Psion Teklogix 7535 Hardware reference guide

Hardware Reference Guide For The
7535
March 24, 2004 P/N 8100018 Rev A
ISO 9001 Certified
Quality Management System
© Copyright 2003 by Psion Teklogix Inc., Mississauga, Ontario
This document and the information it contains is the property of Psion Teklogix Inc.,
is issued in strict confidence, and is not to be reproduced or copied, in whole or in
part, except for the sole purpose of promoting the sale of Psion Teklogix manufactured goods and services. Furthermore, this document is not to be used as a basis for
design, manufacture, or sub-contract, or in any manner detrimental to the interests of
Psion Teklogix Inc.
All trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Return-To-Factory Warranty
Psion Teklogix warrants a return-to-factory warranty for a period of one year. In
some regions, the warranty exceeds this period. Please contact your local Psion
Teklogix office for details. For a list of offices, please refer to Appendix A: “Support
Services And Worldwide Offices”. The warranty on Psion Teklogix manufactured
equipment does not extend to any product that has been tampered with, altered, or
repaired by any person other than an employee of an authorized Psion Teklogix
service organization. See Psion Teklogix terms and conditions of sale for full details.
Service
When requesting service, please provide information concerning the nature of the
failure and the manner in which the equipment was used when the failure occurred.
Type, model, and serial number should also be provided. Before returning any
products to the factory, call the Customer Services Group for a Return
Authorization number.
Support Services
Psion Teklogix provides a complete range of product support services to its
customers. For detailed information, please refer to Appendix A: “Support Services
And Worldwide Offices”.
Disclaimer
Every effort has been made to make this material complete, accurate, and up-todate. Psion Teklogix Inc. reserves the right to make changes without notice and shall
not be responsible for any damages, including but not limited to consequential
damages, caused by reliance on the material presented, including but not limited to
typographical errors.
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.1
1.2
1.3
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Text Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
About The 7535 Hand-Held Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Chapter 2: The Hardware
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
The Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1 Processor . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.2 Onboard Memory . . . . . .
2.1.3 Hardware Architecture . . . .
Identifying Hardware . . . . . . . . .
The Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 Scanner Control Services. . .
2.3.2 Non-decoded Laser Scanners
2.3.3 Decoded Laser Scanners . . .
2.3.4 Imaging Scanners . . . . . .
The Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.1 Touch Input. . . . . . . . . .
2.4.2 The Display Backlight . . . .
The Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.1 The Keyboard Backlight . . .
The LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.1 Charge LED . . . . . . . . .
2.6.2 Radio Traffic LED . . . . . .
2.6.3 Scan LED. . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.4 User Application LED . . . .
The Beeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessory Cards . . . . . . . . . . .
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. 7
. 7
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. 9
. 9
. 9
. 9
. 10
. 10
. 10
. 10
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. 11
. 11
. 11
. 12
. 12
. 12
. 12
. 13
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
1
Contents
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9.1 The Docking Port . . . . .
2.9.2 The Tether Port . . . . . .
2.9.3 COM Ports On The 7535 .
Power Management . . . . . . . .
Turning The 7535 On And Off . .
Resetting The 7535 . . . . . . . .
The Portable Docking Module . .
Pinouts And Cables . . . . . . . .
2.14.1 The Serial Port . . . . . .
2.14.2 The Tether Port . . . . . .
2.14.3 The Docking Port . . . . .
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13
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15
16
16
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19
19
19
24
Overview Of The 7535’s Software . .
The Boot Process . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2 Boot Types . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2.1 Cold Boot . . . . . .
3.2.2.2 Warm Boot . . . . .
3.2.3 Other Power Transitions . . .
3.2.3.1 Suspend . . . . . . .
3.2.3.2 Resume . . . . . . .
3.2.4 User Interface . . . . . . . . .
The Shell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.2 System Structure . . . . . . .
