Digi XPress Specifications

DigiRack Plug-ins
™
Version 7.3
Copyright
© 2007 Digidesign, a division of Avid Technology, Inc. All rights
reserved. This guide may not be duplicated in whole or in part
without the express written consent of Digidesign.
AudioSuite, Avid, Avid DNA, Avid Xpress, Digi 002, Digi 002
Rack, Digidesign, Mbox, Mbox 2, Mbox 2 Mini, Mbox Pro,
MultiShell, Pro Tools, Pro Tools|HD, Pro Tools LE, Pro Tools
M-Powered, and RTAS are either trademarks or registered
trademarks of Avid Technology, Inc. in the US and other
countries. All other trademarks contained herein are the
property of their respective owners.
Product features, specifications, system requirements, and
availability are subject to change without notice.
PN 9329-55974-00 REV A 01/07
contents
Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Plug-in Formats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Conventions Used in This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
About www.digidesign.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter 2. Installation and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Installing Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Organizing Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Chapter 3. Working with Real-Time Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Processing Power Requirements of TDM and RTAS Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Delay in Signal Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Plug-ins as Inserts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Inserting Plug-ins on Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
The Plug-in Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Clip Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Using the Side-Chain Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Tempo Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Automating Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Instrument Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
RTAS Plug-ins on Auxiliary Input and Master Fader Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
HTDM Plug-in Conversion to RTAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Contents
iii
Chapter 4. Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
The AudioSuite Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
The AudioSuite Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
AudioSuite Processing Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Using AudioSuite Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Chapter 5. Adjusting Plug-in Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Adjusting Plug-in Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Chapter 6. DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
EQ III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
EQ II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Click . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Dither . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
POW-r Dither . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
D-Verb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Dynamics III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Dynamics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Mod Delay II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Signal Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
SignalTools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
TimeAdjuster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Trim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Chapter 7. DigiRack AudioSuite Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
EQ III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
EQ II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Dynamics III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Dynamics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Flanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Multi-Tap Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Ping-Pong Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Invert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Duplicate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Normalize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Reverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Signal Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
DC Offset Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Time Compression/ Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Pitch Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Time Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Chapter 8. Plug-in Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Using the Librarian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Plug-in Settings Dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
DigiBase and Plug-in Settings Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Chapter 9. Using ReWire with Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
ReWire Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Using ReWire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Tempo and Meter Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Looping Playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Automating ReWire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Contents
v
Appendix A. DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
DSP Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Appendix B. DSP Delays Incurred by TDM Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
chapter 1
Introduction
Plug-ins are special-purpose software components that provide additional signal processing
functionality to Pro Tools®.
The DigiRack™ plug-ins included with
Pro Tools provide a comprehensive suite of digital signal processing effects that include EQ, dynamics, delay, and other essential functions.
References to Pro Tools LE™ in this guide
are usually interchangeable with Pro Tools
M-Powered™ or Pro Tools Academic™, except as noted in the Pro Tools M-Powered
and Academic Getting Started Guides.
Plug-in Formats
There are three formats of plug-ins:
• TDM plug-ins (real-time, DSP-based)
TDM Plug-ins
(Pro Tools HD Only)
TDM (Time Division Multiplexing) plug-ins
function as track inserts, are applied to audio
during playback, and process audio non-destructively in real time. TDM plug-ins are designed for use with Pro Tools HD software on
Pro Tools|HD® systems, and rely on the processing power of Digidesign DSP cards.
The number and variety of TDM plug-ins that
you can use simultaneously in a session are limited only by the amount of DSP available. You
can increase available DSP by installing additional DSP cards (such as HD Core, HD Accel, or
HD Process cards) in your computer. This
power-on-demand aspect is a significant advantage of Pro Tools|HD systems.
• RTAS® plug-ins (real-time, host-based)
• AudioSuite™ plug-ins (non-real-time, filebased processing)
Chapter 1: Introduction
1
RTAS Plug-ins
RTAS (Real-Time AudioSuite) plug-ins provide
features and functionality similar to their TDM
counterparts, but unlike TDM plug-ins, they rely
on and are limited by the processing power of
your computer. The more powerful your computer, the greater the number and variety of
RTAS plug-ins that you can use simultaneously.
Because of this dependence on the CPU or host
processing, the more RTAS plug-ins you use concurrently in a session, the greater the impact it
will have on other aspects of your system’s performance, such as maximum track count, number of available voices, the density of edits possible, and latency in automation and recording.
RTAS plug-ins can be used with Pro Tools HD,
Pro Tools LE™.
AudioSuite Plug-ins
AudioSuite plug-ins are used to process and
modify audio files on disk, rather than nondestructively in real time. Depending on how you
configure a non-real-time AudioSuite plug-in, it
either creates an entirely new audio file, or alters
the original source audio file. Audio-Suite plugins can be used on all Pro Tools systems and
Avid software.
2
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
System Requirements
To use DigiRack plug-ins you need any the following:
• A Digidesign-qualified Pro Tools system
running Pro Tools
• A Digidesign-qualified Pro Tools system
and a third-party software application that
supports the Digidesign TDM, RTAS, or
AudioSuite plug-in standards
• A qualified Avid® Xpress®, Avid Xpress DV,
or Avid DNA™ system (AudioSuite only)
• A qualified Digidesign VENUE system
(TDM only)
For complete system requirements visit the
Digidesign website (www.digidesign.com).
Compatibility Information
Digidesign can only assure compatibility and
provide support for hardware and software it
has tested and approved.
For a list of Digidesign-qualified computers, operating systems, hard drives, and third-party devices, visit the Digidesign website
(www.digidesign.com).
Conventions Used in This
Guide
All Digidesign guides use the following conventions to indicate menu choices and key commands:
:
Convention
Action
File > Save
Choose Save from the
File menu
Control+N
Hold down the Control
key and press the N key
Control-click
Hold down the Control
key and click the mouse
button
Right-click
Click with the right
mouse button
The following symbols are used to highlight important information:
User Tips are helpful hints for getting the
most from your Pro Tools system.
Important Notices include information that
could affect your Pro Tools session data or
the performance of your Pro Tools system.
Shortcuts show you useful keyboard or
mouse shortcuts.
Cross References point to related sections in
this guide and other Digidesign guides.
About www.digidesign.com
The Digidesign website (www.digidesign.com)
is your best online source for information to
help you get the most out of your Pro Tools system. The following are just a few of the services
and features available.
Registration Register your purchase online. See
the registration form included with your system
for instructions.
Support Contact Digidesign Technical Support
or Customer Service; download software updates and the latest online manuals; browse the
Compatibility documents for system requirements; search the online Answerbase or join the
worldwide Pro Tools community on the Digidesign User Conference.
Training and Education Study on your own using
courses available online or find out how you can
learn in a classroom setting at a certified
Pro Tools training center.
Products and Developers Learn about Digidesign
products; download demo software or learn
about our Development Partners and their plugins, applications, and hardware.
News and Events Get the latest news from
Digidesign or sign up for a Pro Tools demo.
To learn more about these and other resources
available from Digidesign, visit our website
(www.digidesign.com).
Chapter 1: Introduction
3
4
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
chapter 2
Installation and Configuration
Installing Plug-ins
Organizing Plug-ins
The Digidesign DigiRack plug-ins are installed
when you install Pro Tools. For more information about installing Pro Tools, see the Getting
Started Guide that came with your system.
You can customize how plug-in lists (plug-in
menus) are organized in the Insert selector and
Plug-in selector.
If installing multiple packages of plug-ins, do so
in the following order:
1 DigiRack plug-ins (installed with Pro Tools).
2 Packs and other bundles included with your
Digidesign system.
3 Any additional plug-ins. Check with the manufacturer of your plug-ins for compatibility information and support.
Plug-ins organized by categories
Plug-ins organized by manufacturer
Use the “Organize Plug-in Menus By” pop-up
menu in the Pro Tools Display Preferences page
to organize plug-in menus in a Flat List (with
plug-ins in alphabetical order), Category, Manufacturer, or Category and Manufacturer.
Chapter 2: Installation and Configuration
5
“Organize Plug-in Menus By” Option
Flat List Organizes plug-ins in a single list, in alphabetical order.
Category Organizes plug-ins by process category
(such as EQ, Dynamics, Effects, and Delay), with
individual plug-ins listed in the category submenus. Plug-ins that do not have a Category defined will appear in the Other Category folder.
Plug-ins can appear in more than one category.
Category and Manufacturer Organizes plug-ins
in two levels of menus. The top menus display
plug-ins by process category (such as EQ, Dynamics, and Delay), with individual plug-ins
listed in the category submenus. The bottom
menus display plug-ins by their manufacturer
(such as Digidesign, Eventide, Line 6, McDSP),
with individual plug-ins listed in the manufacturer submenus.
To select how plug-ins are organized:
Plug-in categories include:
• EQ
• Dynamics
• Pitch Shift
• Reverb
• Delay
1 Open or create a session.
2 Choose Setup > Preferences, and click the Dis-
play tab.
3 Click the “Organize Plug-in Menus By” pop-
up menu, and select one of the view options.
• Modulation
• Harmonic
• Noise Reduction
• Dither
• Sound Field
• Hardware
• Instrument
• Other
• Wrapped Plug-ins
Choosing Category view for plug-in menus
4 Click Done.
The current Organize Plug-in Menus By setting
is saved with Pro Tools preferences (it is not
saved with the Pro Tools session file).
• Effects
Plug-in Favorites
Manufacturer Organizes plug-ins by their manufacturer (such as Digidesign, Eventide, Line 6,
McDSP), with individual plug-ins listed in the
manufacturer submenus. Plug-ins that do not
have a Manufacturer defined will appear in the
“Other” manufacturer folder.
Most Digidesign Development Partner plug-ins
will be sorted as Digidesign when view by manufacturer is enabled.
6
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
To find a plug-in faster, a plug-in can be designated as a favorite. Favorite plug-ins are shown
at the top of the plug-in menu.
When a plug-in becomes a favorite, it is still
shown in plug-in category and/or manufacturer
sub-menus (if enabled) and its name appears in
bold.
Favorite plug-ins
Default Plug-ins
You can set a default EQ plug-in and Dynamics
plug-in, which places them at the top of the Insert selector pop-up menu on-screen, and first in
the list of menu choices when assigning inserts
on ICON worksurfaces.
Default EQ plug-in
Plug-in categories
Default Dynamics
plug-in
Menu display of favorite plug-ins (Category view shown)
To designate a plug-in as a favorite:
Default plug-in display in Insert selector menu
Control-click (Windows) or Command-click
(Mac) on a plug-in Insert button, and select a
plug-in from the menu (or sub-menus, if enabled) to designate it as a favorite.
To set a default plug-in:
■
1 Choose Setup > Preferences and click Mixing.
2 Under Setup, choose a plug-in from the De-
fault EQ or Default Dynamics pop-up menu.
To change the status of a plug-in favorite:
3 Click OK to close the Preferences window.
1 Control-click (Windows) or Command-click
(Mac) on a plug-in Insert button, a nd select a
plug-in favorite that you no longer want to designate as a favorite.
2 When selecting the plug-in favorite to change,
you can select the plug-in from the list of favorites at the top of the plug-in menu, or in its plugin category/manufacturer sub-menu (where the
plug-in appears in bold).
Chapter 2: Installation and Configuration
7
8
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
chapter 3
Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
Real-time plug-ins process audio nondestructively in real time. They do not alter the original
source audio, but only apply their effect during
playback.
There are two formats of real-time plug-ins:
TDM Plug-ins Rely on the processing power of
Digidesign DSP cards. TDM plug-ins run only on
Pro Tools|HD systems.
RTAS Plug-ins Rely on the processing power of
your computer. RTAS plug-ins run on
Pro Tools|HD and LE systems.
You can add more mixing and processing power
to your system by installing additional DSP
cards, provided you have unused PCI (or PCIe)
expansion slots in your computer or use a
Digidesign-approved Expansion Chassis.
The System Usage window (Window > System
Usage) shows how much DSP is available on
your system, and gives an approximation of
how it is currently being used.
For more information on the System Usage
window, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Processing Power
Requirements of TDM and
RTAS Plug-ins
TDM and RTAS plug-ins differ in their processing power requirements.
TDM Plug-ins
Each real-time TDM plug-in that is inserted in a
Pro Tools session uses a portion of your system’s
total available DSP resources.
Since these DSP resources reside on the cards
that make up your particular Pro Tools hardware configuration, the amount of DSP available depends entirely on the number and type
of DSP cards in your system.
System Usage window
See Appendix A, “DSP Requirements for
TDM Plug-ins” for relative numbers of instances of each DigiRack TDM plug-in that
can be powered by a single DSP chip. DSP
capacity differs with card type.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
9
DSP Sharing Between TDM Plug-ins
With Digidesign’s MultiShell™ II technology,
different types of TDM plug-ins can share the
same DSP chip at the same time. This lets you simultaneously use a greater variety of plug-ins by
efficiently managing the DSP available on each
chip in your system.
To take advantage of this capability, plug-ins
must be MultiShell II compatible. All
DigiRack TDM plug-ins with the exception of
Pitch are MultiShell II compatible.
Some third-party plug-ins may not be MultiShell II compatible. To check compatibility,
contact the manufacturer.
RTAS Plug-ins
RTAS plug-ins rely on and are limited by the processing power of your computer’s CPU. The
more RTAS plug-ins you use concurrently in a
session, the greater the impact it will have on
other aspects of your system’s performance,
such as maximum track count, the density of
edits possible, and latency in automation and
recording.
The CPU meter in the System Usage window
(Window > System Usage) shows how much of
your computer’s processing power is currently
being used by Pro Tools, and how much is still
available.
For more information on the System Usage
window, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
10
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Improving RTAS Plug-in
Performance
You can increase the number of RTAS plug-ins
your system can use concurrently by increasing
the Hardware Buffer Size and CPU Usage Limit.
Hardware Buffer Size
The Hardware Buffer Size (H/W Buffer Size) controls the size of the hardware cache used to handle host processing tasks such as monitoring latency and using Real-Time AudioSuite (RTAS)
plug-ins.
◆ Lower Hardware Buffer Size settings reduce
monitoring latency, and are useful when you are
recording live input.
◆ Higher Hardware Buffer Size settings provide
more audio processing and effects, and are useful when you are mixing and using more RTAS
plug-ins.
In addition to causing slower screen response and monitoring latency, higher
Hardware Buffer Size settings can affect the
accuracy of plug-in automation, mute data,
and timing for Instrument or MIDI tracks.
To change the Hardware Buffer Size:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the H/W Buffer Size pop-up menu, select
the audio buffer size, in samples.
3 Click OK.
RTAS Processors
CPU Usage Limit
The RTAS Processors setting determines the
number of processors in your computer allocated for RTAS plug-in processing.
The CPU Usage Limit controls the percentage of
CPU resources allocated to Pro Tools host processing tasks such as RTAS plug-in performance
and screen redraws.
With computers that have multiple processors,
or that feature multi-core processing or hyperthreading, this setting lets you enable multi-processor support for RTAS processes. Used in combination with the CPU Usage Limit setting, the
RTAS Processors setting lets you control the way
RTAS processing and other Pro Tools tasks are
carried out by the system.
A higher number of processors reserves more
CPU processing capacity for RTAS plug-in processing. This is useful for sessions with large
number of RTAS plug-ins.
◆
A lower number of processors leaves more
CPU processing capacity for automation, screen
redraws, and video playback in Pro Tools, or for
other application running at the same time as
Pro Tools.
◆
◆ Lower CPU Usage Limit settings limit the effect of Pro Tools processing on other CPU-intensive tasks, such as screen redraws, and are useful
when you are experiencing slow system response, or when running other applications at
the same time as Pro Tools.
◆ Higher CPU Usage Limit settings allocate
more processing power to Pro Tools, and are
useful for playing back large sessions or using
more real-time plug-ins.
Increasing the CPU Usage Limit may slow
down screen response on slower computers.
To change the CPU Usage Limit:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the CPU Usage Limit pop-up menu, se-
To set the number of RTAS Processors:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
2 From the RTAS Processors pop-up menu, select
the number of available processors you want to
allocate for RTAS plug-in processing.
3 Click OK.
lect the percentage of CPU processing you want
to allocate to Pro Tools. (On dual-processor Mac
computers, this setting controls the allocation
of a single processor.)
3 Click OK.
For more information on the Hardware
Buffer Size and CPU Usage Limit, refer to
the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
11
RTAS Error Suppression
2 Select Ignore Errors During Playback/Record.
You should only enable RTAS error suppression
if you are experiencing frequent RTAS errors
that are interrupting your creative workflow.
When RTAS error suppression is enabled, you
can experience a degradation of audio quality.
However, this may be acceptable in order to
avoid interrupting playback and recording
when working with instrument plug-ins. Be sure
to disable RTAS error suppression when you
need to ensure the highest possible audio quality, such as for the final mix or audio layback.
3 If available, you can also select Minimize Ad-
Enabling Ignore Errors During Playback/Record only suppresses error reporting.
RTAS errors can result in pops and clicks in
the audio during playback and recording. To
avoid this, try increasing the CPU Usage
Limit and the HW Buffer Size, and reduce
the number of RTAS plug-ins in use in the
session.
To enable RTAS error suppression:
1 Choose Setup > Playback Engine.
Playback Engine dialog, Mbox 2 (Mac OS)
12
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
ditional I/O Latency.
4 Click OK.
RTAS Error Suppression Options
Ignore Errors During Playback/Record When enabled, Pro Tools continues to play and record
even if the RTAS processing requirements exceed the selected CPU Usage Limit. This can result in pops and clicks in the audio during playback and recording, but does not stop the
transport.
Minimize Additional I/O Latency When enabled,
any additional latency due to suppressing RTAS
errors during playback and record is minimized
to 128 samples. Suppressing RTAS errors requires at least 128 samples of additional buffering on some systems. If the Minimize Additional I/O Latency option is disabled, the buffer
is half the H/W Buffer Size, or at least 128 samples (which ever is greater). If you are on an
older, slower computer, you may not want to
enable this option since doing so can adversely
affect performance.
The Minimize Additional I/O Latency option is
only available if the Ignore Errors During Playback/Record option is enabled.
This option is only available on Pro Tools systems that require additional buffering for RTAS
error suppression, as follows:
• Windows XP:
• Mbox® 2 Pro
• Digidesign-qualified M-Audio interfaces
with Pro Tools M-Powered or Pro Tools Academic
• Mac OS X:
• Mbox
Delay in Signal Processing
DSP and host-based processing in digital audio
systems incurs signal delay of varying amounts.
Such delays can vary from as short as few samples to as long as several hundred samples, depending on the type of processing applied.
If you have recorded an instrument on multiple
tracks using multiple microphones (a drum kit
for example) and process the different tracks
with different plug-ins, the tracks may go out of
phase. You will then need to compensate for
these delays to avoid phase cancellation problems.
• Mbox 2
• Mbox 2 Pro
• Mbox 2 Mini
• Digi 002® and Digi 002 Rack
• All Pro Tools M-Powered systems
See Appendix B, “DSP Delays Incurred by
TDM Plug-ins” for information on delays
inherent in specific DigiRack TDM plugins. See the Pro Tools Reference Guide for a
guide to calculating DSP-induced delays.
• All Pro Tools Academic systems
Compensating for Delay
RTAS Plug-ins on Auxiliary Inputs or
Master Faders
With Pro Tools HD, RTAS plug-ins can be inserted on Auxiliary Input and Master Fader
tracks, or after TDM plug-ins on any kind of
track.
This can affect voice usage and total latency,
and limitations on inserting or removing plugins during playback. For more information, see
“RTAS Plug-ins on Auxiliary Input and Master
Fader Tracks” on page 27.
Use the following methods, as available, to compensate for processing delay.
Delay Compensation
Use Delay Compensation to automatically calculate and compensate for processing delay. For
more information on Delay Compensation, see
the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Delay Compensation is automatically enabled on Pro Tools LE systems and cannot
be turned off.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
13
TimeAdjuster
You can compensate for TDM or RTAS plug-ininduced delays by using the TimeAdjuster plugin. This plug-in lets you apply a specific number
of samples of delay to the signal path of a
Pro Tools track. TimeAdjuster provides settings
files that apply the correct compensation time
in samples for delay introduced by one or more
plug-ins. See “TimeAdjuster” on page 90 for
more information about the TimeAdjuster plugin.
For information about TimeAdjuster in
Delay Compensation sessions, see the
Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Manual Delay Compensation
You can manually compensate for processing
delay by first calculating the amount of delay on
each track, and then nudging other track’s playlists later or earlier in time. This method is useful
when Delay Compensation is unavailable, or
when you want to conserve resources.
You can also compensate for offsets incurred by processing delays by using the
same plug-ins on all tracks.
Low-Latency Recording with
Instrument Plug-ins
When an Instrument track containing an instrument plug-in (or a MIDI track routing MIDI
data to an instrument plug-in) is record enabled,
Pro Tools automatically suspends delay compensation through the main outputs of the au-
14
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
dio track, Instrument track, or Auxiliary Input
on which the instrument plug-in is inserted. This
allows for latency-free monitoring of the instrument plug-in during recording.
Delay Compensation for instrument plugins works only when all MIDI and audio
connections take place inside of Pro Tools.
For example, Pro Tools does not suspend
delay compensation when you are using ReWire to connect software synthesizers and
samplers.
MIDI and Audio Processing Plug-ins
Some plug-ins, such as Bruno and Reso, process
audio while allowing MIDI data to control processing parameters. When you record enable an
Instrument or MIDI track that is controlling an
Audio processing plug-in, the track the plug-in
is inserted on will go into low-latency mode, effectively making the processed audio play early.
To keep audio time-aligned when using a MIDI
controlled plug-in on an audio track:
■ Start-Control-click (Windows) or CommandControl-click (Mac) the Track Compensation indicator for the audio track to apply delay compensation.
To keep audio time-aligned when using a MIDI
controlled plug-in on an Auxiliary Input:
1 Start-Control-click (Windows) or Command-
Control-click (Mac) the Track Compensation indicator for the Auxiliary Input to bypass delay
compensation.
2 Enter the total system delay into the User Offset field.
Plug-ins as Inserts
Real-time plug-ins are available as in-line inserts
on audio tracks, Auxiliary Inputs, and Master
Faders. A maximum of 5 real-time plug-ins can
be used per track.
When more than one insert is used on a track,
they process the audio in series, each effect being added to the previous one, from top to bottom in the Mix window.
Inserts can be used in two ways:
On Single Tracks An insert can be applied to an
individual audio track or Auxiliary Input using
the Insert selector on that track.
With in-line inserts, you control the level of effect by adjusting the controls of the plug-in.
To record with a plug-in effect, create an Auxiliary Input, insert the desired effect on the Auxiliary Input track, then route the Auxiliary Input
to the audio track to which you want to record.
Alternatively, bounce the audio track with the
plug-in after recording in order to write the effected audio to disk.
Mono, Multi-Mono, and
Multichannel Plug-ins
Plug-ins can be used in mono, multi-mono, or
multichannel formats, depending on the type of
plug-in and whether the destination is a mono
or multichannel track.
In general, when working with stereo and
greater-than-stereo tracks, use multichannel
plug-ins. If a multichannel version of a plug-in
is not available, use a multi-mono version.
As Shared Resources An insert can be used as a
shared resource in a send-and-return arrangement by bussing signals from several tracks to
an Auxiliary Input, and applying the insert to
the Auxiliary Input track. With such an arrangement, you can control the send level for each
track and the overall level of the effect can be
controlled from the Auxiliary Input track.
Plug-in formats
Shared arrangements let you make more efficient use of your system’s processing power.
Pre-Fader Operation
Real-time plug-ins function as pre-fader inserts
(except on Master Fader tracks, where inserts are
post-fader), meaning that their input levels are
not affected by a track’s volume fader.
Real-time plug-ins are pre-fader, but post-disk.
This means that if you record to disk with a
plug-in inserted on the record track, you will
hear the effect of the plug-in, but the effect will
not be recorded to disk.
Mono Plug-ins Used on mono tracks. Some
mono plug-ins (such as Mod Delay) can generate stereo or greater-than-stereo output from a
mono channel. Plug-ins that occur on a track after a stereo plug-in are used in stereo as well.
Multi-Mono Plug-ins Used on stereo or greaterthan-stereo multichannel tracks when a multichannel version of the plug-in is not available.
Multi-mono plug-ins can analyze and process
each channel independently without regard to
each other. Controls for all channels are linked
by default so that you can adjust them in tan-
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
15
dem. You can unlink controls for independent
adjustment using the Master Link button. See
“Linking and Unlinking Controls on MultiMono Plug-ins” on page 21.
To insert a plug-in on a track:
■ Click the Insert selector on the track and select the plug-in that you want to use.
Multi-mono plug-ins, such as dynamicsbased or reverb plug-ins, may not function
as you expect. Use the multichannel version
of a multi-mono plug-in when available.
Multichannel Plug-ins Used on stereo and
greater-than-stereo multichannel tracks. On
greater-than-stereo multichannel tracks, the
controls for all channels are always linked together.
Inserting a plug-in with Plug-ins by Category enabled
click here
Inserting Plug-ins on Tracks
To use a real-time plug-in in a Pro Tools session,
insert it on a track. Before doing so, make sure
the Inserts View is shown in the Mix or Edit window.
Inserting a plug-in (standard view)
To show inserts in the Mix window:
■
You can also drag and drop plug-in settings
files (.tfx) from DigiBase browsers, or Windows Explorer or the Mac Finder, to Inserts
to insert the corresponding plug-in with
those settings.
Choose View > Mix Window > Inserts.
To show inserts in the Edit window:
■
Choose View > Edit Window > Inserts.
Removing an Insert from a Track
To remove an insert from a track:
■
Click the Insert selector and select No Insert.
Removing a plug-in
16
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Configuring Plug-ins During
Playback
You can change, add, or remove real-time plugins and hardware inserts during playback. On
Pro Tools|HD systems, adding or removing
RTAS plug-ins that change voicing assignments
(for example, inserting an RTAS plug-in after a
TDM plug-in) temporarily interrupts playback,
but without stopping the transport.
Plug-in Changes During Record
Changing plug-ins during audio recording is
disallowed so that you don’t inadvertently interrupt audio recording. However, you can make
changes while recording MIDI only.
Moving and Duplicating Inserts
You can move or duplicate an insert by dragging
it to a different position on the same track or a
different track. Inserts that are moved or duplicated retain their original settings and automation.
To move an insert:
■
Drag the insert to a new insert location.
To duplicate an insert:
■ Alt-drag (Windows) or Option-drag (Mac) the
insert to a new insert location. The duplicated
plug-in retains its original settings and automation.
Making Plug-ins Inactive
You can set plug-ins as inactive in order to free
up DSP resources for other plug-ins and processing. When a plug-in is inactive it retains its assignment, position, and related automation
playlists. However, it will not pass audio and
does not consume any DSP or TDM resources.
To toggle a plug-in active or inactive, do one of the
following:
■ Control-Start-click (Windows) or CommandControl-click (Mac) the Insert button.
– or –
■
Make the track inactive.
For more information about making tracks
inactive, refer to the Pro Tools Reference
Guide.
To toggle plug-ins in the same insert position on all
tracks active or inactive:
■ Control-Start-Alt click (Windows) or Command-Control-Option click (Mac) an Insert button in the position you want to toggle.
To toggle plug-ins in the same insert position on all
selected tracks active or inactive:
Moving a plug-in
Dragging an insert on top of an existing insert replaces it.
■ Control-Start-Alt-Shift-click (Windows) or
Command-Control-Option-Shift-click (Mac) an
Insert button in the position you want to toggle.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
17
The Plug-in Window
The Plug-in window appears whenever you click
a plug-in Insert button on a track. This floating
window lets you set the controls of any realtime plug-in insert in use on a track.
Insert button
Insert
selector
Convert Plug-in Selector Lets you convert the insert from a TDM plug-in to an RTAS plug-in of
the same type (or vice-versa). This feature can
only be used on plug-ins that are available in
both TDM and RTAS formats.
Clip LED Lights red to indicate if any meter in a
plug-in has clipped (not available on all plugins). The Plug-in Clip LED follows Pro Tools settings for clip indication (see the Pro Tools Reference Guide for more information).
