off, providing a minimum level of illumination, or
providing a low level of illumination; (2) a transient motion or
‘local’ motion state wherein the lighting ?xture provides a
low-to-medium amount of illumination (e.g., suf?cient for
safe travel through the area); and (3) a sustained motion state
wherein the lighting ?xture provides a high level of lighting
(e.g., a level desirable for supporting a high level of work
productivity and safety).
[0025]
Referring now to FIGS. 1A-1C, three different
states of a lighting ?xture 100 are illustrated, according to an
206 can be coupled to one or more brackets, rails, hooks, or
other mechanisms for holding frame 206 and therefore light
ing ?xture 200 in place for use. Ballast 202 is coupled to
controller 204. Controller 204 includes processing electron
ics for controlling the state changes and lighting ?xture
behavior during the different states. Controller 204 is shown
to include motion sensor 210. Controller 204 is con?gured to
change states based on motion sensed by motion sensor 210.
[0029] Referring now to FIG. 2B, a diagram of a facility
lighting system 250 for use with lighting ?xture 100 shown in
FIGS. 1A-C and/or lighting ?xture 200 shown in FIG. 2A is
illustrated, according to an exemplary embodiment. Facility
lighting system 250 is shown to include control computer 252
that is con?gured to conduct con?guration and control activi
ties relative to multiple lighting ?xtures’ controllers such as
controller 103 of FIGS. 1A-C or controller 204 of FIG. 2A.
While control computer 252 is shown in FIG. 2B, it should be
appreciated that the lighting ?xtures themselves includes
electronics for conducting the occupancy/motion-based state
transitions. Therefore, control computer 252 is not required in
many exemplary embodiments. If control computer 252 is
exemplary embodiment. Lighting ?xture 100 is shown to
include a light emitting diode (LED) section 102 and two high
intensity ?uorescent (HIF) lighting sections 104 and 106. It
should be appreciated that the methods described herein
couldbe applied to any type or mixture of lighting technology
able to provide at least three different light levels (low/off,
medium, high). In FIG. 1A, lighting ?xture 100 is in a no
provided, it may be used to provide user interfaces for allow
ing a user to change zone boundaries, lighting schedules,
default settings or to make other con?guration/administrative
motion state. In the example of FIG. 1A, a no motion state
parameters, turn lighting ?xtures on or off, change the motion
results in the entirety of the lighting ?xture remaining in a
standby mode wherein the HIF sections 104, 106 as well as
the LED section 102 are off. Lighting ?xture 100 is illustrated
in a transient motion state in FIG. 1B. In the example of FIG.
1B, a transient motion state results in the LED section 102
being ‘on’, while the HIF sections 104, 106 are off, to provide
a low level of illumination. Lighting ?xture 100 is illustrated
in a sustained motion state in FIG. 1C. In the example of FIG.
1C, a sustained motion state results in the HIF sections 104,
106 being on, in addition to the LED section 102 being on, to
provide a high level of illumination. Lighting ?xture 100
further includes a controller 103 con?gured to control opera
changes.
[0030]
Control computer 252 is con?gured to provide a
graphical user interface to a local or remote electronic display
screen for allowing a user to adjust con?guration or control
sensitive modes assigned to a group or zone of lighting ?x
tures, or to otherwise affect the operation of lighting ?xtures
in a facility. For example, control computer 252 is shown to
include touch screen display 254 for displaying such a graphi
cal user interface and for allowing user interaction (e.g., input
and output) with control computer 252. Various exemplary
graphical user interfaces for display on touch screen display
254 and control activities associated therewith are described
in greater detail in application Ser. No. 12/550,270, assigned
to Orion Energy Systems, Inc and titled “Lighting Fixture
Control Systems and Methods.” While control computer 252
is shown as housed within a wall-mountable panel, control
tion of the lights (e.g., determine the state of the lights) and a
motion sensor 105 con?gured to detect nearby motion and to
provide controller 103 with motion information.
embodiment, user interfaces provided by control computer
[0026]
In some embodiments, the transient motion state is
252 and display 254 allow users to recon?gure or reset
entered when local motion (e.g., motion actually sensed by a
aspects of the lighting system.
[0031] Referring further to FIG. 2B, control computer 252
motion sensor local to a lighting ?xture) is detected but the
local motion has not yet been sustained for a period of time
(which would result in a sustained motion state). In the
present disclosure, the phrase ‘a local motion state’ and ‘a
transient motion state’ may be used interchangeably and refer
to the same state.
computer 252 may alternatively be housed in or coupled to
any other suitable computer casing or frame. In an exemplary
is shown as connected to master transceiver 258 via commu
nications interface 256. Master transceiver 258 may be a radio
frequency transceiver con?gured to provide wireless signals
to a network of controllers such as controller 204. In FIG. 2B,
master transceiver 258 is shown in bi-directional wireless
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
communication with a plurality of lighting ?xture controllers
261, 262, 271, and 272. FIG. 2B further illustrates controllers
261 and 262 forming a ?rst logical group 260 identi?ed as
“Zone I” and controllers 271 and 272 forming a second logi
cal group 270 identi?ed as “Zone II.” Control computer 252 is
con?gured to provide different processing, different com
mands, or different modes for “Zone I” relative to “Zone II.”