3.3.2.1 The System Monitor
3.3.2.2 The Desktop . . . .
3.3.2.3 The User Interface .
3.3.2.4 Navigation . . . . .
3.3.2.5 Colour Schemes. . .
3.3.2.6 Differences . . . . .
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29
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32
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34
34
34
34
36
38
39
39
40
Chapter 3: The Software
3.1
3.2
3.3
2
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Contents
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.3.2.7 Error Messages.
Power Management . . . . . . . .
The Filesystem . . . . . . . . . .
Locations Of Applications . . . .
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. 40
. 40
. 41
. 41
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. 45
. 45
. 46
. 48
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.1 Displaying The Datecode Of The Operating System
Serial Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.1 Equipment Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2 Upgrading The Software Image . . . . . . . . . . .
USB Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.1 Equipment Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.2 Upgrading The Software Image . . . . . . . . . . .
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. 55
. 55
. 56
. 56
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. 59
. 59
. 59
Chapter 4: Connecting
4.1
4.2
4.3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.1 Setting Up ActiveSync .
USB Serial Connections . . . .
Bluetooth Wireless Connections
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Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
5.1
5.2
5.3
Appendix A: Support Services And Worldwide Offices
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
3
INTRODUCTION
1
1.1 About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2 Text Conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3 About The 7535 Hand-Held Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
1
Chapter 1: Introduction
About This Manual
1.1 About This Manual
This manual provides development information specific to the Psion Teklogix 7535.
General information about developing with the Psion Teklogix SDK For Mobile
Devices is given in the Developers’ Guide. Specific information about function
calls, methods, etc, is given in the online API Reference Guide.
Chapter 1: Introduction
provides an overview of this manual, 7535 applications, including the PC connectivity software, ActiveSync, and care of the 7535.
Chapter 2: The Hardware
describes the 7535’s hardware.
Chapter 3: The Software
describes the 7535’s software.
Chapter 4: Connecting
describes how to connect to the 7535.
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
provides instructions on reinstalling the 7535’s operating system.
Appendix A: Support Services And Worldwide Offices
presents information for technical support, contacts and the Psion Teklogix
worldwide web address.
1.2 Text Conventions
Note:
Notes highlight additional helpful information.
Important:
These statements provide particularly important instructions or
additional information that is critical to the operation of the
computer and other equipment.
Warning:
These statements provide important information that may prevent
injury, damage to the equipment, or loss of data.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
3
Chapter 1: Introduction
About The 7535 Hand-Held Computer
1.3 About The 7535 Hand-Held Computer
The 7535 is a ruggedized hand-held personal computer, running the Microsoft®
Windows® CE.NET 4.2 operating system. It is intended for use in commercial and
light industrial applications with a focus on real time wireless data transactions. All
possible bar code input methodologies are supported by one of the variety of scanners available. Optimization for specific operational environments is supported with
a wide range of peripheral options and carrying accessories.
The 7535 uses a custom build of Windows CE 4.2 operating system, running on the
Intel X-Scale PXA255 processor. It can accept executables written for this processor
or the ARM v4 processor, or (with the appropriate runtime engines).NET CIL executables or Java bytecode executables.
4
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
2
THE HARDWARE
2.1 The Hardware . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1 Processor . . . . . . . .
2.1.2 Onboard Memory . . .
2.1.3 Hardware Architecture .
2.2 Identifying Hardware . . . . . . .
2.3 The Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 The Display . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.1 Touch Input . . . . . .
2.5 The Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 The LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7 The Beeper . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8 Accessory Cards . . . . . . . . . .
2.9 Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9.1 The Docking Port . . .
