EASIER TO FLY! - Radio Control Zone

EASIER TO FLY!
Tinisn Tor
USA $4.99
www.modelairplanenews.com
7
22627
CANADA $7.50
06
48120
ON THE COVER: reviewed by David Johnson on page 48, the Arizona
Model Aircrafters Fokker Dr.l is a 62-inch-span ARF model that's easy to
assemble and looks great. Powered by an O.S. .52 4-stroke, the model has
excellent flight characteristics (photo by Walter Sidas).
NEWS
HOW TO
JUNE 2DD2 VOLUME 130, NUMBER 6
6B Make Static Scale Props
The ultimate final touch
by Dick van Mourik
PRODUCT REVIEW
FEATURES
74 FMA Direct Co-Pilot
28 l/2 AtoZ
3 tests—helicopter, high-performance and trainer
aircraft—works like a champ!
by Gerry Yarrish
Your guide to small glow models and engines
by the staff of Model Airplane News
HOW TO
36 Florida Jets
80 Assemble ABS Cowls and Wheel Pants
Jet action burns up the Sunshine State
by Rich Uravitch
Basic skills, advanced results
by Rick Bell
CONSTRUCTION
86 Design and Build an
RC Bird Model
A turkey vulture that can thermal
by Bob Hoey
COLUMNS
12 Air Scoop
by the Model Airplane News cr
98 Thinking Big
The latest in giant scale
by GerryYarrish
Engine advice
by Dave Gierke
154
Final Approach
The next-generation UAV.
by William Siuru
FLlGHT TESTS
HANGAR 9
56 Aresti 40
Pattern performance
with.great looks
by Vic Bunze
SIG MFG. 44 SOME thin' Extra ARF
"- Extra eaSy... extra fun by. Jim Oftorato^ . ARIZONA MODEL AIRCRAFTERS
48
Fokker Dr.!
WWI three-wing ARF
• bv David Johnson
DEPARTMENTS Editoria
10 Airwaves
18
Tips
&
tricks
24 Pilot Projects 116"--Wame tha
62
NORTHEAST SAILPLANE PRODUCTS,.
Virus 400A
Electric slpw-flyer ARF
.-
120
Classifieds
124
ProductWatch
130
RCStore.com
153
1 53
•?
Index.of Advertisers
Customer Service
Information
<
Airplane
MODEL!
EDITORIAL
BY DEBRA SHARP
FOUNDED 1929
Small planes, big fun
Who says bigger is better? Small,
1/2A-powered model planes are easier to
transport, less expensive, less time-consuming to build and use fewer building
materials than their larger brethren. Besides,
as small-airplane aficionado Randy Randolph
said to me once, "They're so darn cute, and you
can have a lot more of 'em in your shop!" In this
Global's Fockeissue, we've compiled information on more than 70 1/2A
WulfFw-190.
kits and almost-ready-to-fly models, along with engine availability, prices and tips to
keep your small model airborne. These planes and engines have been popular for
decades, and now, even more designs are available to choose
from. Turn to our "V2A to Z Guide" on page
28 to see why good things often come in
small packages.
FLYING BREAKTHROUGH
Another good, small thing we recently evaluated is the FMA Co-Pilot—an electronic,
onboard unit that has something to
offer pilots of all abilities. Using miniature, infrared sensors to distinguish
between the cooler sky and warmer ground
temperatures, the Co-Pilot automatically stabilizes any model in any flying attitude and wind condition. We tested it in a high-wing, electric trainer, a lowwing, glow-powered aerobat and a high-performance helicopter, and it passed
with flying colors! To find out more about this amazing device, see our review on
page 74.
Ever wonder how some modelers get such beautiful results when they join ABS
plastic parts? This month, associate editor Rick Bell shares his expert techniques for
achieving a seamless, one-piece look on a two-piece engine cowl and wheel pants.
With Rick's step-by-step instructions, you'll have a great-looking model in less
time—and with less effort—than you thought possible.
BIRD-LIKE FLIGHT
Contributor Bob Hoey has more than 11 years of experience designing bird-like
RC models that have remarkable stability without a vertical fin or rudder; this
month, he shares his design techniques and theory along with plans for his
RC Turkey Vulture. Though the
real bird (and Bob's model) may
be lacking in beauty, they both
have graceful soaring ability in
abundance. Built using traditional
balsa and plywood techniques,
Bob's anatomically correct model
is nearly impossible to tell from
the real thing as it flies overhead.
The first major event to kick off
the annual flying season, the 2002
NEWS
EDITORIAL
Editor-in-Chief TOM ATWOOD
Executive Editor DEBRA D. SHARP
Senior Technical Editor GERRY YARRISH
Associate Editor RICK BELL
Assistant Editors MATT BOYD, JAIME LAGOR
Editorial Assistant MELISSA JONES
•
PUBLISHING
Group Publishers LOUIS V. DeFRANCESCO JR.,
YVONNE M. DeFRANCESCO
Associate Publisher SHARON WARNER
•
COPY
Copy Director LYNNE SEWELL
Senior Copyeditor MOLLY Z. O'BYRNE
Copyeditor COREY WEBER
Associate Copyeditor PAIGE L. HAMILTON
•
ART / D E S I G N
Corporate Art Director BETTY K. NERO
Senior Art Director ALAN J. PALERMO
Promotional Art Director LESLIE COSTA
Associate Art Director JOANNA WINN
Assistant Art Directors VICTORIA HOWELL,
COREY W. SMITH
Staff Photographer WALTER SIDAS
Assistant Photographer PETER HALL
ADVERTISING
Director of Advertising SHARON WARNER
Assistant to Director of Advertising/Associate Publisher
SIRI A. WHEELER
Lead/Training Account Executive MONA TASSONE
Senior Account Executive KATHRYN GEARHART
Account Executive ANITA LEO
Junior Account Executives
CINDI VANDEMARK, SHERRY MORGAN
Advertising Coordinator ANN T. WIEBER
•
CIRCULATION
Circulation Director MARC LIU
Circulation Manager CARMINA M. McGOVERN
•
MARKETING
Media Marketing Manager VANESSA LaFERRIERE
•
OPERATIONS
Director of Operations DAVID BOWERS
Senior Digital Production Coordinator
CHRISTINE BACHMANN-CORBIN
Digital Production Coordinator
CHRISTINA MASCHKE-MILEO
Production Associate TOMLINSON S. WHEELER
Production Assistant BOBBI-JO BALDWICK
•
INTERNET
Director, Electronic Communications GARY KOLESAR
Web Developers LEO FICKS, HOLLY HANSEN
Database Coordinator DAN WELSH
Web Programmer JAIME TORRES
•
CORPORATE
Chairman of the Board ALDO DeFRANCESCO
President and CEO LOUIS V. DeFRANCESCO JR.
Secretary and Executive Vice President
YVONNE M. DeFRANCESCO
Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer
CAROL SHEPHERD
•
CONTRIBUTORS
Bob Aberle, Bernard Cawley, Roy L. dough Jr., Roy Day,
Don Edberg, Dave Garwood, Dave Gierke, Henry Haffke,
Tom Hunt, Michael Lachowski, Andy Lennon, George Leu,
Jim Newman, Vic Olivett, Jim Onorato, Dave Patrick,
Randy Randolph, Jef Raskin, Faye Stilley, John Tanzer,
Craig Trachten, Rich Uravitch, Bob Van Tassel,
Dan Wolanski, Nick Ziroli.
Member Audit Bureau
Florida Jets—as always—boasted a great turnout and featured the lat- Even a big old pelican can be modeled.
of Circulations Notice
est d e v e l o p m e n t s in m o d e l - j e t
its graceful wingtip aileron feathers.
technology. Two of the highlights
of this fly-in—the new Eurofighter and F-100F Super Sabre kits—wowed the
crowds; check out these models and more afterburner action on page 36. 4-
Magazine Publishers
of America
AirAGE
PUBLISHING
100 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA
www.modelairplanenews.com
PRINTED IN THE USA
S
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
We welcome your comments and suggestions. Letters should be addressed to "Airwaves," Model Airplane
News, 100 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA; email man@airage.com. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. We
regret that, owing to the tremendous numbers of letters we receive, we cannot respond to every one.
LOVE THAT LITHOPLATE
In his February 2001 "Scale Techniques"
column, George Leu mentioned 0.005 lithoplate for detailing a Midwest Texan, and
this material was also m e n t i o n e d in a
review of Balsa USA's Cub (April 2001 issue).
I gather that lithoplate is a thin, soft aluminum sheet, but what is it exactly, and
where can I buy it in various thicknesses?
I'd appreciate the info; I subscribe to the
magazine and read every issue. Thanks,
[email]
RAY SCHMIDT
Ray; lithoplate is a thin aluminum sheet material used by printing-press operators to print
newspapers and other publications. After a run,
the sheets of lithoplate are set aside, and when
the bins are full, they are sent to be recycled.
Each plate (sheet) is about 18x24 inches; you
can buy used sheets for a song; I paid about 25
cents apiece! I bought a stack several years ago
at a local print shop for 20 bucks and still have
enough to last a lifetime! The ink on the plate
must be cleaned off before you can use the
material, but it is water-soluble so cleaning is
Lrg. volume Pitts
very easy. Use a mixture of hot soapy water and
a little rubbing alcohol. The aluminum is very
thin (0.005 to 0.010 inch) and can easily be
cut with a pair of scissors. The material has
been hardened slightly by the printing process,
but if you heat it quickly with a torch, you can
anneal it to make it easier to bend and form. If
you use it to make flat panels on your model,
rubber cement or spray adhesive works well to
hold it in place. Hope this helps.
GY
BIG BIPLANES
In the April 2002 issue, I read with great
interest your "Thinking Big" column on
biplanes. I am currently
building a 1/6-scale
Boeing F4B-1, 1930s
Navy biplane from an
RCM plan. The upper
wing has a 60-inch span
and 10-inch chord. The
bottom wing has a span
of 48 inches with a 71/2inch chord. The stagger
is positive, with the
leading edge of the
Slimline offers the best
solution for customizing your plane's
exhaust system.
With over 25 years of
product innovation &
development, Slimline
continues to pioneer new
ways to enhance your
plane's look and performance.
The Finest Smoke for Your Plane!
One of Slimline's exclusive developments is the STI Preheat system. This
serviceable smoke- fluid preheater
will optimize smoke-fluid efficiency
for dense trails of white-cloud smoke.
Zenoha GT80
Product Support: 480*967*5053
10
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
bottom wing set 55/8 inches aft of the leading edge of the upper wing. The decalage
angle is designed to be slightly negative,
with 2 degrees positive incidence on the
bottom wing and 1 degree positive incidence on the upper wing. Since the upper
wing is much larger in area, it will have
much more lift than the lower wing. Both
airfoils are essentially flat on the bottom.
Even though the wings differ in span
and chord, shall I still calculate the mean
aerodynamic chord (MAC) and balance
point in the same way as shown in Figure
3 of that article, with the balance point 25
percent of MAC aft of the upper-wing
leading edge? Thank you for your help.
Great article!
BILL TRUEBLOOD
Edgewater, MD
Bill; thank you for your feedback. It is true that
the bigger wing will generate a larger portion of
the lift than the smaller wing, even with the
slight difference in incidence. In practice, the
model will behave normally. Use the horizontal
distance from the top wing leading edge to the
bottom wing trailing edge as the MAC line, then
use the 25 percent point location for the balance
point. This will be a safe place to start. Also,
check where the plan designer indicated the CG.
I always start there and adjust accordingly after
I've test-flown the model. Depending on the
model's behavior, you may still have to slightly
adjust its balance point one way or the other.
When you finish your model, send us a picture
for "PilotProjects."
GY
GYRO GYRATIONS
I just finished reading Rick Bell's article
about gyros. It was very helpful, as I have
always been curious about them and how
they work. I hope you can answer a question. In the section, "Uses for gyros," it
states that using a gyro on the elevator and
the rudder can help a modeler learn to
torque roll. If I want to connect a gyro to a
particular axis for the rudder
and another axis for the
elevator, does that mean
I need two gyros?
JEFF COOMBES,
Austin, TX
Head Lock (tm) Remote
spring loaded locking Glow
Plug Connector fits under Plane
cowls and Helicopter canopies,
letting you cover the glow plug
and head. #M021 Single
shown.
Remote Jack
allows you to
power your plug(s)
from anywhere on
the model, away
from
the
prop
Extended version
For deep heat sink
heads on cars, helicopters and boats. (#M056)
Head Lock.
Head Lock Remote.
The Original Locking
GlowPlug Connectors.
Or for direct power: Head Lock
(tin) fits all standard glow plugs,
is powered by 1.2V to 1.5V battery or Power Panel. (#M009
Shown)
Want to cover your engine? Or keep your hands away from the prop? Use a Head Lock
Remote. They look great, they work great and they're backed by Sullivan quality.
Head Lock Remotes are available in single (M021), Extended (M056) and twin (M022)
configurations. They have a low profile locking head and a
remote jack that can be hidden away from the engine. Head
Locks feature 18 gauge power cords and are available in
PRODUCTS
Standard (M009) and Professional (stainless steel, M037).
Sullivan. 50 years of setting the standard. Made in the USA.
Jeff; I'm glad that you found the information in
the gyro article useful. I had a lot of fun
researching the article and learned a lot about
gyros along the way. To answer your question: at
the present time, gyros control only one axis at a
time; so, yes, you'll need to use a separate gyro
on each control surface (elevator and rudder).
You can hook up both (with a Y-harness) to a
single auxiliary channel, so you'll be able to timi
them off when you're not using them.
Otherwise, the gyros will be active all the time,
and that will affect your control inputs. Be sure
to thoroughly test the gyro inputs and the gain
featiire before flying.
RB
One North Haven Street. Baltimore.
Maryland 21224 USA.
www.sullivanproducts.com
GETTING BETTER IDEAS OFF THE GROUND
COOL IT!
A brief note to express my gratitude for the
very informative article entitled "Cool It"
that appeared in your April 2002 issue.
Thanks to it, many of my longstanding
questions about model engine fuels and
engines were answered—a classic example
of the instructive and understandable
content you provide. Not all of us are
engineers, but we are people who thoroughly enjoy model airplanes.
ED GILLANDERS
Poulsbo, WA
Thanks for your kind words regarding the
engine-cooling article. It's always a pleasure
to hear from readers who benefited from our
efforts!
DAVE GIERKE
JUNE 2002 1 1
NEW PRODUCTS OR PEOPLE hit the model airplane market all the time, so
here's the inside source for what's hot and where you can get it. Every issue, we sift
through product announcements, show reports, rumors and prototypes to let you in on
the best and the latest. Remember, you saw it here first!
by the Model Airplane News crew
WATTAGE
POWERFAN
WattAge makes a triumphant entrance into the ever-growing ducted-fan market
with the introduction of its new 400/6 PowerFan, a lightweight, affordable
unit capable of amazing thrust. The entire fan unit weighs only 1.27 ounces,
and coupled with the Mabuchi 400-size motor, it's able to deliver 12.62
ounces of thrust at 24,500rpm. In addition, the fan blades are constructed of
special material that ensures stiffness and an accurate mold. The complete
unit sells for $35, but you can buy the fan alone (without the motor) for $26.
WattAge; distributed by Global Hobby Distributors, 18480 Bandilier Cir.,
Fountain Valley, CA 92708; (714) 964-0827; fax (714) 962-6452;
www.globalhobby.com.
BOB FIORENZE
T-38 Talon
Jet enthusiasts everywhere are sure to take notice of this new T-38 Talon from Bob Fiorenze.
You could power this 48-inch-wingspan model with a .91 engine, but for some true jet action,
why not throw in a turbine? The kit features an epoxy-primed fiberglass fuselage, a large,
premolded flanged hatch, molded-in panel lines, rivets and access panel details and precut
foam flying surfaces. It also comes with fiberglass inlets and bifurcated exhaust duct, flying
stab hardware, a clear canopy, a fiberglass canopy frame, 3-views, plans, former templates and
a photo-illustrated instruction manual. The Talon is now available at a special introductory
price of $795.
Bob Fiorenze, 401 Westchester Dr., Altamonte Springs, FL 32701; (407) 673-9080;
www.rcaviation.com/fiorenze.
ESPRIT MODEL
Esprit Model's Line of fine-quality model products seems to be getting bigger
and better by the day, and for that matter, so do its planes. Check out this
55-inch-wingspan Kabriolin. Designed specifically with aerobatics in mind, the
Kabriolin features an extremely lightweight balsa and plywood construction that makes it
an ideal 3D trainer. Use electric or glow power—it's your choice! All of the supplied
mounting parts support both options. Should you choose glow, the Kabriolin can
be powered by a .40 to .50 2-stroke or .45 to .72 4-stroke engine. It comes
with a white, gelcoated epoxy cowl complete with molded-in air vents and
kabriolin and Aero 45
an easily removable canopy for simple battery changes. The Kabriolin sells for $279.
And for you electrics enthusiasts out there, Esprit proudly introduces the new 64.5-inch-wingspan Aero
45. Powered by two Speed 480 motors, this semi-scale model of a 1940s-era Czechoslovakian courier
plane features a classic balsa and ply construction with iron-on covering. The kit
comes with all of the wood parts, plans,
instructions, decals, necessary hardware and a
stylish clear canopy, which really distinguishes this
model. For extra performance, Esprit recommends that you
install two Mega 22/10/6 brushless motors. The Aero 45 kit sells
for $119.
Esprit Model, 657 Worcester St., #902, Southbridge, MA 01550; (508)
764-4990; fax (508) 764-4990; prop.rc@verizon.net; www. espritmodel.com.
12 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Improvising is one of the joys of model building. Sure, ARFs are fun and convenient, but the satisfaction of adapting a product not meant for RC is difficult to beat. It helps when the product in question has aLl the right
ingredients, such as these new, free-flight WW II fighters from
Hobbico. Each one is made of light, durable foam and comes fully
painted and trimmed in realistic colors and graphics.
The Me-109 and Spitfire have 20-inch wingspans;
the Zero measures 21.25 inches. Each plane
comes with a motor, prop and rechargeable
battery installed and includes a batterypowered quick charger. You can keep
the stock power system for quick hops
or replace it with your own micro gear. No
glue is required for assembly; the included
screwdriver is all you'll need. The
best part is, these diminutive
warbirds cost less than
$16 each.
HOBBICO
FLYZDNE
WARBIRDS
Hobbico; distributed by
Great Planes Model
Distributors Co.,
P.O. Box 9021, Champaign,
IL 61826-9021; (800) 6377660; fax (217) 398-0008;
www.greatplanes.com.
And your wife says theres no passion left in you.
RCV ENGINES LIMITED
Ultra-low-profile
4-stroke engine
new line of ultra-low-profile 4-strokes for other size applications.
The first released is the .58ci RCV58-CD. Its rotary
cylinder-valve technology allows an amazingly low
engine height—just 66mm (2.6 inches)! That's con-
There's just something about an unconventional engine design
being incurable gearheads, we're compelled by the combina-
siderably shorter than a .60-size 2-stroke, not to mention any comparable 4-stroke. Scale model builders take note;
tion of oddball mechanics and inspired engineering. If a
this engine will fit tight engine compartments without unsightly
quirky engine actually works well, it's darn near irre-
holes in the cowl. If it runs anything like its 120 big brother, this
engine is a bargain at its expected price of $189.
sistible. Take the rotary valve 4-stroke engines
RCV Engines Limited; distributed in the USA by Wildcat Fuels, Inc.,
from RCV Engines Ltd.; we reviewed the 120
206 Stephens Dr., Nicholasville, KY 40356; (859) 885-5619; fax
in September 2001, and we loved its compact
(859) 885-8549; www.wildcatfuel.com.
design and torquey performance. Now RCV has a
JK AEROTECH
P-47
JK Aerotech has answered the prayers of combat
enthusiasts everywhere with the
introduction of this 1/12-scale P-47
Thunderbolt. Constructed of
extruded foam and corrugated plastic, the P-47 is covered entirely
in packing tape for exceptional durability. This "three-in-one" kit can
be built as a Razorback, a bubble-top, or a long-wing, high-altitude
H version with a wingspan of from 42 to 47 inches. The kit features a
canopy, spars, pushrods and control horns, plus a roll of colored tape for covering. It weighs 2.9 pounds and can be powered by a .25
to .46 engine. Best of all, the speed, agility and unlimited vertical performance of this P-47 can be yours for only $45.
JK Aerotech, 10800 SE Orient Dr., Boring, OR 97009; (800) 442-6755; www.jkaerotech.com.
HO Train Sets
Model Airplanes
Monster Kits
Your hobby is our hobby too. For great finds
on whatever you're into, check out eBay.com.
AOL Keyword: eBay
happy hunting"
©2002 eBay Inc. Designated trademarks and brands are the property of their respective owners. All items subject to availability.
When it comes to scale models, it really doesn't get much better
than the "Classic Scale" series from Flair Products, and this
Boeing PT-17 Stearman is the newest addition to that highquality line of kits. Powered by a 1.80 4-stroke engine, this
l:4.3-scale model is capable of extremely scale performances. It
will fly slow and steady, just like the real thing. The kit features
CNC and die-cut parts, strip and sheet wood, a dummy engine, all
of the necessary hardware, scale wheels (including a steerable
tailwheel), full-size plan and instructions. It also comes with
vacuum-formed moldings for the detail trim areas and fiberglass
Looking for big performance in
a small package?
Then JR's new
Voyager 50 CCPM
3D Heli is just the
ticket. The new Voyager is not much larger than most
.30-size helis, so it's easy to transport and to store. The
Voyager's design is based on the already popular Vigor
series of helis and shares many of the same
parts with the Ergo 30/46, so replaceent parts are easy to get.
Voyager 50 CCPM 30
and Nem Heli Engine
m
For quick
assembly, the Voyager
uses 120-degree CCPM
and a belt-driven tail.
This means a low parts
count and easy setup for the
demanding 3D pilot. With its small size and today's
powerful .50-size engines, the Voyager has an outstanding powerto-weight ratio that gives the heli a performance level previously
reserved for larger .60-size helicopters. The Voyager 50 costs $499.99.
For you power-hungry pilots, try the new IMZ RV50-S engine. Its performance features include a side-mounted slide valve carburetor with
reed-valve induction. This smooth-running engine also includes a KSJ
tuned muffler and sells for $479.99. If you're ready to try 3D helicopter
flying, JR's Voyager 50 and IMZ RV50-S are a great way to get started.
JR; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105 Fieldstone Rd.,
Champaign, IL 61822; (800) 338-4639; www.horizonhobby.com.
moldings for the forward fuselage and dummy crankcase. A fully
sprung and damped
undercarriage, various
moldings for the windscreens and fairings and
a complete closed-loop
control system for the
rudder and elevators
round out this incredible package. It's even
possible to customize
your kit to represent a
specific Stearman of your choosing. The price of this 89-inchwingspan model was not available at press time, but it's expected
to sell for between $400 and $450.
Flair Products Ltd.; distributed in the USA by Radical RC, 7046
Harshmanville Rd., Huber Heights, OH 45424; (937) 237-7889;
fax (937) 237-1521; davthacker@aol.com; www. radicalrc.com.
An AC-to-DC power supply is a
must-have for any serious
electrics enthusiast, but
they are often too big and
bulky to be conveniently
transported. DuraTrax has
solved that problem with
its Compact Switching
Power
Supply.
It
is
designed with an eye toward
simplicity and convenience; the switching circuitry is housed inside the compact wall
plug, along with a cooling fan. A removable 4-foot cord is connected
DURATRAX
HANGAR 9
Pro-Lite
Wheels
Why not enhance the appeal of your new scale plane with Hangar 9's
new Pro-Lite Wheels. They not only contribute a great deal of scale
realism, but they also save some weight. Each wheel features a
skinned foam tire that looks like real rubber but weighs only a fraction of the real thing. The large hubs are also extremely lightweight
and durable. The Pro-Lite Wheels range in size from l1/2 to 41/2 inches
and in price from $4.99 to $24.99 each.
Hangar 9; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105 Fieldstone Rd.,
Champaign, IL 61822; (217) 355-9511; www.horizonhobby.com.
16 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Switchin
Power Supply
to the terminal block adapter. The terminals are perfectly shaped to
allow quick attachment of alligator clips of various sizes, and the
mounting block ensures that they never accidentally touch and cause
a short. Pads attached to the pc board on the bottom of the block
enable you to solder wires directly to it. The unit's output is rated at
7 amps of 12V DC current—enough to handle most charging
tasks; $62.99.
DuraTrax; distributed by Great Planes Model Distributors, P.O. Box
9021, Champaign, IL 61826-9021; (800) 637-7660; fax (217)
398-0008; www.duratrax.com. 4-
TIPS & TRICKS
S E N D IN Y O U R I D E A S - (Mode/A/rp/arte News will give a free, one-year subscription (or one-year renewal, if
you already subscribe) for each idea used in "Tips & Tricks." Send a rough sketch to Model Airplane News, 100 East
Ridge, Ridgefield, CT 06877 4606 USA. BE SURE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE CLEARLY PRINTED ON EACH
SKETCH, PHOTO AND NOTE YOU SUBMIT. Because of the number of ideas we receive, we can't acknowledge each one,
nor can we return unused material.
Cut to 1/4"
SPOTLESS FUEL TANKS
A dirty fuel tank can lead to less than
immaculate performance and reliability,
but it can be a chore to get a cleaning
tool inside a tank. To make that easier, trim the bristles of a 6-inch acid brush to
about 1/4 inch. Bend the brush tip to approximately 45 degrees to create your own
tank scrubber. Pour an ounce or two of alcohol into the tank, swish it around, and
let it sit for 15 minutes. Then, use your scrubber to clean the residue from inside
the tank. If you need a sharper angle to reach a corner, bend the brush tip more.
For really stubborn spots, cut the bristles slightly shorter to get more scrubbing
action.
MIRRORING
SERVOS
Split elevators can
cause problems if you
connect two servos through a Y-harness. Servos of
the same brand rotate in the same direction, and
this can result in differing geometry between sides.
This, in turn, produces unequal force and controlsurface reaction. An easy way to avoid this is to use
comparable servos from different brands that
rotate in opposite directions. Of course, the servos
should have roughly the same speed and torque
characteristics, but most standard servos are
enough alike to work.
Thomas Smith, Aberdeen, MD
William Pote, Hobe Sound, FL
KEEP YOUR COOL
With electric power growing by leaps
and bounds, here's a simple cooler box
that you can build to get more flight
time and take better care of your batteries. Cut a piece of 1/4-inch foamboard into two pairs of matching sides
to make four sides of a box. Epoxy the
box together, but leave two opposite ends open.
At one end, insert a 12V fan from RadioShack
(item no. RS 273 243B; $10). Place your
charger on top of the cooler box (secure it
with rubber bands, if desired) and connect the leads from the fan and the
charger to a 12V source. Then, place
your pack in the open end of the
box to cool it down before and during
charging. This way, you won't abuse your packs
by charging them while they're still hot, and you won't
have to wait as long before recharging.
Jack Hillyer, Seattle, WA
GRAB-MAGNET FOR SMALL PARTS
Little parts such as screws, pins, etc. can be difficult to retrieve one at a
time from containers, and if you fish around with your fingers, you
sometimes find the sharp end first—ouch! Next time, cut a strip from a
flexible refrigerator magnet to fit into the container. The magnet will
collect the parts from the bottom of the container, thereby making it easy
for you to retrieve whichever part you need quickly and easily.
Kenneth Kent, Florence, OR
18 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
TIPS & TRICKS
RACK 'EM!
Unless you're wealthy enough to add a new wing onto your house to serve
as a 1/4-scale hangar, chances are that you have to store your models in a
limited area. A great way to make the most of the space you have is to
build a hanging rack out of 1/2-inch PVC pipe. You'll need about 4 feet
of tube, four 90-degree elbows and two 45-degree elbows. Cut the
tube into seven pieces: a top crosspiece, two medium-length diagonal
extensions, two short vertical extensions and two long longitudinal
extensions—exact lengths will vary, depending on the size of your airplane. At the midpoint of the crosspiece, drill a 3/16-inch hole to fit
a 2-inch deck screw, from which you will hang the rack.
When all the angles are squared, glue the pipe together,
and just like that, you'll have a multipurpose plane rack for
90° PVC elbow
45° PVC elbow
" PVC pipe
less than $2 in parts.
Jim Haslouer, Merced, CA
SAWDUST-FREE WORKSHOP
BULLETPROOF YOUR PLANE
Here's a neat way to keep sawdust under control in your workshop.
Take a standard box fan with a rectangular shroud and duct-tape a
filter element from a forced-air heater/air conditioner onto the
intake side of the fan. These filters are available in various sizes
and can be found at hardware and home-improvement stores; they
can be trimmed to fit, if necessary. Be sure to seal the edges well
with the duct tape. When you turn on the fan, the intake air
will be drawn through the filter. If you position
the intake side near you as you
sand, the sawdust will collect in
the filter instead of all over your
workshop (and you).
Jimmy Bruns, Yucca Valley, CA
Kevlar weave is one of the strongest materials
around; it's no coincidence that it is the prime
ingredient in airbags and police body-armor. Ounce
for ounce, it's much stronger than fiberglass, and as
such, it's great for laminating into an airplane to
reinforce high-stress areas such as firewalls, wing
supports and landing-gear mounts. An inexpensive
source for Kevlar is an auto junkyard; deflated
airbags are easily found in late-model wrecks.
Donald Stach, Madeira Beach, FL
ALL-TEMPERATURE PUSHRODS
The plastic pushrods that are included in many kits can stretch or contract, depending on the temperature. This can throw off your trim settings and put
extra stress on parts. A good way to avoid this problem is to run a length of wire through the center of the plastic-tubing pushrods. You can solder the clevises to the wire, which makes a stronger joint. More important, the wire will not be affected by temperature changes. The plastic pushrods now serve as
support for the wires.
