ZyXEL Communications ES-3024 User`s guide

Dimension
ES-3024
Ethernet Switch
June 2003
Version 1
User’s Guide
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by ZyXEL Communications Corporation
The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in any part or as a whole, transcribed, stored in a retrieval
system, translated into any language, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
magnetic, optical, chemical, photocopying, manual, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of ZyXEL
Communications Corporation.
Published by ZyXEL Communications Corporation. All rights reserved.
Disclaimer
ZyXEL does not assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any products, or software described
herein. Neither does it convey any license under its patent rights nor the patents rights of others. ZyXEL further
reserES-3024 the right to make changes in any products described herein without notice. This publication is
subject to change without notice.
Trademarks
Trademarks mentioned in this publication are used for identification purposes only and may be properties of their
respective owners.
ii
Copyright
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
ZyXEL Limited Warranty
ZyXEL warrants to the original end user (purchaser) that this product is free from any defects in materials or
workmanship for a period of up to two (2) years from the date of purchase. During the warranty period and upon
proof of purchase, should the product have indications of failure due to faulty workmanship and/or materials,
ZyXEL will, at its discretion, repair or replace the defective products or components without charge for either
parts or labor and to whatever extent it shall deem necessary to restore the product or components to proper
operating condition. Any replacement will consist of a new or re-manufactured functionally equivalent product of
equal value, and will be solely at the discretion of ZyXEL. This warranty shall not apply if the product is
modified, misused, tampered with, damaged by an act of God, or subjected to abnormal working conditions.
Note
Repair or replacement, as provided under this warranty, is the exclusive remedy of the purchaser. This warranty is
in lieu of all other warranties, express or implied, including any implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for
a particular use or purpose. ZyXEL shall in no event be held liable for indirect or consequential damages of any
kind of character to the purchaser.
To obtain the services of this warranty, contact ZyXEL's Service Center for your Return Material Authorization
number (RMA). Products must be returned Postage Prepaid. It is recommended that the unit be insured when
shipped. Any returned products without proof of purchase or those with an out-dated warranty will be repaired or
replaced (at the discretion of ZyXEL) and the customer will be billed for parts and labor. All repaired or replaced
products will be shipped by ZyXEL to the corresponding return address, Postage Paid. This warranty giES-3024
you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights that vary from country to country.
ZyXEL Limited Warranty
iii
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Interference Statements and Warnings
FCC Interference Statement
This switch complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) This switch may not cause harmful interference.
(2) This switch must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operations.
FCC Warning
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital switch, pursuant to Part
15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in which
case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
CE Mark Warning:
This is a class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case the
user may be required to take adequate measures.
Taiwanese BSMI (Bureau of Standards, Metrology and Inspection) A Warning:
Certifications
Refer to the product page at www.zyxel.com.
iv
Interference Statements and Warnings
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Customer Support
If you have questions about your ZyXEL product or desire assistance, contact ZyXEL Communications
Corporation offices worldwide, in one of the following ways:
Contacting Customer Support
When you contact your customer support representative, have the following information ready:
♦ Product model and serial number.
♦ Firmware version information.
♦ Warranty information.
♦ Date you received your product.
♦ Brief description of the problem and the steps you took to solve it.
METHOD
LOCATION
WORLDWIDE
E-MAIL: SUPPORT
TELEPHONE
WEB SITE
SALES
FAX
FTP SITE
support@zyxel.com.tw
+886-3-578-3942
www.zyxel.com
www.europe.zyxel.com
sales@zyxel.com.tw
NORTH
AMERICA
support@zyxel.com
+886-3-578-2439
+1-800-255-4101
GERMANY
www.us.zyxel.com
support@zyxel.dk
+45-3955-0700
www.zyxel.dk
sales@zyxel.dk
+45-3955-0707
ftp.zyxel.dk
support@zyxel.de
+49-2405-6909-0
www.zyxel.de
sales@zyxel.de
+49-2405-6909-99
Customer Support
ZyXEL Communications
Corp., 6 Innovation Road
II, Science-Based
Industrial Park, Hsinchu,
300, Taiwan
ftp.zyxel.com
sales@zyxel.com
SCANDINAVIA
ftp.europe.zyxel.com
REGULAR MAIL
ZyXEL Communications
A/S, Columbusvej 5, 2860
Soeborg, Denmark
ZyXEL Deutschland
GmbH. Adenauerstr.
20/A2 D-52146
Wuerselen, Germany
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Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table of Contents
Copyright ...................................................................................................................................................................ii
ZyXEL Limited Warranty...........................................................................................................................................iii
Interference Statements and Warnings ....................................................................................................................iv
Customer Support .................................................................................................................................................... v
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................... 15
Features And Applications ........................................................................................................................................................... I
Chapter 1
Getting to Know the ES-3024 ........................................................................................................ 1-1
1.1
Features .................................................................................................................................................1-1
1.2
Applications...........................................................................................................................................1-3
Hardware Installation & Connections ......................................................................................................................................... II
Chapter 2
2.1
Chapter 3
Hardware Installation ..................................................................................................................... 2-1
Installation Scenarios ............................................................................................................................2-1
Hardware Connections .................................................................................................................. 3-1
3.1
Front Panel ............................................................................................................................................3-1
3.2
Uplink Modules .....................................................................................................................................3-2
3.3
Rear Panel..............................................................................................................................................3-4
3.4
Front Panel LEDs ..................................................................................................................................3-4
3.5
Stacking Scenario Examples .................................................................................................................3-5
3.6
Uplink Scenario Example......................................................................................................................3-7
3.7
Configuring the ES-3024.......................................................................................................................3-8
Getting Started............................................................................................................................................................................. III
Chapter 4
4.1
Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................4-1
4.2
System Login.........................................................................................................................................4-1
4.3
Switch Lockout......................................................................................................................................4-2
4.4
Resetting the Switch ..............................................................................................................................4-2
4.5
Home Screen .........................................................................................................................................4-3
4.6
Screen Overview ...................................................................................................................................4-5
Chapter 5
5.1
vi
Introducing the Web Configurator.................................................................................................. 4-1
General, Switch and IP Setup........................................................................................................ 5-1
Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................5-1
Table of Contents
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
5.2
General Setup ........................................................................................................................................ 5-1
5.3
IGMP Snooping .................................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.4
Introduction to VLANs ......................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.5
Introduction to Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)...................................................................................... 5-2
5.6
Dynamic Link Aggregation................................................................................................................... 5-4
5.7
802.1X Authentication .......................................................................................................................... 5-4
5.8
Switch Setup Screen.............................................................................................................................. 5-4
5.9
IP Setup ................................................................................................................................................. 5-8
Chapter 6
Port Setup...................................................................................................................................... 6-1
6.1
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 6-1
6.2
IEEE 802.1x .......................................................................................................................................... 6-2
6.3
Configure 802.1x on a Port ................................................................................................................... 6-2
Advanced Applications ...............................................................................................................................................................IV
Chapter 7
Static Route Setup......................................................................................................................... 7-1
7.1
Static Route Setup ................................................................................................................................. 7-1
7.2
Static Route Edit Setup ......................................................................................................................... 7-2
Chapter 8
VLAN Setup................................................................................................................................... 8-1
8.1
Introduction to IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN ....................................................................................... 8-1
8.2
Configuring Tagged VLANs................................................................................................................. 8-3
8.3
Introduction to Port-based VLANs ....................................................................................................... 8-6
8.4
Configuring Port-based VLANs............................................................................................................ 8-6
Chapter 9
Static MAC Forward Setup ............................................................................................................ 9-1
9.1
Introduction to Static MAC Forward Setup .......................................................................................... 9-1
9.2
Configuring or Editing a Static MAC Forward Rule ............................................................................ 9-2
Chapter 10
Filter Setup .................................................................................................................................. 10-1
10.1
Introduction to Port Filtering............................................................................................................... 10-1
10.2
Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule ................................................................................................... 10-2
Chapter 11
Mirror Setup................................................................................................................................. 11-1
11.1
Introduction to Port Mirroring............................................................................................................. 11-1
11.2
Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule ................................................................................................. 11-2
Chapter 12
12.1
Bandwidth Control Setup............................................................................................................. 12-1
Introduction to Bandwidth Control ..................................................................................................... 12-1
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Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
12.2
Configuring or Editing a Bandwidth Control Rule .............................................................................12-2
Chapter 13
Trunk Setup ................................................................................................................................. 13-1
13.1
Introduction to Trunking .....................................................................................................................13-1
13.2
Trunk Setup .........................................................................................................................................13-1
Advanced Management ............................................................................................................................................................... V
Chapter 14
SNMP........................................................................................................................................... 14-1
14.1
About SNMP .......................................................................................................................................14-1
14.2
Supported MIBs ..................................................................................................................................14-2
14.3
Configuring SNMP..............................................................................................................................14-2
14.4
SNMP Traps ........................................................................................................................................14-3
Chapter 15
RADIUS Setup............................................................................................................................. 15-1
15.1
Introduction to RADIUS .....................................................................................................................15-1
15.2
RADIUS Setup ....................................................................................................................................15-1
Chapter 16
16.1
Logins .......................................................................................................................................... 16-1
Introduction .........................................................................................................................................16-1
Chapter 17
Maintenance ................................................................................................................................ 17-1
17.1
Maintenance ........................................................................................................................................17-1
17.2
Remote Management...........................................................................................................................17-3
Chapter 18
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance............................................................................ 18-1
18.1
Firmware Upgrade...............................................................................................................................18-1
18.2
Restore a Configuration File ...............................................................................................................18-1
18.3
Back Up a Configuration File..............................................................................................................18-2
18.4
Command Line FTP ............................................................................................................................18-2
Chapter 19
19.1
Introduction to Statistics......................................................................................................................19-1
Chapter 20
20.1
Statistics....................................................................................................................................... 19-1
Diagnostic .................................................................................................................................... 20-1
Diagnostic............................................................................................................................................20-1
Commands ................................................................................................................................................................................... VI
Chapter 21
21.1
Command Line Interface Overview ....................................................................................................21-1
21.2
Command Summary............................................................................................................................21-2
Chapter 22
viii
Commands Introduction............................................................................................................... 21-1
Command Examples ................................................................................................................... 22-1
Table of Contents
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
22.1
Commonly Used Commands Overview.............................................................................................. 22-1
22.2
Sys Commands.................................................................................................................................... 22-1
Chapter 23
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN ........................................................................................................ 23-1
23.1
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN Overview.............................................................................................. 23-1
23.2
Filtering Databases.............................................................................................................................. 23-1
23.3
Configuring Tagged VLAN ................................................................................................................ 23-1
23.4
IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration Commands................................................................ 23-3
23.5
VLAN1Q SVLAN Active Command ................................................................................................. 23-8
23.6
VLAN1Q SVLAN Inactive Command ............................................................................................... 23-8
23.7
VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command...................................................................................................... 23-8
23.8
VLAN1Q VLAN List Command ........................................................................................................ 23-9
Appendices and Index................................................................................................................................................................VII
Appendix A Product Specifications........................................................................................................................... 1
Index......................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Table of Contents
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Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
List of Figures
Figure 1-1 Backbone Application ............................................................................................................................................... 1-4
Figure 1-2 Bridging Application ................................................................................................................................................. 1-5
Figure 1-3 High Performance Switched Workgroup Application ............................................................................................... 1-6
Figure 1-4 VLAN Workgroup Application ................................................................................................................................. 1-7
Figure 1-5 Shared Server Using VLAN Example....................................................................................................................... 1-8
Figure 2-1 Attaching Rubber Feet............................................................................................................................................... 2-1
Figure 2-2 Attaching Mounting Brackets and Screws................................................................................................................. 2-2
Figure 2-3 Mounting the ES to an EIA standard 19-inch rack .................................................................................................... 2-3
Figure 3-1 ES-3024 Front Panel ................................................................................................................................................ 3-1
Figure 3-2 Loosening the Screws and Removing the Cover Plate .............................................................................................. 3-3
Figure 3-3 Inserting An Example Module................................................................................................................................... 3-3
Figure 3-4 ES-3024 Rear Panel................................................................................................................................................... 3-4
Figure 3-5 Front Panel LEDs ...................................................................................................................................................... 3-4
Figure 3-6 Stacking Example 1................................................................................................................................................... 3-5
Figure 3-7 Stacking Example 2................................................................................................................................................... 3-6
Figure 3-8 Stacking Example 3................................................................................................................................................... 3-7
Figure 3-9 Uplink Example......................................................................................................................................................... 3-8
Figure 4-1 Web Configurator - Login ......................................................................................................................................... 4-1
Figure 4-2 Change Password Screen........................................................................................................................................... 4-2
Figure 4-3 ES-3024 Home Screen .............................................................................................................................................. 4-3
Figure 5-1 General Setup ............................................................................................................................................................ 5-1
Figure 5-2 Switch Setup.............................................................................................................................................................. 5-5
Figure 5-3 IP Setup ..................................................................................................................................................................... 5-9
Figure 6-1 Port Setup Summary Screen...................................................................................................................................... 6-1
Figure 6-2 Port Edit Screen......................................................................................................................................................... 6-3
Figure 7-1 Static Route Setup .................................................................................................................................................... 7-1
Figure 7-2 Static Route Edit Setup.............................................................................................................................................. 7-2
Figure 8-1 VLAN Static Entry Setup .......................................................................................................................................... 8-3
Figure 8-2 Edit VLAN Static Entry ............................................................................................................................................ 8-5
Figure 8-3 Port-based VLAN Setup............................................................................................................................................ 8-7
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Lists of Figures and Charts
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 8-4 Port-based VLAN Example .......................................................................................................................................8-8
Figure 9-1 Static MAC Forward Setup........................................................................................................................................9-1
Figure 9-2 Configuring or Editing a Static MAC Forward Rule .................................................................................................9-2
Figure 10-1 Filter Setup ............................................................................................................................................................10-1
Figure 10-2 Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule......................................................................................................................10-3
Figure 11-1 Mirror Setup...........................................................................................................................................................11-1
Figure 11-2 Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule ....................................................................................................................11-3
Figure 12-1 Bandwidth Control Setup ......................................................................................................................................12-1
Figure 12-2 Bandwidth Control Setup Edit...............................................................................................................................12-3
Figure 13-1 Trunk Setup............................................................................................................................................................13-2
Figure 14-1 SNMP Management Model ...................................................................................................................................14-1
Figure 14-2 SNMP Setup ..........................................................................................................................................................14-3
Figure 15-1 RADIUS Server.....................................................................................................................................................15-1
Figure 15-2 RADIUS Setup ......................................................................................................................................................15-1
Figure 16-1 Logins ....................................................................................................................................................................16-1
Figure 16-2 Edit Logins ............................................................................................................................................................16-2
Figure 17-1 Maintenance...........................................................................................................................................................17-1
Figure 17-2 Remote Management .............................................................................................................................................17-3
Figure 17-3 Edit Secured Client ................................................................................................................................................17-4
Figure 18-1 Firmware Upgrade .................................................................................................................................................18-1
Figure 18-2 Restore Configuration............................................................................................................................................18-2
Figure 18-3 Backup Configuration............................................................................................................................................18-2
Figure 19-1 Statistics.................................................................................................................................................................19-1
Figure 19-2 STP Statistics .........................................................................................................................................................19-2
Figure 19-3 Aggregator ID:.......................................................................................................................................................19-4
Figure 19-4 LACP Status ..........................................................................................................................................................19-4
Figure 19-5 Hardware Monitor .................................................................................................................................................19-5
Figure 19-6 802.1Q VLAN Status.............................................................................................................................................19-7
Figure 19-7 Port Statistics .........................................................................................................................................................19-8
Figure 19-8 Port Details ............................................................................................................................................................19-9
Figure 20-1 Diagnostic Screen ..................................................................................................................................................20-1
Figure 22-1 Log Disp Command Example................................................................................................................................22-1
Lists of Figures and Charts
xi
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 22-2 Version Command Example .................................................................................................................................. 22-2
Figure 22-3 Monitor Status Command Example ...................................................................................................................... 22-2
Figure 23-1 Tagged VLAN Configuration and Activation Example......................................................................................... 23-2
Figure 23-2 CPU VLAN Configuration and Activation Example ............................................................................................ 23-2
Figure 23-3 Deleting Default VLAN Example ......................................................................................................................... 23-3
Figure 23-4 GARP Status Command Example ......................................................................................................................... 23-3
Figure 23-5 GARP Timer Command Example ......................................................................................................................... 23-4
Figure 23-6 GARP Status Command Example ......................................................................................................................... 23-4
Figure 23-7 VLAN1Q Port Status Command Example ............................................................................................................ 23-5
Figure 23-8 VLAN1Q Port Default VID Command Example.................................................................................................. 23-5
Figure 23-9 VLAN1Q Port Accept Command Example........................................................................................................... 23-5
Figure 23-10 VLAN1Q Port GVRP Command Example ......................................................................................................... 23-5
Figure 23-11 VLAN1Q Port GVRP Command Example ......................................................................................................... 23-5
Figure 23-12 Modifying the Static VLAN Example ................................................................................................................. 23-7
Figure 23-13 VLAN1Q SVLAN Delentry Command Example ............................................................................................... 23-8
Figure 23-14 VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command ...................................................................................................................... 23-9
Figure 23-15 VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command ...................................................................................................................... 23-9
Figure 23-16 VLAN1Q Status Command Example................................................................................................................ 23-10
List of Charts
Chart 1 General Product Specifications ......................................................................................................................................... 1
Chart 2 Performance and Management Specifications .................................................................................................................. 2
Chart 3 Physical and Environmental Specifications ...................................................................................................................... 3
xii
Lists of Figures and Charts
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
List of Tables
Table 3-1 ES-3024: Front Panel Ports .........................................................................................................................................3-1
Table 3-2 ES-3024 Switches: LED Descriptions.........................................................................................................................3-4
Table 4-1 Navigation Panel Links ...............................................................................................................................................4-4
Table 4-2 Web Configurator Screen Overview............................................................................................................................4-5
Table 5-1 General Setup ..............................................................................................................................................................5-1
Table 5-2 STP Path Costs ............................................................................................................................................................5-3
Table 5-3 STP Port States ............................................................................................................................................................5-3
Table 5-4 Switch Setup................................................................................................................................................................5-6
Table 5-5 IP Setup .......................................................................................................................................................................5-9
Table 6-1 Port Setup Summary Screen .......................................................................................................................................6-2
Table 6-2 Port Edit Screen...........................................................................................................................................................6-4
Table 7-1 Static Route Setup .......................................................................................................................................................7-1
Table 7-2 Static Route Edit Setup................................................................................................................................................7-2
Table 8-1 GARP Terminology.....................................................................................................................................................8-2
Table 8-2 VLAN Static Entry Setup............................................................................................................................................8-3
Table 8-3 Edit VLAN Static Entry ..............................................................................................................................................8-5
Table 8-4 Port-based VLAN Setup..............................................................................................................................................8-8
Table 9-1 Static MAC Forward Setup .........................................................................................................................................9-1
Table 9-2 Configuring or Editing a Static MAC Forward Rule...................................................................................................9-2
Table 10-1 Filter Setup ..............................................................................................................................................................10-1
Table 10-2 Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule .......................................................................................................................10-3
Table 11-1 Mirror Setup ............................................................................................................................................................11-1
Table 11-2 Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule......................................................................................................................11-3
Table 12-1 Bandwidth Control Setup ........................................................................................................................................12-1
Table 12-2 Bandwidth Control Setup Edit ................................................................................................................................12-3
Table 13-1 Trunk Groups ..........................................................................................................................................................13-1
Table 13-2 Trunk Setup .............................................................................................................................................................13-2
Table 14-1 SNMP Commands...................................................................................................................................................14-2
Table 14-2 SNMP Setup ............................................................................................................................................................14-3
Table 14-3 SNMP Traps ............................................................................................................................................................14-3
List of Tables
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Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 15-1 RADIUS Setup........................................................................................................................................................ 15-2
Table 16-1 Logins ..................................................................................................................................................................... 16-2
Table 17-1 Maintenance............................................................................................................................................................ 17-2
Table 17-2 Remote Management .............................................................................................................................................. 17-3
Table 17-3 Edit Secured Client ................................................................................................................................................. 17-4
Table 18-1 Filename Conventions............................................................................................................................................. 18-3
Table 18-2 General Commands for GUI-based FTP Clients..................................................................................................... 18-4
Table 19-1 Statistics .................................................................................................................................................................. 19-1
Table 19-2 STP Statistics .......................................................................................................................................................... 19-2
Table 19-3 LACP Statistics ....................................................................................................................................................... 19-4
Table 19-4 Hardware Monitor................................................................................................................................................... 19-6
Table 19-5 802.1Q VLAN Status .............................................................................................................................................. 19-7
Table 19-6 Port Statistics .......................................................................................................................................................... 19-8
Table 19-7 Port Details............................................................................................................................................................ 19-10
Table 20-1 Diagnostic Screen ................................................................................................................................................... 20-1
Table 21-1 command summary ................................................................................................................................................. 21-2
xiv
Lists of Tables
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Preface
Congratulations on your purchase from the Dimension series of Ethernet switches.
This preface introduces you to the ES-3024 and discusses the conventions of this User’s Guide. It also provides
information on other related documentation.
About the ES-3024
The ES-3024 Ethernet switch is a managed switch with features ideally suited in any environment with unshielded
twisted pair (UTP) wiring. It can deliver broadband IP services to:
Multi-tenant unit (MTU) buildings (hotels, motels, resorts, residential multi-dwelling units, office
buildings, educational establishments, etc.)