While control computer 252 is con?gured to complete a vari
ety of control activities for lighting ?xture controllers 261,
262, 271, 272, in many exemplary embodiments of the
present disclosure, each controller associated with a lighting
?xture (e.g., controllers 261, 262, 271, 272) includes circuitry
con?gured to provide a variety of “smart” or “intelligent
features” that are either independent of control computer 252
or operate in concert with control computer 252. A detailed
block diagram of such a controller is shown in FIG. 3.
[0032] Referring now to FIG. 3, a detailed block diagram of
controller 204 is shown, according to an exemplary embodi
ment. Controller 204 is generally con?gured to include cir
cuitry con?gured with an algorithm to control on/dim/off
cycling of connected lighting ?xtures, an algorithm to log
usage information for the lighting ?xture, an algorithm con
?gured to prevent premature restrikes to limit wear on the
lamps and ballast, and/or other algorithms for allowing con
inputs received from wireless controller 305 or sensor circuit
310. By way of another example, a command to turn the
lighting ?xture “off ’ may be received at wireless transceiver
306 and interpreted by wireless controller 305. Upon recog
niZing the “off” command, wireless controller 305 provides
an appropriate control signal to control circuit 304 which
causes control circuit 304 to switch one or more of power
relays R1, R2 off. Similarly, when sensor circuit 310 includ
ing sensor 210 experiences an environmental condition, logic
module 314 may determine whether or not controller 204 and
control circuit 304 should change “on/off” states of one or
more of the relays R1, R2. For example, if motion is detected
by sensor 210 and sensor circuit 310, logic module 314 may
determine that control circuit 304 should change states such
that power relay R1 is “on.” If sustained motion is detected by
sensor 210 and sensor circuit 310, logic module 314 may
determine that control circuit 304 should change states such
that power relay R2 is “on” in addition to power relay Rl
(providing a high level of illumination on the sustained
motion activity). Other control decisions, logic and activities
provided by controller 204 and the components thereof are
described below and with reference to other Figures.
[0036] When or after control decisions based on sensor 210
or commands received at wireless transceiver 306 are made,
troller 204 to send and receive commands or information
in some exemplary embodiments, logic module 314 is con
to/from other peer devices (e.g., other lighting ?xture con
?gured to log usage information for the lighting ?xture in
trollers) or to/from the master controller.
memory 316. For example, if control circuit 304 causes
[0033]
power relays R1 and R2 to change states such that the lighting
?xture turns on or off, control circuit 304 may inform logic
module 314 of the state change and logic module 314 may log
Controller 204 is shown to include power relays R1
and R2 con?gured to controllably switch on, increase,
decrease, or switch off high voltage power outputs that may
be provided to a ?rst ballast (e.g., a ballast for HIF lamps) and
a second ballast (e.g., a ballast for a set of LEDs). In other
exemplary embodiments, power relays R1, R2 may be con
?gured to provide a low voltage control signal, optical signal,
or otherwise to the lighting ?xture which may cause one or
usage information based on the information from control
circuit 304. The form of the logged usage information can
vary for different embodiments. For example, in some
embodiments, the logged usage information includes an
event identi?er (e.g., “on”, “off”, cause for the state change,
more ballasts, lamps, and/ or circuits of the lighting ?xture to
etc.) and a timestamp (e.g., day and time) from which total
turn on, dim, or turn off
usage may be derived. In other embodiments, the total “on”
[0034]
time for the lighting ?xture (or lamp set) is counted such that
As power relays R1 and R2 are con?gured to pro
vide high voltage power switching to varying lighting ?xture
ballasts, controller 204 and relays Rl/R2 may include a port,
terminal, receiver, or other input for receiving power from a
high voltage power source. In embodiments where a rela
only an absolute number of hours that the lamp has been on
(for whatever reason) has been tracked and stored as the
logged usage information. In addition to logging or aggregat
ing temporal values, each logic module 314 may be con?g
tively low voltage or no voltage control signal (e.g., optical) is
provided from relays R1, R2, power for circuitry of controller
ured to process usage information or transform usage infor
mation into other values or information. For example, in some
204 may be received from a power source provided to the
lighting ?xtures or from another source. In any embodiment
embodiments, time-of-use information is transformed by
logic module 314 to track the energy used by the lighting
?xture (e. g., based on bulb ratings, known energy draw of the
?xture in different on/off/partial on modes, etc.). In some
embodiments, each logic module 314 will also track how
much energy savings the lighting ?xture is achieving relative
to a conventional lighting ?xture, conventional control logic,
of controller 204, appropriate power supply circuitry (e.g.,
?ltering circuitry, stabiliZing circuitry, etc.) may be included
with controller 204 to provide power to the components of
controller 204 (e.g., relays R1 and R2).
