Electrolux E32AR75GTT - Icon - Refrigerator Service manual

Technical Service Manual
ICON All Refrigerator and
All Freezer - Professional Series
Publication #5995556346
January 2010
Basic Information
Safe Servicing Practices For All Appliances
Avoid personal injury and/or property damage by observing important Safe Servicing Practices.
Following are some limited examples of safe practices:
1. DO NOT attempt a product repair if you have any doubts as to your ability to complete the repair in a safe and
satisfactory manner.
2. Always use the correct Replacement Parts as indicated in the parts documentation. Substitutions may defeat
compliance with Safety Standards Set For Home Appliances. Do not exceed maximum recommended wattage
on light bulb replacements. Doing so could blow fuses and/or damage transformers.
3. Before servicing or moving an appliance:
• Remove power cord from the electrical outlet, trip circuit breaker to the OFF position, or remove fuse.
• Turn off water supply if applicable.
4. Never interfere with the proper operation of any safety device.
5. Use ONLY REPLACEMENT PARTS CATALOGED FOR THIS APPLIANCE. Substitutions may defeat
compliance with Safety Standards Set For Home Appliances.
6. GROUNDING: The standard color coding for safety ground wires is GREEN, or GREEN with YELLOW
STRIPES. Ground leads are not to be used as current carrying conductors. It is EXTREMELY important that
the service technician reestablish all safety grounds prior to completion of service. Failure to do so will create
a hazard.
7. Prior to returning the product to service, ensure that:
• All electrical connections are correct and secure.
• All electrical leads are properly dressed and secured away from sharp edges, high-temperature components,
and moving parts.
• All non-insulated electrical terminals, connectors, heaters, etc. are adequately spaced away from all metal
parts and panels.
• All safety grounds (both internal and external) are correctly and securely connected.
• All panels are properly and securely reassembled.
ATTENTION!!!
This service manual is intended for use by persons having electrical and mechanical training and a level
of knowledge of these subjects generally considered acceptable in the appliance repair trade. Electrolux
Home Products, Inc. cannot be responsible, nor assume any liability, for injury or damage of any kind
arising from the use of this manual.
© 2010 Electrolux Home Products, Inc.
1-1
Basic Information
This Manual has been prepared to provide Electrolux Service Personnel with Operation and Service Information for an
Electrolux All Refrigerator and/or All Freezer Pro Units, Models Numbers E32AR75FPS, E32AF75FP, E32AR75GTT
and E32AF75GT.
Table of Contents
Section 1 Basic Information ................................. 1-1
Safe Servicing Practices For All Appliances.............
Table of Contents .....................................................
Important Safety Instructions ....................................
Child Safety ..............................................................
Proper Disposal of Refrigerators/Freezers ...............
Major Appliance Warranty Information .....................
Model Number Breakdown .......................................
Serial Number Breakdown........................................
Built-in All Refrigerator Specifications ......................
Understanding Features and Terms - Refrigerator...
Built-in All Freezer Specifications .............................
Understanding Features and Terms - Freezer .........
1-1
1-2
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-9
Section 2 Installation.............................................. 2-1
Warnings and Safety ................................................
Installation Checklist ...............................................
Location ....................................................................
Leveling ....................................................................
Leveling Instructions For All Refrig./Freezer Pairs ...
Electrical Information ...............................................
Cut-Out Dimensions ................................................
Optional Accessories ... ...........................................
Water Supply ............................................................
Connecting the Water Valve to the Ice Maker ..........
Trim And Riser Kit Installation Instructions ...............
Setting Up The Trim And Grill Assembly ..................
Installing Trim & Grill Assembly Into Cabinetry ........
Installing The Riser Kit..............................................
Leveling The Refrigerator And Freezer ....................
How To Adjust Front And Rear Levelers ..................
Final Positioning .......................................................
Care & Cleaning Of Your Trim Kit ............................
Door Removal ..........................................................
Door Handle Mounting Instructions ..........................
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
2-14
2-14
2-14
2-15
2-15
2-15
Section 3 Electronic Control.................................. 3-1
Electronic Temperature Control ................................
Power Up .................................................................
Temperature Setting Selection ................................
Fail Safe Mode .........................................................
Error Indication ........................................................
Exiting Fail Safe Mode .............................................
Initiate Diagnostics Mode ........................................
Diagnostics Indicator ................................................
Defrost Timing .........................................................
Manual Defrost Mode ..............................................
Showroom Mode .....................................................
Compressor Run Time (CRT) Display Mode ...........
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-2
Compressor Delay Start ...........................................
Memory Retention ....................................................
Voltage Range ..........................................................
Stuck Key..................................................................
Main Power Connector .............................................
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-3
Section 4 Ice Maker ................................................ 4-1
Side Mounted Ice Maker ..........................................
Ice Maker Components ...........................................
Installing Water Supply Line to Ice Maker.................
Water Valve Switch – Water Fill Volume ...................
Test Cycling Ice Maker .............................................
Operating Cycle Illustrations - Manual Cycle ............
Operating Cycle Illustrations - Electrical ..................
Operating Cycle Illustrations - Mechanical ..............
4-1
4-2
4-4
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-12
Section 5 Sealed System ....................................
5-1
Notes ........................................................................
Soldering ..................................................................
Introduction ...............................................................
Compressor Oils .......................................................
Refrigeration Systems ..............................................
Sealed System Repair ..............................................
Service Diagnostic Tips ............................................
Refrigerator and Freezer Air Temperatures ..............
Line Voltage ..............................................................
Basic Components ...................................................
Testing for Refrigerant Leaks ....................................
Checking For Internal Leaks.....................................
Definitions .................................................................
Equipment Needed for Evacuation & Recharging ....
Low/High Side Leak or Undercharge........................
Precautions For Charging Sealed Systems ..............
Flushing The System With Nitrogen .........................
Compressor Oil Contamination ................................
Recovering Refrigerant.............................................
Installing a New Compressor....................................
Condenser Replacement ..........................................
Filter-Drier Installation ..............................................
Evaporator and Suction Line Replacement ..............
Installing Evacuation and Recharging Equipment ....
Evacuating System ...................................................
Charging The System ...............................................
Final Leak Test..........................................................
Dedicated Equipment ..............................................
Vacuum Pump Maintenance.....................................
Spills or Leaks ..........................................................
5-1
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-3
5-3
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-5
5-6
5-6
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-10
5-10
5-11
5-11
5-12
5-12
5-13
5-13
5-14
1-2
Basic Information
HFC 134a Comparison With CFC 12 .....................
Inhalation Toxicity ...................................................
Cardiac Sensitization ..............................................
Skin and Eye Contact .............................................
Combustibility of HFC-134a....................................
Bulk Delivery and Storage ......................................
Filling and Charging Operations .............................
Refrigerant Recovery Systems ...............................
Thermal Decomposition .........................................
R-134a Physical Properties ...................................
HFC-134a, CFC-12 Pressure Temperature Chart ..
Terms and Global Warming ...................................
5-15
5-15
5-15
5-15
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-18
5-18
5-19
Section 6 Component Teardown ........................... 6-1
Safety Warnings .......................................................
Refrigerator Exterior Components ............................
Door Handle ..........................................................
Kickplate . ..............................................................
Door Hinge and Door Assembly ............................
Door Stop Assembly .............................................
Door Gasket and Inner Panel . ..............................
Door Hinge and Door Assembly ............................
Door Storage Components .......................................
Adjustable Door Bins .............................................
Dairy Door .............................................................
Door Switch ..............................................................
Interior Components .................................................
Adjustable Interior Shelves....................................
Refrigerator Drawer Assembly ..............................
Air Filter .................................................................
Control Box Assembly ...........................................
Light Fixture...........................................................
Control ...................................................................
Water Filter Base Components .............................
Baffle Plate ...........................................................
Evaporator Cover ..................................................
Mid Level Lighting..................................................
Thermistor ............................................................
Evaporator Fan Assembly ....................................
Defrost Thermostat................................................
Defrost Heater .......................................................
Evaporator .............................................................
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-4
6-4
6-4
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-5
6-6
6-6
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-8
6-9
6-9
6-10
6-10
6-11
Compressor Area Components
All Refrigerator and All Freezer-Pro Models ............. 6-12
Power Cord ...............................................................
Water Valve...............................................................
Theater Lighting Control ...........................................
Filter-Drier.................................................................
Compressor ..............................................................
Drain Pan ..................................................................
Condenser Fan Motor ...............................................
Condenser Coil .........................................................
6-12
6-12
6-13
6-13
6-14
6-15
6-15
6-16
Section 6 Component Teardown (continued)
Freezer Exterior Components
Door Handle ..........................................................
Kickplate . ..............................................................
Door Hinge and Door Assembly ............................
Door Bin ...............................................................
Tilt Out Wire Shelf . ...............................................
Door Stop Assembly..............................................
Door Gasket and Inner Panel ...............................
Door Switch ...........................................................
Interior Components .................................................
Adjustable Interior Shelves....................................
Freezer Drawer Assembly .....................................
Air Filter .................................................................
Control Box............................................................
Light Fixture ..........................................................
Control ..................................................................
Baffle Plate ............................................................
Ice Maker...............................................................
Mid Level Lighting..................................................
Thermistor ............................................................
Evaporator Fan Assembly .....................................
Defrost Thermostat ...............................................
Defrost Heater .......................................................
Evaporator ............................................................
6-17
6-17
6-17
6-18
6-18
6-18
6-19
6-19
6-20
6-20
6-20
6-21
6-21
6-21
6-22
6-22
6-22
6-23
6-23
6-24
6-24
6-25
6-25
Section 7 Parts List ................................................ 7-1
Models E32AF75FPS and E32AR75FPS shown
All Freezer Pro Door Exploded View ......................... 7-1
All Freezer Pro Cabinet Exploded View ..................... 7-2
All Freezer Pro System Exploded View ..................... 7-4
Ice Maker Exploded View .......................................... 7-6
All Refrigerator Pro Door Exploded View................... 7-8
All Refrigerator Pro Cabinet Exploded View .............. 7-10
All Refrigerator Pro System Exploded View .............. 7-12
Section 8 Troubleshooting ..................................... 8-1
Troubleshooting Chart ............................................... 8-1
Section 9 Wiring Schematics ................................. 9-1
Ice Maker Schematic ................................................ 9-1
All Freezer Pro Wiring Diagram ................................ 9-2
All Refrigerator Pro Wiring Diagram ......................... 9-3
1-3
Basic Information
Child Safety
Important Safety Instructions
Packing Materials:
Safety Precautions
•
Do not attempt to install, operate or service the unit until
you have read the safety precautions in this manual.
Safety items throughout this manual are labeled with a
Danger, Warning, or Caution based on the risk type.
•
Definitions
This is the safety alert symbol. It is used to alert
you to potential personal injury hazards. Obey all
safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid possible
injury or death.
DANGER indicates an imminently hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, will result in death
or serious injury.
WARNING indicates a potentially hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
CAUTION indicates a potentially hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor
or moderate injury.
Child Entrapment and Suffocation:
•
Electrolux Home Products Inc. strongly encourages
responsible appliance recycling/disposal methods.
Check with your utility company or visit
www.recyclemyoldfridge.com for more information
on recycling your old refrigerator.
Before you recycle or dispose of your old refrigerator/
freezer:
• Remove the doors.
• Leave the shelves and baskets in place so children
may not easily climb inside.
• Have refrigerant and compressor oil removed by a
qualified service technician.
General Safety
•
•
•
These problems are not limited to the past.
Whether junked, abandoned, or temporarily stored
(even for a few hours), unattended refrigerators and
freezers are dangerous. Please take the precautions
listed below.
Proper Disposal of Refrigerators/Freezers
Indicates installation, operation, or maintenance
information which is important but not hazard
related.
•
Packing cartons covered with rugs, bedspreads,
plastic sheets, or stretch wrap may become airtight
chambers and can quickly cause suffocation.
Destroy or recycle the product’s carton, plastic bags,
and any other exterior wrapping material immediately
after the refrigerator is unpacked. Children should
never play with these items.
Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable
liquids near this or any other appliance. Read
product labels for warnings regarding flammability
and other hazards.
Do not operate the unit in the presence of explosive
fumes.
Avoid contact with any moving parts of the automatic
ice maker.
Remove all staples from the carton to avoid injury.
Staples can also damage finishes if they come in
contact with other appliances or furniture.
1-4
Basic Information
Major Appliance Warranty Information
Your appliance is covered by a one year limited warranty. For one year from your original date of purchase, Electrolux will repair or
replace any parts of this appliance that prove to be defective in materials or workmanship when such appliance is installed, used, and
maintained in accordance with the provided instructions. In addition, the cabinet liner and sealed refrigeration system (compressor,
condenser, evaporator, dryer or tubing) of your appliance is covered by a two through five year limited warranty. During the 2nd
through 5th years from your original date of purchase, Electrolux will repair or replace any parts in the cabinet liner and sea led
refrigeration system which prove to be defective in materials or workmanship when such appliance is installed, used, and
maintained in accordance with the provided instructions.
Exclusions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
This warranty does not cover the following:
Products with original serial numbers that have been removed, altered or cannot be readily determined.
Product that has been transferred from its original owner to another party or removed outside the USA or Canada.
Rust on the interior or exterior of the unit.
Products purchased “as-is” are not covered by this warranty.
Food loss due to any refrigerator or freezer failures.
Products used in a commercial setting.
Service calls which do not involve malfunction or defects in materials or workmanship, or for appliances not in ordinary
household use or used other than in accordance with the provided instructions.
Service calls to correct the installation of your appliance or to instruct you how to use your appliance.
Expenses for making the appliance accessible for servicing, such as removal of trim, cupboards, shelves, etc., which are
not a part of the appliance when it is shipped from the factory.
Service calls to repair or replace appliance light bulbs, air filters, water filters, other consumables, or knobs, handles, or
other cosmetic parts.
Pickup and delivery costs; your appliance is designed to be repaired in the home.
Surcharges including, but not limited to, any after hour, weekend, or holiday service calls, tolls, ferry trip charges, or
mileage expense for service calls to remote areas, including the state of Alaska.
Damages to the finish of appliance or home incurred during transportation or installation, including but not limited to floo rs,
cabinets, walls, etc.
Damages caused by: services performed by unauthorized service companies; use of parts other than genuine Electrolux
parts or parts obtained from persons other than authorized service companies; or external causes such as abuse, misuse,
inadequate power supply, accidents, fires, or acts of God.
DISCLAIMER OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES; LIMITATION OF REMEDIES
CUSTOMER’S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY UNDER THIS LIMITED WARRANTY SHALL BE REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT AS
PROVIDED HEREIN. CLAIMS BASED ON IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE LIMITED TO ONE YEAR OR THE SHORTEST PERIOD ALLOWED BY LAW, BUT
NOT LESS THAN ONE YEAR. ELECTROLUX SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES SUCH
AS PROPERTY DAMAGE AND INCIDENTAL EXPENSES RESULTING FROM ANY BREACH OF THIS WRITTEN LIMITED
WARRANTY OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY. SOME STATES AND PROVINCES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR
LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, OR LIMITATIONS ON THE DURATION OF IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, SO THESE LIMITATIONS OR EXCLUSIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. THIS WRITTEN WARRANTY GIVES YOU
SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS. YOU MAY ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS THAT VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
If You Need Service
Keep your receipt, delivery slip, or some other appropriate payment record to establish the warranty period should service be
required. If service is performed, it is in your best interest to obtain and keep all receipts. Service under this warranty must be
obtained by contacting Electrolux at the addresses or phone numbers below.
This warranty only applies in the USA, Puerto Rico and Canada. In the USA and Puerto Rico, your appliance is warranted by
Electrolux Major Appliances North America, a division of Electrolux Home Products, Inc. In Canada, your appliance is warranted by
Electrolux Canada Corp. Electrolux authorizes no person to change or add to any obligations under this warranty. Obligations for
service and parts under this warranty must be performed by Electrolux or an authorized service company. Product features or
specifications as described or illustrated are subject to change without notice.
Canada
1-800-265-8352
Electrolux Canada Corp.
5855 Terry Fox Way
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5V 3E4
USA
1-877-435-3287
Electrolux Major Appliances North America
P.O. Box 212378
Augusta, GA 30907
1-5
Basic Information
Model Number Breakdown
All Refrigerator Specifications
Serial Number Breakdown
1-6
Basic Information
Understanding Features and Terms - All Refrigerator Professional
Series
Electrolux refrigerators are designed for optimal convenience and storage flexibility. The illustration below is
provided to assist you with familiarizing yourself with product features and terminology.
NOTE: Features may vary according to model.
1-7
Basic Information
All Freezer Specifications
®
1-8
Basic Information
Understanding Features and Terms - All Freezer Professional Series
Electrolux freezer are designed for optimal convenience and storage flexibility. The illustration below is
provided to assist you with familiarizing yourself with product features and terminology.
NOTE: Features may vary according to model.
1-9
Basic Information
Notes
1-10
Installation Information
Recognize safety symbols, words and labels:
Safety items throughout this manual are labeled with a WARNING or CAUTION based on the risk type as described
below:
This symbol alerts you to situations that may cause serious body harm, death or
property damage.
This symbol alerts you to situations that may cause bodily injury or property damage.
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRICAL SHOCK, OR INJURY WHEN USING AN ICON ALL FREEZER
AND/OR ALL REFRIGERATOR, FOLLOW BASIC SAFETY PRECAUTIONS INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING:
-
READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE OPERATING THE FREEZER AND/OR REFRIGERATOR.
-
BEFORE PERFORMING ANY TYPE OF SERVICE OR INSTALLATION, MAKE SURE THAT ELECTRIC
POWER TO THE FREEZER AND/OR REFRIGERATOR IS DISCONNECTED.
-
TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF EXPLOSION OR FIRE, DO NOT STORE OR USE COMBUSTIBLE,
FLAMMABLE, OR EXPLOSIVE LIQUIDS OR VAPORS (SUCH AS GASOLINE) INSIDE OR IN THE VICINITY
OF THIS OR ANY OTHER APPLIANCE.
-
THIS APPLIANCE IS EQUIPPED WITH A THREE-PRONG GROUNDING PLUG FOR PROTECTION
AGAINST POSSIBLE ELECTRIC SHOCK HAZARDS. PLUG IT ONLY INTO A DEDICATED, GROUNDED
ELECTRICAL OUTLET. WHEN ONLY A STANDARD TWO-PRONG ELECTRICAL OUTLET IS AVAILABLE,
THE CUSTOMER MUST HAVE IT REPLACED WITH A DEDICATED, PROPERLY GROUNDED THREEPRONG ELECTRICAL OUTLET BEFORE USING THIS APPLIANCE.
-
DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, CUT OR REMOVE THE THIRD (GROUND) PRONG FROM THE
POWER CORD.
DO NOT USE AN ADAPTER PLUG.
DO NOT USE AN EXTENSION CORD.
DO NOT USE A POWER CORD THAT IS FRAYED OR DAMAGED.
THE USE OF A GROUND FAULT INTERRUPTER (GFI) IS NOT RECOMMENDED.
-
DO NOT INSTALL OR USE A DAMAGED APPLIANCE. IF YOU RECEIVE A DAMAGED APPLIANCE,
IMMEDIATELY CONTACT YOUR DEALER OR BUILDER.
-
THE INSTALLER MUST SHOW THE CUSTOMER THE LOCATION OF THE POWER PLUG SO THAT THEY
KNOW WHERE AND HOW TO DISCONNECT POWER TO THE FREEZER AND/OR REFRIGERATOR.
-
DO NOT INSTALL, REPAIR, OR REPLACE ANY PART OF THE FREEZER AND/OR REFRIGERATOR
UNLESS SPECIFICALLY RECOMMENDED IN THE LITERATURE ACCOMPANYING IT. A QUALIFIED
SERVICE TECHNICIAN SHOULD PERFORM ALL OTHER SERVICE.
Electrolux Home Products Inc. cannot be held responsible for damage to property or injury to persons
caused by failure to comply with the installation, maintenance and safety instructions contained in this
Service Manual.
2-1
Installation Information
DESTROY CARTON, PLASTIC BAGS, AND ANY EXTERIOR WRAPPING MATERIAL IMMEDIATELY AFTER
THE REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER IS UNPACKED. CHILDREN SHOULD NEVER USE THESE ITEMS FOR
PLAY. CARTONS COVERED WITH RUGS, BEDSPREADS, PLASTIC SHEETS OR STRETCH WRAP MAY
BECOME AIR TIGHT CHAMBERS AND CAN QUICKLY CAUSE SUFFOCATION.
A CHILD MIGHT SUFFOCATE IF THEY CRAWL INTO THE UNIT TO HIDE OR PLAY. REMOVE THE DOOR/
LID OF THE REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER WHEN NOT IN USE, EVEN IF YOU PLAN TO DISCARD THE UNIT.
MANY COMMUNITIES HAVE LAWS REQUIRING YOU TO TAKE THIS SAFETY PRECAUTION.
REMOVE OR DISCARD ANY SPACERS USED TO SECURE THE SHELVES DURING SHIPPING. SMALL
OBJECTS ARE A CHOKE HAZARD TO CHILDREN.