2.9.2 The Tether Port. . . . .
2.10 Power Management. . . . . . . .
2.11 Turning The 7535 On And Off . .
2.12 Resetting The 7535 . . . . . . . .
2.13 The Portable Docking Module . .
2.14 Pinouts And Cables. . . . . . . .
2.14.1 The Serial Port . . . .
2.14.2 The Tether Port . . . .
2.14.3 The Docking Port . . .
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. . . . . . . . 7
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. . . . . . . 24
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
5
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Hardware
2.1 The Hardware
Figure 2.1 The 7535
2.1.1 Processor
The 7535 is built around a 400-MHz Intel PXA255 processor. This ARM-corebased CPU is also known as XScale™, and is the successor to the StrongArm
SA1110. This processor has many integrated peripherals, such as UARTs, PCMCIA/CF, and LCD controllers.
2.1.2 Onboard Memory
The 7535 has 32 megabytes of flash memory and 64 megabytes of RAM.
2.1.3 Hardware Architecture
A smaller, low-power microcontroller, the “peripheral controller”, is used to control
and monitor many aspects of the hardware, including controlling system power,
communicating with the smart battery pack, handling communications with the keyboard controller, collecting raw non-decoded scanner input, monitoring temperature, light, and other sensors.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
7
Chapter 2: The Hardware
Identifying Hardware
There are also two PIC microcontrollers; one scans the matrix keyboard and controls the LEDs, and the other drives the keyboard backlight.
2.2 Identifying Hardware
The 7535’s hardware configuration is listed in the information provided by the
System Properties applet in the Control Panel.
To reach this manually:
1. Press Blue + 0 to open the start menu.
2. Select Settings, Control Panel. The Control Panel opens.
3. Double-click on the System icon. The System Properties window
opens.
4. Click on the Properties tab. System Properties lists the hardware and
software in the 7535.
Listed items include:
8
•
Date codes for the 7535’s boot software (‘Boot code’), peripheral-controller
code (‘PCon code’) and OS software (‘WinCE code’).
•
Processor type and speed.
•
Amount of RAM and flash memory.
•
Type and orientation of display.
•
Presence and type of touch screen.
•
Presence and type of scanner.
•
Type of keyboard.
•
Presence of heater.
•
Serial number of main logic board (‘MLB Serial’).
•
Serial number of device.
•
Presence and type of card in internal PCMCIA and Compact Flash slots
(‘PCM/CF Slots-’).
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Scanner
2.3 The Scanner
The 7535 can support the following scanners, internal or external:
•
1D scanner
•
PDF 417 2D scanner
•
image scanner
Only one scanner is installed in the 7535, but a second handheld scanner can be connected via the tether port.
Internal scanners can be triggered from the trigger switch on the 7535’s handgrip (if
present) or from the Scan button on the 7535’s keyboard. External scanners can only
be triggered from their own trigger switch.
2.3.1 Scanner Control Services
This top level service (SCS) is responsible for supporting a variety of Physical Scan
Drivers (PSD), and presenting an API to applications. It receives decoded scan data
from the drivers, performs any configured translations, and delivers the data to the
appropriate application(s).
2.3.2 Non-decoded Laser Scanners
These scanners present raw data to the terminal. Internal and external non-decoded
laser scanners are controlled by the main processor. Activation of the scanner trigger(s) or the keyboard scan button(s) causes the main processor to initiate a scan
with the appropriate scanner. The peripheral controller acquires the raw scanner data
and feeds it to the main processor.
The non-decoded scan driver is responsible for receiving this data from the peripheral controller and decoding it before passing it to the Scan Control Service, which
performs any configured translations and delivers the data to the appropriate application(s).
2.3.3 Decoded Laser Scanners
These scanners process their raw data themselves, presenting formatted data to the
terminal. Both 1D and 2D decoded laser scanners are supported by the 7535. The
scanners will be connected to one of the serial ports and controlled by the main pro7535 Hardware Reference Guide
9
Chapter 2: The Hardware
Imaging Scanners
cessor. Activation of the scanner trigger(s) or the keyboard scan button(s) will initiate a scan with the appropriate scanner. The decoded scan driver is responsible for
receiving scan data and passing it to the Scan Control Service.
