Configuring the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC

Configuring the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch
EHWIC
First Published: July 30, 2010
This document provides configuration tasks for the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch enhanced high-speed
WAN interface cards (EHWICs) supported on Cisco Integrated Services Routers Generation 2 (ISR G2).
Feature History for Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch Enhanced High-Speed Interface Cards
Release
Modification
15.1(2)T
This feature was introduced.
Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images
Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image
support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on
Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at
the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.
Contents
The following sections provide information about the Cisco EtherSwitch EHWICs.
•
Prerequisites for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs, page 2
•
Restrictions for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs, page 2
•
Information About Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs, page 2
•
How to Configure Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs, page 3
•
Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs, page 78
•
Additional References, page 88
Americas Headquarters:
Cisco Systems, Inc., 170 West Tasman Drive, San Jose, CA 95134-1706 USA
Configuring the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC
Prerequisites for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Prerequisites for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
The following are prerequisites to configuring Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs:
•
Configure IP routing on the host router. (See Cisco IOS IP Configuration Guide at
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10592/products_installation_and_configuration_guides_
list.html.)
•
Install the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC on a Cisco ISR G2 platform running
Cisco IOS 15.1(2)T or later.
Restrictions for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
The following restrictions apply to the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs:
•
The Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC cannot function with the following modules in the chassis
at the same time:
– HWIC-4ESW
– HWIC-4ESW-POE
– HWIC-D-9ESW
– HWIC-D-9ESW-POE
– NM-16ESW
– NM-36ESW
•
On the Cisco 1905, 1906, and 1921 ISR platforms, only a single gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC is
supported.
•
Online insertion and removal (OIR) is not supported.
•
When Ethernet switches have been installed and configured in a host router, do not perform OIR of
the CompactFlash memory card in the router. OIR of the CompactFlash memory card compromises
the configuration of the Ethernet switches.
•
VLAN trunking protocol (VTP) pruning is not supported.
•
No more than 200 secure MAC addresses per platform are supported by an EtherSwitch EHWIC.
Information About Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Cisco Gigabit EHWICs are 10/100/1000 BaseT Layer 2 gigabit Ethernet switches with Layer 3 routing
capability. Layer 3 routing is done on the host router.
Note
To link a port on a Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC to an enhanced EtherSwitch service module or
EtherSwitch service module in the same VTP domain, the port and the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch
EHWIC should be stacked.
The gigabit EHWICs are also available with a power over Ethernet (PoE) module to provide inline power
for IP telephones.
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To configure the Cisco Gigabit EHWICs, you should understand the following concepts:
Concepts
Link
VLANs
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/lanswitch/configuration/
Inline Power for Cisco IP Phones guide/lsw_enet_switch_net_external_docbase_0900e4b1809092
0b_4container_external_docbase_0900e4b18096f791.html
Layer 2 Ethernet Switching
802.1x Authentication
Spanning Tree Protocol
Cisco Discovery Protocol
Switched Port Analyzer
IGMP Snooping
Storm Control
Fallback Bridging
How to Configure Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
The following sections provide the configuration tasks for the EtherSwitch EHWICs:
•
Configuring VLANs, page 4
•
Configuring VLAN Trunking Protocol, page 8
•
Configuring Layer 2 Interfaces, page 10
•
Configuring 802.1x Authentication, page 19
•
Configuring Spanning Tree, page 29
•
Configuring MAC Table Manipulation, page 35
•
Configuring Cisco Discovery Protocol, page 38
•
Configuring the Switched Port Analyzer, page 38
•
Configuring Power Management on the Interface, page 40
•
Configuring IP Multicast Layer 3 Switching, page 42
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping, page 45
•
Configuring Per-Port Storm-Control, page 50
•
Configuring Fallback Bridging, page 52
•
Configuring Separate Voice and Data Subnets, page 65
•
Managing the EtherSwitch EHWIC, page 67
•
Configuring Port Security, page 78
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Configuring VLANs
This section describes how to configure VLANs on the switch, and contains the following sections:
•
Adding VLAN Instances, page 4
•
Verifying the VLAN Configuration, page 5
•
Deleting a VLAN Instance from the Database, page 6
Table 1 shows the number of VLANs supported by a Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC.
Table 1
Number of VLANs Supported
Platform
Number of VLANs Supported
1900 Series
16
2901
16
2911
32
2921 and 2951
48
3925
48
3925E, 3945, and 3945E
64
Adding VLAN Instances
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure a Gigabit Ethernet (GE)
interface as Layer 2 access.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
vlan vlan_id
2.
exit
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
vlan vlan_id
Adds an Ethernet VLAN.
Example:
Router(config)#vlan 1
Step 2
exit
Updates the VLAN database, propagates it throughout the
administrative domain, and returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
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Verifying the VLAN Configuration
You can verify the VLAN configuration in VLAN database mode or in privileged EXEC mode.
•
Verifying VLAN Configuration in VLAN Database Mode, page 5
•
Verifying VLAN Configuration in EXEC Mode, page 6.
Verifying VLAN Configuration in VLAN Database Mode
Enter the show command in VLAN database mode to verify the VLAN configuration.
Router#vlan database
Router(vlan)#show
VLAN ISL Id: 1
Name: default
Media Type: Ethernet
VLAN 802.10 Id: 100001
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1002
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1003
VLAN ISL Id: 2
Name: VLAN0002
Media Type: Ethernet
VLAN 802.10 Id: 100002
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
VLAN ISL Id: 1002
Name: fddi-default
Media Type: FDDI
VLAN 802.10 Id: 101002
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Bridge Type: SRB
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1003
VLAN ISL Id: 1003
Name: token-ring-default
Media Type: Token Ring
VLAN 802.10 Id: 101003
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Bridge Type: SRB
Ring Number: 0
Bridge Number: 1
Parent VLAN: 1005
Maximum ARE Hop Count: 7
Maximum STE Hop Count: 7
Backup CRF Mode: Disabled
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1002
VLAN ISL Id: 1004
Name: fddinet-default
Media Type: FDDI Net
VLAN 802.10 Id: 101004
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Bridge Type: SRB
Bridge Number: 1
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STP Type: IBM
VLAN ISL Id: 1005
Name: trnet-default
Media Type: Token Ring Net
VLAN 802.10 Id: 101005
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Bridge Type: SRB
Bridge Number: 1
STP Type: IBM
router(vlan)#exit
APPLY completed.
Exiting....
router#
Verifying VLAN Configuration in EXEC Mode
Enter the show vlan-switch command in privileged EXEC mode to verify the VLAN configuration.
Router#show vlan-switch
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Gi0/1/0, Gi0/1/1, Gi0/1/2
Gi0/1/3
2
VLAN0002
active
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
act/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
act/unsup
1005 trnet-default
act/unsup
VLAN Type
SAID
MTU
Parent RingNo BridgeNo Stp
BrdgMode Trans1
Trans2
---- ----1
enet
2
enet
1002 fddi
1003 tr
1004 fdnet
1005 trnet
router#
---------100001
100002
101002
101003
101004
101005
----1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
-----1005
-
-------srb
-
-----0
-
-------1
1
---ibm
ibm
-----1002
0
1
1
0
0
-----1003
0
1003
1002
0
0
Deleting a VLAN Instance from the Database
You cannot delete the default VLANs for the different media types: Ethernet VLAN 1 and FDDI or
Token Ring VLANs 1002 to 1005.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to delete a VLAN from the database:
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
no vlan vlan_id
2.
exit
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
no vlan vlan_id
Deletes the VLAN.
Example:
Router(config)#no vlan 2
Step 2
exit
Updates the VLAN database, propagates it throughout the
administrative domain, and returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
Verifying VLAN Deletion
You can verify that a VLAN has been deleted from the switch in VLAN database mode.
Use the show command in VLAN database mode to verify that a VLAN has been deleted from the
switch, as shown in the following output example:
Router#vlan database
Router(vlan)#show
VLAN ISL Id: 1
Name: default
Media Type: Ethernet
VLAN 802.10 Id: 100001
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1002
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1003
VLAN ISL Id: 1002
Name: fddi-default
Media Type: FDDI
VLAN 802.10 Id: 101002
State: Operational
MTU: 1500
Bridge Type: SRB
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1
Translational Bridged VLAN: 1003
<output truncated>
Router(vlan)#
Enter the show vlan-switch brief command in EXEC mode to verify that a VLAN has been deleted from
the switch, as shown in the following output example:
Router#show vlan-switch brief
VLAN Name
Status
Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------1
default
active
Gi0/1/0, Gi0/1/1, Gi0/1/2
Gi0/1/3, Gi0/1/4, Gi0/1/5
Gi0/1/6, Gi0/1/7
1002 fddi-default
act/unsup
1003 token-ring-default
active/unsup
1004 fddinet-default
active/unsup
1005 trnet-default
active/unsup
Router#
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Configuring VLAN Trunking Protocol
This section describes how to configure the VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) on an EtherSwitch EHWIC,
and contains the following sections:
Note
•
Configuring a VTP Server, page 8
•
Configuring a VTP Client, page 9
•
Disabling VTP (VTP Transparent Mode), page 9
•
Verifying VTP, page 10
VTP pruning is not supported by EtherSwitch EHWICs.
Configuring a VTP Server
When a switch is in VTP server mode, you can change the VLAN configuration and have it propagate
throughout the network.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure the switch as a VTP server.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
vtp mode server
2.
vtp domain domain_name
3.
vtp password password_value
4.
exit
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
vtp mode server
Configures the switch as a VTP server.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp mode server
Step 2
vtp domain domain_name
Defines the VTP domain name, which can be up to 32 characters
long.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp domain domain1
Step 3
vtp password password_value
(Optional) Sets a password, which can be from 8 to 64 characters
long, for the VTP domain.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp password password1
Step 4
exit
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
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Configuring a VTP Client
When a switch is in VTP client mode, you cannot change the VLAN configuration on the switch. The
client switch receives VTP updates from a VTP server in the management domain and modifies its
configuration accordingly.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure the switch as a VTP client.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
vtp mode client
2.
vtp domain domain_name
3.
vtp password password_value
4.
exit
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
vtp mode client
Configures the switch as a VTP client.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp mode client
Step 2
vtp domain domain_name
Defines the VTP domain name, which can be up to 32 characters
long.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp domain domain1
Step 3
vtp password password_value
(Optional) Sets a password, which can be from 8 to 64 characters
long, for the VTP domain.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp password password2
Step 4
exit
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
Disabling VTP (VTP Transparent Mode)
When you configure the switch as VTP transparent, you disable VTP on the switch. A VTP transparent
switch does not send VTP updates and does not act on VTP updates received from other switches.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to disable VTP on the switch.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
vtp mode transparent
2.
exit
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
vtp mode transparent
Configures VTP transparent mode.
Example:
Router(config)#vtp mode transparent
Step 2
exit
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
Verifying VTP
Use the show vtp status command in privileged EXEC mode to verify VTP status:
Router#show vtp status
VTP Version
: 2
Configuration Revision
: 0
Maximum VLANs supported locally : 256
Number of existing VLANs
: 5
VTP Operating Mode
: Server
VTP Domain Name
: domain1
VTP Pruning Mode
: Disabled
VTP V2 Mode
: Disabled
VTP Traps Generation
: Disabled
MD5 digest
: 0xBF 0x86 0x94 0x45 0xFC 0xDF 0xB5 0x70
Configuration last modified by 0.0.0.0 at 0-0-00 00:00:00
Local updater ID is 1.3.214.25 on interface Gi0/0 (first interface found)
Router#
Configuring Layer 2 Interfaces
This section provides the following configuration information:
•
Configuring a Range of Interfaces, page 10 (required)
•
Defining a Range Macro, page 11 (optional)
•
Configuring Layer 2 Optional Interface Features, page 12 (optional)
Configuring a Range of Interfaces
Use the interface range command in global configuration mode to configure a range of interfaces.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface range {gigabitethernet interfacenumber - interfacenumber | vlan number | macro word}
3.
exit
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface range {gigabitethernet interfacenumber interfacenumber | vlan number | macro word}
Selects the range of interfaces to be configured.
•
The space around the dash is required. For
example, the command interface range
gigabitethernet 0/2/0 - 3 is valid; the command
interface range gigabitethernet 0/2/0-3 is not
valid.
•
You can enter one macro or up to five
comma-separated ranges.
•
Comma-separated ranges can include both
VLANs and physical interfaces.
•
You are not required to enter spaces before or
after the comma.
•
The interface range command only supports
VLAN interfaces that are configured with the
interface vlan command.
Example:
Router(config)#interface range gigabitethernet
0/2/0 - 3
Step 3
exit
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
Defining a Range Macro
Use the define interface-range command in global configuration mode to define an interface range
macro:
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
define interface-range macro-name {gigabitethernet slot/first-interface - last-interface] | vlan
vlan-ID - vlan-ID}
3.
exit
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
define interface-range macro-name {gigabitethernet
Defines the interface-range macro and saves it in
slot/first-interface - last-interface] | vlan vlan-ID - vlan-ID} NVRAM.
Example:
Router(config)#define interface-range first_three
gigabitethernet 0/1/0 - 2
Step 3
exit
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
Verifying Configuration of an Interface Range Macro
Use the show running-configuration command to show the defined interface-range macro
configuration, as shown below:
Router#show running-configuration | include define
define interface-range first_three GigabitEthernet0/1/0 - 2
Configuring Layer 2 Optional Interface Features
•
Interface Speed and Duplex Configuration Guidelines, page 12
•
Configuring the Interface Speed, page 13
•
Configuring the Interface Duplex Mode, page 13
•
Verifying Interface Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration, page 14
•
Configuring a Description for an Interface, page 15
•
Configuring a Gigabit Ethernet Interface as a Layer 2 Trunk, page 15
•
Configuring a GE Interface as Layer 2 Access, page 17
Interface Speed and Duplex Configuration Guidelines
When configuring an interface speed and duplex mode, follow these guidelines:
•
If both ends of the line support autonegotiation, we recommend the default auto negotiation settings.