CHILD ENTRAPMENT AND SUFFOCATION ARE NOT PROBLEMS OF THE PAST. JUNKED OR
ABANDONED REFRIGERATORS OR FREEZERS ARE STILL DANGEROUS– EVEN IF THEY WILL SIT FOR
“JUST A FEW DAYS”. IF YOU ARE GETTING RID OF YOUR OLD REFRIGERATOR OR FREEZER, PLEASE
FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW TO HELP PREVENT ACCIDENTS:
• REMOVE THE DOOR/LID.
• LEAVE SHELVES IN PLACE SO CHILDREN MAY NOT EASILY CLIMB INSIDE.
• HAVE THE REFRIGERANT REMOVED BY A QUALIFIED TECHNICIAN.
Installation Checklist
Ice Maker
Doors
House water supply connected to water valve
No water leaks present at all connections recheck in 24 hours
Ice maker is turned ON
Handles are secure and tight
Door seals completely to cabinet on all sides
Doors are level across the top
Leveling
Unit is level, side-to-side and tilted 1/4” (6mm)
front-to-back
Toe grille is properly attached to the unit frame
Cabinet is setting solid on all corners
Electrical Power
House power turned on
Unit is plugged in
2-2
Front filter must be flush with filter housing
(select models)
Final Checks
Shipping material removed
Fresh food and freezer temperatures set
Crisper humidity controls set
Registration card sent in
Installation Information
Location
1. Choose a place that is near a grounded electrical
outlet. Do Not use an extension cord or an adapter
plug.
2. If possible, place unit(s) out of direct sunlight and
away from range, dishwasher or other heat sources.
3. The unit(s) must be installed on a floor that is level
and strong enough to support a fully loaded unit(s).
4. Consider water supply availability for models
equipped with an automatic ice maker.
5. The unit(s) should be located where surrounding
temperature will not exceed 110ºF (43ºC) or drop
below 40°F (5°C).
6. For ease of installation, proper air circulation and
electrical connections, see Figure 2-1 for
recommended clearances.
7. DO NOT block the toe grille on the lower front of
the unit. Sufficient air circulation is essential for the
proper operation of the unit(s).
Figure 2-1. Installation Clearances
The exterior walls of the refrigerator/freezer may
become quite warm as the compressor works to
transfer heat from the inside. Temperatures as much
as 30°F warmer than room temperatures can be
expected.
If your refrigerator and/or freezer is placed with the
door hinge side against a wall, you may have to allow
additional space so the door can be opened wider.
Leveling
The freezer and/or refrigerator must have all bottom
corners resting firmly on a solid floor. The floor must be
strong enough to support a fully loaded freezer and/or
refrigerator.
It is VERY IMPORTANT for your freezer and/or
refrigerator to be level in order to function properly. If
the unit is not leveled during installation, the door/lid may
be misaligned and not close or seal properly, causing
cooling, frost or moisture problems.
After discarding crating screws and wood base, use a
carpenter’s level to level the unit from front to back.
Adjust the plastic leveling feet in front, ½ bubble higher,
so that the door closes easily when left half way open.
Figure 2-2. Leveling Unit
2-3
Installation Information
Leveling Instructions For All
Refrigerator/Freezer Pairs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Remove two leg levelers provided in literature bag.
While unit is lying on its back for wood skid removal,
install both leg levelers in rear of unit.
Level door of first unit using all four levelers and
slide unit into place. Recheck for levelness and
adjust if necessary.
Measure distance from floor to bottom of door on
first unit. Adjust and level second unit so door height
matches.
Leg Level Adjustments:
One full turn of all four leg levelers will raise door
5/32”.
One full turn of both front leg levelers will raise door
3/16” and tilt top of door back 7/16”.
One full turn of both rear leg levelers will lower door
1/32” and tilt top of door forward 7/16”.
One full turn of both side leg levelers will raise door
3/16” and tilt top of door 3/8”.
Slide second unit into place leaving a minimum gap
of 3/16” between units for door swing clearance.
This last step may require at least one extraction of
the second unit to properly align units in a “built-in”
application.
Electrical Information
These guidelines must be followed to ensure that safety
mechanisms in the design of the unit will operate
properly.
Refer to the serial plate for correct electrical rating. The
power cord of the unit is equipped with at three-prong
grounding plug for protection against shock hazards. It
must be plugged directly in to its own properly grounded
three-prong receptacle, protected with a 15 amp time
delay fuse or circuit breaker. The receptacle must be
installed in accordance with the current edition of the
National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) the local codes and
ordinances. Consult a qualified electrician. Receptacles
with Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) are NOT
RECOMMENDED. DO NOT USE AN EXTENSION
CORD OR AN ADAPTER PLUG.
If the voltage varies by 10% or more, freezer and/or
refrigerator performance may be affected. Operating any
unit with insufficient power can damage the motor. Such
damage is not covered under the warranty. If you suspect
your voltage is high or low, consult your power company
for testing.
To prevent the freezer from being turned off accidentally,
do not plug the unit in to an outlet controlled by a wall
switch or pull cord. Do not pinch, knot, or bend the power
cord in any manner.
Avoid fire hazard or electric shock. Do not use an
extension cord or an adapter plug. Do not remove
any prong from the power cord.
Figure 2-3. Electrical Receptacle
Never unplug the freezer by pulling on the power
cord. Always grip the plug firmly and pull straight
out from the receptacle.
Turning the control to “OFF” turns off the
compressor but does not disconnect power to
other electrical components.
2-4
Installation Information
Cut-Out Dimensions
1. Minimum opening of 66” High x 33” Wide x 25-1/4”
Deep is required for a single-unit “Built-In Look”
installation. 66” Wide is required for double-unit
installation. (66” High to be measured from finished
floor to underside of soffit or overhead cabinet.)
2. Minimum 25-1/4” depth requires recessed electrical
outlet and copper water line.
3. Remove all wall / floor molding prior to built-in
installation.
4. When installing a unit adjacent to wall, cabinet or
other appliance that extends beyond front edge
of unit, 20” minimum clearance is recommended
to allow for optimum 140° door swing, providing
complete crisper access and removal. (Absolute
4” minimum clearance will ONLY allow for 90° door
swing which will provide limited crisper access with
restricted removal.)
5. Water line for ice maker can enter opening through
floor or rear wall. Copper tubing is recommended
between cold water line and water connection
location. Recommended water line tubing is 48”
minimum length by 1/4” diameter. Installation
of easily accessible shutoff valve in water line is
required.
6. To allow for ease of moving out side-by-side units
after installation, 84” minimum length of coiled
copper tubing recommended.
7. If optional Single or Double Trim Kit is to be used,
different cutout dimensions are required.
Figure 2-4. All Freezer Unit Cut-out
Figure 2-5. All Refrigerator Unit Cut-out
Optional Accessories
Single All-Freezer Kit (SFRRSRKIT)
Single All-Refrigerator Kit (SRRRSRKIT)
Double All-Freezer/All-Refrigerator Kit (DUORSRKIT)*
*Louvered Trim Kit (DUORSRKIT) is NOT compatible for
installation with panel-ready models.
Single Louvered Trim Kit (SRRRSRKIT)
For single All-Refrigerator installation. Includes louvered
top grille and vented, louvered toe kick, 4” riser with
leveling system and side / top trim pieces.
Double Louvered Trim Kit (DUORSRKIT)
For All-Freezer/ All-Refrigerator side-by-side installation.
Includes full-width, louvered top grille and vented,
louvered toe kick, two 4” risers with leveling systems and
side / top trim pieces.
Figure 2-6. Trim Kits
2-5
Installation Information
Water Supply
The ice maker (if equipped) requires a permanent water
supply to function correctly. During installation, establish
this water supply by connecting a copper tube from the
household water system to a valve at the rear of the unit.
To avoid property damage:
Use copper tubing for the water supply line
(plastic tubing is more likely to leak).
Manufacturer is not responsible for any
damage if plastic tubing is used for supply line.
• Ensure water supply and installation comply
with state and local laws and regulations.
• DO NOT install water supply tubing where
temperatures fall below freezing.
• Chemicals from a malfunctioning softener
can damage the ice maker. If the ice maker is
connected to soft water, ensure that the softener
is maintained and working properly.
•
3. Remove and discard the plastic cap from the water
valve inlet at the rear of the unit.
4. Slide the brass compression nut, then the ferrule
(sleeve) onto the copper tube.
5. Push the copper tube into the water valve inlet as far
as it will go (¼ inch or 6.4mm).
6. Slide the ferrule (sleeve) into the water valve and
finger-tighten the compression nut onto the valve.
Tighten another half turn with a wrench but DO NOT
over-tighten.
Requirements:
• Access to a cold water line with pressure of 20-120
psi. (System supplied with cold water only.)
• Copper tubing with ¼ inch (6.4mm) Outside
Diameter (OD). Length is the distance from the rear
of the unit to your household water supply line, plus
seven (7) feet (2.1 meters).
• A shut-off valve for the connection between your
household water line and the refrigerator supply line.
DO NOT use a self-piercing shut-off valve.
• A compression nut and ferrule (sleeve) for the water
supply connection at the water valve inlet.
For All-Freezer/All-Refrigerator Side-by-Side Installation
Ice Maker Water Supply Hookup
Ice Maker
Connection
Water Filter
Connection
All
Refrigerator
All
Freezer
Water Inlet
Note: For single-unit installation,
direct plumbing to ice maker recommended.
Figure 2-7. Water Connection
Water line kit number 5303917950, available from the
appliance dealer at additional cost, contains 25 feet
(7.6 meters) of 1/4” OD copper tubing, a saddle type
shut-off valve (non piercing), (2) 1/4” brass compression nuts, (2) ferrules/sleeves, and instructions for
installing a water supply line.
To connect the water supply to the rear of the unit
(See Figure 2-7 and 2-8a):
1. Ensure that the unit is unplugged.
2. Flush the supply line until water is clear by placing
the end of the copper tube in a sink or bucket and
opening the shut-off valve. Close shut-off valve
when flushing is complete.
Figure 2-8a. Water Valve Connection
2-6
Installation Information
7. Secure the copper tube to the units’ rear panel with
a steel clamp and screw.
8. Coil the excess copper tubing (about 2½ turns)
behind the unit as shown. Arrange coiled tubing to
avoid vibration or wear against other surfaces.
9. Open water supply shut-off valve and tighten any
connections that leak.
10. Connect unit to home power supply.
11. To turn ice maker On, lower wire signal arm. (See
ice maker front cover for On/Off position of arm.
Connecting the Water Valve to
the Ice Maker
For models Serial Number WB92254219 and greater built
after June 1, 2009, the units will have a different water
valve than earlier production models. The new water
valves have a quick connect outlet fitting which takes a
standard .255 diameter plastic tube. The old style of
water valves required a flanged tube and a threaded nut
to make the water connection. (See Figure 2-8b)
Figure 2-8b. Water Valves
The water valve on the left is the old style threaded
outlet connection. The water valve on the right has
the push-type outlet fitting.
Water Line Kit PN 297114101 will still be used to make
the water line connections between the new style water
valve and ice maker, however the flanged tube will have
to be modified as described in the steps below:
1. Using a box cutters or knife, cut the pointed end
from the water line just below the raised point. Be
sure to cut straight across the water line. Do not
leave open/cut end at an angle. (See Figure 2-8c)
2. Remove the cut end and plastic nut from the water
line and discard.
3. Measure 11/16” from the end of the water line and
place a mark on the line with a permenent marker.
4. Insert the modified water line into the push-type
fitting on the new valve, making sure that the water
line is pushed in up to the mark.
5. Inspect for leaks once water supply is turned on.
Figure 2-7. Water Connection
Figure 2-8c. Cut along dotted line to modify tubing.
2-7
Installation Information
The following items should be with the collar kit option:
Trim And Riser Kit Installation
Instructions
The Dual Trim and Riser Kit consists of the following:
• Riser Kit - 2 packages
• Hardware Kit - 1 bag
• Trim Kit - 1 package
• Installation Instructions
The Single Trim and Riser Kit consists of the following:
• Riser Kit - 2 packages
• Hardware Kit - 1 bag
• Trim Kit - 1 package
• Installation Instructions
Before starting installation, have the following tools on
hand:
• PhillipsTM Screwdriver
• Shims - Wooden or Plastic
• Tape Measure (min. 7” length)
• Safety Glasses
• Tape (Duct or Masking)
• Carpenter’s Level
• Drill & 1/8” Bit
• 1/2” Socket Wrench
Before You Begin
•
Be careful when unpacking components. Do not use
sharp objects when removing packaging material.
This may scratch the surface of trim components.
•
Make sure there is a large, clear area of floor
(approx. 10’ by 8’) to assemble the trim kit. Place a
drop cloth over the floor to prevent scratching of the
trim kit and/or floor.
Use extreme care when handling the metal trim
pieces. Corners are very sharp and easily damaged
if dropped.
•
Figure 2-9. Trim Kit Components
2-8
Installation Information
Setting Up The Trim And Grill
Assembly
3. Slide grill assembly into top collar trim (A). Tape
together to prevent from sliding. (See Figure 2-12).
1. Lay the parts out on a cleared area face down. Be
sure to place a drop cloth over the floor to prevent
scratching trim kit and/or floor. (See Figure 2-10).
Figure 2-12.
4. Attach brackets (K) to the angled end of each side
trim (B and C). Gently secure brackets to side trim
by tightening set screws (L) only until snug to avoid
dimpling the extrusion face. DO NOT overtighten.
(See Figure 2-13).
Figure 2-10.
2. Slide top grill (E) and bottom grill (D) together.
Make sure the ends are flush, then tape together to
prevent parts from sliding. (See Figure 2-11).
Figure 2-13.
5. Join each side trim (B and C) to the top trim (A).
Make sure the ends of the Grill Assembly are
captured in the channel of each side trim, then tape
in place. Gently secure brackets (K) to top trim (A)
by tightening set screws (L) only until snug to avoid
dimpling the trim face. DO NOT overtighten. (See
Figure 2-14).
.
Figure 2-11.
Figure 2-14.
2-9
Installation Information
Installing Trim & Grill Assembly
Into Cabinetry
1. First, place protective covering where side trim will
contact the floor near rough opening. Then, stand
up the grill and frame assembly and center in rough
opening. You may need to use several pieces of
tape at the top corners and top center to temporarily
hold the assembly in place. (See Figure 2-15).
4. Shim as necessary (shims are not included). (See
Figures 2-17 and 2-18). Next, secure both ends
of top trim (A) to cabinetry using two 3/4” mounting
screws (M) through the holes at each end. Make
sure all screws are snug across the top.
Figure 2-17.
Figure 2-15.
2. Making sure the frame is flush up against the front
surface of cabinetry, carefully run one mounting
screw (M) through the center hole of the top trim (A)
and into the cabinetry. DO NOT tighten at this time.
Figure 2-18.
5. Using a carpenter’s level, check that each side is
vertical. Shim as necessary (shims are not included).
Next, secure top and bottom of each side trim to
cabinetry using two 3/4” mounting screws (M). (See
Figure 2-19).
Some cabinet substrates may require pre-drilling holes
using a 1/8” diameter drill bit.
3. Level the top of the trim frame using a carpenter’s
level. (See Figure 2-16).
Figure 2-19.
Figure 2-16.
2-10
Installation Information
Installing The Riser Kit On Early
Models (See Figure 2-20 to identify)
Installing The Riser Kit On Late
Models (See Figure 2-21 to identify)
1. First, place a protective covering on the floor to
prevent damaging either the refrigerator unit, freezer
unit or the floor.
2. Lay the unit on its side, making sure the side with the
handle is laying closest to the floor to prevent door
from falling open.
3. Remove the two plastic leg levelers on the bottom
front side of the units.
4. Remove riser from its box. Locate plastic bag
containing the mounting hardware needed to install
the riser kit to the unit. The bag should contain four
mounting bolts and four washers for each riser.
5. Position the riser on the bottom of the unit, making
sure the slanted end is toward the back of the unit.
6. Place a washer on the bolt and feed the bolt
through the hole in the top of the riser kit and into
the threaded hole in the foot of the unit. DO NOT
TIGHTEN AT THIS TIME.
7. Repeat the above procedure for the three remaining
attachment points. (See Figure 2-20).
8. Once all four bolts are secured to the four feet of the
unit, tighten the bolts using a 1/2” socket or open
end wrench.
9. After installation, carefully upright the unit with the
help of an assistant.
1. First, place a protective covering on the floor to
prevent damaging either the refrigerator unit, freezer
unit or the floor.
2. Lay the unit on its side, making sure the side with the
handle is laying closest to the floor to prevent door
from falling open.
3. Remove the two front leg leveler brackets, (2)
compressor support screws and rear leg levelers, if
applicable, as shown in Figure 2-21.
4. Remove plastic spacers and Hex Bolt 5/16-18UNC x
1.5” from the box and assemble the two together as
shown in Figure 2-22.
5. Using three HWD #12-24 X .70 screws, fasten the
right front Riser Kit Spacer & Hex Bolt Assembly as
shown in Figure 2-23.
6. Using three HWD #12-24 X .70 screws, fasten the
left front Riser Kit Spacer & Hex Bolt Assembly as
shown in Figure 2-23.
7. Using two HWD ¼ -20 x .87 screws, fasten the right
rear Riser Kit Spacer & Hex Bolt Assembly as shown
in Figure 2-23.
8. Using two HWD ¼ -20 x .87 screws, fasten the left
rear Riser Kit Spacer & Hex Bolt Assembly as shown
in Figure 2-23.
9. Now that all the spacers are assembled on the unit,
you may position the riser on the bottom of the unit,
making sure the slanted end is toward the back of
the unit. See Figure 2-24.
10. Once in position, feed the riser through the four
bolts. Properly mounted riser should hang in place.
11. Place a washer on the bolt and thread into the
provided Nut (6/16” UNC). DO NOT TIGHTEN AT
THIS TIME.
12. Once all four nuts are secured to the four bolts,
tighten using a socket or an open wrench.
13. After installation, carefully upright the unit with the
help of an assistant.
Figure 2-20.
2-11
Installation Information
Figure 2-21.
Figure 2-22.
2-12
Installation Information
Figure 2-23.
Figure 2-24.
2-13
Installation Information
Leveling The Refrigerator And
Freezer
1. Remove the plastic top hinge covers and replace
with the supplied silver hinge covers (I).
2. Remove the plastic toe grill panels at the bottom of
each unit. Save the four screws as they will be used
later in the installation.
3. Place a carpenter’s level across the top of the door.
Using a tape measure, adjust all four levelers so that
each door is level and to a height of 69-3/8” across
top front edge of door. (See Figures 2-25 and 2-26).
Figure 2-25.
4. Place a carpenter’s level vertically on the front of
the door and level so that the front surface of door
is vertical. Recheck to make sure top front edge
of door is still at a height of 69-3/8”. Adjust as
necessary. (See Figures 2-25 and 2-26).
Figure 2-27.
Final Positioning
1. Connect the ice maker water lines (if so equipped).
Refer to the “Connecting Ice Maker To Water
Supply” in the literature bag for proper hook-up of
water filter and ice maker to your household water
supply before sliding the units in place. Plug power
cords into their receptacles prior to pushing unit
fully into place. If your receptacle is not centered in
the space, make sure to slide the unit on the side
opposite the receptacle into place first. Slide units
into place one at a time. Slide units carefully to
avoid pinching or damaging the ice maker and water
filter hoses on the back of the unit.
2. Re-check the level of each unit. Depending on the
flatness of your floor, you may need to readjust
several times before achieving an acceptable state
of levelness and alignment. Allow 3/8” gap between
units for center trim (G or H). (See Figure 2-28).
3. In the case of a side-by-side installation of two units,
install the magnetic center trim piece (G or H) in the
gap between both units. The trim piece should be
flush with tops of units and fit just above the toe grill.
Figure 2-26.
How To Adjust Levelers
1. To adjust the height of the cabinet back, use
an adjustable wrench and turn the leveling bolt
clockwise to raise or counterclockwise to lower.
(See Figure 2-27).
2. To adjust the height of the cabinet front, turn the
front leg leveler clockwise to raise or
counterclockwise to lower. (See Figure 2-27).
Figure 2-28.
4. Attach metal toe grill (F) using the screws saved
during removal of the plastic grill panel(s). It may
help to open door of each unit to aid alignment of
screws. Run screws through the left-most and rightmost grill holes and tighten until slightly snug. Adjust
so the top of toe grill is parallel with the bottom of
both door(s). For a dual unit installation, install two
inner screws. Tighten all screws.
2-14
Installation Information
Care & Cleaning Of Your Trim Kit
The trim and grill kit surfaces are best cleaned with a
cotton cloth dampened with a mixture of water and mild
detergent. Avoid using abrasive cleaners as they will
mar the surface of the metal components.
Hinge Cover
3/8” Bolts
Door Removal
Hinge Plate
For some installations it may be necessary to remove the
door to fit through the entrance of the installation site.
Figure 2-29. Top Hinge Removal
To remove the door, follow the steps below.
1. Make sure electrical plug is disconnected from the
wall outlet.
2. Gently lay freezer on its back on a soft clean
surface.
3. Remove kickplate.
4. Lift plastic cover off upper hinge assembly.
(See Figure 2-29)
5. Using a 3/8” socket or wrench, extract the two bolts
securing the upper hinge to the unit frame.
6. Using a 3/8” socket or wrench, extract the two bolts
securing the lower hinge to the unit frame. Use a
phillips head screwdriver to extract the remaining
screw from the lower hinge assembly.
(See Figure 2-30).