[0035]
Referring still to FIG. 3, controller 204 is shown to
include processing electronics 300. Processing electronics
300 generally utilizes electronics circuits and components
(e. g., control circuits, relays, etc.) to effect the control activi
ties described herein. In the example shown in FIG. 3, pro
cessing electronics 300 is embodied as a circuit (spread over
one or more printed circuit boards) including control circuit
304. Control circuit 304 receives and provides data or control
or relative to another difference or change of the lighting
?xture. For the purposes of many embodiments of this dis
closure, any such information relating to usage for the light
ing ?xture may be considered logged “usage information.” In
other embodiments, the usage information logged by module
314 is limited to on/off events or temporal aggregation of on
states; in such embodiments energy savings calculations or
signals from/to power relays R1 and R2 and sensor circuit
other calculations may be completed by control computer 252
310. Control circuit 304 is con?gured to cause one or more
or another remote device.
lamps of the lighting ?xture to turn on and off (or dim) via
control signals sent to power relays R1 and R2. For example,
[0037] In an exemplary embodiment, controller 204 (e.g.,
via wireless transceiver 306) is con?gured to transmit the
control circuit 304 can make a determination that an “on” or
logged usage information to remote devices such as control
“off” signal should be sent to power relays R1 or R2 based on
computer 252. Wireless controller 305 may be con?gured to
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
recall the logged usage information from memory 316 at
periodic intervals (e.g., every hour, once a day, twice a day,
etc.) and to provide the logged usage information to wireless
transceiver 306 at the periodic intervals for transmission back
to control computer 252. In other embodiments, control com
puter 252 (or another network device) transmits a request for
the logged information to wireless transceiver 306 and the
an “on” state for a prede?ned period of time (e.g., thirty
minutes, ?fteen minutes, etc.) even after the condition that
caused the lamp to turn on is no longer true. Accordingly, if,
for example, motion or a low ambient lighting level causes
control circuit 304 to turn sections 102, 104, and/or 106 on but
then the motion and/ or ambient lighting level suddenly
increases (a worker enters the zone or the sun comes out),
request is responded to by wireless controller 305 by trans
mitting back the logged usage information. In a preferred
control circuit 304 may keep the lamps on (even though the
embodiment a plurality of controllers such as controller 204
that the lamps are taken through their preferred cycle. Simi
asynchronously collect usage information for their ?xture
and control computer 252, via request or via periodic trans
larly, in an alternative embodiment, control circuit 304 may
be con?gured to hold the lamp in an “off” state for a pre
de?ned period of time since the lamp was last turned off to
ensure that the lamp is given time to cool or otherwise settle
after the last “on” state.
mission of the information by the controllers, gathers the
usage information for later use.
[0038]
Wireless controller 305 may also be con?gured to
‘on’ condition expired) for a predetermined period of time so
handle situations or events such as transmission failures,
[0041]
reception failures, and the like. Wireless controller 305 may
control circuit 304 may be con?gured to include a re-strike
respond to such failures by, for example, operating according
violation module (e.g., in memory 316) that is con?gured to
prevent logic module 314 from commanding control circuit
to a retransmission scheme or another transmit failure miti
Referring yet further to FIG. 3, logic module 314 or
gation scheme. Wireless controller 305 may also control any
304 to cause the ?uorescent lamps to turn on while a re-strike
other modulating, demodulating, coding, decoding, routing,
controller 204’s control logic (e.g., controlled by logic mod
time is counted down. The re-strike time may correspond with
a maximum cool-down time for the lamp, allowing the lamp
to experience its preferred strike-up cycle even if a command
or other activities of wireless transceiver 306. For example,
ule 314 and/or control circuit 304) may periodically include
to turn the lamp back on is received at wireless transceiver
making transmissions to other controllers in a zone, making
transmissions to particular controllers, or otherwise. Such
transmissions can be controlled by wireless controller 305
306. In other embodiments, logic module 314 or control
circuit 304 may be con?gured to prevent rapid on/off switch
and such control may include, for example, maintaining a
token-based transmission system, synchronizing clocks of
or a sensor or controller error. Logic module 314 or control
the various RF transceivers or controllers, operating under a
continue the on/off switching based on inputs received from
sensor 210 by analyzing the behavior of the sensor, the
slot-based transmission/reception protocol, or otherwise.
ing due to sensed motion, another environmental condition,
circuit 304 may be con?gured to, for example, entirely dis
Referring still to FIG. 3, sensor 210 may be an
switching, and logged usage information. By way of further
infrared sensor, an optical sensor, a camera, a temperature
sensor, a photodiode, a carbon dioxide sensor, or any other
sensor con?gured to sense environmental conditions such as
example, logic circuit 314 or control circuit 304 may be
con?gured to discontinue the on/off switching based on a
determination that switching based on the inputs from the
sensor has occurred too frequently (e. g., exceeding a thresh
old number of “on” switches within a predetermined amount
of time, undesired switching based on the time of day or night,
etc.). Logic module 314 or control circuit 304 may be con
?gured to log or communicate such a determination. Using
such con?gurations, logic module 314 and/ or control circuit
304 are con?gured to self-diagnose and correct undesirable
behavior that would otherwise continue occurring based on
the default, user, or system-con?gured settings.
[0042] According to one embodiment, a self-diagnostic
[0039]
a lighting level or human occupancy of a space. For example,
in one exemplary embodiment, sensor 210 is a motion sensor
and logic module 314 is con?gured to determine whether
control circuit 304 should change states (e.g., change the state
of power relays R1 and R2) based on whether motion is
detected by sensor 210 (e.g., detected motion reaches or
exceeds threshold value). In the same or other embodiments,
logic module 314 may be con?gured to use the signal from the
sensor 210 to determine an ambient lighting level. Logic
module 314 may then determine whether to change states
based on the ambient lighting level. For example, logic mod
ule 314 may use a condition such as time of day in addition to
ambient lighting level to determine whether to turn the light
ing ?xture off or on. During a critical time of the day (e.g.,
when a staffed assembly line is moving), even if the ambient
lighting level is high, logic module 314 may refrain from
turning the lighting ?xture off. In another embodiment, by
way of further example, logic module 314 is con?gured to
feature would monitor the number of times that a ?xture or
device was instructed to turn on (or off) based upon a signal
received from a sensor (e.g. motion, ambient light level, etc.).