Public facilities (convention centers, airports, plazas, train stations, etc.)
Enterprises.
It can also be deployed as a mini-POP (point-of-presence) in a building basement delivering 10/100Mbps data
service over Category 5 wiring to each customer.
General Syntax Conventions
This guide shows you how to configure the switch using the web configurator and CLI commands. See the
online HTML help for information on individual web configurator screens.
Mouse action sequences are denoted using a comma. For example, click Start, Settings, Control Panel,
Network means first you click Start, click or move the mouse pointer over Settings, then click or move
the mouse pointer over Control Panel and finally click (or double-click) Network.
“Enter” means for you to type one or more characters. “Select” or “Choose” means for you to use one of
the predefined choices.
Predefined choices are in Bold Arial font.
Button and field labels, links and screen names in are in Bold Times New Roman font.
For brevity’s sake, we will use “e.g.” as shorthand for “for instance”, and “i.e.” as shorthand for “that is” or
“in other words” throughout this manual.
Related Documentation
Web Configurator Online HTML help
The online HTML help shows you how to use the web configurator to configure individual screens. More
background information can be found in this UG.
ZyXEL Web Site
The ZyXEL download library at www.zyxel.com contains additional support documentation as well as an online
glossary of networking terms.
Preface
xv
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
User Guide Feedback
Help us help you! E-mail all User Guide-related comments, questions or suggestions for improvement to
techwriters@zyxel.com.tw or send regular mail to The Technical Writing Team, ZyXEL Communications Corp., 6
Innovation Road II, Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan. Thank you!
2
Index
Features and Applications
Part I
Features And Applications
This part acquaints you with the features and applications of the ES-3024.
I
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 1
Getting to Know the ES-3024
This chapter describes the key features, benefits and applications of the ES-3024.
The ES-3024 is a stand-alone Ethernet switch with 24 10/100Mbps ports, two slots for electrical or optical uplink
modules and one slot for a stacking module.
With its built-in web configurator, managing and configuring the switch is easy. From cabinet management to portlevel control and monitoring, you can visually configure and manage your network via the web browser. Just click
your mouse instead of typing cryptic command strings. In addition, the switch can also be managed via Telnet, the
console port, or third-party SNMP management.
1.1 Features
The next two sections describe the hardware and firmware features of the ES-3024.
1.1.1
Hardware Features
24 10/100 Mbps Fast Ethernet Ports
Connect up to 24 computers or switches to the 10/100Mbps auto-negotiating, automatic cable sensing (auto-MDIX)
Ethernet RJ-45 ports. All Ethernet ports support:
IEEE 802.3/3u/3z/3ab standards
Back pressure flow control in half duplex mode
IEEE 802.3x flow control in full duplex mode
Two Slots for Uplink Modules
The modules allow the ES-3024 to connect to another WAN switch or daisy-chain to other switches.
One Slot for Stacking Module
Up to eight switches may be stacked using stacking modules.
Console Port
Use the console port for local management of the switch.
Fans
The fans cool the ES-3024 sufficiently to allow reliable operation of the switch in even poorly ventilated rooms or
basements.
Getting to Know the ES-3024
1-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
1.1.2
Firmware Features
IP Protocols
IP Host (No routing)
Telnet for configuration and monitoring
SNMP for management
SNMP MIB II (RFC 1213)
SNMP v1 RFC 1157
SNMPv2, SNMPv2c or later version, compliant with RFC 2011 SNMPv2 MIB for IP, RFC 2012
SNMPv2 MIB for TCP, RFC 2013 SNMPv2 MIB for UDP
Ethernet MIBs RFC 1643
Bridge MIBs RFC 1493
SMI RFC 1155
RMON RFC 1757
o
SNMPv2, SNMPv2c RFC 2674
Management
Web configurator
Command-line interface locally via console port or remotely via Telnet
SNMP
System Monitoring
•
System status (link status, rates, statistics counters)
•
SNMP
•
Temperatures, voltage, fan speed reports and alarms
•
Port Mirroring allows you to analyze one port’s traffic from another.
Security
System management password protection
Port-based VLAN
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN
802.1x Authentication
Limit dynamic port MAC address learning
Static MAC address filtering
Port Trunking
The ES-3024 adheres to the 802.3ad standard for static and dynamic port trunking.
Bandwidth Control
The ES-3024 supports rate limiting in 1Kbps increments allowing you to create different service plans
1-2
Getting to Know the ES-3024
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
The ES-3024 supports IGMP snooping enabling group multicast traffic to be only forwarded to ports that
are members of that group; thus allowing you to significantly reduce multicast traffic passing through your
switch.
Broadcast storm control
Quality of Service
Four priority queues so you can ensure mission-critical data gets delivered on time.
Follows the IEEE 802.1p priority setting standard based on source/destination MAC addresses.
STP (Spanning Tree Protocol)
STP detects and breaks network loops and provides backup links between switches, bridges or routers. It allows a
switch to interact with other STP-compliant switches in your network to ensure that only one path exists between
any two stations on the network.
1.2 Applications
This section shows a few examples of using the ES-3024 in various network environments.
1.2.1
Backbone Application
In this application, the switch is an ideal solution for small networks where rapid growth can be expected in the
near future.
The switch can be used standalone for a group of heavy traffic users. You can connect computers directly to the
switch’s port or connect other switches to the ES-3024.
In this example, all computers connected directly or indirectly to the ES-3024 can share super high-speed
applications on the Gigabit server.
To expand the network, simply add more networking devices such as switches, routers, firewalls, print servers etc.
Getting to Know the ES-3024
1-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 1-1 Backbone Application
1.2.2
Bridging Example
In this example application the switch is the ideal solution for different company departments to connect to the
corporate backbone. It can alleviate bandwidth contention and eliminate server and network bottlenecks. All users
that need high bandwidth can connect to high-speed department servers via the switch. You can provide a superfast uplink connection by selecting from an array of uplink modules compatible with the ES-3024.
Moreover, the switch eases supervision and maintenance by allowing network managers to centralize multiple
servers at a single location.
1-4
Getting to Know the ES-3024
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 1-2 Bridging Application
Full-duplex mode operation only applies to point-to-point access (for example, when attaching
the switch to a workstation, server, or another switch). When connecting to hubs, use a standard
cascaded connection set at half-duplex operation.
1.2.3
High Performance Switched Workgroup Example
The switch is ideal for connecting two power workgroups that need high bandwidth. In the following example, use
trunking to connect these two power workgroups.
Switching to higher-speed LANs such as FDDI or ATM is not feasible for most people due to the expense of
replacing all existing Ethernet cables and adapter cards, restructuring your network and complex maintenance.
The ES-3024 can provide the same bandwidth as FDDI and ATM at much lower cost while still being able to use
existing adapters and switches. Moreover, the current LAN structure can be retained as all ports can freely
communicate with each other.
Getting to Know the ES-3024
1-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 1-3 High Performance Switched Workgroup Application
1.2.4
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN Application Examples
This section shows a workgroup and a shared server example using 802.1Q tagged VLANs. For more information
on VLANs, see the Switch Setup and VLAN Setup chapters in this User’s Guide. A VLAN (Virtual Local Area
Network) allows a physical network to be partitioned into multiple logical networks. Stations on a logical network
belong to one group. A station can belong to more than one group. With VLAN, a station cannot directly talk to or
hear from stations that are not in the same group(s) unless such traffic first goes through a router.
Tag-based VLAN Workgroup Example
Ports in the same VLAN group share the same broadcast domain thus increase network performance through
reduced broadcast traffic. VLAN groups can be modified at any time by adding, moving or changing ports without
any re-cabling.
1-6
Getting to Know the ES-3024
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 1-4 VLAN Workgroup Application
VLAN Shared Server Example
Shared resources such as a server can be used by all ports in the same VLAN as the server, as shown in the
following example. In this example, only ports that need access to the server need belong to VLAN 3 while they
can belong to other VLAN groups too.
Getting to Know the ES-3024
1-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 1-5 Shared Server Using VLAN Example
1-8
Getting to Know the ES-3024
Hardware Installation & Connections
Part II
Hardware Installation & Connections
This part acquaints you with installation scenarios of the ES-3024, instructs you on how to make
the hardware connections including installing/removing modules, shows some stacking/uplink
examples and explains the front panel LEDs.
II
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 2
Hardware Installation
This chapter shows two switch installation scenarios.
2.1 Installation Scenarios
The switch can be placed on a desktop or rack-mounted on a standard EIA rack. Use the rubber feet in a desktop
installation and the brackets in a rack-mounted installation.
For proper ventilation, allow at least 4 inches (10 cm) of clearance at the front and 3.4 inches (8
cm) at the back of the switch. This is especially important for enclosed rack installations.
2.1.1
Desktop Installation Procedure
Step 1. Make sure the switch is clean and dry.
Step 2. Set the switch on a smooth, level surface strong enough to support the weight of the switch and the
connected cables. Make sure there is a power outlet nearby.
Step 3. Make sure there is enough clearance around the switch to allow air circulation and the attachment of cables
and the power cord.
Step 4. Remove the adhesive backing from the rubber feet.
Step 5. Attach the rubber feet to each corner on the bottom of the switch. These rubber feet help protect the switch
from shock or vibration and ensure space between switches when stacking.
Figure 2-1 Attaching Rubber Feet
Do not block the ventilation holes. Leave space between switches when stacking.
Hardware Installation
2-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
2.1.2
Rack-Mounted Installation
The switch can be mounted on an EIA standard size, 19-inch rack or in a wiring closet with other equipment.
Follow the steps below to mount your switch on a standard EIA rack using a rack-mounting kit.
Step 1. Align one bracket with the holes on one side of the switch and secure it with the bracket screws smaller
than the rack-mounting screws.
Step 2. Attach the other bracket in a similar fashion.
Figure 2-2 Attaching Mounting Brackets and Screws
Step 3. After attaching both mounting brackets, position the switch in the rack by lining up the holes in the
brackets with the appropriate holes on the rack. Secure the switch to the rack with the rack-mounting
screws.
2-2
Hardware Installation
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 2-3 Mounting the ES to an EIA standard 19-inch rack
Hardware Installation
2-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 3
Hardware Connections
This chapter acquaints you with the front and rear panels, shows you how to make the connections,
install/remove (optional) modules and explains the LEDs.
3.1 Front Panel
The following figure shows the front panel of the ES-3024. The front panel contains a console port for local switch
management, switch LEDs, 24 RJ-45 Ethernet ports and two (optional) uplink modules.
Figure 3-1 ES-3024 Front Panel
Table 3-1 ES-3024: Front Panel Ports
CONNECTOR
DESCRIPTION
Console
The console port is for local configuration of the ES-3024 switch.
24 10/100 Mbps RJ-45
Ethernet connectors
Connect these ports to a computer, a hub, an Ethernet switch or router.
3.1.1
Console Port
For local management, you can use a computer with terminal emulation software configured to the following
parameters:
VT100 terminal emulation
9600 bps
No parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit
No flow control
Connect the male 9-pin end of the console cable to the console port of the ES-3024 switch. Connect the female end
to a serial port (COM1, COM2 or other COM port) of your computer.
Hardware Connections
3-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
3.1.2
Ethernet Ports
The ES-3024 has 10/100Mbps auto-negotiating, auto-crossover Ethernet ports. In 10/100Mbps Fast Ethernet, the
speed can be 10Mbps or 100Mbps and the duplex mode can be half duplex or full duplex (100 Mbps only).
When auto-negotiation is turned on, an Ethernet port on the ES-3024 switch negotiates with the peer automatically
to determine the connection speed and duplex mode. If the peer Ethernet port does not support auto-negotiation or
turns off this feature, the ES-3024 switch determines the connection speed by detecting the signal on the cable and
using half duplex mode. When the ES-3024 switch’s auto-negotiation is turned off, an Ethernet port uses the preconfigured speed and duplex mode when making a connection, thus requiring you to make sure that the settings of
the peer Ethernet port are the same in order to connect.
Default Ethernet Negotiation Settings
The factory default negotiation settings for the Ethernet ports on the ES-3024 switch are:
o
Speed: Auto
o
Duplex: Auto
o
Flow control: On
o
Trunking: Disabled
Auto-crossover
All ports are auto-crossover, that is auto-MDIX ports (Media Dependent Interface Crossover), so you may use
either a straight through Ethernet cable or crossover Ethernet cable for all Ethernet port connections. Autocrossover ports automatically sense whether they need to function as crossover or straight ports, so crossover cables
can connect both computers and switches/hubs.
3.2 Uplink Modules
LEDs in the (optional) uplink modules are described in the corresponding module manual.
3.2.1
Installing Modules
You can install one stacking module and up to two (optional) uplink modules separately to meet the needs of your
network. See your module manual for module specifications.
Modules are NOT hot swappable!
Follow these steps to install the optional modules.
Step 1.
Make sure the power cord is not connected to the switch.
Step 2.
Loosen the thumbscrews from the cover plate and remove the cover plate from the optional slot. Do not
discard the cover plate. You can put the cover plate back on if you remove the new module.
3-2
Hardware Connections
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 3-2 Loosening the Screws and Removing the Cover Plate
Step 3.
You should wear an anti-static wrist strap or touch any grounded or metal objects to discharge any bodily
static electricity before you continue.
Step 4.
Remove the optional module from its protective anti-static packaging. Avoid touching the onboard
circuit components by holding it by the edge.
Step 5.
Insert the optional module into an available expansion slot on the switch. Press it firmly until the
optional module snaps into place.
Step 6.
Secure it to the switch with the retaining screws.
Slide the optional module
into the expansion slot until
it snaps into place.
Figure 3-3 Inserting An Example Module1
Never force, bend or twist the optional modules into the expansion slots.
Step 7.
1
See section 3.3.1 for instructions on connecting the power. The switch automatically detects the installed
optional module. Connect any necessary network cables to the optional module and check the LEDs to
verify that it is functioning properly.
This is an example module only!
Hardware Connections
3-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
3.3 Rear Panel
The following figure shows the rear panel of the ES-3024. The rear panel contains the slot for the stacking module
and the power receptacle. See section 3.2.1 for information on inserting and removing modules.
Figure 3-4 ES-3024 Rear Panel
3.3.1
Power Connector
Make sure you are using the correct power source as shown on the panel.
To connect the power to the unit, insert the female end of power cord to the power receptacle on the rear panel.
Connect the other end of the supplied power cord to a 100~240VAC/1.5A power outlet. Make sure that no objects
obstruct the airflow of the fans (located on the side of the unit).
3.4 Front Panel LEDs
After you connect the power to the switch, view the LEDs to ensure proper functioning of the switch and as an aid
in troubleshooting. The front panel LEDs are as follows.
Figure 3-5 Front Panel LEDs
The following table describes the LED indicators on the front panel of an ES-3024 switch.
Table 3-2 ES-3024 Switches: LED Descriptions
LED
COLOR
STATUS
S1
Green
Blinking
S2
PWR
3-4
Green
DESCRIPTION
The system is transmitting/receiving through the stacking port.
ON
The link through the stacking port is up.
OFF
The link through the stacking port is down.
ON
The system is turned on.
OFF
The system is off.
Hardware Connections
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 3-2 ES-3024 Switches: LED Descriptions
LED
COLOR
STATUS
SYS
Green
Blinking
ALM
LNK/ACT
(Ethernet ports)
Red
Green
Yellow
FDX/COL
(Ethernet ports)
Yellow
DESCRIPTION
The system is rebooting and performing self-diagnostic tests.
ON
The system is on and functioning properly.
OFF
The power is off or the system is not ready/malfunctioning.
ON
There is a hardware failure.
OFF
The system is functioning normally.
Blinking
The system is transmitting/receiving to/from a 10 Mbps Ethernet network.
ON
The link to a 10 Mbps Ethernet network is up.
OFF
The link to a 10 Mbps Ethernet network is down.
Blinking
The system is transmitting/receiving to/from a 100 Mbps Ethernet network.
ON
The link to a 100 Mbps Ethernet network is up.
OFF
The link to a 100 Mbps Ethernet network is down.
Blinking
The Ethernet port is negotiating in half-duplex mode and collisions are
occurring; the more collisions that occur the faster the LED blinks.
ON
The Ethernet port is negotiating in full-duplex mode.
OFF
The Ethernet port is negotiating in half-duplex mode and no collisions are
occurring.
3.5 Stacking Scenario Examples
Use Ethernet cables when stacking the switches. See the following figures for example stacking scenarios using the
stacking module. The switches must form a closed ring in all scenarios.
Figure 3-6 Stacking Example 1
Hardware Connections
3-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 3-7 Stacking Example 2
3-6
Hardware Connections
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 3-8 Stacking Example 3
See the Commands Introduction and Commonly Used Commands chapters for information on configuring the
stacking modules (as well as other ports) using line commands.
3.6 Uplink Scenario Example
Use Ethernet cables when daisy-chaining/uplinking the switches. See the following figure for an example uplink
connection using the stacking module. You must uplink to a Gigabit switch when uplinking using the stacking
module. Uplink scenarios using an uplink module depend on the uplink module you use.
Hardware Connections
3-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 3-9 Uplink Example
3.7 Configuring the ES-3024
You may use the embedded web configurator or command line interface to configure the ES-3024. If you’re using
the web configurator, you need Internet Explorer 5.5 and later or Netscape Navigator 6 and later.
You can access the command line interface using a terminal emulation program on a computer connected to the
switch console port (see section 3.1.1) or access the switch via an Ethernet port using Telnet.
When using the command line interface, you can only save STP, 802.1q and 802.1d
configurations using the “config save” command. All other configurations done using the
command line interface are effective only until you restart the switch.
The next part of this guide discusses configuring the ES-3024 using the web configurator.
3-8
Hardware Connections
Getting Started
Part III
Getting Started
This part introduces you to the ES-3024 web configurator and how to use it to configure the
Getting Started menus.
III
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 4
Introducing the Web Configurator
This section introduces the configuration and functions of the Web Configurator.
4.1 Introduction
The embedded web configurator allows you to manage the switch from anywhere through a standard browser such
as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator.
Use Internet Explorer 5.5 and later or Netscape Navigator 6 and later versions.
4.2 System Login
A local console port connection locks out all other connections. Log out from the console port
connection before logging in with the Web Configurator.
Step 1. Start Internet Explorer or Netscape Communicator web browser.
Step 2. Type http:// and the IP address of the switch (for example, the default is 192.168.1.1) in the Location or
Address field. Press Enter.
Figure 4-1 Web Configurator - Login
Step 3. The Password screen appears. The default username is admin and associated default password is 1234.
Step 4. Click Login. The Home screen of the web configurator displays.
4.2.1
Change Your Password
This screen prompts you to change your password if it is still set to the default. It is highly recommended you
change the password.
Introducing The Web Configurator
4-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 4-2 Change Password Screen
4.3 Switch Lockout
You are locked out from managing the switch if another administrator is currently logged in. You must wait until
he/she has logged out before you can log in.
Moreover, you could lock yourself (and all others) out from the switch by:
1. Deleting the management VLAN (default is VLAN 1).
2. Deleting all port-based VLANs with the CPU port as a member. The “CPU port” is the management port of
the switch.
3. Filtering all traffic to the CPU port.
4. Disabling all ports.
5. Assigning minimum bandwidth to the CPU port. If you limit bandwidth to the CPU port, you may find that the
switch performs sluggishly or not at all.
Be careful not to lock yourself and others out of the switch.
4.4 Resetting the Switch
If you lock yourself (and others) from the switch or forget the ES-3024 password, you will need to reload the
factory-default configuration file.
Uploading the factory-default configuration file replaces the current configuration file with the factory-default
configuration file. This means that you will lose all previous configurations and the speed of the console port will
be reset to the default of 9600bps with 8 data bit, no parity, one stop bit and flow control set to none. The
password will also be reset to “1234” and the IP address to 192.168.1.1.
To upload the configuration file, do the following:
Step 1. Connect to the console port using a computer with terminal emulation software. See the Hardware
Connections chapter for details.
4-2
Introducing The Web Configurator
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Step 2. Disconnect and reconnect the switch’s power to begin a session. When you reconnect the switch’s power,
you will see the initial screen.
Step 3. When you see the message “Press any key to enter Debug Mode within 3 seconds” press any key to enter
debug mode.
Step 4. Type atlc after the Enter Debug Mode message.
Step 5. Wait for the Starting XMODEM upload message before activating XMODEM upload on your
terminal.
Step 6. After a successful firmware upload, type atgo to restart the switch.
The switch is now reinitialized with a default configuration file including the default password of “1234”.
4.5 Home Screen
The home screen consists of a navigation panel and a main panel.
Click here for help on
configuring a screen.
Navigation
Panel
This is the
Main Panel
Click Logout to exit the web configurator.
Figure 4-3 ES-3024 Home Screen
Introducing The Web Configurator
4-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 4-1 Navigation Panel Links
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Getting Started
General Setup
This link takes you to a screen where you can configure general identification information
about the switch.
Switch Setup
This link takes you to a screen where you can set up global switch parameters such as
VLAN type, MAC address learning, IGMP snooping, GARP, priority queues, STP,
broadcast storm control, LACP trunking and 802.1X authentication.
IP Setup
This link takes you to a screen where you can configure the IP address, subnet mask
(necessary for switch management) and DNS (domain name server).
Port Setup
This link takes you to screens where you can configure settings for individual switch ports.
Advanced Applications
Static Route Setup
This link takes you to screens where you can configure static routes. A static route
defines how the ES-3024 should forward traffic by configuring the TCP/IP parameters
manually.