•
If one interface supports auto negotiation and the other end does not, configure duplex and speed on
both interfaces; do not use the auto setting on the supported side.
•
Both ends of the line need to be configured to the same setting, for example, both hard-set or both
auto-negotiate. Mismatched settings are not supported.
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Caution
Changing the interface speed and duplex mode configuration might shut down and enable the interface
during the reconfiguration.
Configuring the Interface Speed
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to set the interface speed.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
2.
speed [10 | 100 | 1000 | auto]
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects the interface to be configured.
Example:
The EHWIC slot number can be 0 to 3, and the EHWIC port
number can be 0 to 7.
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet
0/1/2
Step 2
speed [10 | 100 | 1000 | auto]
Sets the interface speed of the interface.
Example:
Router(config-if)#speed 1000
Note
If you set the interface speed to auto on a 10/100/1000-Mbps Gigabitethernet interface, both speed and
duplex are auto negotiated.
Configuring the Interface Duplex Mode
Beginning in interface configuration mode, follow these steps to set the duplex mode of a Gigabit
Ethernet interface.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
duplex [auto | full | half]
2.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
duplex [auto | full | half]
Sets the duplex mode of the interface.
Example:
Router(config-if)#duplex auto
Step 2
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Note
If you set the port speed to auto on a 10/100/1000-Mbps Gigabit Ethernet interface, both speed and
duplex are auto negotiated, and the duplex mode cannot be modified.
The following example shows how to set the interface duplex mode to auto on gigabit Ethernet interface
3:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
router(config-if)#speed 1000
Router(config-if)#duplex auto
Router(config-if)#end
Verifying Interface Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration
Use the show interfaces command to verify the interface speed and duplex mode configuration for an
interface, as shown in the following output example:
Router#show interfaces gigabitethernet 0/1/2
GigabitEthernet0/1/2 is up, line protocol is down
Hardware is EHWIC-4 Gigabit Ethernet, address is 0022.bdd2.7915 (bia 0022.bdd2
.7915)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit/sec, DLY 10 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Auto-duplex, 1000
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input never, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts (0 multicasts)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
0 watchdog, 0 multicast, 0 pause input
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets
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0 unknown protocol drops
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 pause output
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
Router#
Configuring a Description for an Interface
You can add a description of an interface to help you remember its function. The description appears in
the output of the following commands: show configuration, show running-config, and show
interfaces.
Use the description command, in interface configuration mode, to add a description for an interface.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to add a description to the interface:
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
2.
description string
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects the interface to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 2
description string
Adds a description for an interface.
Example:
Router(config-if)#description
gigabitethernet1
Configuring a Gigabit Ethernet Interface as a Layer 2 Trunk
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure a GigabitEthernet interface as
a Layer 2 trunk.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
2.
shutdown
3.
switchport mode trunk
4.
switchport trunk native vlan vlan-num
5.
switchport trunk allowed vlan {add | except | none | remove} vlan1[,vlan[,vlan[,...]]
6.
no shutdown
7.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects the interface to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 2
shutdown
(Optional) Shuts down the interface to prevent traffic
flow until configuration is complete.
Example:
Router(config-if)#shutdown
Step 3
switchport mode trunk
Configures the interface as a Layer 2 trunk.
Note
Encapsulation is always dot1q.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Step 4
switchport trunk native vlan vlan-num
(Optional) For 802.1Q trunks, specifies the native
VLAN.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport trunk native vlan 1
Step 5
switchport trunk allowed vlan {add | except | none |
remove} vlan1[,vlan[,vlan[,...]]
(Optional) Configures the list of VLANs allowed on the
trunk. All VLANs are allowed by default. You cannot
remove any of the default VLANs from a trunk.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport trunk allowed vlan
{add | except | none | remove}
vlan1[,vlan[,vlan[,...]]
Step 6
no shutdown
Activates the interface. (Required only if you shut down
the interface.)
Example:
Router(config-if)#no shutdown
Step 7
end
Exits interface configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Note
Ports do not support Dynamic Trunk Protocol (DTP). Ensure that the neighboring switch is set to a mode
that does not send DTP.
Verifying a GigabitEthernet Interface as a Layer 2 Trunk
Use the following show commands to verify the configuration of a GigabitEthernet interface as a Layer
2 trunk:
router#show running-config interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Building configuration...
Current configuration: 71 bytes
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!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/2
switchport mode trunk
end
router#
router#show interfaces trunk
Port
Mode
Encapsulation
Gi0/1/2 on
802.1q
Port
Gi0/1/2
Status
trunking
Native vlan
1
Vlans allowed on trunk
1-4094
Port
Gi0/1/2
Vlans allowed and active in management domain
1,10,30
Port
Gi0/1/2
Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
1,10,30
router#
Configuring a GE Interface as Layer 2 Access
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure a GE interface as Layer 2
access.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
2.
shutdown
3.
switchport mode access
4.
switchport access vlan vlan_num
5.
no shutdown
6.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects the interface to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet
0/1/2
Step 2
shutdown
(Optional) Shuts down the interface to prevent traffic flow until
configuration is complete.
Example:
Router(config-if)#shutdown
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Step 3
Command
Purpose
switchport mode access
Configures the interface as a Layer 2 access.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport mode access
Step 4
switchport access vlan vlan_num
For access ports, specifies the access vlan.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport access vlan 1
Step 5
no shutdown
Activates the interface. (Required only if you shut down the
interface.)
Example:
Router(config-if)#no shutdown
Step 6
end
Exits interface configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Verifying a GigabitEthernet Interface as Layer 2 Access
Use the show running-config interface command to verify the running configuration of the interface,
as shown below:
Router#show running-config interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Building configuration...
Current configuration: 76 bytes
!
interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
switchport access vlan 3
no ip address
end
Use the show interfaces command to verify the switchport configuration of the interface, as shown
below:
Router#show interfaces gigabitethernet 0/1/0 switchport
Name: Gi0/1/2
Switchport: Enabled
Administrative Mode: trunk
Operational Mode: down
Administrative Trunking Encapsulation: dot1q
Negotiation of Trunking: Disabled
Access Mode VLAN: 0 ((Inactive))
Trunking Native Mode VLAN: 1 (default)
Trunking VLANs Enabled: ALL
Trunking VLANs Active: none
Protected: false
Priority for untagged frames: 0
Override vlan tag priority: FALSE
Voice VLAN: none
Appliance trust: none
router#
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Configuring 802.1x Authentication
This section describes how to configure 802.1x port-based authentication on an EtherSwitch EHWIC:
•
Understanding the Default 802.1x Configuration, page 19
•
Enabling 802.1x Authentication, page 20
•
Configuring the Switch-to-RADIUS-Server Communication, page 22
•
Enabling Periodic Reauthentication, page 23
•
Changing the Quiet Period, page 24
•
Changing the Switch-to-Client Retransmission Time, page 25
•
Setting the Switch-to-Client Frame-Retransmission Number, page 26
•
Enabling Multiple Hosts, page 27
•
Resetting the 802.1x Configuration to the Default Values, page 28
•
Displaying 802.1x Statistics and Status, page 29
Understanding the Default 802.1x Configuration
Table 2 shows the default 802.1x configuration.
Table 2
Default 802.1x Configuration
Feature
Default Setting
Authentication, authorization, and
accounting (AAA)
Disabled.
RADIUS server
•
IP address
•
None specified
•
UDP authentication port
•
1645
•
Key
•
None specified
Per-interface 802.1x enable state
Disabled (force-authorized).
The port transmits and receives normal traffic without
802.1x-based authentication of the client.
Periodic reauthentication
Disabled.
Number of seconds between
reauthentication attempts
3600 seconds.
Quiet period
60 seconds (number of seconds that the switch remains in
the quiet state following a failed authentication exchange
with the client).
Retransmission time
30 seconds (number of seconds that the switch waits for
a response to an EAP request/identity frame from the
client before retransmitting the request).
Maximum retransmission number
2 times (number of times that the switch sends an
EAP-request/identity frame before restarting the
authentication process).
Multiple host support
Disabled.
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Table 2
Default 802.1x Configuration (continued)
Feature
Default Setting
Client timeout period
30 seconds (when relaying a request from the
authentication server to the client, the amount of time the
switch waits for a response before retransmitting the
request to the client). This setting is not configurable.
Authentication server timeout period
30 seconds (when relaying a response from the client to
the authentication server, the amount of time the switch
waits for a reply before retransmitting the response to the
server). This setting is not configurable.
802.1x Configuration Guidelines
Follow these guidelines to configure 802.1x authentication:
•
When the 802.1x protocol is enabled, ports are authenticated before any other Layer 2 feature is
enabled.
•
The 802.1x protocol is supported on Layer 2 static-access ports, but it is not supported on these port
types:
– Trunk port—If you try to enable 802.1x on a trunk port, an error message appears, and 802.1x
is not enabled. If you try to change the mode of an 802.1x-enabled port to trunk, the port mode
is not changed.
– Switch Port Analyzer (SPAN) destination port—You can enable 802.1x on a port that is a SPAN
destination port; however, 802.1x is disabled until the port is removed as a SPAN destination.
Enabling 802.1x Authentication
To enable 802.1x port-based authentication, you must enable AAA and specify the authentication
method list. A method list describes the sequence and authentication methods to be queried to
authenticate a user.
The software uses the first method listed to authenticate users; if that method fails to respond, the
software selects the next authentication method in the method list. This process continues until there is
successful communication with a listed authentication method or until all defined methods are
exhausted. If authentication fails at any point in this cycle, the authentication process stops, and no other
authentication methods are attempted.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure 802.1x port-based authentication.
This procedure is required.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
aaa new-model
3.
aaa authentication dot1x {default | listname} method1 [method2...]
4.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
5.
dot1x port-control auto
6.
end
7.
show dot1x
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
aaa new-model
Enables AAA.
Example:
Router(config)#aaa new-model
Step 3
aaa authentication dot1x {default | listname}
method1 [method2...]
Example:
Router(config)#aaa authentication dot1x
{default | listname} method1 [method2...]
Creates an 802.1x authentication method list.
To create a default list that is used when a named list is not
specified in the authentication command, use the default
keyword followed by the methods that are to be used in default
situations. The default method list is automatically applied to
all interfaces.
Enter at least one of these keywords:
Step 4
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
•
group radius—Use the list of all RADIUS servers for
authentication.
•
none—Use no authentication. The client is automatically
authenticated without the switch using the information
supplied by the client.
Enters interface configuration mode, and specifies the
interface to be enabled for 802.1x authentication.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet
0/1/2
Step 5
Step 6
dot1x port-control auto
Enables 802.1x on the interface.
Example:
Router(config-if)#dot1x port-control auto
For feature interaction information with trunk, dynamic,
dynamic-access, EtherChannel, secure, and SPAN ports, see
the “802.1x Configuration Guidelines” section on page 20.
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Step 7
show dot1x
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Check the Status column in the 802.1x Port Summary section
of the display. An enabled status means the port-control value
is set either to auto or to force-unauthorized.
Router#show dot1x
To disable AAA, use the no aaa new-model command in global configuration mode. To disable 802.1x
AAA authentication, use the no aaa authentication dot1x {default | list-name} method1 [method2...]
command in global configuration mode. To disable 802.1x, use either the dot1x port-control
force-authorized command or the no dot1x port-control command in interface configuration mode.
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Configuring the Switch-to-RADIUS-Server Communication
RADIUS security servers are identified by their host name or IP address, host name and specific UDP
port numbers, or IP address and specific UDP port numbers. The combination of the IP address and UDP
port number creates a unique identifier, which enables RADIUS requests to be sent to multiple UDP
ports on a server at the same IP address. If two different host entries on the same RADIUS server are
configured for the same service—for example, authentication—the second host entry configured acts as
the failover backup to the first one. The RADIUS host entries are tried in the order that they were
configured.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure the RADIUS server parameters on
the switch. This procedure is required.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
radius-server host {hostname | ip-address} auth-port port-number key string
3.
end
4.
show running-config
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
radius-server host {hostname |
ip-address} auth-port
port-number key string
Configures the RADIUS server parameters on the switch.
For hostname | ip-address, specify the host name or IP address of the remote
RADIUS server.
Example:
For auth-port port-number, specify the UDP destination port for authentication
requests. The default is 1645.
Router(config)#radius-server
host {hostname | ip-address}
auth-port port-number key
string
For key string, specify the authentication and encryption key used between the
switch and the RADIUS daemon running on the RADIUS server. The key is a
text string that must match the encryption key used on the RADIUS server.
Note
Always configure the key as the last item in the radius-server host
command syntax because leading spaces are ignored, but spaces within
and at the end of the key are used. If you use spaces in the key, do not
enclose the key in quotation marks unless the quotation marks are part of
the key. This key must match the encryption used on the RADIUS
daemon.
To use multiple RADIUS servers, repeat this command.
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Step 3
Command
Purpose
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show running-config
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show running-config
To delete the specified RADIUS server, use the no radius-server host {hostname | ip-address}
command in global configuration mode.
To configure the timeout, retransmission, and encryption key values for all RADIUS servers, use the
radius-server host command in global configuration mode. To configure these options on a per-server
basis, use the radius-server timeout, radius-server retransmit, and radius-server key commands in
global configuration mode.