7. Lift the door assembly off of the unit frame.
Figure 2-30. Bottom Hinge Removal
Door Handle Mounting
Instructions
For some installations the door handle may need to be
removed. (See Figure 2-31)
To remove the door handle:
1. Remove screw cover plates by pushing in and
sliding the screw cover plate off of the door handle.
2. Using a phillips head screwdriver, extract the screws
securing the door handle to the door assembly.
3. Push upwards until the screw button assembly is
free of the dovetail inside the handle assembly. Pull
handle assembly from door.
Set Screws
Figure 2-31. Handle Removal
2-15
Installation Information
Notes
2-16
Electronic Control
Electronic Temperature Control
The electronic temperature control is located at the top
center of the refrigerated compartment. Temperature
is factory preset to provide satisfactory food storage
temperatures. However, the temperature control is
adjustable to provide a range of temperatures for
personal satisfaction. To adjust the temperature
setting, press the UP button on the control panel for
warmer temperatures and the DOWN button for colder
temperatures. Allow several hours for the temperature to
stabilize between adjustments.
Figure 3-1.
Power Up
On initial power up, control defaults to set temperature
“4”.
Temperature Setting Selection
Freezer Fail Safe Mode:
For settings 1 though 7 when the UP button is pushed (to
increase temperature), the setting number will decrease
by one and when the DOWN button is pushed (to
decrease temperature), the setting number will increase
by one.
When freezer is in fail safe mode the unit will run as
described for the refrigerator. The control will also
remember the compressor run time and when run time
is satisfied, a 30 minute defrost cycle will occur. Manual
defrost will not activate in fail safe.
To turn the control off, go to temperature setting “1”.
Then press the UP key three times within five seconds.
The display will show “0”.
Error Indication
The following error conditions are monitored:
• Thermistor open or shorted.
• Stuck Key (the key appears to be pressed for longer
than 30 seconds).
• Low Voltage (AC line voltage has dropped below 92
volts).
If any of these errors occur, the display will flash an “E” at
one-second intervals.
To turn the control on, press the DOWN key three times
within five seconds. The display will show “1”.
When the temperature setting is changed to “0”, the
compressor and defroster (if applicable) will be turned
off. Thermistor, Stuck Key and Low Voltage errors are
disabled.
Fail Safe Mode
Refrigerator Fail Safe Mode:
When in fail safe mode, the refrigerator will run a “duty
cycle” with the compressor running 5 minutes and then
shutting off for 32 minutes. This will repeat until the error
is interrupted or the unit enters the defrost mode. The
refrigerator will remember compressor run time and will
go into its normal defrost, engaging the heater until the
defrost termination switch is opened and then will remain
in the defrost mode for a total of 30 minutes, including
heater “on” time and dwell time. Any time there is an
interruption of power or fail safe mode, regardless of
where the duty cycle was, the compressor will always run
for 5 minutes even if it was in the run mode when fail safe
was interrupted. Manual defrost will not activate during
this condition.
Refrigerator:
Error indicator comes on at approximately 91 volts.
Freezer:
Error indicator comes on at approximately 92 volts.
During this condition compressor and heater are
disabled.
Exiting Fail Safe Mode
Once a failure is resolved ( such as thermistor or stuck
key), the control resumes its normal operating mode
under the setting it was at before the error occurred.
3-1
Electronic Control
Initiate Diagnostics Mode
Compressor Run Time (CRT) Display Mode
The control will enter Diagnostics Mode when both keys
are pressed for 3 seconds while on temperature setting
“4”.
When pressing both keys for 3 seconds while on setting
“5”, the control will display the current compressor run
time (in seconds) in five digit decimal format. Leading
zeros will be displayed if required. Each digit will be
displayed for three seconds followed by a “-“ character
for one second. When all 5 digits have been displayed,
the control will issue two consecutive “-“ characters and
resume normal operation on setting “5”.
Diagnostics Indicator
The control will display the following (in 3-second
intervals):
• “8” (7 segment display test)
• Model ID
• SW version
• Thermistor status
• “C” = short
• “O” = open
• “-” = good
The control will then return to normal operation.
Defrost Timing
The length of the defrost cycle is 30 minutes, this
includes the heater “on” time and dwell time.
Refrigerator:
This will occur after every 8 hours of compressor run
time.
Freezer:
This will occur after every 12 hours of compressor run
time.
Manual Defrost Mode
When pressing both keys for 3 seconds while on setting
“2”, the control will enter Manual Defrost mode. The
display will show a “d”.
Manual defrost can be cancelled by again holding both
keys for 3 seconds.
Manual Defrost mode will terminate after the defrost
cycle has completed. The control will resume normal
operation on setting “2”. The defrost cycle resets the
compressor run time counter to zero.
Compressor Delay Start
When the compressor is turned off, it will not start again
for 13 minutes if a freezer, and 4 minutes if a refrigerator.
Memory Retention
Whenever power is restored to the control after a power
loss, the control resumes normal operation under the
setting in which it was in before power was lost. However,
if the setting is changed during fail safe, then the new
setting will not be saved, and the control will resume
operations under the last setting it was on before the
failure occurred. Compressor run time (CRT) is retained
while the control has power applied and is recovered after
a power down/up cycle.
Voltage Range
The control operates normally down to a line voltage of
92 volts. Below this voltage, the compressor is turned
off and an “E” will flash on the display at one-second
intervals. Once the voltage rises above 92 volts, the
control resumes normal operation
Stuck Key
If either key is held in for more than 30 seconds, the
control enters fail-safe operation.
Main Power Connector
To test function of defrost heater and compressor:
Showroom Mode
When pressing both keys for 3 seconds while on setting
“0”, the control will enter Showroom Mode. The display
will show an “S” for three seconds. Showroom mode
allows control functions to be demonstrated without
having the defrost heater or compressor operational.
Showroom mode is cancelled in the same manner as
initiating it. The display will show a “-“ character for one
second followed by an “S” for three seconds.
Connect an AC voltmeter from pin 1 (neutral) to pin 3, 4,
or 5. If line voltage is present, that output is on. If line
voltage is 0V, the output is off.
5
4
3
Heater
Compressor
VAC Line
2
1
3-2
VAC Neutral
Ice Maker
Side Mounted Ice Maker
The Ice Maker is designed to produce ice automatically. The length of time between harvest cycles will vary,
depending on load conditions, door openings, ambient temperature and freezer temperature and water temperature.
These factors must be taken into consideration when checking the ice production rate.
With a temperature of -2°F to +5°F in the freezer, the rate of harvest will be 40 to 96 cubes per 24 hour period.
The ice maker is wired across the line and will harvest ice in the refrigeration or defrost cycles.
The water valve and solenoid assembly are both mounted in the compressor compartment.
A tube extends from the water valve up the rear wall of the freezer to a water inlet spout that directs the water into
the fill trough. The water fill spout connects to a housing in the back of the freezer and directs water flow into the ice
maker from the back of the mold.
4-1
Ice Maker
Water Valve Assembly
Ice Maker Components
The water valve is solenoid operated, and when
energized, releases water from the household supply into
the ice mold. The amount of water released is directly
proportional to the length of time the water valve switch
is energized. A flow washer inside the water valve,
maintains a constant rate of water flow over a supply
line with pressure ranging from 20 to 100 psig. It will not
compensate for pressures below 20 psig, or greater than
100 psig. A No. 80-mesh screen, placed ahead of the
flow washer, filters out foreign materials.
Front Cover
A decorative molded plastic front cover encloses the
operating mechanism of the ice maker that protects the
mechanism from moisture. It is essential that the cover
be in place on an operating ice maker to protect against
possible contact with the mechanism by the user.
Ice Mold
The ice mold is die-cast aluminum with the ice maker
thermostat bonded to its front surface. The mold has
a semi-circular interior partitioned into equal size
compartments. Water enters at the side of the mold,
through a fill trough. A film of silicon grease on the top
edge of the mold prevents siphoning of water by capillary
action.
The solenoid coil draws 10 to 20 watts of power. The coil
is wired in series with the mold heater, across the supply
voltage.
Thermostat
Mold Heater
A mold heater, rated at 112 watts at 115 volts, 108
ohms ± 10%, is covered with an aluminum sheath and
embedded in the grooved section on the underside of
the ice mold. When the mold heater is energized, the ice
contact surface within the mold is heated enough to allow
harvest of the ice pieces.
The mold heater is wired in series with the ice maker
thermostat, which acts as a safety device.
The heater is staked in place, and is replaced as part of
the ice maker mold. A thermalmastic sealer is placed
between the heater and the mold to ensure good thermal
contact.
Ice Stripper
An ice stripper is attached to the mold to prevent ice
pieces from falling back into the mold. It also serves as a
decorative side cover.
Ice Ejector
The thermostat is a single-pole, single throw (SPST),
bimetallic, disk-type, thermal switch. It automatically
starts the harvest cycle when the ice is frozen. The
thermostat closes at a temperature of 9°F ± 2°. Wired
in series with the mold heater, the thermostat acts as
a safety device against overheating in the event of
mechanical failure. A thermalmastic bond is provided
where the thermostat is mounted against the mold. A
gasket prevents water from leaking into the support
housing.
Sensing Arm & Linkage
The sensing arm is cam-driven and operates a switch
that controls the quantity of ice produced. In the harvest
cycle, the arm is raised and lowered during each of the
two revolutions of the timing cam. If the sensing arm
comes to rest on top of ice in the storage compartment
during either revolution, the switch will remain open and
stop the ice maker at the end of that revolution. When
sufficient ice is removed from the storage container,
the sensing arm lowers and ice production resumes.
To manually stop the ice maker turn the switch located
on the housing at the left end of the ice maker to Off.
Operation is resumed when switch is turned back to On.
The ejector blades are molded from delrin, and extend
from a central shaft, which turns in nylon bearings at the
front and rear. Each blade sweeps an ice section out of
the mold. The drive end of the ice ejector is “D” shaped.
Food grade silicone grease is used to lubricate the
bearing surfaces.
4-2
Ice Maker
Timing Switches
On/Off Switch
The three timing switches used are single-pole, double
throw (SPDT). They are identical except for function,
and can be used interchangeably.
A single-pole, single-throw switch is mounted on the right
side of the housing at the front of the ice maker. This
switch is used to turn the ice maker off. Unlike the switch
on the bail arm the on/off switch will stop the ice maker
as soon as it is pushed, and it will not allow the ice maker
to complete the revolution.
1. Hold Switch - assures completion of a revolution
once the ice maker operation has started.
2. Water Fill Switch - opens the water valve during the
fill cycle. It is the only adjustable component in the
ice maker.
3. Shut-off Switch - stops ice maker operation when the
storage container is full of Ice. The switch is opened
after the sensing arm is raised to its most upright
position. The switch is mounted to the top right wall
of the ice maker support.
Wiring
A four-prong plug connects the ice maker wiring to the
cabinet wiring harness. The ice maker assembly is wired
across the line and will harvest in either the refrigeration
or defrost cycles. A wiring diagram is located inside the
front cover of the ice maker.
Thermal Cut-Out (TCO)
The thermal cut-out is a one-time limit fuse used as a
safety device. It is located under the mounting plate, in
the head of the ice maker, between the thermostat and
wire connector.
If the thermal cut-out opens, the cause of failure must
be determined and corrected prior to replacing the TCO.
Normals causes of the TCO failing are a bad thermostat
or a shorted coil on the water valve.
Timing Cam & Coupler
Three separate cams are combined in one molded Delrin
part:
1. Inner cam operates shut-off switch lever arm.
2. Center cam operates hold switch.
3. Outer cam operates water fill switch.
One cam end is attached to a large timing gear. The other
cam end is coupled to the ejector.
Timing Gear
This large molded plastic gear is driven by the motor and,
in turn, rotates the cam and ejector. A “D” shaped hole
in the gear fits over the timing cam hub. Spacer tabs on
the backside of the gear prevent the gear from binding on
the mounting plate.
Motor
A low wattage, stall-type motor drives the timing gear.
This gear turns the timing cam and ejector blades
approximately one revolution every three minute (1/3
RPM).
4-3
Ice Maker
Installing Water Supply Line to
Ice Maker
Test Cycling Ice Maker
Operation of the ice maker, water refilling, and controlled
ice storage, require proper functioning and timing of all
components.
Supply line installation must comply with all applicable
plumbing codes. The ¼” tubing, and any other plumbing
materials required, should be obtained locally.
Consider the following:
The ice maker should be connected to a frequently used
cold water line to ensure a fresh water supply. Be sure to
leak test all connections after the water supply has been
turned on.
•
•
•
•
Water Valve Switch – Water Fill
Volume
•
The amount of water fill is directly proportional to the
length of time terminals “C-NC” of the water fill switch are
closed. Closing occurs when the switch plunger drops
into a cavity formed in the cam.
Different water valves have different flow rates. For this
reason, anytime a water valve is replaced, the water fill
must be checked and the fill switch must be adjusted if
needed.
The correct water fill volume is 80 to 100 cc. To measure
the fill volume, test-cycle Ice Maker and collect the water.
Measure in a container calibrated in cubic centimeters
(CC), the fill time is 5.0 seconds.
The fill volume is adjusted by increasing or decreasing
the length of time the water fill switch remains closed.
To adjust the water fill switch, first determine how much
water is needed. The adjusting screw is calibrated so
that one complete revolution changes the water fill about
18 cubic centimeters. Turning the screw clockwise
decreases the fill, while turning counterclockwise
increases the fill.
•
Has unit been properly installed and connected to
sources of electrical power and water?
Has freezer compartment evaporator pulled down to
temperature?
Is the ice maker turned on?
Have several ice making cycles been completed to
remove all the air form the water lines?
Do the ejector blades make two revolutions per
cycle? Is ice stored on blades after harvest?
Is the water solenoid wired in series with the mold
heater?
It may be necessary, on occasion, to test-cycle an ice
maker to check its operation. This can be done on the
repair bench or while mounted in the refrigerated
compartment.
If ice maker is in an operating freezer, take precautions
against the formation of condensate by allowing the cold,
metal components to warm up before removing the front
cover. This can be expedited by cycling the assembly
with the cover in place and the water supply valve closed.
To manually cycle the ice maker, push the on off switch
to the on position then push in harder against the spring
loaded second set of contacts in the switch and hold in
until the hold switch circuit to the motor is completed.
When the motor starts, all components except the ice
maker thermostat should perform normally. Once the ice
maker completes its cycle, if additional testing is necessary you can you can push in on the switch again to start
the ice maker into another cycle.
A vertical cold water line should be selected for
the water supply. If a vertical line is not available,
a horizontal line may be used, providing the
connection is on the side or top of the pipe, but
not on the bottom. Scale and foreign material in
the pipe could cause stoppage of water flow if the
connection is on the bottom.
4-4
Ice Maker
Operating Cycle Illustrations - Manual Cycle
To manually cycle ice maker:
1. Turn the On/Off switch to ON
2. Press in on switch holding the spring loaded contact set closed, this will allow the motor to start.
3. Hold in on the switch for 10 seconds to allow hold switch contacts to close allowing the ice maker to continue
through a cycle.
Operating Cycle Illustrations - Electrical
The following wiring diagrams illustrate the electrical operation of an ice maker.
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat open.
• Motor not rotating.
• Mold Heater off.
• Control Arm in the down position.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NC.
• Water Fill Switch open.
1
4-5
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closes.
• Motor starting.
• Mold starting to heat.
• Control Arm in the down position.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NC.
• Water Fill Switch open.
2
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor starting to rotate.
• Mold starting to heat.
• Control Arm in the down position.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NC.
• Water Fill Switch open.
3
4-6
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor rotating.
• Mold heating.
• Control Arm swinging up.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NC.
• Hold Switch closed C to NC.
• Water Fill Switch open.
4
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor stalls as ejector hits ice in mold.
• Mold heating.
• Control Arm swinging down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NC.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch open.
5
4-7
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor starts to rotate as ice breaks loose.
• Mold heating.
• Control Arm is down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch closed but shorted open by thermostat.
6
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heating.
• Control Arm is down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NC.
• Water Fill Switch open.
7
4-8
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heating.
• Control Arm swinging up.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch open.
8
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat closed.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heating.
• Control Arm swinging up.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NC.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch open.
9
4-9
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 40°F.
• Thermostat opens.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heater off.
• Control Arm swinging up.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NC.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch open.
10
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat open.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heater off.
• Control Arm swinging down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch open.
11
4-10
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat open.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heater is in series with water valve.
• Control Arm swinging down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch closed.
12
• Ice Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat open.
• Motor is rotating.
• Mold heater off.
• Control Arm swinging down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NO.
• Water Fill Switch open.
13
4-11
Ice Maker
• Maker connected to electricity.
• Mold temperature above 9°F.
• Thermostat open.
• Motor not rotating.
• Mold heater off.
• Control Arm down.
• Feeler Arm Switch closed C to NO.
• Hold Switch closed C to NC.
• Water Fill Switch open.
14
Operating Cycle Illustrations - Mechanical
The following diagrams illustrate the mechanical operation of an ice maker.
4-12
Ice Maker
4-13
Ice Maker
4-14
Sealed System
The purpose of this section is to give the service technician an understanding of refrigerants and sealed
system service. Persons attempting to use this service manual to make repairs to sealed system
refrigeration systems should have electrical training as well as training in sealed system repairs. The
person making the repairs must know and understand all laws (Local and International) governing
handling of all refrigerants. The technician must be trained in the use of recovery and recycling
equipment and an EPA certification for servicing refrigeration systems. Electrolux Home Products, Inc.
cannot be responsible, nor assume any liability, for injury or damage of any kind arising from the use of
this manual.
Effective July 1, 1992, the United States clean air act governs the disposal of refrigerants such as R-134a.
Therefore, when discharging or purging the sealed system use an EPA approved refrigerant recovery
system as outlined in the final rule on the protection of stratospheric ozone and refrigerant recycling, which
was published in the Federal Register May 14, 1993.
Electrolux does not permit the use of recovered refrigerant in the servicing of our products for in-warranty
and out-of-warranty repairs or for products covered by service contracts. Therefore, only new refrigerant or
refrigerant that has been reclaimed back to new specifications by a refrigerant manufacturer is to be used.
Soldering
4. Align tubing so no stress is on joint. Do not move
tubing while solder is solidifying or leaks will result.
5. Use a torch of adequate capacity so joint can be
quickly heated with a minimum of heat travel to other
points. Use a good grade of silver solder.
WEAR APPROVED SAFETY GLASSES WHEN
WORKING WITH OR ON ANY PRESSURIZED
SYSTEM OR EQUIPMENT. HAVE AN APPROVED
DRY TYPE FIRE EXTINGUISHER HANDY
WHEN USING ANY TYPE OF GAS OPERATED
TORCH.
1. All joints to be soldered must have a proper fit.
Clearance between tubes to be soldered should
be from .001” to .006”. It is not practical to actually
measure this; however, you do not want a dry fit or
loose fit. Tubing joints should overlap about the
distance of their diameter except for restrictor tubes,
which should be inserted 1.25”.
2. Clean all joint areas with fine steel wool or preferably
an abrasive cloth, such as grit cloth No. 23 or
Scotch-Brite.
3. Apply a thin film of liquid flux recommended for
silver soldering to surfaces to be joined, and to
surfaces immediately adjacent to joint.
During application of heat, use wet cloths to
prevent heat from conducting to areas other than
the soldered joint. Use a sheet of metal or torch
guard pad as a heat deflector to keep flame away
from inflammable materials and painted surfaces.
6. Solder connections. If tubing is properly cleaned
and fluxed, solder will flow readily. Use only enough
solder to make a good bond.
7. Allow joint to cool, then wash exterior with water to
remove flux.
5-1
Sealed System
Introduction
This Service manual is intended as a guide for
introducing the service technician to R-134a refrigerant,
and the equipment needed to service R-134a systems.
The replacement of R-12 refrigerant involves changes
in materials, choice of lubricant, and processing
procedures, with an overall requirement of continuous
high quality system performance and reliability. The
following information provides a good practical
foundation for service needed to maintain long product
life.
Compressor Oils
In a refrigerating system designed for R-134a refrigerant, only R-134a refrigerant is to be used. The current
design of hermetic compressors lead to the situation
that some oil (a small percentage) will follow with the
refrigerant through the whole system. R-134a
compressors require a new lubricant. At this time, only
synthetic ester oil is to be used. The R-12 compressors
used mineral oil. Mineral oil is not compatible with
R-134a and is not to be used in R-134a systems. Ester
oil must not be mixed nor replaced with any other
lubricant. Compressors used with R-134a systems
charged with oil, cannot have any tube fittings exposed
to ambient air for more than 15 minutes. Ester oil is
more hygroscopic (it will absorb water at a much faster
rate) than the mineral oil used with R-12 systems.
Ester oil can be an irritant to eyes and skin. Refer
to manufacture safety data sheets from lubricant
supplier for handling specifications. As with all
current refrigerants, you must have an adequately
ventilated work area at all times for sealed system
service and repairs.
Refrigeration Systems
The sealed refrigeration system will consist of the same
basic components being utilized in the R-12 systems.
There is a 10% to 15% discharge pressure increase
using R-134a, with a 5% to 10% decrease in suction
pressure when compared to the same product with an
R-12 system operating at 90°F (32°C) ambient
temperature conditions. Lower suction pressures result
from the lower density of R-134a refrigerant which
effects refrigerant flow rate. R-134a systems commonly
operate in a 1”-2” vacuum on the suction side.