2.3.4 Imaging Scanners
The 7535 can support an imaging scanner; both internal and external imaging scanners are supported. Psion Teklogix provides a driver for this scanner.
2.4 The Display
The 7535 is available with a 240x320-pixel display, either monochrome (64 shades
of grey) or colour (256k colours). The contrast of the display can be adjusted from
the keyboard via hot-keys, and is automatically temperature-compensated.
2.4.1 Touch Input
Touch input is an option for the 7535’s display. The touch driver controls the hardware directly to receive touch-down, touch-up, and movement events. Touch events
are passed to the application via the operating system.
2.4.2 The Display Backlight
The 7535 has a backlight behind its display. This backlight can be adjusted for intensity, and can be configured to turn on when the ambient light level drops below a
configured value.
2.5 The Keyboard
The 7535 has two types of available keyboard layouts. One type has 58 keys; the
other has 36 keys.
Windows CE .NET returns ‘virtual key codes’ for keypresses. Psion Teklogix’ keyboard drivers take into account when Psion Teklogix’ own special modifier keys
(such as the Blue or Orange key) are pressed; the keyboard driver provides the
virtual key code of the modified key.
10
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Keyboard Backlight
2.5.1 The Keyboard Backlight
The 7535 has a backlight behind its keyboard. This backlight can only be turned off
and on, not adjusted for brightness, but it can be configured to turn on when the
ambient light level drops below a configured value.
2.6 The LEDs
The 7535 has four tri-coloured indicator LEDs.
Radio LED
User Application
LED
Scan LED
Charge LED
Figure 2.2 Indicator LEDs
2.6.1 Charge LED
The lower-right LED is reserved for internal charger/power status. This indicator is
active even when the 7535 is inserted in a docking station (and in suspend mode) so
that the charge status of the battery can be detected easily.
Function
Charge LED Behaviour
External power not available.
Fully charged to within 95% of charge
capacity.
Quick charge successfully completed to
within 75% of charge capacity.
Charge in progress.
Cell temperature out of range for charge.
Unable to charge battery.
Charge circuit failure.
LED off.
LED displays solid green colour.
LED flashes slow green.
LED displays solid yellow colour.
LED flashes yellow.
LED displays solid red colour.
LED flashes fast red.
Table 2.1 Charge LEDs
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
11
Chapter 2: The Hardware
Radio Traffic LED
2.6.2 Radio Traffic LED
The upper-left LED on the 7535 flashes either orange or green to indicate when the
radio transmits and receives data.
Note:
While the standard 802.11b radio available for the 7535 supports the
transmit/receive LED, not all radios support this function.
Function
Radio Traffic LED Behaviour
Radio Transmit
Radio Receive
LED flashes orange.
LED flashes green.
Table 2.2 Transmit and Receive LEDs
2.6.3 Scan LED
Successful scans are indicated in two ways – with a scan LED and with an audio
tone.
Function
Scan in progress
Successful scan
Unsuccessful scan
Scan LED Behaviour
LED displays solid red during scan.
LED displays solid green after decode.
Off when scan ended.
LED flashes red.
Table 2.3 Scan LED
2.6.4 User Application LED
This indicator is available for custom applications. Neither the 7535’s operating
system nor Psion Teklogix’ terminal-emulator TekTerm use this LED.
2.7 The Beeper
The 7535 has an internal beeper whose volume can be manually adjusted via
keyboard hot-keys.
12
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
Accessory Cards
2.8 Accessory Cards
The 7535 can accept accessory cards, which fit into internal slots in the unit. The
7535 has two slots which accept the following types of accessory cards:
•
Compact Flash (CF) cards.
•
MultiMedia Cards (MMCs).
•
Secure Digital (SD) cards.
These cards can contain additional memory, or other accessories. The Compact
Flash slot is normally occupied by a radio.
Typically, 7535 hand-helds are configured at the factory and arrive ready for use.