Settings Menu Lets you copy, paste, save, and
import plug-in settings.
Librarian Menu Recalls settings files saved in the
plug-in’s root settings folder or in the current
session’s Settings folder. See “Using the Librarian” on page 115.
Insert button and selector on track
Settings menu
Compare
Plug-in selector
Track selector
Librarian menu
Automation Safe
Previous Setting
Next Setting
Insert Position
selector
Convert
plug-in
Auto button
Settings
Select
Effect
Bypass
Target
button
Next (+) and Previous (–) Setting Buttons Let
you select the next or previous plug-in setting
from the Librarian menu.
You will lose the current settings if they are
not saved before you use the Next and Previous Setting buttons. Always save your settings to the Librarian menu.
Plug-in window (mono Trim shown)
Track Selector Accesses any non-MIDI track in a
session.
Insert Position Selector Accesses any insert on
the current track.
Plug-in Selector Lets you select any real-time
plug-in installed in the Plug-ins folder (that is
created when you install Pro Tools).
Effect Bypass Button Disables the currently displayed plug-in. This lets you compare the track
with and without the effect.
18
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Plug-ins Settings Select Button Accesses the
Plug-in Settings dialog, which lists the settings
files for the current plug-in. From this list, you
can select a new setting, or audition a series of
settings.
Compare Toggles between the original saved
plug-in setting and any changes you have made
to it so you can compare them.
Auto Lets you enable individual plug-in controls
for automation recording. See “Automating
Plug-ins” on page 24.
Safe When enabled, prevents existing plug-in
automation from being overwritten.
Target Button When multiple Plug-in windows
are open, clicking this button selects that plugin as the target for any computer keyboard commands.
Key Input Selector Lets you select audio on a
particular input or bus and route it to trigger the
plug-in. This menu only appears on plug-ins
that feature side-chain processing. Key inputs
are monophonic.
MIDI Node Display Shows MIDI node information for MIDI-enabled plug-ins. MIDI nodes are
virtual connections from Pro Tools to software
instruments and other MIDI-enabled plug-ins.
MIDI nodes are useful for routing multiple MIDI
tracks to different channels of a single virtual
MIDI device. MIDI node numbers are also displayed in the plug-in header and in a track’s
MIDI Output selector.
Link Enable Buttons Let you selectively link or
unlink the controls of specific channels of a
multi-mono plug-in. Each square represents a
speaker channel. The Master Link button must
be disabled to use the Link Enable buttons. See
“Linking and Unlinking Controls on MultiMono Plug-ins” on page 21.
Channel Selector Accesses a specific channel
within a multichannel track for plug-in control
editing. This menu appears only on multi-mono
plug-ins inserted on tracks with more than one
channel. Shift-clicking this selector opens a separate Plug-in window for each channel of the
multichannel track on which the plug-in is inserted.
Phase Invert Button Inverts the phase polarity of
the input signal on some plug-ins.
Phase Invert
button
LFE Enable
MIDI Node
Midi Node display in a plug-in header (Bruno shown)
Master Link Button When enabled, links the
controls on all channels of a multi-mono plugin so that they can be adjusted in tandem.
Phase Invert
Link Enable buttons
Channel selector Master Link button
Plug-in window (multichannel Compressor/Limiter
shown)
Plug-in window (multi-mono 1-Band EQ shown)
LFE Enable Enables plug-in processing of the
LFE (low frequency effects) channel on a multichannel track formatted for 5.1, 6.1, or 7.1 surround formats on some plug-ins. To disable LFE
processing, deselect this button. For more information on the LFE channel, refer to the Pro Tools
Reference Guide.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
19
Tempo Sync Enables compatible plug-ins to automatically synchronize to the session tempo,
for rhythmic delay, echo, and similar effects. See
“Tempo Sync” on page 23 for more information.
Opening Plug-in Windows
To open a Plug-in window:
Plug-in Window Controls
All plug-ins provide standard Pro Tools controls
for track and insert selection, bypass, and other
controls, in addition to plug-in-specific controls.
To select a different plug-in on the same track:
■ Click the Insert selector and select a plug-in
from the pop-up menu (or Category sub-menu).
■ Click the plug-in button in the Mix or Edit
window channel strip.
By default, each plug-in you open will appear in
the same location as a currently open plug-in,
replacing it in the same window location.
Opening Multiple Plug-in Windows
Pro Tools normally displays a single Plug-in
window from which you can adjust the controls
of any plug-in in a session. You can also open
additional Plug-in windows for specific plug-ins.
Once you begin working with multiple Plug-in
windows, you will need to click the Target button on the plug-in whose controls you want to
adjust using keyboard commands.
Selecting a plug-in from the Plug-in window
To open an additional Plug-in window:
To choose a different track:
■ Shift-click the Insert button for the additional
plug-in.
■ Click the Track selector and choose a track
from the pop-up menu.
To open Plug-in windows for each channel of a
multi-mono plug-in:
■ Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) the
Channel selector in the Plug-in window of the
multi-mono plug-in.
To close all currently open Plug-in windows:
■ Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) the
close box of any currently open Plug-in window.
20
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Choosing a track from the Plug-in window
To choose a different insert:
Click the Insert Position selector and choose
an insert from the pop-up menu.
■
Linking and Unlinking Controls on
Multi-Mono Plug-ins
When a multi-mono plug-in is used on a multichannel track, the controls are normally linked.
Adjusting the Gain control on one channel, for
example, will adjust it for all channels.
If necessary, you can unlink plug-in controls on
specific channels of a track and edit them independently. You can also selectively link the controls of specific channels.
Phase Invert
Choosing an Insert from the Plug-in window
Link Enable buttons
Channel selector Master Link button
Bypassing Plug-ins
To bypass a plug-in, do one of the following:
■
Click the Plug-in window’s Bypass button.
– or –
Control-click (Windows) or Command-click
(Mac) the plug-in’s Insert button in the Mix or
Edit window.
■
When a plug-in insert is bypassed, the Insert selector in the Mix window changes its
color to blue for easy visual reference. If
some, but not all channels of an unlinked
multi-mono plug-in are bypassed, the Insert
selector appears purple.
Plug-in window (multi-mono 1-Band EQ shown)
To unlink controls on a multi-mono plug-in:
■
To access controls for a specific channel:
■
Some channels bypassed (purple)
Bypassed (blue)
Unbypassed (gray)
Deselect the Master Link button.
Select the channel from the Channel selector.
To link the controls of specific channels:
1 Deselect the Master Link button if it is not al-
ready deselected.
Bypass states indicated by color
2 Click the Link Enable buttons for the chan-
nels whose controls you want to link.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
21
Clip Indicators
Using the Side-Chain Input
Many plug-ins provide meters that let you see
when the processed signal is clipping.
The side-chain input is the split-off signal used
by a plug-in's detector to trigger dynamics processing, and is generally drawn internally from
the input signal. However, some plug-ins let you
switch between internal and external side-chain
processing.
In addition to clipping displays that are a part of
a plug-in’s individual interface, some plug-ins
also report the clipping in the plug-in header.
The insert button in the Mix and Edit window
also turns red if a plug-in has clipped.
Clip
LED
Plug-in Clipping indicator in the plug-in header
clipped
A typical use for external side-chain processing
is to control the dynamics of one audio signal
using the dynamics of another signal (the key
input). For example, a kick drum track could be
used to trigger gating of a bass track to tighten it
up, or a rhythm guitar track could be used to
gate a keyboard pad.
Plug-in Clipping indication in the Mix window
Side-Chain Filters
To clear plug-in clipping:
Some plug-ins feature key high-pass and lowpass filters. These controls let you define a specific frequency range in the side-chain signal
with which to trigger the plug-in effect. A common production technique is to use these controls to filter a drum track so that only specific
high frequency sounds (such as a hi-hat) or low
frequency ones (such as a tom or a kick) trigger
the effect.
■
Click the clip LED in the plug-in header
To clear a clip indicator:
■
Click the clip LED in the plug-in header
You can also clear plug-in, send, and, and track
window clip indicators simultaneously.
To clear all clip indicators, do one of the following:
■ Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac)
any meter.
22
With external side-chain processing, a plug-in's
detector is triggered by an external signal (such
as a separate reference track or audio source)
known as the key input.
■
Press Alt-C (Windows) or Option-C (Mac).
■
Choose Track > Clear All Clip Indicators.
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Using a Key Input for External SideChain Processing
To use a key input for external side-chain
processing:
1 Click the plug-in’s Key Input selector and se-
lect the input or bus carrying the audio you
want to use to trigger the plug-in.
Selecting a key input
2 Click External Key to activate external side-
chain processing.
3 Press the Spacebar to begin playback. The
plug-in uses the input or bus that you chose as a
key input to trigger its effect.
4 During playback, do any of the following to
fine-tune side-chain triggering:
• To hear the audio source you have selected
to control the side-chain, enable SideChain Listen or Key Listen (depending on
the plug-in). When finished, disable SideChain Listen/Key Listen to resume normal
plug-in monitoring.
• To filter the side-chain so that only specific
frequencies trigger the plug-in, use the filtering controls (if available) to select the
desired frequency range.
Tempo Sync
Pro Tools provides Tempo Sync to enhance MIDI
Beat Clock support and overall tempo capabilities of plug-ins (such as ReWire client applications) that utilize MIDI Beat Clock.
Tempo Sync provides a direct connection between session tempo and plug-in parameters
that support MIDI Beat Clock. This direct connection lets plug-in parameters such as delay,
auto-pan, and other time-domain effects automatically synchronize to and follow changes in
session tempo.
Tempo Sync simplifies MIDI Beat Clock configuration by making session tempo available to
relevant plug-in parameters directly from
within the plug-in window. For plug-ins that do
not support Tempo Sync, the original MIDI Beat
Clock window (Setup > MIDI > MIDI Beat Clock)
remains available in Pro Tools.
Compatibility and Settings
When opening older sessions that included
plug-ins that subscribe to MIDI Beat Clock,
Tempo Sync will be automatically enabled. Any
plug-ins that used automation for tempo
change should have that automation suspended
or deleted to avoid conflict with Tempo Sync.
Tempo Sync is not available in plug-ins
with which it would limit functionality. For
example, for the Access Music Virus Indigo
and IndigoV40 plug-in, use the Pro Tools
MIDI Beat Clock window (Setup > MIDI >
MIDI Beat Clock). See the Pro Tools Reference Guide for more information.
5 Adjust the plug-in’s Threshold control (if
available) and other controls as needed.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
23
To utilize Tempo Sync:
1 Insert a plug-in that supports Tempo Sync,
such as the DigiRack Mod Delay II.
2 Click the Tempo Sync icon. The tempo shown
will change to match the current session tempo.
Tempo Sync
Tempo Sync icon (Mod Delay II shown)
3 To set a rhythmic delay, click a note value
(whole, half, quarter, eighth, or sixteenth), then
do any of the following to further adjust the
rhythm:
• To enable triplet delay timing, click the 3
button so that it is lit.
• To set a dotted delay value, click to enable
the dotted icon.
• To apply some swing to the delay value, adjust the Groove slider.
Automating Plug-ins
You can automate changes to plug-in controls.
Because Pro Tools creates a separate playlist for
each plug-in control that you automate, you can
later edit and modify each automated control
individually. This lets you to build up complex
automation in stages.
To create automation for a stereo plug-in
with separate controls for each channel,
(such as Mod Delay), record the automation
for one channel, then copy and paste it to
the other channel.
For complete instructions on Pro Tools automation, refer to the Pro Tools Reference
Guide.
Preference Setting to Auto Enable All
Plug-in Parameters
You can configure Pro Tools to enable all parameters for automation when you first assign a
plug-in insert.
To auto-enable all parameters on newly inserted
plug-ins:
1 Choose Setup > Preferences, and click the Mixing tab.
2 In the Automation section, click to select the
Plug-in Controls Default to Auto-Enabled setting.
• When selected, all applicable controls of
newly added plug-ins are enabled for automation.
• When not selected, the controls of newly
added plug-in must be manually enabled
for automation.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Enabling Plug-in Parameters for
Automation
To enable plug-in controls for automation:
1 Open the Plug-in window for the plug-in you
3 Select the controls to automate and click Add.
If there are multiple plug-ins on the same track,
you can select from among these by clicking
their buttons in the Inserts section of this dialog.
want to automate.
2 Do one of the following:
• Click the Automation Enable button in the
Plug-in window.
Plug-in Automation button
Accessing the Plug-in Automation dialog
– or –
• Control-Alt-Start-click (Windows) or Command-Option-Control-click (Mac) the
Track View selector in the Edit window.
You can also Control-Alt-Start-click (Windows) or Command-Option-Control-click
(Mac) any plug-in control in the Plug-in
window, then choose Open Automation Dialog from the pop-up menu.
Plug-in Automation dialog
4 Click OK to close the Plug-in Automation dialog.
As an alternative to using the Plug-in Automation dialog, you can enable individual
plug-in controls directly from the Plug-in
window by Control-Alt-Start-clicking (Windows) or Command-Option-Control-clicking (Mac) the control.
Shortcut for enabling plug-in automation
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
25
To automate a plug-in:
1 In the Automation Enable window, make sure
plug-in automation is enabled.
Record Safing Plug-in Automation
You can protect plug-in automation from being
overwritten by using Automation Safe mode.
To enable plug-in safe mode:
1 Open a plug-in.
Plug--in Automation Enable button
2 Click the Safe button so that it is highlighted.
Safe enabled
Automation Safe enabling a plug-in
To disable plug-in safe mode:
Automation Enable window
2 Select an Automation mode for each track
containing plug-ins you want to automate. For
the initial automation pass, choose Auto Write.
3 Click Play to begin writing automation, and
move the controls you want to automate.
4 When you have finished, click Stop.
After the initial automation pass, you can write
additional automation to the track without
completely erasing the previous pass by choosing Auto Touch mode or Auto Latch mode.
These modes add new automation only when
you actually move the control.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
■ In the Plug-in window, click the Safe button
so that it is unhighlighted.
Instrument Plug-ins
Instrument plug-ins are unique from other plugins in that they generate audio by synthesis or
sample playback, and are controlled by MIDI.
Typically, plug-in instruments are inserted on
Instrument tracks.
You can also insert plug-in instruments on Auxiliary Input tracks and control them with an additional MIDI track. In some cases you may
want to insert and instrument plug-in on and
instrument track, assign any additional audio
outputs in may have to additional Auxiliary Input tracks, and control it from not only the Instrument track on which it is inserted, but also
from multiple MIDI tracks (for example, if you
are using a multiple output–capable drum machine plug-in).
For more information on Instrument tracks,
see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Multiple Outputs for Instrument
Plug-ins
You can route the output of an instrument plugin to the main track outputs and to individual
track inputs on other tracks. This lets you route
multiple samples or synth sounds through separate outputs for individual processing.
For specific information about using multiple plug-in outputs with third-party plugins, consult the documentation from the
plug-in manufacturer.
Main and Auxiliary Plug-in Outputs
When a plug-in that has both main and auxiliary outputs is inserted on a track, the plug-in’s
main outputs are routed through the track that
the plug-in is inserted on, and the plug-in’s auxiliary mono or stereo outputs are available in the
track input pop-up menu on other tracks.
If none of the inserted plug-ins has auxiliary
outputs, the plug-in category in the track input pop-up menu is grayed out.
RTAS Plug-ins on Auxiliary
Input and Master Fader Tracks
(Pro Tools HD Only)
In Pro Tools HD, RTAS plug-ins can be inserted
on Auxiliary Input and Master Fader tracks, or
after TDM plug-ins on any kind of track.
While HTDM plug-ins have a fixed buffer
size, latency caused by RTAS plug-ins is adjustable via the HW Buffer Size setting in
the Playback Engine dialog. For more information, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
When you use a previous version of
Pro Tools to open a session originally created in Pro Tools 7.0, any RTAS plug-ins
inserted on Auxiliary Input or Master Fader
tracks—or after TDM plug-ins on any kind
of track—are made inactive.
This also affects the following RTAS-related behavior in Pro Tools:
• Voice usage and total latency for RTAS
plug-ins
• Limitations on inserting or removing plugins during playback
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
27
Voice Usage and Total Latency for
RTAS Plug-ins
Ordering RTAS and TDM Plug-ins on an
Audio Track
With Pro Tools HD, the initial insert of an RTAS
plug-in may cause additional latency, and will
take up two additional voices per channel
(1 voice for input and 1 voice for output) in the
following conditions:
With Pro Tools HD, when RTAS and TDM plugins are combined on an audio track, the order in
which they are inserted has different results:
• When inserted on an Auxiliary Input or
Master Fader track
• When inserted on an Instrument track that
does not contain an instrument plug-in
• When inserted after a TDM plug-in on any
kind of track
For example, the initial insert of an RTAS plugin on a mono Auxiliary Input track uses two
voices (one channel with two voices), while the
initial insert of that plug-in on a stereo Auxiliary
Input track uses four voices (two channels with
two voices each).
Subsequent RTAS plug-ins on the same track do
not take up additional voices unless a TDM
plug-in is inserted between other RTAS plug-ins.
Avoid inserting TDM plug-ins between
RTAS plug-ins on any kind of track—this
causes unnecessary voice usage and may
cause additional latency.
Furthermore, one additional voice is used for
each occurrence of any of the following conditions when using voices for RTAS plug-ins on a
track:
• When you use an external side-chain for an
RTAS plug-in on that track
• When you select multiple outputs for that
track (one voice used for each output)
• When you select an AFL/PFL Path output
in the Output tab of the I/O Setup dialog
(one voice used for each channel)
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
RTAS Plug-ins Grouped Before TDM Plug-ins No
additional voices will be used, and no processing latency will occur. RTAS plug-ins will be bypassed when Record Enable or TrackInput monitoring is enabled for that track.
TDM Plug-ins Grouped Before RTAS Plug-ins Each
initial insert of an RTAS plug-in after a TDM
plug-in will cause processing latency, and will
use voices as described in “Voice Usage and Total Latency for RTAS Plug-ins” on page 28. RTAS
plug-ins will stay active while Record Enable or
TrackInput monitoring is enabled for that track.
As a rule, always group plug-ins of the same
type together, especially if inserting RTAS
after TDM plug-ins. Otherwise, additional
voices may be unnecessarily used, and unnecessary latency may result.
Ordering Recommendations
When combining RTAS and TDM plug-ins on
an audio track, use one of the following two
strategies based on your recording needs:
• To ensure that RTAS plug-ins stay active when
you record enable a track or use TrackInput
monitoring, group all TDM plug-ins before
RTAS plug-ins.
– or –
• To conserve voices and minimize processing
latency, group all RTAS plug-ins before TDM
plug-ins.
Limitations for Inserting or
Removing Plug-ins During
Playback
When playing back tracks containing RTAS
plug-ins, the following limitations on inserting
or removing plug-ins apply:
• Inserting RTAS and TDM plug-ins on or removing from Auxiliary Input, Master
Fader, or Instrument tracks temporarily interrupts playback, but without stopping
the transport.
• Inserting an RTAS plug-in after a TDM
plug-in on an audio track, or removing an
RTAS plug-in from an audio track if it
comes after a TDM plug-in, temporarily interrupts playback, but without stopping
the transport.
• Inserting a TDM plug-in before an RTAS
plug-in on an audio track, or removing a
TDM plug-in from an audio track if it
comes before an RTAS plug-in, temporarily
interrupts playback, but without stopping
the transport.
HTDM Plug-in Conversion to
RTAS
When you use Pro Tools 7.0 or higher to open a
session that was last saved in a version of
Pro Tools prior to 7.0, most HTDM plug-ins will
be automatically converted to their RTAS counterparts.
However, in rare cases as with some third-party
plug-ins, these plug-ins will not automatically
convert to RTAS and display as inactive. This
means that the plug-in either has not been configured for automatic conversion or that no
RTAS version is available.
In such cases, you must manually convert each
individual HTDM plug-in to its RTAS counterpart by selecting it’s RTAS version from the Insert selector or the Convert Plug-in pop-up
menu. If an RTAS version is not available, the
HTDM version will remain inactive.
When HTDM plug-ins are converted to
RTAS, any RTAS plug-ins that precede
TDM plug-ins on audio tracks will be bypassed if you enable Record Enable or
TrackInput monitoring on that track. See
“Ordering RTAS and TDM Plug-ins on an
Audio Track” on page 28 for details.
Chapter 3: Working with Real-Time Plug-ins
29
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
chapter 4
Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins
AudioSuite plug-ins differ from TDM and RTAS
plug-ins in that they are used to process and
modify audio files on disk rather than nondestructively in real time. Depending on how you
configure a non-real-time AudioSuite plug-in, it
will either alter the original source audio file or
create an entirely new audio source file.
Compressor/Limiter III Processes audio with
compression, or limiting.
Chorus Processes audio with chorusing.
Flanger Processes audio with flanging.
Expander/Gate III Processes audio with expander-gating.
The AudioSuite Menu
De-esser III Processes audio with de-essing to remove sibilance.
AudioSuite plug-ins are accessed through the
AudioSuite menu.
Duplicate Creates a new, continuous source audio file (and region) from the selection.
Plug-ins can be organized in the AudioSuite
menu in Pro Tools by Flat List (with plug-ins in
alphabetical order), Category, Manufacturer, or
Category and Manufacturer.
Delay Adds up to 10.9 seconds of delay.
For more information, see “Organizing
Plug-ins” on page 5.
AudioSuite Plug-ins
1-Band EQ III Processes audio with selectable EQ
filters in a 1-band module.
2–4 Band EQ III Processes audio with two, three,
or four selectable EQ filters.
Multi-Tap Delay Adds up to four independentlycontrollable delays to the original audio signal.
Normalize Uniformly adjusts all levels in a region or regions to a user-definable level, using
the loudest peak in the audio file as the reference.
Ping-Pong Delay Adds a stereo, ping-pong delay
to the audio signal by feeding back the original
signal to its opposite channel.
Gain Adjusts gain (volume) change, in decibels
or percentage before clip.
7-Band EQ III Processes audio with up to seven
selectable EQ filters.
Invert Inverts phase (polarity).
Click Creates an audio click as a tempo reference
for performing and recording.
Pitch Shift Changes an audio file’s pitch with or
without changing its duration.
Chapter 4: Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins
31
Reverse Rewrites selected audio in reverse.
Plug-in Selector
DC Offset Removal Recognizes and removes DC
offset from audio files.
From this menu you can select any AudioSuite
plug-in installed in your Plug-ins folder. (The
Plug-in selector follows the Pro Tools preference
for Organize Plug-ins Menu By.)
Signal Generator Generates audio tones for
equipment calibration purposes.
Time Compression/Expansion Changes an audio
file’s duration without changing its pitch.
Time Shift Changes an audio file’s duration and
pitch independently or together (Varispeed).
The AudioSuite Window
Plug-in selector menu (flat list, non-category view)
When you choose a plug-in from the
AudioSuite menu, the AudioSuite window appears. From this floating window you can access
and edit the controls for any non-real-time AudioSuite plug-in.
Selection Reference
Settings menu
Previous
Setting
Librarian menu
File Mode selector
Next
Setting
Bypass
button
Stereo Processing Mode button
Use in Playlist button
Plug-in
selector
Preview
button
Selection
Reference
Process
Mode
Settings
Select
Process
button
This menu aims the selected process at either regions selected in an audio track or playlist, or at
regions selected in the Audio Regions List.
When you select a region on-screen (in either a
track/playlist or the Region List) Pro Tools normally selects both occurrences of the region.
Since you may not want to process both, this
menu provides a convenient means of limiting
the AudioSuite process to regions selected in
one or the other.
Playlist Applies AudioSuite processing only to
regions currently selected in tracks/playlists in
the Edit window. Processing will not be applied
to regions in the Audio Regions List.
AudioSuite window
Selection Reference pop-up menu (Invert plug-in shown)
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Region List Applies AudioSuite processing only
to regions currently selected in the Audio Regions List. Processing will not be applied to regions located in tracks and playlists in the Edit
window.
If the Use In Playlist option is enabled in
addition to Region List being selected in the
Selection Reference pop-up menu, the processing will be applied to the selected region
in both the playlist and the Regions List.
Use In Playlist Button
This button determines whether the AudioSuite
plug-in will replace all instances of the selected
regions everywhere in the session, or only the
occurrences of the regions that are currently selected.
Use In Playlist On, Reference = Playlist When
Use in Playlist is enabled and the Selection Reference menu is set to Playlist, only regions selected in tracks in the Edit window will be replaced. If the session includes other copies of
the region used in other playlists, those copies
of the original, unprocessed region will not be
replaced.
If the Selection Reference pop-up menu is set
to Region List, the Use in Playlist button
will automatically be disabled to ensure
that you do not accidentally replace every
occurrence of the region in a session.
File Mode Selector
This menu lets you select whether or not the AudioSuite plug-in will process the selected audio
destructively or nondestructively, and how the
original files will be modified.
Use in Playlist button
Use In Playlist Off When Use in Playlist is disabled, a new, processed version of the selected
region will be added to the Regions List. No original regions will be replaced or overwritten anywhere in the session.
Use In Playlist On, Reference = Region
List When Use in Playlist is enabled and the Selection Reference pop-up menu is set to Regions
List, all copies of the selected region will be replaced everywhere in the session.
File Mode pop-up menu (Invert plug-in shown)
There are three options:
Overwrite Files Processes the selected regions destructively, overwriting the original audio. Not
all AudioSuite plug-ins can be used destructively.
Create Individual Files Processes the selected regions nondestructively, creating a new audio
file for each region. The new audio files are
added to the session, leaving the original source
audio files in the Regions List unchanged.
(Whether the processed audio is added to the
current playlist or only to the Regions List, is determined by the Selection Reference setting, as
explained earlier.)
Chapter 4: Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins
33
Create Continuous File Processes the selected regions nondestructively and creates a new audio
file consisting of the selected regions consolidated into a single, unbroken region. This mode
is particularly useful if you are assembling a
composite track from multiple takes. This mode
is not available when the Selection Reference is
set to Region List.
The Create Continuous File option is not
available with some time domain plug-ins.
To achieve a similar result, use the Duplicate plug-in to consolidate regions processed
with these plug-ins.
Chan/Track Process Mode Selector
If you have made a selection that includes regions from multiple tracks, the Normalize
AudioSuite plug-in (as well as some third-party
AudioSuite plug-ins) lets you choose whether
you want to perform processing on a channelby-channel/track-by-track, or an all-channel/all-tracks basis using the Chan/Track Process
Mode selector.
Process Mode Selector
If you have made a selection that includes multiple regions, this pop-up menu lets you specify
whether AudioSuite processing is performed on
a region-by-region, or entire-selection basis.
Process Mode selector (Invert plug-in shown)
Region by Region Analyzes each region in a selection individually, rather than over the entire
multi-region selection as a whole.
Entire Selection Uses the entire selection for
analysis. All regions will be analyzed and processed relative to the entire selection.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Chan/Track Process Mode selector pop-up menu
(Normalize plug-in shown)
Peak On Each Chan/Track Analyzes and processes each selected track individually. If you apply the Normalize plug-in to multiple tracks or a
multichannel track in Peak On Each Chan/Track
mode, each channel or track will be normalized
independently, without regard to the other selected tracks.
Peak On All Chans/Tracks Uses all currently selected channels and tracks for analysis. If you
apply the Normalize plug-in to a multichannel
track or multiple tracks in Peak On All
Chans/Tracks mode, the tracks will be analyzed
as a single entity and regions will be normalized
relative to the averaged peak level within all selected channels and tracks.
Preview
Bypass
The Preview button lets you audition the effect
of a plug-in before you process the audio. By adjusting the plug-in controls while you listen to
this audio preview, you can fine-tune the effect.
Not all AudioSuite plug-ins support this feature.
When Bypass is enabled, the selected audio is
auditioned without AudioSuite processing. The
Bypass button applies only to previewing. It
does not affect actual AudioSuite processing.
The Preview function routes audio to the specific outputs you have chosen with the Audition
pop-up menu in the Outputs page of the
I/O Setup dialog. Make sure you have configured this option correctly for your system or you
may not be able to hear previewed audio.
