Acard AEC-6290 Installation guide

Access Control by Example
ACCBYEG
en
Introductory Guide
Access Control by Example
Table of Contents | en
3
Table of Contents
1
Introduction
4
1.1
The example
4
2
Materials Planning
6
2.1
Planning the doors
6
2.2
Low tier: Electrical components
6
2.2.1
Card reader technologies
7
2.2.2
Credentials technology
7
2.2.3
Wiring for non-reader components
8
2.3
Middle tier: Access Controllers
8
2.4
High tier: Hosting the software for the final system
9
3
Installation with RS-485, AMC and Access PE
3.1
Mounting the access controller and associated hardware
10
3.2
Installing the wiring
10
3.2.1
RS-485 bus topology for readers
10
3.2.2
RS-485 star topology for all other components
10
10
3.3
Mounting the peripheral components
10
3.4
Connecting the peripheral components to the wiring
11
3.4.1
Protective diodes
11
3.4.2
Shielding data cables and avoiding ground loops
12
3.5
Connecting the AMC2 (Access Modular Controller)
13
3.5.1
Preparatory steps on PBC-60 power supply, AMC2 and computer
13
3.5.2
Connecting the peripheral components to the AMC2
14
3.5.3
Setting up the connection between AMC2 and the software
17
4
Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC)
19
4.1
Mounting the access controller
19
4.2
Installing the wiring
19
4.2.1
Wiegand star topology for readers
19
4.3
Mounting the peripheral components
19
4.4
Connecting the peripheral components to the wiring
20
4.4.1
Protective diodes
20
4.4.2
Shielding data cables and avoiding ground loops
21
4.5
Connecting the AEC (Access Easy Controller)
22
4.5.1
Connecting the peripheral components to the AEC
22
4.5.2
Configuring the AEC hardware and network
25
4.5.3
Configuring the AEC software
26
5
Resources and further reading
27
Glossary
28
Index
30
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en | Introduction
1
Access Control by Example
Introduction
Purpose of this document
Based on a simple example, which nevertheless contains most of the common kinds of door
control, this document provides an introduction to installing a small access control system. Its
intention is to steer beginners safely past some of the common dangers and pitfalls.
Intended audience
This document is intended for persons who will be involved, perhaps for the first time, in
physically implementing an access control system, and wish to gain a quick understanding of
the main concepts and tasks involved.
1.1
The example
Dr. Jones has a small but busy medical practice in an inner-city area. In it there are five rooms:
1.
A waiting room with reception area and public access between the hours of 9.00 and
16.00.
2.
A general Storeroom, opening off the reception area, where bandages, crutches, office
supplies and non-hazardous stock items are kept.
3.
A laboratory and secure Storeroom, opening off the reception area, where prescription
drugs, sharps and potentially hazardous materials are kept.
4.
An office opening off the reception area, where a computer and patients’ records are
kept.
5.
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A treatment room, opening off the waiting area.
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Access Control by Example
Introduction | en
5
The access control requirements of the rooms are as follows:
Table 1.1
Room
Access for whom
Access control requirements
1. Waiting Room with
Anybody between 09:00 and
Door should be unlocked at
reception area
16:00
9:00, locked at 16:00 and
requires a card outside of those
hours.
2. General Storeroom
Doctor, lab technician,
Access control to prevent theft.
receptionist
3. Laboratory
Doctor, lab technician
Strict access control to prevent
theft and reduce danger to
persons from hazardous
materials and equipment.
4. Office
Doctor, receptionist
Strict access control to prevent
misuse or theft of medical
records and other sensitive
data.
5. Treatment room
Anybody, anytime, as admitted
No access control as no
by the doctor.
valuables are present, and
patients are always
accompanied by the doctor.
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2
Access Control by Example
Materials Planning
The following section contains a rough analysis of the requirements, and helps you to select
the parts required in the quantities you need. It is useful to think in terms of three tiers: The
electrical components, the access controller and the host system. These tiers are covered in
more detail below.
2.1
Planning the doors
For each of the doors mentioned in Section 1.1 The example, page 4 we need to decide in
general what functionality is required:
–
The easiest case is the treatment room - it does not need to be locked and does not
require any access control hardware.
–
The main entrance to the practice will be unlocked during opening hours, and require a
card outside those hours. The arrival of the first member of staff at the card reader in the
morning should put the door into unlocked mode for the duration of opening hours.
–
All the doors with card readers will require a REX (Request to EXit) unit. Its purpose is to
provide an alarm-free exit without the need for a card. A REX signal comes typically from
a push button or a motion detector inside the room, or is embedded in the door’s own
handle. Here we have decided on REX by motion detector.
–
All access-controlled doors will require magnetic contacts in order to trigger an alarm if
the door is opened by force.
2.2
Low tier: Electrical components
From these considerations we create a table of the doors and the electrical components each
requires.
Room
Access control hardware
1. Waiting Room with reception area
Card Reader, e.g. Bosch Delta 1000
Electric door opener, e.g. Bosch Universal Electric
Door Opener
REX by motion detector, e.g. Bosch DS150i
Magnetic contact, e.g. Bosch ISN-C devices
2. General Storeroom
Card reader
Electric door opener
REX by motion detector
Magnetic contact
3. Laboratory
Card reader
Electric door opener
REX by motion detector
Magnetic contact
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Bosch Security Systems
Access Control by Example
Materials Planning | en
Room
Access control hardware
4. Office
Card reader
7
Electric door opener
REX by motion detector
Magnetic contact
Note:This secured room, which already houses the
computer, is the obvious place to put the access
controller itself.
5. Treatment room
2.2.1
Nothing
Card reader technologies
Card readers differ in two important respects: scan frequency and protocol.