Products using R-134a refrigerant will have a different
heat exchanger than an R-12 product. The difference is
in the capillary tube, it will be longer to maintain a similar
flow rate. On some models, a larger condenser will be
used to reduce the discharge pressures and lower
start-up sound transmission. A different filter-drier will be
used on refrigerating systems with R-134a. The
molecules of R-134a are smaller than those of R-12,
therefore, a dryer with smaller pores is necessary.
Otherwise, R-134a could be trapped inside the filterdrier along with the water. On some products you will
see some changes to the evaporator and suction line.
Ester oil and R-134a mix satisfactorily within the
compressor. Lower gas speed increases the risk of oil
accumulation in the evaporator. Some changes will be
required to ensure good oil returnability.
Sealed System Repair
To prevent any form of cross contamination of R-134a,
and R-12 refrigerant, or a cross contamination of ester
oil and mineral oil, you must have dedicated equipment.
The equipment consists of one set of gauges, manifold,
hoses, vacuum pump, charging cylinder, and
reprocessing or transfer pump. This means you must
have one complete set for CFC, (R-11, R-12) and HCFC,
(R-22) systems, and one complete set for HFC,
(R-134a) systems. You can not share the use of any of
the same equipment on both systems.
Since the R-134a molecule is smaller than the R-12
molecule, R-134a could pass through more minor leaks
than R-12, and the flow through a certain leak would be
larger for R-134a than for R-12. As a consequence, it is
critical to maintain very good brazing processes and leak
tests.
Make sure you do not mix refrigeration oil or refrigerant
in your bulk storage area. Because moisture infiltration
is much higher in ester oil, you must keep it stored in
sealed containers and only allow exposure to room air
for a very short period of time when changing or adding
oil to a system. You must not mix refrigerant in your
storage containers for used refrigerant removed from
products for service. You must have dedicated
cylinders for each refrigerant R-12, R-22, and R-134a.
5-2
Sealed System
Service Diagnostic Tips
A prime requisite on the initial contact is: Always allow
the customer to explain the problem. Many times the
trouble can be diagnosed more quickly, based on the
customer’s explanation. Most of all, do not jump to
conclusions until you have heard the full story and have
evaluated the information obtained from the customer.
Then proceed with your diagnosis.
Before starting a test procedure, connect the product
service cord to the power source, through a wattmeter,
combined with a voltmeter. Then make a visual
inspection and operational check of the refrigerator to
determine the following:
1.
2.
Is the product properly leveled?
Is the product located for proper dissipation of heat
from the condenser? Check recommended spacing
from walls.
3. Feel condenser. With compressor in operation,
condenser should be hot, with gradual reduction in
temperature from entry to exit of condenser.
4. Are door gaskets sealing properly?
(Refrigerators and freezers)
5. Does the door actuate the light switch?
(Refrigerators and freezers)
6. Is evaporator fan properly located on motor shaft?
7. Is the thermostat sensing element properly
positioned?
8. Observe frost pattern on evaporator.
9. Check thermostat knob setting.
10. Inscribe bracket opposite slotted shaft of defrost
timer to determine if timer advances (Refrigerators
and freezers - auto defrost models only).
Refrigerator and Freezer Air Temperatures
Temperatures are affected by improper door seal, frost
accumulation on the evaporator, service load, ambient
temperature, percent of relative humidity, thermostat
calibration (cut-in and cut-out), location of evaporator fan
blade on motor shaft, and by compressor efficiency.
Line Voltage
It is essential to know the line voltage at the product.
A voltage reading should be taken at the instant the
compressor starts, and also while the compressor is
running. Line voltage fluctuation should not exceed 10%
plus or minus, from nominal rating. Low voltage will
cause overheating of the compressor motor windings,
resulting in compressor cycling on thermal overload, or
the compressor may fail to start. Inadequate line wire
size and overloaded lines are common reasons for low
voltage at the product.
Your Country may have regulations or restrictions
governing the discharging of chlorofluorocarbons
(CFC’s) such as R-12 and R-22 to the atmosphere.
Therefore, when discharging or purging the sealed
system, use an approved refrigerant recovery system.
The service technician should inquire as to the number
of people in the family to determine the service load and
daily door openings. In addition, he should know the
room temperature for refrigerator and freezers.
After this phase of diagnosis is completed, a thorough
operational check should be made of the refrigeration
system.
5-3
Sealed System
Basic Components
Testing for Refrigerant Leaks
The basic components of a refrigerated unit are a
compressor, condenser, evaporator, heat exchanger
(capillary tube and suction line), drier and perimeter hot
tube.
The line piercing valve (clamp-on type) should be
used for test purposes only. It must be removed
from system after it has served its purpose.
Perimeter Hot Tube
To reduce the possibility of condensation forming on the
exterior of the cabinet in high humidity areas, a perimeter
hot tube (refrigerant tube) has been installed in the unit.
The perimeter tube extends up the left side, across the
top of the unit and down the right side into the filter drier.
When the compressor operates, warm refrigerant flows
through the primary condenser, then into the primary hot
tube, warming the cabinet front exterior.
The perimeter hot tube is not replaceable. In the unlikely
event of a leak in the hot tube, a kit is available to
bypass the hot tube in the sealed system. An electrical
heater wire must be installed within the tubing. The
electrical connection for the electrical heater wire for a
solid state PTC relay compressor is be connected into
the condenser fan circuit. For a variable speed
compressor, the electrical connection must be made to
the 115V inverter board. Refer to the appropriate parts
list of the model being serviced for the correct kit part
number.
If the sealed system is diagnosed as short of refrigerant
and the system has not been recently opened, there is
probably a leak in the system. Adding refrigerant without
first locating and repairing the leak or replacing the
component will not permanently correct the difficulty.
The leak must be found!
Sufficient refrigerant may have escaped to make it
impossible to leak test effectively. In such cases, add a
¼” line piercing valve to the compressor process tube.
Add sufficient refrigerant vapor to increase the pressure
to 75 lbs. per sq. in. Through this procedure, leaks are
more easily detected before discharging the system into
reprocess/recapture equipment. Check the low side for
leaks. Run the compressor 2 or 3 minutes and check
the high side for leaks. Recover refrigerant using an
EPA approved recovery system.
Checking For Internal Leaks
Before checking for internal leaks, check all accessible
system components and joints for leaks.
Refrigerant Cycle
The refrigerant cycle is a continuous cycle that occurs
whenever the compressor is in operation. Liquid
refrigerant is evaporated in the evaporator by the heat
that enters the cabinet through the insulated walls, and
by the heat from product load and door openings. The
refrigerant vapor is then drawn from the evaporator,
through the suction line, to the compressor.
If an internal leak is suspected, it must be confirmed.
Use the following procedure:
1.
2.
Compression raises the pressure and temperature of the
vapor in the compressor and the vapor is then forced
through the discharge valve into the discharge line and
into the condenser. Air passing over the condenser
surface removes heat from the high pressure vapor
which then condenses to a liquid. The liquid refrigerant
then flows from the condenser to the evaporator through
the small diameter liquid line (capillary tube).
Before it enters the evaporator, the liquid refrigerant is
sub-cooled in the heat exchanger by the low temperature
suction vapor in the suction line. When refrigerant is
added, the frost pattern will improve, the suction and
discharge pressures will rise, the condenser will become
hot and the wattage will increase.
3.
4.
5.
5-4
Discharge the system by using refrigerant recovery
equipment.
Disconnect the condenser and the drier from the hot
tube on refrigerators. On food freezers, separate the
high and low pressure sides of the system. Pinch off
and solder closed one end of the part of the system
to be tested.
Solder a 1/4” charging hose fitting to the open end of
the part of the system to be tested.
Connect a pressure gauge and access valve to the
open end of the part of the system to be tested.
Pressurize to 250 lbs. using dry nitrogen or carbon
dioxide.
Leave the pressure on the hot tube for 24 hours.
Any drop in pressure is an indication of a leak.
Sealed System
Definitions
Recovery:
To remove refrigerant in any condition from a system
and store it in an external container without necessarily
testing or processing it in any way.
Recycling:
To clean refrigerant for reuse by oil separation and
single or multiple passes through devices, such as
replaceable core filter-driers, which reduce moisture,
acidity and particulate matter. This term usually applies
to procedures implemented at the field job site or at a
local service shop.
Reclaim:
To reprocess refrigerant to new product specifications
by means which may include distillation, will require
chemical analysis of the refrigerant to determine that
appropriate product specifications are met. This term
usually implies the use of processes or procedures
available only at a reprocessing or manufacturing facility.
Figure 5-1.
Equipment Needed for
Evacuation & Recharging
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
1 - Heated Dial-A-Charge charging cylinders.
1 - Recovery/Recycling equipment.
1- Tank for each type of refrigerant you use in
service. (Do not mix refrigerants in the same tank)
1 - External vacuum pumps.
Process tube adapter kit (Robinair No.12458)
Tubing cutter.
Pinch-off tool capable of making leak proof seal.
Leak detector.
Complete brazing torch set.
Small 3-corner file.
Grit cloth or Scotch-Brite.
45% silver solder and flux.
1 -Gauge and Manifold set. (See Figure 5-1)
2 - Tube piercing valves.
Oil test kits.
Heat Gun.
Swag Tool. (See Figure 5-2)
Figure 5-2.
5-5
Sealed System
Low/High Side Leak or
Undercharge
Precautions For Charging Sealed
Systems
A loss of refrigerant can result in any of the
following:
1. Excessive or continuous compressor operation.
2. Above normal freezer compartment temperature.
3. A partially frosted evaporator (depending on amount
of refrigerant loss).
4. Below normal freezer compartment temperature.
5. Low suction pressure (vacuum).
6. Low wattage.
Overcharging a refrigeration system with refrigerant can
be dangerous. If the overcharge is sufficient to immerse
the major parts of the motor and compressor in liquid
refrigerant, a situation has been created which, when
followed by a sequence of circumstances, can lead to
the compressor shell seam separating.
When a hydraulic block occurs, the compressor is
prevented from starting. This condition is known as
locked rotor. Electric current continues to flow through
the compressor motor windings which become, in effect,
electric resistance heaters. The heat produced begins
to vaporize the excess refrigerant liquid, causing a rapid
increase in system pressure. If the compressor
protective devices fail, pressure within the system may
rise to extremes far in excess of the design limits.
Under these conditions, the weld seam around the
compressor shell can separate with explosive force,
spewing oil and refrigerant vapor, which could ignite.
The condenser will be “warm to cool”, depending on the
amount of refrigerant lost.
In the case of a low side refrigerant leak resulting in
complete loss of refrigerant, the compressor will run but
will not refrigerate. Suction pressure will drop below
atmospheric pressure and air and moisture will be drawn
into the system, saturating the filter drier. A system with
R-134a refrigerant and ester oil will become saturated
with moisture much faster than a system with R-12 and
mineral oil. Therefore, you must obtain a sample of the
oil and check with an oil test kit to determine the amount
of contamination. You will find that the oil in an R-134a
system will have to be replaced after most low side
leaks.
To eliminate this exceedingly rare but potential hazard,
never add refrigerant to a sealed system. If refrigerant
is required, evacuate the existing charge and recharge
with the correct measured amount of the refrigerant
specified for the system.
If there is reason to believe the system has operated for
a considerable length of time with no refrigerant and the
leak occurred in the low side of the system, excessive
amounts of moisture may have entered the system.
In such cases, the two stage service Dryer Filter part
number 5303918288 and vacuum procedure listed under
Refrigerant Leaks, need to be followed to prevent
repetitive service.
If a slight undercharge of refrigerant is indicated and no
leak can be found after a thorough leak test, the charge
can be corrected without changing the compressor.
If a high side leak is located and some refrigerant
remains in the system it is not necessary to change the
compressor.
Always make sure your equipment is in good condition
and all manufacturer’s instructions are followed to
prevent the accidental rupture of a hose, connection
fitting, or a tank which could cause a serious injury. Run
equipment until system has reached 13 inches of
vacuum. Shut system down and allow to set for two
minutes, if pressure remains below (0) pounds per
square inch, disconnect equipment and proceed. If
pressure does not stay below (0) pounds per square
inch, repeat above procedure until all refrigerant is
removed and system remains in a vacuum.
Flushing The System With
Nitrogen
It is recommended that system be flushed with dry
Nitrogen. However, if refrigerant is used to flush the
system you must look at the serial plate to see what
type of refrigerant is used in the system. This is the only
refrigerant that can be used to flush the system and it
must be recovered.
5-6
Sealed System
Use extreme care when using Dry Nitrogen to flush
systems. Pressure in nitrogen cylinder could be
as high as 2000 psi. Nitrogen cylinder must be
equipped with approved pressure regulator and
pressure relief valve. Ensure that your hoses have
adequate ratings for pressure involved and that all
of your equipment is in good condition.
NEVER PRESSURIZE WITH OXYGEN. NEVER
OPEN A HIGH PRESSURE TANK UNLESS IT IS
EQUIPPED WITH A PRESSURE REGULATOR.
NEVER PUT HIGH PRESSURE ON THE DOME OF
THE COMPRESSOR - IT MIGHT EXPLODE.
MAKE SURE GAUGE FITTINGS ARE IN GOOD
CONDITION AND DO NOT LEAK.
When flushing with nitrogen there MUST Be a
pressure regulator on the tank with the maximum
pressure on the lowside of the sealed system
(evaporator) at 150 PSI and at the High side, 300
PSI.
If dry nitrogen or carbon dioxide is not available.
Follow instructions 1 through 3, then use 4 and 5 listed
below as an alternative method.
The end of the flushing hose on this tank
regulator must be equipped with a hand shut-off
valve (Robinair No. 40380). Close hand shut-off
valve and adjust nitrogen regulator to correct
pressure before proceeding with flushing
procedure.
1. Remove compressor and filter-drier. Connect
process coupling to outlet tube of condenser.
2. Fasten cloth over other end of coil to prevent old oil
from spraying over room.
3. Connect hand shut-off valve on flushing hose to
process coupling.
4. Slowly open hand shut-off valve and allow nitrogen
to flow through condenser until discharge is clear.
4. Connect gauges to charging hose fittings. Pull a
vacuum on each side of the system.
5. Leave the vacuum on each side of the system for 24
hours. Any loss of vacuum is an indication of a leak.
Compressor Oil Contamination
Before installing new compressor, check for possible
system contamination by obtaining an oil sample from
the old compressor. On R-134a systems use an oil test
kit to check for contamination. If oil has a burned odor or
shows contamination (dark color), the system should be
flushed to remove as much of the contamination as
possible before installing a new compressor and
filter-drier. If this contamination is allowed to remain
in the system it will mix with the new oil causing it to
become contaminated and damage the new compressor,
or cause a restriction in the filter-drier or cap tube.
DO NOT exceed 300 Psi.
5. Disconnect cap tube from evaporator. Flush
evaporator in same manner as condenser.
NEVER install a new compressor without first
checking for possible system contamination.
DO NOT exceed 150 Psi.
6. Flush cap tube. This is only possible if you have a
proper service valve adapter.
DO NOT exceed 300 Psi.
7. Reassemble system.
5-7
Sealed System
To recover the refrigerant:
Recovering Refrigerant
Recovering refrigerant is the first step in preventive
maintenance or repair of equipment. Simply put,
recovery means transferring the systems’ refrigerant into
a refillable refrigerant cylinder.
The first step is to have on hand, clean, safe, refillable
cylinders evacuated to 25 microns, and labeled for each
different type of refrigerant you will be working with.
Example; for repairing Electrolux Home Products Inc.
built products you will need one cylinder for R-12, one for
R-22, one for R-134a, and one for R-500 if you work on
dehumidifiers.
Second step is you must have dedicated equipment
for HFC (R-134a) refrigerant. Because of the difference
in the oil and the refrigerant, you can not use the same
equipment on HFC based refrigerants as you use on
CFC based refrigerants.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect unit from source of power.
Attach an approved self tapping line tap valve to the
process tube. Connect refrigerant recovery system
to tap valve. Turn on recovery system, open the
line tap valve, and allow refrigerant to flow into an
approved tank. (See Figure 5-3 )
Allow the recovery pump to run until the system has
reached 13 inches of vacuum.
Shut system down and allow to set for two minutes.
If pressure is below (0) pounds per square inch,
disconnect equipment and proceed with repair.
If pressure does not stay bellow (0) pounds per
square inch, repeat steps 3 and 4 until all refrigerant
is removed and system remains in a vacuum.
Always make sure equipment is in good condition
and all manufacture instructions are followed to
prevent accidental rupture of a hose, connection
fitting, or a tank, that could cause a serious injury.
Always sit tank on a scale when transferring
refrigerant into the tank. Always check the weight
to see when tank is full, do not over fill the tank.
Figure 5-3. Installation of Recovery Equipment
5-8
Sealed System
Installing a New Compressor
DO NOT OPERATE RECIPROCATING
COMPRESSORS WHEN CHARGING LIQUID
REFRIGERANT INTO SYSTEM THROUGH ITS
PROCESS TUBE.
Entirely new compressors have been developed
for use with R-134a and Ester oil refrigeration
systems. Both compressor and electric motor
have been modified. Old compressors intended
for R-12 refrigerant must not be used for new
systems charged with R-134a.
To replace the compressor:
Replacement of compressor and installation of filter-drier
must be done in a continuous sequence so the system is
exposed to atmosphere no longer than necessary.
All replacement compressors are shipped with rubber
plugs in the suction, discharge and process tubes, and
contain the correct oil charge and a holding charge of
inert gas. Compressors have a low-side process tube
attached to the compressor shell. A high-side process
tube is attached to the filter-drier.
Replacement compressors for some units may have an
oil cooler even if the original compressor did not. If the
product is not equipped for an oil cooler, leave the plastic
caps in place and install the compressor, connecting
only to the suction and discharge lines of the new
compressor.
Before installing the replacement compressor, remove
the discharge plug and check for the pop sound of the
inert gas leaving the compressor.
DO NOT use compressor if you do not hear this
sound.
If the compressor checks OK, reinstall the plug. Do not
remove any of the plugs again until the compressor is in
position and you are ready to braze the lines.
A new compressor which is cold (e.g. after having been
kept in a cold service van) should be left to warm to the
surrounding temperature before the plugs on the
compressor connections are removed. This will help
prevent condensation from forming in the oil and the
compressor. Also, avoid opening the system when any
of the components or lines are cold.
A process tube is connected onto the high-side process
tube of the filter drier. This tube is located at the top of
the filter-drier.
1. Pull unit from its installation position and unplug from
wall outlet.
2. Extract the screws securing the compressor shield to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. Attach an approved self tapping line tap valve to the
process tube. Connect refrigerant recovery system
to tap valve. Turn on recovery system, open the
line tap valve, and allow refrigerant to flow into an
approved tank.
4. Using a 7/16” socket, remove the (4) bolts, one in
each corner, holding the compressor to the base.
5. Disconnect electrical leads from compressor.
6. After refrigerant is completely recovered, cut suction
and discharge lines as close to compressor as
possible. Leave only enough tubing to pinch off and
seal defective compressor. Plug or tape any open
system tubing to avoid entrance of moisture and air
into system. Remove inoperable compressor and
transfer mounting parts to new compressor.
7. Release holding charge (release slowly to avoid oil
discharge) on new compressor to ensure there is
no leak in seam or tubing. Reinstall rubber plug.
8. Install new compressor in exact same manner as
original compressor.
If low-side process tube is too short, silver solder
four inch piece of tubing onto process tube at this
time.
9. Reform both suction and discharge lines to align
with new compressor. If they are too short, use
additional lengths of tubing. Joints should overlap
0.5” to provide sufficient area for good solder joints.
Clean and mark area where tubing should be cut.
Cut tubing with tubing cutter. Work quickly to avoid
letting moisture and air into system.
On R-134a systems, compressor must NOT be left
open to atmosphere for more than 10 minutes to
prevent moisture contamination of oil.
5-9
Sealed System
Filter-Drier Installation
10. Solder all connections according to soldering
procedure.
11. Remove original filter-drier.
Any time the sealed system is opened and the
refrigerant charge is removed, the liquid line filter-drier
must be replaced and the system thoroughly evacuated
before replacing refrigerant.
DO NOT unbraze old filter-drier from system. This
will vaporize and drive moisture from desiccant
back into system. The old filter-drier should be cut
out of system.
12. Install new filter-drier at condenser outlet.
13. Evacuate and charge system using recommended
procedure described under Evacuating and
Recharging.
14. Reconnect compressor terminal leads in accordance
with unit wiring diagram.
15. Reassemble unit.
Condenser Replacement
1. Disconnect electrical supply to refrigerator/freezer.
2. Remove compressor access panel.
3. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
4. Remove condenser fan mounting screws.
5. Unplug fan motor harness located in back of fan
motor.
6. Remove fan motor and fan blade.
7. After refrigerant is completely recovered,
disconnect inlet and discharge lines from condenser.
8. Lift front of condenser and pull out of retainers
mounted to the drain pan.
9. Remove old condenser out the back of cabinet.
10. Install replacement condenser.
11. Remove original filter-drier.
DO NOT unbraze old filter-drier from system. This
will vaporize and drive moisture from desiccant
back into system. The old filter-drier should be cut
out of system.
12. Install new filter-drier at condenser outlet.
13. Evacuate and charge the system using
recommended procedure described under
Evacuating and Recharging.
14. Reassemble unit.
DO NOT unbraze old filter-drier from system. This
will vaporize and drive moisture from desiccant
back into system. The old filter-drier should be cut
out of system.