For more information on using the I/O
Setup dialog to configure your system’s audio outputs, refer to the Pro Tools Reference
Guide.
Before you use Preview, be aware that:
The performance of the Preview function depends on the speed of your CPU. Faster computers preview AudioSuite effects better than slower
computers.
Process
Clicking this button begins AudioSuite processing of the selected audio. Processing can occur
during playback (though it may take slightly
longer). Processed files are auto-named with the
region or audio file’s name plus an acronym for
the chosen AudioSuite process.
New files are written to the hard disk specified
for that track in the Disk Allocation dialog, or to
the same drive as the original file if the region is
not currently on a track. See “Auto-File Naming
of AudioSuite-Processed Audio” on page 36.
◆
Regardless of how many tracks and regions
are currently selected, the Preview button will
audition only the first selected stereo track or
the first selected pair of mono tracks.
◆
If you are using Region-by-Region processing
mode, the Preview function will preview only
the first region within a multi-region selection.
To hear all selected regions, temporarily select
Create Continuous File from the File Mode
menu before previewing.
◆
Multichannel Processing
Most DigiRack AudioSuite plug-ins can process
up to 48 channels of audio simultaneously.
When processing multiple regions of different formats (mono and multichannel surround, for example), all channels will be
processed according to the channel format
of the AudioSuite plug-in. Mono AudioSuite
plug-ins can process stereo regions and stereo AudioSuite plug-ins can process mono
regions.
The Preview function is affected by the
AudioSuite Buffer Size option (on the Processing
page of the Pro Tools Preferences dialog). See
“AudioSuite Processing Preferences” on page 37.
◆
Chapter 4: Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins
35
Undoing AudioSuite Processing
Other AudioSuite Controls
If you have processed an audio selection nondestructively, the Undo and Redo commands let
you undo the selected AudioSuite process. You
can undo or redo an AudioSuite process during
audio playback.
In addition to the standard AudioSuite controls,
there are a number of special-purpose controls
found on certain plug-ins:
Undo is not available when a plug-in is configured for destructive editing since the process has already overwritten the source audio file.
Auto-File Naming of AudioSuiteProcessed Audio
When new audio files are created as a result of
AudioSuite processing, Pro Tools will auto-name
these files according to the type of plug-in used.
The name of the region determines the prefix,
while the type of AudioSuite plug-in determines
the suffix.
Auto file-naming follows these rules:
◆ New regions are named beginning with the
region name, followed by an abbreviation of the
current AudioSuite process, followed by standard Pro Tools file and region numbering.
◆ If a plug-in’s File Mode pop-up is set to Overwrite, the original region’s name will not be
changed.
◆ If a plug-in’s File Mode pop-up is set to Create
Individual Files, the resulting regions will have
an abbreviated version of the plug-in name appended to them.
Plug-in Librarian and Settings Menus
The Settings and Librarian pop-up menus that
appear in some AudioSuite plug-ins provide a
means of saving, loading, copying, pasting and
organizing custom plug-in settings files. See
“Using the Librarian” on page 115.
Analyze Button
This button analyzes a selection without actually processing it. On the DigiRack Gain plug-in,
you can use the Analyze feature to determine
the maximum peak level on a track at a specific
gain value before you process the audio.
Key Input Selector
Selects a track/bus to be used to trigger processing. In order to use this feature, the key input
source audio must occur at the same time as the
target audio. Side-chain input is monophonic.
See “Using the Side-Chain Input” on page 22.
Side-chain inputs for plug-ins have no effect
on AudioSuite processes when the Selection
Reference is set to Region List.
Channel Mode Button
The Channel Mode button lets you process contiguous channels within a selected region as
though they were mono or stereo tracks (and in
some cases greater-than-stereo tracks), regardless of the type of tracks they occupy.
Mono Mode Processes each contiguous channel
within a selected region as a separate mono
track. For example, a region comprised of six
mono tracks would be processed as six mono
tracks.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Stereo Mode Processes each contiguous pair of
channels within a selected region as a stereo
track. When applied to an odd number of channels, the plug-in processes the last odd, unpaired channel as mono, using the left channel
settings of the stereo plug-in. If you want the
last track to be processed in stereo, you must select an additional track to pair it with—an
empty one if necessary.
For example, a region comprised of two mono
tracks would be processed as a stereo track, with
the first mono track processed as the left channel and the second mono track processed as the
right channel.
AudioSuite Processing
Preferences
Before you begin using AudioSuite plug-ins, use
the Preferences dialog (Setup > Preferences >
Processing) to configure default AudioSuite options according to your needs. These options include the default dither setting, a dither on/off
checkbox and the AudioSuite buffer size option,
as well as TC/E options.
Multi Mode Processes each set of three or more
contiguous channels within a selected region as
a multichannel greater-than-stereo track, with
the number of selected channels determining
the type of track. For example, five contiguously-selected channels would be processed as a
5.0 track, while seven contiguously-selected
channels will be processed as a 7.1 track.
Multi mode is available only for certain
plug-ins, such as Dynamics III.
Processing Preferences page
AudioSuite
Buffer Size Selects the size of Pro Tools memory
buffer for processing and previewing AudioSuite
plug-ins. Choices are Mini, Small, Medium,
Large, or Jumbo. In general, choosing a smaller
buffer speeds up AudioSuite previewing functions. Choosing a larger buffer speeds up AudioSuite processing of audio files.
Chapter 4: Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins
37
To configure the AudioSuite Buffer Size:
TC/E
1 Choose Setup > Preferences.
The TC/E section lets you choose the plug-in
used for AudioSuite time compression and expansion processing, as well as its default settings.
2 Click Processing.
3 Select an AudioSuite Buffer Size.
Though the default setting will work well for
most situations, you may want to set the buffer
according to your current task. Before you audition an AudioSuite plug-in, set this buffer to
Mini or Small. Then, when you are ready to process a file, reset it to Large or Jumbo.
4 Click Done.
Use AudioSuite Dither When selected, dither is
applied during certain AudioSuite processes
(such as Normalize and Gain), using the dither
algorithm selected in the Dither Plug-in pop-up
menu. Dither is most useful when working with
low-level files that contain a fade in or fade out.
Dither Plug-in AudioSuite plug-ins always create
files that inherit the session’s bit depth. With
the Dither Plug-in pop-up menu you can choose
the dither algorithm used for dithering higherbit source files during AudioSuite processing.
Settings Accesses options for the currently selected Default Dither plug-in. In the case of the
Digidesign Dither plug-in, this lets you to turn
noise shaping on or off.
See “Noise Shaping” on page 60 for more
information.
Bit Depth Selects the default bit depth used by
the dither function during AudioSuite processing. Bit depth can be set to 16-, 18-, 20-, or 24bit.
For an explanation of dither, See “Dither”
on page 59.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
TC/E Plug-in Selects the Time Compression/Expansion plug-in and default settings used when
editing with the TCE Trim tool. If you own a
compatible third-party time compression and
expansion plug-in, you have the option of using
it for Pro Tools time compression and expansion processes by selecting it here.
Default Settings Selects the settings used by the
selected AudioSuite TC/E plug-in.
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
more information about the Time Compression/Expansion Trim tool.
Using AudioSuite Plug-ins
AudioSuite plug-ins can be applied to whole regions, partial regions, or selections that are
made up of whole and partial regions across one
or more tracks.
When audio selected in the Edit window includes partial regions, the regions will automatically be split into two or more regions when
they are processed. Processing will occur only
on the selection, leaving other regions unchanged.
Processing a locked region will cause the region to become unlocked, and processing a
muted region will cause it to become unmuted. For more information on locked and
muted regions, refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Only audio files on locally connected hard
drives can be processed with AudioSuite plugins. You cannot process audio files on remote
hard drives over a network (unless it is a Unity
network).
Selecting Tracks for AudioSuite
Processing
Because AudioSuite processes are performed on
the specific regions that you select, it is important that you select only those regions, or parts
of regions, you actually want to process.
Selecting a region in the Audio Regions List will
automatically select it in a track (if it currently
resides on one). This is the default behavior for
Pro Tools. However, you can change this using
the Region Selection Follows Track Selection, or
Track Selection Follows Regions List Selection
options in the Editing page of the Preferences dialog. Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for an
explanation of these Preferences.
When processing a single audio channel
with an AudioSuite plug-in, make sure that
the plug-in is set to Mono mode, if available.
Selecting Tracks for Delay or Reverb
Processing
Because some AudioSuite effects such as delay
and reverb add additional material to the end of
the selected audio, it is important that you make
a selection that is longer than the original source
material so that the plug-in can write it to the
audio file. If you select only the original material, without leaving additional space at the end,
any reverb decay or delay that occurs after the
end of the region will be cut off.
To compensate for this, place the region in a
track and select the desired audio plus an
amount of blank space at the end of the region
equal to the amount of delay or reverb decay
that you have added in the plug-in. The plug-in
will then have space at the end of the region in
which to write the final delay or decay. If you select more blank space than you need, you can
remove it using the Trimmer tool after applying
AudioSuite processing.
To process audio with an AudioSuite plug-in:
1 Do one of the following:
• Make an Edit selection of the audio you
want to process.
– or –
• Select audio regions in the Region List that
you want to process.
2 Choose an AudioSuite plug-in from the
AudioSuite menu.
Chapter 4: Working with AudioSuite Plug-ins
39
3 Adjust the plug-in controls for the effect you
want. These settings determine how the file is
processed and what effect the processing has on
the original regions.
Follow these guidelines:
• To process the selected region only in the
track in which it appears, select Playlist
from the Selection Reference pop-up. Alternatively, if you want to process the selected
region in the Audio Regions list only,
choose Region List from this pop-up.
• If you want to process and update every occurrence of the selected region throughout
your session, enable the Use In Playlist button (and also select Region List from the Selection Reference pop-up). Alternatively, if
you do not want to update every occurrence of the selected region, deselect the
Use In Playlist button.
• To configure the plug-in for destructive
processing, select Overwrite Files from the
File Mode pop-up menu. This will overwrite and permanently modify the original
source audio files.
• Alternatively, to configure the plug-in for
nondestructive processing, select Create
Individual Files from the File Mode pop-up
menu. This will create new audio files that
have been processed with the AudioSuite
Plug-in and leave the original source audio
files untouched.
• If you have selected multiple regions for
processing and want to create a new file
that connects and consolidates all of these
regions together, select Create Continuous
File from the File Mode pop-up menu.
4 Click the Preview button to begin audition
processing of the selected material.
40
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
5 Make further adjustment to the plug-in pa-
rameters based if necessary.
6 When you are satisfied with the Preview re-
sults, click the Process button.
The selected audio is processed according to the
settings you have specified. Pro Tools appends
an acronym to the region’s name indicating the
AudioSuite process that has been applied. The
new audio files then appear in your session.
Using AudioSuite Plug-ins in
Stereo
Some AudioSuite plug-ins can be used in either
mono or stereo. If you plan to use them in stereo, be aware of the following:
◆ To process a mono track and obtain a stereo
result, select the desired track or region plus an
empty track or region. Then set the plug-in to
Stereo mode and select the Sum Inputs button
(if present) to center the dry signal. When you
process the audio, the result will be two tracks or
regions that represent the right and left channels of the processed audio. You should then
pan these tracks hard right and hard left in your
mix.
◆ If you set a plug-in to Stereo mode, then select
an odd number of Pro Tools tracks for processing (as opposed to an even number), the plug-in
will process the selected tracks in pairs, in stereo.
However, the last odd, unpaired track will be
processed as mono, using the left channel settings of the stereo plug-in. If you want the last
track to be processed in stereo, you must select
an additional track to pair it with—an empty
one if necessary.
For more information, see “Channel Mode
Button” on page 36.
chapter 5
Adjusting Plug-in Controls
Adjusting Plug-in Controls
You can adjust plug-in controls by dragging the
control’s slider or knob, or by typing a value into
the control’s text box. Additionally, some plugins have switches that can be enabled by clicking on them.
To adjust a plug-in control:
1 Begin audio playback so that you can hear the
control changes in real time.
Editing Parameters Using a Mouse
You can adjust rotary controls by dragging horizontally or vertically. Parameter values increase
as you drag upward or to the right, and decrease
as you drag downward or to the left.
Keyboard Shortcuts
◆ For finer adjustments, Control-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac) the control.
2 Adjust the controls of the plug-in for the effect
◆ To return a control to its default value, Altclick (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) the control.
you want. Refer to “Editing Parameters Using a
Mouse” on page 41 and “Editing Parameters Using a Computer Keyboard” on page 41.
Editing Parameters Using a Computer
Keyboard
Closing the plug-in will save the most recent
changes.
Plug-in controls of similar category (such as
EQ or Dynamics plug-ins) can follow track
groups. See the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
more information.
Some controls have text boxes that display the
current value of the parameter. You can edit the
numeric value of a parameter with your computer keyboard.
If multiple Plug-in windows are open, Tab and
keyboard entry remain focused on the plug-in
that is the target window.
Chapter 5: Adjusting Plug-in Controls
41
To change control values with a computer
keyboard:
1 Click the text box corresponding to the control that you want to adjust.
2 Change the value by doing one of the following:
Some controls have text boxes that display the
current value of the parameter. You can edit the
numeric value of a parameter using a scroll
wheel.
• To increase a value, press the Up Arrow on
your keyboard. To decrease a value, press
the Down Arrow on your keyboard.
To change control values using a scroll wheel:
– or –
trol that you want to adjust.
• Type the desired value.
2 To increase a value, scroll up with the scroll
In fields that support values in kilohertz,
typing “k” after a number value will multiply the value by 1,000. For example, type
“8k” to enter a value of 8,000.
3 Do one of the following:
• Press Enter on the numeric keyboard to input the value and remain in keyboard editing mode.
– or –
• Press Enter on the alpha keyboard (Windows) or Return (Mac) to enter the value
and leave keyboard editing mode.
To move forward through the different control fields, press the Tab key. To move backward, press Shift+Tab.
42
Editing Parameters Using a Scroll
Wheel
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
1 Click the text box corresponding to the con-
wheel. To decrease a value, scroll down with the
scroll wheel.
Toggling Switches
To toggle a switch:
■
Click the switch.
Groups and Linked Plug-in Controls
(Pro Tools HD Only)
Plug-ins can follow Pro Tools Groups (Mix, Edit,
or Mix/Edit) for linked control of multiple inserts. For more information, see the Pro Tools
Reference Guide.
chapter 6
DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
EQ III
The EQ III Plug-in provides a high-quality
7 Band, 2–4 Band, or 1 Band EQ for adjusting
the frequency spectrum of audio material.
EQ III is available in the following formats:
• 7 Band: TDM, RTAS, AudioSuite
• 2–4 Band: TDM and RTAS only
• 1 Band: TDM, RTAS, AudioSuite
EQ III supports all Pro Tools session sample
rates: 192 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 96 kHz, 88.2 kHz,
48 kHz, and 44.1 kHz. EQ III operates as a mono
or multi-mono plug-in only. Stereo and multichannel tracks are supported through multimono operation.
EQ III can be operated from the following control surfaces:
EQ III has a Frequency Graph display that shows
the response curve for the current EQ settings
on a two-dimensional graph of frequency and
gain. The frequency graph display also lets you
modify frequency, gain and Q settings for individual EQ bands by dragging their corresponding points in the graph.
By choosing from the 7 Band, 2–4 Band, or
1 Band versions of the EQ III plug-in, you can
use only the number of EQ bands you need for
each track, conserving DSP capacity on
Pro Tools|HD systems.
EQ III Configurations
The EQ III Plug-in appears as three separate
choices in the plug-in insert pop-up menu and
in the AudioSuite menu:
7 Band (“7-Band EQ 3”)
• Digidesign D-Control
2–4 Band (“4-Band EQ 3”)
• Digidesign ProControl
1 Band (“1-Band EQ 3”)
• Digidesign Control|24
• Digidesign 002
• Digidesign Command|8
• Mackie HUI-compatible controllers
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
43
7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ
The 7 Band EQ is available in TDM, RTAS, and
AudioSuite formats. The 2–4 Band EQ is available in TDM and RTAS formats only.
The 7 Band EQ and the 2–4 Band EQ share the
same window and identical controls, but with
the 2–4 Band EQ, a limited number of the seven
available bands can be active at the same time.
EQ III Controls
Adjusting EQ III Controls
You can adjust the EQ III plug-in controls by
any of the following methods:
Dragging Plug-in Controls
The rotary controls on the EQ III Plug-in can be
adjusted by dragging over them horizontally or
vertically. Dragging up or to the right increments the control. Dragging down or to the left
decrements the control.
Dragging a plug-in control
Typing Control Values
7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ window
1 Band EQ
You can enter control values directly by clicking
in the corresponding text box, typing a value,
and pressing Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac).
The 1 Band EQ is available in TDM, RTAS, and
AudioSuite formats.
The 1 Band EQ has its own window, with six selectable filter types.
Typing a control value
Inverting Filter Gain
(Peak EQ Bands Only)
1 Band EQ window
44
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Gain values can be inverted on any Peak EQ
band by Shift-clicking its control dot in the Frequency Graph display, or its Gain knob in the
plug-in window. This changes a gain boost to a
cut (+9 to –9) or a gain cut to a boost (–9 to +9).
Gain values cannot be inverted on Notch, HighPass, Low-Pass, or shelving bands.
Dragging in the Frequency Graph Display
Using Band-Pass Mode
You can adjust the following by dragging the
control points directly in the Frequency Graph
display:
You can temporarily set any EQ III control to
Band-Pass monitoring mode. Band-Pass mode
cuts monitoring frequencies above and below
the Frequency setting, leaving a narrow band of
mid-range frequencies. It is especially useful for
adjusting limited bandwidth in order to solo
and fine-tune each individual filter before reverting the control to notch filter or peaking filter type operations.
Frequency Dragging a control point to the right
increases the Frequency setting. Dragging a control point to the left decreases the Frequency setting.
Gain Dragging a control point up increases the
Gain setting. Dragging a control point down decreases the Gain setting.
Q Start-dragging (Windows) or Control-dragging (Mac) a control point up increases the Q
setting. Start-dragging (Windows) or Controldragging (Mac) a control point down decreases
the Q setting.
Band-Pass mode does not affect EQ III Gain
controls.
To switch an EQ III control to Band-Pass mode:
• Hold Start+Shift (Windows) or Control+Shift
(Mac), and drag any rotary control or control
point horizontally or vertically.
EQ III interactive graph displaying Band-Pass mode
Dragging a control point in the Frequency Graph display
Adjusting Controls with Fine Resolution
Controls and control points can be adjusted
with fine resolution by holding the Control key
(Windows) or the Command key (Mac) while
adjusting the control.
Resetting Controls to Default Values
You can reset any on-screen control to its default value by Alt-clicking (Windows) or Optionclicking (Mac OS) directly on the control or on
its corresponding text box.
When monitoring in Band-Pass mode, the Frequency and Q controls function differently.
Frequency Sets the frequency above and below
which other frequencies are cut off, leaving a
narrow band of mid-range frequencies.
Q Sets the width of the narrow band of midrange frequencies centered around the Frequency setting.
To switch an EQ III control out of Band-Pass mode:
• Release Start+Shift (Windows) or Control+Shift (Mac).
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
45
Using a Control Surface
Output Gain Control
EQ III can be controlled from any supported
control surface, including Digidesign’s
D-Control, D-Command, ProControl, Control|24, Digi 002, or Command|8. Refer to the
guide that came with the control surface for details.
(7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ Only)
The Output Gain control sets the output gain after EQ processing, letting you make up gain or
prevent clipping on the channel where the plugin is being used.
Input Polarity Control
I/O Controls
The following Input and Output controls are
found on all EQ III configurations, except where
noted otherwise.
The Input Polarity button inverts the polarity of
the input signal, to help compensate for phase
anomalies occurring in multi-microphone environments, or because of mis-wired balanced
connections.
Input and Output Meters
Input and Output Meters
Clip
Indicators
Input
Polarity
Control Input
Gain
Control
(7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ Only)
The plasma-style Input and Output meters show
peak signal levels before and after EQ processing, and indicate them as follows:
Output Gain
Control
Green Indicates nominal levels
Yellow Indicates pre-clipping levels, starting at
–6 dB below full scale
Red Indicates full scale levels (clipping)
I/O controls and meters for 7 Band EQ and
2–4 Band EQ (top) and 1 Band EQ (bottom)
Input Gain Control
The Input Gain control sets the input gain of the
plug-in before EQ processing, letting you make
up gain or prevent clipping at the plug-in input
stage.
46
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
The clip indicators at the far right of each meter
indicate clipping at the input or output stage of
the plug-in. Clip indicators can be cleared by
clicking the indicator.
EQ Band Controls
Band Gain Control
The individual EQ bands on each EQ III configuration have some combination of the following controls, as noted below.
Each Peak and Shelf EQ band has a Gain control
for boosting or cutting the corresponding frequencies. Gain controls are not used on HighPass, Low-Pass, or Notch filters.
EQ type
selector
Q
control
Frequency
control
Frequency Control
Band
Enable
button
Gain
control
EQ Band controls (7 Band EQ Low-Mid band shown)
EQ Type Selector
On the 1 Band EQ, the EQ Type selector lets you
choose any one of six available filter types:
High-Pass, Notch, High-Shelf, Low-Shelf, Peak,
and Low-Pass.
On the 7 Band EQ and the 2–4 Band EQ, the
HPF, LPF, LF, and HF sections have EQ Type selectors to toggle between the two available filter
types in each section.
Band Enable Button
Each EQ band has a Frequency control that sets
the center frequency (Peak, Shelf and Notch
EQs) or the cutoff frequency (High-Pass and
Low-Pass filters) for that band.
Q Control
Peak and Notch On Peak and Notch bands, the
Q control changes the width of the EQ band.
Higher Q values represent narrower bandwidths. Lower Q values represent wider bandwidths.
Shelf On Shelf bands, the Q control changes the
Q of the shelving filter. Higher Q values represent steeper shelving curves. Lower Q values
represent broader shelving curves.
Band Pass On High-Pass and Low-Pass bands,
the Q control lets you select from any of the following Slope values: 6 dB, 12 dB, 18 dB, or
24 dB per octave.
(7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ Only)
The Band Enable button on each EQ band toggles the corresponding band in and out of circuit. When a Band Enable button is highlighted,
the band is in circuit. When a Band Enable button is dark gray, the band is bypassed and available for activation. On the 2–4 Band EQ, when a
Band Enable button is light gray, the band is bypassed and unavailable.
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
47
Frequency Graph Display
(7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ Only)
The Frequency Graph display in the 7 Band EQ and the 2–4 Band EQ shows a color-coded control dot
that corresponds to the color of the Gain control for each band. The filter shape of each band is similarly color-coded. The white frequency response curve shows the contribution of each of the enabled
filters to the overall EQ curve.
Low
control dot
(red)
Mid
High
control dot control dot
(yellow)
(blue)
Frequency
response
curve
High-Pass
control dot
(gray)
Low-Mid
control dot
(brown)
High-Mid
control dot
(green)
Low-Pass
control dot
(gray)
Frequency Graph display for the 7 Band EQ
1 Band EQ
The Frequency Graph display in the 1 Band EQ shows a control dot that indicates the center frequency (Peak, Shelf and Notch Filters) or the cutoff frequency (High-Pass and Low-Pass filters) for the
currently selected filter type.
Control dot
Frequency
response
curve
48
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
7 Band EQ
Input/Output Level meters
Input/Output Level
and
Polarity controls
Frequency Graph
Display
High-Pass/
Low Notch
Low-Pass/
High Notch
Low
Shelf/Peak
Mid
Peak
Low-Mid
Peak
High
Shelf/Peak
High-Mid
Peak
7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ window
The 7 Band EQ has the following available bands: High-Pass/Low Notch, Low-Pass/High Notch, Low
Shelf/Low Peak, Low-Mid Peak, Mid Peak, High-Mid Peak, and High Shelf/High Peak.
All seven bands are available for simultaneous use. In the factory default setting, the High-Pass/Low
Notch and Low-Pass/High Notch bands are out of circuit, the Low Shelf and High Shelf bands are selected and in circuit, and the Low-Mid Peak, Mid Peak, High-Mid Peak bands are in circuit.
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
49
High-Pass/Low Notch
Low-Pass/High Notch
The High-Pass/Notch band is switchable between High-Pass Filter and Notch EQ functions.
By default, this band is set to High-Pass Filter.
The Low-Pass/Notch band is switchable between Low-Pass Filter and Notch EQ functions.
By default, this band is set to Low-Pass Filter.
High-Pass Filter Attenuates all frequencies below
the Frequency setting at the selected slope while
letting all frequencies above pass through.
Low-Pass Filter Attenuates all frequencies above
the Frequency setting at the selected slope while
letting all frequencies below pass through.
Low-Notch EQ Attenuates a narrow band of frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. The width of the attenuated band is determined by the Q setting.
High-Notch EQ Attenuates a narrow band of frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. The width of the attenuated band is determined by the Q setting.
High-Pass Filter
button
Band
Enable
button
Frequency Slope
control control
50
Low Notch EQ
button
Band
Enable
button
Frequency
Q
control control
Low-Pass Filter
button
Band
Enable
button
Frequency Slope
control control
High Notch EQ
button
Band
Enable
button
Frequency
Q
control control
High-Pass filter (left) and Low Notch EQ (right)
Low-Pass filter (left) and High Notch EQ (right)
The High Pass and Low Notch controls and their
corresponding graph elements are displayed onscreen in gray.
The Low Pass and High Notch controls and their
corresponding graph elements are displayed onscreen in gray.
High-Pass Filter and Low Notch EQ control values
Low-Pass Filter and High Notch EQ control values
Control
Value
Control
Value
Frequency Range
20 Hz to 8 kHz
Frequency Range
120 Hz to 20 kHz
Frequency Default
20 Hz
Frequency Default
20 kHz
HPF Slope Values
6, 12, 18, or 24 dB/oct
LPF Slope Values
6, 12, 18, or 24 dB/oct
Low Notch Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
High Notch Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
Low Notch Q Default
1.0
High Notch Q Default
1.0
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Low Shelf/Low Peak
The Low Shelf/Peak band is switchable between
Low Shelf EQ and Low Peak EQ functions. By default, this band is set to Low Shelf.
Low-Shelf EQ Boosts or cuts frequencies at and
below the Frequency setting. The amount of
boost or cut is determined by the Gain setting.
The Q setting determines the shape of the shelving curve.
Low Peak EQ Boosts or cuts a band of frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. The
width of the affected band is determined by the
Q setting.
Low Shelf EQ
button
Low Shelf EQ and Low Peak EQ control values
Control
Value
Frequency Range
20 Hz to 500 Hz
Frequency Default
100 Hz
Low Shelf Q Range
0.1 to 2.0
Low Peak Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
Q Default
1.0
Low Shelf Gain Range
–12 dB to +12 dB
Low Peak Gain Range
–18 dB to +18 dB
Low Peak EQ
button
Q
control
Q
control
Band
Enable
button
Band
Enable
button
Gain
control
Frequency
control
The Low Shelf and Low Peak Gain controls and
their corresponding graph elements are displayed on-screen in red.
Gain
control
Frequency
control
Low Shelf EQ (left) and Low Peak EQ (right)
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
51
Low-Mid Peak
Mid Peak
The Low-Mid Peak band boosts or cuts frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. The
width of the band is determined by the Q setting.
The Mid Peak band boosts or cuts frequencies
centered around the Frequency setting. The
width of the band is determined by the Q setting.
Q
control
Q
control
Band
Enable
button
Frequency
control
Gain
control
52
Band
Enable
button
Frequency
control
Gain
control
Low-Mid Peak EQ
Mid Peak EQ
The Low-Mid Gain control and its corresponding graph elements are displayed on-screen in
brown.
The Mid Gain control and its corresponding
graph elements are displayed on-screen in yellow.