Scan Frequency: 125kHz vs. 13.56MHz
The most common scan frequencies for readers are 125kHz and 13.56 MHz.
125kHz is proven technology prevalent in the USA and in Eastern Europe. The cards and
readers tend to be lower priced.
13.56 MHz is newer, more secure technology prevalent in EMEA and increasingly in APAC
countries. Hardware is currently priced somewhat higher.
RS-485 vs Wiegand:
Decide early whether to use Wiegand or RS-485 technology for the readers; each has its own
advantages and disadvantages. Maximum cable length and wiring topology are different, as
the following table shows.
RS-485 Readers
Wiegand Readers
Wiring topology
bus, (“chain”)
star
Maximum cable length
1200m
100m
Number of wires needed
4
10
for the reader
(The slightly lower cost of
Wiegand readers is offset by
higher wiring costs and
potential for wiring errors).
2.2.2
Credentials technology
Decide on the credentials technology you wish to use. For Wiegand readers the choice
includes e.g. iCLASS (3.56MHz) and EM (125kHz) cards. For RS-485 readers there is a wide
choice: MIFARE, HITEC or LEGIC. These credentials types are available in different physical
formats: Most common are the classic credit-card sized identity cards, and the smaller tokens
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Access Control by Example
and key fobs which usually carry no printed personal information.
2.2.3
Wiring for non-reader components
Depending on its manufacturer and model, each of these electrical components will require a
certain number of wires to control its operation. Typical values for number of wires per
component can be found in the table below.
Electrical component
Typical
Notes/explanation
number of
wires
Door opener
2
Power only
Magnetic contact
2
2 wires for power, but often extra wires for
tamper detection
REX with push button
2
E.g. so that the receptionist can open the main
entrance from her desk.
REX with motion
6
detector
Highly variable depending on manufacturer: 2
wires for power, 2 to the magnetic contacts
Burglar alarm
4
(not used in this example)
Emergency exit
4
(not used in this example)
If you know the total number of wires a door (with all its electrical components) requires, and
if you have access to the site during the building phase, then you can influence the kinds of
cable which are laid to the doors.
Cables differ both in the number and the thickness of their wires (also known as “cores”). For
distances under 25m, as in our example; a wire thickness of AWG18 or 1mm² will be
sufficient. For longer distances and stronger currents correspondingly thicker wires will be
required. The AMC2 tolerates a maximum 2V drop from AMC to the devices. Voltage drop is
calculated by electricians according to standard formulae.
It is advisable to use a spreadsheet to track the sum and thickness of wires required per door.
NOTICE! Remember, although RS-485 readers can be wired together in a bus topology, other
components are wired to the controller directly, i.e. in a star topology.
Although some RS-485 readers do provide limited connections for REX and/or magnetic
contacts, we do not use that specialized functionality in this example.
2.3
Middle tier: Access Controllers
An access controller is an electronic device which handles input and output signals from and
to the peripheral components (readers, door controllers, REX units, magnetic contacts etc). It
is an interface through which the access control software communicates with these
components, but the controller is able to handle some signal events on its own if it
temporarily loses its connection to the software.
Examples are the Access Modular Controller AMC2 and the Access Easy Controller from
Bosch Security Systems. The Access Easy Controller is controller hardware with a resident
access control application. The AMC2 is software/host/reader neutral and provides variants to
handle either RS-485 or Wiegand readers.
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Access Control by Example
2.4
Materials Planning | en
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High tier: Hosting the software for the final system
Bosch offers a wide range of software products for configuring access control systems,
depending on the size of the installation. For our small example one of two products would be
suitable:
–
Access Professional Edition: (Access PE)
This product installs on a standard PC. It controls doors via hardware modules called
Access Modular Controllers (e.g. the AMC2 4R4).
–
Access Easy Controller: (AEC)
The access control software is resident on the door controller itself (i.e. middle and high
tiers are combined) and is operated over the network from a standard PC. It uses a webbrowser for its user interface.
For the sake of example the following chapters describe two typical combinations:
–
RS-485 technology, AMC2 controller and Access Professional Edition software
–
Wiegand technology with Access Easy Controller hardware and software
Note: An installation of Access PE / AMC2 with Wiegand technology (a combination not
covered in detail in this document) would proceed similarly to the Access PE chapter, but
with each of the 4 readers connected directly to the access controller rather than “daisychained” to other readers. A suitable AMC2 variant would be the AMC2 4W.
NOTICE! The combination Access PE & AMC2 supports both RS-485 and Wiegand reader
technology through deployment of corresponding variants of the AMC2 controller (e.g. AMC2
4R4 and AMC2 4W).
AEC supports only Wiegand.
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3
Access Control by Example
Installation with RS-485, AMC and Access PE
This chapter describes the installation of our example access control system using RS-485
communication to the readers, an AMC2 as access controller hardware and Access
Professional Edition as the configuration software. We will assume that all the components
decided upon in Section 2.2 Low tier: Electrical components, page 6 have been ordered from
and delivered by the hardware vendor of your choice. The installation is basically a 6 stage
process:
1.
3.1
Mounting the access controller and associated hardware, see 3.1
2.
Installing the wiring, see 3.2
3.
Mounting the peripheral components, see 3.3
4.
Connecting the peripheral components to the wiring, see 3.4
5.
Connecting the AMC to the wiring from the peripheral components, see 3.5.2
6.
Connecting the AMC to the computer and configuring the software, see 3.5.3
Mounting the access controller and associated hardware
The obvious room in which to locate the access controller, the power supply and the
configuration PC is the office. In it the hardware and software will be protected from
unauthorized access. The office is also situated centrally with regard to the doors. The
controllers should be housed in a lockable metal enclosure or cabinet for extra security. The
enclosure should also contain a battery to provide an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
3.2
Installing the wiring
Lay the cables decided upon in Section 2.2.3 Wiring for non-reader components, page 8 from
the office to the respective doors. Aesthetically it is always preferable to hide cabling beneath
floors, above ceilings or underneath wall plaster, but this is not always practical. Note junction boxes are commonly used near doors; we leave them out of this example only for the
sake of simplicity.