VLAN Setup
This link takes you to screens where you can configure port-based or 802.1Q VLAN
(depending on what you configured in the Switch Setup menu).
Static MAC Forward
This link takes you to screens where you can configure static MAC addresses for a port.
These static MAC addresses do not age out.
Filter Setup
This link takes you to screens where you can filter traffic going from one port or ports to
another port or ports.
Mirror Setup
This link takes you to screens where you can copy traffic from one port or ports to another
port in order that you can examine the traffic from the first port without interference
Bandwidth Control
Setup
This link takes you to screens where you can cap the maximum bandwidth allowed from
specified source(s) to specified destination(s).
Trunk Setup
This link takes you to a screen where you can logically aggregate physical links to form
one logical, higher-bandwidth link.
Advanced Management
SNMP
This link takes you to a screen where you can configure SNMP (Simple Network
Management Protocol) for network management and monitoring.
RADIUS
This link takes you to a screen where you can configure RADIUS (Remote Authentication
Dial-In User Service), a protocol for user authentication that allows you to use an external
server to validate an unlimited number of users.
Logins
This link takes you to a screen where you can change your password and configure
passwords for up to four administrators. Only one administrator can be active at any one
time.
Maintenance
This link takes you to screens where you can set UNIX syslog parameters, time and date
and remote management as well as perform firmware and configuration file maintenance.
Statistics
This link takes you to screens where you can view switch statistical information.
Diagnostic
This link takes you to screens where you can view system logs and test port(s).
Logout
Click here to exit the web configurator. You have to log in with your password again after
you log out. This is recommended after you finish a management session both for
security reasons and so as you don’t lock out other switch administrators.
4-4
Introducing The Web Configurator
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
4.5.1
Help
The web configurator’s online help has descriptions of individual screens and some supplementary information.
Click the HELP link from the home screen to view the online help’s home screen summary menu.
Click the HELP link from a web configurator screen other than the home screen to view an online help
description of that screen.
4.6 Screen Overview
The following table lists the various web configurator screens.
Table 4-2 Web Configurator Screen Overview
GETTING STARTED
General Setup
ADVANCED APPLICATIONS
Static Route Setup
Switch Setup
IP Setup
Edit Static Route
VLAN Setup
Edit VLAN Static Entry
Port Setup
Edit Port Setup
Static MAC Forward
ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
SNMP
RADIUS
Logins
Maintenance
Remote Management
Edit Secured Clients
Edit Static MAC Forward
Filter Setup
Edit Filter Setup
Mirror Setup
Edit Mirror Setup
Bandwidth Control Setup
Edit Bandwidth Control Setup
Upgrade Firmware
Restore Configuration
Backup Configuration
Statistics
Diagnostic General
Diagnostic Ethernet Port
Trunk Setup
The next chapters discuss the Getting Started screens.
Introducing The Web Configurator
4-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 5
General, Switch and IP Setup
This chapter describes how to configure the aforementioned screens.
5.1 Introduction
The General Setup screen allows you to configure general switch identification information. The Switch Setup
screen allows you to set up and configure global switch features. The IP Setup screen allows you to configure an
IP address, subnet mask and DNS (domain name server) for the switch for management purposes.
5.2 General Setup
Click General Setup in the navigation panel to open this screen.
Figure 5-1 General Setup
Table 5-1 General Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
System Name
Choose a descriptive name for identification purposes. This name can be up to 30
alphanumeric characters long.
Location
Enter the geographic location (up to 30 characters) of your switch.
Contact Person's
Name
Enter the name (up to 30 characters) of the person in charge of this switch.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch. Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
General, Switch and IP Setup
5-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
5.3 IGMP Snooping
Traditionally, IP packets are transmitted in one of either two ways - Unicast (1 sender to 1 recipient) or Broadcast
(1 sender to everybody on the network). Multicast delivers IP packets to just a group of hosts on the network.
IGMP (Internet Group Multicast Protocol) is a session-layer protocol used to establish membership in a multicast
group - it is not used to carry user data. Refer to RFC 1112 and RFC 2236 for information on IGMP versions 1
and 2 respectively.
A layer-2 switch can passively snoop on IGMP Query, Report and Leave (IGMP version 2) packets transferred
between IP multicast routers/switches and IP multicast hosts to learn the IP multicast group membership. It checks
IGMP packets passing through it, picks out the group registration information, and configures multicasting
accordingly.
Without IGMP snooping, multicast traffic is treated in the same manner as broadcast traffic, that is, it is forwarded
to all ports. With IGMP snooping, group multicast traffic is only forwarded to ports that are members of that
group. IGMP Snooping generates no additional network traffic, allowing you to significantly reduce multicast
traffic passing through your switch.
5.4 Introduction to VLANs
A VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network) allows a physical network to be partitioned into multiple logical networks.
Stations on a logical network belong to one group. A station can belong to more than one group. With VLAN, a
station cannot directly talk to or hear from stations that are not in the same group(s); the traffic must first go
through a router.
In MTU (Multi-Tenant Unit) applications, VLAN is vital in providing isolation and security among the
subscribers. When properly configured, VLAN prevents one subscriber from accessing the network resources of
another on the same LAN, thus a user will not see the printers and hard disks of another user in the same building.
VLAN also increases network performance by limiting broadcasts to a smaller and more manageable logical
broadcast domain. In traditional switched environments, all broadcast packets go to each and every individual
port. With VLAN, all broadcasts are confined to a specific broadcast domain.
Note that VLAN is unidirectional; it only governs outgoing traffic.
See the VLAN Setup chapter for information on port-based and 802.1Q tagged VLANs.
5.5 Introduction to Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
STP detects and breaks network loops and provides backup links between switches, bridges or routers. It allows a
switch to interact with other STP-compliant switches in your network to ensure that only one route exists between
any two stations on the network.
5.5.1
STP Terminology
The root bridge is the base of the spanning tree; it is the bridge with the lowest identifier value (MAC address).
5-2
General, Switch and IP Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Path cost is the cost of transmitting a frame onto a LAN through that port. It is assigned according to the speed of
the link to which a port is attached. The slower the media, the higher the cost - see the next table.
Table 5-2 STP Path Costs
LINK SPEED
RECOMMENDED VALUE
RECOMMENDED RANGE
ALLOWED RANGE
Path Cost
4Mbps
250
100 to 1000
1 to 65535
Path Cost
10Mbps
100
50 to 600
1 to 65535
Path Cost
16Mbps
62
40 to 400
1 to 65535
Path Cost
100Mbps
19
10 to 60
1 to 65535
Path Cost
1Gbps
4
3 to 10
1 to 65535
Path Cost
10Gbps
2
1 to 5
1 to 65535
On each bridge, the root port is the port through which this bridge communicates with the root. It is the port on
this switch with the lowest path cost to the root (the root path cost). If there is no root port, then this switch has
been accepted as the root bridge of the spanning tree network.
For each LAN segment, a designated bridge is selected. This bridge has the lowest cost to the root among the
bridges connected to the LAN.
5.5.2
How STP Works
After a bridge determines the lowest cost-spanning tree with STP, it enables the root port and the ports that are the
designated ports for connected LANs, and disables all other ports that participate in STP. Network packets are
therefore only forwarded between enabled ports, eliminating any possible network loops.
STP-aware switches exchange Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) periodically. When the bridged LAN
topology changes, a new spanning tree is constructed.
Once a stable network topology has been established, all bridges listen for Hello BPDUs (Bridge Protocol Data
Units) transmitted from the root bridge. If a bridge does not get a Hello BPDU after a predefined interval (Max
Age), the bridge assumes that the link to the root bridge is down. This bridge then initiates negotiations with other
bridges to reconfigure the network to re-establish a valid network topology.
5.5.3
STP Port States
STP assigns five port states (see next table) to eliminate packet looping. A bridge port is not allowed to go directly
from blocking state to forwarding state so as to eliminate transient loops.
Table 5-3 STP Port States
PORT STATE
DESCRIPTION
Disabled
STP is disabled (default).
Blocking
Only configuration and management BPDUs are received and processed.
Listening
All BPDUs are received and processed.
General, Switch and IP Setup
5-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 5-3 STP Port States
PORT STATE
DESCRIPTION
Learning
All BPDUs are received and processed. Information frames are submitted to the learning
process but not forwarded.
Forwarding
All BPDUs are received and processed. All information frames are received and forwarded.
5.6 Dynamic Link Aggregation
The ES-3024 supports the link aggregation IEEE802.3ad standard. This standard describes the Link Aggregate
Control Protocol (LACP), which is a protocol that dynamically creates and manages trunk groups.
When you enable LACP link aggregation on a port, the port can automatically negotiate with the ports at the
remote end of a link to establish trunk groups. LACP also allows port redundancy, that is, if an operational port
fails, then one of the “standby” ports become operational without user intervention
Please note that:
You must connect all ports point-to-point to the same Ethernet switch and configure the ports for LACP
trunking.
LACP only works on full-duplex links.
All ports in the same trunk group must have the same media type, speed, duplex mode and flow control
settings.
Configure trunk groups or LACP before you connect the Ethernet switch to avoid causing network
topology loops.
5.7 802.1X Authentication
See the Port Setup chapter for more information on 802.1x authentication.
5.8 Switch Setup Screen
Click Switch Setup in the navigation panel to open the Switch Setup screen. The VLAN Setup screen changes
depending on whether you choose 802.1Q VLAN Type or Port Based VLAN Type in this screen.
5-4
General, Switch and IP Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 5-2 Switch Setup
General, Switch and IP Setup
5-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 5-4 Switch Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
VLAN Type
Choose 802.1Q or Port Based from the drop-down list box. The VLAN Setup
screen changes depending on whether you choose 802.1Q VLAN Type or Port
Based VLAN Type in this screen. See section 5.4 and the VLAN Setup chapter
for more information on VLANs.
IGMP
Snooping
Select the checkbox to enable IGMP snooping and have group multicast traffic
only forwarded to ports that are members of that group, significantly reducing
multicast traffic passing through your switch. See section 5.3 for more information
on IGMP snooping.
802.1Q
MAC Address MAC address learning reduces outgoing traffic broadcasts. For MAC address
Learning
learning to occur on a port, the port must be active.
Aging Time Enter a time from 0 to 1700 seconds. This is how long all dynamically learned
MAC addresses remain in the MAC address table before they age out (and must
be relearned).
300
GARP Timer: Switches join VLANs by making a declaration. A declaration is made by issuing a Join message
using GARP. Declarations are withdrawn by issuing a Leave message. A Leave All message terminates all
registrations. GARP timers set declaration timeout values. See the chapter on VLAN setup for more background
information.
Join Timer Join Timer sets the duration of the Join Period timer for GVRP in milliseconds.
Each port has a Join Period timer. The allowed Join Time range is between 100
and 65535 milliseconds; the default is 200 milliseconds. See the chapter on
VLAN setup for more background information.
200 milliseconds
(default)
Leave Timer Leave Timer sets the duration of the Leave Period timer for GVRP in
600 milliseconds
milliseconds. Each port has a single Leave Period timer. Leave Time must be two
(default)
times larger than Join Timer; the default is 600 milliseconds.
Leave All Leave All Timer sets the duration of the Leave All Period timer for GVRP in
Timer milliseconds. Each port has a single Leave All Period timer. Leave All Timer must
be larger than Leave Timer; the default is 1000 milliseconds.
1000
milliseconds
(default)
Priority Queue Assignment: IEEE 802.1p defines up to 8 separate traffic types by inserting a tag into a MAC-layer
frame that contains bits to define class of service. Frames without an explicit priority tag are given the default
priority of the ingress port. Use the next two fields to configure the priority level-to-physical queue mapping.
The switch has 4 physical queues that you can map to the 8 priority levels. On the switch, traffic assigned to higher
index queues gets through faster while traffic in lower index queues is dropped if the network is congested.
Priority Level (The following descriptions are based on the traffic types defined in the IEEE 802.1d standard (which
incorporates the 802.1p).
Priority 7 Typically used for network control traffic such as router configuration messages.
Priority 6 Typically used for voice traffic that is especially sensitive to jitter (jitter is the variations in delay).
Priority 5 Typically used for video that consumes high bandwidth and is sensitive to jitter.
5-6
General, Switch and IP Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 5-4 Switch Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
Priority 4
Typically used for controlled load, latency-sensitive traffic such as SNA (Systems Network
Architecture) transactions.
Priority 3
Typically used for “excellent effort” or better than best effort and would include important business
traffic that can tolerate some delay.
Priority 2 This is for “spare bandwidth”.
Priority 1
This is typically used for non-critical “background” traffic such as bulk transfers that are allowed but
that should not affect other applications and users.
Priority 0 Typically used for best-effort traffic.
Queue
Select from Queue 0 (for lower priority traffic) to Queue 3 (for higher priority traffic) from the dropdown list boxes to map a queue for each traffic type.
Spanning Tree Protocol: Use STP to detect and disable network loops and provide backup links between switches,
bridges or routers.
Select Spanning Tree Protocol to enable STP on the switch. After configuring switch STP in this screen, you must
configure STP information for each port in the Port Setup screen.
Bridge Priority Bridge priority is used in determining the root switch, root port and designated
port. The switch with the highest priority (lowest numeric value) becomes the STP
root switch. If all switches have the same priority, the switch with the lowest MAC
address will then become the root switch. The allowed range is 0 to 65535.
32768 (default)
The lower the numeric value you assign, the higher the priority for this bridge.
Bridge Priority determines the root bridge, which in turn determines Hello Time,
Max Age and Forwarding Delay.
Hello Time This is the time interval in seconds between BPDU (Bridge Protocol Data Units)
configuration message generations by the root switch. The allowed range is 1 to
10 seconds.
2 (default)
Max Age This is the maximum time (in seconds) a switch can wait without receiving a
BPDU before attempting to reconfigure. All switch ports (except for designated
ports) should receive BPDUs at regular intervals. Any port that ages out STP
information (provided in the last BPDU) becomes the designated port for the
attached LAN. If it is a root port, a new root port is selected from among the
switch ports attached to the network. The allowed range is 6 to 40 seconds.
20 (default)
Forwarding This is the maximum time (in seconds) a switch will wait before changing states.
Delay This delay is required because every switch must receive information about
topology changes before it starts to forward frames. In addition, each port needs
time to listen for conflicting information that would make it return to a blocking
state; otherwise, temporary data loops might result. The allowed range is 4 to 30
seconds.
15 (default)
Broadcast
Use this field to limit the number of broadcast frames that can be stored in the
Storm Control switch buffer or sent out from the switch. Broadcast frames that arrive when the
buffer is full are discarded. Enable Broadcast Storm Control to reduce
broadcast traffic coming into your network.
General, Switch and IP Setup
5-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 5-4 Switch Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
Monitor When the Monitor Interval time period expires, each port begins counting
Interval broadcast frames allowed in its buffers anew. Select a time period from 64, 1024,
8000, 256000 microseconds from the drop-down list box.
Direction Choose to monitor broadcast packets coming into the switch (Incoming) or going
out of the switch (Outgoing).
Link
Aggregation
Control
Protocol
Select this checkbox to enable Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). See
the Trunk Setup chapter for more information on LACP.
System LACP system priority is a number between 1 and 65,355. The switch with the
Priority lowest system priority (and lowest port number if system priority is the same)
becomes the LACP “server”. The LACP “server” controls the operation of LACP
setup. Enter a number to set the priority of an active port using Link Aggregate
Control Protocol (LACP). The smaller the number, the higher the priority level.
65535
802.1x Select this checkbox to permit 802.1x authentication on the switch. You must first
Authentication allow 802.1x authentication on the switch before configuring it on each port.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
5.9 IP Setup
The switch needs an IP address for it to be managed over the network. The factory default IP address is
192.168.1.1. The subnet mask specifies the network number portion of an IP address. The factory default subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0. The default gateway specifies the IP address of the default gateway (next hop) for
outgoing traffic. 0.0.0.0 means no default gateway is specified.
Click IP Setup in the navigation panel to open this screen.
5-8
General, Switch and IP Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 5-3 IP Setup
Table 5-5 IP Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
IP Address
Enter the IP address of your switch in dotted decimal notation for example 192.168.1.1.
IP Subnet
Mask
Enter the IP subnet mask of your switch in dotted decimal notation for example 255.255.255.0.
Default
Gateway
Enter the IP address of the default outgoing gateway in dotted decimal notation, for example
192.168.1.254.
DNS (Domain Name System) is for mapping a domain name to its corresponding IP address
Domain
and vice versa. Enter a domain name server IP address in order to be able to use a domain
Name Server
name instead of an IP address in the Time and Date screen.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch. Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
General, Switch and IP Setup
5-9
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 6
Port Setup
This chapter explains how to configure individual ports on the ES-3024.
6.1 Introduction
Click Port Setup from the navigation panel to enter the port configuration summary screen. You may configure
any of the 26 Ethernet ports (ports 25 and 26 are uplink ports) by clicking its index number.
Figure 6-1 Port Setup Summary Screen
Port Setup
6-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 6-1 Port Setup Summary Screen
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This is the port index number. Click a port link to configure that port.
Active
This field shows whether the port is turned on (Yes) or not (No). The factory default for all ports is
disabled. A port must be enabled for data transmission to occur.
Name
This field shows the name that identifies this port.
Type
This field displays 10/100M for an Ethernet/Fast Ethernet connection and Empty if no uplink
module is inserted in the slot. If an uplink module is present, then its type is displayed here.
Speed
This field displays the configured speed or Auto of the Ethernet port. Auto means the switch
automatically finds the speed of the attached switch.
Duplex
This field displays the Ethernet duplex mode, that is full-duplex (Full) or half-duplex (Half) or N/A
when Auto is selected as the speed.
6.2 IEEE 802.1x
IEEE 802.1x is an extended authentication protocol1 that allows support of RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial
In User Service, RFC 2138, 2139) for centralized user profile and accounting2 management on a network RADIUS
server.
You must enable 802.1x on the switch (see Switch Setup screen) before enabling it on a port.
6.3 Configure 802.1x on a Port
Click a port link in the Port Setup summary screen to enter that port’s configuration screen.
1
At the time of writing, only Windows XP of the Microsoft operating systems supports it. See the Microsoft web site for
information on other Windows operating system support. For other operating systems, see its documentation. If your operating
system does not support 802.1x, then you may need to install 802.1x client software.
2
Not available at the time of writing.
6-2
Port Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 6-2 Port Edit Screen
Port Setup
6-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 6-2 Port Edit Screen
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
Active
A port must be enabled for data transmission to occur. Select Active to
enable the port.
Name
Choose a descriptive name for port identification purposes.
Default 802.1P
Priority
This priority value is added to incoming frames without a (802.1p)
priority queue tag. See Priority Queue Assignment in Table 5-4
Switch Setup for more information.
Limiting Number
of Learned MAC
Address
Use this field to limit the number of (dynamic) MAC addresses that may
be learned on a port. For example, if you set this field to "5" on port 2,
then only the devices with these five learned MAC addresses may
access port 2 at any one time. A sixth device would have to wait until
one of the five learned MAC addresses aged out. MAC-address aging
out time can be set in the Switch Setup screen. The valid range is
from “0” to “254”. “0” means this feature is disabled, so the switch will
learn MAC addresses up to the global limit of 16K.
Type
This read-only label displays the type of port you are currently
configuring.
Speed
Select the speed of the Ethernet connection on this port. Auto (autonegotiation) makes one Ethernet port able to negotiate with a peer
automatically to obtain the connection speed and duplex mode that
both ends support. When auto-negotiation is turned on, an Ethernet
port on the switch negotiates with the peer automatically to determine
the connection speed and duplex mode. If the peer Ethernet port does
not support auto-negotiation or turns off this feature, the switch
determines the connection speed by detecting the signal on the cable
and using half duplex mode. When the switch’s auto-negotiation is
turned off, an Ethernet port uses the pre-configured speed and duplex
mode when making a connection, thus requiring you to make sure that
the settings of the peer Ethernet port are the same in order to connect.
Auto
Duplex
Select a duplex mode from half duplex (Half), full duplex (Full) or
(N/A). N/A displays when auto-negotiation is turned on, as the Ethernet
port on the switch negotiates with the peer automatically to determine
the connection speed and duplex mode.
Full
Flow Control
A concentration of traffic on a port decreases port bandwidth and
overflows buffer memory causing packet discards and frame losses.
Flow Control is used to regulate transmission of signals to match the
bandwidth of the receiving port.
Joe
0 (default)
0
10/100M
The ES-3024 uses IEEE802.3x flow control in full duplex mode and
backpressure flow control in half duplex mode.
IEEE802.3 flow control is used in full duplex mode to send a pause
signal to the sending port, causing it to temporarily stop sending
signals when the receiving port memory buffers fill.
Back Pressure flow control is typically used in half duplex mode to
send a "collision" signal to the sending port (mimicking a state of
packet collision) causing the sending port to temporarily stop sending
signals and resend later. Select Flow Control to enable it.
6-4
Port Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 6-2 Port Edit Screen
LABEL
Spanning Tree
Protocol
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
Select Spanning Tree Protocol to enable. See section 5.5 for more
information.
Priority Configure the priority for each port here. Priority decides which port
should be disabled when more than one port forms a loop in a switch.
Ports with a higher priority numeric value are disabled first. The
allowed range is between 0 and 255 and default value is 128.
128 (default)
Path Cost Path cost is the cost of transmitting a frame on to a LAN through that
port. It is assigned according to the speed of the bridge. The slower the
media, the higher the cost - see Table 5-2 STP Path Costs for more
information.