1. Disconnect electrical supply to refrigerator/freezer.
2. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
3. Using a 3 cornered file, score a groove around
capillary tube as close to old filter-drier as possible.
Break capillary tube along score mark from
filter-drier.
4. Cut condenser outlet tube at filter-drier. Discard
filter-drier.
5. Thoroughly clean condenser outlet tube and
capillary tube.
6. Place inlet connection of filter-drier over condenser
tube approximately ¼” and solder.
7. Insert capillary tube input end into filter-drier outlet.
Do not allow tube to bottom against screen. Solder
carefully so that solder does not plug capillary tube.
8. Install process tube adapter to filter-drier.
9. Evacuate and charge system using the
recommended procedure described under
Evacuating and Recharging.
10. Reassemble unit.
Evaporator and Suction Line
Replacement
1. Disconnect electrical supply to refrigerator/freezer.
2. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
3. Remove shelving.
4. Remove evaporator cover.
5. Remove evaporator from its installation position.
6. Cut or remove suction line from compressor.
5-10
Sealed System
7. Cut filter-drier from condensing unit.
8. Remove sealant from cabinet where suction line
enters.
9. Remove evaporator and suction line as one piece.
10. Install new evaporator with attached suction line.
11. Seal cabinet.
12. Install new filter drier at condenser outlet.
13. Evacuate and charge system using the
recommended procedure described under
Evacuating and Recharging.
R-134A SYSTEMS ARE PARTICULARLY
SUSCEPTIBLE TO MOISTURE CONTAMINATION
WHICH CAN ONLY BE PREVENTED BY
EVACUATING THE SYSTEM FOR A MINIMUM OF 30
MINUTES TO ATTAIN A MINIMUM 29.9 INCH (500
MICRON OR LOWER) VACUUM.
Evacuating System
To achieve the required levels of evacuation, a properly
maintained two stage vacuum pump in good condition is
required. It is absolutely essential to maintain your
vacuum pump according to the manufacturer’s
instructions including required oil changes at the
recommended intervals. Vacuum pump oil should always
be changed after evacuating a contaminated system.
DO NOT unbraze old filter-drier from system. This
will vaporize and drive moisture from desiccant
back into system. The old filter-drier should be cut
out of system.
Vacuum pump performance should be checked
periodically with a micron gauge.
Installing Evacuation and
Recharging Equipment
1. Disconnect refrigerator/freezer from electrical supply.
2. If compressor was replaced, install correct sized
process tube adapter on process tube.
If compressor was not replaced, cut process tube
with tubing cutter leaving as much tube as possible
and install correct size process tube adapter.
3. Install correct sized process tube adapter on
high-side process tube.
4. Attach refrigeration service gauge manifold to
system in following order: (See Figure 5-4)
• Low-side (compound gauge) hose to suction
side process tube adapter.
• High-side (pressure gauge) hose to high-side
process tube adapter.
• Center port manifold hose before hand shut-off
valve to charging cylinder.
• Center port manifold hose after hand shut-off
valve to vacuum pump.
1. Make certain that charging cylinder valve, hand
shut-off valve, and manifold gauge valves are all
closed.
2. Start vacuum pump.
3. Open hand shut-off valve and slowly open both
manifold valves, turning counterclockwise, for two full
rotations.
If high vacuum equipment is used, just crack
both manifold valves for a few minutes and
then open slowly for the two full turns counterclockwise. This will prevent the compressor oil
from foaming and being drawn into vacuum pump.
4. Operate vacuum pump for a minimum of 30 minutes
to a minimum of 29.9” (500 micron) vacuum.
5. Close hand shut-off valve to vacuum pump. Watch
compound gauge for several minutes. If reading
rises, there is a leak in the system, go to step 6. If
no leak is indicated, stop vacuum pump. System is
now ready for charging.
6. If a leak is indicated, stop vacuum pump and
introduce a small charge of refrigerant into system
by cracking valve on bottom of charging cylinder until
system is pressurized to 40 or 50 lbs psi.
7. Leak test low-side. Close compound gauge. Run
compressor for a few minutes and leak test
high-side. When leak is found, recapture refrigerant
using EPA approved recovery system. Repair and
go back to step 1.
5-11
Sealed System
Figure 5-4. Installation of Recovery Equipment
Charging The System
6. As soon as refrigerant in sight glass has gone down
to predetermined level, close charging cylinder valve.
Check the serial plate for the correct refrigerant
type. It is extremely important to verify the type of
refrigerant in the system before starting any sealed
system repairs. After charging the system with
liquid be certain to wait at least 5 minutes before
starting the compressor to give the refrigerant
a chance to disperse throughout the system.
Otherwise the compressor could be damaged by
attempting to pump excessive quantities of liquid.
Preparing The Charging Cylinder:
1. Make certain that hand shut-off valve to vacuum
pump is closed.
2. Close high-side manifold gauge valve.
3. Set charging cylinder scale to pressure indicated on
cylinder pressure gauge.
4. Observe refrigerant level in sight glass. Subtract
amount to be charged into system and note shut off
point.
5. Open charging cylinder valve slowly and allow
proper charge to enter system.
DISCONNECT THE CHARGING CYLINDER HEATER
AT THIS TIME TO PREVENT THE CYLINDER
PRESSURE FROM EXCEEDING ITS MAXIMUM
LIMITS.
7. Allow system to sit for five minutes.
8. Turn on refrigerator compressor. Run compressor for
a few minutes and monitor system pressures.
9. When satisfied that the unit is operating correctly,
clamp the high-side process tube with the pinch-off
tool while the unit is still running.
Final Leak Test
1. With the refrigerator turned OFF leak test all
low-side system components.
2. Turn the unit ON and run until the condenser is
warm. Leak test the high-side system components.
5-12
Sealed System
Dedicated Equipment
R-134a must not be mixed with other types of
refrigerants. R-134a must be recovered in dedicated
and properly identified recovery bags and tanks.
It will be necessary to check with the manufacturer of
your recovery equipment to determine R-134a
compatibility. Some recovery equipment manufacturers have changeover instructions for switching between
refrigerant types. Protect yourself and your equipment
by following all manufacturer guidelines.
Also, ensure that your refrigeration hoses are specified
for use with R-134a refrigerant. Research has shown
that compounds in standard refrigeration hoses may
enter sealed systems and ultimately restrict the cap
tube in an R-134a system.
For example, hoses that were used for a refrigeration
system operating on R-12 may contain small quantities
of mineral oil which can block the capillary tube in a
system operating on R-134a. As little as one milligram
may be sufficient to cause a blockage. In addition,
sealed system components that have been used with
CFC systems must not be used with R-134a systems.
These components may contain residual amounts of
refrigerant and oil which could damage an R-134a
system.
At the earliest stage of development work on R-134a,
tests were carried out on a different type of synthetic oil
known as Poly-Alkaline Glycol (PAG). This oil is also
used in certain air conditioning systems for cars. PAG
and Ester oil DO NOT mix with one another. Service
equipment used for R-134a / Ester oil must not come
into contact with PAG.
Vacuum Pump Maintenance
It is absolutely essential to maintain your vacuum pump
according to the manufacturer’s instructions, including required oil changes at the recommended intervals.
Vacuum pump oil should always be changed after
evacuating a contaminated system. Vacuum pump
performance should be checked periodically with a
micron gauge.
Robinair has stated that their current and discontinued
vacuum pump models, using mineral oil currently
specified for use in their vacuum pumps, can be used to
evacuate R-134a/Ester oil systems. Robinair also states
that it is acceptable to alternate between evacuating
R-12/mineral oil and R-134a/Ester oil systems without
adversely effecting the vacuum pump’s performance.
For other brands of vacuum pumps, check with the
manufacturer for restrictions and guidelines when using
with R-134a.
Check the serial plate for the correct refrigerant
type. It is extremely important to verify the type of
refrigerant in the system before starting any sealed
system repairs.
With the possible exception of the vacuum pump,
all service equipment that comes in contact with
R-134a during evacuation and recharging must
be dedicated. Accordingly, R-134a will require a
dedicated charging cylinder, manifold gauge set,
process tube adapters, and hoses. Any residual
mineral oil on other tools (tubing cutter, etc.) must
be thoroughly cleaned off before using on R-134a/
Ester oil systems. It will be necessary to check
with the manufacturer of your vacuum pump for
refrigerant and oil compatibility issues.
If you use a vacuum pump with mineral oil to
evacuate an R-134a system, it is ABSOLUTELY
ESSENTIAL to have a shut-off valve between the
pump and your manifold gauge set as shown on
page 4-10. The hand valve must be closed during
all times when the vacuum pump is not operating.
This will prevent the migration of mineral oil vapor
into the R134a/Ester oil system. If the vacuum
pump should stop during evacuation for any
reason, the hand pump shut-off valve must be
closed immediately.
Insure that your refrigeration hoses are specified
for use with R-134a refrigerant. Research has
shown that compounds in standard refrigeration
hoses may enter sealed systems and ultimately
restrict the cap tube in an R-134a system.
Vacuum pump suppliers may or may not recommend
changing the vacuum pump oil to the same type that’s in
the system being evacuated. Some manufacturers may
recommend a vacuum pump that’s dedicated to
R-134a systems.
5-13
Sealed System
Spills or Leaks
If a large release of vapor occurs, such as from a large
spill or leak, the vapors may concentrate near the floor
or low spots and displace the oxygen available for
breathing, causing suffocation.
Evacuate everyone until the area has been ventilated.
Use blowers or fans to circulate the air at floor level.
DO NOT re-enter the affected area unless you are
equipped with a self-contained breathing apparatus or
unless an area monitor indicates that the concentration
of HFC-134a vapors in the area is below the AEL.
Always use self-contained breathing apparatus or an
air-line mask when entering tanks or other areas where
vapors might exist. Use the buddy system and a lifeline. Refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for
HFC-134a information.
To achieve the required 29.9 inch (500 micron) vacuum,
a properly maintained two-stage vacuum pump in good
condition is required. A two stage pump can reach a
deeper vacuum than a single stage because the exhaust
from the first pumping stage is discharged into the
second pumping stage. This means the second stage
begins pumping at a lower pressure so a lower ultimate
vacuum can be achieved.
HFC-134a vapors have a slightly sweet odor that can be
difficult to detect. Therefore, frequent leak checks and
the installation of permanent area monitors may be
necessary in enclosed spaces. Refer to ASHRAE
Standards 15 and 34 for refrigeration machinery rooms.
To ensure safety when working with HFC-134a in
enclosed areas:
1. Route relief and purge vent piping (if present)
outdoors, away from air intakes.
2. Make certain area is well ventilated, using
auxiliary ventilation if needed to move vapors.
3. Make sure area is clear of vapors prior to beginning
work.
4. Install air monitoring equipment to detect leaks.
Figure 5-5. Two Stage Vacuum Pump
5-14
Sealed System
HFC 134a COMPARISON WITH CFC 12
HFC 134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is being studied as part of the PAFT I programme sector, which began in
December 1987. It is a prime candidate for the replacement of CFC 12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) in refrigeration and
air conditioning systems, medical aerosols, and in certain foam blowing applications. HFC 134a is similar to CFC 12
in that it has a low chemical reactivity and a high degree of stability. Both chemicals are gases.
Inhalation Toxicity
(Short-term exposures to high concentrations, such as accidental leakages)
Both HFC 134a and CFC 12, are very low in toxicity by the inhalation route. The 4-hour LC50 for HFC 134a is greater than 500,000 ppm, and for CFC 12 it is 760,000 ppm. As with other halogenated hydrocarbons, CFC 12 and HFC
134a can, at high dose levels, sensitize the heart to adrenaline. For CFC 12, the threshold level for cardiac
sensitization is 50,000 ppm, while for HFC 134a it is 75,000 ppm.
HFC-134a poses no acute or chronic hazard when it is handled in accordance with DuPont recommendations and
when exposures are maintained at or below the DuPont Acceptable Exposure Limit (AEL) of 1,000 ppm (8 and 12
hour Time-Weighted Average or TWA).
An AEL is an airborne exposure limit established by DuPont scientists that specifies time-weighted average (TWA)
airborne concentrations to which nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed without adverse effects. The AEL for
HFC-134a has the same value as the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) established for CFC-12 and HCFC-22. TLVs
are established by the American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).
However, inhaling high concentrations of HFC-134a vapor may cause temporary central nervous system depression
with narcosis, lethargy and anesthetic effects. Other effects that may occur include dizziness, a feeling of intoxication and a loss of coordination. Continued breathing of high concentrations of HFC-134a vapors may produce cardiac irregularities (cardiac sensitization), unconsciousness, and with gross overexposure, death. Intentional misuse
or deliberate inhalation of HFC-134a may cause death without warning. This practice is extremely dangerous.
If you experience any of the initial symptoms, move to fresh air and seek medical attention.
Cardiac Sensitization
If vapors are inhaled at a concentration of 75,000 ppm, which is well above the AEL, the heart may become
sensitized to adrenaline, leading to cardiac irregularities and, possibly, to cardiac arrest. The likelihood of these
cardiac problems increases if you are under physical or emotional stress.
Medical attention must be given immediately if exposed to high concentrations of HFC-134a. DO NOT treat with
adrenaline (epinephrine) or similar drugs. These drugs may increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmia and cardiac
arrest. If the person is having difficulty breathing, administer oxygen. If breathing has stopped, give artificial
respiration.
Skin and Eye Contact
At room temperature, HFC-134a vapors have little or no effect on the skin or eyes. However, in liquid form,
HFC-134a can freeze skin or eyes on contact, causing frostbite. Following contact, soak the exposed area in
lukewarm water, not cold or hot. If medical treatment cannot begin immediately, apply a light coat of a nonmedicated
ointment, such as petroleum jelly. If the exposed area is in a location where the presence of the ointment would be
awkward, such as on the eye, apply a light bandage. In all cases of frostbite, seek medical attention as soon as
possible. Always wear protective clothing when there is a risk of exposure to liquid HFC-134a. Where splashing is
possible, always wear eye protection and a face shield.
5-15
Sealed System
Combustibility of HFC-134a
Filling and Charging Operations
HFC-134a is nonflammable at ambient temperatures
and atmospheric pressure. However, tests have shown
HFC-134a to be combustible at pressures as low as 5.5
psi (139.3 kPa absolute) at 177°C (350°F) when mixed
with air at concentrations generally greater than 60%
volume air. At lower temperatures, higher pressures
are required for combustibility. (HCFC-22 is also
combustible at pressures above atmospheric in the
presence of high air concentrations). Test results and
calculations have shown:
•
•
•
•
At ambient temperature, all concentrations of
HFC-134a in air are nonflammable at pressures
below 15 psi (205 kPa absolute).
Based on above information, the following operating
practices are recommended:
•
Tanks should normally be evacuated at start of
filling, and should never be filled while under
positive air pressure.
•
Tank pressure should never be allowed to exceed
300 psi (2,170 kPa) when filling with HFC-134a.
Relief devices on either tanks or HFC-134a supply
system usually prevent this.
•
Tank pressures should be monitored routinely.
•
Air lines should never be connected to storage
tanks.
•
•
Combustible mixtures of air and HFC-134a will not
form when liquid HFC-134a is pumped into closed
vessel if initial air pressure in vessel is limited to one
atmosphere absolute and final pressure is limited to
300 psi (2,170 kPa absolute). If initial air pressure is
greater than one atmosphere, combustible
mixtures may form as tank is filled.
Bulk Delivery and Storage
•
Before evacuating cylinders or refrigeration
equipment, any remaining refrigerant should be
removed by recovery system.
Vacuum pump discharge lines should be free of
restrictions that could increase discharge pressures
above 15 psi (205 kPa) and result in formation of
combustible mixtures.
Cylinders or refrigeration equipment should normally
be evacuated at start of filling, and should never be
filled while under positive air pressure.
Final pressures should not exceed 300 psi
(2,170 kPa).
Filled cylinders should periodically be analyzed
for air (nonabsorbable gas or NAG).
Refrigerant Recovery Systems
Efficient recovery of refrigerant from equipment or
containers requires evacuation at the end of the
recovery cycle. Suction lines to a recovery compressor
should be periodically checked for leaks to prevent
compressing air into the recovery cylinder during
evacuation. In addition, the recovery cylinder pressure
should be monitored, and evacuation stopped in the
event of a rapid pressure rise indicating the presence of
noncondensable air. The recovery cylinder contents
should then be analyzed for NAG, and the recovery
system leak checked if air is present. DO NOT continue
to evacuate a refrigeration system that has a major leak.
Thermal Decomposition
HFC-134a vapors will decompose when exposed to
high temperatures from flames or electric resistance
heaters. Decomposition may produce toxic and irritating
compounds, such as hydrogen fluoride. The pungent
odors released will irritate the nose and throat and
generally force people to evacuate the area. Therefore,
it is important to prevent decomposition by avoiding
exposure to high temperatures.
5-16
Sealed System
R-134a Physical Properties:
R-134a - Tetrafluoroethane
Refrigerant of choice in automotive industry. Genetron134a replaces CFC12 for air conditioning and refrigeration
systems in commercial residential and industrial applications.
R-12 - Dichlorodifluoromethane
A versatile and widely used refrigerant. Common in reciprocating and rotary type equipment. For all types of applications, household to industrial. Also employed in some centrifugal designs and in several special
applications.
Chemical formula ................................................
Molecular weight .................................................
Boiling point at 1 atm...........................................
Critical temperature .............................................
Critical pressure, psia. .........................................
Critical density. Ib./cu. tt. .....................................
Liquid density at 80°F (26.7°C). Ib./cu. ft. ...........
Heat of vaporization at boiling point,
Btu/lb.°F ...............................................................
Specific heat of liquid at 80°F (26.7°C).
Btu/lb.°F ...............................................................
Specific heat of vapor at constant pressure
(1 atm.) and 80°F (26.7°C), (Btu/lb.°F) ...............
*Flammable range, %volume in air. ....................
Ozone depletion potential....................................
Greenhouse warming potential (estimate) ..........
CF3CH2F
102.03
-15.1°F (-26.2°C)
214.0°F (101.1°C)
589.9
31.97
75.0
92.4
0.341
0.204
None
0
0.285
* Flame limits measured using ASTM E681 with electrically activated kitchen match ignition source per ASHRAE
Standard 34.
Comparative Cycle Performance:
Evaporator temperature = 20°F
Condenser temperature = 110°F
Suction superheat = 30°F
sub-cooling = 10°F
Compressor isentropic efficiency = 65%
Evaporator pressure, psi ...............................
Condenser pressure, psi ...............................
Compression ratio ........................................
Compressor discharge temperature, °F ........
Coefficient of performance ............................
Refrigerant circulation per ton, Ib./min. .........
Compressor displacement per ton, cfm. .......
Liquid flow per ton, cu. in. /min. ....................
Latent heat at evaporator temp., Btu/lb .........
Net refrigeration effect. Btu/lb .......................
Refrigerant
12
22
134a
21.0
43.0
18.5
136.4 226.3 146.4
4.23
4.17
4.86
188.1 227.0 178.3
2.90
2.79
2.83
3.80
2.78
3.00
4.51
2.82
4.55
83.2
67.4
71.7
66.5
90.6
86.9
52.7
72.0
66.7
5-17
Sealed System
HFC-134a, CFC-12 Pressure Temperature Chart
5-18
Sealed System
CFCs
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are compounds consisting of chlorine, fluorine, and carbon atoms which are very stable
in the troposphere. They are degraded only in the stratosphere by the sun’s radiation where released chlorine may
contribute to ozone depletion. They can persist in the troposphere for a hundred years or longer.
Fluorocarbons
These chemical compounds include CFCs, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). For
many years, CFCs have served vital functions in society. They are used in a variety of applications including refrigeration, air conditioning, energy efficient insulation, medical products, and cleaning of electronic and precision engineering components. HCFCs and HFCs retain many of the desirable properties of CFCs but because they exist for
a shorter time in the atmosphere, ozone depletion and global warming concerns are significantly reduced.
Global Warming
Global warming, which is an increase in the natural greenhouse effect, refers to the physical phenomenon that may
lead to heating of the earth. Most of the sun’s energy reaches the earth as visible light. After passing through the
atmosphere, part of this energy is absorbed by the earth’s surface and in the process is converted into heat energy.
The earth, now warmed by the sun, radiates heat energy back into the atmosphere toward space.
Naturally occurring gases, such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ozone, absorb and thus retain some of the
outgoing heat energy. This process slows the heat loss, making the earth’s surface warmer than it would be if this
heat energy had passed unobstructed through the atmosphere into space. The warmer earth’s surface, in turn,
radiates more heat until a balance is established between incoming and outgoing energy. This warming process,
caused by the atmosphere’s absorption of the heat energy radiated from the earth’s surface, is called the greenhouse effect.
Increasing concentrations of gases from man-made sources (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, and CFCs) that absorb
the heat radiation could lead to a slow warming of the earth. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as global
warming.
Global Warming Potential (GYP)
An index developed to provide a simplified means of describing the relative ability of each greenhouse gas emission
to affect radiative forcing and thereby the global climate. GYPs are defined on amass basis, relative to either CFC11 (the Halocarbon GYP or HGWP) or carbon dioxide. Because CFC-11 has a finite lifetime in the atmosphere, the
HGWP can be calculated explicitly and is a single number. Because carbon dioxide does not have a finite lifetime
in the atmosphere, GYPs relative to it have to be calculated up to a particular time horizon, for example, 20, 100, or
500 years.