James McCoul, Sterling Heights, Ml
20 M O D E L A I R P L A N E NEWS
UltraCotes back, am
At last there's lots of Hangar 9 UltraCote' in lots of color
Birmingham
Homewood Toy 8 Hobby
205-879-3986
Decatur
Pyramid Hobbies II
Huntsville
RC. Hobbies
256-539-1347
Mobile
HobbyTown USA
334-633-8446
Montgomery
Uncle Al's Hobbies
334-277-1715
Selma
Ken's Model Shop
334-872-9493
ALASKA
Wasilla
Hobbies & More
907-357-6235
Campbell
D & J Hobby
408-379-1696
Costa Mesa
AirWild Hobbies
714-751-0789
Covina
Covina Hobby Shop
626-331-1910
HobbyTown USA
480-892-0405
Glendale
Hobby Bench
602-547-1828
Phoenix
Frank's Hobby House
602-992-3495
Hobby Bench
602-995-1755
Tucson
Classic Hobbies
520-293-2022
Hobby Barn
800-324-4910
HobbyTown USA
520-882-8888
Little Rock
Marks Hobby Shop
501-562-8230
Monticello
Advance Hobbies
501-367-5200
Bakersfield
B 8 F Hobbies
661-322-7955
Burbank
T 8 A Hobby Lobby
818-842-5062
Airborne Hobbies
916-332-4661
RC Country Hobbies
916-731-5868
J 8 M Hobby House
650-593-5019
San Diego
Discount Hobby
Warehouse
858-560-9633
Fountain Valley
Jax Hobbies
714-378-8924
San lose
Sheldon's Hobby Stop
408-943-0872
Fresno
San Marcos
HobbyTown USA
559-435-3342
Glendale
Hobby Zone
818-546-2291
Robin's Hobby Service
818-240-2093
Hanford
Hemet
Dynamic Hobbies
909-925-9331
La Puente
Tony's Hobbies
818-917-5290
Laguna Hills
Gyro Hobbies
949-583-1717
Lakewood
Hobby Warehouse
562-531-8383
Lancaster
Smith Bros
661-942-6984
Montclair
Pegasus Hobbies
909-982-6507
Mountain View
San Antonio Hobby Shop
650-941-1278
Palm Desert
Uncle Don's Hobbies
760-346-8856
HobbyTown
760-739-0672
San Mateo
Talbots Toyland
650-342-0267
Sand City
Monterey Hobbies
831-393-1112
Thousand Oaks
Marty's Hobbies
805-497-3664
Visalia
Visalia Hobbies
559-734-8072
COLORADO
Aurora
Blue Yonder Models
303-337-6887
Colpar Hobbies
303-341-0414
Fort Collins
HobbyTown USA
970-226-3900
Grand lunction
Golden Hobbies
970-523-8300
Norm's RC Hobbies
970-243-8044
Greeley
Don's Hobbies
970-353-3115
Things With Wings
970-352-1067
Poway
Hobby Central
858-513-0373
Lakewood
Action Hobbies
303-233-6275
Redding
Longmont
HobbyTown USA
303-774-1557
Redding RC & Hobby
530-241-2375
Rohnert Park
Hangar One Hobbies, Inc.
707-585-3170
Pinedas Park
Archie's Hobbies & Helis
Korwalk
Al's Hobbies
203-846-9932
Westminster
HobbyTown USA
303-431-0482
727-526-0394
Plantation
Warrick Custom
Hobbies Inc
San Carlos
Dublin
Wold's Hobbies
925-828-5350
Hobby Center
541-928-5255
Gilbert
Sacramento
Middletown
Middletown Electronics
& Hobbies
302-378-8686
Seaford
Aeromarine Hobby Stop
302-629-3944
Citrus Springs
D 8 S Hobby Shop
352-527-1500
Fort Myers
Hobbie Warehouse
941-358-7047
Hobbie Warehouse
941-278-1295
Ft Lauderdale
R. C. Hobbies
954-721-5720
Jacksonville
Cars, Planes & Trams
904-880-9500
Hobby World
904-772-9022
Jupiter
My Rose Hobbies
561-744-3800
Lakeland
Aero R/C Hobbies
863-668-8559
Miami
HobbyTown USA
305-273-7803
Naples
Hobbie Warehouse
941-262-2701
Ocala
Rob's Hobby World
352-854-2799
Orlando
Bob's Hobby Center
407-277-1248
561-460-2844
SanFord
Flightline Hobbies
407-330-7655
South Daytona
Ace Hobbies
904-761-9780
Tampa
Charlie's Discount
Hobbies
813-882-4007
Farmer's Hobby Shop
813-248-3314
West Palm Beach
Craft House Hobby Shop
561-683-0764
Wildwood
Noells Hobbies
352-748-0031
Andersonville
Hodges Hobbies
229-924-9505
Columbus
Hobby Town USA
706-660-1793
Marietta
National Hobby Supply
770-333-0190
Winder
Winder Hobby
770-867-9148
Hi
Graves R/C Hobbies
407-294-5699
Palm Bay
Space Coast Hobbies
321-722-3696
Hayden
Monster Hobbies
208-772-0422
Central Florida Hobbies
Pensacola
Hobby Central
850-471-9800
317-845-4106
208-746-8807
Stick 'n' Rudder Hobby
Pocatello
Dapco Hobbies
208-233-8163
Idaho Falls
JD Hobbies
208-529-9500
317-243-7983
Lafayette
Hobby Time
Sebree
Flying Z Hobbies
270-835-9001
Shelbyville
Quantum Models
502-633-6007
Aurora
HobbyTown USA
630-375-1230
Belleville
Corner Hobby
618-277-6030
Chillicothe
Fly Boy Hobbies
309-274-5344
Elmburst
Al's Hobby Shop
630-832-4908
Galesburg
Wing Manufacturing 8
Hobby
309-342-3009
Joliet
Leisure Hours Hobbies
815-439-1477
Lansing
Lansing Radio Control
708-474-1272
Machesney Park
HobbyTown USA
815-282-0727
Ottawa
Top Gun Hobby Center
815-433-6132
Sandwich
G 8 D Hobbies
815-786-8553
St. Charles
HobbyTown USA
Wheeling
Venture Hobby & Craft
847-537-8669
Evansville
ABC Hobbycraft Co.
812-477-9661
Ft. Wayne
Phil's Hobby Shop
219-426-5056
Griffith,
G 8 G Hobbies
219-924-6686
Indianapolis
Hobby R/C
317-359-6242
Liberty
Bud's R/C Hobbies
765-458-6416
Muncie
Muncie Model & Hobby
317-289-5856
South Bend
Michiana R/C Hobbies
219-289-2883
Metairie
Hobby Hut
504-733-4629
Natchitoches
BnD Hobbies
888-854-0710
Slidell
SI cell Hobbies
504-643-7176
Terre Haute
Joe's Hobby Barn
812-299-5773
Vernon
Hobby Hanger
812-346-6497
Orrington
King's Mountain RC
207-825-5593
Portland
IE
Ray & Robins'Hobby
Center
207-797-5196
Bob's R/C Hobby
319-277-0211
319-355-2071
Des Moines
Hobby Haven
800-697-1213
Lawrence
HobbyTown USA
785-865-0883
Overland Park
Hobby Haven
913-381-3111
Salina
Don's Hobby Shop
800-972-6273
Topeka
Dee & Mee Hobbies
785-228-9601
Lexington
X-Cell Models
859-296-0893
Louisville
Scale Reproductions
Burtonsville
Hobby City
301-421-5977
Cockeysville
Hunt Valley Hobbies
410-666-1098
Crofton
G.P.A.
301-858-0004
Grand Rapids
Rider's Hobby Shop
616-247-9933
517-485-0700
The Hobby Hub
517-351-5843
Macomb
Rider's Hobby Shop
810-532-0050
Madison Heights
Rider's Hobby Shop
248-589-8111
Port Huron
Pastime Hobbies
810-982-2874
Taylor
Rider's Hobby Shop
734-287-7405
Traverse City
Trams & Tilings
231-947-1353
Prop Shop
810-757-7160
800-499-2651
508-835-6165
Farmington
Joe's Hobby Center
248-477-6267
816-353-8396
Springfield
Sleeth Hobbies
417-883-1118
St. Charles
Mark Twain Hobby
Center
636-946-2816
St. Louis
Schaefer's Hobby Center
314-729-7077
Schaefer's R/C Shop
314-352-3750
Billings
Central Hobbies
406-259-9004
Hastings
Mr. Bill's Hardware City
402-462-4865
Kearney
FunTime Hobby
308-234-1806
IE
Elko
Elko Electronics
775-753-6776
Fridley
National Hobby
Company
763-571-9283
Plymouth
Precision Model
Products
508-747-4556
West Boylston
Henry's Hobby House
417-623-0011
Raytown
Reed's
Warren
Belmont
Alex's R/C Hobbyworks
Lee
Barn Speed Hobbies
Joplin R/C Hobbies
Saginaw
Roger's Hobby Center
Burnsville
R/C City
612-894-5208
617-484-3780
loplin
231-744-8797
Waldorf
Doug's Hobby Shop
301-843-7774
502-459-5849
Murray
E Hobby RC
270-753-4359
810-720-2563
Muskegon
Hobby Barn
Cedar Falls
Davenport
HobbyTown USA
Flint
Riders Hobby Shop
Lansing
Rider's Hobby Shop
765-449-8233
630-587-1256
Hilo
Pacific Modelsports
808-933-1348
HobbyTown USA
Bob's Hobbies
954-370-0708
Port Saint Lucie
Quality Aircraft
Boise
Boise Hobby
208-363-9555
HobbyTown USA
208-376-1942
407-295-9256
Lewiston
Little Canada
Hub Hobby Center
651-490-1675
Richfield
Hobby Warehouse
612-861-5587
Hub Hobby Center
612-866-9575
Branson, Hollister
TPA Hobby Center
417-335-6624
Claycomo
MNC Hobbies
816-452-1032
Las Vegas
HobbyTown USA
702-889-9554
Nice Twice Hobbies 8
Sports
702-876-2280
Reno
Hobbies of Reno
775-826-6006
Nashua
RC Buyers Warehouse
603-595-2494
Salem
Bill's Hobby Barn
603-898-9241
Greenbrook
Jerry's Hobby Center
732-752-6030
Multi-Temp Thermal
it's back for good.
it better dealers nationwide. So let the building begin!
Jackson
Jackson Hobby Shop
732-364-3334
Moonachie
US Hobby
201-460-0544
Mt. Laurel
Creek Hobbies
856-722-0489
Old Bridge
G.S. Hobbies
732-727-7871
Pompton Plains
Hobby Hut
973-835-2077
Red Bank
Colorest
732-741-0001
Alamogordo
Flight Deck Hobbies Inc.
505-434-6563
Albuquerque
Albuquerque Hobby
505-275-1882
Hobbies N Stuff
505-293-1217
Farmington
HobbyTown USA
505-325-5156
Rio Rancho
HobbyTown USA
505-994-8874
The Hobby House
716-429-6280
Seaford
Sunrise Hobbies
516-783-4343
Syracuse
Walt's Hobby
315-453-2291
Vernon
Brennan's R/C Hobbies
315-829-4930
Vestal
G J.'S Hobbies 8 Crafts
607-754-3351
Webster
Performance Hobbies
716-872-4990
718-627-3814
Buffalo
Field's Hobby Center
716-681-6440
E. Northport
Larry's Hobby Supplies
631-499-7166
Flushing
Fantasia Hobby World
718-460-5671
Harrison
Tony's Hobby Shop
914-835-4765
Pete's Old Forge
315-369-3748
Poughkeepsie
Hobby House
845-297-3341
Rochester
Dan's Crafts S Things
716-654-8388
513-385-8616
Startleet Hobbies
513-984-9889
Dayton
RC Hobby Center
937-236-2455
Maple Heights
Southeast Hobby
216-663-7171
Miamisburg
B&B Hobbies
937-847-9555
North Canton
Aero Tech Hobbies
330-499-1300
Parma
Parma Hobby
Archdale
K/C Hobby
336-434-3482
Boone
Minor Obsession
828-265-2651
Fayetteville
Hayes Hobby House
910-485-2337
Goldsboro
Glen's Hobby Corner
919-734-7754
Granite Falls
Airborne Hobbies
828-313-3311
Havelock
GBI Hobbies
Brooklyn
East Coast R/C Hobbies
Cincinnati
Phils Hobbies
252-463-4073
King
King R/C
336-983-3969
Landis
High Speed Hobbies
704-855-2940
216-741-6440
Salem
Oakboro
Herbs Hobbies 8 Gifts
704-485-4122
Raleigh
Hobby Masters
919-870-1121
HobbyTown USA
919-790-5324
Eugene
Eugene Goy and Hobby
541-344-2117
877-218-9029
Medford
Al's Toy 8 Hobby
541-779-9935
Portland
Ted's Hobbies Unlimited
503-287-4090
Ultimate Hobbies
503-247-8194
Roseburg
541-673-8266
440-846-1770
419-471-1108
Rider's Hobby Shop
419-843-2931
Westerville
Capstone R/C Suppliers
614-899-6313
Youngstown
Austintown Hobbies
330-793-9233
Boardman Hobby
Center
330-758-1522
541-677-9007
Salem
Leisure Hobbies
503-588-9884
Dickson City
Main Hobby Center
570-489-8857
Easton
Trains 8 Lanes
610-253-8850
Hummelstown
The Hidden Hangar
717-566-7163
Muncy
Leeco Hobbies
570-437-2619
Pittsburgh
1 8 C Hobbies
412-795-9344
Swoyersville
Oklahoma City
Mite's Hobbies 8 Radio
Control
405-682-4300
Mike's Models
405-949-1049
Tulsa
Model Works
918-664-1800
R 8 W Hobbies 8 Crafts
570-283-3066
Warminster
J.C. R/C Hobbies
215-672-5200
Beaverton
R/C Modeler Northwest
503-649-0633
Easley
The Hobby Connection
864-295-1209
Mt. Pleasant
Randy's Model
Aeronautics
843-884-7411
North Augusta
Ultimate Hobbies
803-278-6346
Wilkes-Barre
Walter's Hardware
York
Mel's Hobbies
717-843-8321
972-242-4930
Corsicana
Hobby Crafts Etc.
903-872-6761
Dallas/Ft.Worth Area
Roy's Hobby Shop
El Paso
Hal's Hobby Warehouse
915-591-2213
Greenville
Drycreek Hobby Shop
903-527-5381
Hallsville
Sunshine's
903-660-3320
Houston
Kingsway R/C Hobby
713-266-7750
Blountville
AAA Model Supply
423-323-1513
Franklin
HobbyTown USA
615-771-7441
Knoxville
HobbyTown USA
865-690-1099
M 8 N Hobbies
865-525-7532
Tennessee Model
Hobbies
865-927-2900
McMinnville
ARF Hobbies, Inc.
931-474-7223
Memphis
HobbyTown USA
901-213-2682
Millington
Going Western
901-872-7566
Murfreesboro
HobbyTown USA
615-890-6777
Nashville
Danielle's RC
615-228-0867
Larry's Hobbies
281-443-7373
Performance R/C
281-469-3965
Texas Model Trends
713-941-4000
Trains & Planes
Hobbies
713-974-1277
Irving
Wild Bill's Hobby Shop
972-438-9224
Mesquite
A-l Hobby
972-289-1160
Pasadena
All American Discount
Hobbies
281-998-9600
Pearland
Clarke's Hobby Shop
281-997-2777
Piano
Texas R/C Modellers
972-422-5386
Rockport
Ben's R/C Hobbies
361-729-0420
Bremerton
Legacy Hobbies 8 Gifts
Bountiful
Ultimate Hobbies
801-294-7793
Layton
HT's RC's
801-546-6959
Logan
Earl's R/C
435-752-2255
Midvale
Some Dude's Hobby
Shop
801-567-9944
Orem
World Class Model
801-235-1869
Salt Lake City
West Valley Hobbies
801-964-1700
Sandy
M.R.S. Hobby Shop
801-572-6082
Taylorsville
HobbyTown USA
801-964-8242
Chantilly
Hobby Hangar
Speedway
703-631-8820
Dumfries
Brown Brothers Hobby
Shop
Austin
Cedar Park Hobbies
512-331-2943
Bryan
American Aerospace
979-778-9464
Carrollton
The R.C. Hobby Shop
281-265-4844
Waco
Waco Hobby Stop
254-776-4991
Wichita Falls
Action Hobbies
817-766-2667
360-782-0478
Burlington
Performance R/C
Products
360-755-9464
Lynnwood
Galaxy Hobby
Newport News
Stream R/C Models
757-591-0720
Salem
Crossroads Hobbies of
Salem
540-387-3414
Tazewell
Apex Hobbies
540-988-9005
Virginia Beach
Debbie's R/C World
757-340-6681
Auburn
Ultimate Hobbies
253-939-2515
Bellevue
Abernathy's Northwest
Hobbies
425-747-9914
Sunprairie
Schultz Sport 8 Hobby
608-837-3498
Waldo
Kvindlog Services
888-487-2122
Tacoma
HobbyTown
253-531-8111
Union Gap
The Clover Leaf
509-453-8959
Yakima
Mike's Model Aircraft
Supply
509-453-8238
Teays
Nitro Hobby And Craft
Center
304-757-6474
Wheeling
Fulton's Hobby Shop
304-233-5355
Pope's Hobbyland
715-842-4371
CANADA
414-922-5999
Greenfield
Greenfield News 8
Hobby Center
414-281-1800
La Crosse
ABC Hobbies
608-788-8222
Madison
Dockter's Hobby World
608-274-0024
Hobby Horse
800-604-6229
Milwaukee
Happy Hobby
414-461-6013
Oshkosh
HobbyTown USA
414-426-1840
902-624-9519
IB
Brampton
R/C Wings & Things
905-846-9105
Burlington
Skycraft Hobbies
Bonnyville
Riteway Model Products
403-826-2400
Calgary
Model Land
403-249-1661
PM HobbyCraft Ltd.
403-291-2733
The R/C Hangar
403-236-5098
Edmonton
Great Hobbies
780-466-3388
Hobby Master
780-434-9189
Hobby Wholesale
403-434-3648
905-631-6211
Kingston
Leading Edge Hobbies
000-389-4878
Kitchener
Flite Craft Model
519-742-7141
London
AVF Entertainment 8
Leisure
519-451-1833
Mississauga
Hobby Hobby
905-858-7978
Orleans
Discount Hobbies
613-830-2373
Unionville
Abbotsford
One Stop Hobbies
604-852-6497
Fond Du Lac
Focus, Inc.
R/C Wings 8 Wheels
Wausau
206-306-9914
Spokane
B 8 B Industries
Blockhouse
920-528-8343
425-670-0454
Seattle
Webster's Hobby Shop
703-221-5746
Sugarland
Gehrlein Products
814-866-1131
Mike's Hobby Shop
817-268-0210
Waterford
570-823-1406
Berlin Heights
Daniels Hobbies
419-588-2029
Ray's Hobby
401-738-4908
Bargain Bin
RC World
Swanton
T 'n' T Landing Gear
419-868-5408
Toledo
Hobby Stop-West
Warwick
Grants Pass
Chief Aircraft Inc.
330-337-8650
Strongsville
HobbyTown USA
Skelly Sporting Goods 8
Hobbie
717-792-2860
D's Toys 8 Hobbies
541-389-1330
Nutter's Prop Shop
Naples
Will's CB Shop
828-681-5500
Tammie's Hobbies
503-644-4535
Bend
Burnaby
Norburn Model Aircraft
604-294-4114
A 8 J Hobbies
905-305-1479
Woodstock
Woodstock Radio
Control Models
519-421-0733
Kelowna
Kelowna Speedway 8
Hobby
250-860-7541
Stratford
Merville
Great Hobbies, Inc
Flite Supply
250-337-5320
Nakusp
Lesters Hobbies
250-265-3128
902-569-3262
Nanaimo
Leisure Time Hobbies
250-753-6221
Osoyoos
Palmers Hobbies
250-495-2583
Victoria
B.C. Shaver Shop
250-383-0051
c
Gatineau
Hobby 2000
819-561-6888
Hull
Multi-Hobby
819-770-5050
Laval
Distribution Aux
Modelistes
800-363-8271
SEND IN YOUR SNAPSHOTS Model Airplane News is your magazine and, as always, we encourage
reader participation. In "Pilot Projects," we feature pictures from you—our readers. Both color slides and color
prints are acceptable but please do not send digital printouts. We receive so many photographs that we are
unable to return them. All photos used in this section will be eligible for a grand prize of $500, to be awarded at
the end of the year. The winner will be chosen from all entries published, so get a photo or two, plus a brief
description, and send them in! Send those pictures to "Pilot Projects," Model Airplane News, 100 East Ridge,
Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA.
Todd Mazzei,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
EXTRA 300L
Todd is pretty proud of his brother's plane—as well he should be. Thanks to Todd
for sending in the photo, and kudos to his brother, Trent, on that incredible airbrushed paint job. This 37-percent-scale Aeroworks Extra 300L has a 116-inch
wingspan and is equipped with a T.M.E smoke system. A model of this size requires
a lot of power, and according to Todd, the 18hp 3W engine definitely does the trick.
With more than 11 servos providing control, 3D maneuvers are certainly not a
problem for this aerobat. Trent has flown his plane more than 75 times.
Harley Nelson,
Oregon, Wl
Z-137 AGRO TURBO
Our thanks to Harley for taking the time to send us photos of his
homebuilt beauty. The design caught Harley's attention when it
appeared in Model Airplane News' "Planes Worth Modeling" feature. Utilizing a bit of ingenuity, Harley used an overhead slide
projector to enlarge the image from the magazine and take
measurements. Knowing that
he wanted his crop plane to
hold 3 pounds of dust, he
determined that his model
would have to have a 100-inch
wingspan and weigh 20
pounds—and it does! Harley's
Z-137 is powered by a Moki
2.10 engine, which delivers 25
pounds of thrust turning a
20x10 prop. Harley expects the
plane's performance to be
good, and he intends to find
out for sure as soon as summer arrives.
Byron Clark,
Sun City, AZ
FAIRCHILD PT-23
Byron's PT-23 may look familiar; it started out as a
Dynaflite PT-19 kit. With a little bit of creativity and a lot
of work, Byron transformed the kit by shortening the
front end and adding a fiberglass ring cowl. He powers
his PT-23 with a Saito R 1.70 and controls it with a
Futaba T8UAF radio. It features a JHM Engineering
onboard ignition system and is finished in a yellow, blue
and striped rudder color scheme—the same as only one
production run of the full-size aircraft was painted.
Jim Famed, Biloxi, MS
SOPWITH TRIPLANE
Mike Bridges, Hunt, TX
SCRATCH-BUILT CROP DUSTER
Crop dusters are gaining popularity as RC models, and when you see
a plane like Mike's, you understand why. Who wouldn't want one of
these? Mike scratch-built this plane with the help of his friend, David
West; both are members of the Kerrville R.C. Flyers in Kerrville, TX.
Powered by a U.S. 41cc engine and controlled by a JR radio, this
86-inch-wingspan model weighs 141/2 pounds and is covered with
Stits Lite and MonoKote.
24
M O D E L A I R P L A N E NEWS
Our thanks to Jim for sending us this photo of his standoff scale WW I
Sopwith Triplane, which he designed and built himself. Powered by an O.S.
.25FP engine, Jim's fighter has a 39 3/4-inch wingspan and weighs 3 1/2
pounds. The model has a profile fuselage, but Jim widened the nose to
accommodate the battery and receiver. Jim designed the plane for RC
combat; it's the third in a series of 1/8 -scale WW I combat planes he's building. Jim says his
model possesses all
of the flight characteristics of the fullsize plane; it isn't
particularly fast, but
it's extremely maneuverable and has a
high rate of climb.
PILOT PROJECTS
Jerome Wroblewski, Des Plaines, IL
SKYMASTER
Last summer, Jerome decided he needed a building project; the result is
this beautiful scratch-built Skymaster. Jerome powers his model with an
O.S. .65 2-stroke engine turning a 12x6 pusher prop. The 68-inch-wingspan
model is constructed of lite-ply and balsa with a balsa-sheeted foam wing,
and it's covered entirely in UltraCote. Jerome says his 91/2-pound model
requires a long runway to gain speed before liftoff, but once airborne, it flies
great and has very sensitive elevator input.
Col. Austin Ayotte, Austin, TX
EXTRA 300XS
As a retired Air Force, commercial airline and corporate pilot, Col. Ayotte
certainly knows his way around a plane. Check out his Midwest Products
Extra 300XS! It's powered by an O.S. BGX
engine and controlled by
an Airtronics Vision
radio. The decals were
courtesy of Die-hard
Graphics. According to
Col. Ayotte, this Extra is
a great flyer, even
though he admits to
finding full-size airplanes
much easier to fly than
RC models.
John Giles,
Oklahoma City, OK
MONOCOUPE
This 72-inch scratch-built Monocoupe represents John's
fourth attempt at modeling the aircraft, and according
to him, it is by far the best performer yet. Powered by a
Saito 1.00 engine spinning an APC 15x6 prop, John's
Monocoupe weighs 9 pounds and features functional
flaps and a Futaba radio system. John believes that
working on this plane was a great way to spend his
winter, and we have to agree.
Tops in its Class
specs: BobCat
length: 74"
Engine: 11-141b thrust turbine
Ask any BobCat owner about his experience
building and flying this jet. His answer will be
especially interesting if he has owned any of the
other popular, exposed engine sport jets.
That's because the engineering, parts fit,
completeness, instruction package and factory
support that are part of every BVM kit are
unmatched in the model jet industry.
He'll also tell you that when it comes to flight
characteristics there is just no comparison.
Whether you need a jet trainer or a fully aerobatic
jet, the BobCat has the wing area, airfoil, and an aft
mounted stab to make you look good.
So if you want a similar successful experience,
Experience a BobCat!
specs: BobCat XL
length: 79"
Engine: 11-20+lb thrust turbine
.COM
170 SR 419 • Winter Springs, Fl 32708 • tel 407-327-6333 • fax 407-327-5020
26 MODEL AIRPLANE NEW5
David Hobbs,
Shawnee, KS
SCRATCH-BUILT PROFILE
David designed and built this profile fun fly—a truly unique model in
that all of its control surfaces are of the pull/pull variety, including
the ailerons. Powered by an O.S. .46 FX engine and controlled by a
Hitec radio, David's profile plane has a 42-inch wingspan and weighs
about 5 pounds. Four hatches on the top of the wing provide access
to the aileron servo and radio equipment, and David built tunnels into
the fuselage from the servos to the radio compartment to accommodate the servo electrical leads. The plane is covered in maroon and
white MonoKote, and according to David, it flies very well with good
characteristics at both low and high speeds.
Antonio Carlos Pimentel,
Sao Paulo, Brazil
BEECHCRAFT BONANZA
Hard to believe, but according to Antonio, this 1/5-scale Bonanza from Top
Flite represents his first attempt at building a kit. One would certainly be
hard pressed to distinguish his work from that of an experienced kit
modeler. Antonio's Bonanza is constructed of balsa and plywood and covered with Oracover. Powered by a Magnum XL .912-stroke engine, the
model features ABS plastic on the cowl, cabin and interior and is
equipped with flaps and Robart pneumatic retracts. It's controlled by a
Futaba 8-channel radio with 9 servos. 4
DEALER ENQUIRIES WELCOME
For
more
lnformation
on
where
to
buy
contact your local retailer or check our website.
NEW YORK. Ny 10010, u.SA
To join our bbi club, pisuaviaR http:#WWWblueboxtoys.com BLUEBOX axs ALL RIGHTS Reseerves
ARTICULATED
1/5 Scale Collectiable
JUNE 2002 27
your guid
d engines
•the staff of 'Model Airplane News
o other type of RC airplane is more closely linked to the origins of
the hobby than V2A models. These planes grew directly out of freeflight and control-line models, and they were among the first to
exploit remote control. For many modelers, V2A was their first exposure to the
sbby, and it remains among the most popular model sizes even today.
Why has V2A endured so successfully? To begin with, these planes are
among the simplest, most enjoyable sport models to build. They are small and
light, so they go together easily and fly beautifully. The advent of CAD plans
and laser-cut parts has only improved those characteristics; now, 1/2 A kits are
easier than ever to build. Because these kits are small and are constructed using
conventional materials, they are also extremely affordable. That makes them ideal
for less-experienced builders—especially those who may have cut their teeth on electric backyard flyers and would like to try glow power. And because of their compact
design and light weight, they can fly in smaller spaces than standard-size glow-powered models. To top it off, there are more 1/2 A kits (not to mention several ARFs) available than ever before, and their quality is first rate.
We've assembled a list of more than 70 kits and ARFs that were designed for V2A
engines with displacements of. 10ci or less. There's a wide variety to choose from, from profile-fuselage sport models and trainers to scale warbirds and gliders. Once you spot a kit you
like, check out our engine chart to find just the right powerplant for it. And don't miss the helpful tips on nitro content and 1/2 A support equipment
from our noted experts, Dave Gierke and Randy Randolph. When you consider the style, nostalgia, convenience and selection that 1/2 A has to offer,
we're sure you're going to want to give it a try!
S
Model* like this Slg Mfg. R/C Rascal ($79.95; combine the size and style of classic
free-flight models with modern RC control for a very reasonable price.
28
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
1 / 2 A
E N G
WEIGHT (0Z.)
DISPLACEMENT
THROTTLE
PRICE
$39.95
Fuji
.099 RC aircraft engine
4.32
0.10
Y
$149.99
Norvel
BigMiG Start'Up .049
2.39 t
0.05
N
$49.99
Norvel
BigMiG Start'Up .061
2.39 t
0.06
N
$45.99
Norvel
AME.Q49(CL/RC)
1.69/1.831
0.05
AME .061 (CL/RC)
1.69/1.83 t
BigMiG Sport .049 (CL/RC)
1.69/1.83?
BigMiG Sport .061 (CL/RC)
1.69/1.83 t
2.65 t
Norvel
Norvel
BigMiG Sport .074
$55.99/$75.99
$55.99/$75.99
$45.99/$59.99
0.05
$34.99/$59.99
0.07
$75.99
Thunder Tiger
t Weight includes muffler
* Available in both control-line and RC versions
1 / 2 A ENGINES & NITRO CONTENT by Dave Gierke
This Cox Babe Bee Is typical of
the classic 1/2A and free-flight
engines. It has no throttle and
does not require a dedicated
RC channel. The engine mount
also serves as the fuel tank
and the carb; after the needle
Is tuned for the desired rpm,
the engine will operate at a constant speed.