Low-Mid Peak EQ control values
Mid Peak EQ control values
Control
Value
Control
Value
Frequency Range
40 Hz to 1 kHz
Frequency Range
125 Hz to 8 kHz
Frequency Default
200 Hz
Frequency Default
1 kHz
Low-Mid Peak Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
Mid Peak Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
Low-Mid Peak Q Default
1.0
Mid Peak Q Default
1.0
Low-Mid Peak Gain Range
–18 dB to +18 dB
Mid Peak Gain Range
–18 dB to +18 dB
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
High-Mid Peak
The High-Mid Peak band boosts or cuts frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. The
width of the band is determined by the Q setting.
High Peak EQ Boosts or cuts a band of frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. The
width of the affected band is determined by the
Q setting.
High Shelf EQ
button
Q
control
Q
control
Q
control
Band
Enable
button
Band
Enable
button
Frequency
control
High Peak EQ
button
Band
Enable
button
Gain
control
High-Mid Peak EQ
The High-Mid Gain control and its corresponding graph elements are displayed on-screen in
green.
High-Mid Peak EQ control values
Control
Value
Frequency Range
200 Hz to 18 kHz
Frequency Default
2 kHz
Mid Peak Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
Mid Peak Q Default
1.0
Mid Peak Gain Range
–18 dB to +18 dB
Gain
control
Gain
control
Frequency
Frequency
control
control
High Shelf EQ (left) and High Peak EQ (right)
The High Shelf and High Peak Gain controls and
their corresponding graph elements are displayed on-screen in blue.
High Shelf EQ and High Peak EQ control values
Control
Value
Frequency Range
1.8 kHz to 20 kHz
High Shelf/High Peak
Frequency Default
6 kHz
The High Shelf/Peak band is switchable between
High Shelf EQ and High Peak EQ functions. By
default, this band is set to High Shelf.
High Shelf Q Range
0.1 to 2.0
High Peak Q Range
0.1 to 10.0
Q Default
1.0
High Shelf Gain Range
–12 dB to +12 dB
High Peak Gain Range
–18 dB to +18 dB
High-Shelf EQ Boosts or cuts frequencies at and
above the Frequency setting. The amount of
boost or cut is determined by the Gain setting.
The Q setting determines the shape of the shelving curve.
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
53
2–4 Band EQ
The 2–4 Band EQ uses the same plug-in window
as the 7 Band EQ, but on the 2–4 Band EQ, but a
limited number of the seven available bands can
be active at the same time.
In the factory default setting, the High-Pass/Low
Notch, Low-Pass/High Notch and Mid Peak
bands are out of circuit, the Low Shelf and High
Shelf bands are selected and in circuit, and the
Low-Mid Peak and High-Mid Peak bands are in
circuit.
For Pro Tools HD, using a 2–4 Band EQ instead of a 7 Band EQ saves DSP resources.
Switching Between the 2–4 Band EQ
and 7 Band EQ
When you switch an existing EQ III plug-in between the 2–4 Band and 7 Band versions, or
when you import settings between versions, the
change is subject to the following conditions:
Changing from 2–4 Band to 7 Band
Changing from 7 Band to 2–4 Band
After switching from a 2–4 band EQ to a 7 Band
EQ, or importing settings from a 2–4 Band EQ,
all control settings from the 2–4 Band EQ are
preserved, and the bands in the 7 Band EQ inherit their enabled or bypassed state from the
2–4 Band plug-in.
After switching from a 7 band EQ to a 2–4 Band
EQ, or importing settings from a 7 Band EQ, all
control settings from the 7 Band EQ are preserved in the 2–4 Band EQ, but all bands are
placed in a bypassed state.
Additional EQ bands can then be enabled to add
them to the settings inherited from the
2–4 Band plug-in.
Filter Usage with 2–4 Band EQs
With a 2–4 Band EQ, a maximum of four filters
may be active simultaneously, with each of the
five Peak bands (Low Shelf/Peak, Low-Mid Peak,
Mid-Peak, High-Mid Peak and High Shelf/Peak)
counting as one filter. Each of the Band-pass
and Notch filters (High-Pass, Low Notch, LowPass and High-Notch) counts as two filters.
54
When any combination of these filter types uses
the four-filter maximum on the 2–4 Band EQ,
the remaining bands become unavailable. This
is indicated by the Band Enable buttons turning
light gray. When filters become available again,
the Band Enable button on inactive bands turns
dark gray.
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Bands can then be enabled manually, up to the
2–4 Band EQ four-filter limit.
1 Band EQ
EQ Types
High-Pass Filter
Input Level and
Polarity controls
EQ Type
selector
Frequency Graph
display
The High-Pass filter attenuates all frequencies
below the Frequency setting at the selected rate
(6 dB, 12 dB, 18 dB, or 24 dB per octave) while
letting all frequencies above pass through. No
gain control is available for this filter type.
Gain, Freq and
Q controls
1 Band EQ window
The 1 Band EQ may be set to any one of six EQ
types: High-Pass, Notch, High-Shelf, Low-Shelf,
Peak, and Low-Pass, by clicking the corresponding icon in the EQ Type selector.
Band Controls
The individual EQ types have some combination of the following controls, as noted below.
1 Band EQ set to High-Pass Filter
Notch Filter
The Notch Filter attenuates a narrow band of
frequencies centered around the Frequency setting. No gain control is available for this EQ
type. The width of the attenuated band is determined by the Q setting.
1 Band EQ control values
Control
Value
Frequency Range (All)
20 Hz to 20 kHz
Frequency Default (All)
1 kHz
Q Range (Low/High Shelf)
0.1 to 2.0
Q Range (Peak/Notch)
0.1 to 10.0
Q Default (All)
1.0
Gain Range (Low/High Shelf)
–12 dB to +12 dB
High Peak Gain Range
–18 dB to +18 dB
1 Band EQ set to Notch Filter
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
55
High-Shelf EQ
Peak EQ
The High-Shelf EQ boosts or cuts frequencies at
and above the Frequency setting. The amount of
boost or cut is determined by the Gain setting.
The Q setting determines the shape of the shelving curve.
The Peak EQ boosts or cuts a band of frequencies
centered around the Frequency setting. The
width of the affected band is determined by the
Q setting.
1 Band EQ set to Peak EQ
1 Band EQ set to High-Shelf EQ
Low-Shelf EQ
56
Low-Pass Filter
The Low-Shelf EQ boosts or cuts frequencies at
and below the Frequency setting. The amount
of boost or cut is determined by the Gain setting. The Q setting determines the shape of the
shelving curve.
The Low-Pass filter attenuates all frequencies
above the cutoff frequency setting at the selected rate (6 dB, 12 dB, 18 dB, or 24 dB per octave) while letting all frequencies below pass
through. No gain control is available for this filter type.
1 Band EQ set to Low-Shelf EQ
1 Band EQ set to Low-Pass Filter
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Automating EQ III Controls
All EQ III plug-in controls can be automated in
Pro Tools.
To automate a control directly from the plug-in
window:
Control-Alt-Start-click (Windows) or Command-Option-Control-click (Mac) the control,
and choose Enable Automation.
■
Even if an EQ III band is bypassed, for example,
when the filter capacity of a 2–4 Band EQ is surpassed, its controls are still available for automation. This lets you continue to update settings in
a session in preparation for the next time the bypassed band is enabled.
For complete instructions on automating
plug-ins in Pro Tools, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
EQ II
Enabling automation for a control
For information, see the DigiRack Legacy
Plug-ins Guide.
To automate multiple controls:
Control-Alt-Start-click (Windows) or Command-Option-Control-click (Mac) the control,
choose Open Plug-in Automation Dialog, and
choose the controls you want to automate.
■
The automation-enabled status of EQ III plug-in
controls is indicated by the colored LED beneath each on-screen knob and colored outlines
around each on-screen button.
Automation-enabled buttons
Automation-enabled knobs
Automation-enabled controls
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
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Click
The Click plug-in creates an audio click during
session playback that you can use as a tempo reference when performing and recording. The
Click plug-in receives its tempo and meter data
from the Pro Tools application, enabling it to
follow any changes in tempo and meter in a session. The Click plug-in is a mono-only plug-in.
Several click sound presets are included.
2 Do one of the following:
• Choose Track > Create Click Track.
Pro Tools creates a new Instrument track
named “Click” with the Click plug-in already inserted. In the Edit window, the
click track’s Track Height is set to Mini.
– or –
• Create new a mono Auxiliary Input track
and insert the Click plug-in.
3 Select a click sound preset.
4 Choose Setup > Click and set the Click and
Countoff options as desired.
The Note, Velocity, Duration, and Output
options in this dialog are for use with MIDI
instrument-based clicks and do not affect
the Click plug-in.
Click plug-in
Click Controls
MIDI In LED Illuminates each time the Click
plug-in receives a click message from the
Pro Tools application, indicating the click
tempo.
Accented Controls the output level of the accent beat (beat 1 of each bar) of the audio click.
Unaccented Controls the output level of the unaccented beats of the audio click.
Creating a Click Track
To use the Click plug-in:
1 Choose Options > Click to enable the Click
option (or enable the Click button in the Transport window).
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Click Options dialog
5 Begin playback. A click is generated according
to the tempo and meter of the current session
and the settings in the Click/Countoff Options
dialog.
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
more information on configuring Click options.
Automatically Create Click Track In New
Sessions
To have Pro Tools automatically create a click
track when you create a new session, enable the
Automatically Create Click Track In New Sessions option in the MIDI Preferences page
(Setup > Preferences).
Selecting the Automatically Create Click Track In New
Sessions option in the MIDI Preferences page
Dither
The Dither plug-in is designed for reducing
quantization noise when mixing or fading lowlevel audio signals during word size reduction to
16-, 18-, or 20-bits.
For more advanced dithering, use the DigiRack POW-r Dither plug-in. See “POW-r
Dither” on page 61.
Dither is a form of randomized noise used to
minimize quantization artifacts in digital audio
systems. Quantization artifacts are most audible
when the audio signal is near the low end of its
dynamic range, such as during a quiet passage or
fade-out.
The introduction of dithering can reduce these
quantization artifacts with very low-level noise,
minimizing artifacts as audio reaches low level.
With dithering there is a trade-off between signal-to-noise performance and less-apparent artifacts. Proper use of dithering squeezes better
subjective performance out of 16-bits (or whatever the destination bit-depth).
The most common application of dithering is to
use it on a master output mix as the last processor in the signal path when preparing a 24-bit
session for CD mastering. In this case, you
would insert the Dither plug-in on a Master
Fader to reduce session bit-depth from 24-bits to
16-bits. The inserts on a Master Fader track are
always post-fader.
Insert the Dither plug-in (or any dithering
plug-in, such as Dither, POW-r Dither, or
Maxim) on a Master Fader track when using Bounce to Disk to create a 16-bit file (or
any bit depth lower than 24-bit) from a 24bit session; otherwise the resulting 16-bit
file will be truncated at the destination bit
depth. For more information on Bounce to
Disk, refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
The Dither plug-in has user-selectable bit resolution and a noise shaping on/off option.
Dither plug-in
If outputting 24-bit audio to an analog destination with a 96 I/O, or 192 I/O, you do
not need to use Dither. This allows maximum output fidelity from the high-performance 24-bit digital-to-analog convertors
of the interfaces.
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Noise Shaping
The Dither plug-in features a technique known
as noise shaping to further improve audio performance and reduce perceived noise in lowlevel signals. Noise shaping utilizes filtering to
reduce noise that falls in the middle of the audio
spectrum (specifically, around 4 kHz). This is the
range where human hearing is most sensitive.
In reality, since the noise plays an important
role in reducing quantization artifacts, the noise
is not reduced, rather it is shifted into a frequency range where it is harder to hear. Essentially, noise shaping lessens our perception of
the noise inherent in dithering schemes by
shifting audible noise components into a less
audible range.
Dither and Output Bit Resolution
Dither has two user-selectable settings for optimizing its operation:
Bit Resolution
Use this pop-up menu to choose one of three
possible resolutions for the Dither processing.
As a general rule, set this control to the maximum bit resolution of your destination.
16-bit Recommended for output to digital devices such as DAT recorders and CD recorders,
since they have a maximum resolution of 16bits.
18-bit Recommended for output to analog devices if you are using an 18-bit audio interface,
such as the 888 I/O or 882 I/O audio interface;
this is the maximum resolution available from
the 18-bit digital-to-analog convertors of these
devices.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
20-bit Recommended for output to digital devices that support a full 20-bit recording data
path, such the Sony PCM-9000 optical mastering recorder, or the Alesis ADAT XT 20. Use this
setting for output to analog devices if you are using a 20-bit audio interface, such as the
882|20 I/O audio interface. The 20-bit setting
can also be used for output to digital effects devices that support 20-bit input and output, since
it provides for a lower noise floor and greater dynamic range when mixing 20-bit signals directly
into the TDM environment.
If you want, you can choose not to use the
Dither plug-in and instead utilize the full 24-bit
resolution of Pro Tools’ digital output, depending on your destination device. If you are using
a 24-bit audio interface (such as the 192 I/O,
96 I/O, or 888|24 I/O) and are outputting audio
to an analog destination, we recommend that
you do not use dither.
The DigiRack Dither plug-in only provides
eight channels of uncorrelated dithering
noise. If DigiRack Dither is used on more
than eight tracks, the dithering noise begins
to repeat and dither performance is impaired. For example, if two Quad DigiRack
Dithers are used, both Quad instances of
Dither will have all of their dither noise uncorrelated. However, any additional instances of the Dither plug-in will begin to
repeat the dithering noise.
Noise Shaping
This button engages or disengages Noise Shaping. Noise shaping is on when the button is
highlighted in blue. See “Noise Shaping” on
page 60 for more information.
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
details on using the Dither plug-in during
mixdown.
POW-r Dither
(Pro Tools HD and Pro Tools LE Only)
The POW-r Dither plug-in is an advanced type
of dither that provides optimized word length
reduction. It is designed for final-stage critical
mixdown and mastering tasks where the highest
possible fidelity is desired when reducing bit
depth. For more information on dithering, see
“Dither” on page 59.
Noise Shaping
Noise shaping improves audio performance and
lessens our perception of the noise inherent in
dithering schemes by shifting audible noise
components into a less audible range.
The POW-r Dither plug-in is not appropriate for truncation stages that are likely to be
further processed. It is recommended that
POW-r Dither be used only as the last insert
in the signal chain (especially when using
Type 1 Noise Shaping).
The POW-r Dither plug-in provides three types
of noise shaping, each with its own characteristics. Try each noise shaping type and choose the
one that adds the least amount of coloration to
the audio being processed.
POW-r Dither plug-in
The POW-r Dither plug-in does not run on
third party applications that use DAE.
The multichannel TDM version of the
POW-r Dither plug-in is not supported at
192 kHz. Use the multi-mono TDM or
RTAS version instead.
POW-r Dither Controls
Bit Resolution
Use this pop-up menu to choose either 16- or
20-bit resolutions for POW-r Dither processing.
Set this control to the maximum bit resolution
of your destination.
Type 1 Has the flattest frequency spectrum in
the audible range of frequencies, modulating
and accumulating the dither noise just below
the Nyquist frequency. Recommended for less
stereophonically complex material such as solo
instrument recordings.
Type 2 Has a psychoacoustically optimized low
order noise shaping curve. Recommended for
material of greater stereophonic complexity.
Type 3 Has a psychoacoustically optimized high
order noise shaping curve. Recommended for
full-spectrum, wide-stereo field material.
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
details on using the Dither plug-in.
16-bit Recommended for output to devices with
a maximum resolution of 16-bits, such as DAT
and CD recorders.
20-bit Recommended for output to devices that
support a full 20-bit recording data path.
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61
D-Verb
D-Verb is a studio-quality reverb provided in
TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite formats.
The TDM version of the D-Verb plug-in is
not supported at 192 kHz; use the RTAS
version instead.
D-Verb Controls
Clip Indicator
The Clip Indicator shows if clipping has occurred. It is a clip-hold indicator. If clipping occurs at any time during audio playback, the clip
lights remain on. To clear the clip indicator,
click it. With longer reverb times there is a
greater likelihood of clipping occurring as the
feedback element of the reverb builds up and approaches a high output level. See also “Clip Indicators” on page 22.
Input Level
The Input Level slider adjusts the input volume
of the reverb to prevent the possibility of clipping and/or increase the level of the processed
signal.
Mix
The Mix slider adjusts the balance between the
dry signal and the effected signal, giving you
control over the depth of the effect. This control
is adjustable from 100% to 0%.
D-Verb plug-in
Algorithm
Output Meter
This control selects one of seven reverb algorithms: Hall, Church, Plate, Room 1, Room 2,
Ambience, or Nonlinear. Selecting an algorithm
changes the preset provided for it. Switching the
Size setting changes characteristics of the algorithm that are not altered by adjusting the decay
time and other user-adjustable controls. Each of
the seven algorithms has a distinctly different
character:
The Output Meter indicates the output level of
the processed signal. With the stereo version of
D-verb, it represents the summed stereo output.
It is important to note that this meter indicates
the output level of the signal—not the input
level. If this meter clips, it is possible that the
signal clipped on input before it reached
D-Verb. Monitor your send or insert signal levels
closely to help prevent this from happening.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Hall A good general purpose concert hall with a
natural character. It is useful over a large range
of size and decay times and with a wide range of
program material. Setting Decay to its maximum value will produce infinite reverberation.
Church A dense, diffuse space simulating a
church or cathedral with a long decay time,
high diffusion, and some pre-delay.
Plate Simulates the acoustic character of a
metal plate-based reverb. This type of reverb
typically has high initial diffusion and a relatively bright sound, making it particularly good
for certain percussive signals and vocal processing. Plate reverb has the general effect of thickening the initial sound itself.
Room 1 A medium-sized, natural, rich-sounding
room that can be effectively varied in size between very small and large, with good results.
Room 2 A smaller, brighter reverberant characteristic than Room 1, with a useful adjustment
range that extends to “very small.”
Ambient A transparent response that is useful for
adding a sense of space without adding a lot of
depth or density. Extreme settings can create interesting results.
Nonlinear Produces a reverberation with a natural buildup and an abrupt cutoff similar to a
gate. This unnatural decay characteristic is particularly useful on percussion, since it can add
an aggressive characteristic to sounds with
strong attacks.
Size
The Size control, in conjunction with the Algorithm control, adjusts the overall size of the reverberant space. There are three sizes: Small,
Medium, and Large. The character of the reverberation changes with each of these settings (as
does the relative value of the Decay setting). The
Size buttons can be used to vary the range of a
reverb from large to small. Generally, you
should select an algorithm first, and then
choose the size that approximates the size of the
acoustic space that you are trying to create.
Diffusion
Diffusion sets the degree to which initial echo
density increases over time. High settings result
in high initial build-up of echo density. Low settings cause low initial buildup. This control interacts with the Size and Decay controls to affect
the overall reverb density. High settings of diffusion can be used to enhance percussion. Use low
or moderate settings for clearer and more natural-sounding vocals and mixes.
Decay
Decay controls the rate at which the reverb decays after the original direct signal stops. The
value of the Decay setting is affected by the Size
and Algorithm controls. This control can be set
to infinity on most algorithms for infinite reverb times.
Pre-Delay
Determines the amount of time that elapses between the original audio event and the onset of
reverberation. Under natural conditions, the
amount of Pre-Delay depends on the size and
construction of the acoustic space, and the relative position of the sound source and the listener. Pre-Delay attempts to duplicate this phenomenon and is used to create a sense of
distance and volume within an acoustic space.
Long Pre-Delay settings place the reverberant
field behind rather than on top of the original
audio signal.
Hi Frequency Cut
Hi Frequency Cut controls the decay characteristic of the high frequency components of the
reverb. It acts in conjunction with the Low-Pass
Filter control to create the overall high frequency contour of the reverb. When set rela-
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63
tively low, high frequencies decay more quickly
than low frequencies, simulating the effect of air
absorption in a hall. The maximum value of this
control is Off (which effectively means bypass).
Low-Pass Filter
Low-Pass Filter controls the overall high frequency content of the reverb by setting the frequency above which a 6 dB per octave filter attenuates the processed signal. The maximum
value of this control is Off (which effectively
means bypass).
Adjusting Dynamics III Controls
You can adjust Dynamics III plug-in controls by
clicking and dragging the control’s slider or
knob, or by typing a value into the control’s text
box.
Editing Parameters Using a Mouse
You can adjust rotary controls by clicking and
dragging horizontally or vertically. Parameter
values increase as you drag upward or to the
right, and decrease as you drag downward or to
the left.
Dynamics III
Dynamics III provides three modules:
• Compressor/Limiter
• Expander/Gate
• De-Esser
All Dynamics III modules are available in TDM,
RTAS, and AudioSuite formats.
Dynamics III supports 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz,
88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz and 192 kHz sample rates. Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate modules work with mono, stereo,
and greater-than-stereo multichannel formats
up to 7.1. The De-Esser module works with
mono and stereo formats only.
In addition to standard controls in each module, Dynamics III also provides a graph to track
the gain transfer curve in the Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate plug-ins, and a frequency graph to display which frequencies trigger the De-Esser and which frequencies will be
gain reduced.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Dragging a plug-in control
Keyboard Shortcuts
◆ For finer adjustments, Control-drag (Windows) or Command-drag (Mac) the control.
◆ To return a control to its default value, Altclick (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) the control.
Typing Control Values
You can enter control values directly by clicking
in the corresponding text box, typing a value,
and pressing Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac).
Typing a control value
Editing Parameters Using a Computer
Keyboard
Some controls have text boxes that display the
current value of the parameter. You can edit the
numeric value of a parameter with your computer keyboard.
If multiple Plug-in windows are open, Tab and
keyboard entry remain focused on the plug-in
that is the target window.
To change control values with a computer
keyboard:
1 Click on the text box corresponding to the
control that you want to adjust.
2 Change the value by doing one of the following:
• To increase a value, press the Up Arrow on
your keyboard. To decrease a value, press
the Down Arrow on your keyboard.
– or –
• Type the desired value.
In fields that support values in kilohertz,
typing “k” after a number value will multiply the value by 1,000. For example, type
“8k” to enter a value of 8,000.
Enabling Buttons
To enable a button, click it.
Using a Control Surface
Dynamics III can be controlled from any supported control surface, interface, and worksurface. Refer to the appropriate controller product
guide for more information.
Shared Compressor/Limiter and
Expander/Gate Features
The following parts of the user interface are
shared between the Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate Dynamics III plug-ins.
Levels Section
This indicator let you track input, output, and
gain reduction levels, as well as work with phase
invert and the threshold setting.
See “De-Esser Levels Section” on page 75
for more information on De-Esser III Input/Output Level controls.
Phase
Invert
3 Do one of the following:
• Press Enter on the numeric keyboard to input the value and remain in keyboard editing mode.
– or –
• Press Enter on the alpha keyboard (Windows) or Return (Mac) to enter the value
and leave keyboard editing mode.
To move forward through the different control fields, press the Tab key. To move backward, press Shift+Tab.
Input
meter
Peak hold
indicators
Threshold
arrow
Output
meter
Gain
Reduction
meter
Peak hold
indicators
I/O Meter display (stereo instance shown)
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65
Input and Output Meters
Gain Reduction Meter
The Input and Output meters show peak signal
levels before and after dynamics processing:
The Gain Reduction meter indicates the amount
the input signal is attenuated (in dB) and shows
different colors during dynamics processing:
Green Indicates nominal levels.
Yellow Indicates pre-clipping levels, starting at
–6 dB below full scale.
Red Indicates full scale levels (clipping).
The clip indicators at the top of the Output
meters indicate clipping at the input or output
stage of the plug-in. Clip indicators can be
cleared by clicking the indicator.
The Input and Output meters display differently depending on the type of track (mono,
stereo, or multichannel) on which the plugin has been inserted.
When Side-Chain Listen is enabled, the
Output meter only displays the levels of the
side-chain signal. See “Side-Chain Listen”
on page 77.
Toggling Multichannel Input and Output Meters
With multichannel track types LCRS and
higher, both Input Level and Output Level
meters cannot be shown at the same time. Click
either the Input or Output Meter button to display the appropriate level meter. The Input/Output level meters display is toggled to Output by
default.
Input and
Output Meter
buttons
Input and Output meter buttons
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Light Orange Indicates that gain reduction is
within the “knee” and has not reached the full
ratio of compression.
Dark Orange Indicates that gain reduction is being applied at the full ratio (for example, 2:1).
Threshold Arrow
The orange Threshold arrow next to the Input
meter indicates the current threshold, and can
be dragged up or down to adjust the threshold.
When a multichannel instance of the plug-in
has been configured to show only the Output
meter, the Threshold arrow is not displayed.
Phase Invert
The Phase Invert button inverts the phase (polarity) of the input signal, to help compensate
for phase anomalies that can occur either in
multi-microphone environments or because of
mis-wired balanced connections.
LFE Enable
(Pro Tools HD Systems Only)
Use this graph as a visual guideline to see how
much dynamics processing you are applying.
Threshold
The LFE Enable button (located in the Options
section) is on by default, and enables plug-in
processing of the LFE (low frequency effects)
channel on a multichannel track formatted for
5.1, 6.1, or 7.1 surround formats.
Output signal
level (y-axis)
Input signal
level (x-axis)
LFE Enable button (Compressor/Limiter III shown)
To disable LFE processing, deselect this button.
The LFE Enable button is not available if
the plug-in is not inserted on an applicable
track.
Dynamics Graph Display
The Dynamics Graph display—used with the
Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate plugins—shows a curve that represents the level of
the input signal (on the x–axis) and the level of
the output signal (on the y–axis). The orange
vertical line represents the threshold.
Dynamics graph display
The Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate
plug-ins also feature an animated, multi-color
cursor in their gain transfer curve displays.
The gain transfer curve of the Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate plug-ins shows a moving ball cursor that shows the amount of input
gain (x-axis) and gain reduction (y-axis) being
applied to the incoming signal.
Gain transfer curve and cursor showing amount of
compression
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67
To indicate overshoots (when an incoming signal peak is too fast for the current compression
setting) the cursor temporarily leaves the gain
transfer curve.
Compressor/Limiter III
The cursor changes color to indicate the amount
of compression applied, as follows:
Dynamics III Plug-in Compression Amount
Cursor Color
Compression Amount
white
no compression
light orange
below full ratio
dark orange
full ratio amount
Compressor/Limiter III
See “De-Esser Frequency Graph Display” on
page 76 for information on using the DeEsser’s graph display.
The Compressor/Limiter plug-in applies either
compression or limiting to audio material, depending on the ratio of compression used.
Side-Chain Section
About Compression
For information on using the Side-Chain section
of the Compressor/Limiter or Expander/Gate,
see “Using the Side-Chain Input in Dynamics
III” on page 76.
Compression reduces the dynamic range of signals that exceed a chosen threshold by a specific
amount. The Threshold control sets the level
that the signal must exceed to trigger compression. The Attack control sets how quickly the
compressor responds to the “front” of an audio
signal once it crosses the selected threshold. The
Release control sets the amount of time that it
takes for the compressor’s gain to return to its
original level after the input signal drops below
the selected threshold.
To use compression most effectively, the attack
time should be set so that signals exceed the
threshold level long enough to cause an increase
in the average level. This helps ensure that gain
reduction does not decrease the overall volume
too drastically, or eliminate desired attack transients in the program material.
Of course, compression has many creative uses
that break these rules.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
About Limiting
Compressor/Limiter III Controls
Limiting prevents signal peaks from ever exceeding a chosen threshold, and is generally
used to prevent short-term peaks from reaching
their full amplitude. Used judiciously, limiting
produces higher average levels, while avoiding
overload (clipping or distortion), by limiting
only some short-term transients in the source
audio. To prevent the ear from hearing the gain
changes, extremely short attack and release
times are used.
This section describes controls for the Compressor/Limiter plug-in.
Limiting is used to remove only occasional
peaks because gain reduction on successive
peaks would be noticeable. If audio material
contains many peaks, the threshold should be
raised and the gain manually reduced so that
only occasional, extreme peaks are limited.
Limiting generally begins with the ratio set at
10:1 and higher. Large ratios effectively limit
the dynamic range of the signal to a specific
value by setting an absolute ceiling for the dynamic range.
Input/Output Level Meters
The Input and Output meters show peak signal
levels before and after dynamics processing. See
“Levels Section” on page 65 for more information.