Greenhouse Gases
Gases present in relatively small quantities in the atmosphere that strongly absorb infrared radiation or “heat” emitted
by the earth. The primary greenhouse gases are water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and
some of the chlorofluorocarbons. Concentrations of several greenhouse gases are increasing, primarily as a result of
human activities.
5-19
Sealed System
HCFCs
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are compounds comprised of hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine, and carbon atoms.
These compounds have many of the useful properties of CFCs, but are destroyed naturally in the lower atmosphere
and do not persist to the same extent as CFCs. Only a fraction of HCFCs emitted can be transported to the ozone
layer in the stratosphere where their chlorine could deplete ozone. HCFCs typically have an ozone depletion
potential 2 to 10 percent that of CFCs.
HFCs
Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are compounds consisting of hydrogen, fluorine, and carbon atoms which, like the
HCFCs, are destroyed naturally in the lower atmosphere. They have many of the useful properties of the CFCs.
Because they do not contain chlorine, they are not involved in ozone depletion.
NOT-IN-KIND (NIK) Technologies
Technologies that do not rely on the use of fluorocarbons.
Ozone
Ozone, formed in the stratosphere by the action of sunlight on oxygen, is also an airborne pollutant near ground
level. Low altitude (tropospheric) ozone is formed by reactions between hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen in
sunlight.
Ozone Depletion
Ozone is continually being formed and destroyed by chemical reactions occurring in the stratosphere. There are
large natural changes in ozone concentration in the stratosphere; for example, between summer and winter there is
a change of about 25 percent at mid-latitudes. Ozone depletion occurs if the rate of ozone destruction is increased
due to human activities.
5-20
Component Teardown
Component Teardown
This section explains how to access and remove components from an Electrolux ICON Built-In All Refrigerator
Pro and/or a Built-In All Freezer Pro unit, and has been arranged in such a way as to simulate which components
would need to be removed first in order to gain access to other components. When following a component removal
procedure, it may be necessary to reference another component removal procedure listed earlier in this section.
NOTE: This section will cover the All Refrigerator units first, the Compressor area components for All Refrigerator and
All Freezer units second, and the All Freezer components last.
Electrolux Home Products Inc. cannot be held responsible for damage to property or injury to persons
caused by failure to comply with the installation, maintenance and safety instructions contained in this
Service Manual.
Before continuing, please take note of the WARNINGS and CAUTIONS below.
-
IF IT IS NECESSARY TO REMOVE AN ALL REFRIGERATOR PRO AND/OR AN ALL FREEZER PRO UNIT
FROM ITS INSTALLATION, USE PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES AS UNITS ARE HEAVY AND COULD
FALL RESULTING IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. PULLING A UNIT FROM ITS INSTALLATION
SHOULD ONLY BE PERFORMED BY A TRAINED AUTHORIZED SERVICE TECHNICIAN OR INSTALLER.
-
TO AVOID ELECTRIC SHOCK, POWER TO AN ALL REFRIGERATOR PRO AND/OR AN ALL FREEZER
PRO UNIT MUST BE DISCONNECTED WHENEVER ACCESSING/ REMOVING COMPONENTS POWERED
BY ELECTRICITY OR COMPONENTS NEAR OTHER ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS.
-
AFTER SERVICE IS COMPLETED, BE SURE ALL SAFETY-GROUNDING CIRCUITS ARE COMPLETE, ALL
ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS ARE SECURE, AND ALL ACCESS PANELS ARE IN PLACE.
-
IF UNIT WAS USED PRIOR TO SERVICE, THE COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY WILL BE HOT. WEAR
PROTECTIVE GLOVES AND THE APPROPRIATE SAFETY GEAR WHEN WORKING WITH COMPRESSORS.
-
IF REMOVING A DOOR FROM A UNIT, REMEMBER THAT THE DOORS ARE HEAVY. IF A DOOR WERE TO
FALL, IT COULD CAUSE SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY.
-
Metal edges may be sharp. Use caution and wear appropriate safety equipment when servicing
evaporators and condensers to avoid personal injury.
-
If working in the compressor area, remember that compressor and tubing may be hot.
6-1
Component Teardown
Refrigerator Exterior
Components
Door Handle Removal
The door handle is secured with setscrews to the
handle mounting shoulder screws that are fastened
into the front of the door assembly.
To remove the handle, use a 3/32” allen wrench and
extract the two setscrews located in each handle standoff.
Pull handle assembly from door assembly.
(See Figure 6-1)
Figure 6-1. Handle Removal
Kickplate Removal
The kickplate is secured with two screws to the lower
front of the unit.
Kickplate
To remove the kickplate, extract the screw from each end
of the kickplate with a phillips head screwdriver. (See
Figure 6-2)
Screws
Figure 6-2. Kickplate Removal
Door Hinge and Door Assembly Removal
Hinge
Cover
The door assembly is secured to the unit frame by an
upper and lower hinge assembly.
To remove the door assembly:
Bolts
Upper
Hinge
1. Gently lay freezer on its back on a soft clean
surface.
2. Remove kickplate.
3. Lift plastic cover off upper hinge assembly.
(See Figure 6-3)
4. Using a 3/8” socket or wrench, extract the two bolts
securing the upper hinge to the unit frame.
Figure 6-3. Upper Hinge Removal
5. Using a 3/8” socket or wrench, extract the two bolts
securing the lower hinge to the unit frame. Use a
phillips head screwdriver to extract the remaining
screw from the lower hinge assembly.
(See Figure 6-4)
6. Lift the door assembly off of the unit frame.
Figure 6-4. Lower Hinge Removal
6-2
Component Teardown
Door Stop Assembly Removal
Door Frame
The door stop is secured to with two screws the
underside of the door assembly.
Screws
To remove the door stop:
Door Stop
1. Remove door from unit.
2. Extract the two screws securing the door stop to the
bottom of the door assembly. (See Figure 6-5) Door
stop assembly is now free.
Door Gasket and Inner Panel Removal
The inner panel of the door assembly is secured with
screws that pass through the inner panel and fasten
into the door assembly. The door gasket has an inner
lip that is pressed between the inner panel and the door
assembly and is secured in position when the inner panel
screws are fastened to the door assembly. The inner
panel does not have to be completely removed to extract
the door gasket from the door assembly.
Hinge Bearing
Figure 6-5. Door Stop Removal
Outer
Door
Panel
To remove the door gasket:
1. Lift the inside edge of the door gasket to access the
inner panel screws.
2. Loosen the inner panel screws until the door gasket
can be pulled out from under the inner panel.
(See Figure 6-6)
3. Continue loosening screws around door assembly
until door gasket is free.
4. To remove the inner panel, extract all screws from
the outside edge of the inner panel and remove from
unit.
5. The secondary gasket is secured with two retaining
clips that snap into the inner door panel. Pry out
the two retaining clips with a small putty knife, using
caution not to damage the inner door panel. The
secondary gasket is now free.
Inner Panel
Clip
Secondary
Gasket
Clip
Screw
Door
Gasket
Figure 6-6. Inner Panel and Door Gasket Removal
6-3
Component Teardown
Adjustable Door Bins Removal
There are four two liter door bins that can be arranged
as needed by the user.
To remove a two liter door bin, lift the bin straight up
until it is free of the supports molded into the door liner,
then pull from unit. (See Figure 6-7)
Dairy Door Removal
The dairy door has a hole on each side that fits over
molded pins in the door liner.
Figure 6-7. Adjustable Door Bin Removal
To remove the dairy door:
1. Open dairy door.
2. Grab the dairy door on each side and flex the outer
edge inwards until the door is free of the pins in the
door liner, then pull from door. (See Figure 6-8)
Door Switch Removal
The door switch is mounted inside a hole in the cabinet
base along the lower left hand side.
(See Figure 6-9)
To remove the door switch:
Figure 6-8. Dairy Door Removal
1. Disconnect unit from power supply.
2. Remove kickplate.
3. Reach into the access hole next to the door switch
and disconnect the electrical leads from the door
switch terminals.
4. Press in on the retaining latch on the switch body
and push switch through hole in cabinet base.
Access Hole
Door Switch
Figure 6-9. Door Switch Removal
6-4
Component Teardown
Interior Components
Adjustable Interior Shelves
Multi-position adjustable interior shelves can be moved
to any position for larger or smaller packages. The cantilever shelves are supported at the back of the
refrigerator. (See Figure 6-10) Replace the shelf by
inserting the hooks at rear of the shelf into the wall
bracket. Lower the shelf into the desired slots and lock
into position.
Figure 6-10. Interior Shelving Removal
To remove the shelf assemblies:
1. Lift front edge up.
2. Pull shelf out.
Refrigerator Drawer Assembly Removal
Drawer
Frame
Bracket
The refrigerator drawer assembly can be lifted off of the
supports and pulled from the refrigerated compartment.
The drawer may now be removed from the drawer slides.
(See Figure 6-11)
To remove the refrigerator drawers assemblies:
1. Remove the lowest adjustable interior shelf.
2. Lift up on the front of the drawer assembly and lift
upwards until the bracket releases from the supports
mounted to the liner sidewalls. Then pull assembly
out of the cabinet interior.
3. Remove the glass shelf.
4. Remove crisper drawer from slides by using a flat
bladed screwdriver just behind the clip between the
drawer and rail, then gently twisting up. The clip will
release and the drawer will be free.
5. The drawer slides are secured with two tabs that
lock into the drawer frame brackets. Push drawer
slide upwards until the front tab releases, then pull
drawer slide forward until rear tab disengages.
Drawer slide is now free.
6. The bracket is secured with two screws to the
drawer frame. Extract the two screws to separate
the bracket and drawer frame.
7. The supports are secured with two screws to the
compartment sidewall. Extract the screws and
remove the supports.
Drawer Slide
Drawer Frame
Glass Shelf
Support
Screws
Drawer
Support
Drawer Slide
Figure 6-11. Refrigerator Drawer Assembly Removal
6-5
Component Teardown
Air Filter Removal
Push the plastic bubble tab at the back of the control
box housing. This releases the hinged bottom half to
drop open. Remove the old filter and discard it.
Unpackage the new filter and place it inside the hinged
bottom half of the housing. Push the hinged bottom half
upward until the tab snaps into closed position.
(See Figure 6-12)
Control Box Assembly Removal
The control box assembly is secured with five screws to
the top of the refrigerated compartment and has sealant
along the front face to prevent ambient air from reaching
the compartment thermistor.
The water filter components are part of the control box
assembly.
Figure 6-12. Light Shield and Fixture Removal
To remove the control box:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove the adjustable shelves.
3. Extract the five screws from the recessed holes
in control box securing the control box to the
compartment ceiling. (See Figure 6-13)
4. Pull forward on the control box until the sealant
along the front edge breaks. Use caution not to
strain the wire harness connections.
5. Disconnect wire harness from control box at the
quick disconnects.
6. Push in on the outer edges of the fittings connecting
the water filter base to the inlet and outlet water lines
as you pull the water lines out of water filter base.
Control box is now free.
Screws
Screws
Figure 6-13. Control Box Removal
Light Fixture Removal
To remove the light fixture:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Light
Fixture
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove control box from refrigerated compartment.
Remove light bulbs by turning counter-clockwise.
Disconnect wire leads from light fixture terminals.
Press on the retaining latches securing the light
fixture to the control box while pushing the light
fixture through the cutout in the control box. (See
Figure 6-14)
Control Box
Figure 6-14. Light Fixture Removal
6-6
Component Teardown
Control Removal
Screws
To remove the control:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove control box from refrigerated compartment.
3. Extract the two screws securing the control to the
control box. (See Figure 6-15)
4. Pull the front of the control box away from the
control while pulling the control up and out from its
installation position.
5. Disconnect the two wire harness connections from
the control board. Control is now free.
Control Box
Control
Water Filter Base Components
Control Box
Overlay
The water filter base is secured with two screws to the
underside of the control box. The water filter release
mechanism is secured with two screws and clamps to the
inside of the control box assembly.
Figure 6-15. Light Fixture and Control Removal
To remove the control:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove control box from refrigerated compartment.
3. Remove water filter raceway by pressing in on the
retaining latches and separating the raceway from
the control box assembly. (See Figure 6-16)
4. Extract the two screws from the underside of the
control box assembly securing the water filter base
to the inside of the control box assembly.
5. Extract the screw from each retainer securing
the release rod to the control box assembly. Lift
retainers off release rod. (See Figure 6-16)
6. Lift water filter base and release rod from control
box assembly. Turn release rod 90° to remove from
water filter base.
7. The water lines are removed from the hose junction
mounted to the rear wall by turning the nylon nuts
counter clockwise and then pulling the water lines
from the hose junction. (See Figure 6-17)
8. The hose junction may be removed by first
disconnecting the water lines from the rear of the
unit. Then, press in on the retaining latches while
pushing the hose junction through the cabinet wall.
(See Figure 6-17)
9. Remove the hose junction retainer by extracting the
two screws from the rear of the unit, then pull the
retainer from the unit. (See Figure 6-17)
Screws
Retainers
Water Filter
Water Filter
Base
Raceway Retaining
Latches
Release
Rod
Control Box
Figure 6-16. Light Fixture and Control Removal
Hose Junction Retainer
Hose Junction
Screws
Nuts
Water Filter
Base
Figure 6-17. Light Fixture and Control Removal
6-7
Component Teardown
Baffle Plate Removal
To remove the baffle plate, with one hand grab the
baffle plate from the center and pull back while with the
other hand, reach behind to disengage the retaining
latches. (See Figure 6-18)
Evaporator Cover Removal
The evaporator cover is secured with screws to the
back wall and bottom of the freezer compartment. The
evaporator cover has a gasket on each side to create
proper airflow in the compartment. (See Figure 6-19)
Baffle Plate
Figure 6-18. Baffle Plate Removal
To remove the evaporator cover:
1. Disconnect unit from power supply.
2. Remove the cantilever shelves.
3. Remove the crispers and crisper supports.
Gasket
1 of 2 shown
4. Using a phillips head screwdriver, extract the ten
(10) screws securing the evaporator cover to the
refrigerator compartment.
5. Pull the thermostat knob from thermostat shaft.
6. Carefully pull the evaporator cover away from the
back wall enough to access the wire harness
connections to the light fixtures and thermostat. Use
caution not to damage the gaskets on both sides of
the evaporator cover.
Screws
7. From behind the evaporator cover, disconnect the
wire leads from the light fixture terminals.
Evaporator cover may now be removed from unit.
Figure 6-19. Evaporator Cover Removal
Mid Level Lighting Removal
The mid level lighting components may be accessed
without the evaporator cover being completely removed
from the compartment. By pulling the top of evaporator
cover away from the rear wall, the light wire harness
connections and light fixture may be accessed.
To remove the mid level lighting on the evaporator cover:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove the lens from the lamp housing by
unsnapping it from the lamp housing using your
fingers or a screwdriver. Be careful not to break the
locking tabs on the lamp housing.
3. Remove bulb by turning counterclockwise.
4. Remove evaporator cover or remove screws and pull
away top of cover enough to access components
mounted to rear of cover, then disconnect the wire
leads from the light fixture terminals.
(See Figure 6-20)
5. Remove light fixture by pressing in the retaining
latches and pushing the light fixture through the
evaporator cover.
6-8
Figure 6-20. Mid Level Lighting Removal
Component Teardown
Thermistor Removal
The evaporator cover does not need to be completely
removed to access the thermistor wire harness
connections and mounting screw, however, removing the
evaporator cover from the unit will make the task easier.
Electrical
Connection
Thermistor
Screw
To remove the thermostat control:
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove the adjustable shelves.
Remove the freezer drawers and supports.
Remove the evaporator cover screws, then pull the
top of the evaporator cover away from the back wall
enough to access the thermistor mounting screw and
electrical connection.
5. Extract the screw securing the thermistor to the back
wall of the cabinet interior. (See Figure 6-21)
6. Disconnect thermistor from wire harness at the quick
disconnect. Thermistor is now free.
Ground
Wire
1.
2.
3.
4.
Figure 6-21. Thermistor Removal
NOTE: The lighting wire harness is not shown for clarity.
Evaporator Fan Assembly Removal
Fan Motor
The evaporator fan assembly consists of the fan motor
mount bracket, fan motor and fan blade. Two screws
secure the fan motor to the fan motor mount bracket. The
evaporator fan assembly is then secured with two screws
to the back wall of the freezer compartment. (See Figure
5-18)
Fan Blade
Screws
Electrical
Connection
To remove the evaporator fan assembly:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Disconnect unit from power supply.
Remove the cantilever shelves.
Remove the crispers and crisper supports.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Screws
Fan Motor
Mounting
Bracket
Figure 6-22. Evaporator Fan Assembly Removal
5. Remove wires from retaining clips mounted on the
fan motor mounting bracket. Disconnect the
electrical leads of fan motor at quick disconnect.
6. Using a 5/16” socket or nut driver, extract the two
hex head screws securing the fan motor mounting
bracket to the back wall of the unit.
(See Figure 6-22)
7. Separate the fan motor from the mounting bracket by
extracting the two hex head screws securing the fan
motor to mounting bracket.
8. Pull fan blade from fan motor shaft.
6-9
Component Teardown
Defrost Thermostat Removal
The defrost thermostat is secured with a retaining clip
to the upper left corner of the evaporator assembly. The
defrost thermostat and wire harness connections may be
accessed without completely removing the evaporator
cover. The top of the evaporator cover may be pulled
away from the rear of the cabinet interior enough to
remove the defrost terminator and disconnect the wire
harness connections. (See Figure 6-23)
Disconnect Here
Defrost
Thermostat
To remove the defrost thermostat:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect unit from power supply.
Remove the cantilever shelves.
Remove the crispers and crisper supports.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Disconnect the defrost thermostat wire leads from
the wire harness. (See Figure 6-23)
Figure 6-23. Defrost Thermostat Removal
6. Pull the defrost thermostat off of the evaporator
inlet tubing.
Disconnect Here
Refrigerator defrost thermostats must be installed on
the evaporator inlet tubing.
Defrost Heater Removal
Styrofoam
Styrofoam
The defrost heater is secured with two aluminum straps
to the bottom tube of the evaporator assembly.
To remove the defrost heater:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect unit from power supply.
Remove the cantilever shelves.
Remove the crispers and crisper supports.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Disconnect the defrost heater wire leads from the
wire harness. (See Figure 6-24)
6. Release the aluminum straps securing the defrost
heater to the bottom of the evaporator assembly.
7. Remove the styrofoam insulators from both sides of
the evaporator.
8. Pull defrost heater from evaporator assembly.
Defrost Heater
Aluminum Straps
Figure 6-24. Defrost Heater Removal
6-10
Component Teardown
Evaporator Removal
The evaporator sets upon the two screw standoffs
mounted to the back wall of the freezer compartment.
Two pieces of styrofoam are pressed between the
evaporator assembly and the sidewalls of the unit,
securing the assembly in position. (See Figure 6-25)
Screw Standoffs
To remove the evaporator:
1. Disconnect unit from power supply.
2. Remove the cantilever shelves.
3. Remove the crispers and crisper supports.
4. Remove the evaporator cover.
5. Remove the styrofoam insulators from both sides of
the evaporator.
6. Remove the defrost thermostat and defrost heater.
7. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
Heat Exchanger
Figure 6-25. Evaporator Removal
Whenever the sealed system is opened the filter-drier
must be replaced.
8. Remove the filter-drier.
9. Cut suction line about 1” from compressor.
10. Straighten the tubing, remove the foam sleeve, and
carefully feed the heat exchanger through the
cabinet while pulling up on the evaporator.
6-11
Component Teardown
Compressor Area Components
All Refrigerator and All Freezer-Pro Models
The compressor area components for the All Refrigerator
and All Freezer-Pro Units are similar in layout and have
the same access and removal steps. However, the part
numbers for items in the compressor area may differ
between the all refrigerator and all freezer models.
Electrical
Connection
Power Cord Removal
The power cord enters the compressor area on the lower
left side and is secured to the compressor mounting plate
with a P-clamp and screw.
Ground
Screw
To remove the power cord:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Using a phillips head screwdriver, extract the four
screws securing the compressor area shield to the
rear of the unit. Remove shield.
3. Using a 1/4” socket or wrench, extract the screw
securing the P-clamp to the compressor mounting
plate. (See Figure 6-26)
4. Using a 1/4” socket or wrench, extract the screw
securing the ground wires to the compressor
mounting plate.
5. Disconnect power cord from the wire harness at the
quick disconnect. Remove power cord from unit.
P-Clamp
and Screw
Figure 6-26. Power Cord Removal
Household
Inlet
Water Valve Removal (if equipped)
The water valve is secured with two screws to the
right hand side of the unit behind the compressor
area shield.
Electrical
Connection
To remove the water valve:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area.
2. Using a phillips head screwdriver, extract the four
screws securing the compressor area shield to the
rear of the unit. Remove shield.
3. Disconnect water valve from household water
supply. (See Figure 6-27)
4. Using fingers, disconnect the icemaker water line
from water valve.
5. Using a 1/4” socket or wrench, extract screws
securing water valve to unit frame.
6. Disconnect electrical connections from terminals of
water valve.