House of Balsa Is known for Its high-quality,
fine-scale V2A kits such as this 36-inch
Beechcraft Bonanza; $59.95.
House of Balsa Super Decathlon: $59.95.
Price: $47.29.
1/2A glow engines that operate
on methanol- (alcohol-)
dominated fuel have a
problem-they're
tremendously over-cooled! In the late 1940s, the newly developed "baby
engines" barely ran on glow fuel that was formulated for larger displacement
engines. Containing mostly alcohol, castor oil and a bit of nitromethane, this fuel
was inadequate for the new breed of tiny engines. They protested
by being difficult to start and touchy to adjust, and they ran
,
roughly. The difficulty turned out to be the surface area of
the cylinder and head when compared with the cylinder disThe Norvel Big (WIG Sport
placement; this important ratio is much larger for
.074 ($75.99) is one of the
small engines than it is for large engines. Look at
newer generation of
these examples of displacement versus cylinder surthrottleable 1/2A engines. It
face area. An .049 has a ratio of 13:1, a .40's is 6:1,
operates much like any
and a 1.2's is just 4:1. The solution? Add
larger RC glow engine; a
nitromethane to the fuel; between 25 and 35
percent works well.
Thunder Tiger
GP-07;
$49.99.
House of Balsa P-51 Mustang; $59.95.
channel is assigned to control a servo that moves the
As we know, nitro throttle position on the carb.
adds power and heat to the operating cycle of any engine.
Additional nitro allows the temperature of the crankcase to
increase and provides needed thermal energy to vaporize liquid fuel components before transferring them to the cylinder
for combustion. Vaporized fuel does a better job of mixing with air and burning than do liquid droplets in an
over-cooled engine.
1 /2A TO Z
I / 2 A
M O D E L S
MODEL
NO. OF
CHANNELS
WINi
(IN.)
* ACE
Cox sells this Engine Starting Kit for its 1/2 A engines.
It includes a half-pint bottle of fuel, a battery box, a
starting wand, fuel tubing, a glow-plug clip and an
all-purpose wrench. Price: $11.99.
Here is a selection of 1/2 A props.
Clockwise from top left: Girsh Tornado
6x5; Cox 3-blade 6x3; Cox Grey 5x3; Cox
5x3; Cox 6x3.
Alpha
2 o r3
40
Grasshopper
2or3
43.5
Scooter ARF
3
57
Simple 400
2 to 4
34
Simple AT-6
2to4
35
Simple Extra
2to4
35
Simple F-4U
2 to 4
36
Simple Me-109
2 to 4
35
Simple P-51
2 to 4
35
Simple Piper J-3
2 to 4
35
Simple Ultimate
4
34
Whizard
2or3
40.7
••
* CLANCY AVIATION j
Lazy Bee
Ace Simple
Ultimate Bipe;
$44.99.
3
Lazy Bee Special
4
40
Lazy Bee Special Extended Wing
4
48
Speedy Bee
4
Turbo Bee
3
1
Piece 0' Cake
FUNAERO RC
The next
step Is to
connect the
glow plug
and engage
the spring
starter.
Last, adjust
the needle
valve for
smooth
operation.
3O MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
40.2
29
DYNAFLITE
Flakey Jake
2or3
2or3
Super Jake
4
BooKaty
40
|29.
yard Bee
Here, my Cox
Kilter Bee .047
la mounted on
a JK Aerotech
Kwlk Mount I
first primed
the engine
through the
exhaust port.
40
48
Lazy Bee Extended Wing
Stagger Bee
Ace Grasshopper; $34.99.
1
45
40
40
Engine startup
Tommy Boy
by Randy Randolph
* GLOBAL
All small engines like high-nitro (at least 15percent) fuel. The starting procedure for
engines such as the Cox Tee Dee series,
Norvel and Thunder Tiger is much like that of
any other engine with a front-intake carburetor: fuel, choke and flip; but with some V2A
engines, a few steps make the initial startup
unique.
Focke-WulfFw-190ARC
3
35
Focke-Wulf Fw-190 ARF
3
35
School Boy ARF
3
50
Super Sports Trainer ARF (SST-09)
3
35
The Cox reed valve engines such as the
Pee Wee .020, the Black Widow .049, the
Babe Bee .049 and the Killer Bee .049 are a
little different! For these engines, you must
install a 6x3 prop, close the needle valve,
open it three turns, prime it with a drop or
two of fuel through the exhaust ports, connect the glow plug and use the spring starter
in the front of the engine to flip the prop. By
design, reed-valve engines can run in either
direction with ease, and the spring makes it
easy for them to start in the right direction.
These engines start almost automatically;
once they have started, you simply adjust the
needle as with any glow engine.
|. 34
HACKER
i
Funny ARF
2or3
Mantis ARF
3
41
OspreyX-28GARF
4
43.2
TL-96 ARF
2or3
43.1
23.e
* HERR ENGINEERING
Aqua Star
2or3
40.E
AT-6 Texan
2 to 4
36
Cloud Ranger
3
42
Cloud Ranger
4
42
P-51 Mustang
4
42
Piper Cherokee
2or3
42
Piper J-3 Cub
2or3
48
Pitts Special
4
30
Star-Cruiser
2or3
42
WING AREA
MIN. WEIGHT
WING LOADING ENGINE RANGE
(SQ. IN.)
(OZ.)
(OZ./SQ. FT.)
(2-STROKE)
PRICE
NOTES
28
20
16.1
13.5
.049 to .09
$34.99
High-wing trainer; box fuselage with foam wing
.049 to .074
$34.99
High wing with stick tail boom; box fuselage with foam wing
23
8.3
GP.07
$199.99
High wing; built-up balsa structure; covering included; available combo with Thunder Tiger GP-07
16
12.8
.049 to .074
$24.99
Slab side, foam wing, sheet balsa tail
20
15.3
.049 to .074
$34.99
Semi-scale; foam wing, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
20
15.3
.049 to .074
$34.99
Semi-scale; foam wing, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
20
15.2
.049 to .074
$34.99
Semi-scale; foam wing, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
16
12.7
.049 to .074
$34.99
Semi-scale; foam wing, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
Semi-scale; foam wing, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
16
12.7
.049 to .074
$34.99
16
12.7
.049 to .074
$34.99
Semi-scale; foam wing, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
28
10.2
.10 to .20
$44.99
Semi-scale biplane; foam wings, sheet balsa fuselage and tail
24
16.9
.049 to .07
$34.99
High-wing trainer; box fuselage with foam wing
15
4.1
.049 to. 15
$59.99
High-wing; built up from pre-cut balsa and ply; shock-absorbing gear
16
3.6
.049 to .15
$64.99
Same as Lazy Bee, with 8-inch center wing section extension
15
4.1
.049 to. 15
$69.99
High wing; built up from pre-cut balsa and ply; ailerons; shock-absorbing gear
16
3.6
.049 to .15
$79.99
Same as Lazy Bee Special, with 8-inch center wing section extension
28
7.7
.09 to .25
$79.99
Mid-wing; built up from pre-cut balsa and ply; shock-absorbing gear
18
5.5
.061 to .20
$84.99
Biplane; built up from pre-cut balsa and ply; shock-absorbing gear
10.4
3.4
.061 to .074
$74.99
Internal ducted propeller-no fan unit required; built-up balsa and ply; drop-off gear
9
4.8
.010 to .10
$49.99
High-wing; built up from pre-cut balsa and ply; clear Mylar covering and wheels included
24
6.0
.049
$39.99
Powered glider trainer; all balsa construction
18
24
7.7
11.7
.049 to .061
$34.95
Powered glider; built up from laser-cut balsa and ply; combos with Norvel engines available
.049 to .061
$67.95
High-wing aerobat; built up from laser-cut balsa and ply; combos with Noivel engines available
25
12.2
.061 to .074
$48.95
High-wing aileron trainer; built up from laser-cut balsa and ply
22
11.6
.061
$39.95
Low-wing intermediate; built up laser-cut balsa and ply; combo with Norvel .061 engine available
22
14.4
.09 to .15
$84.99
Semi-scale; prebuilt wood structure; painted fiberglass cowl and canopy included
22
14.4
.09 to .15
$99.99
Semi-scale; prebuilt wood structure; camo covering, painted fiberglass cowl and canopy included
30
13.3
.09 to .15
$84.99
High-wing trainer; box fuselage; all-balsa structure; pre-covered; combos with AP Hornet engines availabl
25.6
13.7
.074 to. 15
$89.99
High-wing trainer; all-balsa construction; factory-applied covering; combo with AP Hornet .09 engine available
High-performance biplane; factory-applied covering
17.6
13.1
.049 to .061
$79.99
22
TK
.049 to .09
$149.9
Low-wing aerobat; fully assembled balsa and ply structure covered in Easycoat film
23
10.4
.061 to .09
$244.9
Aerobatic seaplane with ailerons; one-piece fiberglass fuselage; balsa wing and tail covered in Easycoat film
14.1
7.3
.061 to .10
$109.9
Semi-scale low-wing; one-piece fiberglass fuselage; balsa wing and tail covered in Easycoat film
19
11.2
.049 to .061
$68.95
Seaplane; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction
19
14.4
.049 to .061
$63.95
Sport scale; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction; removable landing gear
16.5
8.0
.049 to .061
$76.95
High-wing sport model; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction; less than 1 hour construction time
16.5
7.3
.049 to .061
$76.95
Same as above, with ailerons
22
10.5
.049 to .074
$99.95
Sport scalfi; laser-cut wood parts; tan and nntr.h construction; accessories included
19
9.3
.049 to .061
$84.95
Sport scale; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction; accessories included
20
8.8
.049 to .061
$85.95
Sport scale; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction; accessories included
26
12.4
.074 to .15
$99.95
Sport scale biplane; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction; accessories included
17
9.2
.049 to .061
$88.95
High-wing trainer; laser-cut wood parts; tab and notch construction; steerable nose gear
S P E C I F I
1 /2A TD Z
1 a N
NO. OF
CHANNELS
WING
(IN.)
Mini Edge 540
2 to 4
32
Mini Sukhoi
2 to 4
34
1/2 A Stealth Sport
2
32
Bonanza
2 to 4
36
Chipmunk
2 to 4
36
Extra 300L Profile
2 to 4
36
Floatplane .10
4
45.5
FW190A
2 to 4
36
J-3 Cub
2or3
52.5
Laser Stick .10
2 to 4
45.5
Me-109E
2to4
36
P47 Thunderbolt
2 to 4
36
P-51 D Mustang
2 to 4
36
MODEL
* HOBBY HANGAR
* HOUSE OF BALSA
Hen Engineering
AT-6 Texan; $63.95.
P-51 D Mustang Profile
2 to 4
36
Spacewalker.10
2 to 4
47
Sukhoi SU-31
2 to 4
36
Super Decathlon .10
2 to 4
47
Pocket Planes P51 Mustang
2 or 3
26
T-52 Trainer
2 to 4
* JK AEROTECH
* LANIER RC
kA Shrike
Dominator200
Indicator
Stinger 10
JK Aerotech T-52 Trainer ARF; $116.90, including Norvel engine.
2or3
4
2
4
*NORVEL
GlassAir 400
2or3
GlassAir SeaEasy ARF
4
Neofun Classic ARF
2 or 3
Neofun UCAN-2 ARF ;
3or4
Neofun Vision ARF
2or3
• PECK-POLYMERS
Prairie Bird
2or3
• SIG MFG.
The Global School Boy
ARF ($84.99) is typical of
V2A, almost-ready-to-fly
models. It is fully covered,
and most of the major
assembly is complete,
right out of the box.
32 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Hummer
2
R/C Rascal
3
Wonder
2or3
49
'ING AREA
MIN. WEIGHT
WING LOADING
ENGINE RANGE
>Q. IN.)
(OZ.)
(OZ./SQ. FT.)
(2-STROKE)
PRICE
NOTES
19
13.3
.061 to. 10
11.8
.061 to .10
$44.99
$41.99
Semi-scale aerobat; built-up wood construction
20
18
10.3
.049
$34.95
Twin tail boom sport model; balsa and ply construction
22
14.7
.051 to .10
$59.95
Standoff scale; balsa and ply construction; formed plastic fuselage top and cowl
22
14.7
.051 to .10
$59.95
Standoff scale; balsa and ply construction; formed plastic fuselage top and cowl
22
11.4
.061 to. 12
$54.95
Profile fuselage aerobat; laser-cut balsa and ply, Du-Bro hardware included
32
14.5
.09 to. 12
$59.95
Sport floatplane; laser-cut balsa and ply construction
22
14.7
.051 to .10
$59.95
Standoff scale; balsa and ply construction; formed plastic fuselage top and cowl
24
9.9
.049 to .074
$49.95
Semi-scale trainer; balsa and ply construction; pre-formed aluminum gear; sheeted fuselage and tail
30
13.6
.047 to. 12
$44.95
High-wing trainer; balsa and ply construction; pre-formed aluminum gear
22
14.7
.051 to .10
$59.95
Standoff scale; balsa and ply construction; formed plastic fuselage top and cowl
22
14.7
.051 to .10
$59.95
Standoff scale; balsa and ply construction; formed plastic fuselage top and cowl
22
14.7
.051 to. 10
$59.95
Standoff scale; balsa and ply construction; formed plastic fuselage top and cowl
22
11.4
.061 to .12
$54.95
Profile fuselage warbird; laser-cut balsa and ply, Du-Bro hardware included
28
12.3
.074 to .12
$59.95
Semi-scale aerobat; balsa and ply construction; pre-formed aluminum gear
22
11.4
.061 to .12
$59.95
Profile fuselage aerobat; laser-cut balsa and ply, Du-Bro hardware included
24
10.5
.061 to .12
$59.95
Semi-scale high-wing sport model; laser-cut balsa and ply; pre-formed aluminum gear
11
10.8
.049 to .061
$30
22
8.4
.049 to .09
$116.9
$116.90
Pink foam construction; includes colored tape covering, Norvel .061 engine, mount, props and hardware
14
12.4
.049 to .061
$22.99
Sport delta wing; all laser-cut balsa construction; tabbed rib wing construction
12
8.3
.049 to .061
$34.99
High-wing sport model; box fuselage with built-up wing; all laser-cut balsa construction
19
8.7
.049 to .051
$34.99
High-wing trainer; all laser-cut balsa construction; tabbed rib wing construction
29
15.5
.09 to .15
$34.99
Sport-scale aerobat; built-up wood fuselage; partially sheeted foam wing; includes aluminum gear and plastic cowl
22
7
.049 to .061
$99.99
Powered glider; fiberglass fuselage; factory painted and covered; combo available w/BigMig Sport .061 engine
23
10.2
.061 to .074
$149.99
Sport seaplane; fiberglass fuselage; factory painted and covered; combo available w/BigMig Sport .074 engine
24
13
.049 to .061
$74.99
High-wing trainer; factory covered and 90-percent assembled; several combos w/Norvel engines available
24
13
.049 to .074
$79.99
Low-wing sport model; factory covered and mostly assembled; combos with Norvel engines available
24
13
.049 to .061
$74.99
High-wing trainer; factory covered and 90-percent assembled; several combos w/Norvel engines available
30
10.2
.049 to .15
$46.99
.049 to .051
$44.95
.049 to .07
$79.95
High-wing vintage-style sport model; laser-cut balsa and ply construction; molded wheel pants
.09 to .19
$37.99
Aerobatic sport model; balsa and plywood construction; several combos w/Norvel engines available
Pink foam construction; includes colored tape covering; combo with Norvel .061 engine available
High-wing trainer; pre-cut all-wood structure
Low-wing sport model; balsa and ply construction; formed aluminum gear; aileron and elevator control
Lanier 1/2A
Shrike; $22.99.
Several */2A models,
such as this Clancy
Aviation Stagger Bee
($84.99), come with
provisions for both
ViA and electric
power. Even if not
specifically designed
for it, models can be
easily converted from
one type of power
system to the other.
JUNE 2DD2
33
1 /2A TD Z
SOURCE
GUIDE
Ace Hobby Distributors,
2682 Walnut Ave., Tustin, CA
92780; (714) 544-0633;
www.acehobby.com.
Herr Engineering
Aqua Star; $68.95.
AP Engines; distributed by
Global Hobby Distributors.
Clancy Aviation; distributed
by Global Hobby Distributors.
Cox Engines, a division of
Estes Rockets;
www.estesrockets.com.
Hacker Mantis ARF;
$149.99.
Fuji; distributed by RJL
Industries USA, P.O. Box 5,
Sierra Madre, CA 91025; (626)
359-0016; fax (626) 3010298; www.mecoa.com.
Global Hobby Distributors,
18480 Bandilier Cir., Fountain
Valley, CA 92708; (714) 9630133; fax (714) 962-6452;
www.globalhobby.com.
Hacker; distributed by
Sig Mfg. Co.
Herr Engineering; distributed
by Sig Mfg. Co.
Hobby Hangar, 7715
Industrial St., W. Melbourne,
FL 32904; (321) 727-8227;
www. hobbyhangar. com.
House of Balsa, 10101 Yucca
Rd., Adelanto, CA 92301;
(760) 246-6462; fax (760)
246-8769;
www.houseofbalsa.com.
Hacker Osprey
X28-G; $244.99.
JKAerotech, 10800 S.E.
Orient Dr., Boring, OR 97009;
(503) 663-4081;
www.jkaerotech.com.
SULLIVAN SAVES THE DAY FOR 1/2A
Sullivan has been a reputable name in the hobby business for over half a
century, and it has provided tools and accessories that have contributed
in one way or another to the operation of just about every type of model
airplane flying today! Two of its most recent products fill a definite need
for the V2A community: small silicone tubing for V2A engines and a Glow
Plug Igniter Adapter that matches the popular igniters to the Norvel and
Cox engines.
The operation of the Glow Plug Igniter Adapter couldn't be simpler or
more reliable; the connection to the plug is a spring-loaded clip that conforms to engines of
any size and stays
. .. ..
connected to the
With Sullivan 1/2A fuel tubing, you
never have to worry about
your fuel line slipping off
the inlet fitting. Price: $1.89.
34
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
LanierRC, P.O. Box 458,
Oakwood, GA 30566; (770)
532-6401; fax (770) 5322163; www.lanierrc.com.
Norvel; distributed by Sig Mfg.
Peck-Polymers, P.O. Box
710399, Santee, CA 92072;
(619) 448-1818; (619)
448-1833; www
.peck-polymers.com.
The Sullivan Glow Plug Igniter Adapter
makes it a cinch to start any X/2A
engine with your existing plug igniter.
Justplug
plugone
one end
end into
into your
your igniter
Just
and
and clip
clip the
the other
other end
end onto
onto your
your glow
glow
plug.
plug. Price:
Price: $7.95.
engine until you
remove it. The other
end of the adapter is a plug that locks into the igniter, essentially converting it into the battery supply for the spring clip. The adapter is practically foolproof and costs just $7.95.
The fuel tubing costs only $1.89 and ends the struggle to find tubing
that has a less than %2-inch inside diameter. Thank you, Sullivan! +
Sig Mfg. Co. Inc., P.O. Box
520, Montezuma, IA 50171;
(800) 247-5008; (515) 6235154; fax (515) 623-3922;
www. sigmfg. com.
Sullivan Products, One
North Haven St., Baltimore,
MD 21224; (410) 732-3500;
fax (410) 327-7443;
www.sullivanproducts.com.
Thunder Tiger; distributed by
Ace Hobby Distributors.
'by Rich
Uravitch
4
O
K; it's the end of February, and you're looking for a warm place to go
before the temperature starts to rise in your hometown. That you are an
avid RC modeler who wants to broaden your horizons to include jet modeling makes the decision a no-brainer—Florida Jets. Once again, the site for this
premier jet event was the Flagler County airport, about five minutes west of
Interstate 95 in Bunnell, FL.
I arrived early Friday morning to see cloudy, drizzly skies, and this was as nice
as It got for the next 48 hours, i watched about a dozen flights through the mist
before I called it quits, hoping for better weather the next day. Unfortunately,
it only worsened; no one got airborne
Saturday because of the deluge of rain
and gusty winds.
But as if to offer a reprieve, Sunday
opened with chilly but sunny skies and
minimal wind nearly down the centerline-a dramatic difference from the
previous two days.
FLYING TIME
A few aircraft always stand out in your
mind as exceptional in performance,
appearance, creativity, or just plain talent. Dave Malchione's big, orange, NMC-marked F-4 Phantom remains a
crowd-pleaser. When he touched down on the numbers in a perfect attitude, all
that was missing were the blue/gray puffs of smoke from the tires!
As is usually the case at jet events, the majority of the models were from the
Bob Violett Models (BVM) product line; there's no question that BVM has captured the lion's share of the jet market. The newest scale machine from the
BVM jet house is the F-1OOF Super Sabre. It has all the appeal of Bob's "D"
model, and he reports that it flies even more smoothly. Watching it fly is aweinspiring. Even with all the external features such as Bull Pups, Mk.82s and
other goodies, it really cooks. What Bob has not yet managed to capture is the
sound of his "D" model; if you've heard it, you know what I mean. It's magical! Bob confided that he has actually tried switching some external things
around trying to determine what is producing that fabulous noise. I sure hope
he finds it!
36
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
This is John Christensen with his smartlooking L-1O11, built from the PCM Models
kit The ATA livery was beautifully executed.
One of two Kerry
Sterner-designed
Rutan ARES at the
meet, Jay
Smullen's model
featured a matte
black color
scheme like the
full-scale version
seen In the movie
"Iron Eagle II."
This Malchione F-4J Rhino from the BVM kit Is a
Florida Jets veteran and continues to be
Impressive—not to mention highly visible!
Marc Frohm of Germany built this amazing
JetCat-powered Euroflghter from a
FiberClassics kit His demo flights mirrored
full scale—In close, with a wide speed
envelope.
Gustavo Campana brought his Impressive L-159 all the way from Argentina.
In nearly any size, this Jet flies extremely well and can be finished In a
variety of paint schemes for the scale enthusiast.
PHOTOS BY RICH URAVITCH
Here Is one of the
Kramer boys' BVM
Bandits; both are
outstanding, with
flawless finishes
performance to
match.
Here's one of Jerry Keller's two large Hawker
Hunters on Its final approach. It's powered by an
AMT turbine engine and weighs 32 pounds.
The Dassault Falcon 10 is an unusual subject, but it was very well
executed. Scratch-built by Tim Davis of nearby Jacksonville, FL, this
aircraft is powered by a pair of RAM 500s. Unfortunately, it had
mechanical problems and didn't fly at the meet.
IAL ACHI
Award
Recipient
Model
Designer Achievement
Kerry Sterner
ARES
Manufacturer Achievement
SimJet
700 turbine
Best Sport Jet Performance
Jason Somes
Hot Spot
Best Military Performance
Stephan Voelker
L-39
Best Military Pre-1960
Sam Snyder
MiG-15
Best Military Post-1960
Bob Violett
F-100F
Best Sport Jet
.JBfiife
Best Civilian Jet
Best Ducted Fan
s
Larry Kramer
Bandit
John Christensen
L-1011
Glenn Roberts
Viper
Best Multi-performance
Jack Diaz
Rafale
Engineering Excellence
Eddie Weeks
The Rig
Critics Choice
Bob Violett
F-100F
Critics Choice (runner-up)
Gustavo Campana
L-159
38 MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Eddie Weeks, who in years past has shown up with a pair of giant
DC-lOs carved from foam and powered by two turbines each, treated
us this year to an air vehicle simply called "The Rig." It's a 33pound, turbine-powered AT450 vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)
model. It uses electric motors with props at the extremities for stabilization. Although I didn't see it, sources tell me that it actually does
VTOL and hover nicely. Eddie's model is very innovative and is the
kind of thing we've come to expect from him. I've no doubt that
other projects like this are lurking in the wings; it surely is an exciting time for jet modelers!
Among the standouts in flight performance was Stephan Voelker
flying a large-scale Czech Albatross L-39. This guy is a World Jet
champ, and it shows. His flying routine kept the model in close and
was very impressive, not unlike full-scale aerobatic demos seen at
the Paris Air Show and Farnborough.
Ali Machinchy was equally proficient at driving Alan Cardash's
Big Boomerang around the patch. This P120-powered machine was
absolutely amazing to watch as it routinely performed 15-foot takeoffs and 50-foot full-stop landings. What occurred between those
two events was unbelievable; picture an IMAC event with 40 percent Extras and CAPs doing their routines. Ali made the same
ith this yVi-foot-span sport jet! It's
capable of rolling circles, tail slides
Sponsor
and inside and outside snaps, plus it
has unmatched slow-flight qualities.
Bob Violett Models
On a more conventional sport-jet
Model Airplane News
note, Jason Somes borrowed Bob
JetCat USA
Wilcox's Hot Spot—and probably a
Malcom Kay Models
huge quantity of JP-4—and proceeded
to fly almost all day. Even on Friday,
R.A. Microjets
with a lot of overcast, the Hot Spot
Airtronics
could be seen flat spinning slowly
SWB Turbines
~
down from just below the cloud
Frank Tiano Enterprises
deck; then, it stabilized and accelerated to some of the lowest passes
H SimJet
I've ever seen.
PCM Models
Marc Frohm's Eurofighter from the
AMT USA
FiberClassics kit showed its wide
Zap/Model Airplane News
speed envelope with everything
from remarkable high-G maneuvers
Zap/Model Airplane News
FLORIDA JETS
Mk.ls, which performed beautifully. The detailing was
superb, the finish was excellent and the flight speed was
just right; further proof that larger models, both sport
and scale, are becoming more popular.
Large, unorthodox and slippery-looking was the Rutan
ARES designed and developed by Kerry Sterner. This
Simjet 2300-powered model weighs just under 24
pounds and was one of two present; the other, by Jay
Smullen, was finished in matte black as it was in the
movie "Iron Eagle II." Since it has been around eight
years and has more than 150 flights, Kerry decided to
retire the prototype, but word is that it might be
released as a kit in the future.
CHANGING TIMES
This giant sport jet was
designed by Alan
Cardash and impressively
flown by Ali Machinchy.
The "Big Boomerang"
demonstrated IMAC-type
routines.
to an almost stopped, high Alpha slow-flight demo that was amazing to watch. All of this was performed within a small area and
below the low overcast deck.
Florida Jets is now in its sixth year, and this was the
third time I attended. All I can say is that the turbine
revolution that began three or four years ago is no longer a revolution, but the norm in jet circles; so much so that I only saw
three ducted-fan models fly all weekend. This year, a variety of
engine manufacturers and importers were represented, including
RAM, JetCat, AMT, Simjet and SWB.
The introduction of the new, smaller turbines offers some great
opportunities for modelers who want to become involved in jets.
A lot of former ducted-fan fliers are letting their models go for very
attractive prices because they want to "step up" to the larger turbines. But ducted-fan models' airframes are ideal for installing the
new generation of smaller, 11- to 12-pound-thrust turbines.
VISUAL TREATS
Attendees of this event were also treated to a number of models that
were appealing from a purely visual standpoint, either because of
the subject itself or the unique way it was presented. Some of the
prettiest sport jets you can imagine were on hand, and it was clear
that these guys were more than willing to trade scale detailing time
for paint application and preparation hours. Typifying the breed
were the BVM Bandits by Vern and Larry Kramer, impeccably done
in "Red Baron" and "Miss Budweiser" schemes. Larry's "Red Baron"
has more than 325 flights on it, and it still looks better than many
newly finished models. The
finishes on some of these
jets were absolutely flawless,
and the color schemes were
exciting, dramatic, highly
visible and, in some cases,
practically works of art.
Pat McCurry's (PCM
Models) new AV8TR turbine trainer might just be
the entry point for turbine
beginners. It features allwood, simple construction
and fixed gear. Pat's prototype was even MonoKotecovered. Although it didn't
fly at the meet, I was told it
flies well and might end up
being the Ugly Stik of the
jet movement!
Erich Himmler and
Viktor Casut, both from
Switzerland, fielded a pair
of gorgeous D.H. Venom
4O
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Above: Eric Rantet from France designed this Aviation Design F-16, and
Gustavo Campana finished It In the unique European "Tiger Meet"
markings. Below: the F-100F Is the newest model from the BVM factory.
If you think this Hun two-holer looks good, you ought to see ft ttyl
k . • -, 'vS3
i *
6
Erich Hlmmler's D.H. Venom was one of
two at the meet. It has a beautifully executed finish and wonderful surface detail.
Sport Jets such as Mitch Wess's BVNI Bandit wore some spectacular finishes—flawless and very colorful.
Walking through the vendors' display area, I was amazed by just
how far this segment of the hobby has come in a remarkably short
time. Manufacturers provided all kinds of information and performed quite impressive demos. With turbine operation, you can
forget about all that needle-valve adjustment, tuned-pipe length,
glow fuel and such; now, you simply hook up a couple of quick disconnect lines for fuel and ignition, hit the start button, and everything happens automatically through the miracle of computer chippery. It's that simple!
THE FUTURE
A number of facts jumped out at me as I thought back over this
year's event. The first is that scale airplanes continue to get larger.
The Aviation Design Su-27 and L-39
Albatross as well as the FiberClassics
Eurofighter offer clear evidence of this
trend. The reason is easy to understand:
bigger models fly better, and now, more
than adequate power is available. Also,
more "off-the-shelf" component availability is making a greater number of jet
This may be the Ugly Stik of the turbine world. Pat McCurry's prototype
AV8TR, all-wood kit is simple to build, and turbine installation is a snap.
It's also finished in MonoKote. What could be easier?
The colorful Su-27 Flanker from the Aviation Design kit is large, impressive and flies extremely well.
42
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
subjects "model-able." Did you ever think you'd see a 9-foot, largely
composite A-10 or A-37? Well, they're here! Given the fact that the
jet guys are among the most creative in the RC hobby, it stands to
reason that we are seeing—and will continue to see—some really
exciting stuff.