Make sure that cables carrying data (e.g. from the reader) are shielded, see 3.4.2
Make sure that there is enough length to reach both components above the door (e.g. REX
with motion detector, magnetic contacts) and components at handle height (e.g. reader, door
opener).
3.2.1
RS-485 bus topology for readers
Readers in an RS-485 environment are connected in a bus topology, i.e. a reader is either
connected directly to the controller and to the next reader, or it is connected to the previous
and possibly the next reader as part of a chain with a maximum length of 4 readers. See
Section 2.2.1 Card reader technologies, page 7.
With readers it is very important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions as regards
grounding (earthing) the device and its cable shielding. See also Section Figure 3.3
Avoiding
a ground loop, page 12
3.2.2
RS-485 star topology for all other components
Every other component in an RS-485 environment is connected directly to its respective
controller in a star topology.
3.3
Mounting the peripheral components
Electrical components must always be mounted (i.e. attached to walls, racks, doors and doorframes) as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
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The following illustration shows typical locations of electrical components with respect to a
door. Note that the access controller (5) should always be in a secured area to prevent
tampering, preferably in a locked cabinet which has space for the power supply and backup
battery to ensure an uninterruptible power supply.
Door from the outside
Same door from the inside
1: Door opener - 2 wires
3: Magnetic contact - 2 wires
2: Reader - 4 wires
4: REX with motion detector - 2 wires
5: Access controller. NOTE: This should not be near the doors themselves, but should
always be located in a secured area (here represented by the cloud).
3.4
Connecting the peripheral components to the wiring
Electrical components must always be connected as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
Nevertheless there are certain basic rules and pitfalls which should be well understood by
every installer of access control devices. Please read the following sections carefully.
3.4.1
Protective diodes
A door opener typically locks or unlocks a door by means of a magnet which is subjected to an
electric current. When this power is switched off a high voltage is induced in the magnetic
coil, which needs to be dissipated to prevent damage to other components. This is generally
done by means of a protective diode.
CAUTION!
If the door opener (or other magnetic component, e.g. a door holding magnet) does not have
an inbuilt protective diode, be sure to connect such a diode electrically in parallel with it. See
illustration below. Section Figure 3.2
Position of the protective diode, page 12. Install
protective diodes wherever excess voltage can be induced by magnetic fields. Suitable diodes
are generally included in the hardware delivery.
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Figure 3.1
3.4.2
A diode
Access Control by Example
Figure 3.2 Position of the protective diode
(Note the
Key: 1: Door opener, 1A: Protective diode, 5: Access controller
colored ring)
The colored ring corresponds to the crossbar in the diode symbol.
Shielding data cables and avoiding ground loops
Cables with cores that carry data have a conducting wrapper, accompanied by a naked
grounding wire, between the cores and the outer plastic casing. When the naked wire is
grounded properly this wrapper “shields” the cores from electrical interference. Without
shielding, the integrity of the data signals is threatened.
A common installation error (particularly in cases where the reader-end and the controller-end
of the cable are handled by different persons) is to ground the shielding at both ends. If the
two grounds are not of identical potential, there is a possibility of current flow through the
shielding, which can disrupt the signals in unpredictable ways, cause malfunctions in the
access control hardware and even masquerade as software errors. This phenomenon is
known as a ground loop.
Figure 3.3 Avoiding a ground loop
5: Access controller
6: Shielding around cable
2: Reader
CAUTION!
To avoid ground loops, be sure to ground cable shields only ONCE.
CAUTION!
Follow carefully the grounding instructions for the reader and other sensitive components.
Failure to ground components correctly can result in damage to those components and to
malfunction of the access control hardware, which can masquerade as a software error.
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Connecting the AMC2 (Access Modular Controller)
The following is an illustration of a typical AMC2. Here the AMC2 4W.
Figure 3.4 An AMC2 access controller
R: Reader connections
P: Pluggable screw terminals
L: LC Display
Space restrictions do not permit a detailed treatment of the AMC2 controller hardware, of
which there are several variants. Always consult the installation guide of the controller you are
using. For our example we have chosen the AMC2 4R4. The relevant installation guide, along
with all the other documentation referenced below, is available in PDF format from the Bosch
Security Systems internet site, see Section 5 Resources and further reading, page 27
As we only need to control 4 doors, one AMC2 device will be sufficient. For connection to the
access control software we will use an ethernet crossover cable aka “null modem”
(alternatively you could use normal ethernet cables and place a hub or a “switch” between
computer and access controller). Other possibilities for the software connection are RS232
(serial) and RS-485 bus). For the power supply we will use the standard Bosch PBC-60 which
also charges the UPS backup battery.
3.5.1
Preparatory steps on PBC-60 power supply, AMC2 and computer
Step
Where
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
no.
1
PBC
Make sure the PBC-60 is not plugged in (under
PBC-60 Datasheet.
power), then use the switch on the side of the PBC-60
to set which voltage is to be fed to the AMC2. In our
example we require only 12V for a simple door opener.
Certain peripheral devices, especially some readers
2
PBC
and powerful door openers, require 24V.
Connect the battery temperature sensor to the RTH
PBC-60 Datasheet.
socket, even if no UPS battery is being used. If a
battery is used then sensing end should be placed near
3
AMC
the battery. This sensor is supplied with the PBC-60
Remove pluggable screw terminals and open the AMC AMC2-4R4 installation guide
casing to gain access to internal jumpers and DIL
“Opening the case”
switches.