Screws
To Ice
Maker
Figure 6-27. Power Cord Removal
6-12
Component Teardown
Theater Lighting Control Removal
Door Switch
The theater lighting control is mounted to the lower left
interior side wall in the compressor area. The control
may be accessed from the front but is easier to access
from the rear of the unit. (See Figure 6-28)
Electrical
Connection
Screws
To remove the theater lighting control:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Extract the screws securing the fiber board cover to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. Disconnect wire harness connector from theater
lighting control.
4. Extract screws securing the theater lighting control to
the side wall of the unit. Remove control from unit.
Figure 6-28. Theater Lighting Control Removal
Filter-Drier Removal
Cut Here
The filter-drier is located in the compressor area on the
left side of the compressor. (See Figure 6-29)
To remove the filter-drier:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Extract the screws securing the fiber board cover to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
4. Using a 3 cornered file, score a groove around
capillary tube as close to old filter-drier as possible.
Break capillary tube along score mark from
filter-drier.
5. Cut condenser outlet tube at filter-drier. Discard
filter-drier.
6. Thoroughly clean condenser outlet tube and
capillary tube.
7. Place inlet connection of filter-drier over condenser
tube approximately ¼” and solder.
8. Insert capillary tube input end into filter-drier outlet.
Do not allow tube to bottom against screen. Solder
carefully so that solder does not plug capillary tube.
9. Install process tube adapter to filter-drier.
10. Evacuate and charge system using recommended
procedure described under Evacuating and
Recharging in the Refrigeration section.
11. Reassemble unit.
Cut Here
Figure 6-29. Filter-Drier Removal
On R-134a systems, the system must NOT be
left open to the atmosphere for more than 10
minutes to prevent moisture contamination of
compressor oil.
6-13
Component Teardown
Compressor Removal
Spring Wire
The compressor sits on four grommets and is secured
with four screws to the compressor mounting plate. (See
Figure 6-30)
Bolt
To remove the filter-drier:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Extract the screws securing the compressor shield to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. Using a small flat bladed screwdriver, release the
locking tab from the wire harness connection and
disconnect from compressor controller.
4. Using a needle nose pliers, remove spring wire
holding the controller to the compressor.
5. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
6. Using a 7/16” socket, remove the (4) bolts, one in
each corner, holding the compressor to the base.
(See Figure 6-30)
7. After refrigerant is completely recovered, cut
suction and discharge lines as close to compressor
as possible. Leave only enough tubing to pinch off
and seal defective compressor. Plug or tape any
open system tubing to avoid entrance of moisture
and air into system. Remove inoperable compressor
and transfer mounting parts to new compressor.
8. Install new compressor inexact same manner as
original compressor.
9. Reform both suction and discharge lines to align
with new compressor. If they are too short, use
additional lengths of tubing. Joints should overlap
0.5” to provide sufficient area for good solder joint.
Clean and mark area where tubing should be cut.
10. Cut tubing with tubing cutter. Work quickly to avoid
letting moisture and air into system.
11. Reassemble unit.
6-14
Capacitor
Controller
Grommet
Figure 6-30. Compressor Components
Component Teardown
Drain Pan Removal
The drain pan is secured with four screws to bottom of
the unit frame.
To remove the drain pan:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Extract the screws securing the compressor shield to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. The rear of the unit may need to be raised to access
the drain pan screws.
Grommet
Retainer
Use caution when tilting a freezer unit. Use
sturdy blocking materials that will not allow the
freezer to rock or tip over when servicing unit.
4. Using a short phillips head screwdriver, extract the
two screws securing the drain pan to the bottom of
the unit frame. (See Figure 6-31)
5. Position unit to access the front of the unit. Remove
kickplate.
6. The front of the unit may need to be raised to access
the drain pan screws.
7. Using a short phillips head screwdriver, extract the
two screws securing the drain pan to the bottom of
the unit frame. (See Figure 6-31)
8. Allow the drain pan to drop down. Pull drain tube
from drain pan.
9. Pull condenser tubes out of the retainers mounted to
the drain pan. Drain pan may now be removed from
the unit.
Screws
Screws
Figure 6-31. Condenser Drain Pan Removal
Bolts
Air Divider
Plastic
Retainers
Condenser Fan Motor Removal
The condenser fan motor is secured with three screws
to the condenser fan motor bracket. Two hooks and two
screws at the base of the condenser fan motor bracket
secure the assembly to the unit base. (See Figure 6-32)
Screws
Figure 6-32. Condenser Fan Motor Removal
To remove the condenser fan motor:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Extract the screws securing the compressor shield to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. Disconnect wire harness from the wire leads of
condenser fan at quick disconnect.
4. Remove the four drain pan screws. Allow the drain
pan to drop from its installation position.
5. With a needle nose pliers, reach behind air dividers
and compress the plastic retainers while pushing
them out of the condenser fan mounting bracket.
Remove air dividers.
6. Using a 1/4” socket or wrench, extract the two
bolts securing fan mounting bracket to unit frame.
7. Using a phillips head screwdriver, extract the three
screws securing the fan motor to the fan mounting
bracket.
8. Pull fan motor and fan blade out from behind the
mounting bracket. Remove fan blade by pulling the
fan blade from the motor shaft.
6-15
Component Teardown
Condenser Coil Removal
Cut Here
The condenser coil is mounted to the drain pan by four
retaining clips.
To remove the drain pan:
1. Pull unit from its installation position to access the
rear compressor area. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Extract the screws securing the compressor shield to
the unit frame and remove from unit.
3. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved recovery
system.
4. Remove condenser fan assembly from unit.
5. Disconnect inlet and outlet lines from condenser.
(See Figure 6-33)
6. The front of the unit will need to be raised to access
the drain pan screws.
7. Using a short phillips head screwdriver, extract the
four screws securing the drain pan to the bottom of
the unit frame.
8. Allow the drain pan to drop down. Pull drain tube
from drain pan.
9. Pull condenser tubes out of the retainers mounted to
the drain pan. Remove condenser from unit.
10. Replace old filter-drier after installing the new
condenser.
6-16
Figure 6-33. Condenser Coil Removal
Component Teardown
Freezer Exterior Components
Door Handle Removal
The door handle is secured with setscrews to the handle
mounting shoulder screws that are fastened into the front
of the door assembly.
To remove the handle, use a 3/32” allen wrench and
extract the setscrew located in each handle standoff.
Pull handle assembly from door assembly.
(See Figure 6-34)
Use a 5/32” allen wrench to extract the screw located
inside the handle standoff, that secures the handle
standoff to the handle.
Figure 6-34. Handle Removal
Kickplate Removal
Kickplate
The kickplate is secured with two screws to the lower
front of the unit.
To remove the kickplate, extract the screw from each end
of the kickplate with a phillips head screwdriver.
(See Figure 6-35)
Screws
Figure 6-35. Kickplate Removal
Door Hinge and Door Assembly Removal
Hinge
Cover
The door assembly is secured to the unit frame by an
upper and lower hinge assembly.
To remove the door assembly:
Bolts
Upper
Hinge
1. Gently lay freezer on its back on a soft clean
surface.
2. Remove kickplate.
3. Lift plastic cover off upper hinge assembly.
(See Figure 6-36)
4. Using a 3/8” socket or wrench, extract the two bolts
securing the upper hinge to the unit frame.
Figure 6-36. Upper Hinge Removal
5. Using a 3/8” socket or wrench, extract the two bolts
securing the lower hinge to the unit frame. Use a
phillips head screwdriver to extract the remaining
screw from the lower hinge assembly.
(See Figure 6-37)
6. Lift the door assembly off of the unit frame.
Figure 6-37. Lower Hinge Removal
6-17
Component Teardown
Door Bin Removal
There are two door bins that can be arranged as needed
by the user.
To remove a door bin, lift the bin straight up until it is free
of the supports molded into the door liner, then pull from
unit. (See Figure 6-38)
Tilt Out Wire Shelf Removal
Figure 6-38. Door Shelf Guard Removal
The tilt out wire shelves have a bar that locates in the end
caps that enable the wire shelves to tilt outward. The end
caps have two standoffs that snap into holes in the inner
panel.
To remove the tilt out wire shelves:
1. Flex the inner panel outward and lift the wire shelf
out of the end cap. Then pull the opposite end of the
wire shelf out of the opposite end cap.
(See Figure 6-39)
2. The end caps are removed by simply pulling the end
caps out of the inner panel.
End Cap
Door Stop Assembly Removal
Wire Tilt-out Shelf
The door stop is secured to with two screws the
underside of the door assembly.
End Cap
Figure 6-39. Door Lock Removal
To remove the door stop:
Door Frame
1. Remove door from unit.
2. Extract the two screws securing the door stop to the
bottom of the door assembly. (See Figure 6-40) Door
stop assembly is now free.
Screws
Door Stop
Hinge Bearing
Figure 6-40. Door Stop Removal
6-18
Component Teardown
Door Gasket and Inner Panel Removal
Outer
Door
Panel
The inner panel of the door assembly is secured with
screws that pass through the inner panel and fasten
into the door assembly. The door gasket has an inner
lip that is pressed between the inner panel and the door
assembly and is secured in position when the inner panel
screws are fastened to the door assembly. The inner
panel does not have to be completely removed to extract
the door gasket from the door assembly.
To remove the door gasket:
1. Lift the inside edge of the door gasket to access the
inner panel screws.
2. Loosen the inner panel screws until the door gasket
can be pulled out from under the inner panel.
(See Figure 6-41)
3. Continue loosening screws around door assembly
until door gasket is free.
4. To remove the inner panel, extract all screws from
the outside edge of the inner panel and remove from
unit.
5. The secondary gasket is secured with two retaining
clips that snap into the inner door panel. Pry out
the two retaining clips with a small putty knife, using
caution not to damage the inner door panel. The
secondary gasket is now free.
Inner Panel
Clip
Door Switch Removal
The door switch is mounted inside a hole in the cabinet
base along the lower left hand side. (See Figure 6-42)
Secondary
Gasket
Door
Gasket
Clip
Screw
Figure 6-41. Inner Panel and Door Gasket Removal
To remove the door switch:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove kickplate.
3. Reach into the access hole next to the door switch
and disconnect the electrical leads from the door
switch terminals.
4. Press in on the retaining latch on the switch body
and push switch through hole in cabinet base.
Door Switch
Access Hole
Figure 6-42. Door Switch Removal
6-19
Component Teardown
Interior Components
Adjustable Interior Shelves
Multi-position adjustable interior shelves can be moved
to any position for larger or smaller packages. The
cantilever shelves are supported at the back of the
refrigerator. (See Figure 6-43) Replace the shelf by
inserting the hooks at the rear of the shelf into the wall
bracket. Lower the shelf into the desired slots and lock
into position.
Figure 6-43. Interior Shelving Removal
To remove the shelf assemblies:
1. Lift front edge up.
2. Pull shelf out.
Freezer Drawer Assembly Removal
Drawer
Frame
Bracket
The freezer drawer assembly can be lifted off of the
supports and pulled from the freezer compartment. The
drawer may now be removed from the drawer slides.
(See Figure 6-44)
To remove the freezer drawers:
1. Remove the lowest adjustable interior shelf.
2. Lift up on the front of the drawer assembly and lift
upwards until the bracket releases from the supports
mounted to the liner sidewalls. Then pull assembly
out of the cabinet interior.
3. Remove the glass shelf.
4. Remove crisper drawer from slides by inserting a flat
bladed screwdriver just behind the clip between the
drawer and rail and gently twisting up. The clip will
release and the drawer will be free.
5. The drawer slides are secured with two tabs that
lock into the drawer frame brackets. Push drawer
slide upwards until the front tab releases, then pull
drawer slide forward until rear tab disengages.
Drawer slide is now free.
6. The bracket is secured with two screws to the
drawer frame. Extract the two screws to separate
the bracket and drawer frame.
7. The supports are secured with two screws to the
compartment sidewall. Extract the screws and
remove the supports.
6-20
Drawer Slide
Drawer Frame
Glass Shelf
Support
Screws
Drawer
Support
Drawer Slide
Figure 6-44. Glass Shelf and Wire Basket
Assemblies Removal
Component Teardown
Air Filter Removal
Push the plastic bubble tab at the back of the control
box housing. This releases the hinged bottom half to
drop open. Remove the old filter and discard it.
Unpackage the new filter and place it inside the hinged
bottom half of the housing. Push the hinged bottom half
upward until the tab snaps into closed position.
(See Figure 6-45)
Control Box Removal
The control box is secured with three screws to the top
front of the refrigerated compartment and has sealant
along the front face to prevent ambient air from reaching
the compartment thermistor.
Figure 6-45. Light Shield and Fixture Removal
To remove the control box:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove the adjustable shelves.
3. Extract the three screws securing the control box to
the compartment ceiling. (See Figure 6-46)
4. Pull forward on the control box until the sealant
breaks. Use caution not to strain the wire harness
connections.
5. Disconnect wire harness from control box at the
quick disconnects. Control box is now free.
Screw
Light Fixture Removal
To remove the light fixture:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove control box from refrigerated compartment.
Remove light bulbs by turning counter-clockwise.
Disconnect wire leads from light fixture terminals.
Press on the retaining latches securing the light
fixture to the control box while pushing the light
fixture through the cutout in the control box.
(See Figure 6-48)
Figure 6-46. Control Box Removal
Screws
Control
Control Box
Light
Fixture
Control Removal
To remove the control:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove control box from refrigerated compartment.
3. Extract the two screws securing the control to the
control box. (See Figure 6-47)
4. Pull the front of the control box away from the
control while pulling the control up and out from its
installation position.
5. Disconnect the two wire harness connections from
the control board. Control is now free.
6-21
Control Box
Overlay
Figure 6-47. Light Fixture and Control Removal
Component Teardown
Baffle Plate Removal
To remove the baffle plate, remove any shelves that block
access to the baffle. Then push towards the center from
one end while pulling away from the back wall.
(See Figure 6-48)
Ice Maker Removal
Baffle Plate
The icemaker is mounted with two 1/4” hex head
screws to the upper left hand corner of the freezer
compartment. (See Figure 6-49)
Figure 6-48. Baffle Plate Removal
To remove the ice maker:
Electrical Connection
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove uppermost glass shelf and ice bucket. If
needed, remove all the adjustable shelves for easier
access to the ice maker.
3. Using a 1/4” extended socket or nut driver, extract
the two screws securing the ice maker to the left
sidewall of the unit.
4. Disconnect wire leads from icemaker at the quick
disconnect mounted in the upper left corner of the
freezer compartment.
Screws
Figure 6-49. Ice Maker Removal
Evaporator Cover Removal
The evaporator cover is secured with screws to the
back wall and bottom of the freezer compartment. The
evaporator cover has a gasket on each side to create
proper airflow in the compartment. (See Figure 6-50)
Gasket
1 of 2 shown
To remove the evaporator cover:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove the adjustable shelves.
Remove the freezer drawers and supports.
Using a phillips head screwdriver, extract the ten
(10) screws securing the evaporator cover to the
freezer compartment.
5. Carefully pull the evaporator cover away from the
back wall enough to access the wire harness
connections to the light fixtures. Use caution not to
damage the gaskets on both sides of the evaporator
cover. The gaskets may be removed to aid in pulling
the evaporator cover away from the back wall.
6. From behind the evaporator cover, disconnect
the wire leads from the light fixture terminals. the
evaporator cover may now be removed from the
refrigerated compartment.
6-22
Screws
Figure 6-50. Evaporator Cover Removal
Component Teardown
Mid Level Lighting Removal
The mid level lighting components may be accessed
without the evaporator cover being completely removed
from the compartment. By pulling the top of evaporator
cover away from the rear wall, the light wire harness
connections and light fixture may be accessed.
To remove the mid level lighting on the evaporator cover:
1. Disconnect power from unit.
2. Remove the lens from the lamp housing by
unsnapping it from the lamp housing using your
fingers or a screwdriver. Be careful not to break the
locking tabs on the lamp housing. (See Figure 6-51)
3. Remove bulb by turning counterclockwise.
4. Remove evaporator cover or remove screws and pull
away top of cover enough to access components
mounted to rear of cover, then disconnect the wire
leads from the light fixture terminals.
5. Remove light fixture by pressing in the retaining
latches and pushing the light fixture through the
evaporator cover.
Figure 6-51. Mid Level Lighting Removal
Thermistor Removal
The evaporator cover does not need to be completely
removed to access the thermistor wire harness
connections and mounting screw, however, removing the
evaporator cover from the unit will make the task easier.
Thermistor
Screw
To remove the thermostat control:
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove the adjustable shelves.
Remove the freezer drawers and supports.
Remove the evaporator cover screws, then pull the
top of the evaporator cover away from the back wall
enough to access the thermistor mounting screw and
electrical connection.
5. Extract the screw securing the thermistor to the back
wall of the cabinet interior. (See Figure 6-52)
6. Disconnect thermistor from wire harness at the quick
disconnect. Thermistor is now free.
Electrical
Connection
Ground
Wire
1.
2.
3.
4.
Figure 6-52. Thermistor Removal
NOTE: The lighting wire harness is not shown for clarity.
6-23
Component Teardown
Evaporator Fan Assembly Removal
The evaporator fan assembly consists of the fan motor
mount bracket, fan motor and fan blade. Two screws
secure the fan motor to the fan motor mount bracket. The
evaporator fan assembly is then secured with two screws
to the back wall of the freezer compartment.
(See Figure 6-53)
Fan Motor
Fan Blade
Screws
To remove the evaporator fan assembly:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove the adjustable shelves.
Remove the freezer drawers and supports.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Remove wires from retaining clips mounted on the
fan motor mounting bracket. Disconnect the
electrical leads of fan motor at quick disconnect.
6. Using a 5/16” socket or nut driver, extract the two
hex head screws securing the fan motor mounting
bracket to the back wall of the unit.
7. Separate the fan motor from the mounting bracket by
extracting the two hex head screws securing the fan
motor to mounting bracket.
8. Pull fan blade from fan motor shaft.
Electrical
Connection
Screws
Fan Motor
Mounting
Bracket
Figure 6-53. Evaporator Fan Assembly Removal
Defrost Thermostat Removal
The defrost thermostat is secured with a retaining clip to
the upper left corner of the evaporator assembly. The
defrost thermostat and wire harness connections may be
accessed without completely removing the evaporator
cover. The top of the evaporator cover may be pulled
away from the rear of the cabinet interior enough to
remove the defrost terminator and disconnect the wire
harness connections. (See Figure 6-54)
Disconnect Here
Defrost
Thermostat
To remove the defrost thermostat:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove the adjustable shelves.
Remove the freezer drawers and supports.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Disconnect the defrost thermostat wire leads from
the wire harness. (See Figure 5-48)
6. Pull the defrost thermostat off of the evaporator
outlet tubing.
Figure 6-54. Defrost Thermostat Removal
Freezer defrost thermostats must be installed on the
evaporator outlet tubing.
6-24
Component Teardown
Defrost Heater Removal
Disconnect Here
The defrost heater is secured with two aluminum straps
to the bottom tube of the evaporator assembly.
(See Figure 6-55)
To remove the defrost heater:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Disconnect power from unit.
Remove the adjustable shelves.
Remove the freezer drawers and supports.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Disconnect the defrost heater wire leads from the
wire harness. (See Figure 5-49)
6. Release the aluminum straps securing the defrost
heater to the bottom of the evaporator assembly.
7. Remove the styrofoam insulators from both sides of
the evaporator.
8. Pull defrost heater from evaporator assembly.
Styrofoam
Styrofoam
Defrost Heater
Aluminum Straps
Figure 6-55. Defrost Heater Removal
Evaporator Removal
The evaporator sets upon the two screw standoffs
mounted to the back wall of the freezer compartment.
Two pieces of styrofoam are pressed between the
evaporator assembly and the sidewalls of the unit,
securing the assembly in position. (See Figure 6-56)
To remove the evaporator:
Screw Standoffs
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Remove the cantilever shelves.
Remove the glass shelf and side rails.
Remove wire baskets and slides.
Remove the evaporator cover.
Remove the styrofoam insulators from both sides of
the evaporator.
6. Remove the defrost thermostat and defrost heater.
7. Recover refrigerant by using EPA approved
recovery system.
Heat Exchanger
Figure 6-56. Evaporator Removal
Whenever the sealed system is opened the filter-drier
must be replaced.
8. Remove the filter-drier.
9. Cut suction line about 1” from compressor.
10. Straighten the tubing, remove the foam sleeve, and
carefully feed the heat exchanger through the
cabinet while pulling up on the evaporator.