100
802.1Q VLAN: These fields are only visible if you chose 802.1Q In the VLAN Type field in the Switch Setup
screen.
Default VLAN ID Default VLAN ID is the PVID, the Port VLAN ID assigned to untagged
frames or priority-tagged frames received on this port.
1(default)
GVRP GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol) is a registration protocol
that defines a way for switches to register necessary VLAN members
on ports across the network. Select this check box to enable GVRP
and propagate VLANs information beyond the local switch.
VLAN Acceptable Choose All if you want the port to accept both tagged and untagged
Frame Type incoming packets (to that port). Choose Tagged if you want the port to
accept just tagged incoming packets (to that port). See section 5.4 for
more information on VLANs.
Port Security
All
Port security means that only packets with dynamically learned MAC
addresses and/or configured static MAC addresses can pass through
this port. The switch can learn up to 16K MAC addresses in total with
no limit on individual ports other than the sum cannot exceed 16K.
For maximum port security, enable Port Security, disable Mac
address learning and configure static MAC address(es) for that port. It
is not recommended you disable Port Security together with MAC
address learning as this will result in many broadcasts.
Address Learning MAC address learning reduces outgoing broadcast traffic. For MAC
address learning to occur on a port, the port must port must have
address learning active and the port itself must be active.
Active Select Active to enable MAC address learning on this port.
Port Setup
6-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 6-2 Port Edit Screen
LABEL
Broadcast Storm
Control
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
Enable Broadcast Storm Control to reduce broadcast traffic coming
into or going out of this port. Broadcast Storm Control includes
multicast packets. Use the Threshold field to limit the number of
broadcast frames that can be:
Stored in a port’s buffer or
Sent out from the port.
Broadcast frames that arrive within the monitor interval specified in the
Switch Setup screen but after the buffer is full are discarded.
Threshold Select the number of frames allowed in the Threshold drop-down list
box. If you wish your network to receive or broadcast a lot of broadcast
traffic then choose a larger number. To reduce broadcast traffic coming
into or going out of your network, choose a smaller number.
Direction Select Incoming to control how many broadcast frames the port can
store in the switch buffer and select Outgoing to control how many
frames the port will send out.
Link Aggregate
Control Protocol
128
incoming
The ES-3024 supports the link aggregation IEEE802.3ad standard.
This standard describes the Link Aggregate Control Protocol (LACP),
which is a protocol that is used to dynamically create and manage
trunk groups. The standard provides link identification, status
monitoring and synchronization across links.
Timeout Timeout is the time interval between the individual port exchanges of
LACP packets in order to check that the peer port in the trunk group is
still up. If a port does not respond after three tries, then it is deemed to
be “down” and is removed from the trunk. Set a short timeout (one
second) for busy trunked links to ensure that disabled ports are
removed from the trunk group as soon as possible.
Select either 1 second or 30 seconds.
802.1x
Select this checkbox to permit 802.1x authentication on this port. You
must first allow 802.1x authentication on the switch (see Switch Setup
screen) before configuring it on each port.
Reauthentication Specify if a subscriber has to periodically re-enter his or her username
and password to stay connected to the port.
Reauthentication Specify how often a client has to re-enter his or her username and
Timer password to stay connected to the port.
On
3600
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
6-6
Port Setup
Advanced Applications
Part IV
Advanced Applications
This part shows you how to configure the Advanced Applications screens.
IV
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 7
Static Route Setup
Static routes tell the ES-3024 how to forward IP traffic when you configure the TCP/IP parameters
manually.
7.1 Static Route Setup
Click Static Route Setup from the navigation panel to display the following static route summary table.
Figure 7-1 Static Route Setup
Table 7-1 Static Route Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Entry
This field displays the index number of the route.
Active
This field displays Yes when the static route is activated and No when is it deactivated.
Name
This field displays the descriptive name for this route. This is for identification purpose
only.
Destination Address This field displays the IP network address of the final destination.
Subnet Mask
This field displays the subnet mask for this destination.
Gateway Address
This field displays the IP address of the gateway. The gateway is an immediate
neighbor of your switch that will forward the packet to the destination.
Metric
This field displays the cost of transmission for routing purposes.
Static Route Setup
7-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
7.2 Static Route Edit Setup
To set up a static route on the switch, click a static route index number.
Figure 7-2 Static Route Edit Setup
Table 7-2 Static Route Edit Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Name
Enter a descriptive name for this route. This is for identification purpose only.
Active
This field allows you to activate/deactivate this static route.
Destination IP
Address
This parameter specifies the IP network address of the final destination. Routing is always
based on network number. If you need to specify a route to a single host, use a subnet
mask of 255.255.255.255 in the subnet mask field to force the network number to be
identical to the host ID.
IP Subnet Mask
Enter the subnet mask for this destination.
Gateway IP
Address
Enter the IP address of the gateway. The gateway is an immediate neighbor of your switch
that will forward the packet to the destination. The gateway must be a router on the same
segment as your switch.
Metric
The metric represents the “cost” of transmission for routing purposes. IP routing uses hop
count as the measurement of cost, with a minimum of 1 for directly connected networks.
Enter a number that approximates the cost for this link. The number need not be precise,
but it must be between 1 and 15. In practice, 2 or 3 is usually a good number.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
7-2
Static Route Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 8
VLAN Setup
They type of screen you see here depends on the VLAN Type you selected in the Switch Setup
screen. This chapter shows you how to configure 802.1Q tagged and port-based VLANs. See the
General, Switch and IP Setup chapter for more information.
8.1 Introduction to IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Tagged VLAN uses an explicit tag (VLAN ID) in the MAC header to identify the VLAN membership of a frame
across bridges - they are not confined to the switch on which they were created. The VLANs can be created
statically by hand or dynamically through GVRP. The VLAN ID associates a frame with a specific VLAN and
provides the information that switches need to process the frame across the network. A tagged frame is four bytes
longer than an untagged frame and contains two bytes of TPID (Tag Protocol Identifier, residing within the
type/length field of the Ethernet frame) and two bytes of TCI (Tag Control Information, starts after the source
address field of the Ethernet frame).
The CFI (Canonical Format Indicator) is a single-bit flag, always set to zero for Ethernet switches. If a frame
received at an Ethernet port has a CFI set to 1, then that frame should not be forwarded as it is to an untagged port.
The remaining twelve bits define the VLAN ID, giving a possible maximum number of 4,096 (212) VLANs. Note
that user priority and VLAN ID are independent of each other. A frame with VID (VLAN Identifier) of null (0) is
called a priority frame, meaning that only the priority level is significant and the default VID of the ingress port is
given as the VID of the frame. Of the 4096 possible VIDs, a VID of 0 is used to identify priority frames and value
4095 (FFF) is reserved, so the maximum possible VLAN configurations are 4,094
TPID
User Priority
2 Bytes 3 Bits
8.1.1
CFI
1 Bit
VLAN ID
12 bits
Forwarding Tagged and Untagged Frames
Each port on the switch is capable of passing tagged or untagged frames. To forward a frame from an 802.1Q
VLAN-aware switch to an 802.1Q VLAN-unaware switch, the switch first decides where to forward the frame and
then strips off the VLAN tag. To forward a frame from an 802.1Q VLAN-unaware switch to an 802.1Q VLANaware switch, the switch first decides where to forward the frame, and then inserts a VLAN tag reflecting the
ingress port's default VID. The default PVID is VLAN 1 for all ports, but this can be changed.
8.1.2
Automatic VLAN Registration
GARP and GVRP are the protocols used to automatically register VLAN membership across switches.
VLAN Setup
8-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
GARP
GARP (Generic Attribute Registration Protocol) allows network switchs to register and de-register attribute values
with other GARP participants within a bridged LAN. GARP is a protocol that provides a generic mechanism for
protocols that serve a more specific application, for example, GVRP.
GARP Timers
Switches join VLANs by making a declaration. A declaration is made by issuing a Join message using GARP.
Declarations are withdrawn by issuing a Leave message. A Leave All message terminates all registrations. GARP
timers set declaration timeout values.
GVRP
GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol) is a registration protocol that defines a way for switches to register
necessary VLAN members on ports across the network. Enable this function to permit VLANs groups beyond the
local switch.
Please refer to the following table for common GARP terminology.
Table 8-1 GARP Terminology
VLAN
PARAMETER
VLAN Type
VLAN
Administrative
Control
TERM
DESCRIPTION
Permanent VLAN
This is a static VLAN created manually.
Dynamic VLAN
This is a VLAN configured by a GVRP registration/deregistration
process.
Registration Fixed
Fixed registration ports are permanent VLAN members.
Registration
Forbidden
Ports with registration forbidden are forbidden to join the specified
VLAN.
Normal Registration Ports dynamically join a VLAN using GVRP.
VLAN Tag Control
VLAN Port
8-2
Tagged
Ports belonging to the specified VLAN tag all outgoing frames
transmitted.
Untagged
Ports belonging to the specified don't tag all outgoing frames
transmitted.
Port VID
This is the VLAN ID assigned to untagged frames that this port received.
Acceptable frame
type
You may choose to accept both tagged and untagged incoming frames
or just tagged incoming frames on a port.
Ingress filtering
If set, the switch discards incoming frames for VLANs that do not have
this port as a member
VLAN Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
8.2 Configuring Tagged VLANs
Select 802.1Q as the VLAN Type in the Switch Setup screen and then click VLAN Setup from the navigation
panel to display the next screen.
Figure 8-1 VLAN Static Entry Setup
Table 8-2 VLAN Static Entry Setup
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
GVRP
GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol) is a registration protocol that defines a way for
switches to register necessary VLAN members on ports across the network. Enable this function
to permit VLANs groups beyond the local switch.
Management
VLAN ID
Management VLAN ID is the VLAN ID of the CPU and is used for management only. The default
is "1". All ports, by default, are fixed members of this "management VLAN" in order to manage the
device from any port. If a port is not a member of this VLAN, then users on that port cannot
access the device. To access the device make sure the port that you are connected to is a
member of Management VLAN.
VLAN Setup
8-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 8-2 VLAN Static Entry Setup
FIELD
Ingress Check
DESCRIPTION
If this check box is selected for a port, the device discards incoming frames for VLANs which do
not include this port in its member set.
Port Number The CPU port refers to the switch management port. By default it forms a VLAN with all Ethernet
ports. If it does not form a VLAN with a particular port then the switch cannot manage that port.
Ingress Select the port(s) for which you want to perform ingress checks.
VLAN ID
The VLAN ID associates a frame with a specific VLAN and provides the information that switches
need to process the frame across the network. You may edit an existing VLAN group by clicking
its ID number.
Name
This is the descriptive name for the static VLAN for identification purposes.
Active
This field displays whether this static VLAN is active or not. You can temporarily stop using a
VLAN group by deactivating it rather than deleting.
Delete
To permanently stop using a VLAN group, delete it by selecting that group’s Delete check box
and then clicking Apply.
Click Add VLAN to create a new VLAN group or click Apply to save your changes back to the switch.
8.2.1
Adding/Editing a VLAN Group
To edit an existing VLAN group, click its ID number under VLAN ID in the VLAN Static Entry Setup screen
(Figure 8-1). To create a new VLAN group, click Add VLAN in the VLAN Static Entry Setup screen (Figure
8-1). The configuration screen for both cases is the same (Figure 8-2).
8-4
VLAN Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 8-2 Edit VLAN Static Entry
Table 8-3 Edit VLAN Static Entry
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Active
Select Active to activate this VLAN group.
Name
Enter a descriptive name (up to 12 characters) for the static VLAN for identification purposes; for
example, “marketing” (without the quotes).
VLAN Group ID Enter the VLAN ID for this static entry; the valid range is between 1 and 4094.
Port Number The port number identifies the port you are configuring. Ports 25 and 26 are the uplink ports.
Normal Select Normal for the port to dynamically join this VLAN group using GVRP.
Fixed Select Fixed for the port to be a permanent member of this VLAN group.
VLAN Setup
8-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 8-3 Edit VLAN Static Entry
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Forbidden Select Forbidden if you want to prohibit the port from joining this VLAN group.
TX Tagging Select TX Tagging if you want the port to tag all outgoing frames transmitted with this VLAN
Group ID.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
8.3 Introduction to Port-based VLANs
Port-based VLANs are VLANs where the packet forwarding decision is based on the destination MAC address
and its associated port.
Port-based VLANs require allowed outgoing ports to be defined for each port. Therefore, if you wish to allow two
subscriber ports to talk to each other, for example, between conference rooms in a hotel, you must define the
egress (an egress port is an outgoing port, that is, a port through which a data packet leaves) for both ports.
Port-based VLANs are specific only to the switch on which they were created.
The port-based VLAN setup screen is shown next. Port 0 (the CPU management port) forms a VLAN with all
Ethernet ports.
8.4 Configuring Port-based VLANs
Select Port-based as the VLAN Type in the Switch Setup screen and then click VLAN Setup from the
navigation panel to display the next screen.
8-6
VLAN Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 8-3 Port-based VLAN Setup
VLAN Setup
8-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 8-4 Port-based VLAN Setup
FIELD
Preset Value
DESCRIPTION
Choose from Port Isolation, All Connected or Customized.
Port Isolation means that each port (1 to 26) can only communicate with the CPU management
port and cannot communicate with each other. All incoming ports are selected while only the CPU
outgoing port is selected. This option is the most limiting but also the most secure.
All Connected means all ports can communicate with each other, that is, there are no virtual
LANs. All incoming and outgoing ports are selected. This option is the most flexible but also the
least secure.
Select Customized to configure specific port-based VLANs (specific only to the ES-3024). Check
the ports that can communicate with each other. For two ports to communicate with each other,
you must define the incoming and outgoing port for both ports. For example, for (just) ports 3 and
5 to form a VLAN, select the ports as shown in Figure 8-4 Port-based VLAN Example.
Incoming
These are the ingress ports; an ingress port is an incoming port, that is, a port through which a
data packet enters. If you wish to allow two subscriber ports to talk to each other, you must define
the ingress port for both ports. The numbers in the top row denote the incoming port for the
corresponding port listed on the left (its outgoing port). CPU refers to the switch management
port. By default it forms a VLAN with all Ethernet ports. If it does not form a VLAN with a particular
port then the switch cannot be managed from that port.
Outgoing
These are the egress ports; an egress port is an outgoing port, that is, a port through which a
data packet leaves. If you wish to allow two subscriber ports to talk to each other, you must define
the egress port for both ports. CPU refers to the switch management port. By default it forms a
VLAN with all Ethernet ports. If it does not form a VLAN with a particular port then the switch
cannot be managed from that port.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
8.4.1
Port-based VLAN Example
First select Customized as the Preset Value and then select the ports as shown for ports 3 and 5 to be in the
same VLAN group.
Figure 8-4 Port-based VLAN Example
8-8
VLAN Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 9
Static MAC Forward Setup
Use these screens to configure static MAC address forwarding.
9.1 Introduction to Static MAC Forward Setup
A static MAC address entry is an address that has been manually entered in the MAC address learning table. Static
MAC addresses do not age out. Static MAC Forward Setup means setting static MAC addresses for a port. This
may reduce the need for broadcasting.
Click Static MAC Forward Setup in the navigation panel to bring up the following read-only screen.
Figure 9-1 Static MAC Forward Setup
Table 9-1 Static MAC Forward Setup
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Index
Click an index number to configure a static MAC address rule for a port.
Name
This field displays the descriptive name for identification purposes for this static MAC addressforwarding rule.
Static MAC Forward Edit Setup
9-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 9-1 Static MAC Forward Setup
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Port
This field displays the port where the MAC address shown in the next field will be forwarded.
MAC Address
This field displays the MAC address that will be forwarded.
Active
This field displays whether this static MAC address forwarding rule is active or not. You may
temporarily deactivate a rule without deleting it.
Add
To add a new static MAC address-forwarding rule, click this button.
Delete
To delete a rule, select its checkbox in the Delete column and then click this Delete button.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
9.2 Configuring or Editing a Static MAC Forward Rule
Click Add to configure a new rule or click an index number to edit an existing static MAC address rule. Either
way, a screen as shown next is displayed.
Figure 9-2 Configuring or Editing a Static MAC Forward Rule
Table 9-2 Configuring or Editing a Static MAC Forward Rule
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Active
Make sure to select this check box to activate your rule. You may temporarily deactivate a rule
without deleting it by deselecting this check box.
Name
Type descriptive name for identification purposes for this static MAC address forwarding rule.
MAC Address
Type the MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character pairs.
Static MAC addresses do not age out.
VID
Type the VLAN identification number.
Port
Select a port where the MAC address entered in the previous field will be automatically forwarded.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
9-2
Static MAC Forward Edit Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 10
Filter Setup
This chapter discusses static MAC address port filtering.
10.1 Introduction to Port Filtering
Port filtering means sifting traffic from one or all ports to one or all ports based on the source and/or destination
MAC addresses and VLAN group.
Click Filter Setup from the navigation panel to bring up the next port filter summary screen.
Figure 10-1 Filter Setup
Table 10-1 Filter Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This field displays the index number of the filter rule.
Name
This field displays the descriptive name for this filter rule. This is for identification
purpose only.
Filter Setup
10-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 10-1 Filter Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
This field displays Yes when the filter rule is activated and No when is it deactivated.
Source MAC
Address
This field displays the source MAC address in hexadecimal format. All Entries means
all MAC addresses.
Source Port
This field displays the Ethernet port number from which packets are transmitted. You
may choose one port only or all ports.
Destination MAC
Address
This field displays the destination MAC address in hexadecimal format. All Entries
means all MAC addresses.
Destination Port
This field displays the Ethernet port number to which packets are sent. You may
choose one port only or all ports.
Delete
To delete a rule, select its checkbox in this column and then click the Delete button.
Add
To add a filter rule, click this button.
Delete
To delete a rule, select its checkbox in the Delete column and then click this Delete
button.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
10.2 Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule
Click Add to configure a new filter rule or click an index number to edit an existing filter rule. Either way, a
screen as shown next is displayed.
10-2
Filter Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 10-2 Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule
Table 10-2 Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
Make sure to select this check box to activate your rule. You may temporarily
deactivate a rule without deleting it by deselecting this check box.
Name
Type a descriptive name for this filter rule. This is for identification purpose only.
Source
The next three fields pertain to the source MAC address and source port.
Source MAC Type a MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character
Address pairs or click All Entries to apply the filter rule to all MAC addresses.
VID Type the VLAN group identification number.
Port Select the port to which the filter rule should be applied. You may choose one port only
or all ports (All Ports).
Destination
Filter Setup
The next three fields pertain to the destination MAC address and destination port.
10-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 10-2 Configuring or Editing a Filter Rule
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MAC Address Type a MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character
pairs or click All Entries to apply the filter rule to all MAC addresses.
VID Type the VLAN group identification number.
Port Select the port to which the filter rule should be applied. You may choose one port only
or all ports (All Ports).
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
10-4
Filter Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 11
Mirror Setup
This chapter discusses the Mirror setup screens.
11.1 Introduction to Port Mirroring
Port mirroring allows you to copy traffic going from one or all ports to another or all ports in order that you can
examine the traffic from the mirror port (the port you copy the traffic to) without interference.
Click Mirror Setup in the navigation panel to bring up the next mirror setup summary screen.
Figure 11-1 Mirror Setup
Table 11-1 Mirror Setup
LABEL
Active
Filter Setup
DESCRIPTION
Clear this check box to deactivate port mirroring on the switch.
11-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 11-1 Mirror Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Mirror Port
The mirror port is the port you copy the traffic to in order to examine it in more detail
without interfering with the traffic flow on the original port(s). Select this port from this
drop-down list box.
Index
This field displays the index number of the mirror rule. Click the index number to edit
this mirror rule.
Name
This field displays the descriptive name for this mirror rule. This is for identification
purpose only.
Active
This field displays Yes when the mirror rule is activated and No when is it deactivated.
Direction
This is the direction to which the rule applies, that is Incoming, Outgoing or Both.
Source MAC
Address
This field displays the source MAC address in hexadecimal format. All Entries means
all MAC addresses.
Source Port
This field displays the Ethernet port number from which packets are transmitted. You
may choose one port only or all ports.
Destination MAC
Address
This field displays the destination MAC address in hexadecimal format. All Entries
means all MAC addresses.
Destination Port
This field displays the Ethernet port number to which packets are sent. You may
choose one port only or all ports.
Delete
To delete a rule, select its checkbox in this column and then click the Apply button.
Add
To add a mirror rule, click this button.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
11.2 Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule
Click Add to configure a new mirror rule or click an index number to edit an existing mirror rule. Either way, a
screen as shown next is displayed.
11-2
Mirror Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 11-2 Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule
Table 11-2 Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
Make sure to select this check box to activate your rule. You may temporarily
deactivate a rule without deleting it by clearing this check box.
Name
Type a descriptive name for this mirror rule. This is for identification purposes only.
Direction
Choose the direction to which the rule applies from Incoming, Outgoing or Both.
Source
The source and destination fields identify the traffic you want to copy for analysis. You
can identify source-destination traffic through a combination of MAC address, VLAN
group and port. Configure these parameters in the next three fields.
MAC Address Type a MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character
pairs or click All Entries to apply the filter rule to all MAC addresses.
VID Type the VLAN group identification number.
Port Select the port to which the filter rule should be applied. You may choose one port only
or all ports (All Ports).
Filter Setup
11-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 11-2 Configuring or Editing a Mirror Rule
LABEL
Destination
DESCRIPTION
The source and destination fields identify the traffic you want to copy for analysis. You
can identify source-destination traffic through a combination of MAC address, VLAN
group and port. Configure these parameters in the next three fields.