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Step
Where
no.
4
AMC
Access Control by Example
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
On the underside of the AMC’s circuit board, set the
AMC2-4R4 installation guide
relay output jumpers for the relay outputs to “wet
“Connecting relay outputs”
mode” i.e. the AMC2 should provide a voltage to our
door openers.
In the illustration opposite...
jumper setting 1 shows “dry” (voltage free) mode, and
5
AMC
setting 2 shows “wet” (voltage provided) mode.
Ensure that the DIL switch number one is set ON and
AMC2-4R4 installation guide “DIL
the rest are off, to identify this AMC to the software as switch selector”
6
AMC
device number one via the ethernet connection.
Close the AMC casing and replace the pluggable screw AMC2-4R4 installation guide
7
AMC
terminals.
“Closing the case”
Short circuit the tamper contact at S13, see Figure 3.5. AMC2-4R4 installation guide
This connection exists to provide protection against
“Tamper protection”
tampering with the AMC device. For our simple
example we do not require it, and rely instead upon
8
the security of the office itself.
Computer Install Access Professional Edition on the computer
which is to be used to configure this access control
Access Professional Edition Installation manual
system.
CAUTION!
Note: To use door openers or other devices with their own external power supplies you must
ensure the relay output jumpers are set to the factory-default “dry mode” position, i.e.
providing no voltage to the relay outputs.
3.5.2
Connecting the peripheral components to the AMC2
The AMC2 possesses 23 connectors of the pluggable screw terminal type. Wires can be
fastened with holding screws to the terminals, and these terminals can be plugged and
unplugged at the AMC2.
We will use nearly all the available connections, as shown in Section Figure 3.5
The AMC2
connections used in the 4-room surgery example., page 15. The numbering scheme S1-S23 is
taken from the AMC2-4R4 installation guide.
We will connect 2 readers (Main entrance and Laboratory) in a bus topology to connection S2,
and 2 readers (Storeroom and Office) to connection S7. Note: S2 and S7 are both connectors
to the same RS-485 bus, and this bus may only have a total of 8 readers. The two reader
connectors on the upper edge of the AMC2 4R4 (S14 and S19) are not used.
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Figure 3.5 The AMC2 connections used in the 4-room surgery example.
Connector
S1 PSU
S2 Reader
used for...
Power input
Main Ent. and Lab card
Connector
S10 Output 3
S13 Tamper
used for...
Storeroom Opener
(to be shorted as not in
port 1
S3 Input 1
S4 Input 2
S5 Output 1
S7 Reader
readers
Main Ent. REX
Main Ent. MC
Main Ent. Opener
Store and Office card
contact
S15 Input 5
S16 Input 6
S17 Output 5
S20 Input 7
use)
Lab. REX
Lab. MC
Lab. Opener
Office REX
port 2
S8 Input 3
S9 Input 4
readers
Storeroom REX
Storeroom MC
S21 Input 8
S22 Output 7
Office MC
Office Opener
CAUTION!
Verify that the voltage specified for your chosen reader and peripheral components
corresponds to the voltage delivered by the power supply. If not then adjust the power supply
output voltage, see Section 3.5.1 Preparatory steps on PBC-60 power supply, AMC2 and
computer, page 13
Otherwise you risk damaging both the AMC and the connected components.
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Access Control by Example
Step
Where
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
no.
1
2
AMC:S1
Connect the power supply to S1
All readers The factory default bus address of readers is usually 1. DIP (DIL) switches inside a
In order to distinguish between readers on the same
DELTA 1000 reader
bus, each requires a unique address.
To do this open each of the readers and set the DIP
switch (or equivalent, according to the reader’s own
documentation) for each of the 4 readers.
It is now crucial that we set the reader addresses
exactly as we will define them in the software, namely:
Main Entrance=1, Lab=2, Storeroom=3, Office=4. see
Section 3.5.3 Setting up the connection between AMC2
and the software, page 17
Tip: Write the address settings on the outside of the
3
AMC:S2
readers, so that you do not mix them up later!
Connect the reader with address 1 (Main entrance) to Back of a DELTA 1000 reader and
and both
the pluggable screw terminal for connection S2 as per S2 connector of the AMC2
readers
the installation instructions for the chosen reader.
For instance, for the Bosch DELTA 1000 proximity
reader connect the power wires to connectors 7(+)
and 6(Ground) and the data wires to connectors
4(Data “A”) and 5 (Data “B”). As the data signal is
generated only by the voltage difference between
these wires, their order is unimportant.
To connect the reader with address 2 (Laboratory) into
this configuration (i.e. into the RS-485 bus) simply
extend the wiring from pin 7 of the first reader to pin 7
of the next, and so on.
4
AMC:S3
Connect the REX unit to S3. In our example we use a
Documentation included with the
DS150 PIR (passive infrared) motion detector. As this REX unit.
is the main entrance the customer may prefer instead
to connect a simple push button here, to be operated
5
AMC:S4
by the receptionist from her desk.
Connect the MC (magnetic contact) unit to S4. Note: in Documentation included with the
this example we use only the power wires. Any tamper MC unit.
6
AMC:S5
detection wires can be left unconnected.
Connect the door opener to the relay output S5.
Documentation included with the
IMPORTANT: Make sure a protective diode is included door opener unit.
in parallel, see Section 3.4 Connecting the peripheral
7
AMC:S7
components to the wiring, page 11
Connect S7 (the second RS-485 reader connector)
analogously to S2 above. Use the readers whose
addresses you set to 3 (Storeroom) and 4 (Office)
above.
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Step
no.