The 7535’s accessory-card slots are not intended for user modification.
If a device needs to be changed or added in these slots, contact qualified Psion Teklogix personnel. Refer to Appendix A: Support Services And Worldwide Offices for
the service number closest to you.
2.9 Ports
The 7535 itself has the following connectors:
•
Docking port.
Connects to chargers and docking modules.
•
Tether port.
Connects scanners and other cabled peripherals.
2.9.1 The Docking Port
The docking port allows the terminal to be placed in a cradle that allows battery
charging and connection to peripherals.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
13
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Docking Port
Available peripherals include chargers and a Portable Docking Module (PDM) that
provides connections for USB host port, USB client port, and a serial port. See “The
Portable Docking Module” on page 17 for details about the PDM.
Figure 2.3 The Docking Port
The docking port supplies DC power, a serial port, a USB host port, and a USB
client port.
Power
Power for charging the batteries and powering the terminal (9-24 V DC; 3.4 A max)
is supplied to the terminal through the docking port.
The terminal can supply 5V power (2 A max) to an external device through the
‘Power Output’ pins. This power is switched; the switch is controlled by the
Docking Port Services driver and is turned on only after the device is attached and a
valid Dock ID is detected.
Console Port
The console port uses a standard 3 wire serial interface (TxD, RxD, GND). Signals
levels are standard RS232 levels. This port is provided as a 9-pin D-connector on
the Portable Docking Module.
This console port is multiplexed between the main processor (the default) and the
peripheral controller. This console port is COM3 under Windows CE .NET.
USB Host Port
The USB host interface complies with USB specification 1.1 and provides a “highspeed” connection to external devices and hubs. Power for external devices is provided through the docking port’s power output pins. The OHCI driver is in charge of
the USB Host interface.
14
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Tether Port
USB Client Port
The docking port provides a USB client interface to connect the 7535 to a USB host
computer or hub. The 7535 acts as a USB serial device via the USB client port. On
the 7535, this serial device is COM4. The 7535 also can act as a USB client (a Mass
Storage Device), when its bootloader is running, to allow software updates via USB.
Dock ID
By reading a resistance value, the 7535 can identify the device attached to the
docking port. The Docking Services driver reads the ID, identifying the device,
checks the registry to see which driver to load, then loads the appropriate driver.
2.9.2 The Tether Port
The Tether Port
Figure 2.4 The Tether Port
The tether port allows an external non-decoded scanner, a serial scanner, or a USB
client device to be connected to the terminal through a single connector. Generic
serial devices, such as printers, GPS receivers, and other serial devices, are also supported.
The tether port is COM1.
The 7535’s peripheral controller identifies connected devices by sensing a resistor
within the cable of the connected device. It notifies a driver running on the main
processor that a device has been connected. This driver then looks for an appropriate
driver to load, and instructs the peripheral controller to configure the port appropriately and enable power to the port.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
15
Chapter 2: The Hardware
COM Ports On The 7535
See “Section 2.14.2 The Tether Port” on page 19 for details of the devices that can
connect to the tether port.
2.9.3 COM Ports On The 7535
The 7535 has the following COM ports:
COM Port
Use
COM1
Tether port
COM2
Reserved (internal use only)
COM3
Console port
COM4
USB port
2.10 Power Management
The 7535 is powered by a lithium-ion rechargeable battery pack. The 7535 can be
powered from external power when used with the AC adaptor. When the 7535 is
powered from the AC adaptor, it will also charge the battery pack.
An internal supercapacitor will hold charge for ten minutes to preserve the contents
of RAM while the 7535’s battery is being changed.
2.11 Turning The 7535 On And Off
To switch on:
press and hold the Enter/On key for at least one second.
To switch off:
press the Blue key, then press the Enter/On key. The 7535 enters a
suspended state. The contents of RAM are preserved.