MAC Address Type a MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character
pairs or click All Entries to apply the filter rule to all MAC addresses.
VID Type the VLAN group identification number.
Port Select the port to which the filter rule should be applied. You may choose one port only
or all ports (All Ports).
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
11-4
Mirror Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 12
Bandwidth Control Setup
This chapter shows you how you can cap the maximum bandwidth allowed from specific source(s) to
specified destination(s) using the Bandwidth Control setup screens.
12.1 Introduction to Bandwidth Control
Bandwidth control means defining a maximum allowable bandwidth for traffic flows from specified source(s) to
specified destination(s). Click Bandwidth Control Setup from the navigation panel to bring up the next screen.
Figure 12-1 Bandwidth Control Setup
Table 12-1 Bandwidth Control Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This field displays the index number of the rule. Click an index number to edit that rule.
Name
This field displays the descriptive name for this rule. This is for identification purposes
only.
Active
This field displays whether the bandwidth control rule is activated or not.
Bandwidth Control Setup
12-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 12-1 Bandwidth Control Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Max. Bandwidth
(kbps)
This field displays the maximum bandwidth allowed in kilobits per second for this traffic
flow.
Source MAC
Address
This field displays the source MAC address in hexadecimal format. All Entries means
all MAC addresses.
Source Port
This field displays the Ethernet port number from which packets are transmitted. You
may choose one port only or all ports.
Destination MAC
Address
This field displays the destination. MAC address in hexadecimal format. All Entries
means all MAC addresses.
Destination Port
This field displays the Ethernet port number to which packets are sent. You may
choose one port only or all ports.
Delete
To delete a rule, select its checkbox in this column and then click the Delete button.
Add
To add a rule, click this button.
Delete
To delete a rule, select its checkbox in the Delete column and then click this Delete
button.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
12.2 Configuring or Editing a Bandwidth Control Rule
Click Add to configure a new rule or click an index number to edit an existing Bandwidth Control setup rule.
Either way, a screen as shown next is displayed.
12-2
Bandwidth Control Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 12-2 Bandwidth Control Setup Edit
Table 12-2 Bandwidth Control Setup Edit
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
Make sure to select this check box to activate your rule. You may temporarily
deactivate a rule without deleting it by clearing this check box.
Name
Type a descriptive name for this bandwidth control rule. This is for identification
purpose only.
Maximum Bandwidth Type the maximum bandwidth allowed in kilobits per second for this traffic flow.
Source
The next three fields pertain to the source MAC address and source port.
MAC Address Type a MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character
pairs or click All Entries to apply the filter rule to all MAC addresses.
VID Type the VLAN group identification number.
Port Select the port to which the bandwidth control rule should apply. You may choose one
port only or all ports (All Ports).
Bandwidth Control Setup
12-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 12-2 Bandwidth Control Setup Edit
LABEL
Destination
DESCRIPTION
The next three fields pertain to the destination MAC address and destination port.
MAC Address Type a MAC address in valid MAC address format, that is, six hexadecimal character
pairs or click All Entries to apply the filter rule to all MAC addresses.
VID Type the VLAN identification number.
Port Select the port to which the bandwidth control rule should apply. You may choose one
port only or all ports (All Ports).
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
12-4
Bandwidth Control Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 13
Trunk Setup
This chapter shows you how to logically aggregate physical links to form one logical, higher-bandwidth
link.
13.1 Introduction to Trunking
Trunking (link aggregation) is the grouping of physical ports into one logical higher-capacity link. You may want
to trunk ports if for example, it is cheaper to use multiple lower-speed links than to under-utilize a high-speed, but
more costly, single-port link.
However, the more ports you aggregate then the fewer available ports you have. You may configure up to four
trunk groups in the ES-3024. A trunk group is one logical link containing multiple ports.
Ports should be physically linked in consecutive order without gaps when forming trunk groups. For example ports
9, 10, 11 and 12 in switch 1 should connect to ports 1, 2, 3 and 4 in switch 2 to form one trunk group; ports 9, 10,
11 and 12 in switch 1 connected to ports 1, 3, 2, 4 in switch 2 would form two trunk groups, not one.
Table 13-1 Trunk Groups
TRUNK GROUP
BEGINNING-TO-END PORT RANGE
T1
1 to 8
T2
9 to 16
T3
17 to 24
T4
25 and 26 (the uplink ports)
See also the Switch Setup chapter for information on dynamic link aggregation using the Link Aggregation
Control Protocol (LACP). The ES-3024 adheres to the 802.3ad standard for static and dynamic (LACP) port
trunking.
13.2 Trunk Setup
Click Trunk Setup in the navigation panel to display the screen shown next.
Trunk Setup
13-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 13-1 Trunk Setup
Table 13-2 Trunk Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Trunk ID
The trunk ID identifies the trunk group, that is, one logical link containing multiple ports
– see Table 13-1 Trunk Groups.
Starting Port
This is the beginning port in the trunk group’s port range and is not configurable - see
Table 13-1 Trunk Groups.
Ending Port
Select the end port in the port range from the drop-down list box - see Table 13-1 Trunk
Groups.
Active
Make sure to select this check box to activate the trunk group. You may temporarily
deactivate a trunk group without deleting it by clearing this check box.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
13-2
Trunk Setup
Advanced Management
Part V
Advanced Management
This part describes the advanced management screens.
V
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 14
SNMP
This chapter discusses SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) for network management and
monitoring.
14.1 About SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol is a protocol used for exchanging management information between
network switches. SNMP is a member of TCP/IP protocol suite. A manager station can manage and monitor the
ES-3024 through the network via SNMP version one (SNMPv1) and/or SNMP version 2c. The next figure
illustrates an SNMP management operation. SNMP is only available if TCP/IP is configured.
Figure 14-1 SNMP Management Model
An SNMP managed network consists of two main components: agents and a manager.
An agent is a management software module that resides in a managed switch (the ES-3024). An agent translates
the local management information from the managed switch into a form compatible with SNMP. The manager is
the console through which network administrators perform network management functions. It executes
applications that control and monitor managed devices.
The managed devices contain object variables/managed objects that define each piece of information to be
collected about a switch. Examples of variables include such as number of packets received, node port status etc.
A Management Information Base (MIB) is a collection of managed objects. SNMP allows a manager and agents
to communicate for the purpose of accessing these objects.
SNMP Setup
14-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
SNMP itself is a simple request/response protocol based on the manager/agent model. The manager issues a
request and the agent returns responses using the following protocol operations:
Table 14-1 SNMP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
Get
Allows the manager to retrieve an object variable from the agent.
GetNext
Allows the manager to retrieve the next object variable from a table or list within an agent. In
SNMPv1, when a manager wants to retrieve all elements of a table from an agent, it initiates a
Get operation, followed by a series of GetNext operations.
Set
Allows the manager to set values for object variables within an agent.
Trap
Used by the agent to inform the manager of some events.
14.2 Supported MIBs
MIBs let administrators collect statistics and monitor status and performance.
The ES-3024 supports the following MIBs:
SNMP MIB II (RFC 1213)
RFC 1157 SNMP v1
RFC 1493 Bridge MIBs
RFC 1643 Ethernet MIBs
RFC 1155 SMI
RFC 2674 SNMPv2, SNMPv2c
RFC 1757 RMON
SNMPv2, SNMPv2c or later version, compliant with RFC 2011
SNMPv2 MIB for IP, RFC 2012 SNMPv2 MIB for TCP, RFC
2013 SNMPv2 MIB for UDP
14.3 Configuring SNMP
To configure SNMP, click SNMP from the navigation panel. The “community” for Get, Set and Trap fields is
simply SNMP’s terminology for password.
14-2
SNMP Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 14-2 SNMP Setup
The following table describes the SNMP configuration parameters.
Table 14-2 SNMP Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Get Community
Enter the get community, which is the password for the incoming Get- and GetNext- requests
from the management station.
Set Community
Enter the set community, which is the password for incoming Set- requests from the
management station.
Trap: Community
Enter the trap community, which is the password sent with each trap to the SNMP manager.
Trap: Destination
Enter the IP addresses of up to four stations to send your SNMP traps to.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
14.4 SNMP Traps
The ES-3024 sends traps to an SNMP manager when an event occurs. SNMP traps supported are outlined in the
following table.
Table 14-3 SNMP Traps
GENERIC TRAP
SPECIFIC TRAP
DESCRIPTION
0 (Cold Start)
0
This trap is sent when the ES-3024 is turned on.
1 (WarmStart)
0
This trap is sent when the ES-3024 restarts.
SNMP Setup
14-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 14-3 SNMP Traps
GENERIC TRAP
SPECIFIC TRAP
DESCRIPTION
2 (linkDown)
0
This trap is sent when the Ethernet is down.
3 (linkUp)
0
This trap is sent when the Ethernet is up.
4
0
(authenticationFailure)
This trap is sent when an SNMP request comes from nonauthenticated hosts.
6 (enterpriseSpecific)
1(TRAP_REBOOT)
This trap is sent when the system is going to reboot. The trap
displays the reason for the reboot.
2
(TRAP_SYSTEMSHUTDO
WN)
This trap is sent when the system is going to shut down. The
trap displays the reason for the shutdown.
3 (TRAP_OVERHEAT)
This trap is sent when the temperature exceeds the threshold
of 65 degrees centigrade. For example, the following trap
shows that the current reading at Temp1 is 68 degrees
centigrade.
"Temp1 exceeds Limit (Limit = 65 degree C, Read = 68
degree C)"
4
This trap is sent when the temperature returns to normal.
(TRAP_OVERHEATOVER)
For example, the following trap shows that the current reading
at Temp1 is 64 degrees centigrade.
"Temp1 back to Normal (Limit = 65 degree C, Read = 64
degree C)"
5 (TRAP_ERRLOG)
This trap is sent when an error log is recorded in the system.
The trap includes the content of the error log.
6 (TRAP_FANRPMLOW)
This trap is sent when the fan speed falls below 4000 RPM
(“Limit”, the minimum speed allowed). For example, the
following trap shows that the current reading at FAN 1 is 3800
RPM.
"FAN1 exceeds Limit (Limit = 4000 RPM, Read = 3800 RPM)"
7
This trap is sent when the fan speed returns to normal.
(TRAP_FANRPMNORMAL)
For example, the following trap shows that the current reading
at FAN 1 is 5500 RPM.
"FAN1 back to Normal (Limit = 4000 RPM, Read = 5500
RPM)"
8 (TRAP_VOLTAGELOW)
This trap is sent when the voltage falls out of the tolerance
range.
For example, the following trap shows that the current reading
at the 3.3V sensor is 3.00V, the upper voltage limit is 3.36V
and the lower voltage limit is 3.10V.
"Power 3.3V exceeds Limit (Up Limit = 3.36V, Down Limit =
3.10V, Read = 3.00V)"
14-4
SNMP Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 14-3 SNMP Traps
GENERIC TRAP
SPECIFIC TRAP
DESCRIPTION
9 (TRAP_POWENORMAL) This trap is sent when the voltage returns to normal.
For example, the following trap shows that the current reading
at the 3.3V sensor is 3.20V, the upper voltage limit is 3.36V
and the lower voltage limit is 3.10V.
"Power 3.3V back to Normal (Up Limit = 3.36V, Down Limit =
3.10V, Read = 3.20V)"
SNMP Setup
14-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 15
RADIUS Setup
This chapter shows you how to configure the RADIUS Setup screen in order to connect to an external
RADIUS server.
15.1 Introduction to RADIUS
RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) authentication is a popular protocol used to authenticate
users by means of an external server instead of (or in addition to) an internal device user database that is limited to
the memory capacity of the device. In essence, RADIUS authentication allows you to validate an unlimited
number of users from a central location.
Figure 15-1 RADIUS Server
15.2 RADIUS Setup
Click Radius from the navigation panel to display the next screen.
Figure 15-2 RADIUS Setup
RADIUS Setup
15-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 15-1 RADIUS Setup
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Authentication
Server IP
Port
Shared Secret
Enter the IP address of the external RADIUS server in dotted decimal notation.
The default port of the RADIUS server for authentication is 1812. You need not change this
value unless your network administrator instructs you to do so.
Specify a password (up to 31 alphanumeric characters) as the key to be shared between the
external RADIUS server and the switch. This key is not sent over the network. This key must
be the same on the external RADIUS server and the switch.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
15-2
RADIUS Setup
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 16
Logins
Configure up to four administrators using this screen
16.1 Introduction
Up to four people may administer the switch via web configurator at any one time. Configure passwords for each
administrator in the menu.
It is highly recommended that you change the default password ("1234").
Click Logins from the navigation panel.
Figure 16-1 Logins
The following table describes the menu fields.
Logins
16-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 16-1 Logins
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Old Password
Type the existing system password ("1234" is the default password when shipped).
New Password
Enter your new system password.
Retype to confirm
Retype your new system password for confirmation
Edit Logins
You may configure passwords for up to four users from this drop-down list. Click on one
of Login 1 to Login 4 and set a user name and password for each user as shown in the
next screen and described in the previous three fields.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Figure 16-2 Edit Logins
16-2
Logins
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 17
Maintenance
This chapter explains how to configure the maintenance screens. The links on the upper right of the
Maintenance screen lead to different screens that let you maintain the firmware and configuration files.
17.1 Maintenance
Click Maintenance in the navigation panel to open the following screen.
Figure 17-1 Maintenance
Maintenance
17-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 17-1 Maintenance
LABEL
Syslog
DESCRIPTION
Select this check box to activate syslog (UNIX system logging) and then configure the
UNIX syslog parameters described in the following fields.
Syslog IP Address Enter the IP address of the syslog server.
Log Facility Select one of seven different options from the drop-down list box. The log facility allows
you to log the message to different files in the server. Please refer to your UNIX manual
for more details.
Service Access
Control
Service Access Control allows you to decide what services you may use to access the
ES-3024. You may also change the default service port and configure “trusted
computer(s)” for each service in the Remote Management screen (see later in this
guide).
Services Services you may use to access the ES-3024 are listed here.
Enable Select the Enable check boxes for the corresponding services that you want to allow to
access the ES-3024.
Server Port For Telnet, FTP or web services, you may change the default service port by typing the
new port number in the Server Port field. If you change the default port number then
you will have to let people (who wish to use the service) know the new port number for
that service.
Time and Date
Setting
Time and Date Setting allows you to set the time manually or get the current time and
date from an external server when you turn on your switch. The real time is then
displayed in the switch logs.
Use Time Server
When Bootup
Enter the time service protocol that your timeserver sends when you turn on the switch.
Not all timeservers support all protocols, so you may have to use trial and error to find a
protocol that works. The main differences between them are the time format.
Daytime (RFC 867) format is day/month/year/time zone of the server.
Time (RFC-868) format displays a 4-byte integer giving the total number of seconds
since 1970/1/1 at 0:0:0.
NTP (RFC-1305) is similar to Time (RFC-868).
None is the default value. Enter the time manually. Each time you turn on the switch, the
time and date will be reset to 2000-1-1 0:0.
Time Server IP
Address
Enter the IP address (or URL if you configure a domain name server in the IP Setup
screen) of your timeserver. The switch searches for the timeserver for up to 60 seconds.
If you select a timeserver that is unreachable, then this screen will appear locked for 60
seconds. Please wait.
Current Time
This field displays the time you open this menu (or refresh the menu).
New Time
(hh:min:ss)
Enter the new time in hour, minute and second format. The new time then appears in the
Current Time field after you click Apply.
Current Date
This field displays the date you open this menu.
New Date (yyyymm-dd)
Enter the new date in year, month and day format. The new date then appears in the
Current Date field after you click Apply.
17-2
Maintenance
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 17-1 Maintenance
LABEL
Time Zone
DESCRIPTION
Select the time difference between UTC (Universal Time Coordinated, formerly known
as GMT, Greenwich Mean Time) and your time zone from the drop-down list box.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
17.2 Remote Management
Click Remote Management in the Maintenance screen to display the following screen.
A “secured client set” is a group of one or more “trusted computers” from which an administrator may use a
service to manage the switch. Configure “trusted computer(s)” for each service in the Remote Management
screen. Click Maintenance to return to the first Maintenance screen.
Figure 17-2 Remote Management
Table 17-2 Remote Management
FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Index
This is the client set index number. A “client set” is a group of one or more “trusted
computers” from which an administrator may use a service to manage the switch.
Active
Yes indicates the client set is active and No indicates that it is not active.
Start Address
The default value for a start and end address is 0.0.0.0, which means you don’t
care which host is trying to use a service/protocol.
End Address
This field displays the end IP address in a range of client IP addresses that may
use the service(s) defined in the next field.
Telnet/FTP/Web/ICMP/SNMP Yes means that the specified service/protocol is enabled for this client set.
Similarly, No means it is not.
To edit a client set, click its client set index number.
Maintenance
17-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 17-3 Edit Secured Client
Table 17-3 Edit Secured Client
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
Select this check box to activate this secured client set. Clear the check box if
you wish to temporarily disable the set without deleting it.
Start Address
Configure the IP address range of trusted computers fro which you can
manage this switch.
End Address
The switch checks if the client IP address of a computer requesting a service
or protocol matches the range set here. The switch immediately disconnects
the session if it does not match.
Telnet/FTP/Web/ICMP/SNMP Select services that may be used for managing the switch from the specified
trusted computers.
Click Apply to save your changes back to the switch or click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
17-4
Maintenance
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 18
Firmware and Configuration File
Maintenance
This chapter shows you how to manage configuration files and upgrade firmware.
18.1 Firmware Upgrade
Click Firmware Upgrade in the Maintenance screen if you want to upgrade your switch firmware. See the
Statistics screen to verify your current firmware version number. Make sure you have downloaded (and unzipped)
the correct model firmware and version to your computer before uploading to the device.
Be sure to upload correct model firmware as uploading the wrong model firmware may damage
your device.
Click Maintenance to go back to the first Maintenance screen when done.
Figure 18-1 Firmware Upgrade
Type the path and file name of the firmware file you wish to upload to the switch in the File Path text box or click
Browse to display the Choose File screen from which you can locate it. After you have specified the file, click
Upload.
18.2 Restore a Configuration File
Backing up your switch configurations allows you to create various “snap shots” of your device from which you
may restore at a later date. Restore a previously saved configuration from your computer to the switch using this
screen. Click Restore Configuration in the Maintenance screen.
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance
18-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Figure 18-2 Restore Configuration
Type the path and file name of the configuration file you wish to restore in the File Path text box or click Browse
to display the Choose File screen (below) from which you can locate it. After you have specified the file, click
Restore. "rom-0" is the name of the configuration file on the switch, so your backup configuration file is
automatically renamed when you restore using this screen.
18.3 Back Up a Configuration File
Back up your current switch configuration to a computer using this screen. Click Backup in the Maintenance
screen.
Figure 18-3 Backup Configuration
Click Backup.
Choose Save this file to disk to display the Save As screen.
Choose a location to save the file on your computer from the Save in drop-down list box and type a descriptive
name for it in the File name list box. Click Save to save the configuration file to your computer.
18.4 Command Line FTP
This section shows some examples of uploading to or downloading files from the switch using FTP commands.
First, understand the filename conventions.
18-2
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
18.4.1
Filename Conventions
The configuration file (often called the romfile or rom-0) contains the factory default settings in the screens such
as password, switch setup, IP Setup, etc. It arrives from ZyXEL with a “rom” filename extension. Once you have
customized the switch's settings, they can be saved back to your computer under a filename of your choosing.
ZyNOS (ZyXEL Network Operating System sometimes referred to as the “ras” file) is the system firmware and
has a “bin” filename extension.
Table 18-1 Filename Conventions
FILE TYPE
INTERNAL
NAME
EXTERNAL
NAME
DESCRIPTION
Configuration File
Rom-0
*.rom
This is the configuration filename on the switch. Uploading the
rom-0 file replaces the entire ROM file system, including your
switch configurations, system-related data (including the
default password), the error log and the trace log.
Firmware
Ras
*.bin
This is the generic name for the ZyNOS firmware on the switch.
Example FTP Commands
ftp> put firmware.bin ras
This is a sample FTP session showing the transfer of the computer file " firmware.bin" to the switch .
ftp> get rom-0 config.cfg
This is a sample FTP session saving the current configuration to a file called “config.cfg” on your computer.
If your (T)FTP client does not allow you to have a destination filename different than the source, you will need to
rename them as the switch only recognizes “rom-0” and “ras”. Be sure you keep unaltered copies of both files for
later use.
Be sure to upload correct model firmware as uploading the wrong model firmware may damage
your device.
18.4.2
FTP Command Line Procedure
Step 1. Launch the FTP client on your computer.
Step 2. Enter “open”, followed by a space and the IP address of your switch.
Step 3. Press [ENTER] when prompted for a username.
Step 4. Enter your password as requested (the default is “1234”).
Step 5. Enter “bin” to set transfer mode to binary.
Step 6. Use “put” to transfer files from the computer to the switch, for example, “put firmware.bin ras” transfers
the firmware on your computer (firmware.bin) to the switch and renames it “ras”. Similarly, “put
config.rom rom-0” transfers the configuration file on your computer (config.rom) to the switch and
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance
18-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
renames it “rom-0”. Likewise “get rom-0 config.rom” transfers the configuration file on the switch to your
computer and renames it “config.rom.” See earlier in this chapter for more information on filename
conventions.
Step 7. Enter “quit” to exit the ftp prompt.
18.4.3
GUI-based FTP Clients
The following table describes some of the commands that you may see in GUI-based FTP clients.