We've now reached a point where turbine operation can be considered nearly routine. This was proven when Jeff Seymour of SWB
Turbines walked me through the auto-start procedure for SWB's
new Mamba turbojet engine. This is clearly a one-button operation!
Throttle response is impressive, with transition from idle to maximum power coming in about three to four seconds. This little beauty is one of the newest generation of units; it measures 3.5 inches in
diameter and produces up to 11 pounds of static thrust. It's just the
ticket for the smaller airframes formerly propelled by the ducted-fan units.
So, where does jet modeling go from here?
Good question. It's already becoming more
highly specialized than it was before turbines. We've seen turbine prices come down,
the variety of available kits expanded, and
more modelers get involved. From a technical standpoint, we'll likely see more autoThis is Bob Violett's
start systems, even more availability of pre"personal" F-4J
fabricated, composite airframes, and equipmodel. It's finished
in Blue Angels markment upgraded to the point at which what
ings and is equipped
we're flying will really become remotely
with a smoke syspiloted vehicles (RPVs) and unmanned
tem. Here, it's just
aerial vehicles (UAVs).
about to touch down.
CONCLUSION
Anyone who has ever put together a club contest knows that the
key to a successful event is promotion and sponsorship. Someone
has to provide the prizes, awards, facilities, staffing and everything else. Florida Jets was top drawer all the way, with the lion's
share of the sponsorship coming from Model Airplane News, Zap,
BVM, RAM Turbines, Airtronics, Simjet, JetCat and SWB. The
facility was first class, and the contest administration was outstanding. To everyone who came from faraway places like
California, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, the UK, Switzerland and
Argentina, I applaud you; your participation made it happen.
I, for one, can't wait until next year's Florida Jets. 4-
Sig Mfg.
Somethin'
Extra ARF
he Somethin' Extra has been providing Sunday fliers with a whole lot of fun for quite some time. Since Sig
first introduced it in kit form, its good looks and outstanding flight performance have made it a favorite at RC
__ flying fields all over the world. Now you can get it into the air more quickly than ever. The almost-ready-to-fly
(ARF) Sig Somethin' Extra is the spitting image of its predecessor. It has the same strong, lightweight design and
flying capabilities of the original, but this one comes 90 percent built, right out of the box. The Somethin' Extra ARF
is expertly covered with Oracover and is offered in two color schemes: white and bright red and white and violet.
WHAT'S IN THE BOX?
ASSEMBLY
Like many of today's high-quality ARFs,
the Somethin' Extra comes with just
about everything you'll need to get flying except the radio, engine, prop, fuel
tubing and pilot figure—which is, of
course, optional. The major components
come built up and already covered. In
addition, the package includes colormatched fiberglass wheel pants, wheels,
sturdy aluminum landing gear, a clear
molded canopy, a fuel tank, an engine
mount, a spinner, tail-support wires and
a unique tube wing-mounting system. It
also comes with a complete hardware
package of high-quality parts and an 18page assembly manual filled with plenty
of photos, sketches and detailed assembly instructions. This is a first-class
package that's built to the high-quality
Before you begin assembly, cover your
workbench with an old blanket or foam
pads to prevent denting or scratching the
precovered parts. Remove any wrinkles in
the covering with a cloth-covered heat iron.
You can also use a hobby-type heat gun to
reshrink the covering, but you must be very
careful around any seams or color joints.
Reheating seams will cause them to "creep,"
and this can make them unsightly. This is
especially true with the Somethin' Extra's
trim scheme and pinstriping.
Sig kits.
44 MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
WING
Assemble the wing first. The two wing panels are practically ready to use. You have
only to install a servo in each panel, hinge
the ailerons and attach the control horns
and linkages. The CA-type hinges have a
die-cut center slot that, according to the
instructions, is supposed to be used to cen-
ter the hinge equally into both the wing
panel and the aileron. Here, I chose not to
follow the procedure presented in the manual because I felt that placing the hinges
with the slot parallel to the hinge line, as
instructed, would have left each with an
effective hinge width of only about M inch.
Instead, I oriented the hinges with the slot
perpendicular to the hinge line and used a
pin to center the hinge. This not only uses
the full width of the hinge but also allows
the Zap CA to wick along the slot and into
the wood.
The Somethin' Extra's plug-in wing panels
are a nice feature; you usually see them only
in much larger planes. This obviously eliminates the need to glue the wing halves together, and having the wing in two pieces makes
for easy transportation and storage. The wing
halves are slipped onto an 1/16-inch-diameter
aluminum tube and are held in place with a
no. 64 rubber band looped over J-hooks
SPECIFICATIONS
MODEL: Somethin' Extra ARF
MANUFACTURER: Sig Mfg. Co. Inc.
TYPE: aerobatic ARF
WIN6SPAN: 51.5 In.
WING AREA: 614 sq. in.
LENGTH: 48.25 in.
WEIGHT: 5 Ib., 7 oz..
WING LOADING: 20.4 oz./sq. ft.
ENGINE REQ'D: .40 to .46 2-stroke or
.56 to .65 4-stroke
ENGINE USED: Saito FA-56 Golden
Knight 4-stroke
FUEL USED: 15% Red Max
RADIO REQ'D: 4-channel w/5 servos
RADIO USED: JR XP8103 transmitter,
NER 549X receiver and five NES-537
servos
PROP USED: 11x7 Master Airscrew
STREET PRICE: $199.99
FEATURES: built-up balsa and lite-ply
construction; expertly covered with
Oracover; offered in two color schemes;
kit includes color-matched, painted
fiberglass wheel pants and all of the
necessary hardware; plug-in wing panels; formed aluminum landing gear.
COMMENTS: this well-thought-out
ARF is extremely user-friendly. The
Somethin' Extra ARF is the spitting
image of the kit version, and It flies
just as great.
HITS
Excellent flight performance.
Great overall appearance.
Ease of assembly.
Complete hardware package.
MISSES
Hinge installation is incorrect (see text).
threaded into the root ribs—simple and neat!
FUSELAGE
The fuselage comes with the removable
canopy hatch in place. To remove the
hatch, simply lift it up at the front and slide
it forward. The locating dowel pin has
already been installed in the rear of the
hatch. There are 17 small openings in the
fuselage that are covered and should be
opened with a no. 11 hobby-knife blade.
The instructions show where all the openings are. When that was complete, I test-fit
the wing to the fuselage and glued the
antirotation dowel into place.
Next, I prepared the fuselage to accept
the stab and fin by removing the spacer
blocks that protect the covered fillet blocks
at the rear of the fuselage. Since the covering material had already been removed
from the stab and fin in the areas to be
glued, it was easy to epoxy them into place.
Both the stab and have factory-prepared
holes for the tail braceOopened these with
a metal pick and installed the braces using
the provided hardware. After joining the
elevator halves with the prebent elevator
joiner wire, 1 hinged the elevator and rudder and attached them to the fuselage along
with the tailwheel.
1 added a Williams Bros. 256-inch civilian
pilot figure and attached the clear canopy
with the four screws and silicon washers
provided. The more I got into this project,
the more I realized just how much thought
went into making the Somethin' Extra userfriendly. Most of the holes had already been
drilled, including those that accept the four
special shouldered silicon washers that help
isolate the canopy from vibration. (Do not
drop these washers; 1 speak from experience
when I tell you that they are extremely difficult to find.)
Next, I attached the wheels and wheel
pan
bolted tne assemmy to tn
finish on the fiberglass wheel pants was
excellent; they matched the Oracover perfectly. Again, all the necessary hardware
was provided.
FUEL TANK AND ENGINE INSTALLATION
The installation of the fuel tank and engine
came next. I assembled the tank and
installed it in the fuselage. The shape of the
tank and the cutouts in the bulkheads
required that I insert the tank upside-down
and then rotate it into position. The
Somethin' Extra comes with a 4-piece
motor-mounting assembly, but I used only
the two beam pieces. I did not need the two
base pieces for the Saito FA-56 Golden
Knight 4-stroke that 1 chose to install. Other
engines may, however, require them.
I installed the Saito upright and fitted it
with an 11x7 Master Airscrew propeller.
JUNE2DD2
45
SIG MFG. SDMETHIN' EXTRA
The Somethin' Extra comes with a four-piece
motor mount, but the Saito FA-S6 only required
the use of the two beam pieces. I installed the
engine upright and then fitted it with a Master
Airscrew prop and a Tru-Turn spinner.
Though the kit includes a white plastic
spinner, I chose to use a 2 1/4-inch aluminum
Tru-Turn spinner instead.
RADIO INSTALLATION
I mounted three JR NKS-53 7 standard
servos on the factory-installed servo tray,
and using the hardware provided, made
up the rudder and elevator pushrods and
the throttle cable. The pushrod and
cable tubes were already installed in the
fuselage, as was an internal receiver
antenna tube, which exited the bottom
rear of the fuselage.
I wrapped the receiver in foam and
mounted it in front of the servos on the
servo tray. I then wrapped the receiver battery in foam and placed it beneath the servo
tray. The CG came out 3/d inches behind
the leading edge of the wing, as the instructions recommended. I centered the ailerons
hi
U
D
LL
Ld
EL
I
s
46
using the gauge provided, and following the
instructions, I set the high and low travel
amounts for all of the control surfaces. The
Somethin' Extra can be flown with a
4-channel radio and 5 servos, but I chose to
use an 8-channel JR computer radio so that
I could set up the ailerons on independent
channels and use them as flaperons. This
also provided me with elevator-flap mixing
for more aggressive maneuvers. Last, I
applied the "Somethin' Extra" decal to the
top of the left wing.
CONCLUSION
I found Sig's Somethin' Extra to be a wellmade ARF that went together easily and
had a pleasing appearance when completed.
The folks at Sig did a fine job on this one;
they incorporated a lot of little things that
make it very builder-friendly. I was eager to
check out the plane's flying characteristics,
and I was not disappointed. 1 liked everything about this one! ±
J
I installed all of the radio gear by following the
instructions, and the CG came out exactly as
recommended. The removable canopy hatch
comes already in place on the fuselage; removing it is simply a matter of sliding it forward at
the front and lifting it up.
The Sig Somethin' Extra comes nearly complete
and with everything you see here. Note the
excellent Oracover covering; it's also available
in a bright red and white color scheme.
Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105 Ficldstoiw Ril.,
Champaign, II. 61X22; (H(X» 338-4639;
fax (217) 355-1552; www.horiy.onliobby.com.
JR; distributed by Hori/.on Hobby Inc.
Master Airscrew; distributed by Windsor
Propeller Co., P.O. Box 250, Runcho Cordova,
CA 95741-0250; (916) 631-8385;
fax (916) 631-8386; www.niasterairscrew.com.
Red Max; a division ofl'HS Supply Inc.,
244 Bethel Hill Rd., P.O. Box 9, Clover, SC 29710;
(800) 742-8484; fax (803) 222-7285;
www.mcmbers.aol.com/l'HSoil/RedMax.html.
Saito; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
Sig Mfg. Co. Inc., P.O. Box 520, Montezunia,
1A 50171; (800) 247-5008; (515) 623-5154;
fax (515) 623-3922; wwwsigmfg.com.
Tru-Turn; distributed by Romeo Mfg.,
P.O. Box 836, South Houston, TX 77587; (713) 9431867; fax (713) 943-7630; www.tru-turn.com.
Williams Bros., 1119 Los Olivos Aw., Unit #3,
Los Osos, CA 93402; (805) 534-1307;
fax (805) 534-1366; www.williamsbrosinc.com.
Zap Glue, 9420 Santa Anita Ave., Rancho
Cucamongu, CA 91730; www.zapglue.com.
Before the first flight, I set the control settings at the low rates
specified in the instructions, and after checking out the controls, I
ran a full tank of fuel through the new Saito engine. I then taxied
around a bit to see how the Somethin' Extra handles on the
ground, and there were no problems; control is positive on the
ground with no bad habits and no tendency to nose over.
TAKEOFF AND LANDING
I turned the Somethin' Extra directly into the wind and advanced
the throttle smoothly. It takes off in very little space and gains
altitude quickly. With just a touch of down-trim, the Somethin'
Extra flies straight and level.
Landing the Somethin' Extra is also super easy. Without
using the flaperons, approach the end of the runway with a little
power on the engine to maintain a moderate speed and simply
fly the model right down to flare height for smooth wheel landings. Using the flaperons will produce similar results but at a
much slower speed and with significantly more accuracy.
HIGH-SPEED PERFORMANCE
Powered with the Saito FA-56 engine, the Somethin' Extra flies at a
respectable speed, but it isn't a bullet. It tracks well at all speeds
with no tendency to tip-stall. The Somethin' Extra's high-speed flight
characteristics can best be described as smooth and predictable.
LOW-SPEED PERFORMANCE
The plane flies safely at low speed without much reduction in control response. To stall it, the Somethin' Extra has to be slowed
almost to a stop. Obviously, you always want to take your plane to a
safe altitude before you check its stall characteristics because every
model behaves differently. The thickness of the Somethin' Extra's
wing allows it to slow way down as long as you have power but
does not allow it to penetrate very well in high-wind, dead-stick conditions. If the engine quits, get the nose down and the speed up.
AEROBATICS
At low rate, the Somethin' Extra is as sedate as a trainer, but
when I switch it to high rate, it's an altogether different airplane.
This plane will perform maneuvers that are not even named yet.
Its roll rate is almost too fast to count, and its snap rolls are
crisp and nearly violent. It enters upright or inverted spins easily,
and recovery is instantaneous when the controls are released. It
will knife-edge forever and does a tumbling act that's hard to
describe. I really have a blast flying this one!
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Arizona Model Aircrafters
by David Johnson
n the past few years, there
has been a tremendous
resurgence of interest in
WW I aircraft. The Fokker
tripiane is among the most popular and recognizable aircraft of
that era. The plane is most closely
associated with WW I's leading
ace, Manfred von Richthofen—"The
Red Baron." In speaking with spectators at various events, I've found that
most modelers would love to own a WW I
model, but many believe they are too much work. The
Arizona Model Aircrafters' Fokker Dr.l is your chance to
own a red tripiane just like Richthofen's, with a mini-
WW I three-wing ARF
mum of fuss.
WINGSPAN: 62 in.
LENGTH: 44% in.
WEIGHT: 6 1b.
I- _
WING AREA: 1,248 sq. in.
- WING LOADING: 11.1
Vsq.ft.
GINE REQ'D: .46 to
.56 4-stroke
1
ENGINE USED: O.S. .52
4-stroke
|
MODEL: Fokker Dr.l
48
,
PROP USED: Zinger 14x4
'; RADIO REQ'D: 4 channel
w/5 servos (ailerons,
dder, throttle and elevator)
TYPE: Vs-scale fighter ARF
RADIO USED: JR
MANUFACTURER: Arizona Model Aircrafters
FUEL USED: Ritch's Brew 15% nltro
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
PRICE: $279 (basic ARF kit); $65 (optional
scale detail package).
FEATURES: almost-ready-to-fly; fabriccovered; painted fiberglass cowl; complete
hardware package; vinyl decals; includes
wheels, guns and dummy engine.
COMMENTS: this plane flies really nicely. It
has a reasonable scale appearance, and it
goes together easily.
HITS
• Good appearance.
• Excellent flight performance.
• Can be assembled very quickly.
MISSES
• Main landing gear not shock absorbent.
• Vague radio-installation instructions.
LJ
o
Li.
Li
EL
h
I set the elevators to have 1 inch of travel in each direction and the
ailerons to have 3/4-inch travel. I gave the rudder as much throw as I
could without its binding. These exceeded the manufacturer's recommendations, but I like authoritative control of the airplane.
the plane remains relatively straight, with only a slight drop in the
right wings. With the application of a little power, it easily recovers. Walking-speed figure-8s at head level just over the runway are
very enjoyable to fly; no drama is involved.
TAKEOFF AND LANDING
On takeoff, I point the nose down the runway while holding some
up-elevator to keep the tail down. I roll the throttle open and gradually let out the up-elevator. By the time I get to 3/4 throttle, the
plane is flying! On its first flight, it required only a few clicks of
down and left trim.
The Fokker Dr.l proved to be equally uneventful when landing. The
only difficult part is getting it to come down. Three-point and wheeled
landings are equally easy; just stay on the rudder during rollout.
HIGH-SPEED PERFORMANCE
The O.S. .52 4-stroke engine does not really provide this triplane
with significant high-speed abilities. Full throttle increases the
climb rate more than anything else. The plane displays no bad
habits at maximum power.
LOW-SPEED PERFORMANCE
This is where the triplane really shines! It remains smooth and
responsive all the way down to stall. When the stall finally comes,
AEROBATICS
The triplane will never be confused with an I MAC plane, but it will
perform any maneuver the original could. Loops, rolls and split-S's
are all well within its capabilities. My personal favorite is a skidding, flat turn; it can be accomplished within a 10-foot diameter.
The full-size plane used this maneuver to great advantage during
dogfights. Overall, this plane is a blast to fly.
JUNE 2DO2
49
a^ssjy
WHAT DO YOU GET?
When I opened the box, I found a nicely
fabric-covered, sport-scale Fokker Dr.l.
When I looked through the contents of
the box, I found that it included the
plane, a dummy engine kit, machine
guns, a painted fiberglass cowl, vinyl
decals and a very complete-looking set of
hardware. I could no longer control my
enthusiasm, so I got busy at once! Within
40 minutes of opening the box, I had an
assembled triplane sitting on its wheels.
ASSEMBLY
To make sure I got it right, I began by
reading the included instructions. As 1
stated before, there really is not a tremendous amount of work involved in getting
this plane ready to fly. I began by hinging
and installing the ailerons and elevators.
The hinges were among the few parts not
included in the package. I chose to use
medium Robart hinge points.
The kit includes all of the necessary linkages to
assemble the control system. I devised my own
method of hooking up the elevator-control surfaces.
The Fokker comes with some cable for a pull/pull
control system on the rudder, but I elected to use
Nyrod instead.
5O
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
The triplane's wings
all come in one piece
and can be easily
attached with the supplied metal bolts. The
cabane struts and interplane struts are also
formed and ready to bolt
into place with small
L-brackets and screws.
The landing-gear wire is
already bent to shape; all
you have to do is insert
the wires into the
mounting slots in the
bottom of the fuselage
and into the sub-wing fairing between the
wheels and then secure them with the
supplied straps and screws.
The instruction sheet was a bit unclear
about how to install the tailskid; it simply
said to install the tailskid and spring with
the supplied bungee. A quick call to the
folks at Arizona Model Aircrafters
cleared everything up. The tailskid
should be installed with the supplied
angle brackets and screws. Next, attach
the hooks to either side of the fuselage
and then attach the spring to the skid
by running the bungee through it and
looping it around the hooks. Arizona
Model Aircrafters did inform me that I
had received an early version of the
model and that the directions have
since been modified.
ENGINE INSTALLATION
This is the only part of the assembly
that might be difficult for a beginner. I
elected to use an O.S. .52 4-stroke
engine in my plane. Because this is a
The Fokker
was designed
for both electric and glow
power;
I chose to
install this O.S.
.52 4-stroke.
The size of the
plane and the
number of
wings may
tempt you to
install a larger
engine. Resist
the urge!
good-size plane with a lot of wings, it took
a great deal of willpower to resist the urge
to install something larger. I suggest that
you also resist this urge.
The plane is designed for either electric
or glow power, but glow fliers will need to
slightly modify the model. You must
enlarge the hole in the firewall so that the
4-stroke carburetor can extend back
through the firewall—a requirement if the
engine is to fit inside the cowl. Laminate
the two '/4-inch plywood engine mounts
together. While they set, enlarge the center hole of the cowl to fit your engine and
mount the cowl on the plane.
Next, set the fuselage upside-down,
tape the engine mount into place and
mark the exact location of the engine on
the mount. Drill your mount holes, attach
the engine to the mount and then epoxy
the mount/engine assembly into place,
making sure to center the engine's crankshaft in the cowl hole. It actually sounds
more complicated than it is.
At this time, I modified the plane to
FDKKER DR.1
COMPANY
PORTLAND
OREGON
THE GLIDERS THAT
HELPED WIN WWII
ARE BACK1.
assist in the balancing
process. I made a plywood tray and set it in
front of the firewall over
the engine. This allowed
me to place my receiver
as far forward as the cowl
would allow. Last, I boxed
in the carburetor with the
supplied pieces. Don't forget to fuelproof these
areas.
The dummy engine
goes together quickly and
easily with the provided The Fokker Triplane comes complete with these
laser-cut parts. I assem- added realism. This is a really nice scale touch!
bled the machine guns as directed.
machine guns for
RADIO INSTALLATION
AMERICAN JUNIOR
READY TO F l y
GlfDERS NOW
AVAILABLE!
I elected to install a JR radio in my triplane. I began with the installation of the
aileron servos. The model came with all of
the necessary linkages. The thoughtful
folks at Arizona even inserted strings to
help pull the leads through. The only
problem I had was that a standard-size
servo didn't seat flush with the wing. I
recommend that you install a mini or a
low-profile servo.
1 next installed the throttle, elevator
and rudder servos immediately behind
the firewall and over the 8-ounce fuel
tank (not included). The kit includes dowels to make the pushrods. The directions
were unclear about how to hook up the
surfaces, so I decided to take the provided
dowel and attach two pieces of the
included threaded rod to one end with
some CA and thread. I then spread the
threaded rod to make a "V." Next, I cut
slots in the rear of the fuselage to correspond with the length of the elevator
horns. 1 then inserted the V-rod through
the fuselage and attached it to the elevator horns with the provided clevises. Last,
I attached the dowel to the elevator servo
using another piece of the provided rod.
The kit includes some cable for a
pull/pull control system on the rudder,
but I elected to use Nyrod instead. I used
the cable and its sleeve to attach the
throttle. After I installed the battery and
receiver on the tray I made in the cowl
area, the model was complete; best of all,
it balanced without any added nose
weight.
CONCLUSION
The Arizona Model Aircrafters 1/5-scale
Fokker Dr.l ARF is a quick and easy way
to get into WW I aircraft. The plane is
IMAA-legal but is small enough to carry to
SZ
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
To assist in the balancing process, I made a
plywood radio tray and set it in front of the firewall. This allowed me to place my radio gear as
far forward as the cowl would allow.
the field fully assembled. To date, I have
let about a half dozen pilots—from rank
beginners to experienced veterans—fly it,
and all have been able to handle this
plane. It provides a reasonable scale
appearance with none of the complexity
and time required to build it yourself. 4Arizona Model Am rafters, 14715 N. 78th Way,
Unit 600, Scottsdalc, AZ 85260; (480) 348-3733;
fax (480) 348-3773; wwwMriy.oinitmhMs.com.
)R; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105
Fieltlstone Rd., Champaign, II. 61822;
(800) 338-4639; www.hony.otihobby.coin.
OS.; distributed by (ireat Planes Model Distributors
Co., P.O. Box 9021, Champaign, IL 61826-9021;
(800) 637-7660; fax (217) 398-0008;
www.greutplanes.com.
Ritch's Brew, 4104 Lark in., Houston, TX 77025;
(713) 661-5458; fax (713) 660-7947;
www.ritchsbrew.com.
Robart Mfg., P.O. Box 1247, 625 N. 12th St.,
St. Charles, 11. 60174; (630) 584-7616;
fax (630) 584-3712; www.robiirt.com.
Zinger; distributed by /&Z Products, 25029
S. Vermont Ave., Harbor City, CA 90710;
(310)539-2313.
Pattern performance
with great looks
by Vic Bunze
astering the basics of RC flying is fun, but
most pilots eventually want to move on to the
thrill of aerobatics. The Hangar 9 Aresti 40
ARF is a great-looking plane that's designed to introduce pilots to the world of precision aerobatics. It's an
inexpensive, attractive model that sports a nicely
applied multicolored finish with a beautifully painted
fiberglass cowl and wheel pants.
The sleek lines of the Aresti blend weH
with the four-color trim scheme. The
model is easy to see during aerobatics.
Great for orientation!
56
MODEL AIRPLANE NEW5
SPECIFICATIONS
MODEL: Aresti 40
MANUFACTURER: Hangar 9
DISTRIBUTOR: Horizon Hobby
TYPE: sport aerobatic ARF
WINGSPAN: 56 in.
WING AREA: 565 sq. in.
WEIGHT: 5.85 Ib.
WING LOADING: 23.9 oz./sq. ft.
LENGTH: 49 in.
ENGINE REQ'D: .40 to .58 2-stroke or .40
to .72 4-stroke
ENGINE USED: Saito FA .72 4-stroke
RADIO REQ'D: 4-channel with 5 servos
(rudder, 2 ailerons, elevator and throttle)
RADIO USED: JR 10X
FUEL USED: Wildcat 15%
PROP USED: APC 12x8
PRICE: $169.99
HITS
• Outstanding aerobatic performance.
• Excellent instruction manual.
• Nicely finished fiberglass cowl and
wheel pants.
MISSES
• No instructions for mounting 4-stroke
engines.
FEATURES: built airframe covered with
UltraCote; painted fiberglass cowl and
wheel pants; tinted canopy; fuel tank with
hardware; painted aluminum landing
gear; hardware package; photo-illustrated
instruction manual.
COMMENTS: the Hangar 9 Aresti 40 ARF
Is an easy-to-build aerobatic model that
really performs, and Its attractive
UltraCote color scheme is easy to see
while performing aerobatics. The model's
precise handling characteristics are a real
confidence builder for the student aerobatic pilot and a joy for the skilled pilot.
Give one a try. You'll love it!
KIT FEATURES
The Aresti 40 is well built and comes
expertly covered with Hangar 9
UltraCote; the four-color scheme is very
attractive and is highly visible during
maneuvers. The kit includes a fuel tank
with hardware, painted 2-piece aluminum landing gear and wheels,
tailwheel and steering assembly, universal aluminum engine mount, tinted
canopy, hinges and all the required control-system hardware.
The major parts come individually
wrapped in plastic bags, and there were
very few wrinkles in the covering. The
42-page instruction manual is chock full
of helpful photos detailing the assembly
process. It is organized into 20 sections
and has three to six clear photographs on
each page. It also lists other tools and
supplies needed to complete the model.
The Aresti goes together easily and
takes only two or three evenings to complete. Assembly is quite typical of today's
quality-engineered ARF models and offers
no surprises.
WING ASSEMBLY
All of the Aresti's control surfaces are preslotted, and assembly begins by attaching
the ailerons to each wing half using the
supplied CA hinges and some thin CA.
I joined the wing halves with the 1-piece
plywood wing joiner. The joiner is flat on
one side and tapered on the other: the
tapered side faces forward and slides into
a slot in each wing half. The joiner also
sets the dihedral angle of 1 x-:i inches.
Installing the aileron servos is next. 1
located the necessary hardware, and then
cut out the servo openings in the wing.
You'll need to supply two 6-inch servo
extensions, and the instructions provide a
useful tip to help thread the extensions
through the wing using a string and a nut
to "plumb" it through the wing. After 1
mounted the servos, I connected the linkages from the servos to the ailerons.
HANGAR 9 ARESTI 4D
The Aresti can accommodate a wide range of engines in the
recommended range. I used a Saito FA .72 for stunning
performance.
A place for everything and everything in its place. The servo tray is already installed for
quick assembly. Note that the battery and receiver are wrapped in foam to protect
them from vibration.
fuselage by a single '/4-20 nylon bolt that
screws into a blind nut.
The 2-piece aluminum landing gear is
bolted onto the fuselage bottom with six
bolts that screw into pre-installed blind
nuts. I bolted the axles onto the landing
gear and installed the wheel pants and
wheels on the landing gear through an
included plywood plate that I laminated
to the inside of the wheel pants.
Here's how the Aresti 40 comes out of the box.
FUSELAGE
The fuselage is complete out of the box
and requires very little preparation. 1
mated the completed wing to the fuselage
and carefully aligned it. The leading edge
of the wing keys into a fuselage bulkhead,
and the rear of the wing is secured to the
L±J
U
z
D
LJ
LL
h
58
TAIL GROUP
Next, the horizontal and vertical stabilizers are mounted to the fuselage. First, I
removed the covering material from the
slots in the fuselage and then inserted and
aligned the horizontal stabilizer. When 1
was satisfied with it, I removed the covering material from the center section of the
stabilizer and epoxied the stabilizer into
TAKEOFF AND LANDING
After checking out the controls, I started the big Saito and taxied the Aresti out to the center of the runway, where I gradually
advanced the throttle and held full up-elevator to keep the tail
on the ground while accelerating. As soon as the speed picked
up, I neutralized the elevator and held in a touch of right rudder.
The Aresti tracked smoothly and predictably and, with slight pull
of the elevator, it rotated and began to climb out. I was immediately impressed with
the smooth responsiveness of this plane.
With its low wing
loading, the Aresti felt
very
solid
and,
because of its clean
design, it doesn't
bleed
off
speed
quickly when landing. To avoid a lot of float after flare, landing
approaches should not be too steep or too fast. The Aresti slows
down nicely, though, and a gradual application of elevator just
before touchdown makes for smooth landings.
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
the fuselage. The vertical fin is mounted
using the same process. Following the
manual, I hinged the elevators and rudder, installed the tailwheel assembly and
added the control horns.
ENGINE, TANK AND COWL INSTALLATION
The supplied universal aluminum motor
mount can accommodate a variety of
engines, and the Saito .72 I used fit easily.
The supplied throttle linkage is a flexible
stranded cable that's routed through a
plastic guide tube and is attached to the
carburetor throttle arm with a screw-lock
connector.
The fuel tank fits into the fuselage
against the firewall; I set it up using a twoline system and then routed the lines
through the firewall and center opening
of the engine mount. This opening is
LOW-SPEED PERFORMANCE
The Aresti has a low wing loading with generous control-surface
area; these help contribute to solid and predictable performance
at slow speeds. The model has no tendency to snap at stall and
is solidly predictable.
HIGH-SPEED PERFORMANCE
The Aresti is happy at full throttle and remains solid and
smooth; it does not attempt to snap out of high-load maneuvers.