2.12 Resetting The 7535
The 7535 hardware can be reset in two different ways. The first way restarts the
operating system. The second way does not load the operating system, but presents
the boot loader. The boot loader can load the operating system. It has a text-mode
console at which commands can be entered.
To reset the 7535 and restart the operating system:
16
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Portable Docking Module
•
Press and hold down the Blue key and the Enter/On key simultaneously
for a minimum of six seconds. The four indicator LEDs light for a second,
and the screen displays the Psion Teklogix and Microsoft® Windows®
CE.net splash screen before displaying the startup desktop.
To reset the 7535 and display the boot loader:
•
Press and hold down the Scan key, the Blue key and the Enter/On key
simultaneously for a minimum of six seconds. The four indicator LEDs
light for a second, and the 7535 displays the boot-loader’s opening screen.
A reset results in a complete reboot of the unit. All RAM memory contents are lost.
The contents of the flash memory and memory card are preserved.
2.13 The Portable Docking Module
The 7535 can be connected to a Portable Docking Module (PDM):
USB Type-B (Client) Port
Docking Port
Serial Port
USB Type-A (Host) Port
DC Power Connector
The Portable Docking Module provides serial and USB ports.
The PDM has the following ports:
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
17
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Portable Docking Module
•
Serial port.
This 9-pin D-connector accepts a null-modem serial cable to connect to the
development machine.
•
USB type B port.
This port accepts a cable from a USB host (typically the development computer). It can be used for OS image updates, ActiveSync connections and
application debugging.
•
USB type A port.
This port connects the 7535 to other devices; the 7535 serves as a USB host.
This port can be used to connect a USB mouse and keyboard.
•
Docking port.
This port connects to the 7535.
•
DC power connector.
Accepts 15 V DC from the AC adaptor.
The Portable Docking Module is available as part of a kit from Psion Teklogix. This
kit, Psion Teklogix part number 1030085, includes the following items:
18
•
The Portable Docking Module (part number 1030083)
•
A USB A-B cable (part number 9003322)
•
A null modem cable (part number 9003659)
•
A DC power adapter (part number 9003323)
•
A power cord.
North American power cord: part number A2032 0036 0001
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
Pinouts And Cables
2.14 Pinouts And Cables
2.14.1 The Serial Port
The RS232 serial port on the 7535’s Portable Docking Module has the standard 9pin pinout; however, the PDM only passes the TxD, RxD, and Ground signals to the
7535’s docking connector. There is no hardware flow control.
The serial cable supplied is a 9-pin-to-9-pin null-modem cable, Psion Teklogix part
number 9003659.
The pinout of a standard 9-pin RS-232 connector is as follows:
Pin
Function
1
DCD
2
RXD
3
TXD
4
DTR
5
Ground
6
DSR
7
RTS
8
CTS
9
RI
Table 2.4 RS232 Pinout
2.14.2 The Tether Port
The 7535 can recognize several types of devices connected to its tether port. These
devices are as follows:
•
USB device.
•
serially-connected RFID reader.
•
generic serial device.
•
non-decoded scanner.
•
decoded serial scanner.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
19
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Tether Port
•
Psion Teklogix ScanSee, a scanner and input device which can be worn on
the back of the hand.
The tether port on the 7535 accepts an eight-pin custom connector:
Figure 2.5 Tether Port Connector
A mating connector is available from Psion Teklogix with part number 1020060.