8
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Where
Step description
17
Illustrations / Reference
AMC:S8,
Connect the REX units for the Storeroom (S8),
S15,
Lab(S15) and Office (S20) analogously to S3.
S20
REX by motion detector is useful but push buttons are
AMC:S9,
very common for cost reasons.
Connect the MC units for the Storeroom (S9),
S16,
Lab(S16) and Office (S21) analogously to S4.
S21
AMCS10,
Connect the door openers for the Storeroom (S10),
S17,
Lab(S17) and Office (S22) analogously to S5.
S22
3.5.3
Step
no.
1
Setting up the connection between AMC2 and the software
Where
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
AMC and
Using a crossover cable (aka “null modem”) connect
AMC2-4R4 installation guide
Computer the AMC’s ethernet port to an ethernet port on the
2
“Ethernet interface”
computer.
Computer Run the Access PE application AmcIPConfig to scan the Access Professional Edition network for AMC devices and find the AMC which we
Configurator: “Controllers”
have connected.
In AmcIPConfig assign an unused IP address to the
AMC and make a note of this address. The address
chosen should be in the same range as that of the
3
4
Access PE workstation.
Computer Define the AMC/LAC in Access PE. In our example we
Access Professional Edition -
use an Ethernet connection, so enter Protocol UDP,
Configurator: “Controllers: defining
Address 1 and Remote IP Address as defined in the
and modifying new controllers”
previous step.
Computer In the Access PE main window click the “download
settings” button to download the latest firmware from
Access PE to the AMC device (here generically known
as a LAC or “Local Access Controller”)
5
(The download settings button)
Computer For the Main entrance define a Time Model for public Access Professional Edition visiting hours between 9:00 and 16:00.
6
Computer Use the Access PE configurator application to
Configurator: “Time models >
Create and modify”
Access Professional Edition -
configure all 4 of the doors described above. Each door Configurator: “Entrances” and
in our example will be of door model 01b and will
“Signals”
require:
–
A reader of type RS-485 with an address of 1-4.
E.g. Main Entrance=1, Lab=2, Storeroom=3,
Office=4.
–
Two analog inputs, one for the REX and one for
the magnetic contact.
7
–
One relay output to the door opener.
Computer Set the Main Entrance to be dependent on the time
model defined above, and for this to come into effect
Access Professional Edition Configurator: “Entrances”
upon first use of the door.
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en | Installation with RS-485, AMC and Access PE
Access Control by Example
Step
Where
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
no.
8
Computer Assign authorization groups to the individual doors,
9
Access Professional Edition Configurator: “Access
e.g:
–
All_Staff (for Main entrance and Storeroom)
–
Doctor_And_Technician (for Laboratory)
–
Doctor_And_Receptionist (for Office)
Computer Create the users of the access control system in
Authorizations”
Access Professional Edition -
Access PE, e.g. Doctor, Receptionist, Lab technician.
Personnel Management: “User
Assign the appropriate authorization groups to each
rights”
user, i.e:
–
Receptionist: All_Staff and
Doctor_And_Receptionist.
–
10
Technician: All_Staff and Doctor_And_Technician.
–
Doctor: <all three authorization groups>
Computer Assign the numbers of the credentials (card, token or
key fob) to the personnel records of their respective
11
users.
Computer Click the “download settings” button (see Step 3
Access Professional Edition Personnel Management: “User
rights”
above) to update the AMC with the changes.
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Access Control by Example
4
Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC) | en
19
Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller
(AEC)
This chapter describes the installation of our example access control system using Wiegand
communication to the readers. AEC is an access control system that uses Wiegand
communication. We will assume that all the components decided upon in Section 2.2 Low tier:
Electrical components, page 6 have been ordered from and delivered by the hardware vendor
of your choice. The installation is basically a 6 stage process:
4.1
1.
Mounting the access controller, see 4.1
2.
Installing the wiring, see 4.2
3.
Mounting the peripheral components, see 4.3
4.
Connecting the peripheral components to the wiring and AEC, see 4.4 to 4.5.1
5.
Configuring the AEC hardware and network, see 4.5.2
6.
Configuring the AEC software, see 4.5.3
Mounting the access controller
The obvious room in which to locate the access controller and power supply is the office. In it
the hardware will be protected from unauthorized access. The office is also situated centrally
with regard to the doors. The enclosure should contain a battery to provide an uninterruptible
power supply (UPS).
The backup battery is optional and is not provided with the standard package.
4.2
Installing the wiring
Lay the cables decided upon in Section 2.2.3 Wiring for non-reader components, page 8 from
the office to the respective doors. Aesthetically it is always preferable to hide cabling beneath
floors, above ceilings or underneath wall plaster, but this is not always practical. Note junction boxes are commonly used near doors; we leave them out of this example only for the
sake of simplicity.
Make sure that cables carrying data (e.g. from the reader) are shielded, see 4.4.2
Make sure that there is enough length to reach both components above the door (e.g. REX
with motion detector, magnetic contacts) and components at handle height (e.g. reader, door
opener).
4.2.1
Wiegand star topology for readers
Readers in a wiegand environment are connected in a star topology, i.e. a reader is connected
directly to the controller. See Section 2.2.1 Card reader technologies, page 7.
With readers it is very important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions as regards
grounding (earthing) the device and its cable shielding.
4.3
Mounting the peripheral components
Electrical components must always be mounted (i.e. attached to walls, racks, doors and doorframes) as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
The following illustration shows typical locations of electrical components with respect to a
door. Note that the access controller (5) should always be in a secured area to prevent
tampering.
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en | Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC)
Access Control by Example
Door from the outside
Same door from the inside
1: Door opener - 2 wires
3: Magnetic contact - 2 wires
2: Reader - 4 wires
4: REX with motion detector - 2 wires
5: Access controller. NOTE: This should not be near the doors themselves, but should
always be located in a secured area (here represented by the cloud).