Unlike scales on analog compressors, metering
scales on a digital device reflect a 0 dB value that
indicates full scale (fs)—the full-code signal
level. There is no headroom above 0 dB.
Compressor/Limiter Graph Display
The Dynamics Graph display lets you visually
see how much expansion or gating you are applying to your audio material. See “Dynamics
Graph Display” on page 67.
Threshold
The Threshold control sets the level that an input signal must exceed to trigger compression or
limiting. Signals that exceed this level will be
compressed. Signals that are below it will be unaffected.
This control has an approximate range of
–60 dB to 0 dB, with a setting of 0 dB equivalent
to no compression or limiting. The default value
for the Threshold control is –24 dB.
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69
An orange arrow on the Input meter indicates
the current threshold, and can also be dragged
up or down to adjust the threshold setting.
Attack
The Attack control sets the attack time, or the
rate at which gain is reduced after the input signal crosses the threshold.
The smaller the value, the faster the attack. The
faster the attack, the more rapidly the Compressor/Limiter applies attenuation to the signal. If
you use fast attack times, you should generally
use a proportionally longer release time, particularly with material that contains many peaks
in close proximity.
Threshold
arrow
Threshold arrow on input meter
This control ranges from 10 μs (fastest attack
time) to 300 ms (slowest attack time).
The Dynamics Graph display also shows the
threshold as an orange vertical line.
Release
The Release control sets the length of time it
takes for the Compressor/Limiter to be fully deactivated after the input signal drops below the
threshold.
Threshold
Threshold indicator on Dynamics Graph display
This control ranges from –60 dB (lowest gain) to
0 dB (highest gain).
Ratio
The Ratio control sets the compression ratio, or
the amount of compression applied as the input
signal exceeds the threshold. For example, a 2:1
compression ratio means that a 2 dB increase of
level above the threshold produces a 1 db increase in output.
This control ranges from 1:1 (no compression)
to 100:1 (hard limiting).
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Release times should be set long enough that if
signal levels repeatedly rise above the threshold,
the gain reduction “recovers” smoothly. If the
release time is too short, the gain can rapidly
fluctuate as the compressor repeatedly tries to
recover from the gain reduction. If the release
time is too long, a loud section of the audio material could cause gain reduction that continues
through soft sections of program material without recovering.
This control ranges from 5 ms (fastest release
time) to 4 seconds (slowest release time).
Knee
Gain
The Knee control sets the rate at which the compressor reaches full compression once the
threshold has been exceeded.
The Gain control lets you boost overall output
gain to compensate for heavily compressed or
limited signals.
As you increase this control, it goes from applying “hard-knee” compression to “soft-knee”
compression:
This control ranges from 0 dB (no gain boost) to
+40 dB (loudest gain boost), with the default
value at 0 dB.
• With hard-knee compression, compression
begins when the input signal exceeds the
threshold. This can sound abrupt and is ideal
for limiting.
• With soft-knee compression, gentle compression begins and increases gradually as the input signal approaches the threshold, and
reaches full compression after exceeding the
threshold. This creates smoother compression.
Hard knee
For more information on the LFE channel,
refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Side-Chain Section
The side-chain is the split-off signal used by the
plug-in’s detector to trigger dynamics processing. The Side-Chain section lets you toggle the
side-chain between the internal input signal or
an external key input, and tailor the equalization of the side-chain signal so that the triggering of dynamics processing becomes frequencysensitive. See “Using the Side-Chain Input in
Dynamics III” on page 76.
Soft knee
Graph examples of hard and soft knee compression
For example, a Knee setting of 10 dB would be
the gain range over which the ratio gradually increased to the set ratio amount.
The Gain Reduction meter displays light orange
while gain reduction has not exceeded the knee
setting, and switches to dark orange when gain
reduction reaches the full ratio.
This control ranges from 0 db (hardest response)
to 30 db (softest response).
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71
Expander/Gate III
Expander/Gate III Controls
This section describes controls for the Expander/Gate plug-in.
Input/Output Level Meters
The Input and Output meters show peak signal
levels before and after dynamics processing. See
“Levels Section” on page 65 for more information.
Expander/Gate Dynamics Graph Display
Expander/Gate III
The Expander/Gate plug-in applies expansion
or gating to audio material, depending on the
ratio setting.
About Expansion
Expansion decreases the gain of signals that fall
below a chosen threshold. They are particularly
useful for reducing noise or signal leakage that
creeps into recorded material as its level falls, as
often occurs in the case of headphone leakage.
The Dynamics Graph display lets you visually
see how much expansion or gating you are applying to your audio material. See “Dynamics
Graph Display” on page 67.
Look Ahead Button
Normally, dynamics processing begins when
the level of the input signal crosses the threshold. When the Look Ahead button is enabled,
dynamics processing begins 2 milliseconds before the level of the input signal crosses the
threshold.
About Gating
Gating silences signals that fall below a chosen
threshold. To enable gating, simply set the Ratio
and Range controls to their maximum values.
Expanders can be thought of as soft noise gates
since they provide a gentler way of reducing
noisy low-level signals than the typically abrupt
cutoff of a gate.
Look Ahead control
The Look Ahead control is useful for avoiding
the loss of transients that may have been otherwise cut off or trimmed in a signal.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Threshold
Ratio
The Threshold control sets the level below
which an input signal must fall to trigger expansion or gating. Signals that fall below the threshold will be reduced in gain. Signals that are
above it will be unaffected.
The Ratio control sets the amount of expansion.
For example, if this is set to 2:1, it will lower signals below the threshold by one half. At higher
ratio levels (such as 30:1 or 40:1) the Expander/Gate functions like a gate by cutting off
signals that fall below the threshold. As you adjust the ratio control, refer to the built-in graph
to see how the shape of the expansion curve
changes.
An orange arrow on the Input meter indicates
the current threshold, and can also be dragged
up or down to adjust the threshold setting.
This control ranges from 1:1 (no expansion) to
100:1 (gating).
Attack
Threshold
arrow
The Attack control sets the attack time, or the
rate at which gain is reduced after the input signal crosses the threshold. Use this along with
the Ratio setting to control how soft the Expander’s gain reduction curve is.
Threshold arrow on Input meter
The Dynamics Graph display also shows the
threshold as an orange vertical line.
This control ranges from 10 μs (fastest attack
time) to 300 ms (slowest attack time).
Hold
Threshold
Threshold indicator on Dynamics Graph display
This control has an approximate range of
–60 dB to 0 dB, with a setting of 0 dB equivalent
to no compression or limiting. The default value
for the Threshold control is –24 dB.
The Hold control specifies the duration (in seconds or milliseconds) during which the Expander/Gate will stay in effect after the initial
attack occurs. This can be used as a function to
keep the Expander/Gate in effect for longer periods of time with a single crossing of the
threshold. It can also be used to prevent gate
chatter that may occur if varying input levels
near the threshold cause the gate to close and
open very rapidly.
This control ranges from 5 ms (shortest hold) to
4 seconds (longest hold).
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73
Release
De-Esser III
The Release control sets how long it takes for the
gate to close after the input signal falls below the
threshold level and the hold time has passed.
This control ranges from 5 ms (fastest release
time) to 4 seconds (slowest release time).
Range
The Range control sets the depth of the Expander/Gate when closed. Setting the gate to
higher range levels allows more and more of the
gated audio that falls below the threshold to
peek through the gate at all times.
De-Esser III
This control ranges from –80 dB (lowest depth)
to 0 dB (highest depth).
Side-Chain Section
The side-chain is the split-off signal used by the
plug-in’s detector to trigger dynamics processing. The Side-Chain section lets you toggle the
side-chain between the internal input signal or
an external key input, and tailor the equalization of the side-chain signal so that the triggering of dynamics processing becomes frequencysensitive.
See “Using the Side-Chain Input in Dynamics
III” on page 76.
The De-Esser reduces sibilants and other high
frequency noises that can occur in vocals, voiceovers, and wind instruments such as flutes.
These sounds can cause peaks in an audio signal
and lead to distortion.
The De-Esser reduces these unwanted sounds using fast-acting compression. A Threshold control sets the level above which compression
starts, and a Frequency control sets the frequency band in which the De-Esser operates.
Using De-essing Effectively
To use de-essing most effectively, insert the DeEsser after compressor or limiter plug-ins.
The Frequency control should be set to remove
sibilants (typically the 4–10 kHz range) and not
other parts of the signal. This helps prevent deessing from changing the original character of
the audio material in an undesired manner.
Similarly, the Range control should be set to a
dB level low enough so that de-essing is triggered only by sibilants. If the Range is set too
high, a loud, non-sibilant section of audio material could cause unwanted gain reduction or
cause sibilants to be over-attenuated.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
To improve de-essing of material that has both
very loud and very soft passages, automate the
Range control so that it is lower on soft sections.
The De-Esser has no control to directly adjust the threshold level (the level that an input signal must exceed to trigger de-essing).
The amount of de-essing will vary with the
input signal.
De-Esser III Controls
This section describes controls for the De-Esser
plug-in.
De-Esser Levels Section
These controls let you track input, output, and
gain reduction levels.
The clip indicators at the top of each meter indicate clipping at the input or output stage of the
plug-in. Clip indicators can be cleared by clicking the indicator.
Gain Reduction Meter
The Gain Reduction meter indicates the amount
the input signal is attenuated, in dB. This meter
shows different colors during de-essing:
Light Orange Indicates that gain reduction is being applied, but has not reached the maximum
level set by the Range control.
Dark Orange Indicates that gain reduction has
reached the maximum level set by the Range
control.
Frequency
Input
meter
Output
meter
Gain
Reduction
meter
The Frequency control sets the frequency band
in which the De-Esser operates. When HF Only
is disabled, gain is reduced in frequencies within
the specified range. When HF Only is enabled,
the gain of frequencies above the specified value
will be reduced.
This control ranges from 500 Hz (lowest frequency) to 16 kHz (highest frequency).
De-Esser III I/O Meter display
Range
Input and Output Meters
The Range control defines the maximum
amount of gain reduction possible when a signal is detected at the frequency set by the Frequency control.
The Input and Output meters show peak signal
levels before and after dynamics processing:
Green Indicates nominal levels.
Yellow Indicates pre-clipping levels, starting at
–6 dB below full scale.
This control ranges from –40 dB (maximum deessing) to 0 dB (no de-essing).
Red Indicates full scale levels (clipping).
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75
HF Only
When the HF Only button is enabled, gain reduction is applied only to the active frequency
band set by the Frequency control. When the
HF Only button is disabled, the De-Esser applies
gain reduction to the entire signal.
Listen
When enabled, the Listen button lets you monitor the sibilant peaks used by the De-Esser as a
side-chain to trigger compression. This is useful
for listening only to the sibilance for fine-tuning
De-Esser controls. To monitor the whole output
signal without this filtering, deselect the Listen
button.
Use this graph as a visual guideline to see how
much dynamics processing you are applying at
different points in the frequency spectrum.
Current gain
reduction
Frequency
Gain
(y-axis)
Range
Frequency
(x-axis)
De-Esser Frequency Graph Display
De-Esser graph display
The De-Esser Frequency Graph display shows a
curve that represents the level of gain reduction
(on the y-axis) for the range of the output signal's frequency (on the x-axis). The white line
represents the current Frequency setting, and
the animated orange line represents the level of
gain reduction being applied to the signal.
Using the Side-Chain Input in
Dynamics III
(Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate
Only)
Dynamics processors typically use the detected
amplitude of their input signal to trigger gain reduction. This split-off signal is known as the
side-chain. The Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate plug-ins feature external key capabilities and filters for the side-chain.
With external key side-chain processing, you
trigger dynamics processing using an external
signal (such as a separate reference track or audio source) instead of the input signal. This external source is known as the key input.
In Pro Tools TDM 6.9.x and lower, RTAS
plug-ins do not provide external key sidechain processing. If you want to use sidechain processing, use the TDM versions of
plug-ins on Pro Tools|HD systems.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
With side-chain filters, you can make dynamics
processing more or less sensitive to certain frequencies. For example, you might configure the
side-chain so that certain lower frequencies on a
drum track trigger dynamics processing.
Side-Chain Section
The Side-Chain section lets you toggle the sidechain between the internal input signal or an
external key input, listen to the side-chain, and
tailor the equalization of the side-chain signal
so that the triggering of dynamics processing becomes frequency-sensitive.
External Key
Side-Chain Listen
Side-Chain Listen
When enabled, this control lets you listen to the
internal or external side-chain input by itself, as
well as monitor its levels with the Output meter.
This is especially useful for fine-tuning the plugin’s filter settings or external key input.
Side-Chain Listen is not saved with other
plug-in settings.
HF and LF Filter Enable Buttons
The HF Filter Enable and LF Filter Enable buttons toggle the corresponding filter in or out of
the side-chain. When this button is highlighted,
the filter is applied to the side-chain signal.
When this button is dark grey, the filter is bypassed and available for activation.
LowPass
HF Filter
Enable
LF Filter
Enable
HF
Frequency
Control
HF
BandPass
HF Filter
Enable
Compressor/Limiter and Expander/Gate Side-Chain
External Key
The External Key toggles external side-chain
processing on or off. When this button is highlighted, the plug-in uses the amplitude of a separate reference track or external audio source to
trigger dynamics processing. When this button
is dark grey, the External Key is disabled and the
plug-in uses the amplitude of the input signal to
trigger dynamics processing.
LF
BandPass
LF Filter
Enable
HighPass
LF
Frequency
HF and LF Filter Side-Chain
High-Frequency (HF) Filter Type
The HF filter section lets you filter higher frequencies out of the side-chain signal so that
only certain bands of high frequencies or lower
frequencies pass through to trigger dynamics
processing. The HF side-chain filter is switchable
between Band-Pass and Low-Pass filters.
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77
Band-Pass Filter Makes triggering of dynamics
processing more sensitive to frequencies within
the narrow band centered around the Frequency
setting, and rolling off at a slope of 12 dB per octave.
Low-Pass Filter Makes triggering of dynamics
processing more sensitive to frequencies below
the Frequency setting rolling off at a slope of
12 dB per octave.
Using an External Key Input for SideChain Processing
To use a filtered or unfiltered external key input to
trigger dynamics processing:
1 Click the Key Input selector and select the input or bus carrying the audio from the reference
track or external audio source.
HF Frequency Control
The Frequency control sets the frequency position for the Band-Pass or Low-Pass filter, and
ranges from 80 Hz to 20 kHz.
Low-Frequency (LF) Filter Type
The LF filter section lets you filter lower frequencies out of the side-chain signal so that only certain bands of low frequencies or higher frequencies are allowed to pass through to trigger
dynamics processing. The LF side-chain is switchable between Band-Pass and High-Pass filters.
Band-Pass Filter Makes triggering of dynamics
processing more sensitive to frequencies within
the narrow band centered around the Frequency
setting, and rolling off at a slope of 12 dB per octave.
Selecting a Key Input
2 Click External Key to activate external side-
chain processing.
External Key
Side-Chain Listen
Side-Chain section
3 To listen to the signal that will be used to con-
trol side-chain input, click Side-Chain Listen to
enable it (highlighted).
High-Pass Filter Makes triggering of dynamics
processing more sensitive to frequencies above
the Frequency setting rolling off at a slope of
12 dB per octave.
4 To filter the key input so that only specific frequencies trigger the plug-in, use the HF and LF
controls to select the desired frequency range.
LF Frequency Control
5 Begin playback. The plug-in uses the input or
bus that you chose as an external key input to
trigger its effect.
The Frequency control sets the frequency position for the Band-Pass or High-Pass filter, and
ranges from 25 Hz to 4 kHz.
6 Adjust the plug-in’s Threshold control to finetune external key input triggering.
7 Adjust other controls to achieve the desired effect.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Using a Filtered Input Signal for SideChain Processing
Mod Delay II
To use the filtered input signal to trigger dynamics
processing:
1 Ensure the Key Input selector is set to No Key
Input.
Key Input selector
2 Ensure that the External Key button is dis-
abled (dark grey).
External Key
Side-Chain Listen
Mod Delay II plug-in (Long Delay shown)
Side-Chain section
3 To listen to the signal that will be used to con-
There are five different Mod Delay II plug-ins,
capable of different maximum delay times:
trol side-chain input, click Side-Chain Listen to
enable it (highlighted).
• The Short Delay provides 43 ms of delay at all
sample rates.
4 To filter the side-chain input so that only spe-
• The Slap Delay provides 171 ms of delay at all
sample rates.
cific frequencies within the input signal trigger
the plug-in, use the HF and LF controls to select
the desired frequency range.
5 Begin playback. The plug-in uses the filtered
input signal to trigger dynamics processing.
6 To fine-tune side-chain triggering, adjust the
plug-in controls.
Dynamics II
Short Delay and Slap Delay do not have
Tempo, Meter, Duration, and Groove controls.
• The Medium Delay provides 341 ms of delay
at all sample rates.
• The Long Delay provides 683 ms of delay at
all sample rates.
• The Extra Long Delay provides 2.73 seconds
of delay at all sample rates.
For information, see the DigiRack Legacy
Plug-ins Guide.
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
79
The TDM versions of the Extra Long Delay
mono-to-stereo and stereo plug-in are not
supported at 96 kHz. All TDM versions of
the Extra Long Delay plug-in are not supported at 192 kHz. RTAS versions of the Extra Long Delay plug-in are fully supported
at all sample rates.
Mod Delay II Controls
Input Controls the input volume of the delay to
prevent clipping.
Mix Controls the balance between the delayed
signal (wet) and the original signal (dry). If you
are using a delay for flanging or chorusing, you
can control the depth of the effect somewhat
with the Mix setting.
LPF (Low-Pass Filter) Controls the cutoff frequency of the Low-Pass Filter. Use the LPF setting to attenuate the high frequency content of
the feedback signal. The lower the setting, the
more high frequencies are attenuated. The maximum value for LPF is Off. This lets the signal
pass through without limiting the bandwidth of
the plug-in.
Delay Sets the delay time between the original
signal and the delayed signal.
Depth Controls the depth of the modulation applied to the delayed signal.
Rate Controls the rate of modulation of the delayed signal.
Feedback Controls the amount of feedback applied from the output of the delay back into its
input. It also controls the number of repetitions
of the delayed signal. Negative feedback settings
give a more intense “tunnel-like” sound to
flanging effects.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Tempo Sync Tempo Sync provides a direct connection between session tempo and plug-in parameters that support MIDI Beat Clock. This direct connection lets plug-in parameters such as
delay, auto-pan, and other time-domain effects
automatically synchronize to, and follow
changes in, session tempo. For plug-ins that do
not support Tempo Sync, the original MIDI Beat
Clock window (Setup > MIDI > MIDI Beat Clock)
remains available in Pro Tools.
Tempo Sync is not available in plug-ins
with which it would limit functionality. For
example, for the Virus Indigo and
IndigoV40 plug-in, use the Pro Tools MIDI
Beat Clock window (Setup > MIDI > MIDI
Beat Clock). See the Pro Tools Reference
Guide for more information.
For more information, see “Tempo Sync” on
page 23.
Tempo Available in some plug-ins that do not
support Tempo Sync, Tempo selects the desired
tempo in beats per minute (bpm). This setting is
independent of Pro Tools’ tempo. When a specific Duration is selected (see “Duration” below), moving this control will affect the Delay
setting. Likewise, the range of both controls will
be limited to the maximum available delay with
the currently selected Duration. To enter very
short or long delays it may be necessary to deselect all Duration buttons.
Use Event > Identify Beat or Event > Beat
Detective to determine the tempo. For more
information about Identify Beat and Beat
Detective refer to the Pro Tools Reference
Guide.
Meter Use this to enter either simple or compound time signatures. The Meter control defaults to a 4/4 time signature.
Duration Specifies a desired delay from a musical
perspective. Enter the desired delay by selecting
appropriate note value (whole note, half note,
quarter note, eight note, or sixteenth note). Select the Dot or Triplet modifier buttons to dot
the selected note value or make it a triplet. For
example, selecting a quarter note and then selecting the dot indicates a dotted quarter note,
and selecting an eighth note and then selecting
the triplet indicates a triplet eight note.
Multichannel Mod Delay II
The Tempo and Meter controls are linked on
multichannel versions of Mod Delay II. Each
channel has its own Duration and Groove controls, but the Tempo and Meter controls are global.
Tempo, Meter, Duration, and Groove controls for a
stereo instance of Mod Delay II
Signal Generator
Triplet modifier Dot modifier
Duration
Tempo, Meter, Duration, and Groove controls
Groove Provides fine adjustment of the delay in
percentages of a 1:4 subdivision of the beat. It
can be used to add “swing” by slightly offsetting
the delay from the precise beat of the track.
It is not possible to exceed the maximum
delay length for a particular version of Mod
Delay II. Consequently, when adjusting any
of the tempo controls (Tempo, Meter, Duration, and Groove) you may not be able to
adjust the control across its full range. If
you encounter this behavior, switch to a
version of Mod Delay II that has a longer
delay time (for example, switch from Medium Delay to Long Delay).
The Signal Generator plug-in produces audio
test tones in a variety of frequencies, waveforms,
and amplitudes. It is particularly useful for generating reference signals with which to calibrate
Pro Tools|HD interfaces (such as the 96 I/O or
192 I/O) and other elements of your studio.
Refer to the Pro Tools|HD Getting Started
Guide for instructions on using Signal Generator to calibrate the 96 I/O, or 192 I/O
audio interfaces, as well as older audio interfaces.
Signal Generator plug-in
The TDM Signal Generator produces a tone
as soon as it is inserted on a track. To mute
the Signal Generator, use the Bypass button.
When using the RTAS version of Signal
Generator, start playback to generate.
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
81
Signal Generator Controls
SurroundScope
Frequency Sets the frequency of the signal in
hertz. Values range from a low of 20 Hz to a
high of 20 kHz in a 44.1 kHz session. The upper
limit of the frequency range for this setting will
increase to match the Nyquist frequency (half the
sample rate) in 96 kHz and 192 kHz sessions
(HD-series systems only).
(Pro Tools HD Only)
Level Sets the amplitude of the signal in decibels. Values range from a low of –95 dB to a high
of 0.0 dB.
Signal These buttons select the waveform.
Choices are sine, square, sawtooth, triangle,
white noise, and pink noise.
SurroundScope is a plug-in that provides surround metering for multichannel track types
from 3 channels (LCR) to 8 channels (7.1 surround). Stereo and mono tracks are not supported.
This version of SurroundScope is compatible
with sessions that used the previous versions of SurroundScope.
Meters
Surround Display
The Signal Generator plug-in is not intended for rigorous test purposes; it is a simple level calibration tool.
Peak Generates signal at the maximum possible
level without clipping.
RMS Generates signal at levels consistent with
the RMS (Root-Mean-Square) value, or the effective average level of the signal.
SignalTools
DigiRack SignalTools metering plug-ins provide
two metering modules: SurroundScope and
PhaseScope.
Display Options
The SignalTools plug-ins support TDM and
RTAS plug-in formats at all sample rates.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
SurroundScope
Phase/Leq(A) Display
Surround Display
PhaseScope
SurroundScope detects the multi-channel format of the track and displays each channel in
the signal in a circle around the Surround Display.
PhaseScope is a multichannel metering plug-in
that provides signal level and phase information
for stereo tracks only. (Mono and LCR or greater
multichannel tracks are not supported.)
Meters
Lissajous Meter Display
SurroundScope Surround Display (5.0 shown)
The Surround Display generates a composite image that indicates relative signal strength in the
displayed channels.
A circle in the center of the display indicates a
surround signal that is panned equally to all
channels.
◆
Display Options
Phase/Leq(A) Display
PhaseScope
An irregular shape that is closer to one side of
the display indicates that the channels on that
side have a stronger signal.
◆
A teardrop shape that points toward a single
channel indicates that the signal is panned to
that channel.
◆
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
83
Lissajous Meter Display
SignalTools Display Options
The PhaseScope Lissajous Meter displays the relationship between the amplitude and phase of
a stereo signal, enabling you to monitor stereo
imaging graphically.
Both SignalTools plug-ins offer two display options: Phase Meter Display and Leq(A) Meter
Display.
To choose a display option:
A “Lissajous curve” (also known as a Lissajous figure or Bowditch curve) is a type of
graph that is able to describe complex harmonic motion. To learn more, search the
Web or your local library for information on
its origins and its two principal developers,
Jules Antoine Lissajous, and Nathaniel
Bowditch.
■ Click the corresponding button in the Options section of the plug-in window.
SignalTools display options
Phase Meter Display
The Phase Meter indicates the phase coherency
of two channels of a multi-channel signal.
SignalTools Phase Meter
The Phase Meter is green when the channels are
positively out of phase (values from 0 to +1) and
red when the channels are negatively out of
phase (values from 0 to –1).
PhaseScope Lissajous Meter Display
The Lissajous Meter display is divided into four
quadrants, with left and right channels arranged
diagonally. When audio is panned predominantly to a particular speaker channel, a diagonal line appears, indicating the channel.
The Lissajous Meter displays in-phase material
as a vertical line and out-of-phase material as a
horizontal line.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
At the center or zero position, the signal is a perfect stereo image. At the +1 position, the signal
is a perfect mono image. At the –1 position, the
signal is 100% out of phase.
SurroundScope With SurroundScope you can select the two channels to compare by clicking the
channel buttons around the Surround Display.
Selected channels are indicated in blue.
Selecting Channels for Leq(A) Metering
SurroundScope With SurroundScope, you can
select any combination of channels for Leq(A)
metering by clicking the channel buttons
around the Surround Display. Selected channels
are indicated in green.
Selecting SurroundScope channels for phase metering
PhaseScope With PhaseScope, the left and right
channels are always compared.
Leq(A) Meter Display
The Leq(A) Meter display lets you view the true
weighted average of the power level sent to any
channel or combination of channels (except the
LFE channel) in a multichannel track.
The Leq(A) Meter display shows a floating average for the level over the interval chosen in the
Window menu. For example, with a setting of 2
seconds, the display shows the average value for
the most recent 2 seconds of audio playback.
Selecting SurroundScope channels for Leq (A) metering
PhaseScope With PhaseScope, you can select either or both channel for Leq(A) metering by
clicking the channel buttons in the corners of
the Lissajous display. Selected channels are indicated in green.
Selecting PhaseScope channels for Leq(A) metering
Leq(A) Metering Controls
SignalTools Leq(A) meter and controls
Window The Leq(A) window menu lets you
choose the length of time the signal is measured
before an average value is calculated. Settings
range from 1 second to 2 minutes.
When the Leq(A) meter is in INF (infinite) mode
it is constantly averaging the signal without a
floating averaging window.
Reset The Reset button lets you manually reset
the start time of the Leq(A) measurement window.
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
85
Auto Reset When enabled, causes the start time
of the Leq(A) measurement window to be automatically reset whenever playback starts in
Pro Tools.
Hold on Stop When enabled, causes the Leq(A)
measurement window timer to pause when
playback stops, and resume when playback begins again.
In any of the Loop Transport modes, the
measurement start time is automatically reset each time playback goes back to the beginning of the loop.
SignalTools Level Meters
The SignalTools plug-ins let you choose the type
of metering to use. Each meter type has a different metering scale and response.
Peak Hold
selector
Reference
mark
SignalTools level meters
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Meter Type
selector
Meter Types
Peak (Default meter type) Uses the metering
scale in DigiRack EQ III and Dynamics III plugins.
RMS (Root Mean Square) was used in previous
versions of the Digidesign SurroundScope plugin and uses the same “true” RMS metering scale.
The “true” RMS meter scale is not the same
as the AES 17 RMS scale. For a sine wave
with a peak value of –20 dBFS, the “true”
RMS meter will show a value of –23 dBFS.
(The same sine wave will show a value of
–20 dBFS on an AES 17 RMS meter.‚
Peak + RMS Uses a multi-color display to show
both types of metering. Peak metering is shown
in conventional green color, while RMS metering is shown in blue.
VU (Volume Unit) Uses AES standards for signal
level indication.
BBC Uses IEC-IIa standards for signal level indication. This style of metering suppresses short
duration peaks that would not affect broadcast
program material. Reference calibration (4 dB) is
–18 dBFS.