If the number of instructions to turn on (or off) exceeded a
predetermined limit during a predetermined time period,
logic module 314 and/or control circuit 304 could be pro
grammed to detect that the particular application for the ?x
ture or device is not well-suited to control by such a sensor
provide a command to control circuit 304 that is con?gured to
(e.g. not an optimum application for motion control or ambi
cause control circuit 304 to turn the one or more lamps of the
ent light-based control, etc.), and would be programmed to
?uorescent lighting ?xture on when logic module 314 detects
motion via the signal from sensor 210 and when logic circuit
314 determines that the ambient lighting level is below a
disable such a motion or ambient light based control scheme,
and report/log this action and the basis. For example, if the
algorithm is based on more than four instructions to turn on
threshold setpoint.
(or off) in a 24 hour period, and the number of instructions
[0040] Referring yet further to FIG. 3, control circuit 304 is
con?gured to prevent damage to lamps 108 or 110 from
provided based on signals from the sensor exceeds this limit
manual or automatic control activities. Particularly, control
circuit 304 may be con?gured to prevent on/off cycling of
sections 102, 104, 106 by holding the lamps of the sections in
within this period, the particular sensor-based control func
tion would be disabled, as not being optimally suited to the
application and a noti?cation would be logged and provided
to a user or facility manager. Of course, the limit and time
US 2014/0097759 A1
period may be any suitable number and duration intended to
suit the operational characteristics of the ?xture/device and
the application. In the event that a particular sensor-based
control scheme in a particular zone is disabled by the logic
module and/ or control circuit, the ?xture or device is intended
to remain operational in response to other available control
schemes (e.g. other sensors, time-based, user input or
demand, etc.). The data logged by the logic module and/or
control circuit may also be used in a ‘learning capacity’ so that
the controls may be more optimally tuned for the ?xtures/
devices in a particular application and/or zone. For example,
the logic module and/or control circuit may determine that
disablement of a particular sensor-based control feature
occurred due to an excessive number of instructions to turn on
(or off) based on signals from a particular sensor that occurred
within a particular time window, and may be reprogrammed
to establish an alternate monitoring duration that excludes
this particular time window for the particular sensor-based
control scheme to ‘avoid’ time periods that are determined to
be problematic. This ability to learn or self-update is intended
to permit the system to adjust itself to update the sensor-based
control schemes to different time periods that are more opti
mally suited for such a control scheme, and to avoid time
periods that are less optimum for such a particular sensor
based control scheme.
[0043]
Referring now to FIG. 4, a more detailed block
diagram of control computer 252 is shown, according to an
exemplary embodiment. Control computer 252 may be con
?gured as the “master controller” described in Us. applica
Apr. 10, 2014
[0045] Touch screen display 254 and more particularly user
interface module 408 are con?gured to allow and facilitate
user interaction (e. g., input and output) with control computer
252. It should be appreciated that in alternative embodiments
of control computer 252, the display associated with control
computer 252 may not be a touch screen, may be separated
from the casing housing the control computer, and/ or may be
distributed from the control computer and connected via a
network connection (e. g., Internet connection, LAN connec
tion, WAN connection, etc.). Further, it should be appreciated
that control computer 252 may be connected to a mouse,
keyboard, or any other input device or devices for providing
user input to control computer 252. Control computer 252 is
shown to include a communications interface 256 con?gured
to connect to a wire associated with master transceiver 258.
[0046] Communications interface 256 may be a proprietary
circuit for communicating with master transceiver 258 via a
proprietary communications protocol. In other embodiments,
communications interface 256 may be con?gured to commu
nicate with master transceiver 258 via a standard communi
cations protocol. For example, communications interface 256
may include Ethernet communications electronics (e.g., an
Ethernet card) and an appropriate port (e.g., an RJ45 port
con?gured for CAT5 cabling) to which an Ethernet cable is
run from control computer 252 to master transceiver 258.
Master transceiver 258 may be as described in Us. applica
tion Ser. Nos. 12/240,805, 12/057,217, or 11/771,317, which
are each incorporated herein by reference. Communications
interface 256 and more generally master transceiver 258 are
tion Ser. No. 12/240,805, ?led Sep. 29, 2008, and incorpo
rated herein by reference in its entirety. Control computer 252
is generally con?gured to receive user inputs (e. g., via touch
controlled by logic of wireless interface module 412. Wire
less interface module 412 may include drivers, control soft
ware, con?guration software, or other logic con?gured to
facilitate communications activities of control computer 252
screen display 254) and to set or change settings of lighting
with lighting ?xture controllers. For example, wireless inter
system 250 based on the user inputs.