You also need to configure some settings on the RADIUS server. These settings include the IP address
of the switch and the key string to be shared by both the server and the switch. For more information,
refer to the RADIUS server documentation.
Enabling Periodic Reauthentication
You can enable periodic 802.1x client reauthentication and specify how often it occurs. If you do not
specify a time period before enabling reauthentication, the time between reauthentication attempts is
3600 seconds.
Automatic 802.1x client reauthentication is a global setting and cannot be set for clients connected to
individual ports.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable periodic reauthentication of the client
and to configure the number of seconds between reauthentication attempts.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
dot1x re-authentication
3.
dot1x timeout re-authperiod seconds
4.
end
5.
show dot1x
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
dot1x re-authentication
Enables periodic reauthentication of the client, which is disabled by
default.
Example:
Router(config)#dot1x re-authentication
Step 3
dot1x timeout re-authperiod seconds
Sets the number of seconds between reauthentication attempts.
The range is from 1 to 4294967295; the default is 3600.
Example:
Router(config)#dot1x timeout
re-authperiod seconds
Step 4
end
This command affects the behavior of the switch only if periodic
reauthentication is enabled.
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 5
show dot1x
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show dot1x
To disable periodic reauthentication, use the no dot1x re-authentication command in global
configuration mode. To return to the default number of seconds between reauthentication attempts, use
the no dot1x timeout re-authperiod global configuration command.
Changing the Quiet Period
When the switch cannot authenticate the client, the switch remains idle for a set period of time, and then
tries again. The idle time is determined by the quiet-period value. A failed authentication of the client
might occur because the client provided an invalid password. You can provide a faster response time to
the user by entering smaller number than the default.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the quiet period:
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
dot1x timeout quiet-period seconds
3.
end
4.
show dot1x
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
dot1x timeout quiet-period seconds
Sets the number of seconds that the switch remains in the quiet state
following a failed authentication exchange with the client.
Example:
The range is from 0 to 65535; the default is 60.
Router(config)#dot1x timeout
quiet-period seconds
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show dot1x
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show dot1x
To return to the default quiet time, use the no dot1x timeout quiet-period command in global
configuration mode.
Changing the Switch-to-Client Retransmission Time
The client responds to the EAP-request/identity frame from the switch with an EAP-response/identity
frame. If the switch does not receive this response, it waits a set period of time (known as the
retransmission time), and then retransmits the frame.
Note
You should change the default value of this command only to adjust for unusual circumstances such as
unreliable links or specific behavioral problems with certain clients and authentication servers.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the amount of time that the switch
waits for client notification:
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
dot1x timeout tx-period seconds
3.
end
4.
show dot1x
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
dot1x timeout tx-period seconds
Example:
Step 3
Sets the number of seconds that the switch waits for a response to an
EAP-request/identity frame from the client before retransmitting the
request.
Router(config)#dot1x timeout
tx-period 40
The range is from 1 to 65535; the default is 30.
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show dot1x
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show dot1x
To return to the default retransmission time, use the no dot1x timeout tx-period command in global
configuration mode.
Setting the Switch-to-Client Frame-Retransmission Number
In addition to changing the switch-to-client retransmission time, you can change the number of times
that the switch sends an EAP-request/identity frame (assuming no response is received) to the client
before restarting the authentication process.
Note
You should change the default value of this command only to adjust for unusual circumstances, such as
unreliable links or specific behavioral problems with certain clients and authentication servers.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to set the switch-to-client frame-retransmission
number.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
dot1x max-req count
3.
end
4.
show dot1x
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
dot1x max-req count
Example:
Sets the number of times that the switch sends an EAP-request/identity
frame to the client before restarting the authentication process. The range
is 1 to 10; the default is 2.
Router(config)#dot1x max-req 3
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show dot1x
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show dot1x
To return to the default retransmission number, use the no dot1x max-req command in global
configuration mode.
Enabling Multiple Hosts
You can attach multiple hosts to a single 802.1x-enabled port. In this mode, only one of the attached
hosts must be successfully authorized for all hosts to be granted network access. If the port becomes
unauthorized (reauthentication fails, and an EAPOL-logoff message is received), all attached clients are
denied access to the network.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to allow multiple hosts (clients) on an
802.1x-authorized port that has the dot1x port-control interface configuration command set to auto.
To disable multiple hosts on the port, use the no dot1x multiple-hosts command in interface
configuration mode.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
dot1x multiple-hosts
4.
end
5.
show dot1x interface type 0/slot/port
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Enters interface configuration mode, and specify the interface to which
multiple hosts are indirectly attached.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
dot1x multiple-hosts
Allows multiple hosts (clients) on an 802.1x-authorized port.
Example:
Make sure that the dot1x port-control interface configuration command
is set to auto for the specified interface.
Router(config-if)#dot1x
multiple-hosts
Step 4
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Step 5
show dot1x interface type 0/slot/por
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show dot1x interface type
0/1/2
Resetting the 802.1x Configuration to the Default Values
You can reset the 802.1x configuration to the default values with a single command.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to reset the 802.1x configuration to the default
values.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
dot1x default
3.
end
4.
show dot1x
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
dot1x default
Resets the configurable 802.1x parameters to the default values.
Example:
Router(config)#dot1x default
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show dot1x
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show dot1x
Displaying 802.1x Statistics and Status
To display 802.1x statistics for all interfaces, use the show dot1x statistics command in privileged
EXEC mode. To display 802.1x statistics for a specific interface, use the show dot1x statistics interface
type 0/slot/port in privileged EXEC mode.
To display the 802.1x administrative and operational status for the switch, use the show dot1x in
privileged EXEC mode. To display the 802.1x administrative and operational status for a specific
interface, use the show dot1x interface type 0/slot/port command in privileged EXEC mode.
Configuring Spanning Tree
•
Enabling Spanning Tree, page 30
•
Configuring Spanning Tree Port Priority, page 30
•
Configuring Spanning Tree Port Cost, page 31
•
Configuring the Bridge Priority of a VLAN, page 33
•
Configuring the Hello Time, page 34
•
Configuring the Forward-Delay Time for a VLAN, page 34
•
Configuring the Maximum Aging Time for a VLAN, page 34
•
Disabling Spanning Tree, page 35
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Enabling Spanning Tree
You can enable spanning tree on a per-VLAN basis. The switch maintains a separate instance of
spanning tree for each VLAN (except on VLANs on which you disable spanning tree).
Note
Spanning tree is enabled by default on all VLANs when they are created and the ports become members
of that VLAN.
To enable spanning tree on a per-VLAN basis, use the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID command in global
configuration mode.
Verifying Spanning Tree
Use the show spanning-tree vlan to verify spanning tree configuration.
Router#show spanning-tree vlan 1
VLAN1 is executing the ieee compatible Spanning Tree protocol
Bridge Identifier has priority 32768, address 0025.451b.b22a
Configured hello time 2, max age 20, forward delay 15
Current root has priority 32768, address 0008.e36d.9f70
Root port is 18 (GigabitEthernet0/1/4), cost of root path is 38
Topology change flag not set, detected flag not set
Number of topology changes 11 last change occurred 02:43:01 ago
from GigabitEthernet0/1/2
Times: hold 1, topology change 35, notification 2
hello 2, max age 20, forward delay 15
Timers: hello 0, topology change 0, notification 0, aging 300
Port 16 (GigabitEthernet0/1/2) of VLAN1 is forwarding
Port path cost 4, Port priority 128, Port Identifier 128.16.
Designated root has priority 32768, address 0008.e36d.9f70
Designated bridge has priority 32768, address 0025.451b.b22a
Designated port id is 128.16, designated path cost 38
Timers: message age 0, forward delay 0, hold 0
Number of transitions to forwarding state: 1
BPDU: sent 9810, received 1
Router#
Configuring Spanning Tree Port Priority
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure the spanning tree port priority
of an interface.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
2.
spanning-tree port-priority port_priority
3.
spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID port-priority port_priority
4.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects an interface to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet
0/slot/port
Step 2
spanning-tree port-priority port_priority
Configures the port priority for an interface. The
port_priority value can be from 0 to 255, in increments of 8.
Example:
Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config-if)#spanning-tree port-priority
port_priority
Step 3
spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID port-priority
port_priority
Configures the VLAN port priority for an interface. The
port_priority value can be from 0 to 255, in increments of 8.
Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Example:
Router(config-if)#spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID
port-priority port_priority
Step 4
end
Exits configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Verifying Spanning Tree Port Priority
Use the show spanning-tree interface command to verify spanning-tree interface and the spanning-tree
port priority configuration.
Router#show spanning-tree interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Port 16 (GigabitEthernet0/1/2) of VLAN1 is forwarding
Port path cost 4, Port priority 128, Port Identifier 128.16.
Designated root has priority 32768, address 0008.e36d.9f70
Designated bridge has priority 32768, address 0025.451b.b22a
Designated port id is 128.16, designated path cost 38
Timers: message age 0, forward delay 0, hold 0
Number of transitions to forwarding state: 1
BPDU: sent 9096, received 1
Router#
Configuring Spanning Tree Port Cost
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure the spanning tree port cost of
an interface.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
2.
spanning-tree cost port_cost
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3.
spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID cost port_cost
4.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects an interface to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 2
spanning-tree cost port_cost
Configures the port cost for an interface. The value of
port_cost can be from 1 to 65535.
Example:
Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config-if)#spanning-tree cost 50
Step 3
spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID cost port_cost
Configures the VLAN port cost for an interface. The value
of port_cost can be from 1 to 65535.
Example:
Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config-if)#spanning-tree vlan 1 cost 50
Step 4
end
Exits configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Calculating Port Cost
Port cost value calculations are based on the bandwidth of the port. There are two classes of values. Short
(16-bit) values are specified by the IEEE 802.1D specification, and range in value from 1 to 65535. Long
(32-bit) values are specified by the IEEE 802.1t specification, and range in value from1 to 200,000,000.
Assigning Short Port Cost Values
You can manually assign short port costs in the range of 1 to 65535. Table 3 lists the default short port
cost values.
Table 3
Default Short Port Cost Values
Port Speed
Default Cost Value
10 Mbps
100
100 Mbps
19
1000 Mbps
4
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Assigning Long Port Cost Values
You can manually assign long port costs in the range of 1 to 200,000,000. Table 4 lists the recommended
cost values.
Table 4
Recommended Long Port Cost Values
Port Speed
Recommended Value
Recommended Range
10 Mbps
2,000,000
200,000 to 20,000,000
100 Mbps
200,000
20,000 to 2,000,000
1000 Mbps
20,000
2,000 to 200,000
Verifying Spanning Tree Port Cost
Use the show spanning-tree vlan command to verify the spanning-tree port cost configuration.
Router#show spanning-tree vlan 200
Port 264 (GigabitEthernet0/1/2) of VLAN200 is forwarding
Port path cost 17, Port priority 64, Port Identifier 129.8.
Designated root has priority 32768, address 0010.0d40.34c7
Designated bridge has priority 32768, address 0010.0d40.34c7
Designated port id is 128.1, designated path cost 0
Timers: message age 2, forward delay 0, hold 0
Number of transitions to forwarding state: 1
BPDU: sent 0, received 13513
Router#
Configuring the Bridge Priority of a VLAN
To configure the spanning tree bridge priority of a VLAN, use the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID priority
bridge_priority command in global configuration mode. The bridge_priority value can be from 1 to
65535.
Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 1 priority 25
Caution
Exercise care when using this command. For most situations, the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID root
primary command and the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID root secondary command are the preferred
commands to modify the bridge priority.
Verifying the Bridge Priority of a VLAN
Use the show spanning-tree vlan bridge command to verify the bridge priority, as illustrated below:
Router#show spanning-tree vlan 200 bridge brief
Hello Max Fwd
Vlan
Bridge ID
Time Age Delay
---------------- -------------------- ---- ---- ----VLAN200
33792 0050.3e8d.64c8
2
20
15
Router#
Protocol
-------ieee
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Configuring the Hello Time
To configure the hello interval for the spanning tree, use the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID hello-time
hello_time command in global configuration mode. The hello_time value can be from 1 to 10 seconds.
Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 1 hello-time 5
Configuring the Forward-Delay Time for a VLAN
To configure the forward delay for the spanning tree, use the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID forward-time
forward_time command in global configuration mode. The value of forward_time can be from 4 to 30
seconds. Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 1 forward-time 4
Configuring the Maximum Aging Time for a VLAN
To configure the maximum age interval for the spanning tree, use the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID
max-age max_age command in global configuration mode. The value of max_age can be from 6 to 40
seconds. Use the no form of this command to restore the defaults.
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 1 max-age 20
Configuring the Root Bridge
The EtherSwitch EHWIC maintains a separate instance of spanning tree for each active VLAN
configured on the switch. A bridge ID, consisting of the bridge priority and the bridge MAC address, is
associated with each instance. For each VLAN, the switch with the lowest bridge ID becomes the root
bridge for that VLAN.
To configure a VLAN instance to become the root bridge, the bridge priority can be modified from the
default value (32768) to a significantly lower value so that the bridge becomes the root bridge for the
specified VLAN. Use the spanning-tree vlan vlan-ID root command to alter the bridge priority.
The switch checks the bridge priority of the current root bridges for each VLAN. The bridge priority for
the specified VLANs is set to 8192 if this value will cause the switch to become the root for the specified
VLANs.
If any root switch for the specified VLANs has a bridge priority lower than 8192, the switch sets the
bridge priority for the specified VLANs to 1 less than the lowest bridge priority.