The 7535 distinguishes between devices connected to the tether port by reading the
resistance between pin 8 and pin 5 of the tether port. These resistance values are as
follows:
20
Tether ID
Resistor Value (Ohm)
Connected Device
1
150k
USB
2
59k
3
34.8k
4
23.2k
5
16.2k
6
11.8k
7
8.66k
8
6.34k
9
4.53k
10
3.01k
11
1.82k
12
825
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Serially-connected RFID device
Generic serial device
Non-decoded scanner
Decoded serial scanner
Psion Teklogix ScanSee
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Tether Port
Table 2.5 Recognized Tether Port Resistance Values
Devices that connect to the tether port may be wired as follows:
USB Device
Tether Connector Pin
Pin Description
1
2
VCC (+5 V from 7535)
3
USB+
4
USB-
5
GND
6
7
8
150k Ohm Resistor
(Connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.6 Tether Connector Pinout For USB Device
PowerScan Non-decoded Scanner
Tether Connector Pin
Description
1
SCN_TRIG (TRIGGER)
2
VCC (+5 V from 7535)
3
SOS (SOS)
4
SCN_DATA (BAR_OUT)
5
GND (GND and CONFIG2)
6
SCAN_ENABLE (PWR_ENABLE)
7
SCN_ACK (GOOD READ)
8
8.66k Ohm Resistor
(Connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.7 Tether Connector Pinout For PowerScan Non-decoded Scanner
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
21
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Tether Port
Symbol P300STD Non-decoded Scanner
Tether Connector Pin
Description
1
SCN_TRIG (TRIGGER)
2
VCC (+5V from 7535)
3
SOS (SOS)
4
SCN_DATA (DEP)
5
GND (GND)
6
SCAN_ENABLE (ENABLE)
7
SCN_ACK (DECODE)
8
8.66k Ohm Resistor
(Connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.8 Tether Connector Pinout For Symbol P300STD Non-decoded Scanner
PowerScan Decoded Scanner
Tether Connector Pin
Description
1
RXD (to 7535)
2
VCC (+5 V from 7535)
3
4
TXD (from 7535)
5
GND
6
7
8
4.53k Ohm Resistor
(connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.9 Tether Connector Pinout For PowerScan Decoded Scanner
22
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Tether Port
Symbol P304PRO Decoded Scanner
Tether Connector Pin
Description
1
RXD (to 7535)
2
VCC (+5 V from 7535)
3
4
TXD (from 7535)
5
GND
6
7
8
4.53k Ohm Resistor
(connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.10 Tether Connector Pinout For Symbol P304PRO Decoded Scanner
Generic Serial Device
Tether Connector Pin
1
Pin Description
RXD (to 7535)
2
3
CTS (to 7535)
4
TXD (from 7535)
5
GND
6
7
RTS (from 7535)
8
16.2k Ohm Resistor
(Connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.11 Tether Connector Pinout For Generic Serial Device
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
23
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Docking Port
ScanSee
Tether Connector Pin
Pin Description
Pin On ScanSee
1
RXD (to 7535)
W4
2
VCC (+5V from 7535)
W2
4
TXD (from 7535)
W3
5
GND
W1
3
6
7
8
1.82k Ohm Resistor
(Connect the other end of resistor to pin 5)
Table 2.12 Tether Connector Pinout For ScanSee
2.14.3 The Docking Port
The docking port on the 7535 can connect to the following devices:
•
Portable Docking Module
•
Powered Cradle
•
Port Replicator
•
Combo Charger And Dock
•
Quad Dock
The docking port has the following pinout:.
Pin 2
Pin 1
Pin 12
Pin 11
Figure 2.6 Docking Port Connector
24
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 2: The Hardware
The Docking Port
Pin Number
Purpose
Notes
1
EXT_5V
Switched 5V DC from 7535 (2 A max)
2
RXD
RS232 RxD (7535 console port)
3
TXD
RS232 TxD (7535 console port)
4
PWR_IN
DC input to 7535 (9-20 V DC; 3.4 A max)
5
USB Host -
USB host data - (to USB peripherals)
6
USB Host +
USB host data + (to USB peripherals)
7
PWR_IN
DC input to 7535 (9-20 V DC; 3.4 A max)
8
DOCK_ID
The resistance between this pin and ground
identifies the device to which the terminal is
connected.