6-25
Component Teardown
Notes
6-26
Parts List
All Freezer Pro Door Exploded View Model E32AF75FPS
Ref #
1
9
11
12
13
18
18*
21A
26
27
27*
59
64
72
72A
73
74
79
80
80A
93
Part #
216522309
216527902
297316549
241603101
216974400
241637912
241601001
5304460608
216524201
5304472186
5304406520
216974500
216403700
297118100
297118200
216513900
216514000
218755401
218755504
216514300
5304460605
Description
Gasket-door, white
#
Panel-inner door, frzr
Panel-outer door, stainless, LH
*
Label, nameplate, elux/icon
Door Stop
Handle Assembly, stainless, w/endcaps
Wrench, allen
Screw, flat head, #1/4-20, door stop/hng
Gasket, secondary
Clip, panel mtg
Clip, panel mtg kit, (40)
Bearing, door closer
Plug-button, hole filler, door base
Shelf, tilt out, wire
Shelf, tiltout, short, wire
End Cap, shelf, LH, tilt-out
End Cap, shelf, RH, tilt-out
Screw-set, 10-32 x 0.375
Screw-shoulder, #10 AB, handle mounting
Bin-door, adjustable, (2)
Screw, ph truss head, 8-18AB x 0.500
7-1
Functional Parts
Non-Illustrated Parts
Parts List
All Freezer Pro Cabinet Exploded View Model E32AF75FPS
7-2
Parts List
Ref #
3
5
6
9
13 #
14
15A
16A
19
25
26
26*
26B
26C
26E
29
32
34A
34B
35
37
38
40
41
42
47
47A
50
63
63*
63*
71A
72
93
93A
*
131
148
148A
154
155
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
177
*
*
*
#
*
Part #
216503100
297259600
297200600
297200100
297250000
216822900
297048600
297139501
216204902
297099254
297091600
297142600
297091801
297091704
297099400
216313501
5308005500
297053102
297053200
216273000
297273900
297283800
297164402
240578902
297108901
297133000
297102700
08013207
216396900
297164650
297164651
297146800
297036900
5304460605
297174300
216327800
297108300
297271700
297271701
297053000
5303313703
216912401
297280400
297092700
297092701
297107602
297107603
297099500
297116000
216910405
297001704
297114600
Description
Screen-drain
Fan Blade, evaporator
Breaker Kit w/corners, no lock slot
Breaker Kit w/corners, 32”, top and bottom
Motor, fan, 115 V
Switch, light/lamp, ramp
Light Bulb/Lamp, short
Socket, light/lamp, 25 W
Gasket-evap cover
Cover-evaporator
Case-crisper, shallow
Screw, blunt, 8-32 x 5/8
Panel, crisper window
Panel, crisper front
Divider-crisper, shallow
Hose-drain
Drain
Shield-light
Lens, light
Clip, drain hose
Trim-cabinet corner, white, (2)
Hinge-upper
Cover-hinge, silver
Screw, hex head, 1/4-20 x 5/8
Shelf-sliding
Baffle-plate
Insert-pan cover, glass
Bracket-fan motor
Screw, leveling foot, plastic, adjustable
Bracket, LH leg levelor
Bracket, RH leg levelor
Screw, 8-18AB x 0.470
Grille/Kickplate, 32”, white
Screw, ph truss head, 8-18AB x 0.500
Screw, #8, 18x.63, self pierce
Clip, wire
Channel-shelf mtg, side, (2)
Frame-crisper cover, upper
Frame-crisper cover, lower
Wire, jumper
Clip, (2)
Screw, hex washer head, 8-32 x 0.500, bracket fan mtr, (2)
Valve, breather
Bracket, crisper cover, RH
Bracket, crisper cover, LH
Slide, crisper, RH
Slide, crisper, LH
Support-crisper
Electronics, theater lgt
Energy Guide
Insulation, 24”, drain tube
Instructions, installation, icemaker
Functional Parts
Non-Illustrated Parts
7-3
Parts List
All Freezer Pro System Exploded View Model E32AF75FPS
7-4
Parts List
Ref #
1#
2
4
5#
14 #
15 #
15A
15B
16
17
18
19
20
27
29 #
30
31
32
35
43B
55 #
57
60
61
86
87
93
107
130
136
141
141A
146
146*
151#
158
205
206
*
*
*
*
*
*
*#
#
*
Part #
297152200
5308000110
216987500
297171400
216730700
216997300
297217900
297114000
241507803
297110300
297078701
297078801
297216600
297293300
297270420
216954224
297165800
216649200
297177200
297315800
218909912
297110801
241584301
241639501
216036601
5304463290
5304460605
297165400
297244700
240405201
297164200
297194700
297164000
216337701
297334100
297111000
297108500
241504902
216502500
240555002
297014500
297108000
297110400
297174300
297169900
Description
Condenser, dynamic
Strap-evap/heater, aluminum, (2)
Drier-filter
Harness-main
Heater-defrost
Evaporator
Heat Exchanger, suct/cap tube
Light Bulb, short, blue tint, 40W
Socket-light
Box-control, front
Insulator-evap, styrofoam, RH
Insulator-evap, styrofoam, LH
Thermostat, defrost
Grommet, compressor
Compressor, w/o electricals
Controller, compressor
Pan-drain
Clip, controller
Bolt, compressor
Clip, wire
Capacitor, run, 220 VAC, 12 microfarad
Overlay-control box
Motor-condenser fan
Blade-condenser fan
Screw, RWHD, 8-32A x 0.500, GX-CA
Screw, hi-lo blunt, #8-18X1/2
Screw, ph truss head, 8-18AB x 0.500
Shield, compressor, Compartment
Support, evaporator mtg
Grommet, rubber, black, cond tube/wire
Divider, air flow
Divider, small, air flow
Shroud-fan orfice
Screw, HWH, 10-24 x 0.500, Swage
Electronic control, assy
Standoff
Cap-air filter
Filter-air
Sleeve, suction line
Screw-#8-32 X 3/8
Plug-suction line
Jumper-wire, electronic w/lt
Thermistor
Screw, #8, 18x.63, self pierce
Cord-power, flat
Functional Parts
Non-Illustrated Parts
7-5
Parts List
Ice Maker Exploded View Model E32AF75FPS
7-6
Parts List
Ref #
Part #
1
1*
2
3
4
5
6
7#
7*
8
9
10
11 #
12
13
14
15 #
16
17
18
18*
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
36*
51
55 #
60
61
62
65
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
297044902
240561701
5304456650
5304456657
5304456658
5304456659
5304456691
5304445222
5304445223
5304456661
5304456662
5304456689
5304456663
5304456664
5304456665
5304455676
5304456667
5304456668
5304456669
5304456670
240352602
5304456671
5304455677
5304456672
5304456673
5304456674
5304456675
5304456676
5304455680
5304456677
5304456660
5304456678
5304456679
5304456680
5304456681
5304456682
5304456683
5304456684
5304456685
5304456690
216887500
241803701
218362501
5304456686
5304456687
240385201
241642503
241642601
241806601
297114101
5304456666
5304456688
5304456692
5304456693
5304456737
IM501
Description
Tube-water inlet, inlet valve, to ice maker
Seal-water inlet, inlet valve, to ice maker
Spring-shutoff arm, ice maker
Nameplate
#
Functional Parts
Gear
*
Non-Illustrated Parts
Plate-mounting
Screw, M 3x20 #3, valve plate
Motor-ice maker Svo
Spring Beam
Spacer-hold switch
Cam
Washer, nylon
Thermal Cutoff, ice maker, complete assy
Harness-wiring
Thermostat, ice maker
Screw, plask, 4x14x3/4
Switch-micro, (3)
Support
Mold-ice maker, w/therm cut off
Ejector-ice
Wiring Harness, internal, wiring harness
Bearing & Inlet, fill cup
Screw, 8-32 x 3/8
Ice Stripper
Shut-off Arm
Screw, M 4x25 #2, mold-to-support, (2)
Lever Arm
Screw, M 4x12.8 #2, lever arm/sprt
Screw, plask, 4-14 x 3/8
Screw, M 3x25 #3, hold switch mtg, (2)
Screw, M 4x6 #2
Screw, M 3x12 #3, (2)
Screw-timing adj, M 4x25 #3
Insulator
Plate-valve switch
Spring, timing adjust
Screw, M 4x12 #2, (3)
Screw
Cover-ice maker
Label, ID plate
Tube, water, ice maker
Valve-water, single solenoid, 60 Hz, 105/120 V
Screw, hex washer head, 8-18AB x 1.250, spacer, (2)
Bracket-leveling, ice maker
Screw-IM brkt mtg, pan hd phillips, 8-32T x 0.375
Container, ice bin
Ice Maker, radius cube, 115 V, Svce
Harness-wiring Svo
Connector-water, straight
Adapter-water supply, nut & sleeve, compression ftg
Screw, M 3x20 #2, (6)
Terminal
Washer
Nut, M 3.5
Washer
Ice Maker Kit
7-7
Parts List
All Refrigerator Pro Door Exploded View Model E32AR75FPS
7-8
Parts List
Ref #
1
7
9
11
12
13
18
18*
21A
26
27
27*
27A
48C
48D
49
59
64
79
80
93
Part #
216522309
240338313
216953601
297316548
241603101
5303271076
241637912
241601001
5304460608
216524201
5304472186
5304406520
240396102
297108200
240396302
297107801
216974500
216403700
218755401
218755504
5304460605
#
*
Description
Gasket-door, white
Door, dairy, clear
Panel-inner door, refr
Panel-outer door, stainless, RH
Label, nameplate, elux/icon
Door Stop
Handle Assembly, stainless, w/endcaps
Wrench, allen
Screw, flat head, #1/4-20, door stop/hng
Gasket, secondary
Clip, panel mtg
Clip, panel mtg kit, (40)
Retainer, tall bottle
Bin-door, gallon
Snugger, paddle type
Bin-door, 2-liter
Bearing, door closer
Plug-button, hole filler, door base
Screw-set, 10-32 x 0.375
Screw-shoulder, #10 AB, handle mounting
Screw, ph truss head, 8-18AB x 0.500
Functional Parts
Non-Illustrated Parts
7-9
Parts List
All Refrigerator Pro Cabinet Exploded View Model E32AR75FPS
7-10
Parts List
Ref #
Part #
3
5
6
9
13 #
14
15A
16A
19
25
26
26A
26B
26C
26E
26F
26G
27A
28
29
32
34A
34B
35
37
38
40
41
42
47
47A
47B
50
62
63
63*
63*
71A
72
93
93A
*
131
148
148A
152
154
155
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
177
*
*
*
216503100
297259600
297200600
297200100
297250000
216822900
297048600
297139501
216204902
297099254
297091600
297091601
297091800
297091703
297099400
297099401
297123700
240362201
297179300
216313501
5308005500
297053102
297053200
216273000
297273900
297283800
297164402
240578902
297108901
297133000
297102700
297102701
08013207
297142600
216396900
297164650
297164651
297146800
297036900
5304460605
297174300
216327800
297130200
297271700
297271702
216974600
297053000
5303313703
216912401
297280400
297092700
297092701
297107602
297107603
297099500
297116000
297001704
5303305324
297226504
Description
Screen-drain
# Functional Parts
Fan Blade, evaporator
* Non-Illustrated Parts
Breaker Kit w/corners, no lock slot
Breaker Kit w/corners, 32”, top and bottom
Motor, fan, 115 V
Switch, light/lamp, ramp
Light Bulb/Lamp, short
Socket, light/lamp, 25 W
Gasket-evap cover
Cover-evaporator
Case-crisper, shallow
Case-crisper, deep
Panel, crisper window
Panel, crisper front
Divider-crisper, shallow
Divider-crisper, deep
Case-deli
Control-humidity
Hinge, bottom/RH
Hose-drain
Drain
Shield-light
Lens, light
Clip, drain hose
Trim-cabinet corner, white, (2)
Hinge-upper
Cover-hinge, silver
Screw, hex head, 1/4-20 x 5/8
Shelf-sliding
Baffle-plate
Insert-pan cover, glass
Insert-pan cover, glass, lower
Bracket-fan motor
Screw, blunt, 8-32 x 5/8
Screw, leveling foot, plastic, adjustable
Bracket, LH leg levelor
Bracket, RH leg levelor
Screw, 8-18AB x 0.470
Grille/Kickplate, 32”, white
Screw, ph truss head, 8-18AB x 0.500
Screw, #8, 18x.63, self pierce
Clip, wire
Channel-shelf mtg, side, (2)
Frame-crisper cover
Frame-crisper cover, lower
Bearing, hinge closer
Wire, jumper
Clip, (2)
Screw, hex washer head, 8-32 x 0.500, bracket fan mtr, (2)
Valve, breather
Bracket, crisper cover, RH
Bracket, crisper cover, LH
Slide, crisper, RH
Slide, crisper, LH
Support-crisper
Electronics, theater lgt
Insulation, 24”, drain tube
Paint, touch-up, white
Energy Guide
7-11
Parts List
All Refrigerator Pro System Exploded View Model E32AR75FPS
7-12
Parts List
Ref #
Part #
1
2
4#
5#
14 #
15 #
15A
15B
16
*
17
17*
18
19
20
27
29 #
30
31
32
35
43B
55 #
57
60
61
86
87
93
107
130
136
137#
138
139
141
141A
146
146*
151#
153
154
154*
155
156
157
158
198
199
199*
205
206
*
*
*
*
*#
297152200
5308000110
216938600
297171500
216730700
216997300
297319400
297114000
241507803
297108000
297110301
5304455649
297078701
297078801
216731001
297293300
297270400
216954229
297165800
216649200
297177200
297315800
218909912
297110901
241584301
241639501
216036601
5304463290
5304460605
297165400
216486800
240405201
242007905
240397301
240396002
297164200
297194700
297164000
216337701
297334200
297110200
297112901
297130900
241518001
297110100
297110500
297111000
240397401
240397501
240398401
297108500
241504902
216502500
240555002
297110400
297174300
297169901
Description
Condenser, dynamic
Strap-evap/heater, aluminum, (2)
Drier-filter
Harness-main
Heater-defrost
Evaporator
Heat Exchanger
Light Bulb, short, blue tint, 40W
Socket-light
Jumper-wire, electronic w/lt
Box-control, front
Screw, pan hd, 6-20 x 0.438
Insulator-evap, styrofoam, RH
Insulator-evap, styrofoam, LH
Thermostat, defrost
Grommet, compressor
Compressor, w/o electricals
Controller, compressor
Pan-drain
Clip, controller
Bolt, compressor
Clip, wire
Capacitor, run, 220 VAC, 12 microfarad
Overlay-control box
Motor-condenser fan
Blade-condenser fan
Screw, RWHD, 8-32A x 0.500, GX-CA
Screw, hi-lo blunt, #8-18X1/2
Screw, ph truss head, 8-18AB x 0.500
Shield, compressor, Compartment
Support, evaporator mtg
Grommet, rubber, black, cond tube/wire
Filter, water, carbon cassette, front, with o’rings
Button-filter release
Base-water filter
Divider, air flow
Divider, small, air flow
Shroud-fan orfice
Screw, HWH, 10-24 x 0.500, Swage
Electronic control, assy
Hose-junction attachment
Hose, water inlet
Cap, hose attachment
Nut, 1/2-20, nylon, water hose, (2)
Retainer, hose junction
Raceway, water filter
Standoff
Retainer
Rod
Spring-filter release rod
Cap-air filter
Filter-air
Sleeve, suction line
Screw-#8-32 X 3/8
Thermistor
Screw, #8, 18x.63, self pierce
Cord-power, flat
7-13
# Functional Parts
* Non-Illustrated Parts
Parts List
Notes
7-14
Troubleshooting
Problem
Freezer/refrigerator
compressor does not
run.
Freezer/refrigerator runs
too much or too long.
Interior freezer/
refrigerator temperature
is too cold.
Correction
Cause
Unit is plugged into a circuit that has a
ground fault interrupt.
Use another circuit. Check circuit for proper
voltage.
Temperature control is in the “OFF”
position.
Set control to a temperature setting. Instruct
customer.
Unit may not be plugged in, or plug
may be loose.
Ensure plug is tightly pushed into outlet.
House fuse blown or tripped
circuit breaker.
Check/replace fuse with a 15 amp time delay
fuse. Reset circuit breaker.
Power outage.
Check house lights. Call local Electric Company.
Room or outside weather is hot.
It’s normal for the freezer/refrigerator to work
harder under these conditions.
Unit has recently been disconnected
for a period of time.
It takes 4 hours for the unit to cool down
completely.
Large amount of warm or hot food
have been stored recently.
Warm food will cause unit to run more until the
desired temperature is reached.
Door is opened too frequently or kept
open too long.
Warm air entering the unit causes it to run more.
Open the door less often.
Unit door may be slightly open.
See Problem section “Door will not close”.
Temperature control is set too low.
Set control to a warmer setting. Allow several
hours for the temperature to stabilize.
Freezer/refrigerator gaskets are dirty,
worn, cracked or poorly fitted.
Clean or change gasket. Leaks in the door seal
will cause unit to run longer in order to maintain
desired temperature.
Temperature control is set too low.
Set control to a warmer setting. Allow several
hours for the temperature to stabilize.
Temperature control is set too warm.
Interior freezer/
refrigerator
temperature is too warm.
Door is opened too frequently or kept
open too long.
Freezer/refrigerator
external surface
temperature is warm.
Set control to a colder setting. Allow several
hours for the temperature to stabilize.
Warm air entering the unit causes it to run more.
Open the door less often.
Unit door may be slightly open.
See Problem section “Door will not close”.
Large amount of warm or hot food
have been stored recently.
Wait until the unit has had a chance to reach its
selected temperature.
Unit has recently been disconnected
for a period of time.
Unit requires 24 hours to cool down
completely.
The external freezer/refrigerator walls
can be as much as 30ºF warmer than
room temperature.
This is normal while the compressor works to
transfer heat from inside the unit cabinet.
8-1
Troubleshooting
Problem
Cause
Correction
Louder sound levels
whenever Freezer/
refrigerator is on.
Modern Freezers have increased
storage capacity and more stable
temperatures. They require heavy duty
compressors.
This is normal. When the surrounding noise
level is low, you might hear the compressor
running while it cools the interior.
Louder sound levels
when compressor
comes on.
Freezer/refrigerator operates at higher
pressures during the start of the ON
cycle.
This is normal. Sound will level off or disappear
as freezer/refrigerator continues to run.
Popping or cracking
Metal parts undergo expansion and
sound when compressor contraction, as in hot water pipes.
comes on.
This is normal. Sound will level off or disappear
as freezer/refrigerator continues to run.
Bubbling or gurgling
sound.
Refrigerant used to cool the unit is
circulating throughout system.
This is normal.
Vibrating or rattling
noise.
Freezer/refrigerator is not level. It rocks
on the floor when it is moved slightly.
Level the freezer/refrigerator.
Floor is uneven or weak.
Ensure floor can adequately support unit. Level
the unit by putting wood or metal shims under
part of the unit
Freezer/refrigerator is touching the wall.
Re-level freezer/refrigerator or move slightly.
Moisture forms on inside Weather is hot and humid, which
increases internal rate of frost build-up.
Freezer/refrigerator
walls.
Door is slightly open.
Odors in Freezer/
refrigerator.
Light bulb is not on.
See Problem section “Door will not close”.
Door is opened too frequently or kept
open too long.
Open the door less often.
Interior needs to be cleaned.
Clean interior with sponge, warm water, and
baking soda. Replace air filter.
Cover the food tightly.
Foods with strong odors are in the
Freezer.
Door will not close.
This is normal.
Freezer/refrigerator is not level. It rocks
on the floor when it is moved slightly.
This condition can force the cabinet out of
square and misalign the door. Level unit.
Floor is uneven or weak.
Ensure floor can adequately support unit. Level
the unit by putting wood or metal shims under
part of the unit.
The fluorescent lamp or light bulb is
burned out.
Replace lamp or light bulb.
Automatic ice maker not No electric current is reaching the
working. (Some freezer freezer/refrigerator.
models)
See Problem section “Freezer/refrigerator
compressor does not run” on previous page.
1. Ensure the wire signal arm is not in the UP
position.
2. Water supply is turned off.
3. Water pressure is too low.
4. The freezer is not cold enough.
Ice maker is not working
8-2
Troubleshooting
The following table relates to troubleshooting the thermostat, electronic components and compressor with its
associated components.
Problem
Correction
Cause
1. Is the temperature control set to
off?
Yes. Set control from 1 to 7
No. Go to step 3.
2. Measure the input voltage to the
electronic control. Is line to neutral
voltage being applied?
Yes. Replace defective electronic control.
No. Defective wire harness.
3. Disconnect the wiring harness
from the compressor controller
and measure the voltage drop
between the two wires in the
harness. Does the meter read line
to neutral voltage?
Yes. Replace defective compressor controller
or compressor and evaporator fan motor.
No. Replace defective electronic control.
Compressor does not
run, but the evaporator
fan motor does.
1. Check voltage at compressor.
2. Defective compressor or
compressor controller.
1a. No voltage. Defective wire harness.
1b. Voltage. Replace compressor controller.
2. Replace compressor controller. If problem
is not corrected replace compressor.
Evaporator fan motor
does not run,but the
compressor operates.
1. Is there something blocking the
fan blade?
Yes. Remove restriction from fan blade.
No. Replace defective fan motor.
Interior light does not
glow when door is
opened.
1. Check the light bulb with an
ohmmeter. Is the bulb good?
Yes. Replace defective door switch.
No. Replace light bulb.
Compressor runs
continuously, but freezer
is not cold.
1. Connect a low side gauge to the
processing tube on the
compressor. Is the pressure in a
vacuum or lower than normal?
Yes. System low on refrigerant, check for leak
in system before adding refrigerant.
No. Replace defective compressor.
Compressor runs
continuously and the
freezer/refrigerator is too
cold.
1. Check error code.
See Section 3 Electronic Control
Freezer/refrigerator does
not automatically defrost.
1. Defective timer.
Yes. Check/replace defrost thermostat.
Yes. Check/replace defrost heater.
No. Replace defrost timer.
Compressor and
evaporator fan motor
does not run.
8-3
Troubleshooting
Notes
8-4
Wiring Schematics
Ice Maker Schematic
9-1
Wiring Schematics
All Freezer Pro Wiring Diagram
9-2
Wiring Schematics
All Refrigerator Pro Wiring Diagram
9-3
Wiring Schematics
Notes
9-4