Nordic Uses IEC Type I standards for signal level
indication and provides greater resolution for
readings between –10 dBu and +4 dBu. Reference calibration (0 dB) is –18 dBFS.
DIN Uses IEC Type I standards for signal level indication and provides greater resolution for
readings between –10 dBu and +5 dBu. Reference calibration (–9 dB) is –18 dBFS.
VENUE Provides Peak metering behavior with a
meter scale calibrated specifically for Digidesign
VENUE systems. Reference calibration (0 dB) is
–20 dBFS.
Meter values are always displayed on control surfaces in dBFS values, regardless of
the Meter Type setting.
Pitch
(Pro Tools HD Only)
The Pitch plug-in is designed for a variety of audio production applications ranging from pitch
correction of musical material to sound design.
Meter Peak Hold Options
Each of the SignalTools plug-ins lets you choose
the style of peak hold when peaks are shown in
the plug-in meters.
3 Second Displays peak levels for 3 seconds
Infinite Displays peak levels until meters are
cleared
No Peak Hold Does not display peak levels
Reference Mark Options
Each SignalTools meter type lets you adjust the
level of the reference mark on the side of the
meter display. The mark is set by default to the
reference level for the corresponding meter
type.
SignalTools meters also change color to
show different ranges of level. The relative
range of color automatically adjusts to follow the current Reference Mark setting in all
meter types (except Peak+RMS).
To change the reference level of a SignalTools
meter:
Drag the reference mark to a different location
on the meter scale.
■
Pitch plug-in
Pitch processing uses the technique of varying
sample playback rate to achieve pitch transposition. Because changing audio sample playback
rate results in the digital equivalent of varispeeding with tape, this is an unsatisfactory
method since it changes the overall duration of
the material.
Pitch transposition with the Pitch plug-in involves a much more complex technique: digitally adding or subtracting portions of the audio
waveform itself, while using de-glitching cross-
Chapter 6: DigiRack Real-Time TDM and RTAS Plug-ins
87
fades to minimize undesirable artifacts. The result is a processed signal that is transposed in
pitch, but still retains the same overall length as
the original, unprocessed signal.
The Pitch plug-in was formerly called
DPP-1. It is fully compatible with all settings and presets created for DPP-1.
Pitch Controls
Input Level Attenuates the input level of the
Pitch plug-in to help prevent internal clipping.
Signal Present Indicator LED Indicates the presence of an input signal.
Clip Indicator Indicates whether clipping has occurred on output. It is a Clip-Hold Indicator. If
clipping occurs at any time, the clip light will remain on. To clear the Clip Indicator, click it.
Long delay times and high feedback times increase the likelihood of clipping.
Mix Adjusts the ratio of dry signal to effected signal in the output. In general, this control should
be set to 100% wet, unless you are using the
Pitch plug-in in-line on an Insert for an individual track or element in a mix. This control can
be adjusted over its entire range with little or no
change in output level.
Delay Sets the delay time between the original
signal and the pitch-shifted signal. It has a maximum setting of 125 milliseconds. You can use
the Delay control in conjunction with the Feedback control to generate a single pitch-shifted
echo, or a series of echoes that climb in pitch.
Feedback Controls the amount and type of feedback (positive or negative) applied from the output of the delay portion of the Pitch plug-in
back into its input. It also controls the number
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
of repetitions of the delayed signal. You can use
it to produce effects that spiral up or down in
pitch, with each successive echo shifted in
pitch.
Coarse Adjusts the pitch of a signal in semitones
over a two octave range. Pitch changes are indicated both in the Semitones field and in the Musical Staff Relative section below this slider. Using the –8va and +8va buttons in conjunction
with the Coarse slider provides a full 4-octave
range of adjustment.
–8va and +8va Buttons Clicking the –8va button
adjusts pitch down one octave from the current
setting of the coarse and fine pitch controls.
Clicking the +8va button adjusts pitch up one
octave from the current setting of the coarse and
fine pitch controls.
Relative Pitch Entry (Musical Staff)
Clicking on any note on this musical staff selects a relative pitch transposition value that
will be applied to an audio signal. If Middle C is
illuminated, it indicates that no pitch transposition has been selected. If a pitch transposition is
selected, the note interval corresponding to the
selected transposition value is indicated in yellow. Alt-clicking (Windows) or Option-clicking
(Mac) on the staff will set the coarse pitch
change value to zero.
Relative pitch entry
Fine Controls the pitch of a signal in cents (hundredths of a semitone) over a 100 cent range.
The range of this slider is –49 to +50 cents. Precise Pitch change values are indicated in the
Cents field. The flat, natural, and sharp signs below this slider indicate deviation from the nearest semitone.
Ratio Indicates the ratio of transposition between the original pitch and the selected transposition value.
Crossfade Adjusts crossfade length in milliseconds to optimize performance of the Pitch plugin according to the type of audio material you
are processing. The Pitch plug-in performs pitch
transposition by replicating or subtracting portions of audio material and very quickly crossfading between these alterations in the waveform of the audio material.
Crossfade length affects the amount of smoothing performed on audio material to prevent audio artifacts such as clicks from occurring as the
audio is looped to generate the pitch shift.
In general, small, narrow-range pitch shifts require longer crossfades and large shifts require
smaller ones. The disadvantage of a long crossfade time is that it will smooth the signal, including any transients. While this is sometimes
desirable for audio material such as vocals, it is
not appropriate for material with sharp transients such as drums or percussion.
The default setting for this control is Auto. At
this setting, crossfade times are set automatically, according to the settings of the Coarse and
Fine pitch controls. The Auto setting is appropriate for most applications. However, you can
manually adjust and optimize crossfade times
using the Crossfade slider if necessary. For audio
material with sharper attack transients, use
shorter crossfade times. For audio material with
softer attack transients, use longer crossfade
times.
Minimum Pitch Sets the minimum fundamental
pitch that the Pitch plug-in will recognize when
performing pitch transposition. Use this to optimize the Pitch plug-in’s performance by adjusting this control based on the lowest fundamental pitch of the audio material that you want to
process.
On audio material with a low fundamental
pitch frequency content (such as an electric bass
guitar) setting this control to a lower frequency
such as 30 Hz will improve the Pitch plug-in’s
performance. The most important thing to remember when using this control is that the fundamental frequency of audio material you want
to process must be above the frequency you set
here.
The range of this slider is from 15 Hz to 1000 Hz.
The default setting is 60 Hz. Adjustment is tied
to the current setting of the Maximum Pitch
control so that the minimum range is never less
than one octave, and the maximum range never
more than five octaves.
Maximum Pitch Adjusts the maximum fundamental pitch that the Pitch plug-in will recognize when performing pitch transposition. To
optimize the Pitch plug-in’s performance, adjust
this setting (and the Minimum Pitch setting)
based on the highest fundamental pitch of the
audio material that you want to process. The
range of this slider is from 30 Hz to 4000 Hz. The
default setting is 240 Hz.
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TimeAdjuster
The TimeAdjuster plug-in provides three functions:
• Compensation for delays due to TDM- or
RTAS-based routing
• Gain compensation (+/– 24 dB)
• Phase inversion for correcting out-of-phase
signals
TimeAdjuster plug-in
For special information on Delay Compensation and Time Adjuster, see the Pro Tools
Reference Guide.
The TimeAdjuster plug-in is an efficient way to
compensate for DSP or host-based processing
delays in your Pro Tools system.
There are three versions of the TimeAdjuster
plug-in, each of which supports different sample delay ranges:
Short Supports a maximum delay of 256 samples at all sample rates.
Medium Supports a maximum delay of 2048
samples at all sample rates.
Long Supports a maximum delay of 8192 samples at all sample rates.
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TimeAdjuster Controls
Phase Invert Inverts the phase (polarity) of the
input signal. While most Digidesign plug-ins
supply a phase invert button of their own, some
third-party plug-ins may not. Phase inversion is
also useful for performing delay compensation
by tuning unknown delay factors by ear (see
“Using TimeAdjuster for Manual Delay Compensation” on page 91).
Gain Provides up to 24 dB of positive or negative
gain adjustment. This control is useful for altering the gain of a signal by a large amount in real
time. For example, when you are working with
audio signals that are extremely low level, you
may want to adjust the channel gain to a reasonable working range so that a fader is positioned at its optimum travel position. Use the
Gain control to make a wide range of gain adjustment in real time without having to permanently process the audio files, as you would with
an AudioSuite plug-in.
Delay Provides up to 8192 samples of delay compensation adjustment, or general adjustment of
phase relationships of audio recorded with multiple microphones, depending on which version
of TimeAdjuster is used. It defaults to a minimum delay of four samples, which is the delay
created by use of the TimeAdjuster plug-in itself.
While phase inversion controls have been used
for many years by engineers as creative tools for
adjustment of frequency response between multiple microphones, sample-level delay adjustments provide far more control. Creative use of
this control can provide a powerful tool for adjusting frequency response and timing relationships between audio signals recorded with multiple microphones.
Using TimeAdjuster for Manual
Delay Compensation
DSP and host-based processing in all digital systems incurs delay of varying amounts. You can
use the TimeAdjuster TDM plug-in to apply an
exact number of samples of delay to the signal
path of a Pro Tools track to compensate for delay incurred by specific plug-ins. TimeAdjuster
provides presets for common delay-compensation scenarios.
To compensate for several plug-ins in-line, use
the delay times from each settings file as references, and add them together to derive the total
delay time.
Some plug-ins (such as Digidesign’s Maxim
and DINR BNR) have different delays at
different sample rates. Refer to the Digidesign Plug-ins Guide for more information
about these plug-ins.
Alternatively, look up the delay in samples for
the plug-ins you want to compensate for, then
apply the appropriate amount of delay.
the polarity (phase) of one of them, the signals
will be of opposite polarity and cancel each
other out. This technique is convenient for finding the exact delay setting for any plug-in.
To determine the delay of a plug-in by inverting its
signal phase:
1 Place duplicate audio regions on two different
audio tracks and pan them to the center
(mono).
2 Apply the plug-in whose delay you want to
calculate to the first track, and a Time Adjuster
plug-in to the second track.
3 With TimeAdjuster, invert the phase.
4 Control-drag (Windows) or Command-drag
(Mac) to fine-tune delay in one sample increments, or use the up/down arrow keys to change
the delay one sample at a time until the audio
signal disappears.
5 Change the polarity back to normal.
6 Save the TimeAdjuster setting for later use.
Comb-Filter Effect Cancellation
A delay table for DigiRack plug-ins appears
in Appendix B, “DSP Delays Incurred by
TDM Plug-ins.”
Adjust the delay with the signal in phase until
any comb-filter effects cancel out.
To manually compensate for DSP-induced delays, try one of the following methods:
Viewing Channel Delay
Phase Inversion
Because plug-ins display their delay values in
the channel delay indicators, this can be used as
another method for determining delay compensation.
If you are working with phase-coherent track
pairs, or tracks recorded with multiple microphones, you can invert the phase to negate the
delay. If you don’t hear any audio when you invert a signal’s phase, you have precisely adjusted
and compensated for the delay. This is because
when you monitor duplicate signals and invert
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91
To view time delay values and use TimeAdjuster to
compensate for the delay:
1 Control-click (Windows) or Command-click
(Mac) the Track Level Indicator to toggle between level (that appears on the display as
“vol”), headroom (“pk”), and channel delay
(“dly”) indications. Delay values are shown in
samples.
However, this may not always be necessary. You
may only really need to compensate for delays
between tracks where phase coherency must be
maintained (as with instruments recorded with
multiple microphones or stereo pairs). If you are
working with mono signals, and the accumulated delays are small (just a few samples, for example), you probably needn’t worry about delay
compensation.
For more information about delays and
mixing with Pro Tools HD, see the
Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Determining the DSP delay of track inserts (Mix window
shown)
2 Apply the TimeAdjuster plug-in to the track
whose delay you want to increase, and Controlclick (Windows) or Command-click (Mac) its
Track Level indicator until the channel delay
value is displayed for that track.
3 Change the delay time in TimeAdjuster by
moving the Delay slider or entering a value in
the Delay field, until the channel delay value
matches that of the first track.
4 Test the delay values by duplicating an audio
track and reversing its phase while compensating for delay.
Trim
The Trim plug-in can be used to attenuate an audio signal from –∞ (Infinity) dB to +6 dB or –∞
(Infinity) dB to +12 dB. For example, using a
multi-mono Trim plug-in on a multi-channel
track provides simple, DSP-efficient muting
control over the individual channels of the
track.
This capability is useful, since Track Mute buttons mute all channels of a multi-channel track
and do not allow muting of individual channels
within the track.
When to Compensate for Delays
If you want to compensate for delays across your
entire system with Time Adjuster, you will want
to calculate the maximum delay incurred on
any channel, and apply the delays necessary to
each channel to match this channel.
Trim plug-in
Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac)
the Trim selector to open a Plug-in window
for each channel of a multi-channel track.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Trim Controls
Phase Invert Inverts the phase (polarity) of the
input signal to change the frequency response
characteristics between multi-miked sources or
to correct for miswired microphone cables.
Gain Provides –∞ dB to +6 dB or +12 dB of gain
adjustment, depending whether the Gain toggle
is set to +6 or +12.
+6/+12 Gain toggle Switches the maximum
level of attenuation between –∞ dB to +6 dB and
–∞ dB to +12 dB.
Automation data adjusts to reflect the current Gain setting. When working with automation data from an older version of the
Trim plug-in, ensure the Gain setting is set
at +6 dB.
Output Meter Indicates the output level, including any gain compensation added using the
Gain control.
Mute Mutes the signal output.
See also “Linking and Unlinking Controls
on Multi-Mono Plug-ins” on page 21.
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chapter 7
DigiRack AudioSuite Plug-ins
EQ III
The EQ III Plug-in provides a high-quality
7 Band, 2–4 Band, or 1 Band EQ for adjusting
the frequency spectrum of audio material.
1 Band EQ
The 1 Band EQ has its own window, with six selectable filter types.
The EQ III Plug-in appears as two separate
choices in the plug-in the AudioSuite menu:
7 Band, or 1 Band. (2–4 Band is not available in
AudioSuite format; use the 7 Band instead).
1 Band EQ window
7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ
The 7 Band EQ and the 2–4 Band EQ have the
same window and identical controls, but on the
2–4 Band EQ, a limited number of the seven
available bands can be active at the same time.
The features of these plug-ins are non-real-time,
but otherwise identical to their real-time counterparts.
For information on the individual controls
for these plug-ins, see “EQ III” on page 43
EQ II
For information, see the DigiRack Legacy
Plug-ins Guide.
7 Band EQ and 2–4 Band EQ window
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95
Dynamics III
Dynamics III provides three modules:
• Compressor/Limiter
• Expander/Gate
• De-Esser
The features of these plug-ins are non-real-time,
but otherwise identical to their real-time counterparts.
For information on individual controls in
these plug-ins, see “Dynamics III” on
page 64.
De-Esser 3 plug-in
Dynamics II
For information, see the DigiRack Legacy
Plug-ins Guide.
Compressor/Limiter 3 plug-in
Expander/Gate 3 plug-in
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Chorus
Chorus adds a shimmering quality to audio material by combining a time-delayed, pitchshifted copy of an audio signal with itself.
The Chorus plug-in was formerly called
D-fx Chorus. It is fully compatible with all
settings and presets created for D-fx Chorus.
Mix Adjusts the balance between the effected
signal and the original signal and controls the
depth of the effect. Mix is adjustable from 0% to
100%.
Low-Pass Filter Controls the cutoff frequency of
the Low-Pass Filter. Use this to attenuate the
high frequency content of the feedback signal.
The lower the setting, the more high frequencies are removed from the feedback signal.
The range of the Low-Pass Filter is 20 Hz to
19.86 kHz, with a maximum value of Off (which
effectively means bypass).
Delay Sets the delay time between the original
signal and the chorused signal. The higher the
setting, the longer the delay and the wider the
chorusing effect. Delay is adjustable from 0–20
milliseconds.
Chorus plug-in
Gain Adjusts the input volume of the chorus to
prevent clipping or increase the level of the processed signal. This slider is set to a default of
+3 dB. If your source audio has been recorded
very close to peak level, this +3 dB default setting could cause clipping. Use this control to reduce the input level.
Selecting the Sum Input button sums the dry input signals (mono or stereo) before processing
them. The dry signal then appears in the center
of the stereo field and the wet, effected signal
will be output in stereo.
When the Sum Inputs button is selected, the
LFO waveform on the right channel is automatically phase inverted to enhance the mono-stereo effect.
LFO Rate Adjusts the rate of the LFO (low frequency oscillator) applied to the delayed signal
as modulation. The higher the setting, the more
rapid the modulation. You can select either a
sine wave or a triangle wave as a modulation
source, using the LFO Waveform selector.
LFO Width Adjusts the intensity of the LFO applied to the delayed signal as modulation. The
higher the setting, the more intense the modulation. Use the LFO Waveform selector to select
a sine or a triangle wave as a modulation source.
Feedback Controls the amount of feedback applied from the output of the delayed signal back
into its input. Negative settings provide a more
intense effect.
LFO Waveform Selects a sine wave or triangle
wave for the LFO. This affects the character of
the modulation. The sine wave has a gentler
ramp and peak than the triangle wave.
Sum Inputs button
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Flanger
The Flanger animates and adds a swirling, moving quality to audio material by combing a timedelayed copy of an audio signal with itself.
The Flanger uses a through-zero flanging algorithm that results in a tape-like flanging effect.
This technique delays the original dry signal by
256 samples, then modulates the delayed signal
back and forth in time in relation to the dry signal, passing through its zero point on the way.
The Flanger plug-in was formerly called
D-fx Flanger. It is fully compatible with all
settings and presets created for D-fx
Flanger.
When the Sum Inputs button is selected, the
LFO waveform on the right channel is phase inverted to enhance the mono-stereo effect.
Mix Adjusts the balance between the effected
signal and the original signal and controls the
depth of the effect. Mix is adjustable from 0% to
100%.
High-Pass Filter Controls the cutoff frequency of
the High-Pass Filter. Use this to attenuate the
frequency content of the feedback signal and
the frequency response of the flanging. The
higher the setting, the more low frequencies are
removed from the feedback signal.
LFO Rate Adjusts the rate of the LFO (low frequency oscillator) applied to the delayed signal
as modulation. The higher the setting, the more
rapid the modulation. You can select either a
sine wave or a triangle wave as a modulation
source, using the LFO Waveform selector.
LFO Width Adjusts the intensity of the LFO applied to the delayed signal as modulation. The
higher the setting, the more intense the modulation.
Flanger plug-in
Gain Adjusts the input volume of the flanger to
prevent clipping or increase the level of the processed signal. This slider is set to a default of
+3 dB. If your source audio has been recorded
very close to peak level, this +3 dB default setting could cause clipping. Use this control to reduce the input level.
Selecting the Sum Input button sums the dry input signals (mono and stereo) before processing
them. The dry signal then appears in the center
of the stereo field and the wet, effected signal
will be output in stereo.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Feedback Controls the amount of feedback applied from the output of the delayed signal back
into its input. Negative settings provide a more
intense effect.
LFO Waveform Selects a sine wave or triangle
wave for the LFO. This affects the character of
the modulation. The sine wave has a gentler
ramp and peak than the triangle wave.
Multi-Tap Delay
The Multi-Tap Delay adds up to four independently-controllable delays or taps to the original
audio signal. Use the Multi-tap delay to add spatialization or complex rhythmic echo effects to
audio material. You can individually control the
delay time and number of repetitions of each of
the four taps.
The Multi-Tap Delay plug-in was formerly
called D-fx Multi-Tap Delay. It is fully
compatible with all settings and presets created for D-fx Multi-Tap Delay.
Selecting the Sum Input button sums the dry input signals (mono or stereo) before processing
them. The dry signal then appears in the center
of the stereo field and the wet, effected signal
will be output in stereo.
Feedback Controls the amount of feedback applied from the output of the delay into its input.
It also controls the number of repetitions of the
delayed signal. For the feedback feature to function, the Gain slider must be raised above its
lowest setting.
Pan The pan sliders for each of the four taps control their apparent location in the stereo field.
Delay Sets the delay time between the original
signal and the delayed signal. The higher the
setting, the longer the delay. This control is adjustable from 0–1500 milliseconds (1.5 seconds).
Mix Adjusts the balance between the effected
signal and the original signal and controls the
depth of the effect. Mix is adjustable from 0% to
100%.
Selecting Audio for Processing with
AudioSuite Delay
Because Multi-Tap Delay adds additional material to the end of selected audio (a delay tap),
make a selection that is longer than the original
source material so AudioSuite Delay can write it
into the audio file.
Multi-Tap Delay plug-in
Gain The Gain slider for each of the Multi-Tap
delay’s four delay lines controls the input level
of that individual delay tap. Adjust Gain to prevent clipping or increase the level of the processed signal.
Select only the original material, without leaving additional space at the end, will produce a
delay that occurs after the end of the region will
be cut off.
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99
To accommodate for this, place the region in a
track, and select the desired audio plus an
amount of blank space at the end of the region
equal to the amount of delay that you have
added in the plug-in. The plug-in will then have
space at the end of the region in which to write
the final delay.
Ping-Pong Delay
The Ping-Pong Delay plug-in adds a controllable
delay to the original audio signal. Use the PingPong delay to add spatialization, and panned
echo to audio material. This plug-in feeds back
delayed signals to their opposite channels, creating a characteristic ping-pong echo effect.
The Ping-Pong Delay plug-in was formerly
called D-fx Ping-Pong Delay. It is fully
compatible with all settings and presets created for D-fx Ping-Pong Delay.
Delay Sets the delay time between the original
signal and the delayed signal. The higher the
setting, the longer the delay. This control is adjustable from 0–1500 milliseconds (1.5 seconds).
Low-Pass Filter Controls the cutoff frequency of
the Low-Pass Filter. Use this to attenuate the
high frequency content of the feedback signal.
The lower the setting, the more high frequencies are removed from the feedback signal.
The range of the Low-Pass Filter is 20 Hz to
19.86 kHz, with a maximum value of Off (which
effectively means bypass).
Feedback Controls the amount of feedback applied from the output of the delay into its input.
It also controls the number of repetitions of the
delayed signal.
Cross-Feedback Cross-Feedback feeds the delayed signals to their opposite channel: The left
channel delay is fed to the right channel input
and vice-versa. The result is a stereo echo that
ping-pongs back and forth between the right
and left channels.
Selecting Audio for Delay Processing
Ping-Pong Delay plug-in
Gain Adjusts the input volume of the Ping-Pong
Delay to prevent clipping or increase the level of
the processed signal.
Mix Adjusts the balance between the effected
signal and the original signal and controls the
depth of the effect. Mix is adjustable from 0% to
100%.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Because Ping-Pong Delay adds additional material (a delay tap) to the end of selected audio,
make a selection that is longer than the original
source material to allow the delay tap to be written into the end of the audio file.
Selecting only the original material, without
leaving additional space at the end, will cause
delay taps that occur after the end of the region
to be cut off.
Invert
The Invert plug-in reverses the polarity of selected audio. Positive sample amplitude values
are made negative, and all negative amplitudes
are made positive.
This process is useful for altering the phase or
polarity relationship of tracks. The Invert plug-in
is useful during mixing for modifying frequency
response between source tracks recorded with
multiple microphones. You can also use it to
correct audio recorded out of phase with an incorrectly wired cable.
The Duplicate plug-in works nondestructively.
You cannot choose to overwrite files.
Delay
The Delay plug-in provides time delay-based effects, with up to 10.9 seconds of delay, at any
session sample rate. You can also use it to produce multiple delay-based effects, including slap
echo, doubling, chorusing, and flanging.
Invert plug-in
Delay AudioSuite plug-in
Duplicate
The Duplicate plug-in duplicates the selected
audio in place. Depending on how its controls
are configured, the new region will appear in either the Regions List or playlist. You can use this
to flatten or consolidate an entire track consisting of multiple regions into one continuous audio file that resides in the same place as the original individual regions.
Duplicate plug-in
The audio is unaffected by Pro Tools volume or
pan automation, or by any real-time plug-ins
that may be in use on the track as inserts. The
original audio file regions are merely rewritten
in place to a single duplicate file.
The controls of the AudioSuite Delay plug-in operate in non-real-time, but are otherwise identical to the real-time Mod Delay II plug-in.
For information on the individual controls
for the AudioSuite Delay plug-in, see “Mod
Delay II” on page 79.
If you have the Mod Delay Plug-in installed,
Short Delay, Slap Delay, Medium Delay, and
Long Delay will be available in the AudioSuite
menu in addition to Delay (Mod Delay II). The
features of these plug-ins are identical to their
real-time counterparts. The only difference is
that the AudioSuite versions operate in non-real
time.
For information on the individual controls
for the AudioSuite Short Delay, Slap Delay,
Medium Delay, and Long Delay plug-ins,
see “Mod Delay II” on page 79.
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Selecting Audio Delay Processing
Because AudioSuite Delay adds additional material (a delay tap) to the end of selected audio,
make a selection that is longer than the original
source material to allow the delay tap to be written into the end of the audio file.
Selecting only the original material, without
leaving additional space at the end, will cause
delay taps that occur after the end of the region
to be cut off.
Normalize
The Normalize plug-in optimizes the volume
level of an audio selection. Use it on material recorded with too little amplitude, or on material
whose volume levels are inconsistent (as in a
poorly recorded narration).
Unlike compression and limiting, which modify
the dynamics of audio material, normalization
preserves dynamics by uniformly increasing (or
decreasing) amplitude.
To prevent clipping during sample rate conversion, Normalize to no greater than the
range between –2 dB to –0.5 dB. Optimum
settings will vary with your program material and your Conversion Quality setting (in
the Editing tab of the Preferences dialog).
Normalize plug-in
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Max Peak At Specifies how close to maximum
level (clipping threshold) the peak level of a selection is boosted. Set this value by adjusting the
Max Peak At slider, by entering a numeric decibel value below the clipping threshold, or by entering a percentage of the clipping threshold.
You can normalize stereo pairs together so that
two sides of a stereo signal are processed relative
to each other.
RMS/Peak Toggle Switches the calibration of
normalizing between Peak or RMS modes. Peak
normalizes the input signal at the maximum
possible level without clipping. RMS normalizes
the input signal at a level consistent with the
RMS (Root-Mean-Square) value, or the effective
average level of the selected region.
Normalizing Multiple Regions Across Tracks
When multiple regions are selected across multiple tracks, the Normalize plug-in can search
for peaks in two different modes:
Peak On Each Chan/Track Searches for the peak
level on a channel-by-channel or track-by-track
basis.
Peak On All Chans/Tracks Searches for the peak
level of the entire selection. If ten tracks are selected, for example, the Normalize function will
find the peak value from all ten.
Gain
Signal Generator
The Gain plug-in boosts or lowers a selected region’s amplitude by a specific amount. Use it to
smooth out undesired peaks and other dynamic
inconsistencies in audio material.
The Signal Generator plug-in produces audio
test tones in a variety of frequencies, waveforms,
and amplitudes.
Gain plug-in
Gain Specifies the desired gain level. Set this
value by manually adjusting the Gain slider, or
by entering a numeric decibel value, or by entering a percentage.
Find Level When clicked, displays the peak amplitude value of the current selection.
RMS/Peak Toggle Switches the calibration of
gain adjustment between Peak or RMS modes.
Peak adjusts the gain of the input signal to the
maximum possible level without clipping. RMS
adjusts the input signal to a level consistent
with the RMS (Root-Mean-Square) value, or the
effective average level of the selected region.
Signal Generator plug-in
The features of this plug-in are non-real-time,
but otherwise identical to its real-time counterpart.
You can use the AudioSuite Signal Generator plug-in for musical purposes as well as
for testing purposes. For example, you might
want to add a little color to a kick drum
track by doubling it with a 50 Hz tone, using the kick track as the key input signal
gating the tone track.
Reverse
The Reverse plug-in replaces the audio with a reversed version of the selection.
Reverse plug-in
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To create an audio region using the Signal
Generator plug-in:
1 Make a selection in the Tracks window.
2 Choose AudioSuite > Signal Generator.
3 Enter values for the Frequency, Level, and Sig-
nal controls.