4.4
Connecting the peripheral components to the wiring
Electrical components must always be connected as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
Nevertheless there are certain basic rules and pitfalls which should be well understood by
every installer of access control devices. Please read the following sections carefully:
4.4.1
Protective diodes
A door opener typically locks or unlocks a door by means of a magnet which is subjected to an
electric current. When this current is switched off a high voltage is induced in the magnetic
coil, which needs to be dissipated to prevent damage to other components. This is generally
done by means of a protective diode.
CAUTION!
If the door opener (or other magnetic component, e.g. a door holding magnet) does not have
an inbuilt protective diode, be sure to connect such a diode electrically in parallel with it. See
illustration below. Section Figure 4.2
Position of the protective diode, page 21. Install
protective diodes wherever excess voltage can be induced by magnetic fields.
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Access Control by Example
Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC) | en
21
+
COM
Output
PSU
NC
4-Reader Board
+
-
Door Strike/
Electromagnetic Lock
Figure 4.1 A diode
=
Back Biased
Suppression Diode
Figure 4.2 Position of the protective diode
4.4.2
Shielding data cables and avoiding ground loops
Cables with cores that carry data have a conducting wrapper, accompanied by a naked
grounding wire, between the cores and the outer plastic casing. When the naked wire is
grounded properly this wrapper “shields” the cores from electrical interference. Without
shielding, the integrity of the data signals is threatened.
A common installation error (particularly in cases where the reader-end and the controller-end
of the cable are handled by different persons) is to ground the shielding at both ends. If the
two grounds are not of identical potential, there is a possibility of current flow through the
shielding, which can disrupt the signals in unpredictable ways, cause malfunctions in the
access control hardware and even masquerade as software errors. This phenomenon is
known as a ground loop.
Figure 4.3 Avoiding a ground loop
5: Access controller
6: Shielding around cable
2: Reader
CAUTION!
To avoid ground loops, be sure to ground cable shields only ONCE.
CAUTION!
Follow carefully the grounding instructions for the reader and other sensitive components.
Failure to ground components correctly can result in damage to those components and to
malfunction of the access control hardware, which can masquerade as a software error.
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en | Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC)
4.5
Access Control by Example
Connecting the AEC (Access Easy Controller)
The following is an illustration of an AEC2.1 unit
Figure 4.4 An AEC2.1 access controller
1: CPU Board
2: 4 Reader Board
3: Power Supply Unit 4: Backup Battery
Note: AEC2.1 does not come with the 12 VDC standby battery.
Space restrictions do not permit a detailed treatment of the AEC2.1 controller hardware, of
which there are several variants. Always consult the hardware manual of the controller you are
using. The relevant hardware manual, along with all the other documentation referenced
below, is available in PDF format from the Bosch Security Systems internet site, see
Section 5 Resources and further reading, page 27.
As we only need to control 4 doors, one AEC2.1 device will be sufficient. For connection to
the access control software we will use an ethernet crossover cable aka “null modem”
(alternatively you could use normal ethernet cables and place a hub or a “switch” between
computer and access controller). For the power supply we will use the standard power cable
(100~240 VAC) which also charges the UPS backup battery.
4.5.1
Connecting the peripheral components to the AEC
The AEC2.1 possesses connectors of the pluggable screw terminal type. Wires can be
fastened with holding screws to the terminals, and these terminals can be plugged and
unplugged at the AEC2.1.
We will connect 4 readers (Main entrance, Laboratory, Storeroom and Office) in a star
topology i.e. all the readers are connected to the controller.
Figure 4.5 below shows an example with one door connected to the controller.
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Access Control by Example
Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC) | en
23
BOSCH
T7
Input1
Input2
Input3
LED1
In1
Gnd
In2
Gnd
In3
Gnd
In4
Gnd
In5
Gnd
In6
In7
Gnd
Input4
Gnd
Gnd
12V
In8
Gnd
T8
READER 1
T6
T2
COM1
NC1
DO-1
NO1
D1-1
COM2
LED2
LED1
BUZ1
NC2
READER 2
N GND V2
G
G
V1 V1
12 VAC/DC POWER
SUPPLY FOR STRIKE
T3
12V
COM3
JP2
Gnd
LED3
DO-2
NC3
NO3
D1-2
COM4
LED2
LED4
BUZ2
NC4
NO4
1 2
LED9
LED10
LED11
LED12
4-Reader Board
SW1
T10
12V
READER 3
L
NO2
T9
RUN JP1
TX
SW2
RX
CARD READ
T4
COM5
Gnd
LED5
DO-3
NC5
NO5
D1-3
COM6
LED3
LED6
BUZ3
NC6
NO6
T5
T11
12V
COM7
Gnd
LED7
DO-4
D1-4
COM8
LED4
LED8
NC8
NO8
T13
RS232
TX RX
DC 15V DC 15V
OUT
IN
+ T14 + -
GND
RS485
B A
Shield
Main
PWR
Tamper
Fail
+ + -
RTS
BUZ4
NC7
NO7
Earth
READER 4
- +
T1
T12
6.8K Ohm
Door Contact
Exit Device
6.8K Ohm
HID
+
DOOR
STRIKE
Figure 4.5 The AEC2.1 connections showing one of the door connections.
CAUTION!
Verify that the voltage specified for your chosen reader and peripheral components
corresponds to the voltage delivered by the power supply. If not then adjust the power supply
output voltage.
Otherwise you risk damaging both the AEC and the connected components.
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en | Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC)
Step
Where
Step description
no.
1
AEC2.1
Connect the power supply to the power cord in the
2
AEC2.1
controller.