Top speed with the 12x8 propeller in level flight is about
70mph.
AEROBATICS
This is where the Aresti shines. It is a smooth-tracking plane and
has no tendency to go off on its own. In other words, it flies
where you point it. It has a fast roll rate on high rates and is
very smooth at low rates. Knife-edge tracking is virtually perfect,
with insignificant tuck to the wheels or canopy. Spin recovery is
immediate, and inverted flight requires only slight down-elevator
input. The model's smooth, predictable performance adds
tremendously to the fun of practicing precise aerobatics.
HANGAR 9 ARESTI 4D
properly positioned for an MDS engine,
but I found that the opening placed the
tank too high relative to the Saito .72's
carburetor, so I enlarged the opening to
lower the tank.
I fitted the fiberglass cowl to the fuselage and used paper templates that I
taped to the fuselage sides as "markers"
for the engine exhaust, needle valve and
glow-plug access ports. 1 then transferred
these marks to the cowl and opened them
up using a rotary cutting tool. I made
under-size cuts and carefully opened
them up to get a perfect-fitting cowl.
RADIO INSTALLATION AND FLIGHT SETUP
Radio installation in the Aresti is easy and
well thought out. I assembled the
pushrods using the supplied parts and
installed the servos, receiver and battery
pack. I hooked up the pushrods to the servos and control surfaces, and I used the
recommended control throws.
The Saito FA .72 is a smooth, strongrunning engine that provides all the
vertical performance you could want. I
used an APC 12x8 propeller, and it
proved to be a good match; it provided a
nice combination of vertical performance and good
top-end speed.
Because the cowl
fits tightly around
the inverted engine
in the Aresti, I
highly recommend
a remote glow
setup. The rear tilt
of the glow plug on
the Saito makes it
cumbersome
to
connect a standard
glow igniter. A
remote
adapter
solves the problem
beautifully and provides the option to add
glow heat for idle enhancement.
CONCLUSION
The Hangar 9 Aresti 40 ARF is a classylooking plane with a no-compromise
aerobatic attitude. It is a great sport plane
and an excellent model to wring out your
aerobatic sequences. It's attractive with its
multicolored trim scheme and has good
contrast between the top and bottom of
the wing. The model goes together
quickly, has a fine-quality fiberglass cowl
and wheel pants and is a terrific value in
terms of looks, performance and excitement at the flying field. ±
APC Props; distributed by Landing Products,
1222 Harter Ave., Woodland, CA 95776; (530)
661-0399; fax (530) 666-6661; www.apcprop.com.
Hangar 9; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105 Fieldstone Rd.,
Champaign, IL 61822; (800) 338-4639;
fax (217) 355-1552; www.horizonhobby.com.
JR; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
MDS Engines; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
Saito; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
UltraCote; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
Four Star 120
For .90 - 1.20 engines
Four Star 60
For .60 - .75 engines
Four Star 40
For .30 - .40 engines
*
"An amazing performance." "Talent like this
doesn't show up anywhere else." "It's hard to
follow this act."
These are just a few of the comments heard
around flying fields when a SIG Four Star airplane shows up.
Based on a very simple design goal, SIG
Four Star airplanes have impeccable flight characteristics without looking like a box with
wings.
Featuring laser cut parts, SIG Four Stars go
together fast and true for even the most novice
of builders. Add in a molded canopy, complete
*
hardware package, large decal sheet, full size
plans, and a fully illustrated instruction booklet
as only SIG can do for a value-packed Build It
Yourself kit unlike any other on the market.
Performance-wise, the Four Stars shines.
Tear through the air with anything you can
throw at it, and the SIG Four Stars stay right
with you. Landings are trainer-slow with no
unwanted stall tendencies.
Sized to fit every flyer, SIG Four Stars are
available wing-sized from 59" to IMAA-big 81"
and for .40, .60, and biggie 1.20 engines. Each
kit delivers the same easy construction and out-
standing flying distinctiveness you expect.
Now showing at a hobby dealer near you.
Pick one up and give your two thumbs a reason
to go up.
SIG MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC.
Montezuma, Iowa
www.sigmfg.com
TEST
Northeast Sailplane Products
Electric slow-flyer ARF
he Virus 400A is the largest of
by John Tracey
"^"
Northeast Sailplane Products'
(NSP's) series of Virus park flyers.
It's designed as a lightly loaded trainer, and it
has a huge, flat-bottom wing with giant barn-door
ailerons. A 57-inch wingspan adds to its stability. The unique
style of its swept-up wingtips and teardrop-shape fuselage combines to create an attractive plane. The tail boom is formed
of dual carbon-fiber tubes for strength and lightness. Virus 400A comes equipped with a Speed 480 motor and an MP Jet
3.5:1 reduction drive. It also comes with a propeller and landing gear with lightweight foam wheels. The plane is covered
with iron-on Solarfilm.
WING CONSTRUCTION
Building the Virus 4OOA is pretty basic;
the written instructions include diagrams
to help you build the model. A few details
are omitted from the instructions, but if
you use your common sense, you'll have
no problems building the plane.
The first step is to join the wing halves.
A small metal rod reinforces the joint
between the halves. The rod slips into a
62
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
small brass-tube sleeve in each wing half.
After using 5-minute epoxy to join the
wing, I wrapped the joint with clear tape
for extra reinforcement. When finished,
the wing is more than strong enough for
any maneuver this plane will do.
The "A" in Virus 400A stands for
"ailerons," and NSP is not kidding. The
huge barn-door ailerons account for 30
percent of the wing chord, and each is
controlled by an individual servo. One of
the advantages of this setup is that it
allows the ailerons to be mixed with a
computer radio and used as flaperons for
very slow landings and short takeoffs. I
recommend that you use servos with at
least 14 ounces of torque; I used Cirrus
CS-20BB Sub Micros. If you don't have a
computer radio, you can use a Y-connector to connect the aileron servos to the
•MODEL: Virus 400A
^H
•DISTRIBUTOR: Northeast Sailplane ProdtiCT^
• f Y P E : sport-flyer ARF
•jVINGSPAN: 57 in.
BfVING AREA: 627 sq. in.
•WEIGHT: 28.2 oz.
• W I N G LOADING: 6.5 oz./sq. ft.
•pENGTH: 37.5 In.
• M O T O R USED: Speed 480 geared 3.5:1
HI (included)
• P R O P USED: APC 10x7 slow flyer (included)
• R A D I O REQ'D: 4-channel (5-channel w/flap•f eron mixing optional), 4 mlcroservos and
• ESC (2 aileron, elevator and rudder)
• R A D I O USED: Futaba 6XAS w/4 Cirrus
•t CS-20BB sub-microservos and GWS
m GS-400 ESC
•pATTERY USED: 10-cell, 600mAh Ni-Cd
•FLIGHT DURATION: 6 to 7 min.
• P R I C E : $159.95
•FEATURES: all components are built and
•covered in Solarfllm. The kit includes a carbon
• f i b e r tall boom, a Multiplex Speed 480 motor,
• a n MP Jet gearbox, a propeller, music-wire
•jandlng gear, lightweight foam wheels and all
•necessary hardware.
•COMMENTS: the Northeast Sailplane Products
• | / l r u s 400A Is a unique ARF model that's a lot
• o f fun to fly. Its wing design allows the model
• t o maneuver in small flying areas without tip•jftalling. When the ailerons are used as
•flaperons, the model can be flown extremely
•slowly and, because its ailerons are so large,
•slow-speed turning is instantaneous.
• j » Good craftsmanship and easy assembly.
• p * Unique wing design.
•• Good flight capabilities.
•MISSES
•• None found.
receiver, but you won't be able to use the
ailerons as flaperons.
The ailerons are top-hinged with tape,
and a large gap on the bottom of the
ailerons ensures a lot of travel. I taped the
ailerons into a neutral position so they
would not move while I installed the
hinge tape, and I used SR Batteries Gapless
Hinge Tape instead of the recommended
tape. When you use it, make sure everyJUNE2DD2
63
NORTHEAST SAILPLANE PRODUCTS VIRUS4unReglarmonthyicmebywearingyourshtathecomfrtofyourhmeform einfotp:/leyahg@.mbrscukfxDDA
thing is lined up correctly before you secure
it; it bonds so thoroughly that it cannot be
moved once it has been
pressed into place.
You'll need to extend
your aileron servo leads
to reach the receiver; I
cut them and soldered
6-inch
extensions
between each plug and
servo. You can also buy
6-inch servo extensions
at a hobby store. I bent
the included aileron
pushrod wires to size
and attached them to
the ailerons and servos. 1
made a V-bend in each
pushrod to make adjustments easier.
FUSELAGE
AND TAIL GROUP
Above: the pushrods for the rudder
and elevator run through the carbonfiber tail boom.Regularmonthyicbwgurshotaecmf yourh meinfotp:/lyag@.brscukxI used plastic sleeves
in the tail boom to prevent any metalto-metal contact, and I replaced the
wooden elevator joiner with a stiffer
carbon-fiber rod. Above right: the tail
feathers are mounted on a balsa
block, and the carbon-fiber rods are
inserted in the balsa block—a very
simple mounting method. Note the
pushrod exit. Right: the unique wingtip
design adds a lot of stability to the
flight characteristics.
The next step is to
attach the tail surfaces
to the carbon-fiber tail
boom. The tail-boom
rods are inserted into a
balsa block, and the horizontal stabilizer is glued to it followed by
the vertical fin. I felt that the wooden
joiner for the elevator halves was not
strong enough; it flexed a lot and gave
more control to one side than to the
other. I replaced the wooden joiner with a
piece of carbon-fiber rod; with this modification, the elevators moved equally and
I was able to perform nice, tight loops.
Northeast Sailplane notes that later kits
include a stronger elevator joiner, so it
should not be a problem.
The pushrods for the rudder and elevator are installed inside the top
carbon-fiber tail boom, and I used a
Dremel Moto-Tool to cut the exit holes for
them at the rear. I inserted two plasticsleeves for the pushrods to slide into so
they would not rub against each other and
cause radio interference. It would have
G
TAKEOFF AND LANDING
I usually hand-launch my planes to conserve power; despite its
large size, the Virus leaves my hand with barely a dip before it
reaches flying speed. The Speed 480 provides plenty of power;
climb-out is great. I climbed the plane for altitude while I trimmed
it out; it is a nice flyer. The high wing and generous wing area allow
it to remain stable on approach, and the plane settles in nicely.
LL
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS
When I had the model trimmed, I brought it down closer to me
and realized I could maneuver it easily in a small area. It does
everything slow and easy. The larger control surfaces and light
wing loading really pay off, and with good throttle management, I
can get flights of 6 to 7 minutes. The flight characteristics of the
Virus 400A make it an excellent aileron trainer, and the thick,
flat-bottom airfoil makes it resistant to stalls at high angles of
attack. The turned-up wingtips give the model excellent turning
abilities with little chance of stalling. Schoolyards and parking
lots are great places to fly this bird.
LULL
I
64
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
been easier to install the rods
outside the boom, but they
look better hidden inside.
I glued the two servo rails
in the rear of the fuselage
and attached the servos to
them. I recommend that you
move the rails forward in the
fuselage to help attain the
proper center of gravity. The
kit does not come with a battery tray, but the instructions
and diagrams show how to
construct one out of 1/8-inch
balsa. I used the bottom of the fuselage
as a template and made a tray that fit
onto the top of the longerons inside the
nose of the fuselage. Before I glued the
tray into place, I attached a strip of
hook-and-loop fastener to it for the battery. I cut a hole in the nose of the
fuselage directly under the propeller to
access the battery compartment. This
makes it easy to change batteries without
having to remove the wing.
I inserted the music-wire landing gear in
the fuselage and secured it with epoxy.
The wheels are made of a lightweight
foam with plastic hubs, and their large
diameter allows takeoffs from grass fields.
I next assembled the drive system to
the model and encountered no problems.
To secure the pinion gear on the motor
shaft, I first lightly sanded the shaft,
added a drop of solder to it with a 100W
soldering iron and then pressed the pinion into place. Then I slid the motor into
the included MP gearbox and added a
couple of drops of thin CA for extra security. This assembly is screwed to the
firewall with two screws, followed by the
AEROBATICS
That huge wing with its 6.5-ounce wing loading makes this plane
a real floater. The Virus 400A loops very well, but I would not consider it an aerobatic plane. Its large ailerons help it maneuver
well, but the wingspan is too big for a satisfactory roll rate.
NORTHEAST SAILPLANE PRODUCTS VIRUS 4DDA
33% & 39%
Extra 330L
3i%&
37% Extra 3001
Above left: motor installation is
straightforward and easy. Above
right: two servos are used to control the ailerons. This allows you to
use them as flaperons if desired.
Note the short pushrod; it provides
for a solid control system.
APC Props; distributed by Landing
Products, 1222 Harter Avc,
Woodland, CA 95776; (530) 6610399; fax (530) 666-6661;
www.apcprop.com..
Edge 540
% 29% 36% 40%
Cirrus
Ventures,
115 Hunter Avc,
f'anwood, Nj 07023-1030; (90S)
322-7221.
The built and covered tail feathers take only a few minutes to
attach to the tail boom. I used SR Batteries Gapfess Hinge
Tape to hinge all of the control surfaces.
prop adapter and propeller. The Virus
400A was ready for flight.
IN SUMMARY
.60 Si 33%
Edge540T
ARF
I have to say that the unique looks and
stable flying characteristics of the Virus
400A add up to a very nice plane. When
you use the ailerons as flaperons, a
whole new spectrum of flying is revealed;
slow flight that borders on hovering and
takeoffs in only a few feet are just some
of the tricks that this model can do.
With its large wheels, takeoffs from grass
are easily accomplished, and I'm
impressed with its maneuverability. The
Virus 400A can be flown in tight spaces
and makes a great trainer.
The rear of the fuselage is constructed of carbon-fiber rods.
They're lightweight and very strong.
World Class Aircraft
303 366-4205
401-D Laredo, Aurora, CO 80011
www.aero-works.net
66 MODEL AIRPLANE NEW5
Dretnel Tool, 4915 21st St., Racine,
Wl 53406; (800) 437-3635; fax
(414) 554-7654; www.dremel.com.
Futaba Cor)p. of americauted by (ireat P
Distributors Co., P.O. Box 9021; Champaign, II.
61826-9021;(800) 637-7660; www.futaba-rc.com.
Grand Wing Servos GWS); distributed by Balsa
Products, 122]ansen Ave., lselin, Nf 08830-2601;
(732) 634-6131; www.balsapr.com.
Multiplex USA, 560 Library St., San Fernando,
CA 91340; (800) 375-1312; (818) 838-6467; fax
(818) 838-3127; www.multiplexrc.com.
Northeast Sailplane Products, 948 Hercules Dr.,
Ste. 12, Colchester, VT 05446; (802) 655-7700;
fax (802) 655-7755; www.nesail.com.
Solarfilm; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.,
(800) 338-4639; fax (217) 355-1552;
www.hori/.onhobby.com.
SR Batteries Inc., Box 287, Heliport, NY 11713;
(631) 286-0079; fax (631) 286-0901;
www. srbatteries.com.
HOW TO
Make Static
Scale Props
2j
The choice of building materials for the plug depends on
the builder's individual preferences. I used a block of hard
polyurethane foam. It is vital that you smooth out the foam as
much as possible. Any imperfections will immediately show up
in the moldings. Careful sanding (start with 400-grit and end with
1200) and polishing will pay off later.
The ultimate final touch
by Dick van Mourik
W
henever I attend a scale meet, I wonder why so
many scale modelers spend so much time installing
features such as sliding canopies and retract doors,
but no one feels the need to upgrade from a plain gray
2-blade 12x6 prop for static judging. The use of static props
doesn't have to be limited to the highest competition models;
scale propellers are major attractions on any aircraft, and they
are more than worth the time it takes to create them.
Constructing static scale props does not require any special talent or equipment beyond that possessed by the average modeler. To help explain the techniques involved, this
article outlines the steps I took in the production of the static
scale prop for my 1/4-scale Zlin Z-50 LS. Give it a try; you'll be
amazed by what you can create with some glass, epoxy and a
little practice!
A prop blade is not the easiest part
to form a mold around. To allow for
removal, the molding must be split.
I placed the blade on a bed of
modeling clay, which I then
smoothed out as much as possible. I placed the whole thing on a
bearer plate made of plasticcoated fiberboard, onto which I
formed the flange.
Be sure that you liberally treat both the plug and the support with
release agents. I normally use a combination of two: first, I use a special mold-release wax that I allow to dry for a few minutes before I
polish it out. Depending on the plug's finish, I may repeat this process
six to 10 times. Second, I carefully apply some poly vinyl alcohol
(PVA) to the plug/mold with a soft, wet sponge. (You could also thin
the PVA to a milk-like consistency and apply it in a single layer with a
dry cloth.) As the water evaporates, it forms a very thin film.
Ultimately, it's the wax that ensures debonding from the resin and
plug, but this film provides an extra measure of safety. I always use a
very thin layer of PVA because any imperfections will clearly show.
When the release agents were
completely dry, I used a soft
brush to gently apply the first layer of
molding compound. Molding compound has a high viscosity and
should be carefully stirred to allow
the hardener to be thoroughly
mixed. To prevent air bubbles, I
always use a small brush in the corners first. It is best to apply thick layers and avoid retouching the mixture with the brush where it has already been applied. I normally get
a decent result from two layers. Brush the second one on after the
first layer has hardened but before it has fully cured.
1 A sketch and several photos of the full-size aircraft at
various angles provided the basis for an accurate plug.
In this case, I was really lucky; the manufacturer of the full-size
plane supplied me with factory information as well as a logo
and identification sticker.
SB MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
When the second coat had
hardened to the stage where it
is sticky, I poured a mixture of
cotton fibers and chopped fiberglass strands over the compound. The strands and fibers
ensure a firm bonding between
the compound and resin. When
it had cured, I used a vacuum
cleaner to remove any excess
material.
Glass cloth will not take
to sharp corners, so I filled
these with a mixture of resin,
chopped strands and a thickening agent. A generous
layer of this mixture will prevent any cloth from showing
through. It also helps to flatten out any irregularities in
the compound. Use only aircraft-grade epoxy; it's much
easier to work with and it
leads to better results.
Immediately following
the resin/fiber mixture,
I applied the layers of glass
cloth that would form the
mold. I try to minimize the
amount of resin; the cloth
reaches its maximum
strength once it's completely
soaked. Any excess resin
only adds weight. The first
layer of cloth can be laid on
the mixture with almost no
resin at all. I added subsequent layers of cloth until it formed a rigid mold. For small items like
this, I stick to a wall thickness of %2 to % inch; this requires approximately five layers of 1 -ounce cloth. I always let the cloth cover a fairly
wide area (about 1 inch) around the plug, as the second half will be
formed against this and will require trimming after the moldings have
cured. This photo shows the final stage of the first half of the mold.
l For the second side
of the molding, I
simply repeated all of the
previous steps. Here, I've
just applied the glass cloth
to the molding compound
to begin forming the second
half of the mold.
When they were fully
cured, I drilled the
moldings through while
they were still attached
to the plug; this ensures
maximum accuracy.
I then trimmed off the
excess cloth and
separated both halves
from the plug. For the
first splitting, I normally
use some warm water
to dissolve the PVA; an old credit card carefully placed in between
the flanges can also be beneficial. Never use metal tools or brute
force! Usually, the plug just falls off. In this photo, I had just
removed the two halves from the plug.
Because you must close the mold while the cloth is still
wet, it is essential that the cloth fit the molding exactly.
Pictured here are two layers of 0.4-ounce cloth together
with a non-woven surface cloth. The black shoelace is, in fact,
carbon roving, which I later laid around the blade's perimeter.
| = | When the first half
had fully hardened,
began the second half
of the molding. Never
remove the molding
from the support or the
first half of the molding
from the plug in the
early stages; patience
is the key to this
process! I carefully
removed the blade from the support and cleaned off any excess
clay. This photo shows part of the newly formed flange in black,
with all of the clay still stuck to the blade and flange. Thanks to
the release agents, it was easy to remove.
Next, I used a Dremel saw to cut
off any excess cloth. To ensure a
proper fit, I drilled some 1/8-inch
blind holes into the flange,
spaced about 3 inches apart.
This will act as a lock when forming the second half of the mold.
Commercial pins are available as
well, but for small items like
these, I generally stick to this
method. Once again, I liberally
treated the plug and flange with
release agents before moving
on to the next step.
Making the actual
prop is basically
just a variation of
the molding
process, beginning
with the application
of the wax and
PVA; the primary
distinction is in the
outside coating.
Though gelcoat is the most common choice, you can also use a
good quality epoxy-based paint. I brushed on two coats of yellow
Hobby Poxy. Once it had hardened to the point that it was sticky, I
brushed in some slightly thickened resin.
JUNE2DD2
69
HDWTD MAKE STATIC SCALE PROPS
This is a close-up of the
molding halves with the
slightly thickened resin brushed in.
This layer is necessary to prevent
the cloth from showing through the
blade and is best left to harden for
about 30 minutes to an hour before
you apply the first layer of cloth.
This photo was taken
immediately before I joined
the halves. In this stage,
all of the material is wet.
On one half, I filled the
perimeter with a mixture of
resin and fibers and strands,
and I placed wet carbon
roving on the other half. After
joining the halves, I inserted a small brush through the root hole to
press the roving to the inside of the leading edge and the root.
The Pr0P came out of the mold
shiny and glossy. After trimming
off the excess resin, I had a perfect,
strong and lightweight static prop blade.
Production of subsequent blades is
very straightforward and requires
only a fraction of the time that's needed
to make the first blade.
Of course, three blades
alone do not form an
air screw. This photo shows all
of the parts required to form
the completed item. I made
the static spinner from carbon
in the same mold that I used to
make the flying spinner. I used
some hard foam to make the
backplate and the purple
blocks that serve as blade
retainers. I used a graphics computer program and printed my
own decals using Super-Cal decal paper.
This is the completed
static prop ready to
go—my latest pride
and joy. In VA scale,
the prop's diameter
came out to be 20
inches.
Hobby Poxy, 36 Pine St., Rockaway, NJ 07866; (973) 625-3 WO; fax (973)
625-8303.
EXCLUSIVE USA DISTRIBUTOR
Hacker B20 Series Motors
•
•
•
•
Ultra-light and Compact Design
Low Current and High Thrust
Direct Drive or 4:1 Gearbox
For Slowflyers, Parkflyers and "400" Models
3rushless
Motors
Hacker B40 Series Motors
•
•
•
•
Small, Efficient and Very Powerful
Up to 70 amps for Competition
Direct Drive or 4.4:1 Ceramic Bearing Gearbox
Sport Models to Competition Gliders
Hacker B50 Series Motors
•
•
•
•
High-Power and Lightweight
Up to 100 amps for Competition
Direct Drive or 6.7:1 Needle Bearing Gearbox
F5B, Large Gliders and Aerobatic Models
Hacker Brushless Motors have been
specifically
developed
for
Radio
Controlled Models. All motors are
designed and produced in Southern
Germany near Munich (Home of BMW).
Every motor embodies precision German
technology and manufacturing techniques
to create very powerful and efficient
motor systems.
Specifications
B20 S Series
B20 L Series
B40 S Series
B40 L Series
B50 S Series
B50 L Series
Max RPM
Motor Weight
Weight+Gearbox
Price Motor Only
Price Motor + Gearbox
60,000
1.4 Oz.
1.8Oz.
$89.00
$125.00
60,000
2.0 Oz.
2.4 Oz.
$109.00
$135.00
80,000
4.6 Oz.
6.5 Oz.
$129.00
$219.00
80,000
5.6 Oz.
7.5 Oz.
$139.00
$229.00
80,000
7.1 Oz.
9.0 Oz.
$159.00
$249.00
80,000
8.7 Oz.
10.6 Oz.
$179.00
$269.00
Aero-Model, Inc.
2122 W. 5th Place
VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS
7O MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Tempe, AZ 85281
Phone 480-726-7519
www.aero-model.cor
Fax
480-963-5565 aeromodel@qwest.ne
FMA Direct C O - P H o t
by Gerry Yarrish
ne of the newest devices to aid us in flying our models is
the Co-Pilot Infrared Stabilization System from FMA
Direct. For this article, we really put the Co-Pilot through
its paces by installing it and testing it in three different types
of airplanes. We tested it in the Multiplex Brummi, a simple, 3-channel electric high-wing trainer, and also in Hangar
9's high-performance, low-wing glow-powered ARF, the
Advance 40. Then, to completely change things, we
installed it in the JR Ergo Sport, a
fully aerobatic .60-size helik
copter. The Co-Pilot handled
Ik
each plane and its particular
characteristics perfectly. If
you've ever wanted to
k
install a compact and
reliable autopilot
system in your
*"
RC model,
4
read on.
We're sure you'll be as
, impressed as we are.
k
SPECIFICATIONS
PRODUCT: Co-Pilot Stabilization System
MANUFACTURER: FMA Direct
INPUTS: aileron, elevator and auxiliary
channel for remote on/off switching
OUTPUTS: pitch (elevator) and roll
(aileron or rudder)
SYSTEM WEIGHT: 1 oz.
DIMENSIONS
SENSOR HEAD: 1.35 in. across
(octagonal) x 0.53 in. thick
CONTROLLER UNIT: 1.5x0.89x0.6 in.
POWER CONSUMPTION: 5mA
PRICE: $119.95
3 tests
—helicopter, highperformance and trainer
aircraft-works iike a champ!
74
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
COMMENTS: the Co-Pilot is an infraredsensing, two-axis onboard stabilization
system that plugs into your model's
receiver system. The unit is very easy to
set up and calibrate and can be used
with fixed-wing airplanes, flying wings,
and helicopters. The unit comes with a
24-inch ribbon wire to connect the
sensor head to the microprocessor
controller unit.
HITS
• Works exactly as advertised.
• Easy to install.
• Simple to calibrate and operate.
MISSES
• Only one sensitivity adjustment; it would
be nice to be able to adjust pitch and
roll independently.
The Co-Pilot is a two-axis, four-sensor
control-stabilization system that plugs
into your RC system. It has no moving
parts and uses infrared (IR) heat sensors to
control the model's roll and pitch. The
system has two components: a sensor
head that you attach to the underside of
your model and a controller unit that you
install inside your model like a receiver. A
thin ribbon cable connects the two. Two
wire leads are connected to the controller;
one has a push-button switch, and the
other ends with a servo-lead connector.
You use the switch when you calibrate the
unit before each flight session, and the
servo lead can be plugged into an unused
radio channel in your receiver for in-flight
on/off function.
The Co-pilot comes with a wellillustrated instruction booklet that shows
various installations. The instructions show
in detail how to install the unit in a normal
fixed-wing airplane, in a flying wing and in
a helicopter. Here's how it works.
The sensor head has four
IR heat sensors that face left,
right, forward and aft. The
sensors read how much IR
heat is present in the four
directions. The controller
unit evaluates the IR heat
information and adjusts the
controls to keep the IR heat
values equal for all four sensors for normal straight-andlevel flight. Infrared heat is a
much better source for control input than visible light
because IR heat isn't affected
as much by cloud cover.
The controller is plugged into the RC
receiver system between the receiver and
the servos. Once it has been calibrated,
the unit need not be calibrated again
unless the weather changes drastically.
Above: the controller unit is smaller than a standard receiver and is plugged into the radio system between the servos and the receiver.
Right: the FMA Co-Pilot sensor head is held in
place on the belly of the model with a piece of
hook-and-loop fastener. Note the ribbon wire
leading inside the model to the controller unit.
Below: with the model standing on its nose, simply press the calibration switch; the controller
unit does the rest. Note
that the sensor head on
the model's belly is facing away from me during the procedure.
Since the unit
works by reading
the differences in IR
heat levels rather
than in light intensity, it works equally well in bright
sunlight or overcast
conditions. The
unit will also work
at night, though the inability to see your
model is a limiting factor.
It takes only a few minutes to install
the units; you'll need to cut a small opening in the bottom of the fuselage so you
can pass the ribbon wire through to connect the sensor head to the controller.
This takes only about 2 minutes.
CALIBRATING THE UNIT
Before the first flight of the day, you'll have
to calibrate the unit to read the ambient IR
heat; this is a two-step procedure. First,
place the model's nose on the ground with
its tail sticking straight up and the sensor
head facing away from you. Turn on the
transmitter and receiver and then press the
push-button IR calibration switch. The control surfaces will then quickly deflect several
times; the number of deflections tells you
High-performance applications
I wanted to see how the FMA Co-Pitot performed in a model other than a trainer,
so I installed it in a Hangar 9 Advance 40. On the day I flew it, the weather was
partly cloudy with temperatures in the mid-50s, and the wind was about 7- to
13mph. I set up the unit to control the elevators and ailerons to allow me to
turn it off during the flight if something went wrong. I connected the remote
sensitivity lead to the retract gear switch.
Cautiously, I took off with the unit turned off. At a safe altitude, I turned it
on, let go of the sticks and waited to see what would happen: the plane continued to fly straight and level. I could see the wind rock the wings, but the unit
always returned them to level-pretty cool! With more confidence in the system,
I turned the plane around for another pass and could feel the unit "fighting" my
control inputs.
On the next pass, I rolled the plane into knife-edge flight and, again, let go
of the sticks. As before, the plane returned to level flight—this was getting inter-
by Rick Bell
esting! On the next pass, I rolled the plane inverted and let go of the sticks; the
plane immediately corkscrewed back to upright and level flight. I did this several
more times, and the plane always returned to upright and level flight without
any input from me. Don't do this at low altitude! When the plane is inverted, the
unit applies up-elevator, and the plane does a split-S back to straight and level.
I think ft would be better if instead the unit rolled the plane upright without
elevator input.
I was quite impressed during landing approaches; as the speed decreased,
the plane settled nicely, and the nose and the wings remained level. I needed
to use throttle only to make the approach to the runway and rudder to compensate for the crosswind; the Co-Piiot made landings really easy.
The Co-Pilot works as advertised. Whether you use it in a high-performance
model or in a .40-size trainer, Co-Pilot removes much of the risk, and this, consequently greatly enhances the RC experience.