For example, if all switches in the network have the bridge priority for VLAN 100 set to the default value
of 32768, entering the spanning-tree vlan 100 root primary command on a switch will set the bridge
priority for VLAN 100 to 8192, causing the switch to become the root bridge for VLAN 100.
Note
The root switch for each instance of a spanning tree should be a backbone or distribution switch. Do not
configure an access switch as the spanning tree primary root.
Use the diameter keyword to specify the Layer 2 network diameter (that is, the maximum number of
bridge hops between any two end stations in the Layer 2 network). When you specify the network
diameter, the switch automatically picks an optimal hello time, forward delay time, and maximum age
time for a network of that diameter, which can significantly reduce the spanning tree convergence time.
Use the hello keyword to override the automatically calculated hello time.
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Note
We recommend that you avoid configuring the hello time, forward delay time, and maximum age time
manually after configuring the switch as the root bridge.
To configure the switch as the root, use the spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID root primary [diameter
net-diameter [hello-time seconds]] command in global configuration mode. Use the no form of this
command to restore the defaults.
Disabling Spanning Tree
To disable spanning tree on a per-VLAN basis, use the no spanning-tree vlan vlan_ID command in
global configuration mode.
Verifying that Spanning Tree is Disabled
Use the show spanning-tree vlan command to verify that the spanning tree is disabled, as shown in the
example below:
Router#show spanning-tree vlan 200
<output truncated>
Spanning tree instance for VLAN 200 does not exist.
Router#
Configuring MAC Table Manipulation
Port security is implemented by providing the user with the option to make a port secure by allowing only
well-known MAC addresses to send in data traffic. Up to 200 secure MAC addresses per platform are
supported.
•
Enabling Known MAC Address Traffic, page 35
•
Creating a Static Entry in the MAC Address Table, page 36
•
Configuring the Aging Timer, page 37
Enabling Known MAC Address Traffic
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable the MAC address secure option.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
mac-address-table secure mac-address gi 0/slot/port [vlan vlan id]
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Command
Step 1
Purpose
Enters global configuration mode.
configure terminal
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
mac-address-table secure mac-address gi 0/slot/port [vlan Secures the MAC address traffic on the port.
vlan id]
Example:
Router(config)#mac-address-table secure
0000.0002.0001 gi 0/1/2 vlan 1
Step 3
end
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Verifying the MAC Address Table Secure Option
Use the show mac-address-table secure command to verify the configuration, as illustrated below:
Router#show mac-address-table secure
Secure Address Table:
Destination Address
------------------0000.0002.0001
Address Type
-----------Secure
VLAN
---2
Destination Port
-------------------GigabitEthernet0/1/2
Creating a Static Entry in the MAC Address Table
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to create a static entry in the MAC address table.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
mac-address-table static mac-address gi 0/slot/port [vlan vlan id]
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Command
Step 1
configure terminal
Purpose
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
mac-address-table static mac-address gi 0/slot/port [vlan Creates static entry in the MAC address table.
vlan id]
Example:
Router(config)#mac-address-table static
0025.451b.b22e gi 0/1/2 vlan 1
Step 3
end
Exits global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Use the show mac-address-table command in privileged EXEC mode to verify the configuration.
Configuring the Aging Timer
The aging timer may be configured from 10 to 630 seconds, in 10-second intervals.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure the aging timer.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
mac-address-table aging-time 10-1000000
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
mac-address-table aging-time 10-1000000
Configures the MAC address aging timer age, in seconds.
Acceptable time range is from 10 to 630.
Example:
Router(config)#mac-address-table aging-time 320
Step 3
end
Exits configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Caution
Do not change the aging timer. If you change the aging timer, the EtherSwitch EHWIC could go out of
synchronization.
Verifying the Aging Time
Use the show mac-address-table aging-time command to verify the MAC address table aging timer, as
shown below:
Router#show mac-address-table aging-time
Mac address aging time 320
Configuring Cisco Discovery Protocol
Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) is primarily used to obtain protocol addresses of neighboring devices
and discover the platform of those devices. CDP can also be used to display information about the
interfaces your router uses. CDP is media- and protocol-independent, and runs on all
Cisco-manufactured equipment including routers, bridges, access servers, and switches.
For information on how to configure CDP, seeUsing Cisco Discovery Protocol at
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/netmgmt/configuration/guide/nm_cdp_discover.html
Configuring the Switched Port Analyzer
This section describes how to configure a Switched Port Analyzer (SPAN) session for an EtherSwitch
EHWIC.
Note
An EtherSwitch EHWIC supports only one SPAN session.
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Note
Tx, Rx, or both Tx and Rx monitoring is supported.
•
Configuring the SPAN Sources, page 39
•
Configuring SPAN Destinations, page 39
•
Verifying the SPAN Session, page 39
•
Removing Sources or Destinations from a SPAN Session, page 39
Configuring the SPAN Sources
To configure the source for a SPAN session, use the monitor session session source {interface type
0/slot/port | vlan vlan_ID [, | - | rx | tx | both]} command in global configuration mode. This command
specifies the SPAN session, the source interfaces or VLANs, and the traffic direction to be monitored.
Router(config)#monitor session 1 source interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0
Configuring SPAN Destinations
To configure the destination for a SPAN session, use the monitor session session destination {interface
type 0/slot/port | vlan vlan_ID [, | - | rx | tx | both]} command in global configuration mode.
Router(config)#monitor session 1 destination interface gigabitethernet 0/1/1
Verifying the SPAN Session
Use the show monitor session command to verify the sources and destinations configured for the SPAN
session.
Router#show monitor session 1
Session 1
--------Source Ports:
RX Only: None
TX Only: None
Both: Gi0/1/0
Source VLANs:
RX Only: None
TX Only: None
Both: None
Destination Ports: Gi0/1/1
Filter VLANs: None
Removing Sources or Destinations from a SPAN Session
To remove sources or destinations from the SPAN session, use the no monitor session session command
in global configuration mode as shown in the following example:
Router(config)#no monitor session 1
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Configuring Power Management on the Interface
This section describes how to configure power management on the interface and contains the following
topics:
•
Configuring Power to Cisco IP Phones, page 40
•
Configuring Maximum Inline Power Supply to a Port, page 41
•
Verifying Power Management on the Interface, page 41
Configuring Power to Cisco IP Phones
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to manage power to Cisco IP phones.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
3.
power inline auto
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects a particular GigabitEthernet interface for
configuration.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
power inline auto
Example:
Router(config-if)#power inline auto
Configures the port to supply inline power automatically to
a Cisco IP phone. Use the power inline never command to
permanently disable inline power on the port.
Note
On the Cisco ISR G2, the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch
EHWICs with POE modules does not provide inline
power to devices unless their speed and duplex
settings are both set to auto.
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Configuring Maximum Inline Power Supply to a Port
The default power limit per port is 20 watts. Use the power inline port max max-wattage command to
configure the maximum inline power supply to a port the EHWIC.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure the maximum inline power for a
port on the EHWIC:
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
3.
power inline port max max-wattage
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface gigabitethernet 0/slot/port
Selects a particular GigabitEthernet interface for
configuration.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/3
Step 3
power inline port max max-wattage
Sets the maximum power to a device connected to the
EHWIC port.
Example:
The maximum power can be set between 4,000 and 20,000
milliwatts.
Router(config-if)#power inline port max 6300
Verifying Power Management on the Interface
Use the show power inline command to verify the power configuration on the ports.
Router#show power inline
PowerSupply
----------INT-PS
Interface
--------Gi0/1/3
Gi0/1/2
Gi0/1/1
Gi0/1/0
Gi0/3/7
Gi0/3/6
SlotNum.
Maximum
Allocated
Status
--------------------------0
200.000
32.100
PS GOOD
RPS ABSENT
Config
Device
Powered
PowerAllocated
State
---------------------------------auto
Cisco
On
6.300 Watts
PHONE
auto
Unknown Off
0.000 Watts
NOT_PHONE
auto
Unknown Off
0.000 Watts
UNKNOWN
auto
IEEE-3
On
12.900 Watts
PHONE
auto
Unknown Off
0.000 Watts
NOT_PHONE
auto
IEEE-3
On
12.900 Watts
PHONE
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Use the show power inline actual command to show the actual power used by the device at that time.
Router#show power inline actual
Interface
Power
-------------------- ----Gi1/0
no
Gi0/1/3
yes ( 3.599 Watts)
Gi0/1/2
yes ( 5.758 Watts)
Gi0/1/1
no
Gi0/1/0
no
Gi0/3/7
no
Gi0/3/6
yes ( 6.838 Watts)
Gi0/3/5
no
Gi0/3/4
no
Gi0/3/3
no
Gi0/3/2
no
Gi0/3/1
no
Gi0/3/0
no
Ethernet Switch Network Modules with PoE support should be reloaded to function
properly upon PoE Power Supply OIR insertion/removal.
Configuring IP Multicast Layer 3 Switching
These sections describe how to configure IP multicast Layer 3 switching:
•
Enabling IP Multicast Routing Globally, page 42
•
Enabling IP Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) on Layer 3 Interfaces, page 43
•
Verifying IP Multicast Layer 3 Switching Summary, page 43
•
Verifying the IP Multicast Routing Table, page 45
Enabling IP Multicast Routing Globally
You must enable IP multicast routing globally before you can enable IP multicast Layer 3 switching on
Layer 3 interfaces.
For complete information and procedures, see these publications:
•
Cisco IOS IP Multicast Configuration Guide, Release 15.1
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/ipmulti/configuration/guide/15_1/imc_15_1_book.html
•
Cisco IOS IP Addressing Services Command Reference
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/ipaddr/command/reference/iad_book.html
•
Cisco IOS IP Multicast Command Reference
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/ipmulti/command/reference/imc_book.html
To enable IP multicast routing globally, use the ip multicast-routing command in global configuration
mode.
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Enabling IP Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) on Layer 3 Interfaces
You must enable PIM on the Layer 3 interfaces before enabling IP multicast Layer 3 switching functions
on those interfaces.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to enable IP PIM on a Layer 3 interface.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface vlan vlan-id
2.
ip pim {dense-mode | sparse-mode | sparse-dense-mode}
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
interface vlan vlan-id
Selects the interface to be configured.
Example:
Router(config)#interface vlan 1
Step 2
ip pim {dense-mode | sparse-mode |
sparse-dense-mode}
Enables IP PIM on a Layer 3 interface.
Example:
Router(config-if)#ip pim dense-mode
The following example shows how to enable PIM on an interface using the default mode
(sparse-dense-mode):
Router(config-if)#ip pim sparse-dense-mode
Router(config-if)#
The following example shows how to enable PIM sparse mode on an interface:
Router(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
Router(config-if)#
Verifying IP Multicast Layer 3 Switching Summary
Note
The show interface statistics command does not verify hardware-switched packets. It only verifies
packets switched by software.
The show ip pim interface count command verifies the IP multicast Layer 3 switching enable state on
IP PIM interfaces and the number of packets received and sent on the interface.
Use the following show commands to verify IP multicast Layer 3 switching information for an IP PIM
Layer 3 interface.
Step 1
Router#show ip pim interface count
State:* - Fast Switched, D - Distributed Fast Switched
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H - Hardware Switching Enabled
Address
Interface
10.0.0.1
VLAN1
Router#
Step 2
FS
*
Mpackets In/Out
151/0
Router#show ip mroute count
IP Multicast Statistics
5 routes using 2728 bytes of memory
4 groups, 0.25 average sources per group
Forwarding Counts:Pkt Count/Pkts per second/Avg Pkt Size/Kilobits per second
Other counts:Total/RPF failed/Other drops(OIF-null, rate-limit etc)
Group:224.9.9.9, Source count:1, Packets forwarded: 0, Packets received: 66
Source:10.0.0.2/32, Forwarding:0/0/0/0, Other:66/0/66
Group:224.10.10.10, Source count:0, Packets forwarded: 0, Packets received: 0
Group:224.0.1.39, Source count:0, Packets forwarded: 0, Packets received: 0
Group:224.0.1.40, Source count:0, Packets forwarded: 0, Packets received: 0
Router#
Note
Step 3
A negative counter means that the outgoing interface list of the corresponding entry is NULL, and this
indicates that this flow is still active.
Router#show ip interface vlan 1
Vlan1 is up, line protocol is up
Internet address is 10.0.0.1/24
Broadcast address is 255.255.255.255
Address determined by setup command
MTU is 1500 bytes
Helper address is not set
Directed broadcast forwarding is disabled
Multicast reserved groups joined: 224.0.0.1 224.0.0.2 224.0.0.22 224.0.0.13
Outgoing access list is not set
Inbound access list is not set
Proxy ARP is enabled
Local Proxy ARP is disabled
Security level is default
Split horizon is enabled
ICMP redirects are always sent
ICMP unreachables are always sent
ICMP mask replies are never sent
IP fast switching is enabled
IP fast switching on the same interface is disabled
IP Flow switching is disabled
IP CEF switching is enabled
IP CEF Fast switching turbo vector
IP multicast fast switching is enabled
IP multicast distributed fast switching is disabled
IP route-cache flags are Fast, CEF
Router Discovery is disabled
IP output packet accounting is disabled
IP access violation accounting is disabled
TCP/IP header compression is disabled
RTP/IP header compression is disabled
Policy routing is disabled
Network address translation is disabled
WCCP Redirect outbound is disabled
WCCP Redirect inbound is disabled
WCCP Redirect exclude is disabled
BGP Policy Mapping is disabled
Router#
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Verifying the IP Multicast Routing Table
Use the show ip mroute command to verify the IP multicast routing table:
Router#show ip mroute 224.10.103.10
IP Multicast Routing Table
Flags:D - Dense, S - Sparse, B - Bidir Group, s - SSM Group, C - Connected,
L - Local, P - Pruned, R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,
T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP created entry,
X - Proxy Join Timer Running, A - Candidate for MSDP Advertisement,
U - URD, I - Received Source Specific Host Report, Z - Multicast Tunnel,
Y - Joined MDT-data group, y - Sending to MDT-data group
Outgoing interface flags:H - Hardware switched, A - Assert winner
Timers:Uptime/Expires
Interface state:Interface, Next-Hop or VCD, State/Mode
(*, 224.10.10.10), 00:09:21/00:02:56, RP 0.0.0.0, flags:DC
Incoming interface:Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
Outgoing interface list:
Vlan1, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:09:21/00:00:00, H
Router#
Note
The RPF-MFD flag indicates that the flow is completely hardware switched. The H flag indicates that
the flow is hardware switched on the outgoing interface.