Connect the Main Entrance reader to the pluggable
Access Control by Example
Illustrations / Reference
screw terminal Reader1 for connection.
Connect the Laboratory reader to the pluggable screw
terminal Reader2 for connection.
Connect the Storeroom reader to the pluggable screw
terminal Reader3 for connection.
Connect the Office reader to the pluggable screw
3
AEC2.1
terminal Reader4 for connection.
Connect the REX unit to the terminal In1 and Gnd in
Documentation included with the
Input1 point. In our example we use a motion detector. REX unit.
As this is the main entrance the customer may prefer
instead to connect a simple push button here, to be
operated by the receptionist from her desk.
IMPORTANT: Install 6.8K ohm end-of-line resistors at
each device. The resistor should be wired in parallel
(across) normally open devices and in series with
4
AEC2.1
normally closed devices.
Connect the MC (magnetic contact) unit to the
Documentation included with the
terminal In2 and Gnd in Input1 point. Any tamper
MC unit.
detection wires can be left unconnected.
IMPORTANT: Install 6.8K ohm end-of-line resistors at
each devices. The resistor should be wired in parallel
(across) normally open devices and in series with
5
AEC2.1
normally closed devices.
Connect the door opener to the relay output COM1
Documentation included with the
and NC1 in T2.
door opener unit.
NOTE: Door openers typically require their own power
supplies, in which case the AEC connection must be in
“dry mode”, i.e. providing no voltage.
IMPORTANT: Make sure a protective diode is included
in parallel, see Section 4.4 Connecting the peripheral
6
AEC2.1
components to the wiring, page 20.
Connect an external battery to provide power for the
7
AEC2.1
door opener.
Connect the Laboratory, Storeroom and Office readers
8
AEC2.1
as above.
Connect the REX units for the Storeroom (In3 and Gnd
in Input2 terminal), Lab (In5 and Gnd in Input3
terminal) and Office (In7 and Gnd in Input4 terminal).
REX by motion detector is useful but push buttons are
very common for cost reasons.
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Introductory Guide
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Access Control by Example
Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC) | en
Step
Where
Step description
no.
9
AEC2.1
Connect the MC units for the Storeroom (In4 and Gnd
25
Illustrations / Reference
in Input2 terminal), Lab (In6 and Gnd in Input3
10
AEC2.1
terminal) and Office (In8 and Gnd in Input4 terminal).
Connect the door openers for the Storeroom (COM3
and NC3 in T3), Lab (COM5 and NC5 in T4) and Office
(COM7 and NC7 in T5).
4.5.2
Configuring the AEC hardware and network
Step
Where
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
no.
1
Power
Connect the power cable (100~240 VAC) to the AEC2.1
2
cable
AEC2.1
power socket, but do not switch on the power.
Unlock the enclosure door with the keys provided. Open AEC2.1 Hardware Manual
the enclosure to gain access to the internal CPU, 4 reader
3
AEC2.1
board and PSU.
Check all circuit board mounting screws for snugness.
AEC2.1 Hardware Manual
Verify that socket mounted components are secure.
Verify jumper and switch settings of all boards.
Insert Compact Flash onto the AEC2.1 CPU.
AEC2.1 Hardware Manual
Connect an ethernet crossover cable from the computer AEC2.1 Hardware Manual
4
5
CPU
CPU
6
to the AEC2.1 CPU network port.
Computer Connect a computer running the Windows operating
system to the AEC using the crossover network cable.
Configure the computer's IP address on the same
192.168.0 network as the default IP address of the
7
AEC2.1
controller (192.168.0.41).
Power up the controller at this time. The CPU board will
perform a power-up self-test. This test takes about 90
seconds to complete.
The system will take approximately 7 mins to 10 mins to
launch the back end programs when the system is
8
booted up for the first time.
Computer Open a Web browser application (Internet Explorer 7.0
9
factory default IP address is 192.168.0.41.
Computer Login to AEC2.1 using the user name “user1” and
and above) and enter the controller's IP address. The
AEC2.1 Software Manual
password “8088”.
Select the desired language for the software interface
10
from the dropdown list. Click the Login button.
Computer From the home page, select System > Network Settings. AEC2.1 Software Manual
Modify the Controller's IP Address, Subnet mask, and
11
Gateway to fit into the customer's network configuration.
Computer From the home page, select System > Advance Settings
> System Maintenance > Reboot to reboot the
controller. After rebooting, the controller will begin
responding to its new address.
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en | Installation with Wiegand and Access Easy Controller (AEC)
4.5.3
Access Control by Example
Configuring the AEC software
Step
Where
Step description
Illustrations / Reference
no.
1
AEC and
Use a normal network cable to connect the AEC’s
AEC2.1 Hardware Manual and
2
Computer ethernet port to an ethernet port in the network hub. AEC2.1 Software Manual
Computer Open a Web browser application (Internet Explorer 7.0 AEC2.1 Hardware Manual and
and later) and enter the controller's default IP address AEC2.1 Software Manual.
192.168.0.41.
If you have changed the IP address enter the new IP
3
address.
Computer From the main page select Configuration > Device >
AEC2.1 Software Manual
Door. Edit the description of the existing door
configuration as Main_Entrance, Lab, Storeroom and
4
Office.
Computer For the Main entrance define a Schedule for public
AEC2.1 Software Interface:
5
visiting hours between 9:00 and 16:00.
Computer Assign the above defined schedule to the Main
Configuration > Schedules
AEC2.1 Software Interface -
Entrance and set the schedule to unlock the door.