JUNE2DD2
75
FMA DIRECT CD-PILDT
on a scale of from one to 10 what the IR
conditions are. Between three and 10
deflections means the unit will operate
properly; two indicates that the unit will
operate but needs its sensitivity increased
over cooler terrain. If the unit deflects only
once, it means there isn't enough difference
in the IR temperature between sky and
ground. It's best not to fly with the unit
turned on.
After step one, the servos begin to cycle
slowly. During this time, you must place
the model on the ground in a level flight
attitude and then walk away about 10
feet. The unit then calibrates itself for
level flight. Once the unit is calibrated, all
you have to do before each successive
flight for the rest of the day is to quickly
check that the unit is working. Turn on
the transmitter and receiver, and point
the model's nose toward the ground. The
unit should provide full up-elevator. Also,
when you point a wingtip at the ground,
it should deflect either the rudder or the
ailerons (depending on which channel
you have the unit plugged into) to correct
the bank angle. After this quick check,
you can launch the model.
AUTOPILOT FLIGHT
The day I tested the unit, I installed it in a
Multiplex Brummi and flew it on a windy
day. From the moment I hand-launched
the model, the unit worked beautifully. As
is normal, to climb, I held up-elevator and
applied full power. When the model was
about 75 feet high, I let go of the control
stick and waited to see what would happen.
The Brummi tracked straight into the wind,
and its wings always returned to level—
even after a strong gust of wind tipped the
wing nearly vertical. After it flew to the
edge of the field, I turned the model to the
right (slightly downwind) and let go of the
controls again. As before, the model righted
itself whenever necessary and maintained a
constant altitude. During the flight, I even
crabbed the model into the wind; it happily
flew slightly sideways as the wind pushed it
along. The wind became rather strong at
this point, so I throttled it back and guided
the model straight into the wind for a landing. The Co-Pilot kept its wings level all the
way to the flare; all I did was adjust the
throttle to control the descent.
On the second flight, I turned the sensitivity down about 1/4 turn and had an
even nicer flight. This time, the wind
by Hal deBolt
This radical new Co-Pilot stabilization system
reminds me of the first adventures I had with
reed and proportional RC systems. You have to
do two things to make the unit operate properly.
First, be sure that the neutral points on the
model's control surface are properly set before
you install the unit. Then, after completing the
Co-Pilot preflight checkout, you must make sure
that the control settings haven't changed. With
or without the Co-Pilot online, they should be
the same.
The hook-and-loop-fastening material that
came with the unit was a little too spongy for my
taste. It could be compressed and then not
return to its original condition. This lack of consistency made it easy to disturb the sensor,
which caused an alignment problem. Using
either a thinner fastener material or doublesided servo tape to attach the sensor would
eliminate this problem. The ideal location for the
sensor is out on a wing panel, away from things
that can affect the sensor's view. It is possible
to mount it on the fuselage, but you must make
sure that the landing gear and/or the propeller
do not affect the unit's operation. To properly
Magnattila
Span
60"
Engines .30-.40 2 str.
.40-.60 4 str.
Radio
4 channel
Weight 5.5 Ibs^,
Fun Scale
control the model, you will have to fly the model
FLAIR
with the unit activated to see if it needs any
fine-tuning. I found that a solidly mounted sensor was difficult to adjust, so I made a simple,
adjustable sensor mount with a ball-link attachment on the fuselage. It is a plywood plate
attached to a ball swivel, which permits infinite
movements. Two adjustment screws allow fineposition adjustment of the entire sensor unit.
This adaptation worked just fine.
AUTOGYRO APPLICATION
Gyros and helicopters require constant control
Texan/Harvard
Span:
66"
Weight: 5 - 7 Ib
Radio:
4 Channel
Engines: .30 - .46 2 str
.40 - .60 4 str
attention; a loss of orientation and control close
to earth can be disastrous. It isn't unusual for a
gyro to attain a nose-up attitude without the
pilot noticing the change. I have seen gyros get
to very high altitudes and then drift for a 1/2 mile
Boeing PT-17 Stearman
Span
89"
downwind because the model's attitude wasn't
apparent to its pilot. If this happens to someone
(scale 1:4.3)
69"
Length
Weight 1 8 - 2 1 Ib
Power
180+ 4 strokes
(2 stroke petrol or glow equally acceptable)
Radio
4 channel, 5 servos
who is using the Co-Pilot, the system will stabilize the model until orientation is regained. The
Co-Pilot works so well that I have also seen it
control a perfect landing for a gyro that was
Flair Products Ltd
www. flairproducts. co. uk
Available in the US at:
Radical RC
7046 Harshmanville Road,
Huber Heights, Ohio 45424
Web: www.radicalrc.com.
Email:
DAVTHACKER@aol.com
Sport Aerobatic
Fabulous Builders Kits,
(33 models in range)
reduced, it produced a proper descent that
GCBM R/C Inc.
Authentic Vintage Kits,
5009 Fairdale.
Pasadena. TX 77505,
Order line: 800-609-7951.
Fax: 281-998-2529.
Web: www.gcbmrc.com.
Email: mlmcgraw@pdq.net
(36 models in range)
ended in a no-rollout landing.
Quality ARTF Kits,
M D D E L A I R P L A N E NEWS
On all types of models-fixed-wing, heli-
(25 models in range)
copters and autogyros-l can say that the
and Accessories for all needs.
Dealer enquires welcome
advertised!
Visit our website to see comprehensive details.
76
practically out of sight. The gyro was hovered at
a high altitude and when the model's power was
FMA Co-Pilot stabilization system works as
FMA DIRECT CD-PILOT
by Rick Bell
I was anxious to test the FMA Co-Pilot in a helicopter, so I used my JR Ergo
Sport 60. The unit's manual recommends that a hole be drilled into the chassis
for the calibration button, but instead, I mounted the button on the front of the
servo tray and secured the control box on the top of the gyro. I attached the
sensor unit to the top of the tail boom and oriented its pickups at a 45-degree
angle to the heli's centerline. I then routed the ribbon cable forward to the control box and secured it so that it wouldn't become entangled with the pushrods,
bellcranks and other airframe parts. The installation took only a few minutes.
Following the instructions, I plugged the unit into the receiver and then connected the roll and elevator servos to the unit. There are four dipswitches on the
control box, and these must be set in the correct sequence for the unit to give
the correct control inputs.
Calibrating the unit took some effort; I couldn't get it
to function properly the first time I tried to calibrate it.
When I tilted the heli to the right, the Co-Pilot gave a right
roll command, and that was the wrong direction. And
when I switched the unit on or off with the auxiliary chan-
nel, the trim settings changed considerably.
It was easy to fix the trim changes; during calibration, I tilted the heli to compensate for the changes. The control input problem was also easily solved by
adjusting the positions of the dipswitches. Once I figured out
the sequence, the Co-pilot worked correctly and made the
appropriate inputs.
TEST FLIGHT
After I calibrated the unit, I set the sensitivity at about 50
percent and started the helicopter. I switched off the CoPilot and trimmed the heli for a hands-off hover. For safety,
I climbed to about 25 feet and then hit the switch to turn on
the Co-Pilot. The heli continued to hover and didn't move at
all. To confirm that the unit was working, I gave a right roll
command and released the stick; the heli promptly returned
to a stable hover. With more confidence, I then gave a forward cyclic command, but much more aggressively. The
result was the same-the heli immediately returned to a
level hover. Very neat indeed!
The heli was also very stable in forward flight. I could feel
the Co-Pilot attempt to counter my
control inputs; this was unnerving at
first, but I soon became accustomed
to it. The neat part about forward
flight was that when I let go of the
sticks, the heli quickly stopped and
returned to a hover.
1: mounting the sensor on a helicopter Is
a little different from
mounting ft on an airplane; the sensor
must be rotated 45
degrees, and it must
be set horizontally. I
used double-stick
tape and a zip-tie to
secure the sensor to
the tall boom, Instead
of the recommended
hook-and-loop-fastener. 2:1 mounted the control unit onto the top of the gyro and attached the calibration button to the front of the servo tray. These proved to be good locations for both Items. 3: neatness counts! All wires
are neatly tucked out of the way so they don't interfere with any part of the airframe, and I used zlp-tles to secure
the ribbon cable to the chassis. Installing the Co-Pilot In a helicopter takes only a few minutes.
condition was much calmer, and the sun
was out. I recalibrated the unit and
launched the model as before. On the first
day, the IR rating was three; on the second day, it was five. Again, the model flew
beautifully with very little input from me.
What a cool experience!
I am completely happy with the CoPilot's performance. If you fly your model
in normal (mildly windy) conditions, it
will easily fly all by itself. Used in conjunction with an instructor, this unit will
78
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
greatly shorten the learning curve for any
beginning pilot. For $119.95, the Co-Pilot
is a great learning aid for the student
pilot. As he becomes more accustomed to
the model's stability, the unit's sensitivity
can be gradually decreased until the student can fly completely unassisted. For
experienced pilots, the unit can be used to
enhance the stability of faster models,
especially in gusty conditions. It helps
smooth out final approaches, and that
improves landings. Install the FMA Co-
The FMA Co-Pilot is a great tool
to help beginners learn how to hover
and get into forward flight with little
risk to the heli. The possibilities are
almost endless. Learning tail-in or
nose-in hovering, performing aerobatics or stabilizing a helicopter
camera platform are all easy when
the helicopter returns to a stable
upright hover simply by letting go of
the sticks! Give the Co-Pilot a try;
you'll be pleasantly surprised.
Pilot in your next model and give autopilot flight a try. You'll love it! ±
JR; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
FMA Direct, 9607 Dr. Perry Rd., Unit 109,
Ijumsville, MD 21754; (800) 343-2934;
fax (301) 831-8987; www.fnuidirect.com.
Hangar 9; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc.
Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105 Ficldstone Rd.,
Champaign, II. 61822; (800) 338-4639;
www.horiy.onhobby.coin.
Multiplex USA, 560 Library St., San Fernando, CA
91340; (800) 375-1312; fax (818) 838-3127;
www.inultiplexrc.com.
Assemble ABS
Cowls and
Wheel Pants
Basic skills, advanced results
W
by nek Ben
hen you buy the latest and greatest kit, chances are
this article, I used a cowl and wheel pant from Midwest's
pretty good that the included vacuum-formed ABS plas-
giant-scale CAP 232. Let's take a look.
tic cowl and wheel pants will need to be assembled.
Because of the assembly required, many modelers don't give
these ABS plastic parts a second thought; instead, they toss
them into the spare-parts box and opt to use aftermarket fiberglass replacements.
The truth is, the ABS parts in kits are usually of good quality
and don't require a lot of work to produce strong, durable, lightweight cowls and wheel pants. The techniques and tips presented describe how I assemble ABS parts for a one-piece look.
To produce a good result, you'll need some basic materials
such as fiberglass cloth, glue for plastic (or thin CA), putty,
styrene plastic and spray contact cement. These are used to
assemble and strengthen the parts and improve their looks. For
D
First, trim the parts for proper fit. This step determines how much
extra work you'll need to do later. The more thorough you are
now, the less filling and sanding you'll need to do later. Be methodical
with this step. The cowl and wheel pant parts should fit together easily
and not have to be force-fit.
SO
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
When the parts have
been trimmed but
before you glue them
together, scuff the
inside of the cowl
and wheel pants
with 60-grit sandpaper.
This will give the epoxy
(applied later) something
to grip.
I g l Most cowl and wheel-pant halves have molded-in lips that mate
^ " ^ with each other; this provides a gluing surface for the parts. (If
your parts have molded-in lips, skip to step 6.) Some parts, however,
are trimmed at the factory and do not have a lip for the mating half.
Don't despair; you can easily add a lip using strips of styrene. Many
hobby shops have sheets of styrene plastic for scratch builders; I use
sheets that are 0.030 thick. This provides plenty of strength yet is
flexible enough to be molded to the shape needed. For cowls, I cut
%-inch-wide strips; for wheel pants, I use 1/2-inch-wide strips.
Using small
spring clamps,
test-fit the plastic strips to the
inside of the
cowl and note
where you'll
need to bend the
plastic to conform to any
curves. Do the
same for the
wheel pants.
Using your fingers, gently bend the plastic to the curve needed; you'll be relieving the
tension in the plastic strips when they are glued into place.
Now glue the strips
into one of the cowl
halves and a wheel
pant, and use plenty
of spring clamps. For
glue, I usually use
Oatey Clear PVC
Cement (you can also
use thin CA); it slightly
dissolves the plastic
and when the cement
dries, the parts will
be firmly welded
together. Let the
cement cure
overnight.
Here's a tip: before you glue the halves together, take a razor blade or
a hobby knife with a no. 11 blade and put a slight radius on the inside
corner of the mating part. By removing this edge, you allow the parts
to fit together more tightly. You'll end up with a more closely fitting
seam that requires less filler.
Now glue
the cowl
and wheel-pant
halves together.
I again use Oatey
PVC Cement and
plenty of tape,
rubber bands,
or clamps to
hold the parts
together. Here are
the cowl and
wheel pant glued
together and
ready for
reinforcement
and seam work.
After the glue has set, remove the clamps and check the lip for
any glue residue that needs to be removed, and then test-fit the
parts together. Because of the wheel pant's curves, you'll most likely
need to trim the lip so the halves can easily fit together. Remember,
take your time so you achieve the best possible fit. The cowl should
not require much trimming. When you've finished, the parts should
again fit together easily.
Use 60-grit sandpaper to block-sand and remove any high spots, and
then blend the seams together. As you sand, you'll notice some shiny
spots; these are low spots that you'll need to fill with putty. Don't
worry about any scratches; they'll be filled in with putty and primer
later. Now block-sand and further smooth the seams with 150-grit
sandpaper to remove most of the scratches. It's a good idea to wear a
mask when you're sanding so you don't inhale the dust. Now is a good
time to cut out the openings in the cowl and wheel pant (you'll need
access to the inside of the pant for the next step). Use a rotary tool
with a cutting bit to rough out the openings, and then use a file or
sandpaper to final-shape the openings.
JUNE
2002
81
HDW TD ASSEMBLE ABS COWLS AND WHEEL PANTS
Cut some
strips of
heavy (4- to
9-ounce) fiberglass cloth about
2 inches wide
for the cowl and
about 1 1/2 inches
wide for the
wheel pant;
you'll use them
to reinforce the
seams from the
inside. If the
plastic is somewhat thin, you can fiberglass the entire inside instead
of just the seam. Also have some smaller pieces of cloth handy for
oddly contoured areas and to add reinforcement to mounting holes
or other weak areas. Now lay the strips of cloth into place over the
seams. To simplify this job, spray a light coat of contact cement on
the cloth; this will help hold it in place when you brush on the epoxy.
Mix about 1/2 ounce of slow-curing epoxy in a graduated cup (smaller
batches have a longer working time). Thin the epoxy a little by adding
some rubbing alcohol to it; a thinner mixture more easily soaks
through the cloth and onto the plastic. To apply the epoxy, use
disposable acid brushes; they are easily bent to reach into nooks and
crannies. Apply enough epoxy to the cloth to thoroughly wet it but not
so much that it runs all over the place, and then check for voids; apply
more epoxy as necessary. Work small areas at a time, and then move
to a different section. Allow the epoxy to cure for several hours.
After the epoxy has cured, trim away any excess cloth. Now the parts
are ready for you to remove the seams and apply the putty. Many
putties are available; most modelers have their favorites. I like to use
3M Acryl-Blue Glazing Putty, available at auto-parts stores. This putty
dries quickly, doesn't shrink and feather-sands nicely. You can also
make a filler paste of epoxy and baby powder. Use an artist's spatula
to apply the putty to the part and smooth it out. Work the putty into the
seam and the surrounding area. I applied tape to one half of the cowl
so I wouldn't put any putty where it isn't needed. Once the putty starts
to set up, remove the tape. Be sure to work in a well-ventilated area!
After the putty has cured, roughly block-sand the
filler to shape with 60-grit sandpaper. Check to
see whether any additional filler is needed, and apply as
necessary. Now switch to 150-grit and start to smooth
out and feather the filler into the surrounding areas.
Constantly check the filler for low spots and fill them if
necessary. Because you're using a sanding block, the
putty on the high spots are sanded out while the putty in
the low areas gets left behind. Next, lightly wet-sand the
entire part with 400-grit wet
or dry sandpaper to help remove scratches left behind by the previous sanding.
Just be careful not to sand away the putty. Thoroughly wash the parts to clean
off any finger oils and dust in preparation for priming. Because I covered my
model with Top Flite MonoKote, I used LustreKote primer. Whichever paint system
you use, check its compatibility on some scrap plastic first.
Now that you have primed your parts, they should look just like primed
fiberglass parts. With a little effort, time and basic building skills, you will
have made a cowl and wheel pants that are as durable as fiberglass, and
you will have saved yourself some money in the process. So when your next
kit includes ABS plastic parts, don't chuck them out; build them and amaze
your flying buddies with your finishing skills. ±
LustreKote; distributed by Great Planes Model Distributors Co., P.O. Box 9021,
Champaign, IL 61826-9021; (800) 637-7660; fax (217) 398-0008; www.greatplanes.com.
MonoKote; distributed by Great Planes.
Top Flite; distributed by Great Planes.
82
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
CTION
The easiest way to launch your
bird model Is to drop ft from a
mother ship. This way, you can
try out slight modifications and
wing-configuration changes.
Is Ha model or the real thing? Really hard to
tell—even for real birds!
Design and Build an
A turkey vulture that can thermal!
by Bob Hoey
odelers have been attempting to build and fly bfrd models for a
time. The challenge of doing this successfully, however, is obvious
i builder-after all, birds have neither rudders nor vertical tails. Over the
last 11 years, I have used RC models to try to understand how soaring birds fly
without vertical tails. I have developed four bird models (Raven, Seagull, Turkey
Vulture and Pelican) that fly reasonably well without vertical fins or rudders. This
research has given me a pretty good understanding of the stability and control of
gliding birds. I can now design glider models of birds that require surprisingly small
design concessions and look quite realistic In flight. The bird's complex control!
methods cannot be duplicated exactly, and our flying ability is limited to _J
dng and controlling from a remote viewpoint, so we may have to cheaj
e to achieve stable, controllable flight. Nevertheless, we can
amlc methods for stability and control.
Blrd-IIke flight Is possible with
model even wHhout a vertical fin
and rudder. The secret Is In the
wingtlp feathers that act like
ailerons to turn the model.
Even a big old pelican can be
modeled. Notice its graceful
wlngtlp aileron feathers.
PECIFICATIONS
5DEL: Turkey Vulture
ODEL TYPE: bird-like rudderless glider
'INGSPAN: 64 in.
ING AREA: 600 sq. in.
NGTH: 25.5 in.
EIGHT: 2.5 Ib.
ING LOADING: 9.75 oz./sq. ft.
tDIO REQ'D: 2-channel (aileron and elevator)
Herein my seagull model.,Note:that the mbvabte*
wingtip feature, begins at about the gray/black iolbr
Jlne'. (The midspan break in the photo is a fixed
ground-adjustable joint for altering the dihedral.) * V|
DESIGN METHOD
Start by observing and photographing the bird species you wish
to imitate. Try to get bottom, side and front views, but be prepared for a real challenge, since these critters are continuously
changing shape. Slides are best because they can be projected
onto a wall, and your subject's shape can be traced with a pencil.
Varying the projection distance also allows different views to be
scaled to the same size. Use a little artistic license and develop a
3-view.
Next, apply the simplified stability and control criteria
described herein (center of gravity [CG] location, wing dihedral
and sweep). Make design alterations to your 3-view to bring these
numbers within reason. The final step is to design flexibility into
the structure to allow for trial-and-error development of your
design. (Provide for changes in dihedral, CG and tail area, for
example). Gliding flight without a vertical tail is certainly
possible, but stability will be less than that of a typical RC glider.
COMMENTS: designed by Bob Hoey, this bird-like RC Turkey
Iture uses highly effective wingtip aileron feathers to bank
d turn the model just like a real bird. The model has no
^rtical fin or rudder but is very stable in flight. Built of balsa
and plywood, the model is covered with MonoKote and has a
drop-away ventral fin for bungee high-start launches. It can also
Ib dropped from another airplane. The wing is highly undermbered and slightly reflexed. The plan shows the articulated
Bngtip aileron feathers in detail.
speed. Using a slightly reflexed airfoil (typical for flying wings)
also avoids large tail deflections.
ROLL-YAW AXIS
The complex shape of a bird's wing, and a bird's lack of a vertical
tail, make the design of the wing critical to successful flight. Wing
sweep and dihedral are the critical features. Dihedral varies over
the span of most bird wings. Land birds (hawks, buzzards, eagles,
etc.) usually have small dihedral near the root and increasing
dihedral near the tip. Sea birds (gulls, pelicans, albatross, etc.), on
the other hand, often have negative dihedral but high sweep in
their outer wing panels. A method for defining the total dihedral
effect for the wing is also described in the "Click Trip." These
calculations are for the wing only and do not account for the
PITCH AXIS
The complex planform of a bird's wing requires more attention
during the design to properly locate the CG. The wing's mean
aerodynamic chord (MAC) and aerodynamic center (AC) can be
located using the procedure described in the "Click Trip" URL at
the end of this article. First flights should be made with the CG
close to the aerodynamic center. Bird models are typically very
short-coupled in pitch, and the tail area may need to be enlarged,
much like any scale model. A 15- to 20-percent increase will
improve trim ability and require less attention to maintain glide
The basic keel and plywood crutch
parts of the fuselage (bird's body).
JUNE 2002 S7
DESIGN AND BUILD AN RC BIRD MODEL
The tip feathers operate in a region of up-flow as the vortex begins to form around the wingtip. They have a large negative angle relative to the wing but are generating
upward lift and a small amount of forward thrust. When used differentially as ailerons, the difference in lift produces a roll, and the difference in thrust causes a small
yaw in the same direction. (These birds are pretty clever!)
Initial setting: no roll, slight adverse yaw
Final setting: good roll, slight proverse yaw
Here, the formers and side sheeting have been added to the
structure.
FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS
Set the elevator's neutral position so the elevator is
parallel with the stabilizer. If you
are using a computer radio,
program the throttle lever to
control (bias) the two ailerons up
or down together (like flaperons).
Set the tip-aileron neutral position
so that the leading edge of each
aileron is about 1/8 inch below the
wing's leading edge. Add ballast
as necessary to get the CG to the
location shown on the plan. Do
some hand glides in still air to
establish the trim settings.
For slope advocates, this
model is a real floater, as is its
real-life counterpart. Without ballast, it does not
penetrate well but is quite realistic in a fight
88 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
TIP FEATHER CONFIGURATIONS
destabilizing influence of
the body, heads, beaks and
other
lateral
areas
forward of the CG.
Artificial vertical fins in
the form of "feet" (ventral
fins) or clear circular discs
near the wingtip, toed-in
about 20 degrees, can be
beneficial for early flights.
The required fin area is
usually quite small (6 to 8
square inches) and can be
reduced or removed as
flight experience increases.
Note: electric motors at
the front have been tried and are quite
destabilizing. If you intend to try a propeller, use one of the above techniques to
add some vertical fin area.
STRUCTURE
The outer wing panels of a real bird are
extremely light compared with the rest of
the structure (they're just feathers!). Outer
wing panels should be kept as light as
possible to keep roll inertia low. Heavy
wingtips result in unwanted rolling
oscillations. Unusual wing dihedral
patterns (gull, for example) can be
duplicated by using a full-depth balsa spar
and cutting it to the desired dihedral
shape. For thin wings,
glue carbon fiber to
the top and bottom of
breeze. If you have a computer radio, you can
the spar for added
experiment with the aileron bias setting in flight.
strength. Sheeting the
There should be a position that
leading edges (top and
allows gentle coordinated turns
bottom, back to the
with the tip ailerons with no
spar) will provide the
adverse yaw. If you don't have a
necessary D-tube seccomputer radio, try adjusting the
aileron bias on successive flights
tion
for
torsion
to find the best setting. (Don't go
strength. The model's
too far upward, or aileron control
weight will likely be
will disappear completely.) The
considerably less than
model will be considerably lighter
that of a real bird,
than the real bird, so experimentespecially for larger
ing with ballast is appropriate.
species, but this differYour Turkey Vulture model will
ence is mainly in the
not only attract attention from
fuselage (body weight
your fellow modelers, but it will
and shoulder muscles).
also likely attract some attention from other soaring birds, such as hawks and ravens.
DESIGN AND BUILD AN RC BIRD MDDEL
A little more sheeting and a couple
of balsa blocks carved to shape,
and you'll almost be finished.
(horizontal tail that tilts
around a longitudinal
axis for controlling turns)
works OK depending on
the CG location but is not
very powerful. If used
with a pitch-stable air-
CONTROL
Two methods for pitch control
have been tried—a standard
Here's the completed fuselage ready to cover with
elevator at the rear of the tail
MonoKote. To make it easier to finish, I simply painted
and the single-piece tail hinged
the head and beak.
at the wing's trailing edge. The
elevator at the rear is the most
plane (forward CG), the model flies well,
effective.
but the control action is opposite to the
Because of the large adverse yaw associway birds really fly (the model will turn in
ated with ailerons, they don't work well
the same direction as the tilted tail, but
when there is no vertical tail. A rolling tail
During the past 11 years, many encounters have occurred between these models and real birds.
Unfortunately, these encounters are usually spontaneous and take place at a fairly high altitude, so I
have no photographic evidence of them.
There are lots of ravens around here; they are gregarious birds, and quite inquisitive. The models
circle easily and climb with the real birds in thermals. Often, one or two ravens fly formation with the
model and follow it as it circles in a thermal (or, just as often, I follow them). Occasionally, one will
come in quite close. Because the wing loadings of the models are lighter than their real counterparts,
the models can fly more slowly. Sometimes, I slow the model to near-stall and then watch as the poor
birds stall or flap off to one side.
One warm, still day, I thermalled a Raven model with about 25 real ravens for about half an hour. The
entire gaggle got so high that I had trouble distinguishing the model from the real birds. I made step
inputs in roll control, and then flew the bird that rolled abruptly. From my notes on the day of the flight:
"Finally I got too high to see well, so I put in full forward trim and flew straight. One bird followed,
matching the model's speed and descent rate, and joined up in formation. I pulled up into a loop. He
watched, then joined up again. I went into a full-up, full-left spiral for about 5 turns to lose altitude,
then recovered. The raven pulled his wings in and did about 3 half-rolls, then some other maneuvers,
then joined up again. I continued trying to descend, and eventually he left.
"The fixed-geometry, under-cambered wing of the models is no match for the refined, variablegeometry wing of the real birds in straight, high-speed flight. The model quickly drops below and
behind. On several occasions, ravens have followed the model down to about 20 feet altitude, and
then circled overhead squawking loudly as the model lands. One raven landed nearby and walked all
the way around the model (it was probably puzzled by my belly landing}."
I have also thermalled the Turkey Vulture model with real turkey vultures. The appearance and climb
performance were similar, but real vultures aren't as friendly as ravens; they completely ignored the
model.
/ used a 0.063-inch-thick piece of aluminum for
my wing dihedral brace. Note that the fulldepth spars slide into place in the slots cut
into the brace.
The wing is built with a front and rear portion
glued to the main spar. Here you see the wing root
and the slots in the ribs for the aluminum brace.
no one will notice!). Drag flaps on the
lower wing surface (or spoilers on the
upper surface) also work well for initiating
turns, but they aren't very efficient or
realistic. Since they rely on dihedral effect
to control turns, they often require larger
wing dihedral than that observed on a
real bird.
Wingtip ailerons (feathers) are the most
bird-like roll-control method. They are
very sensitive to the initial incidence setting of the two ailerons. I use a bias control through the throttle channel to help
locate the proper angle in flight. For land
birds, use the forward three feathers as a
single aileron surface that rotates around
a spanwise axis (detailed on the plan). For
sea birds, use the outer 22 percent of the
semi-span as an aileron, rotating around a
I've had the most fun with hawks. They will dive at any of the models (raven, seagull, or turkey vulture) from out of nowhere. They have never touched or damaged a model but
usually go screaming by with their wings folded. I once watched a hawk regain altitude
after the attack and then begin circling off to the side. He stayed there until I did something abnormal, such as a stall, with the model. He then folded his wings and came right
at the model, aborting at the last minute. I triggered three attacks this way. Apparently,
the hawks thought they were watching a wounded or sick bird. Recently, a hawk zoomed in
and established a position directly above the seagull model just a few inches away. He
stayed in that position for about 15 seconds as I made turns with the model. Eventually,
he flew away. I expected to find claw marks on the model but saw no evidence of any contact. Hawk attacks on the Turkey Vulture model are more cautious—usually from above
and directly behind. They fly in trail with the model for awhile until they are satisfied that I
it is not a wounded, easy target. I hope to eventually install one of the new, tiny video cameras in a model to document
some of these encounters-up close and personal.
'ere, the two wing panels have been joined. Note the reflex
hape of the airfoil. The wingtip aileron feathers and the
'ding-edge sheeting still have to be installed.
90
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
DESIGN AND BUILD AN RC BIRD MODEL
spanwise axis at the wing 1/4 chord (see the
seagull photo).
Kimbrough rotary-drive couplers
eliminate unsightly pushrods and control
horns and minimize control-system slop.
To provide the stiffest possible link, I use a
carbon rod or an aluminum tube for the
torque rod, and I mount the servos as far
inboard in the wing as is practical.
BIRD-LIKE FLIGHT
The tail feathers are built flat on the building
board. Note that the horizontal stabilizer's
leading edge is shaped to match up to the
wing's trailing edge and is reinforced with
He-inch plywood.
Here are the wingtip feathers. They are made
out of He-inch medium balsa. Note the dihedral
added to the first two pairs.
In general, high-start bungee launches
don't work well for models without rudders or vertical tails. I use a drop-away fin
secured in a slot in the fuselage. The fin
can be attached to the towline so that it
drops off after launch. Slope soaring is
easy and can produce very realistic flights
in light wind. Air launches (drops) from a
powered RC mother ship also work well (I
have made more than 1,000 air launches
to date). This launch method allows for
repeat testing and refinement of the
model. If a tip-aileron-bias feature (tip
feathers) is being used, start with the
aileron leading edge about 1/8 inch below
the wing's leading edge at the end rib.