face module 412 may package, address format, or otherwise
prepare messages for transmission to and reception by par
[0044] Referring further to FIG. 4, control computer 252 is
shown to include processing circuit 402 including memory
404 and processor 406. In an exemplary embodiment, control
computer 252 and more particularly processing circuit 402
are con?gured to run a Microsoft Windows Operating System
(e. g., XP, Vista, etc.) and are con?gured to include a software
suite con?gured to provide the features described herein. The
software suite may include a variety of modules (e.g., mod
ules 408-414) con?gured to complete various activities of
control computer 252. Modules 408-414 may be or include
computer code, analog circuitry, one or more integrated cir
cuits, or another collection of logic circuitry. In various exem
plary embodiments, processor 406 may be a general purpose
processor, a speci?c purpose processor, a programmable
logic controller (PLC), a ?eld programmable gate array, a
combination thereof, or otherwise and con?gured to com
plete, cause the completion of, and/or facilitate the comple
tion of the activities of control computer 252 described
herein. Memory 404 may be con?gured to store historical
data received from lighting ?xture controllers or other build
ing devices, con?guration information, schedule informa
tion, setting information, zone information, or other tempo
rary or archived information. Memory 404 may also be
con?gured to store computer code for execution by processor
406. When executed, such computer code (e.g., stored in
memory 404 or otherwise, script code, object code, etc.)
con?gures processing circuit 402, processor 406 or more
generally control computer 252 for the activities described
herein.
ticular controllers or zones. Wireless interface module 412
may also interpret, route, decode, or otherwise handle com
munications received at master transceiver 258 and commu
nications interface 256.
[0047] Referring still to FIG. 4, user interface module 408
may include the software and other resources for the handling
of automatic or user inputs received at the graphical user
interfaces of control computer 252. While user interface mod
ule 408 is executing and receiving user input, user interface
module 408 may interpret user input and cause various other
modules, algorithms, routines, or sub-processes to be called,
initiated, or otherwise affected. For example, control logic
module 414 and/or a plurality of control sub-processes
thereof may be called by user interface module 408 upon
receiving certain user input events. User interface module 408
may also be con?gured to include server software (e.g., web
server software, remote desktop software, etc.) con?gured to
allow remote access to touch screen display 254. User inter
face module 408 may be con?gured to complete some of the
control activities described herein rather than control logic
module 414. In other embodiments, user interface module
408 merely drives the graphical user interfaces and handles
user input/output events while control logic module 414 con
trols the majority of the actual control logic.
[0048] Control logic module 414 may be the primary logic
module for control computer 252 and may be the main routine
that calls, for example, modules 408, 410, etc. Control logic
module 414 may generally be con?gured to provide lighting
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
control, energy savings calculations, demand/response-based
control, load shedding, load submetering, HVAC control,
building automation control, workstation control, advertise
used as a comprehensive energy management system for a
facility. For example, a motor that controls the movement of
a spinning advertisement may be coupled to the power output
ment control, power strip control, “sleep mode” control, or
or relays of a controller very similar if not identical to con
any other types of control. In an exemplary embodiment,
control logic module 414 operates based off of information
troller 204. This controller may be assigned to a zone (e.g., via
user interfaces at touchscreen display 254) and provided a
stored in one or more databases of control computer 252 and
stored in memory 404 or another memory device in commu
schedule for turning on and off during the day. In another
embodiment, the electrical relays of the controller may be
coupled to other building devices such as video monitors for
nication with control computer 252. The database may be
populated with information based on user input received at
graphical user interfaces and control logic module 414 may
continuously draw on the database information to make con
trol decisions. For example, a user may establish any number
of zones, set schedules for each zone, create ambient lighting
parameters for each zone or ?xture, etc. This information is
stored in the database, related (e.g., via a relational database
scheme, XML sets for zones or ?xtures, or otherwise) and
recalled by control logic module 414 as control logic module
414 proceeds through its various control algorithms.
informational display, exterior signs, task lighting, audio sys
tems, or other electrically operated devices.
[0052] Referring further to FIG. 4, power monitor 450 is
shown as coupled to ?eldbus interfaces 416 in an exemplary
embodiment. However, power monitor 450 may also or alter
natively be coupled to its own controller or RF transceiver 451
for communicating with master transceiver 258. Power moni
tor 450 may generally be con?gured to couple to building
power resources (e.g., building mains input, building power
meter, etc.) and to receive or calculate an indication of power
[0049] Control logic module 414 may include any number
of functions or sub-processes. For example, a scheduling
sub-process of control logic module 414 may check at regular
may be received in a variety of different ways according to
intervals to determine if an event is scheduled to take place.
When events are determined to take place, the scheduling
include a current transformer (CT) con?gured to measure the
current in the mains inlet to a building, may be coupled to or
utilized by the building or a portion of the building. This input
varying embodiments. For example, power monitor 450 may
sub-process or another routine of control logic module 414
include a pulse monitor, may be con?gured to monitor volt
may call or otherwise use another module or routine to initiate
age, or may monitor power in other ways. Power monitor 450
is intended to provide “real time” or “near real time” moni
the event. For example, if the schedule indicates that a zone
should be turned off at 5 :00 pm, then when 5:00 pm arrives the
toring of power and to provide the result of such monitoring
scheduling sub-process may call a routine (e.g., of wireless
to control computer 252 for use or reporting. When used with
interface module) that causes an “off” signal to be transmitted
power monitor 450, control logic module 414 may be con?g
ured to include logic that sheds loads (e.g., sends off signals to
lighting ?xtures via a lighting ?xture controller network,
sends off signals to monitored devices 418 and 422, adjusts
by master transceiver 258. Control logic module 414 may also
be con?gured to conduct or facilitate the completion of any
other process, sub-process, or process steps conducted by
control computer 252 described herein.