Table 18-2 General Commands for GUI-based FTP Clients
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
Host Address
Enter the address of the host server.
Login Type
Anonymous.
This is when a user I.D. and password is automatically supplied to the server for
anonymous access. Anonymous logins will work only if your ISP or service
administrator has enabled this option.
Normal.
The server requires a unique User ID and Password to login.
Transfer Type
Transfer files in either ASCII (plain text format) or in binary mode. Configuration and
firmware files should be transferred in binary mode.
Initial Remote Directory
Specify the default remote directory (path).
Initial Local Directory
Specify the default local directory (path).
18.4.4
FTP over WAN Restrictions
FTP over WAN will not work when:
Telnet service is disabled in Secured Client Sets.
The IP address(es) in the Secured Client Sets menu does not match the client IP address. If it does not
match, the switch will disconnect the Telnet session immediately.
18-4
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 19
Statistics
This chapter explains the Advanced Management Statistics screens.
19.1 Introduction to Statistics
The web configurator provides statistics screens to allow you to see how much traffic the switch is handling and
how it is handling it.
Click Statistics in the navigation panel to open this screen. Use this screen to view general information and to
access other screens with more detailed statistical information.
Figure 19-1 Statistics
Table 19-1 Statistics
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
System Name
This field displays the switch 's model name.
F/W Version
This field displays the version number of the switch 's current firmware including the
date created.
Ethernet Address
This field refers to the Ethernet MAC (Media Access Control) address of the switch.
IP Address
This is the IP address of the switch in dotted decimal notation.
IP Mask
This shows the IP subnet mask of the switch.
STP Status
Click this button to display Spanning Tree Protocol statistics.
Statistics
19-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-1 Statistics
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
LACP Status
Click this button to display Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) trunking
statistics.
Hardware Monitor
Click this button to display hardware (fan, temperature, and voltage) statistics.
Port Statistics
Click this button to display statistics on all ports.
VLAN Status
Click this button to display 802.1Q VLAN statistics.
Port Details
Select a port from the drop-down list box to display individual port statistics.
19.1.1
STP Status
Click STP Status in the Statistics screen to open this screen. Use this screen to view Spanning Tree Protocol
information about the root bridge and this switch (this switch may be the root bridge). See the Switch Setup
chapter for more information on STP.
Figure 19-2 STP Statistics
Table 19-2 STP Statistics
LABEL
Bridge
19-2
DESCRIPTION
Root refers to the base of the spanning tree (the root bridge). Our Bridge is this
switch. This switch may also be the root bridge.
Statistics
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-2 STP Statistics
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Bridge ID
This is the unique identifier for this bridge, consisting of bridge priority plus MAC
address. This ID is the same for Root and Our Bridge if the switch is the root
switch.
Hello Time (second)
This is the time interval (in seconds) at which the root switch transmits a
configuration message. The root bridge determines Hello Time, Max Age and
Forwarding Delay.
Max Age (second)
This is the maximum time (in seconds) a switch can wait without receiving a
configuration message before attempting to reconfigure.
Forwarding Delay
(second)
This is the time (in seconds) the root switch will wait before changing states (that is,
listening to learning to forwarding).
Cost to Bridge
This is the path cost from the root port on this switch to the root switch.
Port ID
This is the priority and number of the port on the switch through which this switch
must communicate with the root of the Spanning Tree.
Topology Changed
Times
This is the number of times the spanning tree has been reconfigured.
Time Since Last
Change
This is the time since the spanning tree was last reconfigured.
Poll Interval(s)
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes. You may change
the refresh interval by typing a new number in the text box and then clicking Set
Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt STP statistic polling.
19.1.2
LACP Status
Click LACP Status in the Statistics screen to open this screen. Use this screen to view port trunking. See the
Switch Setup chapter for more information on LACP.
LACP aggregation ID consists of the following information:
Statistics
19-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
AGGREGATOR ID:
[(0000,00-00-00-00-00-00,0000,00,0000)]
[(0000,00-00-00-00-00-00,0000,00,0000)]
Local switch
0000
00-00-00-00-00
System priority
0000
Local switch MAC address
00
Key
Port Priority
0000
00
0000
1
Port Number1
Peer switch
0000
00-00-00-00-00
System priority
MAC address
Key
Port Priority
0000
1
Port Number1
Figure 19-3 Aggregator ID:
Figure 19-4 LACP Status
Table 19-3 LACP Statistics
LABEL
1
DESCRIPTION
Trunk ID
The trunk ID identifies the trunk group, that is, one logical link containing multiple
ports – see the Trunk Setup chapter for more in formation on trunk groups.
Aggregator ID
See Figure 19-3 for more detailed information on this field.
Enabled Port
These are the ports you have configured in the Trunk Setup screen to be in the
trunk group.
Synchronized Ports
These are the ports that are currently transmitting data as one logical link in this
trunk group.
This is “0” as it is the aggregator ID for the trunk group, not the individual port.
19-4
Statistics
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-3 LACP Statistics
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Poll Interval(s)
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes. You may change
the refresh interval by typing a new number in the text box and then clicking Set
Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt statistic polling.
19.1.3
Hardware Monitor
Click Hardware Monitor in the Statistics screen to open this screen. Use the hardware performance statistics in
this screen for hardware troubleshooting.
Figure 19-5 Hardware Monitor
Statistics
19-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-4 Hardware Monitor
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Temperature Unit (C)
The switch has temperature sensors that are capable of detecting and reporting if the
temperature rises above the threshold. You may choose the temperature unit
(Centigrade or Fahrenheit) in this field. MAC, CPU and PHY refer to the location of
the temperature sensors on the switch printed circuit board.
Current This shows the current temperature in degrees centigrade at this sensor.
Max This field displays the maximum temperature measured at this sensor.
Min This field displays the minimum temperature measured at this sensor.
Threshold This field displays the upper temperature limit at this sensor.
Status This field displays Normal for temperatures below the threshold and Error for those
above.
Fan speed (RPM)
A properly functioning fan is an essential component (along with a sufficiently
ventilated, cool operating environment) in order for the device to stay within the
temperature threshold. Each fan has a sensor that is capable of detecting and
reporting if the fan speed falls below the threshold shown.
Current This field displays this fan's current speed in Revolutions Per Minute (RPM).
Max This field displays this fan's maximum speed measured in Revolutions Per Minute
(RPM).
Min This field displays this fan's minimum speed measured in Revolutions Per Minute
(RPM). "<41" is displayed for speeds too small to measure (under 2000 RPM).
Threshold This field displays the minimum speed at which a normal fan should work.
Status Normal indicates that this fan is functioning above the minimum speed. Error
indicates that this fan is functioning below the minimum speed.
Voltage(V)
The power supply for each voltage has a sensor that is capable of detecting and
reporting if the voltage falls out of the tolerance range.
Current This is the current voltage reading.
Max This field displays the maximum voltage measured at this point.
Min This field displays the minimum voltage measured at this point.
Tolerance A tolerance of plus-minus five percent is the acceptable deviation from the nominal
voltage.
Status Normal indicates that the voltage is within an acceptable operating range at this
point; otherwise Error is displayed.
Poll Interval(s)
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes. You may change
the refresh interval by typing a new number in the text box and then clicking Set
Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt statistic polling.
19-6
Statistics
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
19.1.4
VLAN Status
Click VLAN Status in the Statistics screen to open this screen. Use this screen to check status and membership
data about the card’s IEEE 802.1Q VLANs.
Figure 19-6 802.1Q VLAN Status
Table 19-5 802.1Q VLAN Status
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Number of VLAN
This is the number of VLANs configured on the switch.
Index
This is the VLAN index number.
VID
This is the VLAN identification number that was configured in the VLAN Setup screen.
Member
Ports that have been added to this VLAN are listed here in numerical order.
Untagged Port
Untagged ports that have been added to this VLAN are listed here in numerical order.
Elapsed Time
This field shows how long it has been since a normal VLAN was registered or a static
VLAN was set up.
Status
This field shows how this VLAN was added to the switch; dynamically using GVRP or
statically, that is, added as a permanent entry.
Poll Interval(s)
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes. You may change the
refresh interval by typing a new number in the text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt polling statistics.
Previous/Next
Page
Click one of these buttons to show the previous/next screen if all status information
cannot be seen in one screen.
Statistics
19-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
19.1.5
Port Statistics
Click Port Statistics in the Statistics screen to open this screen. Use this screen to check status and performance
data about the switch’s ports.
Figure 19-7 Port Statistics
Table 19-6 Port Statistics
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
System up Time This field shows how long the system has been running since the last time it was started.
Port
This identifies the Ethernet port.
Link
This field displays the speed (either 10M for 10Mbps, 100M for 100Mbps or another value
depending on the uplink module being used) and the duplex (F for full duplex or H for half).
State
This field displays the STP state of the port. See the Switch Setup chapter for details on
STP states.
LACP
This fields displays whether LACP has been enabled on the port.
TxPkts
This field shows the number of transmitted frames on this port.
RxPkts
This field shows the number of received frames on this port.
Errors
This field shows the number of received errors on this port.
19-8
Statistics
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-6 Port Statistics
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Tx KB/s
This field shows the number of kilobytes per second transmitted on this port.
Rx KB/s
This field shows the number of kilobytes per second received on this port.
Up Time
This field shows the total amount of time in hours, minutes and seconds the port has been
up.
Poll Interval(s)
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes. You may change the
refresh interval by typing a new number in the text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt system statistic polling.
Clear Counter
Choose a port from the drop-down list box and then click Clear Counter to erase the
recorded statistical information for that port.
19.1.6
Port Details
Select a port from the Port Details drop-down list box in the Statistics screen to display individual port statistics.
Use this screen to check status and detailed performance data about an individual port on the card.
Figure 19-8 Port Details
Statistics
19-9
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-7 Port Details
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This refers to the port number.
Link
This field shows whether the Ethernet connection is down, and the speed/duplex mode.
State
This field shows the training state of the ports. The states are FORWARDING (forwarding),
which means the link is functioning normally or STOP (the port is stopped to break a loop or
duplicate path).
LACP
This field shows if LACP is enabled on this port or not.
TxPkts
This field shows the number of transmitted frames on this port
RxPkts
This field shows the number of received frames on this port
Errors
This field shows the number of received errors on this port.
Tx KB/s
This field shows the number kilobytes per second transmitted on this port.
Rx KB/s
This field shows the number of kilobytes per second received on this port.
Up Time
This field shows the total amount of time the connection has been up.
Tx Packet
The following fields display detailed information about frames transmitted.
TX This field shows the number of good frames (unicast, multicast and broadcast) transmitted.
Multicast This field shows the number of good multicast frames transmitted.
Broadcast This field shows the number of good broadcast frames transmitted.
Pause This field shows the number of 802.3x Pause frames transmitted.
Tagged This field shows the number of frames with VLAN tags transmitted.
Rx Packet
The following fields display detailed information about frames received.
RX This field shows the number of good frames (unicast, multicast and broadcast) received.
64 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) received that were 64 octets in
length.
65-127 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) received that were between 65
and 127 octets in length.
128-255 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) received that were between 128
and 255 octets in length.
256-511 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) received that were between 256
and 511 octets in length.
512-1023 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) received that were between 512
and 1023 octets in length.
1024-1518 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) received that were between 1024
19-10
Statistics
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 19-7 Port Details
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
and 1518 octets in length.
>1518 This field shows the number of frames (including bad frames) transmitted that were greater than
1518 octets in length.
Multicast This field shows the number of good multicast frames received.
Broadcast This field shows the number of good broadcast frames received.
Pause This field shows the number of 802.3x Pause frames received.
Tagged This field shows the number of frames with VLAN tags received.
Control This field shows the number of control received (including those with CRC error) but it does not
include the 802.3x Pause frames.
TX Collision
The following fields display information on collisions while transmitting.
Single This is a count of successfully transmitted frames for which transmission is inhibited by exactly
one collision.
Multiple This is a count of successfully transmitted frames for which transmission was inhibited by more
than one collision.
Excessive This is a count of frames for which transmission failed due to excessive collisions. Excessive
collision is defined as the number of maximum collisions before the retransmission count is
reset.
Late This is the number of times a late collision is detected, that is, after 512 bits of the frame have
already been transmitted.
Error Packet
The following fields display detailed information about frames received that were in error.
RX CRC This field shows the number of frames received with CRC (Cyclic Redundant Check) error(s).
Length This field shows the number of frames received with a length that was out of range.
Alignment This field shows the number of frames received of proper size but with CRC error(s) and a nonintegral number of octets.
Runt This field shows the number of frames received that were too short (shorter than 64 octets),
including the ones with CRC errors.
Dropped Packet
The following filed indicates why frames were dropped.
Giant This field shows the number of frames dropped because they were bigger than the maximum
frame size.
Poll Interval(s)
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes. You may change the refresh
interval by typing a new number in the text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to stop port statistic polling.
Clear Counter
Click this button to erase the recorded statistical information for this port.
Statistics
19-11
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 20
Diagnostic
This chapter explains the Diagnostic screens.
20.1 Diagnostic
Click Diagnostic in the navigation panel to open this screen. Use this general diagnostic screen to check system
logs, reset the system or ping IP addresses. Click the Ethernet port link in this screen to diagnose an Ethernet port.
Figure 20-1 Diagnostic Screen
Table 20-1 Diagnostic Screen
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
System Log
Display
Click this button to display a log of events in the multi-line text box.
Reboot System
Click this button to restart the switch. A warning dialog box displays asking if you're sure. Click
OK to proceed.
Clear System Log Click this button to clear the log of events in the multi-line text box.
IP Address
Type the IP address of a device that you want to ping in order to test a connection.
Ping
Click this button to have the device ping the IP address (in the field to the left) 5 times.
Diagnostic
20-1
Commands
Part VI
Commands
This part gives information on commands for the ES-3024.
VI
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 21
Commands Introduction
This chapter introduces line commands and gives a summary of commands available.
21.1 Command Line Interface Overview
In addition to the web configurator, you can use line commands to configure the switch. It is recommended that
you use the web configurator for everyday management of the switch and that you use line commands for
advanced switch diagnosis and troubleshooting. If you have problems with your switch, customer support may
request that you issue some of these commands to assist them in troubleshooting.
You can use the “config save” command to save tagged IEEE 802.1Q VLAN and STP commands
in non-volatile memory (Flash) but all other line command configurations are saved in volatile
memory (DRAM) only, so are not effective after you restart the switch!
Telnet to the switch or connect a computer to the console port and use terminal emulation software configured to
the following parameters:
21.1.1
VT100 terminal emulation
9600 bps
No parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit
No flow control
Command Conventions
The system uses a one-level command structure. You must type the full command every time, as follows.
192.168.1.1> <command>
For instance, the following example shows how to enable GVRP.
192.168.1.1> sys sw gvrp enable
The conventions for typing in most CI commands are shown next.
command <interface|device> subcommand [parameter]
command subcommand [parameter]
21.1.2
Command Syntax Conventions
1. Command keywords are in courier new font.
2. The | symbol means “or”.
3. Required fields in a command are enclosed in angle brackets <>. Use the following command to turn the
system monitor on or off.
Commands Introduction
21-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
sys monitor enable <on/off>
4. Optional fields in a command are enclosed in square brackets [], for example, year, month and day are
optional in the following command. This command just displays the date if you don’t specify the year, month
and day parameters.
sys date [year month day]
5. Commands can be abbreviated to the smallest unique string that differentiates the command. For example the
“system date” command could be abbreviated to “s d”.
6. Type “help” or “?” to display a list of valid commands or type a command followed with “help” or “?” to
display a list of associated subcommands.
21.2 Command Summary
The following tables are summaries of the commands available in the ES-3024 together with a brief description of
each command. See the related section in the User’s Guide for more background information.
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
sys
Retrieves the date and time from
the time server specified in the
web configurator.
adjtime
date
[year month day]
Sets or displays the system’s
current date.
edit
Edits the system preset text file
such as autoexec.net.
feature
Displays a list of the device’s
major features.
[hostname]
Sets or displays the system name.
clear
Clears the error log.
disp
Shows the error log.
online [on|off]
Enables/disables the error log to
be displayed on screen.
stdio
[minute]
Sets or displays the management
terminal idle timeout value.
time
[hour [min [sec]]]
Sets or displays the system time.
trcdisp
parse, brief, disp
Sets the level of detail that should
be displayed. Use “parse” to
display the most detail and “disp”
to display the least.
hostname
log
trclog
21-2
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
switch
[on|off]
Enables/disables/ the system trace
log or shows whether it’s on or off.
online
[on|off]
Enables/disables the trace log
onscreen display (for example in
the telnet management window).
level
[level]
Sets the level (1-10) of trace logs
(1 shows the least) to display.
type <bitmap>
Uses hexadecimal characters to
set the type of trace logs to record.
disp
Shows the trace log.
clear
Erases the trace log.
call
Shows call events.
encapmask
[mask]
Shows which type of
encapsulation the trace log
records or sets it if you specify the
encapsulation’s hexadecimal
character.
trcpacket
create <entry> <size>
Creates a packet trace buffer.
destroy
Removes the packet trace buffer.
Sets the packet trace direction for
channel <name>
[none|incoming|outgoing|bothway a given channel.
]
Commands Introduction
string [on|off]
Enables/disables the sending of a
log to the trace packet buffer when
configuration changes are made or
displays the current setting.
switch [on|off]
Enables/disables packet trace or
displays the current setting.
disp
Displays the trace packets.
udp
Sends the trace packets to
another system using UDP.
udp switch [on|off]
Enables/disables the sending of
the trace packets to another
system using UDP or displays the
current setting.
udp addr <addr>
Sets the target IP address for
sending trace packets using UDP.
udp port <port>
Sets the UDP port (should match
that of the target IP address) for
sending trace packets using UDP.
parse [[start_idx], end_idx]
Displays detailed packet details of
the packet range specified.
21-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
brief
Displays a brief listing of packet
contents.
Displays the RAS code and driver
versions.
version
view
DESCRIPTION
view <filename>
Displays the specified text file.
switch [on|off]
Turns the watchdog firmware
protection feature on or off.
cnt [value]
Sets (0-34463) or displays the
current watchdog count (in 1.6 sec
units).
status
Displays the status of the
hardware monitor.
show
Displays the hardware monitor’s
statistics.
vlimit <idx> <high> <low>
Sets the maximum (<high>) or
minimum (<low>) voltage at the
specified point (<idx>).
tlimit <idx> <limit>
Sets the maximum (<limit>)
temperature at the specified point
(<idx>).
flimit <bank> <idx> <limit>
Sets the maximum (<limit>) fan
revs per minute (RPM) at the
specified fan (<idx>) in the
specified bank (<bank>). A “bank”
delineates a set of fans.
fanmask <bank> [<mask>]
Sets the fan detection mask in the
specified bank (<bank>). Use the
mask to disable monitoring of a
fan.
vclear
Clears the voltage statistics.
tclear
Clears the temperature statistics.
fclear
Clears the fan statistics.
clear
Clears the hardware monitor
statistics.
enable [<on/off>]
Enables or disables the hardware
monitor.
test
Tests the hardware monitor chip.
lbt intlbt <port|All> [count]
ixe2424 refers to the switch chip.
Performs an internal loop back test
on a specified port or all ports.
lbt extlbt <port|All> [count]
Performs an external loop back
test on a specified port or all ports.
wdog
monitor
ixe2424
21-4
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
pktcnt <port>
Display port statistic counter
pktcntclear <port>
Reset port statistic counter
port <portID> <enable | disable>
<Speed> <FlowCtrl>
Port setup
phyread <portID> [<phyAddr>]
Read PHY register
phywrite <portID> <phyAddr>
<data>
Write PHY register
dbm mac cnt [port]
Display number in L2 DBM
Dbm mac list [port]
Display entries in L2 DBM
Dbm mac search <MAC> <VID>
Search the MAC/VID learnt on
which port.
log level [0-4]
Sets the log level. Logs displayed
consist of critical, error, warning,
debug and informational
messages in order of severity. Log
level “4” displays all messages; log
level “0” just displays critical
messages.
log switch on/off
Outputs messages to the console
or telnet screen.
log list
Lists all IXE log modules.
Log module <module_id> <on/off
Enable / disable log on specific
IXE module
log switch < on|off >
Log all modules to tracelog.
(Current display to console
directly)
memdum <start_addr> <length>
Displays the switch chip’s memory
map for the block specified.
wreg <addr> <value>
Writes to a register.
rreg <addr>
Reads from a register.
show_int_count
Displays the interrupt counter.
clear_int_count
Resets the interrupt counter.
Displays the system socket’s ID #,
type, control block address (PCB),
IP address and port number of
peer device connected to the
socket (Remote Socket) and task
control block (Owner).
socket
cpu
display
Displays the CPU’s utilization.
snmp
getCommunity [<community>]
Sets or displays the SNMP
GetRequest community.
Commands Introduction
21-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
server
DESCRIPTION
setCommunity [<community>]
Sets or displays the SNMP
SetRequest community.
trustedHost [<hostt>]
Sets or displays the SNMP trusted
host.
trapCommunity [<community>]
Sets or displays the SNMP Trap
community.
trapDest [<destination>]
Sets or displays the SNMP trap
server.
disp
Shows SNMP settings.
access <telnet|ftp|web|icmp>
<enable/disable>
Enables or disables a service.
port <telnet|ftp|web> <portNo>
Sets a port for a service.
secIP setEntry <index> <startaddr> <end-addr> [[TELNET]
[FTP] [WEB] [ICMP]]
Sets a secured entry.
secIP active <index>
Turns on a secured entry.
secIP inactive <index>
Turns off a secured entry.
sec IP disp
Shows the secured entries.
disp
Shows the device’s service port
numbers and access control
settings.