Move the bias up slowly in flight until
you find that sweet spot where gentle,
coordinated turns are possible. A few
words of caution: tip feathers are easily
damaged. Building stronger feathers (out
of fiberglass, for example) only adds more
To order the full-size plan, turn to "RCStore.com" on page 130.
92 MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
1
The front three feathers are movable, while the
rear three feathers are fixed in place on the
wingtip. You can see the carbon-fiber rod and
the brass tube bushing used to articulate the
aileron feathers.
Here, all the wingtip feathers are in place.
A hatch will be added to the opening under
the tip.
weight outboard and moves the failure
points into the primary structure. Wire
tip-skids help some, but my solution is to
use straight-grained 1/16-inch balsa sheet
for the feathers and take some thin CA to
the flying site.
Let's hope these brief comments and
DESIGN AND BUILD AN RC BIRD MODEL
The aileron servo for each wing
FLYING LIKE A BIRD
It was a calm Saturday morning, and as I walked outside for the
morning paper, I spotted a raven gliding toward me at telephone-pole
height. Although this is a common sight here in the California desert,
I stopped to watch. I had just retired from the Air Force Flight Test
panel is attached to the root
end of the wing. This keeps the
tips light for better turning performance. A Kimbrough rotary
coupler connects the torque
rod to the servo.
Center as a stability and control flight-test engineer, and now I had time
to expand my interest in bird flight as a new hobby. As I watched, the
raven started a slow bank to the right with its wings fully outstretched.
Left: without a vertical fin
The turn got steeper and steeper until, at last, the raven dived-head-
and rudder, bird models
first—into the middle of the road, about 30 yards in front of me. I was
can be very difficult to
dumbfounded. I had never seen a bird crash before!
launch with a bungee
high-start or a winch line.
To improve the ride, you
can use a drop-away
ventral fin like this one
that fits into a slot in the
bottom of the fuselage.
hints spur some interest in building models that look and fly like birds.
The analysis methods mentioned are good starting points, but they do
not ensure that a new bird model will fly well on the first launch. There
is still much to learn about how birds fly.
BUILDING A TURKEY VULTURE
Span • 4.17 ft.
Length • 1.92 ft.
Wing area = 2.78 sq. ft. Aspect ratio = 6.2S
Weight = 1.1 Ib.
BASE-LINE RAVEN
There was no evidence of life after the impact, and I suspected that
the bird had suffered a stroke or a heart attack. In any case, this little
fellow had unwittingly given his life to science. I seized the opportunity
to weigh him and draw an outline of his wings and tail on a sheet of
butcher paper. The dimensions were surprisingly similar to a ^A-size
radio-controlled model that I had been flying. I reasoned that I could
probably learn something about how birds fly by building a glider model
with the same shape, size and planform of a large soaring bird.
I hoped to establish a "base-line" configuration that would fly, even
if I had to cheat a little at the beginning. The starting point was a series
of small, balsa-wood, profile models with 6- to 8-inch spans that I
glided around the living room. I was a little surprised to find that these
models were stable in all axes, even without vertical tails. Lateral
control was an enigma, but I soon discovered that either spoilers or
drag flaps caused the model to turn toward the high-drag wing.
To provide room for the radio gear, I built the prototype Raven
model about 8 percent larger than a real raven. Pitch control was
provided by deflection of the rear portion of the tail, and lateraldirectional control was provided by the use of drag flaps (downward
only) on the bottom of each wing. I built it to be sturdy, since I expected
frequent crashes. The model was launched from the top of a small hill.
It appeared to be stable but glided with a gentle rolling oscillation that
could not be controlled with the drag flaps, so a very small vertical fin
was added. Stable and controllable glides were then possible.
It seems that each successful test produces additional, unanswered
questions, such as: how do birds twist their wingtip feathers to produce
proverse yaw? Does a bird's airfoil really have a reflexed trailing edge
in flight? Do birds adjust the wing sweep at the wingtips as part of the
control mechanism? Of course, there is also a wide variety of species
with various wing shapes to try. I have only begun to explore the
technical aspects of how birds really fly. I am constantly amazed at
the incredible complexity of bird flight, and I marvel at that little
"bird-brain" that's able to coordinate all the required actions.
Early flights of my Turkey Vulture model oscillated continuously in roll.
I made three changes to help it fly better. First, I built a new, lighter
wing. Next, I replaced the drag flaps with wingtip-aileron feathers, and
third, I installed Kimbrough rotary-drive couplers to control all moving
surfaces. In its current configuration, the model oscillates lightly in
turbulence, much as a real bird does, but it's easily controlled and will
stabilize nicely in still air.
The model is based on photos of vultures flying in thermals. It is
approximately full size (66-inch span) but is roughly half the weight of a
real turkey vulture. The wing construction incorporates a full-depth spar
and a cambered-wing airfoil with reflex. The fuselage (body) is built with
balsa formers, sheeting and balsa blocks for the head and minor fairing
pieces. I cover my bird models with MonoKote film and paint the heads
to match. This results in a model that is a true floater but does not penetrate the wind as well as a model
with less camber. The model handles
ballast well, and this can be used to
somewhat improve penetration. Real
soaring birds reduce their wingspan
and area and increase their wing
sweep when flying straight between
thermals (more options for
experimentation?).
Detailed instructions for building
the Turkey
Vulture
model
accompany the full-size plan.
You can also view the detailed article
and some related aerodynamic illustrations via the "Click Trip" Web
address at the end of this article.
Please let me know, through Model
Airplane News, of your experiences
with bird-like flight. ±
For the full story, take the "Click Trip"!
MODELAIRPLANENEWS.COM
94 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
For more information and to
see the model fly, click on
the article and videos link.
The latest in giant scale
I
f you live in the Northeast, one sure-fire sign that the winter
building season is drawing to an end is the annual WRAM show
in White Plains, NY. Every year, thousands of modelers trek to
this modeling mecca to show off their latest projects
and for a preview of things to come from the RC
model industry. Hosted by the Westchester Radio
Aero Modelers club, the 2002 show (the 34th)
was definitely worth the trip.
REALLY BIG STUFF
At this year's show, it was obvious that very big
aerobatic models are in vogue. Several companies
showed almost-ready-to-fly unlimited aerobatic
planes in the 150cc engine-displacement range.
Being able to see these Tournament-of-Championsize aircraft up close is a great way to observe the latest
trends. Typically, these giants have three servos per aileron, four
servos for elevator and at least two servos for rudder control. For
the ultimate in system redundancy, many pilots split their
onboard RC systems in two by using a left- and a right-side
receiver, battery pack and switch harness to control the servos on
either side of the aircraft. Considering how much you can invest
in one of these beauties, I'd say that installing a redundant radio
system is a very good idea.
RC SHOWCASE REVOLUTION
I spoke with Mike Dooley of RC Showcase about the company's
awesome-looking, all-composite, almost-ready-to-fly Velox
Revolution.
Manufactured by
Krill, the 47-percent-scale model
has a 135-inch
wingspan, weighs
about 50 pounds
Left: the ZDZ 210B2 is
an impressive twincylinder gasoline engine
with electronic ignition.
98 MDDEL AIRPLANE NEW5
This Krill Velox Revolution took up
about half the display space in the
RC Showcase booth. The 47-percentscale unlimited aerobat has
all-composite construction.
and is intended for the ZDZ 210 twin-cylinder gasoline
engine. The finish on this molded-Kevlar and carbon-fiber
beauty is flawless. The model basically comes as you see it in
the picture and is ready for engine and radio installation. The
most difficult part about this project would probably be finding a
47-percent-scale pilot figure to put under that beautifully molded
canopy.
J'TEC RADIOCRAFT EXTRA 330LX
Next to our booth was an impressive Extra 330EX ARF. A scaledup version of the popular J'Tec RadioCraft 35-percent aerobat, this
ARF has a 123-inch span and 2,745 square inches of wing area.
Weighing 38 pounds, the Extra has a respectable wing loading of
32 ounces per square foot. Designed around a 150cc-size engine,
the 40-percent-scale 330LX comes with an engine-mounting box
completely built, and right engine thrust is already incorporated
into the structure. Pilot holes have also been drilled in the firewall
for either the Desert Aircraft DAI50 or the 3W 150 engine. Made
from laser-cut balsa and plywood parts, it has fully sheeted foamcore wing panels and horizontal stabilizer panels.
ZIROLI'S VENGEANCE
Always ready to show something new at the WRAM show, Nick
Ziroli Sr. displayed his latest warbird project high above the Nick
Ziroli Plans booth. Sporting an unpainted epoxy resin and fiberglass cloth finish,
Nick's Vultee A-31
Vengeance is a
replica of an early
American-built
dive-bomber used
in the South
Pacific
during
WW II. Designed
around a Zenoah
G-62, the '/6-scale
A-31
has
a RC Showcase showed some new canister mufflers
96-inch span. The for its ZDZ engines. These mufflers are mounted
internally in the airplane and are very efficient
model uses Robart and quiet.
no. 150 90-degree
THINKING BIG
Bubba Splvey showed
off his new Laser 200 in the
Lanier RC booth. Part
of the Lanier
21st Century
ARF line, the 1/3-scale
Laser has a 96-inch span.
rotating retractable landing gear (P-40
style) and has wing flaps. Nick's plan as well as a
fiberglass engine cowl and a molded greenhouse canopy will
be available soon. The model uses traditional balsa and plywood
construction, with formers assembled over a flat stick-built
alignment crutch. If you want something just a little bit different
for the flying field, Nick's Vengeance should do the trick.
cowl, engine mount, landing gear,
control horns, fuel tank, wheels and
all necessary hardware and instructions.
S.I. MODELS WEEKS SOLUTION
S.I. Models provides a custom model airplane CAD
service that offers model plan development,
plotting/printing services and custom model
aircraft graphics. The company also offers a plan
for a beautiful 33-percent-scale Weeks Solution
modeled after the full-size aircraft built by Kermitt
Weeks. It weighs 19 l/4 pounds and is powered by a Zenoah G62.
S.I. Models also offers an assembled cabane structure, landing
LANIER LASER 200
The new IMAA- and IMAC-legal 1/3-sca\e Laser 200 ARF from
Lanier RC has a 96-inch wingspan and 1,596 square inches of
wing area. Its fuselage is 79 inches long, and the model is
intended for 3.2 to 4.2 2-stroke and 2.4 to 3.0 4-stroke engines.
With an estimated flying weight of from 17 to 22 pounds, the
new Laser should be a performer and have excellent landing
characteristics. Part of Lanier's 21st Century ARF line, the kit
comes with nearly everything you need except radio equipment
and an engine. High-quality hardware is included. The model has
removable wings that are strengthened with an aluminum spar. A
factory-painted fiberglass engine cowl and wheel pants match the
covering precisely. If you're looking for a new aerobatic giant,
Lanier's new Laser 200 is a classic design that delivers.
KANGKE LASER 2000
Super Kraft planes are manufactured by Kangke Industrial and use
traditional balsa and plywood construction. The new 87-inch
Laser 2000 is completely jig-built at the factory with plug-in wing
panels and is covered with Oracover film. Intended for
experienced fliers, the Laser has 1,275 square inches of wing area
and should weigh between 16 and 18 pounds. Ideally suited for
40 to 50cc gasoline engines, the kit comes with painted fiberglass
Here are the parts from the new Kangke Laser 2000 kit. Built of light balsa
and plywood, this aerobat is perfect for a Brison 3.2 gasoline engine.
Watch for a review coming soon.
100
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
Nick Ziroli Sr. showed this ready-to-paint Vultee 4-31 Vengeance.
The 1/6-scale dive bomber uses a Zenoah G-62 for power.
gear, canopy, a CD with construction photos, and a short kit with
fuselage sides, wing ribs and other parts. The construction plans a
are $40 each; the construction CD is $10; the complete hardware
package is $115; and the wood short kit is $220. A 42-percent
Solution is also available. For information, contact Tom Lowrie,
RD 3, Box 153, Dalton, PA 18414; tomt^simodels.com, or call
(570) 563-1445.
GLENN TORRANCE MODELS
I chatted with Glenn Torrance about his impressive WW I
designs. Glenn exhibited two kits at the show: his Fokker Dr.l
triplane and his latest Fokker D-VIII. Both are in 'A scale, and the
kits are absolutely gorgeous. Many laser-cut parts are included,
and Glenn offers two sets of plans with his kits—one full size and
one reduced copy—to use as a reference while you build. National
scale competitor Tom Kosewski was also in the booth with his
scratch-built Fokker D-VII to show off Glenn's new '/i-scale
printed lozenge fabric. Specializing in WW I aviation, Glenn has
raised the bar for kit quality and completeness. Basically, his
models are scaled-down versions of the real aircraft, and every
detail is reproduced. Glenn uses laser-cutting in very creative
ways—for thin leather sheets to provide a truly scale cockpit
coaming. Even the holes in the plywood sheeting are laser-cut, so
you can sew the leather padding into place! Quite impressive.
Glenn's models are designed around the Laser 200 4-stroke
engine, but other engines such as the Zenoah G-23 or Saito 180
can also be used.
The D-VIII has an 82.6-inch span and is 56.8 inches long. Its
flying weight should be 16 to 18 pounds. The kit has more than
300 parts and a photo-illustrated 100-page construction manual.
THINKING BIG
Included are a two-piece aluminum engine cowl (with cable groove),
laser-cut wood parts, stamped metal parts, precut plywood panels
and plywood wing covering (35 pieces). Also included are dummy
engine cylinders and Spandau machine guns (from Williams Bros.),
lacing cord for stitching and cable bindings, seatbelt harness and fittings, laminated rudder and elevator outlines and functional landing
gear—and many other parts too numerous to mention. Glenn also
showed me a kit for his newest design, the unusual and seldom modeled Fokker D-VI. It is basically a biplane that uses the Fokker
triplane fuselage, and this kit should be out in August. For the ultimate WW I airplane, Glenn Torrance Models is the place to look.
This impressive
Weeks Solution
biplane is available as a plan
from S.I. Models.
It comes in 33and 42-percent
versions, with
many available
accessories
including hardware
and a wood
short kit.
The Ultimate Park Flyer SM
Electric powered
Flies In high winds
5-7minute Nighttime
Folding, flexible
rotor blades
FUSION 35 controller
30 in. main rotor diameter
6-7 cell Ni-Cad car battery packs
Improved main rotor and tail rotor blades
\
Glenn Torrance Models raised the bar in kit quality
and completeness with its Fokker D-VIII and Dr.l
kits. A Fokker D-VI kit will be out soon.
Powerful brushed
motor modified by
Simplified motor/
radio installation
The new Lite Machines Corona™ electric helicopter is the ultimate park
flyer. With its powerful Electro-Fusion™ 540-size motor, the Corona has
punchy performance to fly in confined areas and accelerate against gusty
winds. The Corona has patented flexible rotor blades that fold up to reduce
crash damage, and flies up to seven minutes on a standard six or seven cell
R/C car battery.
ever flown a helicopter before? Don't worry, the Corona conies with a
fully illustrated construction manual and an operator's guide that will
teach you how to fly on your own. Kits start at $199. Discount combos contain
everything from motors to radio control systems. See your local dealer or call
Lite Machines for details.
Phone: (765) 463-0959
Fax:
(765) 463-7004
www. litemachines. com
102 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
opatron
www.shopatron .com
There was so much more at the 2002 WRAM
show, but I have only so much space in the
column. Do yourself a favor and pencil in
the last weekend in February 2003 on your
calendar, and try to attend this Northeast
modeling extravaganza. You'll be glad
you did.
RPM REAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT
by
Dave
Gieike
Engine advice
I
t's time again to answer your engine questions. We have a
variety of situations this month, from an engine that isn't getting enough fuel to flying with antique powerplants to mixing
your own fuel. Keep those letters coming; if you have a question
you'd like to see answered here, please write to me c/o Model
Airplane News, 100 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA, or
email me at man@airage.com.
MIXING FUEL
Gerald Weiss of Menomonee Falls, WI, writes: "I am a 65-year-old
model builder and flier. I have several old model engines from my
childhood, including a K&B, GHQ, McCoy, Pacemaker .59 and
O&R. The smallest engine is a .19, and all are in good running
condition. 1 would like to use them, but where can I obtain—or
how do I mix—new fuel for these engines? I can only get 5- or 10percent-nitro fuel here. Should I add castor oil to these fuels?"
plug by the early '50s. The Pacemaker .59s were both spark ignition. The Ohlsson & Rice engines were originally spark ignition
but finished their production run with glow plugs. If your
Pacemaker, O&R and McCoy engines are still fitted with their
ignition timer and breaker points, I suggest running them on
spark ignition with gasoline/oil fuel. Here's a good mix: three
parts (by volume) of regular-grade pump gasoline and one part
SAE-70 oil.
Unfortunately, SAE-70 mineral oil is almost impossible to find
today, but Klotz BeanOil castor oil (available at motorcycle shops)
is a substitute that will not contaminate your engine's combustion chamber with carbon deposits. It's an excellent lubricant.
For glow O&R, K&B and McCoy engines, use 5- to 10-percent
nitromethane, 25- to 30-percent Klotz BeanOil castor oil and 65to 70-percent methanol. Several companies, including Wildcat
Fuels, will mix this blend to your specifications. Don't attempt to
use RC fuel in these old engines; 100-percent synthetic lube won't
adequately protect lapped pistons and cylinders, and the percentage of lubricant is usually too low. If you know the oil content of
the RC fuel, however, here's a useful formula for determining how
much castor oil to add to bring it up to acceptable specifications:
(F -1) x A
100-F
= oz. of castor oil to add
Where:
F = final percentage of oil desired;
I = initial percentage of oil already in the fuel;
A = ounces of fuel you are treating.
Example: if you have a gallon (128 ounces) of 18-percent synthetic
oil fuel, and you want to add castor oil to bring it up to 28 percent (not a bad idea with all that synthetic), find the following:
The author mixes his own fuel. The 5-gallon can on the left is methanol;
the graduated cylinder holds 1,000ml; the plastic 5-gallon can (third from
the left) contains nitromethane; the short gallon jug contains castor oil;
the standard gallon container (far right) contains Klotz KL-200 synthetic
oil. All fuel ingredients are available from Klotz. Many specialty fuel companies will custom mix fuel to your specifications; others already have
the desired blend as part of their standard products.
Gerald, I wish that you had included the individual displacements for each of your engines. Some manufacturers such as
McCoy used both lapped steel and ringed aluminum-alloy pistons
with meehanite (fine-grain cast iron) cylinders. Others such as
O&R produced only lapped-steel piston and cylinder units. Early
K&Bs had lapped iron pistons and a steel cylinder. Both versions
of the Pacemaker .59 were outfitted with a lapped-steel piston and
meehanite cylinder. As for the GHQ (in my opinion, the worst
American engine ever produced!), sell it to an engine collector;
they have been paying up to about $125 for one of these lemons.
All of these early engines required extensive break-in with relatively high percentages of castor-oil-based fuel. Except for very
early spark-ignition examples, K&B engines were all glow. McCoy
started out with ignition but had mostly switched to the glow
112 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
(10)x 128
100-28
= 17.8 oz.
Therefore, add 17.8 ounces of Klotz BeanOil to the gallon of 18percent synthetic-oil fuel. Of course, you will need another empty
gallon jug to help mix all of this together, since the original container is now too small. Also, the actual percentage of
nitromethane and methanol will decrease slightly but not enough
to affect engine performance.
FUEL-STARVED POWERPLANT
Tom Schumacher sent this email. "I hope you can help me with a
problem I'm having with my MDS 1.48. The engine is mounted
inverted and powers a Hangar 9 1/4-scale Cub. I originally used the
remote needle-valve setup with very poor results. It seemed that
no matter how much the engine was turned to the rich side, I
could never get it to 'four-cycle.' At first I thought that I might
have an air leak somewhere in the fuel system, so I replaced the
[fuel] lines and used wire-ties to cinch down every connection—
no luck. I've now eliminated the remote needle valve all together.
RPM
Using the needle in the carb helped, but not much. Frustrated, I
gave up; the Cub has been hanging in my garage ever since!
After reading your article in the November 2001 issue of Model
Airplane News concerning proper break-in, I purchased a test
stand, hoping to figure out the problem with the 1.48, but I didn't.
Before I ran the engine on the test stand, it had about 20 ounces
of fuel through it. I was finally able to get the engine running at
a rich four-cycle, but it took seven (!) turns to the rich side on
the needle valve. This seems excessive. I've tried the old trick of
using a small piece of fuel line around the needle valve to eliminate air leaks, but that didn't work either. When I go from seven
to six turns out, the engine runs at peak rpm; there is no
adjustability. I've considered replacing the carb but have no idea
what to replace it with."
thing, so install them as is; the grease will simply wash out during engine operation. If you don't like the slight frictional drag
that the seals produce, simply remove them. Pry them from
their seats with a tiny slot-type screwdriver (such as those used
by jewelers), or use a hobby knife with a no. 11 blade. Don't
touch (and possibly damage) the balls in the process (unlikely,
since you'll be careful!). You can then wash out the grease with
a solvent; I like to use lacquer thinner because it doesn't attract
rust-producing water from the air (caused by hygroscopic
action, as occurs with alcohol). Allow the bearings to dry naturally. Don't use compressed air to hasten drying; dirt in the
airstream could contaminate the bearing assembly. Lubricate
them with Marvel Mystery Oil and install them in your Moki.
Tom, it's a shame that you've had all this trouble with the MDS
1.48 2-stroke engine; it seems like a good match for the Cub.
The first thing that comes to mind is, what size fuel line are you
using? You didn't say in your letter. Is it the large variety or the
medium? If the latter, I suggest that you change to the larger
size. Fuel-flow rates can exceed 2 ounces per minute at a rich
"four-cycling" mode of operation with this engine, and that's a
lot of flow for medium-size fuel line.
Another possible cause of the problem is a restriction within
the carburetor itself. A piece of flashing or a chip from manufacturing processes could be lodged somewhere within the metering jet tube. Remove the carb from the engine and carefully disassemble it, looking closely at the jet and idle-needle
assembly/interface. With the primary needle valve removed,
blow air or force fuel through the spraybar with a fuel
bulb/syringe to see whether it behaves as if it's restricted. Try
running a piece of small diameter music wire, or a pipe cleaner,
through the spraybar.
Last, make certain that the carb is tightly sealed to the
neck of the crankcase; even a small air leak can lean a
fuel mixture in a hurry.
Mr. B. Jackson of Burlington, Ontario, Canada, writes: "I purchased four old Fox engines, including an early .78 with an
exhaust baffle coupled to the carburetor. Two Fox .36s and a Fox
.29 completed my find; all engines are new in the box! When I
told my fellow club members that I was going to use one of the
.36s in a Balsa USA Stick 40, they told me that Fox .29s and .36s
were hard to start, the carburetors were difficult to adjust, and
they really vibrate—especially in a lightly constructed model
such as the Stick 40. They also informed me that the Fox .29
and .36 require a minimum of 15-percent nitromethane in the
fuel. Can you tell me how much of this information is fact and
how much is fiction?"
OLDER FOX ENGINES
Mr. Jackson, it sounds as though your Fox .29 and .36s are
equipped with cast-iron pistons and steel cylinders. This combination required several hours of patient break-in before the iron and
steel were "bedded-in" and heat-cycle stress relief was achieved.
The break-in fuel was very important to the "iron Fox"; it required
a minimum of 25-percent castor oil (preferably 28 percent, with
a low nitromethane percentage—about 5 percent).
Although the Fox instructions were clearly written,
many modelers ignored them and tried to fly the
engine right out of the box; this never worked and
NEW BEARINGS FOR A MOKI
gave rise to the problems described by your club
D. Gibbs emails: "I have a three-year-old Moki
members. In my opinion, this was not the fault of
1.8. It starts very easily, runs very reliably and
the manufacturer or the engine. Properly broken in,
has plenty of power. In mid-flight the other
day, however, the engine stopped. The front
Fox engines are great runners.
[ball] bearing had failed, and a small piece of
In reference to Fox carburetors, I'd like to note
steel from the failed bearing had lodged at the
that Duke Fox produced more carburetor designs
very front of the crankcase housing, between
than any other manufacturer during the '60s and '70s.
it and the crankshaft. This caused only very
Another prolific producer of carb designs, SuperTigre, had to
minor damage to the housing, just behind
take a back seat to Fox in this arena. On at least one occathe front bearing, and didn't damage the
sion,
Peter Chinn (past engine columnist for Model Airplane
crankshaft at all. Using 600-grit wet/dry abraNews) was diligently trying to explain the workings of a
sive paper and some mild detergent mixed
recently released Fox carburetor while Duke Fox was proBall bearings for crankshaft
moting a newer version in an ad in the same issue!
with water for lubrication, I was able to support—front and rear.
With proper break-in and fuel (5- to 10-percent nitro is
completely clean up the inside of the
plenty), Fox R/C .29s and .36s are easy to start, smooth running
housing. The large, rear ball bearing seems fine, but I figured
and very throttleable—if the owner follows Duke's detailed
that while I had the crankcase housing unbolted from the
instructions. As an added benefit, a properly maintained "iron
crankcase, I would change out both bearings. I had previously
Fox" will run and last forever.
acquired replacement bearings from a local supplier, but unlike
the unsealed originals, these are sealed. The new bearings are
good-quality units from SKF. Would it be all right to replace the
Klotz Special Formula Products Inc., 7424 Freedom Way, Fort
old bearings with the sealed units? Does it make a difference?"
Wayne, IN 46817; (800) 242-0489; fax (219) 490-0490;
www.klotzlube.com.
Mr. Gibbs, the seals on your replacement bearings won't hurt a
114 MDDEL AIRPLANE NEW5
NAME THAT PLANE
Can you identify this aircraft?
S E N D Y O U R A N S W E R to Model Airplane News, Name
that Plane Contest (state issue in which plane appeared),
100 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA.
Congratulations to Eric Fotheringham of
Upton, MA, for correctly identifying
April's mystery plane as the Avro Lincoln,
the last piston-engine bomber to serve the
Royal Air Force (RAF)- Virtually a scaled-up
version of its predecessor—the famous
Lancaster bomber—the Lincoln was powered by four Rolls-Royce Merlin 85
engines with annular radiators. Armed
with twin .50-caliber Browning machine
guns in the nose turret, two 20mm
Hispano Mk4 or Mk5 cannon in the dorsal
turret, twin .50-caliber machine guns in
the rear turret and up to 14,000 pounds of
bombs, the Lincoln was originally intended for use in the Pacific theater, but it
arrived on the scene too late for operational service. First issued to the RAF in
September 1945, the Lincoln became its
standard postwar heavy bomber, and 20
squadrons were eventually equipped with
the plane. The 120-foot-wingspan bomber
was produced in several different versions, and in addition to 168 aircraft built by Avro, Lincolns were also produced by Armstrong-Vickers and Armstrong Whitworth and in Canada and Australia. One Lincoln was
even converted for the bulk uplift of fuel and made 45 civil runs during the Berlin Airlift.
The winner will be chosen, four weeks following publication, from correct answers received (delivered by U.S.
mail) and will be awarded a free, one-year subscription to Model Airplane News. If already a subscriber, the winner will be given a free, one-year subscription extension.
Breezy Day? Let s Go Flying
Specifications:
Wing Span:
35.75 inches
Wing Area:
214.5 sq. inches
Weight:
8 to 11 ounces
Mini-Sport
Piper J-3 Cub
Specifications:
Wing Span:
48.25 inches
Wing Area:
ight:
Specifications:
Wing Span:
35.75 inches
Wing Area:
214.5 sq. inches
Weight:
8 to 11 ounces
Breezy Day Park Flyers Fly In Wind Grounding Most Other Park Flyers
What good is an R/C airplane if you can't fly it in a gentle breeze? Most
park flyers have a hard time penetrating even the weakest air currents.
Fear the wind no more. The wizards at Hen Engineering have developed four unique Breezy Day Park Flyers sure to keep your head in the
clouds, while others are stuck to the ground. Utilizing special CAD software and distinctive airfoil designs, Breezy Day Park Flyers are engineered
to slice through light breezes with authority. Flight times of 8-12 minutes
and more are possible.
Each Breezy Day Park Flyer features all Laser cut wooden parts (the
finest laser cut wood in the world), tab and notch construction for quick
and accurate assembly, 3-D CAD design for precise parts fit, computer
drawn plans, quality hardware pack, propeller, landing gear wire & wheels
(except Rally-XP), and a complete step by step instruction manual.
Add in your favorite Direct Drive 280 electric motor and mini 3 channel
radio system (not included), and you have an unbeatable formula for fun.
Breezy Day Park Flyers. Available at your local hobby retailer.
Herr Engineering
www.iflyherr.com
Herr Engineering is a division of SIC Manufacturing Company, Montezuma, lo
ALUMINUM SPINNERS
1
MODEL A RPLANE NEWS
Complete Units include spinnerspinner nut, and bushing set.
R A T E S I non-commercial—25 cents per word
1
Complete assortment of spinner nuts
Easy to assemble; easy to use
1
Precision machined
1
Recommended for use with electric
starters
Great for fun fliers
1
Low priced
1
DA-150—The Choice
of Champions!
DA-150s swept the top-three places
at Tournament of Champions 2000
I st - Christophe Paysant-LeRoux
2nd - Chip Hyde
3rd -Jason Shulman
\
SIZE
PART NO.
PRICE
SIZE
PART NO.
PRICE
1 1/2"
1 3/4"
2"
5503
5504
5505
12.23
14.84
15.90
2 1/4"
5506
5507
16.49
18.35
2 1/2"
PRICE LIST
DA-150 Engine: $1,495.00
DA-150 Muffler Set: $165.00
desertaricraft@theriver.com
www.desertaircraft.com
Phone: 520-722-0607
Fax: 520-722-5622
140 South Camino Seco, Suite# 418
Tucson, AZ 857 10-4487
1ZO
MDDEL AIRPLANE NEWS
ADS, Model Airplane News, 100 E. Ridge,
Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA, or call (203)
431-9000.