Time Compression/
Expansion
The Time Compression/Expansion plug-in adjusts the duration of selected regions, increasing
or decreasing their length without changing
pitch.
4 Click Process in the Signal Generator plug-in.
Select the Create Continuous File option for
greater flexibility in making audio selections for use with the Signal Generator plugin.
For information on the individual controls
for the Signal Generator plug-in, see “Signal
Generator” on page 81.
DC Offset Removal
The DC Offset Removal plug-in removes DC offset from audio files. DC offset is a type of audio
artifact (typically caused by miscalibrated analog-to-digital convertors) that can cause pops
and clicks in edited material.
To check for DC offset, find a silent section in
the audio material. If DC offset is present, a
near-vertical fade-in with a constant or steadystate offset from zero will appear in the waveform. Use the DC Offset Removal plug-in to remove it.
DC Offset Removal plug-in
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Time Compression/Expansion plug-in
It is especially useful in audio post-production
for adjusting audio to specific time or SMPTE
durations for synchronization purposes. Time
Compression/Expansion is nondestructive.
Normalizing a selection before using Time
Compressing/Expansion may produce better
results.
Source and Destination The Source fields display
the length of the current selection before processing in each of the listed formats. All fields
are always active; a change made to one value is
immediately reflected in the others.
The Destination fields both display and control
the final length of the selection after processing.
Enter the length of the Destination file by double-clicking the appropriate field in the Destination column.
Use the Ratio, Crossfade, Min Pitch, and Accuracy controls to fine-tune the Time Compression/Expansion process.
Ratio Sets the destination length in relation to
the source length. Moving the slider to the right
increases the length of the destination file,
while moving the slider to the left decreases its
length.
Crossfade Adjusts the crossfade length in milliseconds, optimizing performance of the Time
Compression/Expansion according to the type
of audio material being processed. (This plug-in
achieves length modification by replicating or
subtracting very small portions of audio material and very quickly crossfading between these
alterations in the waveform of the audio material.)
Crossfade length affects the amount of smoothing performed on audio material. This prevents
audio artifacts such as clicks from occurring.
Long crossfade times may over-smooth a signal
and its transients. This may not be desirable on
drums and other material with sharp transients.
Use the Crossfade slider to manually adjust and
optimize crossfade times if necessary. For audio
material with sharper attack transients, use
smaller crossfade times. For audio material with
softer attack transients, use longer crossfade
times.
Min Pitch Sets the minimum, or lowest, pitch
that will be used in the plug-in’s calculations
during the Time Compression/Expansion process. The control has a range of 40 Hz to 1000
Hz.
This control should be set lower when processing bass guitar or audio material with a low frequency range. Set this control higher when processing higher frequency range audio material.
Accuracy Prioritizes the processing resources allocated to audio quality (Sound) or timing
(Rhythm). Moving the slider towards “Sound”
generally results in better sonic quality and
fewer audio artifacts. Moving the slider towards
“Rhythm” puts the emphasis on keeping the
tempo consistent.
When you are working with audio loops, listen
carefully and adjust the Accuracy slider until
you find a setting that keeps timing solid within
the region. If you don’t, start and end times may
be precise, but the beats in rhythmic material
may appear to be shuffled if too little priority is
given to Rhythm.
Time Compression & Expansion settings
created in version 4.x and later of Pro Tools
for Windows are not compatible with later
versions.
Chapter 7: DigiRack AudioSuite Plug-ins
105
Pitch Shift
The Pitch Shift plug-in adjusts the pitch of any
source audio file with or without a change in its
duration. This is a very powerful function that
transposes audio a full octave up or down in
pitch with or without altering playback speed.
is enabled, fidelity can be affected. For example,
time expansion as a result of Time Correction
when lowering pitch can cause the audio to
sound granulated.
Ratio Adjusts the amount of transposition
(pitch change). Moving the slider to the right
raises the pitch of the processed file, while moving the slider to the left decreases its pitch.
Crossfade Use this to manually adjust crossfade
length in milliseconds to optimize performance
of the Pitch Shift plug-in according to the type
of audio material you are processing. This plugin achieves pitch transposition by processing
very small portions of the selected audio material and very quickly crossfading between these
alterations in the waveform of the audio material.
Pitch Shift plug-in
Gain Adjusts input level, in 10ths of a dB. Dragging the slider to the right increases gain, dragging to the left decreases gain.
Coarse and Fine Adjusts amount of pitch shift.
The Coarse slider transposes in semitones (half
steps). The Fine slider transposes in cents (hundredths of a semitone).
Time Correction Disabling this option has the effect of “permanently varispeeding” your audio
file. The file’s duration will be compressed or extended according to the settings of the Coarse
and Fine pitch controls. When Time Correction
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Crossfade length affects the amount of smoothing performed on audio material. This prevents
audio artifacts such as clicks from occurring. In
general, smaller pitch transpositions require
longer crossfades; wider pitch transpositions require smaller crossfades. Long crossfade times
may over-smooth a signal and its transients.
This is may not be desirable on drums and other
material with sharp transients.
Use the Crossfade slider to adjust and optimize
crossfade times. For audio material with sharper
attack transients, use smaller crossfade times.
For audio material with softer attack transients,
use longer crossfade times.
Min Pitch Sets the lowest pitch used in the plugin’s Pitch Shift processing. The control has a
range of 40 Hz to 1000 Hz. Use it to focus the
Pitch Shift process according to the audio’s spectral shape.
Use lower values when processing lower frequency audio material. Use higher values when
processing higher frequency audio material.
Accuracy Sets the processing resources allocated
to audio quality (Sound) or timing (Rhythm).
Set the slider toward Sound for better audio
quality and fewer audio artifacts. Set the slider
toward Rhythm for a more consistent tempo.
Reference Pitch Activates a sine wave-based
pitch generator that you can use as an audible
reference when pitch-shifting audio material.
Note Adjusts the frequency of the reference tone
in semitones (half steps).
Detune Provides finer adjustment of the frequency of the reference tone in cents (100ths of
a semitone).
Time Shift
Time Shift provides high quality time compression and expansion (TCE) algorithms and formant correct pitch-shifting. Time Shift is ideal
for music production, sound design, and postproduction applications. Use it to manipulate
audio loops for tempo matching or to transpose
vocal tracks using formant correct pitch shifting. You can also use it in audio post-production
for pull up and pull down conversions as well as
for adjusting audio to specific time or SMPTE
durations for synchronization purposes.
Time Shift Displays and Controls
Gain Adjusts the volume of the reference tone
in dB.
To use the Reference Pitch:
1 Select the audio material you want to use as a
pitch reference. Click the preview button to begin playback of the selected audio.
2 Click the Reference Pitch button to activate
the reference sine wave tone.
3 Adjust the Note and Detune settings to match
the reference tone to the pitch of the audio playback. Adjust the Gain setting to change the relative volume of the reference tone. It may also
be helpful to toggle the Reference Pitch on and
off to compare pitch.
4 Select the audio material to be pitch shifted.
5 Adjust the Coarse and Fine Pitch Shift con-
trols to match the pitch of the audio playback to
the reference pitch.
6 Click Process to apply pitch shift to the selec-
tion.
Time Shift plug-in
The interface for Time Shift is organized in four
parts: Audio, Time, Formant or Transient, and
Pitch.
Chapter 7: DigiRack AudioSuite Plug-ins
107
Audio Use the controls in the Audio section to
select the most appropriate time compression
and expansion algorithm (mode) for the type of
material you want to process, and to attenuate
the gain of the processed audio to avoid clipping.
Time Use the controls in the Time section to
specify the amount of time compression or expansion you want to apply.
Formant or Transient Use the controls in the Formant or Transient section to adjust either the
amount of formant shift or the transient detection parameters depending upon which mode
you have selected in the Audio section. The Formant section is only available when Monophonic is selected as the Audio Mode. The Transient
section is available with slightly different controls depending on whether Polyphonic or
Rhythmic is selected as the Audio Mode.
Pitch Use the controls in the Pitch section to apply pitch shifting. Pitch shifting can also be formant correct if you select the Monophonic audio setting.
Monophonic Use for processing monophonic
sounds (such as a vocal melody).
Polyphonic Use for processing complex sounds
(such as a multipart musical selection).
Rhythmic Use for processing percussive sounds
(such as a mix or drum loop).
Rhythmic mode uses transient analysis for
time shifting. If you select audio with no apparent transients, or set the Transient
Threshold control to a setting above any detected transients, Time Shift assumes a “virtual-transient” every three seconds to be
able to process the file. Consequently, the
file should be 20 bpm or higher (one beat every three seconds) to achieve desirable results. For material that has no apparent
transients, use Monophonic or Polyphonic
mode.
Varispeed Use to link time and pitch change for
tape-like pitch and speed change effects, and
post-production workflows.
Range
Audio
The Audio section of Time Shift provides controls for specifying the type of audio you want
to process and gain attenuation of the processed
signal to avoid clipping.
Time Shift plug-in, Audio section
Mode
The Audio Mode pop-up menu determines the
type of TCE and pitch shift algorithm for processing audio: Monophonic, Polyphonic,
Rhythmic, or Varispeed.
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The Audio Range pop-up menu determines the
frequency range for analysis: Low, Mid, High, or
Wide. For low-range material, such as a bass guitar, select Low. For mid-range material, such as
male vocals, select Mid. The high range control
is for material with a high fundamental frequency, such as female vocals. For more complex material that covers a broad frequency
spectrum, select Wide.
In Polyphonic mode, Wide is the default setting
and is usually best for all material when using
the Polyphonic audio type.
In Monophonic mode, Mid is the default setting
and is usually matches the range of most monophonic material.
The range pop-up menu is unavailable in Rhythmic mode and Varispeed mode.
Gain
The Audio Gain control attenuates the input
level to avoid clipping. Adjust the Gain control
from 0.0 dB to –6.0 dB to avoid clipping in the
processed signal.
Clip Indicator
The Clip indicator indicates clipping in the processed signal. When using time compression or
pitch shifting above the original pitch, it is possible for clipping to occur. The Clip indicator
lights when the processed signal is clipping. If
the processed signal clips, undo the AudioSuite
process and attenuate the input gain using the
Gain control. Then, re-process the selection.
Level Indicator
The Level indicator displays the level of the output signal using a plasma LED, which uses the
full range of plasma level metering colors.
Time
The Time section of Time Shift provides controls
for specifying the amount of time compression
or expansion as well as the timebase used for calculating TCE. Adjust the Time control to change
the target duration for the processed audio.
Time Shift plug-in, Time section
Original Displays the Start and End times, and
Length of the edit selection. Times are displayed
in units of the timebase selected in the Units
pop-up menu.
Processed Displays the target End time and
Length of the processed signal. Times are displayed in units of the timebase selected in the
Units pop-up menu. You can click the Processed
End and Length fields to type the desired values.
These values update automatically when adjusting the Time control.
Tempo Displays the Original Tempo and Processed Tempo in beats per minute (bpm). You
can click the Original Tempo and Processed
Tempo fields to type the desired values. The Processed Tempo value updates automatically
when adjusting the Time control.
Unit Select the desired timebase for the Original
and Processed time fields: Bars|Beats, Min:Sec,
Time Code, Feet+Frames, or Samples.
Time Shift does not receive Bars|Beat and
Feet+Frame information from Pro Tools
7.0 or 7.1. Consequently, Bars|Beats and
Feet+Frames are displayed as “N/A.”
Shift Displays the target time compression or expansion as a percentage of the original. Adjust
the Time control or click the Shift field and type
the desired value. Time can be shifted from
25.00% to 400.00% of the original speed (or 4 to
1/4 times the original duration). The default setting is 100.00%, or no time shift. 25.00% results
in 4 times the original duration and 400.00% results in 1/4 of the original duration.
The Shift field only displays up to 2 decimal
places, but lets you type in as many decimal
places as you want (up to the IEEE standard).
While the display rounds to 2 decimal places,
the actual time shift is applied based on the
Chapter 7: DigiRack AudioSuite Plug-ins
109
number you typed. This is especially useful for
post-production pull up and pull down factors
(see “Post Production Pull Up and Pull Down
Tasks” on page 112).
Formant
The Formant section of Time Shift lets you shift
the formant shape of the selected audio independently of the fundamental frequency. This is
useful for achieving formant correct pitch shifting. It can also be used as an effect. For example,
you can formant shift a male vocal up by five
semitones and it will take on the characteristics
of a female voice.
The Formant section is only available when
Monophonic is selected as the Audio Type. The
Formant section provides a single control for
transposing the formants of the selected audio
by –24.00 semitones (–2 octaves) to +24.00
semitones (+2 octaves), with fine resolution in
cents. Adjust the Formant Shift control or click
the Shift field and type the desired value.
Time Shift plug-in, Formant section
Audio with a fundamental pitch has an
overtone series, or set of higher harmonics.
The strength of these higher harmonics creates a formant shape, which is apparent if
viewed using a spectrum analyzer. The overtone series, or harmonics, have the same
spacing related to the pitch and have the
same general shape regardless of what the
fundamental pitch is. It is this formant
shape that gives the audio its overall characteristic sound or timbre. When pitch
shifting audio, the formant shape is shifted
with the rest of the material, which can result in an unnatural sound. Keeping this
shape constant is critical to formant correct
pitch shifting and achieving a natural
sounding result.
Transient
The Transient section is only available when
Polyphonic or Rhythmic is selected as the Audio
Type, and provides slightly different controls for
each.
When Polyphonic is selected as the Audio Type,
the Transient section provides controls for setting the transient detection threshold and for
adjusting the analysis window length for processing audio.
Time Shift plug-in, Transient section with Polyphonic
selected as the Audio Type
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When Rhythmic is selected as the Audio Type,
the Transient section provides controls for setting the transient detection threshold, and for
adjusting the decay rate of the transients in the
processed audio when time stretching.
Time Shift plug-in, Transient section with Rhythmic
selected as the Audio Type
Follow Enables an envelope follower that simulates the original acoustics of the audio being
stretched. Click the Follow button to enable or
disable envelope following. Follow is only available when Polyphonic is selected as the Audio
Type.
Threshold Sets the transient detection threshold
from 0.0 dB to –40.0 dB. Disable transient detection by setting the Threshold control to Off
(turn the knob all the way to the right). Part of
Time Shift’s processing relies upon separating
“transient” parts of the selection from “nontransient” parts. Transient material tends to
change its content quickly in time, as opposed
to parts of the sound which are more sustained.
Adjust the Threshold control or click the
Threshold field and type the desired value.
The default value for Threshold is –6.0 dB. For
highly percussive material, lower the threshold
for better transient detection, especially with
the Rhythmic audio setting. For less percussive
material, and for shifting with the Polyphonic
audio setting, a higher setting can yield better
results. Experiment with this control, especially
when shifting drums and percussive tracks, to
achieve the best results.
Window Sets the analysis window length for processing audio. You can set the Window from 6.0
milliseconds to 185.0 milliseconds. Adjust the
Window control or click the Window field and
type the desired value. The Window control is
only available when Polyphonic is selected as
the Audio Type.
The default for Window size is 18.0 milliseconds
and works well for many applications, but you
may want to try different Window settings to
get the best results. Try larger window sizes for
low frequency sounds or sounds that do not
have many transients. Try smaller window sizes
for drums and percussion. 37.0 milliseconds
tends to work well for polyphonic instruments
such as piano or guitar. A setting as large as 71.0
milliseconds works well for bass guitar. Settings
in the 12 millisecond range work well on drums
or percussion.
Decay Rate Determines how much of the decay
from a transient is heard in the processed audio
when time stretching. When time stretching using the Rhythmic setting, the resulting gaps between the transients are filled in with audio, and
Decay Rate determines how much of this audio
is heard by applying a fade out rate. Decay Rate
is only available when Rhythmic is selected as
the Audio Type. Adjust the Decay Rate up to
100% to hear the audio that is filling the gaps
created by the time stretching with only a slight
fade, or adjust down to 1.0% to completely fade
out between the original transients.
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111
Pitch
The Pitch section provides controls for pitch
shifting the selected audio. Use the Pitch control
to transpose the pitch from –24.00 semitones
(–2 octaves) to +24.00 semitones (+2 octaves),
with fine resolution in cents.
Shift Displays the pitch shift amount as a percentage. You can pitch shift from 25.00% (–2 octaves) to +400.00% (+2 octaves). Adjust the
Pitch control or click the Shift field and type the
desired value. The default value is 100% (no
pitch shift).
Post Production Pull Up and Pull
Down Tasks
Time Shift plug-in, Pitch section
Transpose Displays the transposition amount in
semitones. You can transpose pitch from –24.00
semitones (–2 octaves) to +24.00 semitones (+2
octaves), with fine resolution in cents. Adjust
the Pitch control or click the Transpose field and
type the desired value.
Table 8 on page 112 provides information on
TCE settings for common post-production tasks.
Type the corresponding TCE% (represented to
10 decimal places in Table 8) in the Time Shift
field for the corresponding post-production task
and the process the selected audio.
Use the corresponding Time Shift Plug-in
Setting for the desired post-production task.
Table 8. Most commonly used TCE settings in Post workflows
112
Post workflow plug-in setting
TCE% (to 10 decimal places)
Frames
Pal to Film –4%.tfx
96.0%
25 to 24/30
PAL to NTSC –4.1%.tfx
95.9040959041%
25 to 23.976/29.97
Film to PAL +4.1667%.tfx
+104.1666666667%
24/30 to 25
Film to NTSC –0.1%.tfx
99.9000999001%
24/30 to 23.976/29.97
NTSC to Pal +4.2667%.tfx
+104.2708333333%
23.976/29.97 to 25
NTSC to Film +0.1%.tfx
+100.10%
23.976/29.97 to 24/30
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
AudioSuite Input Modes
AudioSuite TCE Plug-in Preference
Time Shift supports the Pro Tools
AudioSuite Input Mode selector for use on
mono or multi-input processing.
The Time Shift plug-in’s high quality time compression and expansion algorithms that can be
used with the Pro Tools TCE Trim tool.
AudioSuite Input mode selector
Mono Mode Processes each audio region as a
mono file with no phase coherency maintained
with any other simultaneously selected regions.
Multi-Input Mode Processes up to 48 input channels and maintains phase coherency within
those selected channels.
AudioSuite Preview
Time Shift supports Pro Tools AudioSuite Preview and Bypass. For more information on using
AudioSuite Preview and Bypass, see the DigiRack
Plug-ins Guide.
AudioSuite Preview and Bypass are unavailable with Time Shift in Pro Tools 7.0
and 7.1.
TCE Plug-in option in Processing Preferences page
Time Shift is not available with the TCE
Trim tool in Pro Tools 7.0 and 7.1.
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for
more information about the TCE Trim tool.
To select Time Shift for use with the TCE Trim tool:
1 Choose Setup > Preferences.
2 Click the Processing tab.
3 From the TC/E Plug-in pop-up menu, select
Time Shift.
4 Select the desired preset setting from the De-
fault Settings pop-up menu.
5 Click OK.
Chapter 7: DigiRack AudioSuite Plug-ins
113
Processing Audio
Time Shift lets you change the time and pitch of
selected audio independently or concurrently.
Normalizing a selection before using Time
Shift may produce better results.
To change the pitch of a selected audio region:
1 Select AudioSuite > Pitch Shift > Time Shift.
2 Select the Audio Mode appropriate to the type
of material you are processing (Monophonic,
Polyphonic, or Rhythmic).
3 In Monophonic or Polyphonic mode, select
To change the time of a selected audio region:
1 Select AudioSuite > Pitch Shift > Time Shift.
2 Select the Audio Mode appropriate to the type
of material you are processing (Monophonic,
Polyphonic, or Rhythmic).
the appropriate Range for the selected material
(Low, Mid, High, or Wide).
4 If transposing the pitch of the selection up, attenuate the Gain control as necessary.
5 If using Monophonic mode, adjust the For-
3 In Monophonic or Polyphonic mode, select
mant Shift control as desired.
the appropriate Range for the selected material
(Low, Mid, High, or Wide).
6 If using Polyphonic or Rhythmic mode, adjust
the Transient controls as desired.
4 If compressing the duration of the selection,
attenuate the Gain control as necessary.
7 Make sure Time Shift is set to 0% (unless you
also want to change the duration of the section).
5 If using Monophonic mode, adjust the Formant Shift control as desired.
8 Adjust the Pitch Shift control to the desired
6 If using Polyphonic or Rhythmic mode, adjust
the Transient controls as desired.
7 Make sure Pitch Shift is set to 100% (unless
you also want to change the pitch of the selection).
8 Adjust the Time Shift control to the desired
amount of time change. Time change is measured in terms of the target duration using the
selected timebase or as a percentage of the original.
9 Click Process.
amount of pitch change. Pitch change is measured in semitones (and cents) or as a percentage
of the original.
9 Click Process.
To change the time and pitch of a selected audio
region:
1 Select AudioSuite > Pitch Shift > Time Shift.
2 Select Varispeed from the Audio Mode pop-up
menu.
3 Adjust either the Time Shift or Pitch Shift control to match the desired amount of time and
pitch change in terms of a percentage of the
original.
4 Click Process.
Using the Monophonic, Polyphonic, or
Rhythmic modes, you can adjust both the
Time Shift and Pitch Shift controls independently before processing.
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chapter 8
Plug-in Settings
Using the Librarian
The Settings Librarian makes it easy to create
your own library of plug-in settings. Using the
Librarian and Settings pop-up menus, you can
copy, paste, save, and import these settings from
plug-in to plug-in, or from session to session.
The Settings Menu
Use the Settings menu commands to save, copy,
paste, and manage plug-in settings files.
Settings menu
Settings menu commands include:
Save Settings Saves the current settings. This
command overwrites any previous version of
the settings. The setting then appears in the Librarian menu.
Librarian menu
Once you create and save settings files to disk
(and tell Pro Tools where to find them by assigning their root folder) they will appear in the Librarian menu (and in the Plug-in Settings dialog).
You can also use the Plug-in Settings dialog
to select settings or audition them. See
“Plug-in Settings Dialog” on page 118.
Save Settings As Saves the current settings under a different name.
Copy Settings Copies the current settings. You
can then apply these settings to the same type of
plug-in on a different track by choosing the
track in the Plug-in window and pasting the settings with the Paste Settings command.
Chapter 8: Plug-in Settings
115
Paste Settings Pastes settings copied with the
Copy Settings command.
The default location for the Root Plug-in Settings folder is as follows:
Import Settings Imports a settings file from a location other than the Root Settings folder or Session folder.
Windows Program Files\Common Files\
Digidesign\DAE\Plug-in Settings
Delete Current Settings File Permanently deletes the current settings file from disk.
Lock Settings File Prevents the current settings
from being overwritten by the Save command.
If you attempt to save control settings, you will
be required to save them using a different name
or disk location.
To save plug-in settings to any location
other than the default Plug-in Settings
folder, you must first create a folder named
“Plug-in Settings” in the new location and
then save to that folder.
Set As User Default Defines the current settings
as the User Default for a specific plug-in.
Choosing a Destination for
Settings
Settings Preferences
Before you save plug-in settings, select their destination folder.
The Settings Preferences sub-menus are for
choosing preferences for saving and importing
plug-in settings. They include:
Set Plug-in Default To Sets the default setting to
either Factory Default (the standard default setting for that plug-in) or User Default (your custom setting you specify with the Set As User Default command).
Save Plug-in Settings To Selects the folder where
plug-in settings are saved. If you choose Session
Folder, the settings are saved in a folder named
“Plug-in Settings” within the current Session
folder. If you choose Root Settings Folder, the
settings are saved in the folder you specified
with the Set Root Settings Folder command (see
below).
Set Root Settings Folder Selects a location or
root folder for saving and importing settings.
This root settings folder must be named “Plug-in
Settings.” Use this command only if you want to
choose a location other than the default Plug-in
Settings folder.
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Mac Library/Application Support/
Digidesign/Plug-in Settings
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
To select a destination folder:
■ From the Settings pop-up menu, choose Settings Preferences > Save Plug-in Settings To, and
choose Session Folder or Root Settings Folder.
If you choose Root Settings folder, Pro Tools
saves settings to the default Root Plug-in Settings folder unless you have specified a different
location for the Root Settings folder.
To select a different Root Settings folder:
1 From the Settings pop-up menu, choose Set-
tings Preferences > Set Root Settings Folder.
2 Select the folder you want to use as your Root
folder and click Select.
Managing Settings
Use the Settings pop-up menu to manage settings.
Unlinked multi-mono plug-ins have specific
rules for settings. See “Editing Settings on
Unlinked Multi-Mono Plug-ins” on
page 118.
To save a setting:
1 Choose Save Settings from the Settings pop-
up menu.
2 Type a name and click OK. The setting appears
in the Librarian menu.
Press Control+Shift+S (Windows) or Command+Shift+S (Mac) to save plug-in settings.
To load a previously saved setting:
Choose the setting from the Librarian pop-up
menu.
■
To paste a setting:
1 Open the source plug-in.
2 Choose Copy Settings from the Settings pop-
up menu.
3 Open the destination plug-in.
4 Choose Paste Settings from the Settings pop-
up menu.
Press Control+Shift+V (Windows) or Command+Shift+V (Mac) to paste plug-in settings.
To create a custom User Default setting:
1 Create and save a setting.
2 Choose Set As User Default from the Settings
pop-up menu.
To make a plug-in default to your custom setting:
■ From the Settings pop-up menu, choose Settings Preferences > Set Plug-in Default To > User
Setting.
To import a setting:
1 Choose Import Settings from the Settings pop-
up menu.
2 Locate the settings file you want to import
and click Open. Pro Tools loads the setting and
copies it to the root destination folder.
Creating Subfolders for Settings
To make it easier to find specific types of settings, you can subdivide settings files by creating subfolders for them.
To copy a setting:
Choose Copy Settings from the Settings popup menu.
■
Press Control+Shift+C (Windows) or Command+Shift+C (Mac) to copy plug-in settings.
Librarian menu with subfolders for settings
Chapter 8: Plug-in Settings
117
To create a settings subfolder:
1 From the Settings pop-up menu, choose Save
Settings.
2 Click the New Folder button and type a name
for the subfolder.
3 Name the setting and click Save. The setting is
saved within the subfolder.
Changing Settings with the
Next (+) and Previous (–) Settings
Buttons
The Next (+) and Previous (–) Settings buttons
let you select the next or previous setting of the
Librarian menu.
To change plug-in settings using the Next (+) and
Previous (–) Settings buttons:
Press the Plus (+) or Minus (–) buttons to select
the next or previous plug-in settings file. The
next (or previous) settings file are enabled, and
the Librarian menu changes to reflect the new
setting.
■
Plug-in Settings Dialog
The Plug-in Settings dialog lists the settings files
for the current plug-in type. From this list, you
can select a new setting, or audition a series of
settings. Auditioning plug-in settings is especially useful for selecting patch names for virtual
MIDI instrument plug-ins or trying out different
effects types applied to your audio.
The Plug-in Settings dialog includes the following:
Folder This pop-up menu lets you switch between session settings located in root or session
folders (and any available subfolders)
Patch Field This field displays the name of the
active (highlighted) setting.
Increment Patch Every X Sec This option lets
you audition contiguous plug-in settings onthe-fly by automatically scrolling through them
for a specified number of seconds.
Editing Settings on Unlinked MultiMono Plug-ins
When a multi-mono plug-in is unlinked, importing, copying, pasting, or bypassing settings
affects only the currently selected channel.
To apply an operation to all channels of an
unlinked plug-in:
■ Hold down the Alt key (Windows) or Option
key (Mac) while performing the command.
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DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Plug-in Settings dialog
To change plug-in settings using the Plug-in
Settings dialog:
1 Click the Settings Select button.
To audition plug-in settings:
1 Click the Settings Select button.
2 From the Settings dialog, click a setting—the
Settings
Select
Plug-in header settings
starting point from which you will scroll
through the settings files.
3 Enter a value for the number of seconds that
will elapse between each program change, and
press Enter.