Configuring IGMP Snooping
This section describes how to configure IGMP snooping on your router and consists of the following
configuration information and procedures:
•
Enabling or Disabling IGMP Snooping, page 45
•
Enabling IGMP Immediate-Leave Processing, page 47
•
Statically Configuring an Interface to Join a Group, page 48
•
Configuring a Multicast Router Port, page 49
Enabling or Disabling IGMP Snooping
By default, IGMP snooping is globally enabled on the EtherSwitch EHWIC. When globally enabled or
disabled, it is also enabled or disabled in all existing VLAN interfaces. By default, IGMP snooping is
enabled on all VLANs, but it can be enabled and disabled on a per-VLAN basis.
Global IGMP snooping overrides the per-VLAN IGMP snooping capability. If global snooping is
disabled, you cannot enable VLAN snooping. If global snooping is enabled, you can enable or disable
snooping on a VLAN basis.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to globally enable IGMP snooping on the
EtherSwitch EHWIC.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
ip igmp snooping
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3.
end
4.
show ip igmp snooping
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
ip igmp snooping
Globally enables IGMP snooping in all existing VLAN interfaces.
Example:
Router(config)#ip igmp snooping
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show ip igmp snooping
Displays snooping configuration.
Example:
Router#show ip igmp snooping
To globally disable IGMP snooping on all VLAN interfaces, use the no ip igmp snooping global
command.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable IGMP snooping on a VLAN interface.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id
3.
end
4.
show ip igmp snooping [vlan vlan-id]
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id
Enables IGMP snooping on the VLAN interface.
Example:
Router(config)#ip igmp snooping
vlan 1
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show ip igmp snooping [vlan vlan-id] Displays snooping configuration.
(Optional) vlan-id is the number of the VLAN.
Example:
show ip igmp snooping vlan 1
To disable IGMP snooping on a VLAN interface, use the no ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id command
in global configuration mode for the specified VLAN number (for example, vlan1).
Enabling IGMP Immediate-Leave Processing
When you enable IGMP Immediate-Leave processing, the EtherSwitch EHWIC immediately removes a
port from the IP multicast group when it detects an IGMP version 2 leave message on that port.
Immediate-Leave processing allows the switch to remove an interface that sends a leave message from
the forwarding table without first sending out group-specific queries to the interface. You should use the
Immediate-Leave feature only when there is only a single receiver present on every port in the VLAN.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable IGMP Immediate-Leave processing.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id immediate-leave
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id
immediate-leave
Enables IGMP Immediate-Leave processing on the VLAN interface.
Example:
Router(config)#ip igmp snooping
vlan 1 immediate-leave
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To disable Immediate-Leave processing, follow Steps 1 and 2 to enter interface configuration mode, and
use the no ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id immediate-leave command in global configuration mode.
Statically Configuring an Interface to Join a Group
Ports normally join multicast groups through the IGMP report message, but you can also statically
configure a host on an interface.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to add a port as a member of a multicast group.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id static mac-address interface interface-id
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id static
mac-address interface interface-id
Example:
Router(config)#ip igmp snooping vlan 1
static 0100.5e02.0203 interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
end
Statically configures a port as a member of a multicast group:
•
vlan-id is the multicast group VLAN ID.
•
mac-address is the group MAC address.
•
interface-id is the member port.
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Use the show mac-address-table multicast [vlan vlan-id] [user | igmp-snooping] [count] command
in privileged EXEC mode to view the MAC address table entries for a VLAN.
Configuring a Multicast Router Port
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable a static connection to a multicast
router.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id mrouter {interface interface-id | learn pim-dvmrp}
3.
end
4.
show ip igmp snooping [vlan vlan-id]
5.
show ip igmp snooping mrouter [vlan vlan-id]
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id mrouter
{interface interface-id | learn pim-dvmrp}
Specifies the multicast router VLAN ID (1 to 1001).
Specifies the interface to the multicast router.
Example:
Router(config)#ip igmp snooping vlan 1
mrouter interface gigabitethernet0/1/2
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Step 4
show ip igmp snooping [vlan vlan-id]
Verifies that IGMP snooping is enabled on the VLAN interface.
Example:
Router#show ip igmp snooping vlan 1
Step 5
show ip igmp snooping mrouter [vlan vlan-id]
Displays information on dynamically learned and manually
configured multicast router interfaces.
Example:
Router#show ip igmp snooping mrouter vlan 1
Configuring Per-Port Storm-Control
You can use these techniques to block the forwarding of unnecessary flooded traffic. This section
describes how to configure per-port storm-control and characteristics on your router and consists of the
following configuration procedures:
•
Enabling Per-Port Storm-Control, page 50
•
Disabling Per-Port Storm-Control, page 52
By default, unicast, broadcast, and multicast suppression is disabled.
Enabling Per-Port Storm-Control
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable per-port storm-control.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
storm-control {broadcast | multicast | unicast} level level-high [level-low]
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4.
storm-control action shutdown
5.
end
6.
show storm-control [interface-type interface-number] [broadcast | multicast | unicast | history]
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters interface configuration mode, and enter the port to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
storm-control {broadcast | multicast |
unicast} level level-high [level-low]
Example:
Step 4
Configures broadcast, multicast, or unicast per-port storm-control.
Specify the rising threshold level for either broadcast, multicast, or
unicast traffic. The storm control action occurs when traffic
utilization reaches this level.
Router(config-if)#storm-control
{broadcast | multicast | unicast} level
level-high [level-low]
(Optional) Specify the falling threshold level. The normal
transmission restarts (if the action is filtering) when traffic drops
below this level.
storm-control action shutdown
Selects the shutdown keyword to disable the port during a storm.
The default is to filter out the traffic.
Example:
Router(config-if)#storm-control action
shutdown
Step 5
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Step 6
show storm-control [interface-type
interface-number] [broadcast | multicast |
unicast | history]
Verifies your entries.
Example:
Router#show storm-control
gigabitethernet 0/1/2 history
Note
If any type of traffic exceeds the upper threshold limit, all of the other types of traffic are stopped.
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Disabling Per-Port Storm-Control
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to disable per-port storm-control.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
no storm-control {{broadcast | multicast | unicast} level | action shutdown}
4.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters interface configuration mode, and enter the port to configure.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
no storm-control {{broadcast |
multicast | unicast} level | action
shutdown}
Disables per-port storm control or the specified storm control action.
Example:
Router(config-if)#no storm-control
action shutdown
Step 4
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Use the show storm-control [interface-type interface-number] [broadcast | multicast | unicast |
history] command in privileged EXEC mode to verify your entries.
Configuring Fallback Bridging
This section describes how to configure fallback bridging on your switch. It contains the following
configuration information:
•
Understanding the Default Fallback Bridging Configuration, page 53
•
Creating a Bridge Group, page 53
•
Preventing the Forwarding of Dynamically Learned Stations, page 55
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•
Configuring the Bridge Table Aging Time, page 56
•
Filtering Frames by a Specific MAC Address, page 56
•
Adjusting Spanning-Tree Parameters, page 57
•
Monitoring and Maintaining the Network, page 64
Understanding the Default Fallback Bridging Configuration
Table 5 shows the default fallback bridging configuration.
Table 5
Default Fallback Bridging Configuration
Feature
Default Setting
Bridge groups
None are defined or assigned to an interface. No
VLAN-bridge STP is defined.
Switch forwards frames for stations that it has
dynamically learned
Enabled.
Bridge table aging time for dynamic entries
300 seconds.
MAC-layer frame filtering
Disabled.
Spanning tree parameters:
Switch priority
32768.
Interface priority
128.
Interface path cost
10 Mbps: 100.
100 Mbps: 19.
1000 Mbps: 4.
Hello BPDU interval
2 seconds.
Forward-delay interval
20 seconds.
Maximum idle interval
30 seconds.
Creating a Bridge Group
To configure fallback bridging for a set of SVIs, these interfaces must be assigned to bridge groups. All
interfaces in the same group belong to the same bridge domain. Each SVI can be assigned to only one
bridge group.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to create a bridge group and assign an interface
to it.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
no ip routing
3.
bridge bridge-group protocol vlan-bridge
4.
interface vlan vlan-id
5.
bridge-group bridge-group
6.
end
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7.
show vlan-bridge
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
no ip routing
Disables IP routing.
Example:
Router(config)#no ip routing
Step 3
bridge bridge-group protocol
vlan-bridge
Assigns a bridge group number, and specifies the VLAN-bridge
spanning-tree protocol to run in the bridge group. The ibm and dec
keywords are not supported.
Example:
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is from
1 to 255.
Router(config)#bridge 1 protocol
vlan-bridge
Step 4
Frames are bridged only among interfaces in the same group.
interface vlan vlan-id
Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the interface on
which you want to assign the bridge group.
Example:
The specified interface must be an SVI: A VLAN interface that you
created by using the interface vlan vlan-id global configuration
command.
Router(config)#interface vlan 1
These ports must have IP addresses assigned to them.
Step 5
bridge-group bridge-group
Assigns the interface to the bridge group created in Step 3.
Example:
By default, the interface is not assigned to any bridge group. An
interface can be assigned to only one bridge group.
Router(config-if)#bridge-group 1
Step 6
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Step 7
show vlan-bridge
(Optional) Verifies forwarding mode.
Example:
Router#show vlan-bridge
To remove a bridge group, use the no bridge bridge-group protocol vlan-bridge global configuration
command. To remove an interface from a bridge group, use the no bridge-group bridge-group command
in interface configuration mode.
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Preventing the Forwarding of Dynamically Learned Stations
By default, the switch forwards any frames for stations that it has dynamically learned. By disabling this
activity, the switch only forwards frames whose addresses have been statically configured into the
forwarding cache.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to prevent the switch from forwarding frames
for stations that it has dynamically learned.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
no bridge bridge-group acquire
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
no bridge bridge-group acquire
Example:
Router(config)#no bridge 1 acquire
Enables the switch to stop forwarding any frames for stations that it has
dynamically learned through the discovery process and to limit frame
forwarding to statically configured stations.
The switch filters all frames except those whose destined-to addresses
have been statically configured into the forwarding cache. To configure
a static address, use the bridge bridge-group address mac-address
{forward | discard} command in global configuration mode.
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To cause the switch to forward frames to stations that it has dynamically learned, use the bridge
bridge-group acquire command in global configuration mode.
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Configuring the Bridge Table Aging Time
A switch forwards, floods, or drops packets based on the bridge table. The bridge table maintains both
static and dynamic entries. Static entries are entered by you. Dynamic entries are entered by the bridge
learning process. A dynamic entry is automatically removed after a specified length of time, known as
aging time, from the time the entry was created or last updated.
If you are likely to move hosts on a switched network, decrease the aging-time to enable the switch to
quickly adapt to the change. If hosts on a switched network do not continuously send packets, increase
the aging time to keep the dynamic entries for a longer time and thus reduce the possibility of flooding
when the hosts send again.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure the aging time.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
bridge bridge-group aging-time seconds
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
bridge bridge-group aging-time seconds
Specifies the length of time that a dynamic entry remains in the bridge
table from the time the entry was created or last updated.
Example:
Router(config)#bridge 1 aging-time
50
Step 3
end
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For seconds, enter a number from 0 to 1000000. The default is 300.
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To return to the default aging-time interval, use the no bridge bridge-group aging-time command in
global configuration mode.
Filtering Frames by a Specific MAC Address
A switch examines frames and sends them through the internetwork according to the destination address;
a switch does not forward a frame back to its originating network segment. You can use the software to
configure specific administrative filters that filter frames based on information other than the paths to
their destinations.
You can filter frames with a particular MAC-layer station destination address. Any number of addresses
can be configured in the system without a performance penalty.
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Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to filter by the MAC-layer address.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
bridge bridge-group address mac-address {forward | discard} [interface]
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
bridge bridge-group address mac-address Specifies the MAC address to discard or forward.
{forward | discard} [interface]
• For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is
from 1 to 255.
Example:
• For mac-address, specify the MAC-layer destination address to be
Router(config)#bridge 1 address
filtered.
0025.451b.b22e forward
Step 3
end
•
Specify forward to forward the frame destined for the specified
interface. Specify discard to discard the frame.
•
(Optional) For interface, specify the interface on which the address
can be reached.
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To disable the frame forwarding ability, use the no bridge bridge-group address mac-address command
in global configuration mode.
Adjusting Spanning-Tree Parameters
Parameters affecting the entire spanning tree are configured with variations of the bridge command in
global configuration mode. Interface-specific parameters are configured with variations of the
bridge-group command in interface configuration mode.