Ends the console or telnet
session.
exit
ip
address
[addr]
Displays the host IP address.
alias
<iface>
Sets an alias for the specified
interface.
aliasdis
<0|1>
Disables/enables the alias for the
specified interface.
arp
status <iface>
Displays an interface’s IP Address
Resolution Protocol status.
httpd
debug [on|off]
Enables or disables the HTTP
debug flag.
status
Displays the ICMP statistics
counter.
discovery <iface> [on|off]
Sets the ICMP router discovery
flag.
[iface] [ipaddr] [broadcast
<addr> |mtu <value>|dynamic]
Configures a network interface.
icmp
ifconfig
21-6
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
ping
DESCRIPTION
<hostid>
Pings a remote host.
status [if]
Displays the routing table.
add
<dest_addr|default>[/<bits>]
<gateway> [<metric>]
Adds a route.
addiface <dest_addr|default>
[/<bits>] <gateway> [<metric>]
Adds an entry to the routing table
for the specified interface.
addprivate <dest_addr|default>
[/<bits>] <gateway> [<metric>]
Adds a private route.
drop <host addr> [/<bits>]
Drops a route.
route
Displays IP statistic counters.
status
udp
Displays the UDP status.
status
tcp
ceiling
telnet
Commands Introduction
[value]
Sets the TCP maximum round trip
time.
floor [value]
Sets the TCP minimum round trip
time.
irtt [value]
Sets the TCP default initial round
trip time.
kick <tcb>
Drops the TCP connection of the
specified TCP Control Block.
limit [value]
Sets a TCP output window limit.
mss
Inputs the TCP Maximum
Segment Size.
[value]
reset <tcb>
Resets the TCP connection of the
specified TCP Control Block.
rtt
Sets the round trip time for the
TCP control block.
<tcb> <value>
status
[tcb] [<interval>]
Displays the TCP statistic
counters.
syndata
[on|off]
Turns on/off the option to send
data with the SYN packet.
trace [on|off]
Turns on/off the trace for
debugging.
<host> [port]
Telnets to the specified host.
support
Shows if TFTP is supported.
stats
Displays the TFTP status.
21-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Table 21-1 command summary
COMMAND
traceroute
DESCRIPTION
<host> [ttl] [wait] [queries]
Sends ICMP packets to trace the
route of a remote host.
status
Displays the IGMP group table.
querier
Displays the port number of the
incoming port that received the
latest IGMP querier.
enable
Turns on IGMP snooping.
disable
Turns off IGMP snooping.
igmpsnoop
config
This command stores tagged IEEE
802.1Q VLAN and STP
configurations only in nonvolatile
memory. All other command
configurations are lost when you
restart the switch.
save
The following commands are system switch commands; all are preceded with sys sw .
COMMAND
garp
gvrp
qos
Shows the GARP timer status.
status
timer
<join timer(ms)><leave
timer(ms)><leave all timer<ms>
Sets the GARP timer’s Join
Timer, Leave Timer and Leave
All Timer.
status
Shows whether GVRP is
enabled or not.
enable
Enables GVRP.
disable
Disables GVRP.
defpri
<port> [<0..7>]
Sets the default ingress User
Priority for a port.
map
<0..7> [<queue>]
Maps a User Priority to a Traffic
Class.
All “sys sw vlan1q” commands
relate to IEEE 802.1Q Tagged
VLAN configuration. Use “config
save” to save your configuration
changes.
vlan1q
port
21-8
DESCRIPTION
status <port>
Shows a port’s VLAN
information.
defaultvid <port><vid>
Sets the default VLAN ID of a
port.
accept <port> <all|tagged>
Sets the type of frames that a
port accepts.
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
COMMAND
svlan
vlan
driver
DESCRIPTION
gvrp <port> <enable|disable>
Enables/disables GVRP on the
specified port.
cpu <vlan id>
Sets the VLAN ID of the
management VLAN (CPU).
setentry<name><vid><port><adctl>
<tagctl>
Applies a static VLAN (name,
admin control tag, tag control) to
a port.
delentry <vid>
Deletes the specified (VID) static
VLAN.
active <vid>
Turns on the specified static
VLAN.
inactive <vid>
Turns off the specified static
VLAN.
list
Displays a table of static VLANs.
list <all|vid|start_vid end_vid>
Shows the specified IEEE
802.1Q Tagged VLAN table.
status
Shows the IEEE 802.1Q tagged
status.
config
Shows the switch’s settings.
count
disp
Shows the switch Network Driver
Interface Specifications (NDIS)
level counters (CPU interface).
clear
Clears the switch NDIS level
counters (CPU interface).
All “sys sw rstp” commands
relate to rapid STP configuration.
Refer to IEEE Std 802.1w. Use
“config save” to save your
configuration changes.
rstp
bridge
enable
Enables RSTP.
disable
Disables RSTP.
priority <priority>
Sets the system priority.
maxage <max age>
Sets the max age timer
hellotime <hello time>
Sets the hello timer.
forwarddelat <forward delay time>
Sets the forward delay time
version <stp:0|rstp:2>
Displays/enables the STP mode;
STP or RSTP. RSTP is the
default used when configuring
STP via web configurator.
enable <port_no>
Enables RSTP on this port.
disable <port_no>
Disables RSTP on this port.
port
Commands Introduction
21-9
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
pathcost <port_no>
Displays the specified port’s path
cost.
priority <port_no>
Displays the specified port’s
priority.
edgeport <port_no>
Displays if this port is an edge
port.
p2plink <port_no>
Displays whether the specified
port can connect to one bridge or
multiple bridges.
mcheck <port_no>
Enables the Port Protocol
Migration state machine
(Disabled, Blocking, Listening,
Learning, Forwarding) on the
specified port.
Refer to IEEE 802.3ad for more
information on link aggregation
control protocol.
lacp
Displays ports trunked using
LACP.
agg
port
dot1x
21-10
enable <port_no>
Enables LACP on the specified
port.
disable <port_no>
Disables LACP on the specified
port.
status <port_no>
Displays whether LACP is
enabled on the specified port.
actoradm activity [port_no]
[0:passive 1:active]
Allows/disallows the specified
local port to engage in trunking.
actoradm display [port_no]
Shows whether the specified
local port is engaged in trunking.
actoradm key [port_no][key]
Shows the specified local port
LACP key.
actoradm priority
[priority]
Shows the specified local port
LACP priority.
[port_no]
actoradm timeout [port_no]
[0:long_timeout|1:short_timeout]
Enables a short or long timeout
on the specified local port.
status
Displays LACP status on all
ports.
keymgnt [on|off]
Turns LACP key management
on or off.
syspriority <priority>
Sets the LACP system priority.
The switch with the lowest
priority becomes the LACP
“server”.
“sys sw dot1x” commands relate
to IEEE 802.1X security.
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
enable
Enables 802.1X security on the
switch.
disable
Disables 802.1X security on the
switch.
status
Shows switch 802.1X security
status.
port
enable <port_no>
Enables 802.1X security on the
specified port.
disable <port_no>
Disables 802.1X security on the
specified port.
reauth <port_no> <on|off>
Turns re-authentication on or off
on the specified port.
reauthperiod <port_no><value>
Configures how often the
specified port should be reauthenticated.
status <port_no>
Displays 802.1X security status
on the specified port.
auth <profile | radius>
Sets whether an external
RADIUS server or the internal
switch user database performs
authentication.
portcontrol<port-no><auto |auth |
unauth>
Sets how the specified port
should be authenticated.
server <ip>
Sets the external RADIUS server
IP address.
secret <secret>
Sets the external RADIUS server
password.
port <port>
Sets the external RADIUS server
port number.
show
Displays the external RADIUS
server settings.
set
radius
Internal switch user database.
Information in this database is
flushed on restarting the switch.
profile
Commands Introduction
add <username> <passwd>
Creates a username and
password profile in the internal
switch user database.
delete <idx>
Deletes a username and
password profile in the internal
switch user database.
21-11
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
COMMAND
list
Displays run-time bandwidth
control, port mirror and port filter
rule status.
display
l2set
<src port> <src mac> <src
vid><dest port><dest mac> <dest
vid>
Sets source/destination port,
MAC address and VLAN group
information.
del
<class id>
A class is automatically created
when you create a bandwidth
control, port mirror or port filter
rule. This command deletes the
specified class.
These commands relate to
broadcast storm control.
bmstorm
Clears current run-time settings
disable
21-12
Lists all profiles in the internal
switch user database.
A class is the basic rule
parameters for a bandwidth
control, port mirror or port filter
rule.
class
mac
DESCRIPTION
type
<type>
Specifies the type of frames to
limit in the switch; broadcast,
multicast or both.
basis
<type>
Specifies whether frames are
limited in the switch on a perpacket or per-Byte basis.
display
[index]
Displays broadcast storm control
ports’ settings
interval
[value]
Sets/displays the monitor
interval.
set
<port><threshold><direction>
Specifies the packet threshold
and direction (ingress/egress) on
the specified port.
del
<index>
Disables broadcast storm control
on this port.
Displays static MAC addresses.
static
disable
Clears current run-time static
MAC address settings
display [port]
Displays current run-time static
MAC addresses on the specified
port.
set<port><mac addr.><vid>
Configures a static MAC address
on the specified port.
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
COMMAND
.
del<port><mac addr.><vid>
DESCRIPTION
Deletes a static MAC address on
the specified port.
The following commands relate
to port filters. Port filtering means
sifting traffic from one or all ports
to one or all ports based on the
source and/or destination MAC
addresses and VLAN group.
filter
disable
Clears current run-time filters.
display
Displays current run-time filter
status.
set
<src port><src mac><src vid><dest
port><dest mac><dest vid>
Creates a filter rule using
source/destination port, MAC
address and VLAN group
information. “*” means “any”.
The following commands relate
to port mirrors. Port mirroring is
copying traffic from one or all
ports to another or all ports for
external analysis.
mirror
disable
Clears current run-time port
mirror settings.
display
Displays current run-time port
mirror settings.
set
port
<src port><src mac><src vid><dest
port><dest mac><dest vid>
Creates a mirror rule using
source/destination port, MAC
address and VLAN group
information. “*” means “any”.
<input|output|both>
Sets the direction of mirrored
traffic.
<port>
Sets the mirror port (the port
traffic is copied to for analysis).
The following commands relate
to bandwidth control rules.
Bandwidth control means
defining a maximum allowable
bandwidth for traffic flows from
specified source(s) to specified
destination(s).
bw
disable
Clears current run-time
bandwidth control rules.
display
Displays current run-time
bandwidth control rules.
Commands Introduction
21-13
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
COMMAND
set
<src port><src mac><src vid><dest
port><dest mac><dest vid><max bw>
Creates a bandwidth control rule
using source/destination port,
MAC address and VLAN group
information. “*” means “any”.
The following commands relate
to trunking. Trunking is the
grouping of physical ports into
one logical higher-capacity link.
trunk
21-14
DESCRIPTION
disable
Clears current run-time trunk
settings.
display
Displays current run-time trunk
settings.
set
<group><# ports>
Adds ports to a trunk group.
del
<group>
Delete the specified trunk group.
Commands Introduction
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 22
Command Examples
This chapter describes some commands in more detail.
22.1 Commonly Used Commands Overview
These are commands that you may use frequently in configuring and maintaining your switch. See the following
chapter for IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN commands.
22.2 Sys Commands
These are the commonly used commands that belong to the sys (system) group of commands.
22.2.1
Log Disp Command
Syntax:
ras> sys log disp
This command displays the system error log.
An example is shown next.
ras>
1
6
9
11
12
14
16
18
20
22
23
26
28
30
34
36
37
39
42
sys
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Thu
Thu
Thu
Thu
Thu
Thu
Thu
Thu
Thu
log
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
disp
12 15:27:45
12 15:34:42
12 16:16:46
12 16:26:06
12 16:31:18
12 16:42:20
12 16:55:39
12 17:19:30
12 17:43:31
12 17:45:48
13 09:08:09
13 09:23:53
13 09:36:05
13 09:52:48
13 10:32:02
13 11:51:02
13 12:06:22
13 12:15:12
13 16:17:25
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
2003
PP1d
PP13
PP13
PP1d
PP13
PP13
PP13
PP13
PP13
PP1d
PP14
PP13
PP13
PP13
PP13
PP1f
PP13
PP13
PP13
ERROR
INFO
INFO
ERROR
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
ERROR
ERROR
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
INFO
unknown variable
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
unknown variable
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
unknown variable
Last errorlog repeat 54 Times
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
adjtime task pause 1 day
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
SMT Password pass
Figure 22-1 Log Disp Command Example
22.2.2
Log Clear Command
Syntax:
Commonly Used Commands
22-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
ras> sys log clear
This command clears the system error log.
If you clear a log (using the log clear command), you cannot view it again.
22.2.3
Version Command
Syntax:
ras> sys version
This command shows the RAS code, firmware version, system uptime and bootbase version.
An example is shown next.
ras> sys version
ZyNOS version: V3.50(DS.0)b16 | 03/30/2003
romRasSize: 1638380
system up time:
29:15:35 (a0baac ticks)
bootbase version: V1.02| 02/26/2003
Figure 22-2 Version Command Example
22.2.4
Monitor Status Command
Syntax:
ras> sys monitor status
This command shows the hardware monitor’s status.
An example is shown next.
ras> sys monitor status
Time
V0
V1
V2
V3
V4
T0
T1
T2
F10
F11
Err
or
---------- ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----160200
2.512 1.856 3.312 4.999 4.999 35.0 33.5 29.5 2909 3013
0000
0000
Figure 22-3 Monitor Status Command Example
22.2.5
Enabling RSTP on the Stacking Module
Step 1. First enable RSTP
sys sw rstp bridge enable
22-2
Commonly Used Commands
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Step 2. Then enable RSTP on the stacking port.
sys sw rstp port enable 27
sys sw rstp port enable 28
Step 3. Save the configuration
config save
Commonly Used Commands
22-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chapter 23
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
This chapter describes the IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN and associated commands. Use the “config
save” command to save configuration changes.
23.1 IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN Overview
See the VLAN Setup chapter for more information on VLANs. There are two kinds of tagging:
1. Explicit Tagging
A VLAN identifier is added to the frame header that identifies the source VLAN.
2.
Implicit Tagging
The MAC (Media Access Control) number, the port or other information is used to identify the source of a VLAN
frame.
The IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN uses both explicit and implicit tagging.
It is important for the switch to determine what devices are VLAN-aware and VLAN-unaware so that it can decide
whether to forward a tagged frame (to a VLAN-aware device) or first strip the tag from a frame and then forward it
(to a VLAN-unaware device).
23.2 Filtering Databases
A filtering database stores and organizes VLAN registration information useful for switching frames to and from a
switch. A filtering database consists of a static entries (Static VLAN or SVLAN table) and dynamic entries
(Dynamic VLAN or DVLAN table).
23.2.1
Static Entries (SVLAN Table)
Static entry registration information is added, modified and removed by administrators only.
23.2.2
Dynamic Entries (DVLAN Table)
Dynamic entries are learned by the switch and cannot be created or updated by administrators. The switch learns
this information by observing what port, source address and VLAN ID (or VID) is associated with a frame. Entries
are added and deleted using GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP), where GARP is the Generic Attribute
Registration Protocol.
23.3 Configuring Tagged VLAN
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
23-1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
The following procedure shows you how to configure tagged VLAN.
Step 1. Use the IEEE 802.1Q tagged VLAN commands to configure tagged VLAN for the switch.
•
Use the sys sw vlan1q svlan setentry command to configure a VLAN ID for each port on the
switch.
•
Use the sys sw vlan1q svlan active command when you are finished configuring the VLAN (see
the last step).
•
Use the sys sw vlan1q port defaultVID command to set the VLAN ID you created for a port to
that specific port in the PVID table.
•
Use the sys sw vlan1q svlan active command to activate the VLAN IDs.
Example:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
ras>
ras>
ras>
ras>
ras>
ras>
sys
sys
sys
sys
sys
sys
sw
sw
sw
sw
sw
sw
vlan1q
vlan1q
vlan1q
vlan1q
vlan1q
vlan1q
setentry up1 2000 24 fixed tag
port defaultVID 24 2000
setentry up2 2001 25 fixed untag
port defaultVID 25 2001
svlan active 2000
svlan active 2001
Figure 23-1 Tagged VLAN Configuration and Activation Example
Step 2. Configure your management VLAN.
•
Use the sys sw vlan1q svlan setentry command to configure a VLAN ID (VID 3 in this example)
for managing the switch (the “management” or “CPU” VLAN).
•
Use the sys sw vlan1q svlan active command to activate the new management VLAN ID.
Example:
1.
2.
ras> sys sw vlan1q setentry 3 24 fixed tag
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan active 3
Figure 23-2 CPU VLAN Configuration and Activation Example
Step 3. Perform the procedure below to complete the VLAN setup.
a. Telnet to the operational IP address of the switch.
b. Use the sys sw vlan1q svlan cpu command to set VID 3 as the management VLAN.
c. Use the sys sw svlan delentry command to remove the default VLAN ID (1).
Example:
23-2
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
1.
2.
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan cpu 3
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan delentry 1
Figure 23-3 Deleting Default VLAN Example
23.4 IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration Commands
These sw (switch) commands allow you to configure and monitor the IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN.
23.4.1
GARP Status Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw garp status
This command shows the switch’s GARP timer settings, including the join, leave and leave all timers.
An example is shown next.
ras> sys sw garp status
GARP Timer Status :
Join Timer = 200 msec
Leave Timer = 600 msec
Leave All Timer = 10000 msec
Figure 23-4 GARP Status Command Example
23.4.2
GARP Timer Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw garp timer timer <join timer(ms)> <leave timer(ms)>
<leave all timer<ms>
where
<join timer (ms)>
=
This sets the duration of the Join Period timer for GVRP in
milliseconds. Each port has a Join Period timer. The allowed
Join Time range is between 100 and 32767 milliseconds; the
default is 200 milliseconds.
<leave timer(ms)>
=
This sets the duration of the Leave Period timer for GVRP in
milliseconds. Each port has a single Leave Period timer. Leave
Time must be two times larger than Join Timer; the default is
600 milliseconds.
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
23-3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
<leave all timer<ms>=
This sets the duration of the Leave All Period timer for GVRP
in milliseconds. Each port has a single Leave All Period timer.
Leave All Timer must be larger than Leave Timer; the default
is 10000 milliseconds.
This command sets the switch’s GARP timer settings, including the join, leave and leave all timers.
Switches join VLANs by making a declaration. A declaration is made by issuing a Join message using GARP.
Declarations are withdrawn by issuing a Leave message. A Leave All message terminates all registrations. GARP
timers set declaration timeout values.
The following example sets the Join Timer to 300 milliseconds, the Leave Timer to 800 milliseconds and the Leave
All Timer to 11000 milliseconds.
ras> sys sw garp timer 300 800 11000
Figure 23-5 GARP Timer Command Example
23.4.3
GVRP Status Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw gvrp status
This command shows the switch’s GVRP settings.
An example is shown next.
ras> sys sw gvrp status
GVRP control block status:
gvrpEnable = 1
gvrpPortEnable:
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOXXXX
Figure 23-6 GARP Status Command Example
23.4.4
GVRP Enable Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw gvrp enable
This command turns on GVRP in order to propagate VLAN information beyond the switch.
23.4.5
GVRP Disable Command
Syntax:
23-4
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
ras> sys sw gvrp disable
This command turns off GVRP so that the switch does not propagate VLAN information to other switches.
23.4.6
VLAN1Q Port Status Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q port status <port>
This command shows information about the specified port’s VLAN settings.
The following example shows the settings for port 1.
ras> sys sw vlan1q port status 1
Port 2 VLAN Setup :
Default VLAN ID = 1
VLAN Acceptable Type = Tagged Only
GVRP = Enable
Figure 23-7 VLAN1Q Port Status Command Example
23.4.7
VLAN1Q Port Default VID Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q port defaultVID <port> <VID>
where
<port>
=
A port number
<VID>
=
The VLAN ID. Valid parameter range = [1 – 4094].
This command sets a default VLAN ID for all untagged packets that come in through the specified port.
The following example sets the default VID of port 1 to 2000.
ras> sys sw vlan1q port defaultVID 1 2000
Figure 23-8 VLAN1Q Port Default VID Command Example
23.4.8
VLAN1Q Port Accept Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q port accept <port> <all|tagged>
where
<port>
=
<all|tagged> =
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
A port number
Specifies all Ethernet frames (tagged and untagged) or only tagged
Eh
f
23-5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
<all|tagged> =
Specifies all Ethernet frames (tagged and untagged) or only tagged
Ethernet frames.
This command sets the specified port to accept all Ethernet frames or only those with an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tag.
The following example sets port 2 to accept only tagged frames.
ras> sys sw vlan1q port accept 2 tagged
Figure 23-9 VLAN1Q Port Accept Command Example
23.4.9
VLAN1Q Port GVRP Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q port gvrp <port> <enable|disable>
where
<port>
=
<enable|disable> =
A port number
Turn GVRP on or off.
This command turns GVRP on or off for the specified port.
The following example turns off GVRP for port 2.
ras> sys sw vlan1q port gvrp 2 disable
Figure 23-10 VLAN1Q Port GVRP Command Example
23.4.10
VLAN1Q SVLAN CPU Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan cpu <VLAN ID>
where
<VID> =
The VLAN ID. Valid parameter range = [1 – 4094].