[0050] Referring further to FIG. 4, device interface module
410 facilitates the connection of one or more ?eld devices,
sensors, or other inputs not associated with master transceiver
258. For example, ?eldbus interfaces 416 and 420 may be
con?gured to communicate with any number of monitored
devices 418 and 422. The communication may be according
to a communications protocol which may be standard or
proprietary and/or serial or parallel. Fieldbus interfaces 416,
ambient light setpoints, adjusts schedules, shuts lights off
according to a priority tier, etc.) to maintain a setpoint power
meter level or threshold. In other exemplary embodiments,
control logic module 414 may store or receive pricing infor
mation from a utility and shed loads if the metered power
usage multiplied by the pricing rate is greater than certain
absolute thresholds or tiered thresholds. For example, if daily
energy cost is expected to exceed $500 for a building, control
logic module 414 may be con?gured to change the ambient
420 can be or include circuit cards for connection to process
light setpoints for the lighting ?xtures in the building until
ing circuit 402, jacks or terminals for physically receiving
daily energy cost is expected to fall beneath $500. In an
connectors from wires coupling monitored devices 418 and
exemplary embodiment, user interface module 408 is con?g
422, logic circuitry or software for translating communica
ured to cause a screen to be displayed that allows a user to
tions between processing circuit 402 and monitored devices
418 and 422, or otherwise. In an exemplary embodiment,
device interface module 410 handles and interprets data input
from the monitored devices and controls the output activities
of ?eldbus interfaces 416 and 420 to monitored devices 418
and 422.
[0051] Fieldbus interfaces 416 and 420 and device interface
module 410 may also be used in concert with user interface
module 408 and control logic module 414 to provide control
to the monitored devices 418 and 422. For example, moni
tored devices 418 and 422 may be mechanical devices con
?gured to operate a motor, one or more electronic valves, one
or more workstations, machinery stations, a solenoid or
associate different zones or lighting ?xtures with different
demand/response priority levels. Accordingly, a utility pro
vider or internal calculation determines that a load should be
shed, control logic module 414 will check the zone or lighting
?xture database to shed loads of the lowest priority ?rst while
leaving higher priority loads unaffected.
[0053] Referring now to FIG. 5, an exemplary control activ
ity for a system of controllers as described herein is illus
trated, according to an exemplary embodiment. As described
in FIG. 2B, lighting ?xtures (or more particularly controllers
for lighting ?xtures) can be grouped into zones. Rather than
reporting motion, ambient light, or other sensed conditions
controlled independently. User interface module 408 may
allow schedules and conditions to be established for each of
back to master transceiver 258 for processing or action, con
trollers such as controller 204 may be con?gured to broadcast
commands or conditions to other RF transceivers coupled to
other controllers in the same zone. For example, in FIG. 5,
lighting zone I includes four controllers. When motion is
devices 418 and 422 so that control computer 252 may be
detected by sensor 210 of controller 204, logic module 314
valve, or otherwise. Such devices may be assigned to zones
similar to the lighting ?xtures described above and below or
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
and/ or control circuit 304 causes wireless transceiver 306 to
transmit an indication that motion was detected by the sensor.
Accordingly, control circuits of the controllers receiving the
indication can decide whether or not to act upon the indication
of motion. The RF signals including an indication of motion
may also include a zone identi?er that receiving controllers
can use to determine if the signal originated from their zone or
another zone. In other exemplary embodiments, controller
204 may address messages to particular controllers (e.g., the
addresses of neighbors or the addresses of other controllers in
the zone). Logic module 314 may further be con?gured to
cause the radio frequency transceiver to transmit commands
to other radio frequency transceivers coupled to other ?uo
rescent lighting ?xtures. For example, logic module 314 and/
or control circuit 304 may be con?gured to interpret a signal
received at the radio frequency transceiver as indicating that
motion was detected by another device in the zone. In an
further shown to include using circuitry of the ?rst controller
to transmit a command and/ or an indication of the event with
a ?rst zone identi?er (step 606). The transmission is received
by a controller in a second zone. Circuitry of the controller in
the second zone determines that the transmission is for
another zone and does not act on the received transmission
(step 608). The transmission may also be received by a second
controller for the ?rst zone (step 610). Circuitry of the second
controller for the ?rst zone inspects the received transmission
and acts on the information of the transmission when the
controller discovers that its stored zone identi?er matches the
received zone identi?er (step 612). The second controller for
the ?rst zone may also be con?gured as a relay node and to
retransmit the received command or indication to other ?rst
zone controllers (e.g., controller 506).