To adjust spanning-tree parameters, perform the tasks in these sections:
•
Changing the Switch Priority, page 58
•
Changing the Interface Priority, page 58
•
Assigning a Path Cost, page 59
•
Adjusting BPDU Intervals, page 60
•
Disabling the Spanning Tree on an Interface, page 63
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Note
Only network administrators with a good understanding of how switches and STP function should make
adjustments to spanning-tree parameters. Poorly planned adjustments can have a negative impact on
performance. A good source on switching is the IEEE 802.1d specification.
Changing the Switch Priority
You can globally configure the priority of an individual switch when two switches tie for position as the
root switch, or you can configure the likelihood that a switch will be selected as the root switch. This
priority is determined by default; however, you can change it.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the switch priority.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
bridge bridge-group priority number
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
bridge bridge-group priority number
Changes the priority of the switch.
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For number, enter a number from 0 to 65535. The default is 32768.
The lower the number, the more likely the switch will be chosen as
the root.
Example:
Router(config)#bridge 1 priority 50
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
No no form of this command exists. To return to the default setting, use the bridge bridge-group priority
number command in global configuration mode, and set the priority to the default value. To change the
priority on an interface, use the bridge-group priority command in interface configuration mode
(described in the next section).
Changing the Interface Priority
You can change the priority for an interface. When two switches tie for position as the root switch, you
configure an interface priority to break the tie. The switch with the lowest interface value is selected.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the interface priority.
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SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
bridge-group bridge-group priority number
4.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters interface configuration mode, and specifies the interface to set
the priority.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
bridge-group bridge-group priority
number
Example:
Router(config-if)#bridge-group 1
priority 100
Step 4
end
Changes the priority of an interface.
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For number, enter a number from 0 to 255. The lower the number,
the more likely that the interface on the switch will be chosen as the
root. The default is 128.
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
To return to the default setting, use the bridge-group bridge-group priority number command in
interface configuration mode.
Assigning a Path Cost
Each interface has a path cost associated with it. By convention, the path cost is 1000/data rate of the
attached LAN, in Mbps.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to assign a path cost.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
bridge-group bridge-group path-cost cost
4.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters interface configuration mode, and specifies the interface to set
the path cost.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
bridge-group bridge-group path-cost
cost
Assigns the path cost of an interface.
Example:
Router(config-if)#bridge-group 1
path-cost 5
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For cost, enter a number from 1 to 65536. The higher the value, the
higher the cost.
– For 10 Mbps, the default path cost is 100.
– For 100 Mbps, the default path cost is 19.
– For 1000 Mbps, the default path cost is 4.
Step 4
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
To return to the default path cost, use the no bridge-group bridge-group path-cost cost command in
interface configuration mode.
Adjusting BPDU Intervals
You can adjust BPDU intervals as described in these sections:
Note
•
Adjusting the Interval between Hello BPDUs, page 60
•
Changing the Forward-Delay Interval, page 61
•
Changing the Maximum-Idle Interval, page 62
Each switch in a spanning tree adopts the interval between hello BPDUs, the forward delay interval, and
the maximum idle interval parameters of the root switch, regardless of its individual configuration.
Adjusting the Interval between Hello BPDUs
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these step to adjust the interval between hello BPDUs.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
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2.
bridge bridge-group hello-time seconds
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
bridge bridge-group hello-time seconds
Specifies the interval between hello BPDUs.
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For seconds, enter a number from 1 to 10. The default is 2 seconds.
Example:
Router(config)#bridge bridge-group
hello-time seconds
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To return to the default setting, use the no bridge bridge-group hello-time global configuration
command.
Changing the Forward-Delay Interval
The forward-delay interval is the amount of time spent listening for topology change information after
an interface has been activated for switching and before forwarding actually begins.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the forward-delay interval.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
bridge bridge-group forward-time seconds
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
bridge bridge-group forward-time
seconds
Specifies the forward-delay interval.
Example:
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For seconds, enter a number from 10 to 200. The default is 20
seconds.
Router(config)#bridge 1 forward-time
12
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To return to the default setting, use the no bridge bridge-group forward-time seconds command in
global configuration mode.
Changing the Maximum-Idle Interval
If a switch does not hear BPDUs from the root switch within a specified interval, it recomputes the
spanning-tree topology.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the maximum-idle interval (maximum
aging time).
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
bridge bridge-group max-age seconds
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
bridge bridge-group max-age seconds
Example:
Specifies the interval the switch waits to hear BPDUs from the root
switch.
•
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is 1
to 255.
•
For seconds, enter a number from 10 to 200. The default is 30.
Router(config)#bridge 1 max-age 50
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To return to the default setting, use the no bridge bridge-group max-age command in global
configuration mode.
Disabling the Spanning Tree on an Interface
When a loop-free path exists between any two switched subnetworks, you can prevent BPDUs generated
in one switching subnetwork from impacting devices in the other switching subnetwork and still permit
switching throughout the network as a whole. For example, when switched LAN subnetworks are
separated by a WAN, BPDUs can be prevented from traveling across the WAN link.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to disable spanning tree on an interface.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
bridge-group bridge-group spanning-disabled
4.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters interface configuration mode, and specifies the interface ID.
Example:
Router(config)#interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
bridge-group bridge-group
spanning-disabled
Disables spanning tree on the interface.
For bridge-group, specify the bridge group number. The range is from
1 to 255.
Example:
Router(config-if)#bridge-group 1
spanning-disabled
Step 4
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
To reenable spanning tree on the interface, use the no bridge-group bridge-group spanning-disabled
command in interface configuration mode.
Monitoring and Maintaining the Network
To monitor and maintain the network, use one or more of the following commands in privileged EXEC
mode.
Command
Purpose
clear bridge bridge-group
Removes any learned entries from the forwarding
database and clears the transmit and receive
counts for any statically configured entries.
show bridge [bridge-group] [interface] [address] Displays classes of entries in the bridge
[group] [verbose]
forwarding database.
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Configuring Separate Voice and Data Subnets
For ease of network administration and increased scalability, network managers can configure the Cisco
Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC to support Cisco IP phones such that the voice and data traffic reside on
separate subnets. You should always use separate VLANs when you are able to segment the existing IP
address space of your branch office.
User priority bits in the 802.1p portion of the 802.1Q standard header are used to provide prioritization
in Ethernet switches. This is a vital component in designing Cisco AVVID networks.
The Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC provides the performance and intelligent services of
Cisco IOS software for branch office applications. The Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC can identify
user applications—such as voice or multicast video—and classify traffic with the appropriate priority
levels.
Note
See Cisco AVVID QoS Design Guide for more information on how to implement end-to-end QoS as you
deploy Cisco AVVID solutions.
Beginning in EXEC mode, follow these steps to automatically configure Cisco IP phones to send voice
traffic on the voice VLAN ID (VVID) on a per-port basis (see the “Voice Traffic and VVID” section on
page 66).
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
enable
2.
configure terminal
3.
interface type 0/slot/port
4.
switchport mode trunk
5.
switchport voice vlan vlan-id
6.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
enable
Enters the privileged EXEC mode. A preset password may be
required to enter this mode.
Example:
Router> enable
Step 2
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
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Step 3
Command
Purpose
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters the interface configuration mode and the port to be
configured.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet
0/3/1
Step 4
switchport mode trunk
Configures the port to trunk mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Step 5
switchport voice vlan vlan-id
Configures the voice port with a VVID that will be used
exclusively for voice traffic.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport voice vlan 1
Step 6
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Voice Traffic and VVID
The Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC can automatically configure voice VLAN. This capability
overcomes the management complexity of overlaying a voice topology onto a data network while
maintaining the quality of voice traffic. With the automatically configured voice VLAN feature, network
administrators can segment phones into separate logical networks, even though the data and voice
infrastructure is physically the same. The voice VLAN feature places the phones into their own VLANs
without the need for end-user intervention. A user can plug the phone into the switch, and the switch
provides the phone with the necessary VLAN information.
Configuring a Single Subnet for Voice and Data
For network designs with incremental IP telephony deployment, network managers can configure the
Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC so that the voice and data traffic coexist on the same subnet. This
might be necessary when it is impractical either to allocate an additional IP subnet for IP phones or to
divide the existing IP address space into an additional subnet at the remote branch. It might be necessary
to use a single IP address space for branch offices. (This is one of the simpler ways to deploy IP
telephony.)
This configuration approach must address two key considerations:
•
Network managers should ensure that existing subnets have enough available IP addresses for the
new Cisco IP phones, each of which requires a unique IP address.
•
Administering a network with a mix of IP phones and workstations on the same subnet might pose
a challenge.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to automatically configure Cisco IP phones to
send voice and data traffic on the same VLAN.
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SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface type 0/slot/port
3.
switchport access vlan vlan-id
4.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
interface type 0/slot/port
Enters the interface configuration mode and the port to be
configured.
Example:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet
0/3/1
Step 3
Step 4
switchport access vlan vlan-id
Sets the native VLAN for untagged traffic.
Example:
Router(config-if)#switchport access vlan 1
The value of vlan-id represents the ID of the VLAN that is
sending and receiving untagged traffic on the port. Valid IDs
are from 1 to 1001. Leading zeroes are not accepted.
end
Returns to the privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-if)#end
Verifying Switchport Configuration
Use the show run interface command to verify the switchport configuration.
Router#show run interface gigabitethernet 0/3/1
Use the write memory command to save the current configuration in flash memory.
Router#write memory
Managing the EtherSwitch EHWIC
This section describes how to perform basic management tasks on the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch
EHWIC with the Cisco IOS CLI. You might find this information useful when you configure the switch
for the previous scenarios.
The following topics are included:
•
Adding Trap Managers, page 68
•
Configuring IP Information, page 69
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•
Enabling Switch Port Analyzer, page 72
•
Managing the ARP Table, page 73
•
Managing the MAC Address Tables, page 73
•
Removing Dynamic Addresses, page 75
•
Adding Secure Addresses, page 76
•
Configuring Static Addresses, page 77
•
Clearing MAC Address Tables, page 78
•
Configuring Port Security, page 78
Adding Trap Managers
A trap manager is a management station that receives and processes traps. When you configure a trap
manager, community strings for each member switch must be unique. If a member switch has an IP
address assigned to it, the management station accesses the switch by using its assigned IP address.
By default, no trap manager is defined, and no traps are issued.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to add a trap manager and community string.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
snmp-server host {hostname | ip-address} traps version 1 community string
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
snmp-server host {hostname | ip-address}
traps version 1 community string
Enters the trap manager IP address, community string, and traps to
generate.
Example:
Router(config)#snmp-server host
172.2.128.263 traps version 1 snmp
vlan-membership
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
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Verifying Trap Managers
Use the show running-config command in privileged EXEC modeto verify that the information was
entered.
Configuring IP Information
This section describes how to assign IP information on the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWIC. The
following topics are included:
•
Assigning IP Information to the Switch, page 69
•
Specifying a Domain Name and Configuring the DNS, page 71
Assigning IP Information to the Switch
You can use a BOOTP server to automatically assign IP information to the switch; however, the BOOTP
server must be set up in advance with a database of physical MAC addresses and corresponding IP
addresses, subnet masks, and default gateway addresses. In addition, the switch must be able to access
the BOOTP server through one of its ports. At startup, a switch without an IP address requests the
information from the BOOTP server; the requested information is saved in the switch running the
configuration file. To ensure that the IP information is saved when the switch is restarted, save the
configuration by entering the write memory command in privileged EXEC mode.
You can change the information in these fields. The mask identifies the bits that denote the network
number in the IP address. When you use the mask to subnet a network, the mask is then referred to as a
subnet mask. The broadcast address is reserved for sending messages to all hosts. The CPU sends traffic
to an unknown IP address through the default gateway.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enter the IP information.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
interface vlan vlan-id
3.
ip address ip-address subnet-mask
4.
exit
5.
ip default-gateway ip-address
6.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
Step 3
interface vlan vlan-id
Enters interface configuration mode, and enters the VLAN to
which the IP information is assigned.
Example:
Router(config)#interface vlan 1
VLAN 1 is the management VLAN, but you can configure any
VLAN from IDs 1 to 1001.
ip address ip-address subnet-mask
Enters the IP address and subnet mask.
Example:
Router(config-if)#ip address 192.108.1.27
255.255.255.0
Step 4
exit
Returns to global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#exit
Step 5
ip default-gateway ip-address
Enters the IP address of the default router.
Example:
Router#ip default-gateway 192.31.7.18
Step 6
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router#end
Use the following procedure to remove the IP information from a switch.
Note
Using the no ip address command in configuration mode disables the IP protocol stack and removes the
IP information. Cluster members without IP addresses rely on the IP protocol stack being enabled.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to remove an IP address.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
interface vlan vlan-id
2.
no ip address
3.
end
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DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Step 2
Command
Purpose
interface vlan vlan-id
Enters interface configuration mode, and enters the VLAN to
which the IP information is assigned.
Example:
Router(config)#interface vlan 1
VLAN 1 is the management VLAN, but you can configure any
VLAN from IDs 1 to 1001.
no ip address
Removes the IP address and subnet mask.
Example:
Router(config-subif)#no ip address
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config-subif)#end
Caution
If you are removing the IP address through a telnet session, your connection to the switch will be lost.
Specifying a Domain Name and Configuring the DNS
Each unique IP address can have a host name associated with it. The Cisco IOS software maintains an
EC mode, and related Telnet support operations. This cache speeds the process of converting names to
addresses.
IP defines a hierarchical naming scheme that allows a device to be identified by its location or domain.