This command sets the management VLAN (CPU). You can only use ports that are members of this management
VLAN in order to manage the switch.
The following example sets VLAN ID 2 to be the CPU (management) VLAN.
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan cpu 2
Figure 23-11 VLAN1Q Port GVRP Command Example
23-6
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
23.4.11
VLAN1Q SVLAN Setentry Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan setentry <name> <VID> <port> <adctl>
<tagctl>
where
<name>
=
A name to identify the SVLAN entry.
<VID>
=
The VLAN ID [1 – 4094].
<port>
=
This is the switch port number.
<adctl>
=
This is the registrar administration control flag.
Valid parameters = [fixed, forbidden, normal].
Select fixed to register a <port #> to the static VLAN table with <vid>.
Select normal to confirm registration of the <port #> to the static VLAN
table with <vid>.
Select forbidden to block a <port #> from joining the static VLAN table
with <vid>.
<tagctl> =
This is the tag control flag. Valid parameters = [tag|untag].
Select tag to tag outgoing frames.
Select untag to send outgoing frames without a tag.
This command adds or modifies an entry in the static VLAN table. Display your configuration by using the sys
sw vlan1q svlan list command. An example of a configuration is shown next.
Modify a Static VLAN Table Example
The following is an example of how to modify a static VLAN table.
1.
2.
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan setentry
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan setentry
2000
2001
1
2
fixed
fixed
tag
tag
Figure 23-12 Modifying the Static VLAN Example
Forwarding Process Example
Tagged Frames
Step 1.
First the switch checks the VLAN ID (VID) of tagged frames or assigns temporary VIDs to untagged
frames (see 23.4.7).
Step 2.
The switch then checks the VID in a frame’s tag against the SVLAN table.
Step 3.
The switch notes what the SVLAN table says (that is, the SVLAN tells the switch whether or not to
forward a frame and if the forwarded frames should have tags).
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
23-7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Step 4.
Then the switch applies the port filter to finish the forwarding decision. This means that frames may be
dropped even if the SVLAN says to forward them. Frames might also be dropped if they are sent to a
CPE (customer premises equipment) DSL device that does not accept tagged frames.
Untagged Frames
Step 1.
An untagged frame comes in from the LAN.
Step 2.
The switch checks the PVID table and assigns a temporary VID of 1.
Step 3.
The switch ignores the port from which the frame came, because the switch does not send a frame to the
port from which it came. The switch also does not forward frames to “forbidden” ports.
Step 4.
If after looking at the SVLAN, the switch does not have any ports to which it will send the frame, it
won’t check the port filter.
23.4.12
VLAN1Q SVLAN Delentry Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan delentry <VID>
where
<VID>
=
The VLAN ID [1 – 4094].
This command deletes the specified VLAN ID entry from the static VLAN table
The following example deletes entry 2 in the static VLAN table.
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan delentry 2
Figure 23-13 VLAN1Q SVLAN Delentry Command Example
23.5 VLAN1Q SVLAN Active Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan active <VID>
This command enables the specified VLAN ID in the SVLAN (Static VLAN) table.
23.6 VLAN1Q SVLAN Inactive Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan inactive <VID>
This command disables the specified VLAN ID in the SVLAN (Static VLAN) table.
23.7 VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command
23-8
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan list
This command shows the IEEE 802.1Q Tagged SVLAN (Static VLAN) table.
An example is shown next.
For the AdCtl section of the last column, “-“ is a port set to normal, “x” is a forbidden port and “F” is a fixed port.
For the TagCtl section of the last column, “T“ is a tagged port, “U” is an untagged port.
ras> sys sw vlan1q svlan list
802.1Q VLAN Static Entry:
idx. Name
VID Active
AdCtl / TagCtl
---- ------------ ---- -------- -----------------------0
1
1 active ------------------------FFFF
TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTUUUU
Figure 23-14 VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command
23.8 VLAN1Q VLAN List Command
Syntax:
ras> sys sw vlan1q vlan list <all|VID|start_VID|end_VID>
where
<all|VID|start
_VID|end_VID>=
Specify either all of the VLAN entries (all), a single VLAN ID (VID) or a
range of VLAN IDs starting from a certain VID (start_VID) or a range of
VLAN Ids ending at a specific VID (end_VID).
This command shows the current IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN table or a specific part of it.
An example is shown next.
For the EgressPort section of the last column, “E” is an egress port for this VLAN, “-“ is not an egress port for
this VLAN.
The UntaggedPort section of the last column displays “-“ for a tagged port and “U” for an untagged port.
ras> sys sw vlan1q vlan list all
No.
VID ElapsedTime Status
------ ---- ----------- -----1)
1
51:30:02 Static
EgressPort/UntaggedPort
-----------------------------------E|EEE--|-----|-EEEE|EEEEE|EEE
-----|-----|-----|-----|----U|UUU
Figure 23-15 VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command
23.8.1
VLAN Status Command
Syntax:
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
23-9
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
ras> sys sw vlan1q vlan status
This command displays the current configuration of the IEEE 802.1Q VLAN.
See the following example shows the default VLAN settings. The default VLAN allows all ports to connect to each
other and sets them to send untagged packets.
ras> sys sw vlan1q status
802.1Q VLAN Setup :
GVRP = Enable
Managament VLAN ID = 1
Figure 23-16 VLAN1Q Status Command Example
23-10
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Appendices and Index
Part VII
Appendices and Index
This part contains appendices of advanced background feature information and an Index.
VII
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Appendix A
Product Specifications
These are the ES-3024 product specifications.
Chart 1 General Product Specifications
IEEE802.3 10BASE-T Ethernet (twisted-pair copper)
IEEE802.3u 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet (twisted-pair copper)
ANSI/IEEE802.3 Auto-negotiation
IEEE802.3x Flow Control
Standards
IEEE802.1p Priority Queues
IEEE802.1q VLAN
IEEE802.1d Spanning Tree
IEEE 802.1x Authentication
IEEE 802.3 ad Trunking
IEEE 802.1w Rapid reconfiguration
Protocol
CSMA/CD
24 10/100BASE-T Ethernet ports
Interface
Two expansion slots for uplink modules
One expansion slot for stacking module.
One console port
Ethernet: 10Mbps (half duplex), 20Mbps (full duplex)
Data Transfer Rate
Fast Ethernet: 100Mbps (half duplex), 200Mbps(full duplex)
Uplink rates depend on the uplink module used (see your module manual)
10BASE-T: 2-pair Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Cat.3, 4, 5 (100 meters)
EIA/TIA-586 100-ohm Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) (100 meters)
Network Cables
100BASE-TX, 1000BASE-T: UTP Cat.5 (100 m max.) EIA/TIA-568 100-ohm STP
(100 m max.)
Uplink cables depend on the uplink module used (see your module manual)
Full/Half Duplex
Media Interface Exchange
Product Specifications
Full/half duplex for 10/100Mbps speeds
Full duplex only for Gigabit speeds (see your module manual)
All ports are auto-crossover (auto-MDI-X) and auto-negotiating.
1
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chart 2 Performance and Management Specifications
Back plane
12.8 Gbps
14880 PPS for 10BASE-T
Packet Forwarding Rate
148800 PPS for 100BASE-TX/FX
Uplink packet forwarding rate depends on the uplink module used (see your
module manual)
Switching Method
Store-and-forward
MAC Address Table
16 K entries
2MB (excluding optional modules)
Data Buffer
Uplink data buffers depend on the uplink module used (see your module
manual)
VLAN
IEEE 802.1Q tag-based VLAN, 4095 Max
IEEE 802.1p Priority Queues
4 queues
Port Trunking
IEEE802.3ad dynamic port trunking
Port Security
Static MAC address filtering
MAC address learning limit
Multicasting
Support IGMP snooping
Broadcast Storm
Support broadcast storm control
Port Mirroring
All Ethernet, stacking and uplink ports support port mirroring
Web-based management
Management
Telnet
SNMP
Management Security
User ID/Password for Telnet and Web-based management authentication
Up to 4 administrators allowed
SNMP MIB II (RFC 1213)
RFC 1157 SNMP v1
SNMPv2, SNMPv2c or later version, compliant with RFC 2011 SNMPv2 MIB for
IP, RFC 2012 SNMPv2 MIB for TCP, RFC 2013 SNMPv2 MIB for UDP
MIBs
RFC 1643 Ethernet MIBs
RFC 1493 Bridge MIBs
RFC 1155 SMI
RFC 1757 RMON
RFC 2674 SNMPv2, SNMPv2c
2
Product Specifications
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Chart 3 Physical and Environmental Specifications
Main switch: 4.3Kg
Weight
Optional module: 220 ~ 280g
Main switch: S1, S2, PWR, 10/100Mbps, SYS, ALM, LNK/ACT, FDX/COL
LED
Uplink and stacking LEDs depend on the module used (see your module manual)
Main switch:
441(W) x 226(D) x 66.5(H) mm
Dimensions
(17.3(W) x 8.9(D) x 2.6(H) inches), 19-inch rack-mount width, 1.5 U height
Optional Switch Modules: 178(W) x 152(D) x 25(H) (7(W)x 6(D)x 1(H) inches)
Power Supply
100 - 240VAC 50/60Hz 1.5A max internal universal power supply
Power Consumption
Main switch: 60W max.
T2A250VAC
Fuse Rating
Caution: For continued protection against risk of fire, replace only with the same type
and fuse rating.
Operating Temperature
0ºC ~45ºC (32ºF to 113ºF)
Storage Temperature
-25ºC ~70ºC
Operational Humidity
10% to 90% (Non-condensing)
North America UL 1950 listing
Safety
CSA C22.2 No. 950 (Canada)
European Union
EN60950, EN41003
EMC
North America FCC Part15 (Class A)
EMI
European Union Conducted/Radiated Emission: EN55022 Class A
EMS
European Union
Current HarmonicEN61000-3-2 +A12
Voltage FluctuationEN61000-3-3
Electrostatic Discharge
IEC 1000-4-2, Level 2
(ESD)
Radiated SusceptibilityIEC 1000-4-3, Level 2
Electrical Fast TransientsIEC 1000-4-4,Level 2
Surge TestIEC 1000-4-5
Product Specifications
3
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Index
1
10/100M Auto-crossover Ethernet, 3-2
8
802.1Q, 8-1, 8-3
802.1Q VLAN Type, 5-4, 5-6
802.1X, 4-4, 5-4
802.3ad, 1-2
A
Address Learning, 6-5
AGGREGATOR ID, 19-4
Aging Time, 5-6
Airflow, 3-4
All Connected, 8-8
ALM, 3-5
authenticationFailure, 14-4
Auto-crossover, 3-2
B
Back Panel, 3-4
Back plane, 9
Backup Configuration, 18-2
Bandwidth Control, 1-2
Bandwidth Control Setup, 12-1, 12-3
BPDU, 5-3, 5-7
Bridge ID, 19-3
Bridge MIBs RFC 1493, 1-2
Bridge Priority, 5-7
Broadcast storm control, 1-3
Broadcast Storm Control, 5-7, 6-6
Direction, 6-6
Threshold, 6-6
C
CE, iv
Certification, iv
class A, iv
Cold Start, 14-3
Command Conventions, 21-1
4
Command Line Interface, 21-1
Command Summary, 21-2
Commands
Abbreviations, 21-2
config save, 21-8
Help, 21-2
ip, 21-6
Optional fields, 21-2
Required fields, 21-1
sys, 21-2
sys sw, 21-8
config save, 3-8, 21-1, 21-8, 21-9, 23-1
Configuration File, 18-3
Console Port, 1-1, 3-1
Contact Person's Name, 5-1
Contacting Customer Support, v
Copyright, ii
Current Harmonic, 10
Customer Support, v
Customized, 8-8
D
Data Buffer, 9
Daytime (RFC 867), 17-2
Default 802.1P Priority, 6-4
Default Gateway, 5-9
Default Settings
Ethernet, 3-2
Destination MAC Address, 10-2, 11-2, 12-2
Diagnostic, 20-1
Dimensions, 10
Disclaimer, ii
Domain Name Server, 5-9
Domain Name System, 5-9
Dropped Packet, 19-11
Duplex, 6-2, 6-4
DVLAN Table, 23-1
Dynamic Link Aggregation, 5-4
E
egress port, 8-8
Electrical Fast Transients, 10
Index
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
EMC, 10
EMI, 10
EMS, 10
enterpriseSpecific, 14-4
Error Packet, 19-11
Ethernet MIBs RFC 1643, 1-2
F
Fans, 1-1
FCC, iv
FCC Rules, iv
FCC Warning, iv
Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Interference Statement, iv
Filename Conventions, 18-3
Filter Setup, 10-1
Filtering Databases, 23-1
Firmware, 18-3
Firmware Upgrade, 18-1
Fixed, 8-2, 8-5
Flow control, 3-8
Flow Control, 6-4
Forbidden, 8-2, 8-6
Forwarding Delay, 5-7, 19-3
Forwarding Process Example, 23-7
Front Panel, 3-1
Front Panel LEDs, 3-4
FTP over WAN Restrictions, 18-4
G
GARP, 23-1
GARP Status Command, 23-3, 23-4
GARP Timer, 5-6
GARP Timer Command, 23-3, 23-4
General Setup, 4-4, 4-5, 5-1
Get Community, 14-3
GetNext, 14-2
Giant, 19-11
GVRP, 23-1
GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol), 8-2, 83
GVRP Disable Command, 23-4
GVRP Enable Command, 23-4
GVRP Status Command, 23-4
Index
H
Hardware Monitor, 19-2, 19-5, 19-6
Fans, 19-6
Temperature, 19-6
Volatge, 19-6
Hello Time, 5-7, 19-3
Help, 4-5
Home Screen, 4-3
HTML help, xv
I
IEEE 802.1p, 5-6
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN, 23-1
Commands, 23-1
Introduction, 23-1
IEEE 802.1x, 6-2
IGMP snooping, 1-3
IGMP Snooping, 5-2, 5-6
Ingress Check, 8-4
Installation
Desktop, 2-1
Rack-Mounted, 2-2
Internet Explorer 5.5, 4-1
IP Address, 5-9
IP Protocols, 1-2
IP Setup, 4-4, 4-5, 5-1, 5-8, 5-9
IP Subnet Mask, 5-9
J
Join Timer, 5-6
L
LACP
Timeout, 6-6
LACP Status, 19-3, 19-4
Leave All Timer, 5-6
Leave Timer, 5-6
LED Descriptions, 3-4
Limiting Learned MAC Address, 6-4
Link Aggregate Control Protocol (LACP),, 5-4, 6-6
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP, 5-8
linkDown, 14-4
Location, 5-1
Log Clear Command, 22-1
5
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Log Disp Command, 22-1
Log Facility, 17-2
Logins, 16-1, 16-2
M
MAC address learning, 1-2, 5-6, 6-5, 9-1
MAC Address Learning, 5-6
MAC Address Table, 9
Management Information Base (MIB), 14-1
Management VLAN ID, 8-3
Max Age, 5-3, 5-7, 19-3
Max. Bandwidth (kbps), 12-2
Media Interface Exchange, 8
MIBs, 9
Mirror Setup, 11-1
Monitor Interval, 5-8
Monitor Status Command, 22-2
Mounting Brackets, 2-2
MSC1000 Commands, 21-1
Multi-tenant unit (MTU), xv
N
Navigation Panel Links, 4-4
Netscape Navigator 6, 4-1
Network Applications
Bridging, 1-4
Collapsed Backbone, 1-3
High Performance Switched Workgroup, 1-5
VLAN Application, 1-6
VLAN Server, 1-7
VLAN Workgroup, 1-6
Network Cables, 8
Normal, 8-2, 8-5
NTP (RFC-1305), 17-2
O
Operating Temperature, 10
Operational Humidity, 10
Optional Modules
Installing, 3-2
P
Packet Forwarding Rate, 9
Password
6
Default, 4-1
POP (point-of-presence, xv
Port Based VLAN Type, 5-4, 5-6
Port Details, 19-2, 19-9, 19-10
Port Filtering, 10-1
Port Isolation, 8-8
Port Mirroring, 1-2, 11-1, 21-13
Port Setup, 4-4, 4-5, 5-4, 5-7, 6-1, 6-2
Port Statistics, 19-8
Port Trunking, 1-2
Port-based VLANs, 8-6
Power Connector, 3-4
Power Consumption, 10
Power Supply, 10
Priority, 5-6
Priority Level, 5-6
Priority Queue Assignment, 5-6, 6-4
Product specifications, 8
PWR, 3-4
Q
Quality of Service, 1-3
Queue, 5-7
R
Radiated Susceptibility, 10
RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User
Service), 15-1
RADIUS Setup, 15-1, 15-2
ras, 18-3
Rear Panel, 3-4
Rear Panel Connections
Rear Panel, 3-4
Reauthentication, 6-6
Related Documentation, xv
Remote Management, 17-2, 17-3
repair, iii
Resetting the Switch, 4-2
Restore Configuration, 18-1, 18-2
RMON RFC 1757, 1-2
Rom-0, 18-3
Rubber Feet, 2-1
Runt, 19-11
Rx KB/s, 19-9, 19-10
Index
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Rx Packet, 19-10
RxPkts, 19-8, 19-10
S
Safety, 10
Scenarios, 2-1
Screen Overview, 4-5
Secured Client, 17-4, 18-4
Service, iii
Set Community, 14-3
Shared Secret, 15-2
SMI RFC 1155, 1-2
SNMP, 4-4
Configuring, 14-2
Community, 14-2
Trap, 14-3
Get, 14-2
Manager, 14-1
MIBs, 14-2
Trap, 14-2
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol), 141
SNMP Commands, 14-2
SNMP MIB II (RFC 1213), 1-2
SNMP Traps, 14-3
SNMP v1 RFC 1157, 1-2
SNMPv1, 14-1
SNMPv2, SNMPv2c RFC 2674, 1-2
Source MAC Address, 10-2, 10-3, 11-2, 12-2
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), 5-2
Stacking Module, 1-1
Stacking Scenarios, 3-5
standard browser, 4-1
Standards, 8
Static MAC Forward Setup, 9-1
Static Route, 7-1
Static Route Setup, 7-1
Static VLAN Table Example, 23-7
Statistics, 18-1, 19-1, 19-2, 19-3, 19-4, 19-5, 19-7,
19-8, 19-9
LACP, 19-2
Port, 19-2
Port Details, 19-2
STP, 19-1
VLAN, 19-2
Index
STP (Spanning Tree Protocol), 1-3
STP Path Costs, 5-3
STP Port States, 5-3
Surge Test, 11
SVLAN Delentry Command, 23-8
SVLAN Table, 23-1
Switch Lockout, 4-2
Switch Setup, 5-4, 8-1, 8-3, 8-6, 13-1
Switching Method, 9
Synchronized Ports, 19-4
Syntax Conventions, xv
SYS, 3-5
Sys Commands, 22-1
Syslog, 17-2
System Monitoring, 1-2
System Name, 5-1
System Priority, 5-8
System up Time, 19-8
T
Tagged VLAN, 8-1
Forwarding, 8-1
GARP, 8-2
GVRP, 8-2
Registration, 8-1
Taiwanese BSMI A Warning, iv
Terminal emulation, 3-1
Terminal Emulation, 3-1, 21-1
Time (RFC-868), 17-2
Time and Date, 17-2
Trademarks, ii
Trap, 14-3
Trunk Groups, 13-1
Trunk ID, 13-2
Trunk Setup, 13-1, 13-2
Trunking (link aggregation), 13-1
TX Collision, 19-11
Tx KB/s, 19-9, 19-10
Tx Packet, 19-10
TX Tagging, 8-6
TxPkts, 19-8, 19-10
U
Untagged Port, 19-7
7
Dimension ES-3024 Ethernet Switch
Up Time, 19-9
Uplink Modules, 1-1
Uplink Scenario, 3-7
V
ventilation, 2-1
ventilation holes, 2-1
Version Command, 22-2
VID, 8-1, 8-2, 9-2, 10-3, 10-4, 11-3, 11-4, 12-3, 12-4,
19-7
VLAN
Explicit Tagging, 23-1
ID (VID), 23-1
Implicit Tagging, 23-1
Introduction, 5-2
Registration Information, 23-1
VLAN Administrative Control, 8-2
VLAN Group, 8-4, 8-5, 8-6
VLAN ID, 8-1, 8-2, 8-3, 8-4, 8-5
VLAN Port, 8-2
VLAN Status, 19-7
VLAN Status Command, 23-9
VLAN Tag Control, 8-2
VLAN Type, 5-6, 6-5
VLAN1Q Port Accept Command, 23-5
VLAN1Q Port Default VID Command, 23-5
VLAN1Q Port GVRP Command, 23-5
8
VLAN1Q Port Status Command, 23-5
VLAN1Q SVLAN Active Command, 23-8
VLAN1Q SVLAN CPU Command, 23-5
VLAN1Q SVLAN Inactive Command, 23-8
VLAN1Q SVLAN List Command, 23-8
VLAN1Q SVLAN Setentry Command, 23-7
VLAN1Q VLAN List Command, 23-9
Voltage Fluctuation, 10
VT100, 3-1, 21-1
W
WarmStart, 14-3
Web Configurator, 4-1
Login, 4-1
Web Configurator Screen Overview, 4-5
X
XMODEM upload, 4-3
Z
ZyNOS, 18-3
ZyNOS (ZyXEL Network Operating System), 18-3
ZyXEL Limited Warranty, iii
Note, iii
ZyXEL Web Site, xv
Index