[0056] FIG. 7 illustrates how different lighting zones may
be organized within a building having aisles. In the example
exemplary embodiment of the lighting ?xture controller,
of FIG. 7, building entrance 704 is shown to include two
some will be con?gurable as relay devices and when so con
lighting ?xtures (labeled with Az7 in the illustration)
?gured, will relay any commands or information the control
assigned to a ‘general’ mode of operation and zone 7 of the
building. Production area 706 of the building is shown to
include ?ve lighting ?xtures (labeled with Tz8 in the illustra
tion) assigned to a ‘task’ mode of operation and zone 8 of the
building. High tra?ic work area 740 of the building includes
some lighting ?xtures set in a general mode of operation and
others set in a task mode of operation (the lighting ?xtures in
ler receives from other zone controllers. Controller 504 is
illustrated to be con?gured as such a relay device. When
controller 504 receives broadcast 500 indicating motion from
controller 261, controller 504 relays broadcast 500 via trans
mission 502 to other zone devices (e.g., controller 506). This
way, an event such as motion can be propagated to each of the
lighting ?xtures in a zone without network traf?c to controller
261 and/or without necessitating direct control of the lighting
?xtures by controller 261. This activity may be con?gurable
(e.g., via a GUI provided by control computer 252) so that
only some controllers are relays, all controllers are relays, or
so that no controllers are relays and only devices within range
of the detecting controller act on its broadcasts. Further, the
relay or rebroadcast can be address-based or more similar to
a true broadcast. For example, in an address-based relay, the
controller serving as a relay may know the addresses of cer
tain network controllers to which to transmit the relayed
information. In another example, the broadcast may be gen
eral and not addressed to any particular controller, control
lers, or zone.
a task mode of operation and associated zone 9 are labeled
Tz9 in the illustration of FIG. 7 and the lighting ?xtures in the
general mode of operation and associated with zone 9 are
labeled Az9).
[0057]
The illustration of FIG. 7 further illustrates three
aisles. Each aisle is shown as divided into two zones, a small
forward zone near the front of the aisle (i.e., near the high
traf?c work area of the building) and a larger zone behind the
small forward zone. Items that need to be frequently accessed
may be placed in the small forward zone near the front of the
aisle, while items that are less frequently accessed may be
placed in the larger zone. Referring to aisle portion 710, two
lighting ?xtures are shown as installed within the aisle portion
ler may be con?gured to store a lighting zone value in
(labeled withAzl in the illustration) and assigned to an ‘aisle’
mode of operation and zone 1 of the building. Referring to
aisle portion 701, six lighting ?xtures are shown as installed
memory (e.g., memory 316). This value may be used, for
within the aisle portion (labeled with Az2 in the illustration)
example, to determine whether another device sending a
command is associated with the lighting zone value stored in
memory. For example, controller 271 may include a lighting
building. Referring to aisle portion 720, two lighting ?xtures
[0054]
To implement zone control activities, each control
zone value of “II” in memory and controller 261 may include
data representative of controller 261’s lighting zone value
(e.g., “I”) with its transmission indicating that motion was
detected. When controller 271 receives the lighting zone
value, controller 271 (e.g., a control circuit or logic circuit
thereof) may compare “I” and “II” and make a determination
that controller 271 will not act on the received indication of
motion (i.e., controller 271 leaves its relays off while all of the
controllers in zone I switch their relays on).
[0055] Referring now to FIG. 6, a ?ow chart ofa process
600 for controlling multiple lighting ?xtures in a zone based
on sensor input is shown, according to an exemplary embodi
ment. Process 600 is shown to include receiving signals from
a sensor (e.g., sensor 210) coupled to a ?rst controller for a
?rst zone (step 602). Once received, circuitry of the ?rst
controller can determine whether the received signals repre
sent an event that should be acted upon (e.g., by changing
lighting states, etc.) in the ?rst zone (step 604). Process 600 is
and assigned to an ‘aisle’ mode of operation and zone 2 of the
are shown as installed within the aisle portion (labeled with
Az3 in the illustration) and assigned to an ‘aisle’ mode of
operation and zone 3 of the building. Referring further to aisle
portion 702, six lighting ?xtures are shown as installed within
the aisle portion (labeled with Az4 in the illustration) and
assigned to an ‘aisle’ mode of operation and zone 4 of the
building. Referring to aisle portion 730, two lighting ?xtures
are shown as installed within the aisle portion (labeled with
Az5 in the illustration) and assigned to an ‘aisle’ mode of
operation and zone 5 of the building. Referring to aisle por
tion 703, six lighting ?xtures are shown as installed within the
aisle portion (labeled with Az6 in the illustration) and
assigned to an ‘aisle’ mode of operation and zone 6 of the
building. The general, task, and aisle modes of operation for
a lighting ?xture are described with reference to subsequent
Figures.
[0058]
Referring now to FIG. 8, a ?ow chart of a process
800 for providing an aisle mode of operation is shown. While
a process 800 is illustrated and described with particularity, it
Apr. 10, 2014
US 2014/0097759 A1
should be noted that many different timings, checks, step
orders, or other variations are contemplated and may fall
within the scope of one or more appended claims. Process 800
can be executed by processing electronics 300 of controller
204 shown in FIG. 3 or by other processing electronics
coupled to a lighting ?xture. In an alternative embodiment,
process 800 can be partially or entirely executed by process
ing electronics remote from the lighting ?xture (e.g., a control
computer 252). For example, in an alternative embodiment,
some of the steps of process 800 may be executed by a
lighting ?xture’s local controller and other of the steps of
process 800 may be executed by control computer 252.
[0059] Process 800 is shown to begin at step 802 where
timers or counters Tl through T5 are initially set to zero (step
802). Timers or counters Tl through T5 are variously used to
control the timing of transitions into and out of varying light
ing states. Tl represents a time period for which dim illumi
nation should be provided by the lighting ?xture. T2 repre
6 seconds and T4 is reset to equal 2 seconds (step 814). If T4
is greater than zero seconds (meaning that motion has been
detected within the T4 dwell time), then step 812 checks for
whether the local motion has been sustained for a predeter
mined period of time (e.g., 6 seconds). In other words, step
812 checks for whether T3 has been counted down from 6 to
zero.