Domain names are pieced together with periods (.) as the delimiting characters. For example,
Cisco Systems, Inc. is a commercial organization that IP identifies by a com domain name, so its domain
name is cisco.com. A specific device in this domain, the FTP system, for example, is identified as
ftp.cisco.com.
To track domain names, IP has defined the concept of a domain name server (DNS), the purpose of which
is to hold a cache (or database) of names mapped to IP addresses. To map domain names to IP addresses,
you must first identify the host names and then specify a name server and enable the DNS, the Internet
global naming scheme that uniquely identifies network devices.
Specifying the Domain Name
You can specify a default domain name that the software uses to complete domain name requests. You
can specify either a single domain name or a list of domain names. When you specify a domain name,
any IP host name without a domain name has that domain name appended to it before being added to the
host table.
Specifying a Name Server
You can specify up to six hosts that can function as a name server to supply name information for the
DNS.
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Enabling the DNS
If your network devices require connectivity with devices in networks for which you do not control name
assignment, you can assign device names that uniquely identify your devices within the entire
internetwork. The Internet global naming scheme, the DNS, accomplishes this task. This service is
enabled by default.
Enabling Switch Port Analyzer
You can monitor traffic on a given port by forwarding incoming and outgoing traffic on the port to
another port in the same VLAN. A Switch Port Analyzer (SPAN) port cannot monitor ports in a different
VLAN, and a SPAN port must be a static-access port. Any number of ports can be defined as SPAN ports,
and any combination of ports can be monitored. SPAN is supported for up to two sessions.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable SPAN.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
monitor session session-id {destination | source} {interface type 0/slot/port | vlan vlan-id} [, | - |
both | tx | rx]
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
monitor session session-id {destination | source}
{interface type 0/slot/port | vlan vlan-id} [, | - | both | tx |
rx]
Enables port monitoring for a specific session
(“number”). (Optional) Supply a SPAN destination
interface or source interface.
Example:
Router(config)#monitor session 1 destination
interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Use the no monitor session session-id command in global configuration mode to disable SPAN.
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Managing the ARP Table
To communicate with a device (on Ethernet, for example), the software first must determine the 48-bit
MAC or local data link address of that device. The process of determining the local data link address
from an IP address is called address resolution.
The Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) associates a host IP address with the corresponding media or
MAC addresses and VLAN ID. Taking an IP address as input, ARP determines the associated MAC
address. After a MAC address is determined, the IP-MAC address association is stored in an ARP cache
for rapid retrieval. Then the IP datagram is encapsulated in a link-layer frame and sent over the network.
Encapsulation of IP datagrams and ARP requests and replies on IEEE 802 networks other than Ethernet
is specified by the Subnetwork Access Protocol (SNAP). By default, standard Ethernet-style ARP
encapsulation (represented by the arpa keyword) is enabled on the IP interface.
When you manually add entries to the ARP Table by using the CLI, you must be aware that these entries
do not age and must be manually removed.
Managing the MAC Address Tables
This section describes how to manage the MAC address tables on the Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch
EHWIC. The following topics are included:
•
Understanding MAC Addresses and VLANs, page 74
•
Changing the Address Aging Time, page 74
•
Configuring the Aging Time, page 74
•
Verifying Aging-Time Configuration, page 75
The switch uses the MAC address tables to forward traffic between ports. All MAC addresses in the
address tables are associated with one or more ports. These MAC tables include the following types of
addresses:
•
Dynamic address—Source MAC address that the switch learns and then drops when it is not in use.
•
Secure address—Manually entered unicast address that is usually associated with a secured port.
Secure addresses do not age.
•
Static address—Manually entered unicast or multicast address that does not age and that is not lost
when the switch resets.
The address tables list the destination MAC address and the associated VLAN ID, module, and port
number associated with the address. The following shows an example of a list of addresses as they would
appear in the dynamic, secure, or static address table.
Router#show mac-address-table
Destination Address
------------------000a.000b.000c
000d.e105.cc70
00aa.00bb.00cc
Address Type
-----------Secure
Self
Static
VLAN
---1
1
1
Destination Port
-------------------GigabitEthernet0/1/2
Vlan1
GigabitEthernet0/1/0
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Understanding MAC Addresses and VLANs
All addresses are associated with a VLAN. An address can exist in more than one VLAN and have
different destinations in each. Multicast addresses, for example, could be forwarded to port 1 in VLAN
1 and ports 9, 10, and 11 in VLAN 5.
Each VLAN maintains its own logical address table. A known address in one VLAN is unknown in
another until it is learned or statically associated with a port in the other VLAN. An address can be secure
in one VLAN and dynamic in another. Addresses that are statically entered in one VLAN must be static
addresses in all other VLANs.
Changing the Address Aging Time
Dynamic addresses are source MAC addresses that the switch learns and then drops when they are not
in use. Use the Aging Time field to define how long the switch retains unseen addresses in the table. This
parameter applies to all VLANs.
Configuring the Aging Time
Setting too short an aging time can cause addresses to be prematurely removed from the table. When the
switch receives a packet for an unknown destination, it floods the packet to all ports in the same VLAN
as the receiving port. This unnecessary flooding can impact performance. Setting too long an aging time
can cause the address table to be filled with unused addresses; it can cause delays in establishing
connectivity when a workstation is moved to a new port.
The aging timer may be configured from 10 to 630 seconds, in 10-second intervals.
Beginning in global configuration mode, follow these steps to configure the dynamic address table aging
time.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
mac-address-table aging-time seconds
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#configure terminal
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Step 2
Command
Purpose
mac-address-table aging-time seconds
Enters the number of seconds that dynamic addresses are to be
retained in the address table. Valid entries are from 10 to 1000000.
Example:
Note
Router(config)#mac-address-table
aging-time 300
Step 3
end
The aging timer may be configured from 10 to 630, in
10-second intervals.
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Verifying Aging-Time Configuration
Use the show mac-address-table aging-time command to verify the configuration:
Router#show mac-address-table aging-time
Mac address aging time 300
Router#
Removing Dynamic Addresses
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to remove a dynamic address entry.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
no mac-address-table dynamic hw-addr
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#configure terminal
Step 2
no mac-address-table dynamic hw-addr
Enters the MAC address to be removed from dynamic MAC address
table.
Example:
Router(config)#no mac-address-table
dynamic 001e.4a96.b8cd
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
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Use the clear mac-address-table dynamic command in privileged EXEC mode to remove all dynamic
entries.
Use the show mac-address-table dynamic command in privileged EXEC mode to verify configuration.
Adding Secure Addresses
The secure address table contains secure MAC addresses and their associated ports and VLANs. A
secure address is a manually entered unicast address that is forwarded to only one port per VLAN. If you
enter an address that is already assigned to another port, the switch reassigns the secure address to the
new port.
You can enter a secure port address even when the port does not yet belong to a VLAN. When the port
is later assigned to a VLAN, packets destined for that address are forwarded to the port.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to add a secure address.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
mac-address-table secure hw-address interface gi 0/slot/port vlan vlan-id
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router(config)#configure terminal
Step 2
mac-address-table secure hw-address interface gi
0/slot/port vlan vlan-id
Enters the MAC address, its associated port, and the
VLAN ID.
Example:
Router(config)#mac-address-table secure
00c0.00a0.03gi interface gi 0/1/2 vlan 1
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
Use the no mac-address-table secure hw-address interface gi 0/slot/port vlan vlan-id command in
global configuration mode to remove a secure address.
To remove all secure addresses, use the clear mac-address-table secure command in privileged EXEC
mode.
Use the show mac-address-table secure command in priviledged EXEC mode to verify configuration.
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Configuring Static Addresses
A static address has the following characteristics:
•
It is manually entered in the address table and must be manually removed.
•
It can be a unicast or multicast address.
•
It does not age and is retained when the switch restarts.
Because all ports are associated with at least one VLAN, the switch acquires the VLAN ID for the
address from the ports that you select on the forwarding map. A static address in one VLAN must be a
static address in other VLANs. A packet with a static address that arrives on a VLAN where it has not
been statically entered is flooded to all ports and not learned.
Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to add a static address.
SUMMARY STEPS
1.
configure terminal
2.
mac-address-table static mac-address vlan vlan-id interface type slot/port
3.
end
DETAILED STEPS
Step 1
Command
Purpose
configure terminal
Enters global configuration mode.
Example:
Router#configure terminal
Step 2
mac-address-table static mac-address vlan vlan-id Enters the static MAC address, the interface, and the VLAN
interface type slot/port
ID of those ports.
Example:
Router(config)#mac-address-table static
000a.000b.000c vlan 1 interface
gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Step 3
end
Returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Example:
Router(config)#end
To remove a static addresses, use the mac-address-table static mac-address vlan vlan-id interface type
slot/port command in global configuration mode.
To remove all static addresses, use the clear mac-address-table static command in privileged EXEC
mode.
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Verifying Static Addresses
Use the show mac-address-table static command to verify configuration:
Router#show mac-address-table static
Static Address Table
Destination Address Address Type VLAN
------------------- ------------ ---000a.000b.000c
Static
1
Destination Port
-------------------GigabitEthernet0/1/2
Clearing MAC Address Tables
To remove a MAC address table, use the clear mac-address-table [dynamic | secure | static] [address
mac-address] [interface type slot/port] [vlan vlan-id] command in privileged EXEC mode as shown in
the following example.
Router#clear mac-address-table static address 0040.C80A.2F07 interface gigabitethernet
0/1/2
Configuring Port Security
Port security can be either static or dynamic.
Static port security allows the user to specify which devices are allowed access through a given switch
port. The specification is done manually by placing allowed device MAC addresses in the MAC address
table. Static port security is also known as MAC address filtering.
Dynamic port security is similar. However, instead of specifying the MAC address of the devices, the
user specifies the maximum number of devices that will be allowed on the port. If the maximum number
specified is more than the number of MAC addresses specified manually, the switch will learn the MAC
address automatically, up to the maximum specified. If the maximum number specified is less than the
number of MAC addresses already specified statically, an error message will be produced.
Use the mac-address-table secure [mac-address | maximum maximum addresses] gigabitethernet
0/slot/port [vlan vlan id] command in global configuration mode to specify static or dynamic port
security. mac-address enables static port security. maximum maximum addresses enables dynamic port
security.
Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
This section provides the following configuration examples:
•
Range of Interface: Examples, page 79
•
Optional Interface Feature: Examples, page 79
•
VLAN Configuration: Example, page 80
•
VLAN Trunking Using VTP: Example, page 80
•
Spanning Tree: Examples, page 81
•
MAC Table Manipulation: Example, page 83
•
Switched Port Analyzer (SPAN) Source: Examples, page 84
•
IGMP Snooping: Example, page 84
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•
Storm-Control: Example, page 86
•
Ethernet Switching: Examples, page 86
Range of Interface: Examples
This section provides the following configuration examples:
•
Single Range Configuration: Example, page 79
•
Range Macro Definition: Example, page 79
Single Range Configuration: Example
The following example shows all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on an HWIC-4ESW in slot 1 being
reenabled:
Router(config)#int range gigabitethernet 0/1/0 Router(config-if-range)#no shut
Router(config-if-range)#
*Mar 21 14:01:21.474: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface
*Mar 21 14:01:21.490: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface
*Mar 21 14:01:21.502: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface
*Mar 21 14:01:21.518: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface
Router(config-if-range)#
3
GigabitEthernet0/1/0,
GigabitEthernet0/1/1,
GigabitEthernet0/1/2,
GigabitEthernet0/1/3,
changed
changed
changed
changed
state
state
state
state
to
to
to
to
up
up
up
up
Range Macro Definition: Example
The following example shows an interface-range macro named enet_list being defined to select
interfaces 0/1/0 through 0/1/3:
Router(config)#define interface-range enet_list gigabitethernet 0/1/0 - 0/1/3
Router(config)#
The following example shows how to change to the interface-range configuration mode using the
interface-range macro enet_list:
Router(config)#interface range macro enet_list
Optional Interface Feature: Examples
•
Interface Speed: Example, page 79
•
Setting the Interface Duplex Mode: Example, page 80
•
Adding a Description for an Interface: Example, page 80
Interface Speed: Example
The following example shows the interface speed being set to 100 Mbps on GigabitEthernet interface
0/3/7:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/3/7
Router(config-if)#speed 100
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Setting the Interface Duplex Mode: Example
The following example shows the interface duplex mode being set to full on GigabitEthernet interface
0/3/7:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/3/7
Router(config-if)#duplex full
Adding a Description for an Interface: Example
The following example shows how to add a description of GigabitEthernet interface 0/3/7:
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/3/7
Router(config-if)#description Link to root switch
VLAN Configuration: Example
The following example shows how to configure inter-VLAN routing:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#vlan 1
Router(config)#vlan 2
Router(config)#interface vlan 1
Router(config-if)#ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)#no shut
Router(config-if)#interface vlan 2
Roouter(config-if)#ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)#no shut
Router(config-if)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0
Router(config-if)#switchport access vlan 1
Router(config-if)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/1
Router(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2
Router(config-if)#exit
VLAN Trunking Using VTP: Example
The following example shows how to configure the switch as a VTP server:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#vtp mode server
Setting device to VTP SERVER mode.
Router(config)#vtp domain Lab_Network
Setting VTP domain name to Lab_Network
Router(config)#vtp password WATER
Setting device VLAN database password to WATER.
Router(config)#exit
APPLY completed.
Exiting....
Router#
The following example shows how to configure the switch as a VTP client:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#vtp client
Setting device to VTP CLIENT mode.
Router(config)#exit
In CLIENT state, no apply attempted.
Exiting....