6
7
Computer Assign Access groups to the individual doors, e.g:
–
All_Staff (for Main entrance and Storeroom)
–
Doctor (for Office and Laboratory)
–
Receptionist (for Office)
–
Technician (for Laboratory)
Computer Create the users e.g. Doctor, Receptionist, Lab
Configurator: Configuration >
Device > Door > Scheduling Options
AEC2.1 Software Interface Configurator: Card > Access Groups
AEC2.1 Software Interface -
Technician and assign individual card numbers to
Configurator: Card > Card
access the doors.
Administration
Assign the appropriate access groups to each user, i.e:
| 1.0 | 2009.10
–
Receptionist: All_Staff and Receptionist.
–
Technician: All_Staff and Technician.
–
Doctor: All Staff and Doctor
Introductory Guide
Bosch Security Systems
Access Control by Example
5
Resources and further reading | en
27
Resources and further reading
Links to literature, websites etc.
Document
Location / Link
Bosch Security Systems: Product
http://products.boschsecuritysystems.eu/en/
information
Bosch Access Control Products:
http://products.boschsecuritysystems.eu/en/EMEA/
Information and downloadable
products/bxp/
documentation:
CATM5addb76fb1a3ee8977d108b6d43d16f5
AMC2 4R4 Installation Guide
http://resource.boschsecurity.com/documents/AMC2AccessModu_InstallationGuide_AMC24R4_enUS_T444303
7323.pdf
Miscellaneous AMC2 hardware and
http://products.boschsecuritysystems.eu/en/EMEA/
extensions
products/bxp/
CATM23980e086f5b3df3a8cbc6c804a471bb
Access Professional Edition V2.0
http://products.boschsecuritysystems.eu/en/EMEA/
products/bxp/SKUPFT6355205515.P1.F.01U.127.354CATM8d3152ce9e0ab66b2810c85db614c882
AEC2.1 Hardware Manual
http://products.boschsecuritysystems.eu/en/EMEA/
products/bxp/
CATM5addb76fb1a3ee8977d108b6d43d16f5
AEC2.1 Software Manual
http://products.boschsecuritysystems.eu/en/EMEA/
products/bxp/
CATM5addb76fb1a3ee8977d108b6d43d16f5
AEC2.1 Utilities Manual
http://resource.boschsecurity.com/documents/
AccessEasyContr_InstructionBook_UtilitiesProgrammMan
ual_enUS_T6385916427.pdf
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en | Glossary
Access Control by Example
Glossary
A
Access control
Protecting resources from misuse by unauthorized persons whilst facilitating their legitimate
use by authorized persons.
Access PE
Access Professional Edition - access control software sold by Bosch Security Systems for midrange access control installations.
AEC
Access Easy Controller - an access controller sold by Bosch Security Systems with a browser
based user interface for small to mid-range access control installations.
Alarm
An event that draws attention to a situation requiring human intervention. An alarm can trigger
further events such as live video, video playback, the display of action plans/maps etc.
AMC2
Access Modular Controller - an access controller module (HW + firmware) sold by Bosch
Security Systems for any size of access control installations.
C
Credentials
Objects carried by an individual person in order to identify that person to access control
systems or to other persons. Typical forms of credentials are cards and key fobs.
D
DIL or DIP switch
A bank of small binary switches used for configuring hardware at installation time, but not
involved in user interaction.
Door model
One of a set of standard door configurations defined in the access control software. Using
door models accelerates the software configuration process.
G
Ground loop
Unwanted electrical current through a conductor caused by its being grounded at more than
one point, with these points having different electric potentials.
J
Jumper
A small component used to connect two pins thus making a binary switch. Like DIL switches
jumpers are used for configuring hardware at installation time but are not involved in user
interaction.
L
LAC
Local Access Controller. A generic term for access controllers, found in the Access PE GUI and
documentation. The AMC2 is a kind of LAC.
M
MC
Magnetic contact. A component which detects whether a door is open or not. In combination
with other components it can be used to raise an alarm if the door is forced open.
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Introductory Guide
Bosch Security Systems
Access Control by Example
Mode wet/dry
Glossary | en
29
An AMC connection is in “wet mode” when the AMC provides a voltage to the peripheral
device via that connection. “Dry mode” is the opposite, i.e. no voltage is provided via the
connection. The mode is determined by a jumper setting inside the AMC unit. It is important
that devices with their own power supplies be connected only in dry mode.
P
Protective diode
A small component wired in parallel with a magnetic component in order to dissipate any
harmful excess voltage induced by powering off the magnet.
R
REX
A Request to EXit device. An electronic device, typically a push button or a motion detector,
which signals the need to unlock a door to allow exit.
RS-485
A digital communications standard which is especially effective over long distances and in
electrically “noisy” environments. Here it is an alternative communication medium to Wiegand
for connecting readers to access controlers. RS-485 uses a bus topology and has a longer
range than Wiegand.
T
Tier
An access control system can be considered as consisting of three tiers: the electrical
components (low tier), the access controllers (middle tier) and the software host system
(high tier).
Time model
A structure of hours of the day which is defined by administrators as a named entity in an
access control system. System administrators can control, for instance, the opening times of a
door, or the valid attendance times of a person based on such time models, thus accelerating
the software configuration process.
W
Wiegand
Bosch Security Systems
The Wiegand interface is a common wiring standard for card readers
Introductory Guide
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30
en | Index
Access Control by Example
Index
A
access control software 9
access control system 4
access controller 8
Access Easy Controller 22
Access Professional Edition 17
AMC2 13
authorization group 18
C
credentials 7
D
door model 17
E
end-of-line resisitor 24
G
ground loop 12
L
location of components 10
M
modes wet/dry 14
P
protective diode 11
R
Reader’s bus address 16
RS485 7
T
three tiers 6
time model 17
W
Wiegand 7, 19
wiring topology 7
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Introductory Guide
Bosch Security Systems
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Germany
Telefon
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Fax
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www.boschsecurity.com
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