[0063] If step 812 results in a determination that local
motion has been sustained, then T4 is reset to 2 seconds at step
816. Further, in response to sustained local motion, relay R2
is caused to be ‘on’ providing a ‘high’ illumination level. T2
is reset to thirty seconds and a sustained motion message is
transmitted from transceiver 3 06. As will be explained below,
when T2 counts down to zero, relay R2 is deactivated. There
fore, in response to detected sustained local motion (e. g.,
detecting movement associated with a worker concentrating
on making a product pull in an aisle location for longer than
6 seconds), the lighting ?xture is caused to switch from a dim
sents a time period for which high illumination should be
illumination state to a high or bright illumination statei
provided by the lighting ?xture. T3 and T4 represent time
providing the highest possible light level for the worker in the
periods which are used to represent periods of time where
aisle. If local motion does not continue, the lighting ?xture
sustained local motion is detected. T5 represents a time
returns to a dim state after time T2 expires, saving energy
period for which local motion has occurred. While particular
timings are described with reference to process 800 and the
other processes described herein, different state timings may
be associated with varying exemplary embodiments.
[0060] At step 804, the primary aisle mode loop begins. It
should be noted that, prior to starting the primary aisle mode
loop at step 804, any number of additional steps may be
conducted to warm up the lamp, conduct daily lamp “season
ing”, or to conduct another start-up task. For example, the
initial motion detected in a zone during a day may result in all
lamps within the zone being turned high for one minute to
ensure the daily lamp seasoning.
[0061]
Once the loop is begun, process 800 can begin con
tinually checking for whether local motion is detected (step
806). As described above with reference to FIG. 3, and
according to an exemplary embodiment, sensor circuit 310
and sensor 210 can process infrared video signals to estimate
whether signi?cant movement (e.g., enough to be a human
rather than a small animal) is occurring in the space covered
by the sensor 210’s sensor detection signal. In response to
local motion being detected, activities including switching
relay Rl (e.g., shown in FIG. 3) to be “on” to provide rela
tively ‘dim’ illumination from the lighting ?xture are com
pleted (step 808). In step 808, timer T1 is set/reset to equal 90
seconds. In step 808, also in response to the detection of local
motion, the processing electronics of the lighting ?xture (e.g.,
when high illumination is no longer required due to worker
activity.
[0064] At step 820, process 800 decrements all non-zero
timers other than T4 by one. Steps 822 and 824 check for the
expiration of timer T1 and T2, respectively. As described
above, if T2 has expired, then (at step 828) relay R2 is deac
tivated to reduce the illumination level from high to dim (e. g.,
where Tl only is activated). If Tl has expired, then (at step
826) relay R1 is deactivated to reduce the illumination level
from dim to off (or lower). After state changes at steps 826,
828, or after consecutive ‘no’ decisions at step 822, 824, the
loop repeats at step 804.
[0065] As shown in FIG. 8, if local motion is not detected at
step 806, then T4 is decremented by one (if T4 is not already
zero) at step 830. At step 832, process 800 includes checking
for whether a sustained motion received message has been
received from a linked or nearby lighting ?xture (e.g., a
lighting ?xture within the same zone). Step 832 also checks
for whether T5 is greater than 0. If T5 is greater than zero,
local motion has recently been detected by the lighting ?xture
at step 806. Accordingly, step 832 essentially checks for
whether sustained motion is happening nearby and whether
local motion has recently occurred (e.g., with in the last 5
seconds). If so, then relay R2 is switched on to provide a high
illumination level at step 818. T2 is reset to 30 seconds such
munications interface (e.g., transceiver 306 of FIG. 3, a wired
that the high level of illumination will be provided for at least
30 seconds. Further, transceiver 306 is caused to rebroadcast
communications interface) to transmit a zone motion mes
a sustained motion message to the zone.
sage to other lighting ?xture controllers in the zone. Each
time local motion is detected, T5 is reset to equal 3 seconds.
[0066] If a sustained motion message is not received at step
832 (or T5 is zero when the sustained motion message is
received), then a check is conducted for whether zone motion
has been received (step 834). A zone motion message is a
message from another lighting ?xture’s transceiver in the
zone indicating that motion (but not sustained motion) was
detected by the transmitting ?xture’s motion sensor. If the
loop has progressed to step 834 and no zone motion has been
received, then step 820 is reached without further state
changes and the loop continues as described above. If a zone
processing electronics 304 shown in FIG. 3) causes a com
It should be noted that relay Rl will stay ‘on’ while local
motion is being detected. As will be noted below, because
timer T1 is reset to 90 seconds each time local motion is
detected, the lighting ?xture will provide dim illumination for
at least ninety seconds after local motion is detected.
[0062] At step 810, a check is conducted for whether T4 is
greater than 0 seconds. T4 is used as a dwell timer such that a
number of seconds (e.g., 2) can pass before the process 800
resets timer T3 that is used for checking whether the local
motion is sustained in step 812. If T4 is not greater than zero
seconds according to the check at step 810, T3 is reset to equal
motion message has been received during a cycle of the loop
at step 834, then relay R1 is switched on to provide a dim
illumination level (step 836). At step 836, T1 is also reset to