BUSINESS
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS 1952-1980; "Air Trails"
1937-1952, "Young Men" 1952-1956, "American
Modeler" 1957-1967, "American Aircraft Modeler"
1968-1975. $1 for list. George Reith, 3597 Arbutus Dr.
N., Cobble Hill, BC, Canada V0R1L1.
[4/03]
GIANT-SCALE COCKPIT KITS. VS-scale P51, P40, F8F,
19% P47. Viking Cockpits, 13738 Destino PL,
Cerritos, CA 90703; (562) 926-4180; email brucevike@aol.com.
[6/02]
21658 Cloud Way, Hayward, CA 94545
510-783-4868 • FAX 510-783-3283
www.aeroloft.com
• Displacement: 9.1 5 ci. (1 50cc)
• Output: 16 hp
• Weight: 8.25 lbs (3.74 kilos)
• Desert Aircraft auto advance
electronic ignition.
• Exclusive Desert Aircraft designed
cylinders, pistons and crankshaft.
• Three-piece CNC milled, 2024
T3 aluminum alloy crankcase.
• Long rod to stroke ratio.
• Aerobatic power curve.
• Most torque in its class.
• Two year warranty.
(no commercial ads of any kind accepted at this
rate); commercial—50 cents per word (applies to
retailers, manufacturers, etc.); count all initials,
numbers, name and address, city, state, zip code
and phone number. All ads must be paid for in
advance. To run your ad for more than one
month, multiply your payment by the number of
months you want it to run. Deadline: the 10th day
of the month, 3 months in advance, e.g., January
10 for the April issue. We don't furnish box numbers, and it isn't our policy to send tear sheets.
Please make all checks payable to: AIR AGE
INC. SEND AD AND PAYMENT TO: CLASSIFIED
Phone 480-380-4799
Fax 480-380-4843
7919 East Mawson Road
Mesa, Arizona 85207
CUSTOM MUFFLERS
• Custom mufflers made
to your specifications.
• Prices depending on
complexity starting at
$125.00.
• Call for other brand
prices.
•Add $10.00 for smoke
windvanes! Details: Windm, 520 Hooper Rd., 153,
Endwell, NY 13760-1960;www.windm.com.
[6/02]
RYOBI CONVERSIONS. We are the oldest, the best
and least expensive. For complete engines, conversion
kits, or our 360-degree muffler, we have all your conversion needs. For free conversion instructions and
catalog, send SASE to Jag Engines, 16073 Muscatel,
Hesperia,
CA
92345;
(760)
244-727
faxO, or see our website at http://www.jagengines.
com.
[6/02]
BOBS AIRCRAFT DOCUMENTATION 2002. World's
largest commercial collection of aircraft photos
(400,000) and 3-view line drawings (35,000). 256-page
catalog, $8 (Canada, Mexico, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto
Rico—$10; foreign, $18; includes postage). 3114
Yukon Ave., Costa Mesa, CA 92626 USA; (714) 9798058.
[12/02]
FOR SALE: Scale plans for a 57-in.-wingspan
Westland Lysander. Must structurally build it to suit
your needs. For use with high-powered or heavy
engines. Plans come in 29 sections. Approximately
12x3 feet. Price: $120 in U.S. funds only. Make
checks payable and mail to: Lee R.T. Frick, P.O. Box
2201, Murrells Inlet, SC 29576. Please allow 30 to 60
days for delivery.
[6/02]
ALUMINUM CAN PLANS. Build airplanes, vehicles,
locomotives and construction equipment. Free list.
Tesscar, Box 333A, Scappoose, OR 97056, or
www.tesscar-aluminum-craft.com.
[9/02]
NOW GET ENGINE SERVICE ESTIMATES ONLINE! Go
G23
$95.00
G38
$95.00
G45
$100.00
G62
$120.00
GT80-445-Twin $125.00
per set
add $5.00 tor shipping/handling
WARPLANE WINDVANE PLANS! Build amazing scale
(non-functional
$300.00/set)
BOLD MUFFLERS
423 SW Log Drive • Port St. Lucie, FL 34953
Tel/Fax: 561-344-8785 • email:waldopepper1@earthlink.net
to www.starcomposites.com/BJModelEngines/, or
contact us directly for a free estimate. We service all
makes, models, sizes and strokes, gas or glow, plane
or heli, boat and car. Experienced. Custom service.
Your parts, out-of-production engines, crashed—all
OK. Bill Jensen, BJ's Model Engine Service, 36
Macintosh Dr., Oxford, CT 06478; email wbilljensen@acs.com; (203) 888-4488; fax (203) 8883255.
[12/02]
Puzzled by Computer
R/C Systems?
S CHECK OUT these books by
Don Edberg, MAN'S "Effective
Programming" columnist:
GAS ENGINE CONVERSIONS, KITS AND PARTS:
Homelite. Weedeater, Ryobi. McCulloch, Honda.
Information, $5. Visa/MC. Carr Precision, 6040 N.
Cutter Cir., #303. Portland, OR 97217; phone/fax
(503) 735-9980; www.carrprecision.com; email carrprecision@worldnet.att.net.
[6/02]
MODEL AIRPLANE SCHOOL: at Hobbies Aloft R/C
Flight School, you will experience more than 100
hands-on landings per day of training until you solo—
guaranteed! Ray Smith will be your personal trainer,
and using "kinesthetic instruction" (no buddy-boxes),
he will guide you down to each landing until you can
execute the landing sequence all by yourself. Typical
students require 4 to 6 days of training to solo, and
then their RC flying fun really begins! We fly yearround on the beautiful California coast near Monterey.
Call toll-free, (888) 700-4421 to make a reservation,
and please visit our website; www.hobbiesaloft.com.
[8/02]
RADIO CONTROLLED HOT-AIR BALLOONS.
Specializing in manufacturing 1/4-scale hot-air balloons and blimps. Perfect for advertising banners,
aerial photography, or to entertain crowds after a
mass ascension. All balloons are custom designed
for personal or promotional use. Call Bernard
Smatana at (505) 244-9490, (505) 249-4641, or
email rcballoons@aol.com: www.modelballoon.com.
[07/02]
www.telstarhobbies.com Crash videos! Your online
source for RC and full-scale aviation books and
videos. (772) 286-2535; sales@telstarhobbies.com.
[05/03]
RC FLIGHT TRAINING. Learn to take off and land
in far western North Carolina, near Murphy. 1635
Settawig Rd.. Brasstown, NC 28902; (828)
389-8968.
[11/02]
HOBBYIST
+ Get The Most From
Your Futaba 8 book.
186 pages, only $14.95!
>> Program Futaba's
BA TTERIES AMERICA
www.batteriesamerica.com
Electric flight R/C Packs, & morel
DP
Small-scale Electric Flight Ni-MH packs!
Great for indoor park flyers, etel Specify Shape: A=sideX side;
B=twin-stick; C=two rows; D=four sticks. JST conn.=$3.00 xtra
Cell Type size
Super 7 covers planes &
gliders. 96 pages, $14.95!
+ Guide to Computer
Radios available again! A
180-page PDF file on a CD,
read on a PC\ just $12.95!
See your hobby shop or order direct.
S&H (US 1st class): 1 or 2 books add
$5, for 3 add $7. Calif, add 7.75%
tax. Canada add US$8, others add
US$10. S&H for CD $3, non-US $5.
Dynamic Modelling • 4922a Rochcllc
Ave • Irvine, CA 92604-2941 USA •
Order toll-free 1-888-770-1812.
Info: 949-552-1812. Web orders:
home.flash.net/~dynamic3/
email: dynamic3@flash. net
"T.O.C." OF MARYLAND—2002 FLYING COMPETITION. Fit, May 31 to Sun., June 2, 2002. IMAC-style
event w/emphasis on freestyle aerobatics. Relaxed
open flying Friday; banquet on Saturday evening;
$$S prizes: raffles: food. Contact Art Vail, (410) 2474281: email artvail@erols.com.
[6/02]
$29.95
$26.95
$29.95
$29.95
$30.95
QN-012BC charger
BP-U8412 pack
QN-012DC charger
B P - U 8 4 1 2 pack 7.2v 1200mAh W/JST. (3oz) $ 2 9 . 9 5
Q N - 0 1 2 B C 2-hour Smart Charger (AC) for Li-Ion $ 2 9 . 9 5
Q N - 0 1 2 D C 2-hr Smart mobile portable charger (DC) $ 2 9 . 9 5
MOTOR- Speed 400 SANYO Ni-Cd packs (no connector):
Shapes (see top): (A)=side X side; (B)-twin-stick; (C)=two rows;
(D)=four sticks. Add deans ultra connector for $5.00 extra
7.2 volt
8.4 volt
9.6 volt
N-500AR(2/3A)
$20.00
KR-600AE(2/3A) $17.00
$24.00
$20.00
$28.00
$23.00
R/C Park Flyer
4
FOR SPEED 280
ELECTRIC POWER
SANYO Receiver Packs w/ Connector! (Flat or Square)
Choose Futaba FM, JR (hiTEC), or AIRTRONICS plug I
MAGAZINE BACK ISSUES: Model Airplane News,
RCM, FM. Model and full-scale titles, 1930-1999.
Send SASE for list: Carolyn Gierke, 1276 Ransom,
Lancaster, IMY 14086.
[6/02]
EVENTS
9.6 volt
AP-170
170mAh (1/2AAA. 5gms)
$ 1.95 ea.
AP-300
300mAh (1/3AA. 7 6gms)
$ 2.50 ea
AP-600
600mAh (2/3 AA. 14.2 gms)
$2.50ea
AP-1000 IQOOmAh (2/3A 21 2qms)
$ 3.00 ea
LITHIUM ION flight packs & smart chargers !
Cell Type size
UGLY SPORT £ ? r
8.4 volt
$26.95
$23.95
$26.95
$26.95
$27.95
AP-brand Nickel-Metal Hydride Cells. Our private-label,
long life cells. Great for R/C pks & slow-flight motors. Free tabs!
AP-150
150mAh (1/3 AAA 3.84 gmsi
$ 2.25 ea
4.8 VOlt
USED ENGINES WANTED: pre-1970 preferred. T.
Crouss, 100 Smyrna, West Springfield, MA 01089.
[11/02]
7.2 volt
AP-150<I/3AAA) $23.95
AP-17O(1/2AAA) $20.95
AP-300(i/3AA)
$23.95
AP-600(2/3AA)
$23.95
AP-1000(2/3A)
$24.95
700mAh (Standard AANiCd)
$ 9.95ea.
4.8 VOlt
110OmAh (hi-cap. AA NiCd)
$13.95ea.
4.8 VOlt
1300mAh (Sub-CNiCd)
$13.95ea.
4 . 8 VOlt
1400mAh (hi-cap. A NiCd)
$14.95ea.
4.8 VOlt 1600mAh (AA Nickel Hydride!) $15.95ea
GO! n-PLATED CONNECTORS - IN STOCK !
Specify Futaba FM. JR (hitec). or AIRTRONICS
• 33"span
• 7oz.lsq.ft. wing loading
• 61 laser cut parts
Male (Battery/Servo, 3-wire) w/12'lead
Female (Receiver, 3-wire) w/12' lead
12" Extension (1 male, 1 female)
24" Extension (1 male, 1 female)
36" Extension (1 male, 1 female)
Y-Connector (1 male, 2 female)
Switch Harness (2 male, 1 female)
BMJR Model Products
Box 1210«Sharpes, FL 32959-1210
321-537-1159
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2.00ea
2.00ea.
3.50ea.
4.00ea.
4.50ea.
5.50ea.
6.50ea
www.bmjrmodels.com
Ot
CARLSON ENGINE IMPORTS
Czech-MP JET® .061
Side by Side
Square
SANYO NiCd Transmitter Packs with wire leads.
Choose shape & mAh. Add Futaba 3-pin or 2-pin, JR 3-pin or 2-pin.
hitec 3-pin or 2-pin, or Airtronics 3-pm plug for S3.00 extra per pack.
9.6 VOlt
700 mAh (square / side by side) $16.95ea
9.6 VOlt 1 1 0 0 mAh (square / side by side) $22.95ea.
SANYO NiCd cells (Plain or w/Solder tabs) Red= Fast Charge
$ 2.95 ea
2/3 AR
500mAh (-N-500AR")
$ 1.95ea
2/3 AE
600mAh (fiat top 2/3A)
AAC
700mAh (button top AA)
$ 1.50 e
SC
1300mAh (flat top Sub-C)
$ 2.75 e
S C R C 2400mAh (long-life Sub-Ci
$ 6.25 e
U/C
Plain Bearing Glow 50.00
Ball Bearing Glow
65.00
Ball Bearing Diesel 65.00
All engines
Add $5.00 P&H per Order.
R/C
U/C&
Rye
55.00 60.00
70.00 75.00
70.00 75.00
include silencer
Visa & MC OK
'i Sett Seleetuui o£ Vieid SM^UUA.
Carlson Engine Imports- 814 E. Marconi Ave.
Phoenix Az. USA 85022- Ph./Fax 602-863-1684
BATTERIES AMERICA 2211-D Parview Rd,
Middleton, Wl 53562. To order, call TOLL FREE:
1 -800-308-4805
Inquiries: 608-831-3443 / Fax: 608-831-1082
Website: www.batteriesamerica.com
E-mail tousat:ehyost@chorus.net
JUNE 2002
1Z1
AT MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS, we not only tell you what's new, but we also try it out first so we
can bring you mini-reviews of the stuff we like best. We're constantly being sent the latest support equipment
manufacturers have to offer. If we think a product is good—something special that will make your modeling
experiences a little easier or just plain more fun—we'll let you know here. From retracts and hinges to glow
starters and videotapes, look for it in "Product Watch."
JR
MatchBox
Servo matching and
power distribution
Intended for modelers of giant-scale craft and others who want to use
multiple servos on a single channel, the new JR MatchBox is an
onboard electronic device that precisely matches servos used on a
single channel. Digital servos give modelers a new level of control precision, but slight variables in control-linkage geometry still
remain—especially when more than one servo is attached to a single
control surface. Examples of this are giant-scale, TOC-style aerobatic
airplanes that use three servos per aileron and two servos per elevator half. The slightest mismatch between these grouped servos can
cause increased current drain as the servos fight each other. Now,
however, there is an easy solution to this problem. The MatchBox
allows modelers to match servos with precision and offers servosetting flexibility. Weighing just over 0.33 ounce, the unit is about the
same size as a small receiver and can be plugged into any channel
that drives more than one servo. Up to four servos can then be
plugged into it and, using the selector dial and buttons, the servos can
be independently adjusted. The unit allows adjustments to neutral
point (subtrim), endpoint and direction reversing.
A big plus is that the MatchBox also lets you power the servos with
a separate auxiliary battery pack! This is highly recommended if you
are driving three or four high-current servos. You do have to use a
switch harness for the second battery pack to switch off the power to
the unit. A power shunt is also included and is plugged into the battery
port if an auxiliary battery pack is not used.
The MatchBox can also be used in a Y-harness configuration
where the servos on a single channel are used for various
applications. An example is split elevator halves, with a
servo used to move each half. Each servo's endpoint
can be adjusted and, if needed, one of the servos
can be reversed to give the proper elevator
input. Typically, this kind of setup flexibility
is only offered with a programmable
computer radio.
The MatchBox is very easy to
use. The selector dial has 10
positions (0 through 9).
Positions 1 through 8 correspond to the numbered servo
plug-in slots on the opposite
end of the unit. To select a servo
and adjust it, you simply turn the
selector to the corresponding position number and then push either the
Increase (+) or Decrease (-) buttons to
make the desired adjustment.
• Position 0 is the default position to
which the unit should be turned for normal
operation. Any adjustments that are made are
stored in memory when the dial is returned to
0. This must be done before the airborne system
has been shut off. If power is turned off before the dial is set at 0, the
settings will be lost.
124
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
• Selecting any dial positions from 1 to 4 allows the modeler to make
servo neutral point and endpoint adjustments to the servos using a
combination of transmitter stick positions and the Increase or
Decrease buttons. With the control stick in the neutral position, you
can adjust the neutral point of the selected servo, and with the stick
in the extreme left or right position, the endpoints can be adjusted.
• Selecting positions 5 to 8 allows servo-reversing. As before, these
adjustments are made using the transmitter stick position (neutral)
and the buttons.
You can reset the MatchBox to the factory default settings by turning the selector to position 9 and then simultaneously pressing the
Increase and Decrease buttons.
The MatchBox comes with detailed instructions, a short wire lead to
connect to the receiver and a battery power shunt. If you would like to
add a greater degree of servo adjustment to your next model, for
$69.99, the JR MatchBox is a handy little device to have around. I've
used it, and I like it! I think you'll like using it, too. —Gerry Vanish
JR; distributed by Horizon Hobby Inc., 4105 Fieldstone Rd., Champaign,
IL 61822; (800) 338-4639;
www.horizonhobby.com.
PRODUCTWATCH
SANDMAN ABRASIVE PRODUCTS
Foam-backed sanding pads
Flexible finishing tools
Whether you are applying an iron-on film or a painted finish, to
achieve a great-looking model, you need to have a smooth surface under it. To get that perfect surface, you have to do a lot of
sanding, and Sandman Abrasive Products' foam-backed sanding pads are the right tools for the job. These abrasive-coated
pads come in various shapes, can be
used wet or dry and come in
grits from 80 to 600.
They can be used to sand balsa, fiberglass and plastic surfaces, and finer grits can be special
ordered. The pads fit comfortably in your hand, and they conform easily to contours such as
wing leading edges, fuselage turtle decks and wing fillets. They are also great for sanding fiberglassed wing surfaces and for smoothing primer to obtain a very smooth paint surface.
The differently shaped pads, such as the radius block or the slanted block, are ideal for
sanding hard-to-reach edges and surfaces. I like the fact that the pads are washable and
can be used for many years. I found the finer 2,000 and 4,000 grits ideal for removing
scratches from clear plastic canopies. The Sandman foam pads are great companions to the
traditional hardwood-sanding block on your workbench. —Rick Bell
'
Sandman Abrasive Products, 12676 Pierce St., Unit 6, Pacoima, CA
9 1 3 3 1 ; (818) 834-8851; (888) 954-1800; fax (818) 834-8850;
www.sandmanabrasives.com.
GREAT PLANES
Power Plane
Save time and elbow grease
Removing material from leading edges, nose blocks and wingtips can
be a time-consuming job. First, you have to carefully cut away chunks
of material and then use a razor plane to smooth the part so you
can sand it to its final shape. Don't get me wrong; I love my building time in the shop, but like anyone else, I like to save time,
too. The new Great Planes' Power Plane is a handy workbench
tool and a great timesaver.
The Power Plane removes material from flat surfaces as easily
as an electric-powered rotary cutter, but you can also set the depth
of the cut accurately (as finely as 0.030 inch at a time). It has a spiral
rotary-cutting blade.
I had excellent results the very first time I used it. The tool is plugged into any
110V AC outlet for power, and it is light and easy to hold. It feels a lot like holding a
curved sanding block, but it removes a considerable amount of material with each
pass. Its two power buttons allow you to operate it with either hand. Since you have to
depress both buttons, the unit can't be turned on accidentally by tipping it over on its
side, nor can it be left on by mistake.
The cutting blade is easy to remove and can be replaced when it gets dull. I have
used the Power Plane on balsa and lite-ply sheeting, and it works very well. The
instructions recommend that you not use the tool on hardwoods such as oak, maple
and birch.
If you're looking to save a little time and want the newest gadget for the workshop, the $29.99 Great Planes Power Plane is just the ticket. —Gerry Yarrish
Great Planes Model Mfg. Co., PO. Box 9021, Champaign, IL 61826-9021; (800) 6377660; www.greatplanes.com.
1 2 6 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWs
Advertisers
3 Sea Bees, 147
Ace Hobby Dist., C4
Aeroloft Designs, 120
Aeroworks, 66
Aero-Model Inc., 70
Aero Electric, 149
Airborne Video Systems, 144
Air Foil Aviation, 140
AirBorne Models,
122-123
Airtronics, C3
American Junior, 52
America's Hobby Center, 128
Autogyro, 151
BMJR Model Products, 121
Backyard Flyer
book, 141
Backyard Flyer
subscription, 115
Blue Box Toys, 27
Bob Smith
Industries, 51
Bob Violett Models, 26
Bold Mufflers, 120
Bruckner, 138
C3GM Sidewalk Flyers, 144
Carlson Engine, 121
Castle Creations, 51
C.B. Tatone, 120
Century Jet Models, 144
Chase-Durer, 21
Chief Aircraft, 118-119
Cleveland Model &
Supply Co., 142
Dave Brown Products, 142
Dave Patrick Models, 146
Desert Aircraft, 120
DJ Aerotech, 129
Doppeldecker, 135
Draganfly, 7
Du-Bro Products, 43
Dumas, 151
Dymond
Modelsports, 101
Dynamic Modeling, 121
eBay, 14-15
Electro Dynamics, 148
Erickson Motors, 145
Fiberglass
Specialties, 135
First Place Engines, 137
Flair Products Ltd., 76
Flight Line Toys, 125
FMA Direct, 67
FunAeroR/C, 151
Futaba, 19,71
G&P Sales, 134
Global Hobby Dist., 13
Great Planes, 4-5
Hangar 9, 9
Hayes Products, 140
Herr Engineering, 116
Hitec RCD, 72-73
Hobbico, 79
Hobby Horse, 108
Hobby Lobby Intl.,
77
Hobby People, 84-85
Horizon Hobby Inc.,
96-97
Ikarus, 129,135, 139, 147
jetsetairplanes.com, 93
JK Aerotech, 129
JR, 22-23, 54-55
K&B, 147
K&S, 140
Kangke USA Inc.,
47
Kyosho, 35
Landing Products, 137
Lanier RC, 89
Laser Models, 25
Lite Machines, 102
Mach 1 Hobbies, 144
MaxCim, 139
Maxx Products, 136
Mecoa, 143
Megatech, 65
MH Mini, 147
MicroPilot, 147
Micro Fasteners, 144
Midwest Products, 125
Miller R/C, 142
Model Rectifier
Corp. (MRC), C2
Morgan Fuels, 39
Mr. Ni-Cd Batteries, 121
MTM Intl., 134
Nelson Hobby Specialties, 125,
NickZiroli, 150
NewKolb. 135
Northeast Sailplane, 95
Northwest Hobby, 137
Norvel, 134
Omni Models, 99
On Top of the
World, 144
Pacific Aeromodeler, 145
Page Aviation, 148
Paul Guillow, 151
Peak Electronics, 150
Peck-Polymers, 147
Performance RC, 133
Polk, 129
Powermaster Hobby Products,
139
Precision Micro Electronics,
148
Prince America, 41
Propwash, 142
Quantum Models,
109-111
Raceplanes, 151
RC Accesory, 137
REVO Blimps USA, 149
Richmond RC, 103
RC Showcase, 140
RCstore.com, 130-132
RCV Engines Ltd., 127
Robart Mfg., 91
RTL Fasteners, 135
Sherline Products, 152
Sig Mfg., 60
Sky Hooks & Rigging, 134
SKS Videos, 142
Slimline Products, 10
Smithy Co., 139
Soarsoft, 134
Spinmaster. 83
Stalker Radar, 149
Sullivan Products, 11
T&D Sales, 147
Tekoa, 139
TNC Electronics, 150
Top Flite, 53
Tower Hobbies,
104-107,117
Toytronix, 129
Trick R/C, 61
Tru-Turn, 149
Turnkey RC, 150
Universal Laser, 150
Widget Supply, 133
Wildcat Fuels, 113
Windsor Propeller Co., 127,133
Zap, 17
Zurich, 135
MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS (ISSN 0026-7295, USPS 533-470) is published monthly by Air Age Inc., 100 East Ridge, Ridgefield,
CT 06877-4606 USA. Copyright 2002; all rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in whole or in
part without the consent of the copyright owner. Periodical postage permit paid at Ridgefield, CT, and additional mailing offices.
Customer
Service
Thank you for joining the Air Age family
of publications where you can explore
the exciting worlds of radio control and
aviation.
These tips will help you get the most out
of your subscription:
How to read your label:
#BXNBNMF***************AUTO** 3-DIGIT 068
#12345ABC123AB12C#AUG03 MAIR 000
Your account number is
12345ABC123AB12C.
Your expiration date issue is August
2003.
How and when to tell us of
an address change
Address changes should be requested
before you move. Our labels are printed
ahead of time, so please allow 4-6 weeks
for the change to take effect. Please
include a copy of your current label.
Send all address changes to:
Model Airplane News
P.O. Box 428
Mount Morris, IL 61054
You may also contact us via email at
MAIR@kable.com, or fax (815) 734-1223.
Our cancellation policy
All cancellations must be requested in
writing. You may send in your request
via mail, email, or fax. You will be sent a
refund for all unserved issues.
Our renewal policy
Renewal notices are sent six months
prior to your expiration date (see
label above). You may renew your
subscription via mail by sending in
your renewal invoice with payment.
For faster service, renew online at
SUBSCRIPTIONS. U.S. and Canada, call (800) 827-0323; elsewhere, call (815) 734-1116. Or set your Web browser to
www.airage.com/subscribe.html. U.S.: $34.95 (one year), $55.95 (two years). Canada: $49.95 (one year), $87.95 (two years),
inc. GST. reg. no. 13075 4872 RT. Elsewhere: $48.95 (one year), $83.95 (two years). Prepayment required: Visa, MC and AmEx
accepted.
www.modelairplanenews.com
EDITORIAL. Send correspondence to Editors, Model Airplane News. 100 East Ridge, Ridgefield, CT 06877-4606 USA. Email:
man@airage.com. We welcome all editorial submissions, but assume no responsibility for loss/damage of unsolicited material.
To authors, photographers and people featured in this magazine: all materials published in Model Airplane News become the
exclusive property of Air Age Inc., unless prior arrangement is made in writing with the Publisher.
deal will be in the first renewal
ADVERTISING. Send advertising materials to Advertising Dept.. Model Airplane News, 100 East Ridge, Ridgefield. CT 068774606 USA; phone (203) 431-9000; fax (203) 431-3000.
CHANGE OF ADDRESS. To make sure you don't miss any issues, send your new address to Model Airplane News, P.O. Box 428,
Mount Morris. IL 61054 USA, six weeks before you move. Please include the address label from a recent issue, or print the information exactly as shown on the label. The Post Office will not forward copies unless you provide extra postage.
Effective October 2001, the best
notice you receive. By renewing
early and for a longer term, you create
savings for us, which we pass on to you.
So always check your first renewal effort
for the lowest price available.
POSTMASTER. Please send Form 3579 to Model Airplane News. P.O. Box 428, Mount Morris, IL 61054 USA.
JUNE 2DD2
153
FINAL APPROACH
BY WILLIAM SIURU
The next-generation UAV
T
he Predator and Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicles
(UAVs) are playing key roles in the war on terrorism.
Predators equipped with Hellfire missiles can seek out and
destroy enemy targets. Other Predators fly reconnaissance
missions over Iraq. UAVs are great for high-risk missions because
they don't endanger human pilots, but they fly slow and, thus,
are vulnerable to hostile antiaircraft fire. They also must be flown
by highly
skilled pilots
on the ground. Last, they are
expensive; Predators cost about
$2 million each.
Graduate student Loannls Martlnos and
Professor Eric Feron of the Department of
Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT hold
the robotic helicopter they helped develop.
Here, Me
X-Cell 60
RC hellcopter Is In
flight with
the technologically
advanced
control
system
on board.
With Navy funding, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology (MIT) are developing the technology to produce
more maneuverable, more intelligent and less expensive UAVs.
Researchers equipped an X-Cell 60 RC helicopter with a
7-pound instrumentation box containing inertial sensors, a
global positioning (GPS) receiver, an altimeter and a computer.
Flown manually by a trained UAV pilot, the robot helicopter
performed a 360-degree aileron roll at high speed. The maneuver was recorded, and the information was used to create a
computer simulation from which the researchers developed the
autonomous control software for the helicopter's onboard computer. The maneuver was then repeated robotically to achieve
the first-ever autonomous acrobatic maneuver with a helicopter. Researchers are currently working on a split-S—a basic
combat maneuver used by pilots to reverse direction quickly.
The control system works by memorizing the maneuvers
performed by an experienced human pilot and breaking down
the complex pilot inputs into basic mathematical algorithms.
In "building-block" fashion, the computer can then create new,
complex maneuvers just by recombining the various sets of
algorithms. This development makes it possible to program and
fly aggressive maneuvers that may have been previously
unheard of, giving UAVs a decided advantage in a hostile environment. On a typical mission, a human pilot on the ground
would manually control the UAV through basic maneuvers
such as takeoff and landing, though autonomous takeoff and
landing have already been demonstrated. With a flip of a
switch on the control box, the helicopter would then fly
autonomously.
This new technology presents many possibilities. Small,
agile, robotic helicopters could perform military reconnaissance
154 MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS
This Is a block diagram of the
system used to simulate actual
flight maneuvers and develop
computer algorithms.
or carry weapons. They would be particularly attractive for use
in mountainous, urban and other challenging areas that are
currently too dangerous for larger, manned aircraft. They could
fly at low altitude and in tight spaces to locate terrorists in
caves and record live images that could be transmitted to the
ground or to manned aircraft in flight. Civilian versions could
survey disaster sites that are too dangerous for manned operations. According to the researchers, the technology could, in
the future, yield a 6-inch version able to fly robotically through
an air-conditioning duct, land inside a room and covertly listen
in on a conversation.
The robot helicopter is equipped with vibration-isolation
gear to protect the electronic equipment; this gear could also
keep a camera still, which would give filmmakers a more economical way to shoot blur-free aerial footage.
The researchers estimate that a military robotic helicopter
with a range of at least several hundred miles would cost
around $500,000. A non-militarized version for filming aerial
imagery would cost significantly less. Though the military is
currently testing unmanned helicopter drones, these would
probably not be in service until after 2006. +