4 Select the option for Increment Patch.
To switch between settings folders, press
Control (Windows) or Command (Mac)
and use the Up/Down Arrow keys.
2 Do one of the following:
• From the dialog list, select the desired plugin setting.
– or –
• Use the Arrow keys to scroll through the
available settings.
3 Click Done.
After the specified number of seconds, Pro Tools
selects the next setting.
5 When you are finished auditioning settings,
do one of the following:
• Click Done to stop incrementing patches,
and to close the Plug-in Settings dialog.
– or –
• Select the Increment Patch option to stop
incrementing patches and keep the Plug-in
Settings dialog open.
Auditioning Plug-in Settings
When the Plug-in Settings dialog is open, you
can have Pro Tools automatically scroll through
and audition the settings files saved in the plugin’s root settings folder or in the current session’s Settings folder.
DigiBase and Plug-in Settings
Files
DigiBase browsers recognize plug-ins settings
files (.txf) as a known Type and lets you drag and
drop them to Pro Tools plug-in windows and Inserts. You can also search for plug-in settings by
type.
Searching for Plug-in Settings Files
To search for plug-in settings files:
1 In the Workspace browser, click the Search
icon.
Chapter 8: Plug-in Settings
119
2 Select Plug-in Settings File from the Type pop-
up menu.
Dragging and Dropping Plug-in Settings Files
You can insert a plug-in with a specific plug-in
settings file, as well as change plug-in settings of
inserted plug-ins by dragging and dropping
plug-in settings files from a DigiBase browser,
Windows Explorer, or the Mac Finder.
To insert a plug-in by drag and drop:
■ Drag and drop a plug-in settings file from a
DigiBase browser, Windows Explorer, or the Mac
Finder to an Insert in the Mix (or Edit) window.
Searching for plug-in settings files
3 To further narrow your search, type all or part
of the name of the plug-in settings file you want.
4 Click Search.
5 To sort your search by Plug-in Name or Manufacturer, click the corresponding column title.
Dragging and dropping a plug-in settings file to an
Insert
To change plug-in settings by drag and drop:
Plug-in settings files found in the Workspace browser
and sorted by Plug-in Name
■ Drag and drop a plug-in settings file from a
DigiBase browser, Windows Explorer, or the Mac
Finder to the plug-in window. The plug-in settings file must be for the same plug-in name. For
example, you cannot replace a 1-Band EQ 3 with
a plug-in setting for 4-Band EQ 3.
With DigiBase Pro (Pro Tools HD and LE
with DV Toolkit 2 only), you can create catalogs of specific plug-in settings that you
work with frequently to streamline your
workflow. For more information on DigiBase Pro and Catalogs, see the Pro Tools
Reference Guide.
Dragging and dropping a plug-in settings file to a plug-in
120
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
chapter 9
Using ReWire with Pro Tools
Pro Tools supports ReWire version 2.0 technology developed by Propellerheads Software. ReWire is available as a DigiRack RTAS plug-in.
ReWire provides real-time audio and MIDI
streaming between applications, with sampleaccurate synchronization and common transport functionality.
Compatible ReWire client applications are automatically detected by Pro Tools and are available in the RTAS Plug-ins Insert menus in
Pro Tools. Selecting a ReWire client application
within Pro Tools will automatically launch that
application (if the client application supports
this feature). Any corresponding MIDI nodes for
that application are available in Instrument
tracks’ MIDI Output selector (Instrument view)
and MIDI tracks’ Output selector.
Once the outputs of your software synthesizers
and samplers are routed to Pro Tools, you can:
• Process incoming audio signals with plugins
• Automate volume, pan, and plug-in controls
ReWire RTAS plug-in
Using ReWire, Pro Tools can send MIDI to a ReWire client application, such as software synthesizer, and receive audio back from the ReWire
client.
Pro Tools does not support receiving MIDI
from or sending audio to ReWire client applications.
• Bounce To Disk
• Take advantage of the audio outputs of
your Digidesign audio interfaces
Exchange of additional metadata such as
controller and note names between
Pro Tools and ReWire clients is not supported.
Chapter 9: Using ReWire with Pro Tools
121
ReWire Requirements
To use the ReWire plug-in, you will need:
• A Digidesign-qualified Pro Tools system
• ReWire-compatible client software, such as:
• Reason from Propellerheads Software
• Live from Ableton
Client software must support the same
sample rate as the session using ReWire.
For example, third-party client software
that does not support sample rates beyond
48 kHz cannot be used in 96 kHz Pro Tools
sessions.
ReWire support is also under development for
other third-party companies. For availability,
check with the manufacturer or visit the Digidesign website (www.digidesign.com).
ReWire and Track Count with
Pro Tools HD
With Pro Tools HD, the ReWire RTAS plug-in
can be inserted on any kind of track. Each channel of audio transmitted through ReWire then
uses the same amount of resources as the audio
track on which it is inserted.
Consequently, you can only use a total combination of audio tracks and ReWire audio streams
that does not exceed the maximum number of
possible voices for your system. For example, if
you are playing 40 audio tracks in a 48 kHz/24bit session on a 128-voice Pro Tools|HD 2 system, that will leave 88 channels of audio (88
mono, or 44 stereo) that can be used with ReWire. (ReWire supports a maximum of 64 audio
streams per application.)
122
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Using ReWire at higher sample rates will increase the load on the CPU. For example, CPU
load at 96 kHz is double the load at 48 kHz. You
can monitor Pro Tools CPU usage in the System
Usage window, making sure to not overtax your
system.
With Pro Tools HD, the standard Hardware
Buffer size of 512 samples is strongly recommended for using ReWire in sessions
with sample rates above 48 kHz.
ReWire and Track Count on
Pro Tools LE Systems
With Pro Tools LE, performance is determined
by several factors, including host CPU speed,
available memory, and buffer settings. Digidesign cannot guarantee 64 simultaneous audio
channel outputs with ReWire on all computer
configurations.
For the latest information on recommended
CPUs and system configurations, visit the Digidesign website (www.digidesign.com).
Using ReWire
The ReWire plug-in is installed when you install
Pro Tools. All inter-application communications between Pro Tools and ReWire client software is handled automatically.
To use a ReWire client application with Pro Tools:
1 Make sure that the ReWire client application
is installed properly and that you have restarted
your computer.
2 In Pro Tools, choose Track > New and specify
one Instrument track (or audio or Auxiliary Input track), and click Create.
3 In the Mix window, click the Insert selector on
the track and assign the ReWire RTAS client
plug-in to the track insert.
The ReWire client application will launch automatically in the background (if the client applications supports auto-launch). If the client application does not support auto-launch, launch
it manually.
4 Configure the ReWire client application to
play the sounds you want.
Quitting ReWire Client Applications
When quitting Pro Tools sessions that integrate
ReWire client applications, quit the client application first, then quit Pro Tools.
If you quit Pro Tools before quitting ReWire
client applications, a warning dialog box
may appear stating that “one or more ReWire applications did not terminate.” To
avoid this, quit all ReWire client applications before quitting Pro Tools.
5 In Pro Tools, set the output of the client appli-
cation in the ReWire plug-in window.
Tempo and Meter Changes
Some ReWire client applications, such as
Reason, support a single stereo output path
(Reason’s remaining 62 outputs are mono
only). If you want to use multiple stereo outputs with Reason you will need to insert
multiple multi-mono ReWire plug-ins, then
unlink and assign left and right outputs separately using the Link Enable and Channel
selector buttons in the Plug-in window.
6 In the Mix window, click the track’s MIDI Out-
put selector a and select the ReWire client application. Some ReWire clients (such as Reason)
may list multiple devices. If so, choose the device that you want.
7 Choose Options > MIDI Thru and record en-
able the MIDI track. Play some notes on your
MIDI controller to trigger the client application.
8 If your ReWire client application is a se-
quencer and you want to begin synchronized
playback with Pro Tools, press the Spacebar or
click the Play button on the Pro Tools Transport.
If you experience system performance problems while using Pro Tools with ReWire client applications, you may need to increase
the Pro Tools CPU Usage Limit. See “CPU
Usage Limit” on page 11 for instructions.
Pro Tools transmits both Tempo and Meter data
to ReWire client applications, allowing ReWirecompatible sequencers to follow any tempo and
meter changes in a Pro Tools session.
With the Pro Tools Conductor button selected,
Pro Tools always acts as the Tempo master, using the tempo map defined in its Tempo Ruler.
With the Pro Tools Conductor button deselected, the ReWire client acts as the Tempo master. In both cases, playback can be started or
stopped in either application.
Pro Tools supports tempo values from
30–300 bpm. When slaved to a ReWire client application, Pro Tools playback will be
restricted to this range even if the client application’s tempo is outside this range. Additionally, some ReWire client applications
(such as Reason) may misinterpret
Pro Tools meter changes, resulting in mismatched locate points and other unexpected
behavior. To prevent this, avoid using meter
changes in Pro Tools when using Reason as
a ReWire client.
Chapter 9: Using ReWire with Pro Tools
123
Looping Playback
Automating ReWire
Because Pro Tools does not offer separate loop
markers as found in other third party applications such as Reason, if you want to loop playback, do one of the following:
ReWire supports automation for switching inputs during playback.
To loop playback in Pro Tools:
1 In the Pro Tools Time Line, select the time
1 Set the track’s automation to write.
2 Do one of the following:
range that you want to loop.
• Change the input link pop-up menu manually.
2 Begin playback by pressing the Spacebar or
clicking the Transport’s Play button.
– or –
To loop playback within a ReWire client sequencer
With playback stopped, specify the loop
within the ReWire client application and begin
playback.
■
If you create a playback loop by making a
selection in the Pro Tools Time Line, once
playback is started, any changes made to
loop or playback markers within the ReWire client application will deselect the
Pro Tools Time Line selection and remove
the loop.
124
To automate switching inputs during playback:
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
• Draw the automation in the Edit window.
For information on drawing automation,
see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
appendix a
DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
The number of TDM plug-ins you can use at one
time depends on how much DSP power is available in your system. Since the TDM hardware on
Pro Tools cards provide dedicated DSP for plugins, plug-in performance is not limited by CPU
processing power.
The DSP tables on the following pages show the
theoretical total number of instances of each DigiRack TDM plug-in that can be powered by a
single DSP chip on Pro Tools|HD-series cards.
DSP usage differs according to card type and
DSP chip availability.
DSP tables show the theoretical maximum
performance when no other plug-ins or system tasks (such as I/O) are sharing available DSP resources. You will typically use
more than one type of plug-in simultaneously. The data in these tables are provided as guidelines to help you gauge the
relative efficiency of different plug-ins on
your system. They are not guaranteed performance counts that you should expect to
see in typical real-world sessions and usage.
There are a total of nine DSP chips on a
Pro Tools|HD card (HD Core, HD Process, and
HD Accel). HD Core and HD Process cards provide identical chip sets. HD Accel cards provide
newer, more powerful DSP chips (making the
HD Accel card ideal for DSP-intensive plug-ins,
and for high sample rate sessions).
Not all plug-ins are supported on all types of
chips. The following tables indicate the number
of compatible chips per card.
DSP Requirements
DSP requirements for DigiRack TDM plug-ins
are provided on the following pages.
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
125
Mono and Stereo DigiRack Plug-ins on HD Cards
The following table compares the maximum number of instances of each DigiRack TDM plug-in that
can be powered by a single DSP chip on an HD Accel card to that of HD Core and HD Process cards.
Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for Pro Tools|HD cards at 44.1 and 48 kHz
HD Accel
HD Core and HD Process
mono/stereo
mono/stereo
Plug-in
EQ III (1-band)
66
33
28
14
EQ III (2–4 band)
36
18
15
7
EQ III (7-band)
23
11
10
5
Click
18
n/a
3
n/a
Dither
46
43
34
18
D-Verb
6
6
4
4
Compressor/Limiter III
18
11
7
5
Expander/Gate III
16
11
7
5
De-Esser III
12
8
5
3
Mod Delay II (short)
74
36
43
21
Mod Delay II (slap)
73
36
32
16
Mod Delay II (medium)
36
18
16
8
Mod Delay II (long)
17
7
8
4
Mod Delay II (extra long)
4
2
2
1
Pitch
1
1
1
1
POW-r Dither
22
10
9
4
Signal Generator
48
n/a
25
n/a
PhaseScope (SignalTools)
n/a
13
n/a
5
Time Adjuster (short)
146
72
117
58
Time Adjuster (medium)
32
16
114
56
Time Adjuster (long)
72
36
32
16
Trim
145
n/a
119
n/a
Maximum instances are approximately half at 88.2 kHz and 96 kHz, and approximately a quarter at
176.4 and 192 kHz. Actual results will likely be less due to system and session variables.
126
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Multi-Mono and Multi-Channel DigiRack Plug-ins
Plug-ins used in multi-mono format on greater-than-stereo tracks require one mono instance per
channel of the multi-channel audio format. A multi-mono EQ used on a 5.1 format track, for example, requires six mono instances since there are six audio channels in the 5.1 format. Because multichannel versions of the Compressor II, Limiter II, and Expander/Gate II plug-ins are available for use
on greater-than-stereo tracks, separate instance counts are given for those configurations.
Table 2. Theoretical maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for a Pro Tools HD Core and HD
Process card at 48 kHz**
LCR
Quad
&
LCRS
5.0
5.1 &
6.0
6.1 &
7.0
7.1
DSP Chips per
HD Card
DigiRack Pitch
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
9
D-Verb
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
9
Compressor/Limiter III
3
3
2
2
2
2
9
Expander/Gate III
3
3
2
2
2
2
9
Mod Delay I (short)
14
11
8
7
6
5
9
Mod Delay I (slap)
10
8
6
5
4
4
9
5
4
3
2
2
2
9
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
9
Mod Delay II (short)
14
11
8
7
6
5
9
Mod Delay II (slap)
10
8
6
5
4
4
9
Mod Delay II (medium)
5
4
3
2
2
2
9
Mod Delay II (long)
2
2
1
1
1
1
9
Mod Delay II (extra
long)
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
partial
9
12
9
7
6
5
4
9
3
2
1
1
2
1
9
30
22
18
15
13
11
9
Plug-in
De-Esser III
Mod Delay I (medium)
Mod Delay I (long)
Dither
POW-r Dither
Time Adjuster (short)
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
127
Table 2. (Continued) Theoretical maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for a Pro Tools HD Core
and HD Process card at 48 kHz**
Plug-in
LCR
Quad
&
LCRS
5.0
5.1 &
6.0
6.1 &
7.0
7.1
DSP Chips per
HD Card
Time Adjuster
(medium)
30
22
18
15
13
11
9
Time Adjuster (long)
10
8
6
5
4
4
9
Trim*
39
29
23
19
16
14
9
Signal Generator*
8
6
5
4
3
3
9
SurroundScope
(SignalTools)
4
3
2
2
1
1
9
“Partial” indicates that a single instance of the multi-mono plug-in is sharing more than 1 DSP chip.
* Instance counts are provided for multi-mono versions of plug-ins that have no available multichannel version.
** Maximum instances are approximately half at 88.2 kHz and 96 kHz, and approximately a quarter at
176.4 and 192 kHz. Actual results will likely be less due to system and session variables.
Monitoring DSP Usage
The System Usage window (Window > System Usage) shows approximately how much DSP is available in your system and how it is being used in the current Pro Tools session.
For more information about DSP usage and allocation, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
128
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
appendix b
DSP Delays Incurred by TDM Plug-ins
Virtually all TDM plug-ins incur some amount
of signal delay.
If you are working with mono tracks, or are processing all channels with the same plug-in, the
signal delays are not long enough to be significant and should not be a concern.
This signal delay is significant only if you use a
plug-in on one channel of a stereo or multichannel signal but not the others, since this can
cause the channels to be slightly out of phase.
Pro Tools|HD systems provide automatic
Delay Compensation to compensate for signal processing delays. For detailed information, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Table 3 shows the delays inherent in each type
of Digidesign TDM plug-in.
≈
Table 3. Samples of delay incurred by each real-time
DigiRack TDM plug-in on HD cards
Plug-in
Samples of Delay on
HD Cards
EQ III (1-band)
4
EQ III (2–4 band)
4
EQ III (7-band)
4
Compressor II
4
De-esser
4
DigiRack Pitch
3
D-Verb
3
Compressor/Limiter III
4
Expander/Gate III
92
De-Esser III
4
Limiter II
4
Gate II
4
Expander/Gate II
4
Mod Delay I/II (short)
4
Mod Delay I/II (slap)
4
Appendix B: DSP Delays Incurred by TDM Plug-ins
129
Table 3. (Continued)Samples of delay incurred by each
real-time DigiRack TDM plug-in on HD cards
Plug-in
130
Samples of Delay on
HD Cards
Mod Delay I/II
(medium)
4
Mod Delay I/II (long)
4
Mod Delay II (extra
long)
4
Dither
4
POW-r Dither
4
Time Adjuster
4
Signal Generator
4
SignalTools
SurroundScope
4
SignalTools
PhaseScope
4
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
index
Numerics
7 Band, 2–4 Band, or 1 Band (EQ III) 43
A
Accuracy control 105, 107
adjusting plug-in parameters
computer keyboard 41
keyboard shortcuts 41
mouse 41
scroll wheel 42
toggling switches 42
Algorithm control 62
AudioSuite
buffer size 38
Input Mode selector 113
Invert 101
multichannel processing 35
plug-ins 2
Preview 113
processing 39
processing preferences 37, 113
AudioSuite plug-in selector 32
AudioSuite plug-ins
Chorus 97
DC Offset Removal 104
Delay 101
Duplicate 101
Flanger 98
Gain 103
Invert 101
Multi-Tap Delay 99
Normalize 102
Ping-Pong Delay 100
Pitch Shift 106
Reverse 103
Signal Generator 103
Time Compression/Expansion 104
using 39
AudioSuite processing on networked hard drives
39
AudioSuite window 32
Audition pop-up menu 35
Auto button 18
automation
Auto Latch mode 26
Auto Touch mode 26
creating 26
plug-in 24
preferences 24
Safe button 18
Automation Safe button 18
Auxiliary Inputs
inserting RTAS plug-ins 27
B
BBC (metering) 86
bit resolution for Dither plug-in 60, 61
buffer size for AudioSuite processing 37
Bypass button 35
for real-time plug-ins 18
C
Category 6
Cents control 88
Chan/Track Process Mode 34
Channel selector 19
Chorus plug-in 97
Church algorithm 63
Click plug-in 58
Accented control 58
Unaccented control 58
Clip indicator
DigiRack Pitch 88
D-Verb 62
Clip LED 18
Index
131
clipping 18
closing multiple plug-in windows 20
Coarse & Fine controls 106
Compare button 18
compensating for DSP delays 129
Compressor/Limiter (AudioSuite) 96
computer keyboard
adjusting plug-in parameters 41
configuring AudioSuite Buffer 38
Convert Plug-in pop-up 18
Copy Settings command 115
copying a plug-in setting 117
CPU meter 10
CPU power requirements for RTAS plug-ins 10
CPU Usage Limit 10
Create Continuous File command 34
Create Individual Files command 33
creating a settings subfolder 118
Crossfade control 89, 105, 106
Cross-Feedback control 100
D
D2
adjusting parameters 65
DC Offset Removal plug-in 104
Decay control 63
De-Esser (AudioSuite) 96
Delay 6
delay
DSP induced 13, 91, 92
Delay control 88, 97, 99
Delete Current Settings File command 116
destination fields 104
destination folder for plug-in settings 116
Diffusion control 63
DIN (metering) 86
Dither 6
Dither bit depth for AudioSuite 38
Dither plug-in 59, 61
pop-up menu 38
DSP
and EQ III 54
DSP delay compensation 14, 91, 92
DSP delays 129
DSP delays inherent in plug-ins 129
132
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Duplicate plug-in 101
duplicating inserts 17
D-Verb 62
Dynamics 6
Dynamics II plug-ins 64
Dynamics III 96
AudioSuite 96
E
Edit Settings option 38
Effects 6
effects
recording with 15
Entire Selection mode 34
EQ 6
EQ III 43
EQ II plug-ins 57, 95
EQ III 43
DSP management 54
Frequency Graph Display 45
gain (inverting) 44
Expander/Gate (AudioSuite) 96
external audio source, using for side-chain 23
External Key 23
external side-chain processing 22
Extra Long Delay plug-in 79
F
favorites 6
Feedback control 88, 97, 98, 99
File Mode selector 33
Fine control 88
Flanger plug-in 98
flattening a track 101
Frequency control 82
Frequency Graph display (EQ III) 45
G
Gain control 99
Gain plug-in 103
H
Hall algorithm 62
Hardware 6
Hardware Buffer Size 10
Harmonic 6
HD-series cards
DSP delays 129
Hi Frequency Cut control 63
High-Pass Filter control 98
host processing 2
I
Import Settings command 116
importing plug-in settings 117
Increment Patch 118
Input Level control 100
Input mode
Mono 113
Multi-Input 113
Insert Position selector 18
inserts 15
post-disk 15
pre-fader 15
pre-fader operation 15
Instrument 6
internal side-chain processing 22
Invert plug-in 101
inverting gain (EQ III) 44
K
key input 22
definition 22
Key Input selector 19
using for external side-chain
processing 23
Key Input selector 23, 36
Key Listen control 23
keyboard shortcuts 64
adjusting plug-in parameters 41
L
latency
and RTAS 10
Leq(A)
Auto Reset 85
Hold on Stop 85
Reset 85
Window 85
Leq(A) Meter 85
Level control 82
LFE Enable button 19
LFO Rate control 97, 98
LFO Waveform control 97, 98
LFO Width control 97, 98
Librarian menu 18
Link Enable buttons 19
linking plug-in controls 21
Lissajous Meter 84
Lock Settings File command 116
locked regions and AudioSuite processing 39
Long Delay plug-in 79
Low-Pass Filter control 64, 97
M
Manufacturer 6
Master Faders
inserting RTAS plug-ins 27
Master Link button 19
Max Peak At control 102
Maximum Pitch control 89
Medium Delay 79
metering
BBC 86
DIN 86
for VENUE 87
Leq(A) 85
level meters 86
Lissajous in PhaseScope 84
multichannel SurroundScope 82
Nordic 86
Peak 86
Peak + RMS 86
peak hold options 87
Phase Meter 84
PhaseScope 83
reference mark 87
RMS 86
VU 86
MIDI Beat Clock 23, 80
MIDI Output selector 123
Minimum Pitch control 89, 105, 106
Mix control 97, 99
Mod Delay II
Tempo Sync 24
Mod Delay II plug-ins 79
Modulation 6
Index
133
mono plug-ins 15
mouse
adjusting plug-in parameters 41
moving inserts 17
multi-channel plug-ins 16
multi-mono plug-ins 15
MultiShell II compatible plug-ins 10
Multi-Tap Delay plug-in 99
muted regions and AudioSuite processing 39
N
Noise Reduction 6
Noise Shaping 60, 61
non-real-time plug-ins 31
Nordic (metering) 86
Normalize plug-in 102
Note control 107
O
opening multiple plug-in windows 20
ordering RTAS and TDM plug-ins 28
Other 6
output bit resolution for Dither plug-in 60
Output Meter 62
Overwrite File command 33
P
Pan control 99
Paste Settings command 116
pasting plug-in settings 117
Peak 86
Peak + RMS 86
peak hold 87
Peak On All Chans/Tracks mode 34
Peak On All Tracks mode 102
Peak On Each Chan/Track mode 34
Peak On Each Track mode 102
phase cancellation 91
Phase Invert button 19, 90
Phase Meter 84
PhaseScope 83
Ping-Pong Delay plug-in 100
pink noise 82
Pitch plug-in 87
134
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
Pitch Shift 6
Pitch Shift plug-in 106
Pitch transposition 87
Playlist command 32
plug-in controls
adjusting 64
linking 21
Plug-in Controls Default to Auto-Enabled 24
Plug-in selector
for AudioSuite plug-ins 32
for real-time plug-ins 18
plug-in settings librarian 36, 115
Plug-in window 18
closing multiple windows 20
opening multiple windows 20
plug-in-induced delays 14
plug-ins
adjusting parameters 41
as Inserts 15
auditioning settings 118
automating 24
creating a default setting 117
inserting 16
Manufacturer view 6
mono 15
moving and duplicating 17
multichannel 16
multi-mono 15
removing 16
post-disk inserts 15
POW-r Dither plug-in 61
Pre-delay control 63
pre-fader inserts 15
preferences
Plug-in Controls Default to Auto-Enabled 24
previewing AudioSuite effects 35
Process Mode selector 34
processing
AudioSuite 35
multichannel for AudioSuite 35
preferences 37
requirements of real-time plug-ins 9
R
Ratio control 89, 105, 106
real-time plug-ins 9
recording with plug-in effects 15
reference mark in SignalTools 87
Reference Pitch control 107
Region by Region mode 34
Region List command 33
Relative Pitch Entry 88
Reset Leq(A) 85
Reverb 6
Reverse plug-in 103
ReWire
and voices 122
plug-in description file 122
track count 122
RMS 86
Root Settings folder 116
specifying 116
RTAS plug-ins 2
additional latency 28
improving performance 10
ordering with TDM plug-ins 28
placing after TDM plug-ins 27
placing on Auxiliary Inputs or Master Faders 27
voice usage 28
RTAS Processors setting 11
S
saving plug-in settings 117
Save Plug-in Settings To command 116
Save Settings As command 115
Save Settings command 115
screen response 10
scroll wheel
adjusting plug-in parameters 42
selecting tracks for AudioSuite processing 39
Selection Reference selector 32
Set As User Default command 116
Set Plug-in Default To command 116
Set Root Settings Folder command 116
settings 36
choosing a destination for 116
copying 117
creating subfolders 117
creating User Default 117
importing 117
pasting 117
saving 117
Settings Preferences command 116
Settings menu 18
Short Delay plug-in 79
shortcuts for keyboard input 64
sibilants 74
side-chain
definition 22
filters 22
processing 19
Side-Chain Listen 23
side-chain processing 22
Signal control 82
signal delay 129
Signal Generator plug-in 81, 103
Signal Present Indicator 88
SignalTools
level meters 86
Size control 63
Slap Delay plug-in 79
Sound Field 6
Source and Destination controls 104
subfolders, creating for settings 117
SurroundScope 82
switches
adjusting plug-in parameters 42
system settings
RTAS Processors 11
System Usage window 128
RTAS 10
TDM 9
T
Target button 19
TC/E control 38
TCE Trim tool 113
TCE Trim tool preference 38
TDM plug-ins 1, 9
DSP requirements 125
inserting on tracks 16
moving and duplicating 17
ordering with RTAS plug-ins 28
removing from tracks 16
tempo
Tempo Sync 23
Tempo Sync 20, 23, 80
Mod Delay II 80
through-zero flanging 98
Time Compression/Expansion plug-in 104
Index
135
Time Correction control 106
Time Shift 107
Audio Gain control 109
Audio Mode pop-up menu 108
Audio Range pop-up menu 108
Audio section 108
changing pitch 114
changing time 114
changing time and pitch 114
Clip indicator 109
Decay Rate 111
displays and controls 107
Follow button 111
Formant section 110
Level indicator 109
Monophonic mode 108
Original time 109
Pitch section 112
Pitch Shift 112
Polyphonic mode 108
post-production workflow 112
Processed time 109
pull up/pull down TCE percentages 112
Rhythmic mode 108
Tempo displays 109
Threshold control 111
Time section 109
Time Shift 109
timebase 109
Transient section 110
Transpose 112
Unit pop-up menu 109
Varispeed mode 108
Window 111
TimeAdjuster plug-in 90
using for delay compensation 13
Track selector 18
tracks
affect of RTAS 10
Trim plug-in 92
136
DigiRack Plug-ins Guide
U
unlinking plug-in controls 21
Use in Playlist button 33
User Default setting, creating 117
V
VENUE (metering for) 87
voices
and ReWire 122
and RTAS 10, 28
VU 86
W
website 3
white noise 82
www.digidesign.com
DIGIDESIGN
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Daly City, CA 94014-3886 USA
Tel: 650.731.6300
Fax: 650.731.6399
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Tel: 650.731.6100
Fax: 650.731.6384
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