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Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Router#
The following example shows how to configure the switch as VTP transparent:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#vtp transparent
Setting device to VTP TRANSPARENT mode.
Router(config)#exit
APPLY completed.
Exiting....
Router#
Spanning Tree: Examples
•
Spanning-Tree Interface and Spanning-Tree Port Priority: Example, page 81
•
Spanning-Tree Port Cost: Example, page 82
•
Bridge Priority of a VLAN: Example, page 82
•
Hello Time: Example, page 82
•
Forward-Delay Time for a VLAN: Example, page 83
•
Maximum Aging Time for a VLAN: Example, page 83
•
Spanning Tree: Examples, page 83
•
Spanning Tree Root: Example, page 83
Spanning-Tree Interface and Spanning-Tree Port Priority: Example
The following example shows the VLAN port priority of an interface being configured:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Router(config-if)#spanning-tree vlan 1 port-priority 64
Router(config-if)#end
Router#
The following example shows how to verify the configuration of VLAN 1 on the interface when it is
configured as a trunk port:
Router#show spanning-tree vlan 1
VLAN1 is executing the ieee compatible Spanning Tree protocol
Bridge Identifier has priority 32768, address 0025.451b.b22a
Configured hello time 2, max age 20, forward delay 15
Current root has priority 32768, address 0008.e36d.9f70
Root port is 18 (GigabitEthernet0/1/4), cost of root path is 38
Topology change flag not set, detected flag not set
Number of topology changes 18 last change occurred 22:36:19 ago
from GigabitEthernet0/1/2
Times: hold 1, topology change 35, notification 2
hello 2, max age 20, forward delay 15
Timers: hello 0, topology change 0, notification 0, aging 300
Port 18 (GigabitEthernet0/1/2) of VLAN1 is forwarding
Port path cost 19, Port priority 128, Port Identifier 128.18.
Designated root has priority 32768, address 0008.e36d.9f70
Designated bridge has priority 32768, address 0022.bdc5.2233
Designated port id is 128.35, designated path cost 19
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Timers: message age 2, forward delay 0, hold 0
Number of transitions to forwarding state: 1
BPDU: sent 19, received 89512
Router#
Spanning-Tree Port Cost: Example
The following example shows how to change the spanning-tree port cost of a Gigabit Ethernet interface:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Router(config-if)#spanning-tree cost 18
Router(config-if)#end
Router#
Router#show run interface gigabitethernet0/1/2
Building configuration...
Current configuration: 140 bytes
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/2
switchport access vlan 1
no ip address
spanning-tree vlan 1 port-priorityy 64
spanning-tree cost 18
end
The following example shows how to verify the configuration of the interface when it is configured as
an access port:
Router#show spanning-tree interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
Port 33 (GigabitEthernet0/1/2) of VLAN1 is forwarding
Port path cost 18, Port priority 64, Port Identifier 64.33
Designated root has priority 32768, address 00ff.ff10.37b7
Designated bridge has priority 32768, address 00ff.ff10.37b7
Designated port id is 128.13, designated path cost 0
Timers: message age 2, forward delay 0, hold 0
Number of transitions to forwarding state: 1
BPDU: sent 1, received 175
Router#
Bridge Priority of a VLAN: Example
The following example shows the bridge priority of VLAN 20 being configured to 33792:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 20 priority 33792
Router(config)#end
Router#
Hello Time: Example
The following example shows the hello time for VLAN 20 being configured to 7 seconds:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 20 hello-time 7
Router(config)#end
Router#
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Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Forward-Delay Time for a VLAN: Example
The following example shows the forward delay time for VLAN 20 being configured to 21 seconds:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 20 forward-time 21
Router(config)#end
Router#
Maximum Aging Time for a VLAN: Example
The following example configures the maximum aging time for VLAN 20 to 36 seconds:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 20 max-age 36
Router(config)#end
Router#
Spanning Tree: Examples
The following example shows spanning tree being enabled on VLAN 20:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 20
Router(config)#end
Router#
Note
Because spanning tree is enabled by default, the show running command does not display the command
you entered to enable spanning tree.
The following example shows spanning tree being disabled on VLAN 20:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#no spanning-tree vlan 20
Router(config)#end
Router#
Spanning Tree Root: Example
The following example shows the switch being configured as the root bridge for VLAN 10, with a
network diameter of 4:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#spanning-tree vlan 10 root primary diameter 4
Router(config)#exit
Router#
MAC Table Manipulation: Example
The following example shows a static entry being configured in the MAC address table:
Router(config)#mac-address-table static beef.beef.beef int Gi0/1/5
Router(config)#end
The following example shows port security being configured in the MAC address table.
Router(config)#mac-address-table secure 0000.1111.2222 Gi0/1/2 vlan 3
Router(config)#end
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Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Switched Port Analyzer (SPAN) Source: Examples
This section provides the following configuration examples:
•
SPAN Source Configuration: Example, page 84
•
SPAN Destination Configuration: Example, page 84
•
Removing Sources or Destinations from a SPAN Session: Example, page 84
SPAN Source Configuration: Example
The following example shows SPAN session 1 being configured to monitor bidirectional traffic from
source interface Gigabit Ethernet 0/1/1:
Router(config)#monitor session 1 source interface gigabitethernet 0/1/1
SPAN Destination Configuration: Example
The following example shows interface Gigabit Ethernet 0/1/7 being configured as the destination for
SPAN session 1:
Router(config)#monitor session 1 destination interface gigabitethernet 0/1/7
Removing Sources or Destinations from a SPAN Session: Example
This following example shows interface Gigabit Ethernet 0/1/2 being removed as a SPAN source for
SPAN session 1:
Router(config)#no monitor session 1 source interface gigabitethernet 0/1/2
IGMP Snooping: Example
The following example shows the output from configuring IGMP snooping:
Router#show mac-address-table multicast igmp-snooping
EHWIC Slot: 1
-------------MACADDR
0100.5e05.0505
0100.5e06.0606
EHWIC Slot: 2
-------------MACADDR
0100.5e05.0505
0100.5e06.0606
VLANID
1
2
VLANID
1
2
INTERFACES
Gi0/1/1
INTERFACES
Gi0/3/4
Gi0/3/0
Router#
The following is an example of output from the sh run int privileged EXEC command for VLAN 1:
Router#show run int vlan 1
Building configuration...
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Current configuration :82 bytes
!
interface Vlan1
ip address 192.168.4.90 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
end
Router#show run int vlan 2
Building configuration...
Current configuration :82 bytes
!
interface Vlan2
ip address 192.168.5.90 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
end
Router#
Router#sh ip igmp group
IGMP Connected Group Membership
Group Address
Interface
239.255.255.255 Vlan1
224.0.1.40
Vlan2
224.5.5.5
Vlan1
224.5.5.5
Vlan2
224.6.6.6
Vlan1
224.6.6.6
Vlan2
Router#
Uptime
01:06:40
01:07:50
01:06:37
01:07:40
01:06:36
01:06:39
Expires
00:02:20
00:02:17
00:02:25
00:02:21
00:02:22
00:02:20
Last Reporter
192.168.41.101
192.168.5.90
192.168.41.100
192.168.31.100
192.168.41.101
192.168.31.101
Router#show ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
Flags:D - Dense, S - Sparse, B - Bidir Group, s - SSM Group, C Connected,
L - Local, P - Pruned, R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,
T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP created entry,
X - Proxy Join Timer Running, A - Candidate for MSDP Advertisement,
U - URD, I - Received Source Specific Host Report
Outgoing interface flags:H - Hardware switched
Timers:Uptime/Expires
Interface state:Interface, Next-Hop or VCD, State/Mode
(*, 239.255.255.255), 01:06:43/00:02:17, RP 0.0.0.0, flags:DC
Incoming interface:Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
Outgoing interface list:
Vlan1, Forward/Sparse, 01:06:43/00:02:17
(*, 224.0.1.40), 01:12:42/00:00:00, RP 0.0.0.0, flags:DCL
Incoming interface:Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
Outgoing interface list:
Vlan2, Forward/Sparse, 01:07:53/00:02:14
(*, 224.5.5.5), 01:07:43/00:02:22, RP 0.0.0.0, flags:DC
Incoming interface:Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
Outgoing interface list:
Vlan1, Forward/Sparse, 01:06:40/00:02:22
Vlan2, Forward/Sparse, 01:07:44/00:02:17
(*, 224.6.6.6), 01:06:43/00:02:18, RP 0.0.0.0, flags:DC
Incoming interface:Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
Outgoing interface list:
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Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Vlan1, Forward/Sparse, 01:06:40/00:02:18
Vlan2, Forward/Sparse, 01:06:43/00:02:16
Router#
Storm-Control: Example
The following example shows bandwidth-based multicast suppression being enabled at 70 percent on
Gigabit Ethernet interface 2:
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#interface gigabitethernet0/1/2
Router(config-if)#storm-control multicast level 70.0 30.0
Router(config-if)#end
Router#show storm-control multicast
Interface Filter State Upper
Lower
--------- ------------ --------Gi0/1/0
inactive
100.00% 100.00%
Gi0/1/1
inactive
100.00% 100.00%
Gi0/1/2
Forwarding
70.00%
30.00%
Gi0/1/3
inactive
100.00% 100.00%
Current
------N/A
N/A
0.00%
N/A
Ethernet Switching: Examples
•
Subnets for Voice and Data: Example, page 86
•
Inter-VLAN Routing: Example, page 87
•
Single Subnet Configuration: Example, page 87
•
Ethernet Ports on IP Phones with Multiple Ports: Example, page 87
Subnets for Voice and Data: Example
The following example shows separate subnets being configured for voice and data on the EtherSwitch
EHWIC:
interface GigabitEthernet0/1/2
description DOT1Q port to IP Phone
switchport native vlan 50
switchport mode trunk
switchport voice vlan 150
interface Vlan 150
description voice vlan
ip address 10.150.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 172.20.73.14
interface Vlan 50
description data vlan
ip address 10.50.1.1 255.255.255.0
This configuration instructs the IP phone to generate a packet with an 802.1Q VLAN ID of 150 with an
802.1p value of 5 (default for voice bearer traffic).
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Configuration Examples for Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Note
In a centralized CallManager deployment model, the DHCP server might be located across the WAN
link. If so, an ip helper-address command pointing to the DHCP server should be included on the voice
VLAN interface for the IP phone. This is done to obtain its IP address as well as the address of the TFTP
server required for its configuration.
Be aware that IOS supports a DHCP server function. If this function is used, the EtherSwitch EHWIC
serves as a local DHCP server and a helper address would not be required.
Inter-VLAN Routing: Example
Configuring inter-vlan routing is identical to the configuration on an EtherSwitch EHWIC with an
MSFC. Configuring an interface for WAN routing is consistent with other IOS platforms.
The following example provides a sample configuration:
interface Vlan 160
description voice vlan
ip address 10.6.1.1 255.255.255.0
interface Vlan 60
description data vlan
ip address 10.60.1.1 255.255.255.0
interface Serial0/3/0
ip address 160.3.1.2 255.255.255.0
Note
Standard IGP routing protocols such as RIP, IGRP, EIGRP, and OSPF are supported on the EtherSwitch
EHWIC. Multicast routing is also supported for PIM dense mode, sparse mode and sparse-dense mode.
Single Subnet Configuration: Example
The EtherSwitch EHWIC supports the use of an 802.1p-only option when configuring the voice VLAN.
Using this option allows the IP phone to tag VoIP packets with a CoS of 5 on the native VLAN, while
all PC data traffic is sent untagged.
The following example shows a single subnet configuration for the EtherSwitch EHWIC:
Router#gigabitethernet 0/1/2
description Port to IP Phone in single subnet
switchport access vlan 40
The EtherSwitch EHWIC instructs the IP phone to generate an 802.1Q frame with a null VLAN ID value
but with an 802.1p value (default is COS of 5 for bearer traffic). The voice and data vlans are both 40 in
this example.
Ethernet Ports on IP Phones with Multiple Ports: Example
The following example illustrates the configuration for the IP phone:
interface GigabitEthernet0/x/x
switchport voice vlan x
switchport mode trunk
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Additional References
The following example illustrates the configuration for the PC:
interface GigabitEthernet0/x/y
switchport mode access
switchport access vlan y
Note
Using a separate subnet, and possibly a separate IP address space, may not be an option for some small
branch offices due to the IP routing configuration. If the IP routing can handle an additional subnet at
the remote branch, use Cisco Network Registrar and secondary addressing.
Additional References
The following sections provide references related to EtherSwitch EHWICs.
Related Documents
Related Topic
Document Title
Connecting Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Connecting Cisco Gigabit EtherSwitch EHWICs
Installing Cisco interface cards in Cisco access routers. Installing Cisco Interface Cards in Cisco Access Routers.
Information about configuring Voice over IP features
Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Configuration Guide
Voice over IP commands
Cisco IOS Voice, Video, and Fax Command Reference, Release
12.3 T
Standards
Standards
Title
No new or modified standards are supported by this
feature, and support for existing standards have not
been modified by this feature.
—
MIBs
MIBs
MIBs Link
CISCO-ENTITY-VENDORTYPE-OID-MIB
To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS
releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the
following URL:
OLD-CISCO-CHASSIS-MIB
http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs
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Additional References
RFCs
RFCs
Title
No new or modified RFCs are supported by this
feature, and support for existing RFCs have not been
modified by this feature.
—
Technical Assistance
Description
Link
Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page,
containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical
content, including links to products, technologies,
solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered
Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access
even more content.
http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml
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Additional References
Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of
Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The
use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)
Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses. Any examples, command display output, and
figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses in illustrative content is unintentional and
coincidental.
© 2010 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
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