9
GROUND
10
USB_D-
USB Client Data - (from USB host)
11
USB_D+
USB Client Data + (from USB host)
12
GROUND
Table 2.13 Docking Port Pinout
The 7535 distinguishes between devices on the docking port by reading the resistance
between pin 8 and ground on the docking port. These resistance values are as follows:
Dock ID
Resistor Value (Ohm)
1
150k
2
59k
3
34.8k
4
23.2k
5
16.2k
6
11.8k
7
8.66k
8
6.34k
9
4.53k
10
3.01k
11
1.82k
12
825
Connected Device
Powered Cradle
PDM
Port Replicator
Combo charger/dock
Quad dock
Table 2.14 Recognized Docking Port Resistor Values
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
25
3
THE SOFTWARE
3.1 Overview Of The 7535’s Software . .
3.2 The Boot Process. . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2 Boot Types . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2.1 Cold Boot . . . . . .
3.2.2.2 Warm Boot. . . . . .
3.2.3 Other Power Transitions . .
3.2.3.1 Suspend . . . . . . .
3.2.3.2 Resume . . . . . . .
3.2.4 User Interface . . . . . . .
3.3 The Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.2 System Structure . . . . . .
3.3.2.1 The System Monitor .
3.3.2.2 The Desktop . . . . .
3.3.2.3 The User Interface . .
3.3.2.4 Navigation . . . . . .
3.3.2.5 Colour Schemes . . .
3.3.2.6 Differences. . . . . .
3.3.2.7 Error Messages . . .
3.4 Power Management . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 The Filesystem . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 Locations Of Applications . . . . . . .
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7535 Hardware Reference Guide
27
Chapter 3: The Software
Overview Of The 7535’s Software
3.1 Overview Of The 7535’s Software
This chapter describes features of the boot process and operating-system software
that are specific to the 7535.
The 7535 uses a custom build of Microsoft’s Windows CE.NET 4.2, with OS-native
device drivers for its custom hardware. It can accept executables written for the Intel
X-Scale PXA255 processor, or (with the appropriate runtime engine) .NET CIL
executables or Java bytecode executables.
The Psion Teklogix-developed ‘BooSt’ bootloader and mini-OS is used to perform
initial hardware configuration and load system software.
The system software design supports the services required by applications. The
operating system environment and standard development tools provide the standard
services; an application may interface with Psion Teklogix’ custom hardware and
software interfaces via the Psion Teklogix Mobile Devices SDK.
3.2 The Boot Process
3.2.1 Overview
The 7535 handheld terminal has both a main processor and a peripheral controller.
When the terminal is booted, the peripheral controller boots into BooSt, then runs its
own software. This software is stored in the peripheral controller’s onboard flash
memory.
The main processor uses BooSt as a bootloader and Windows CE .NET 4.2 as the
primary operating system.
The image for the main processor’s software, including BooSt and Windows CE
.NET, are stored in the terminal’s flash memory. The main processor cannot boot
directly from the flash; a more complex boot process is required. The peripheral
controller loads a small amount of code into the main processor’s instruction cache,
enabling it to start its own boot loader.
3.2.2 Boot Types
The boot process is the series of steps between pressing the on key on the 7535 to
when the main operating system is ready for user input. There are three possible
times that this may happen:
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
29
Chapter 3: The Software
Boot Types
•
the first time the terminal is turned on at the factory (‘initial software load’)
•
the terminal is turned on after it is powered down (‘cold boot’)
•
the terminal is turned on after it was suspended (‘resume from suspend’).
The most common type of boot is the resume from suspend. When the 7535 is
turned off, it enters a ‘suspended’ state, where its main processor is stopped, but
retains the contents of its RAM.
Cold boot only occurs if the terminal is intentionally rebooted or if both the main
battery and the backup super-capacitor become fully discharged.
The first-time software load, as the name suggests, only happens once, at the factory, and is not discussed further here.
On a cold boot or resume from suspend, the peripheral controller boots using the
bootloader image in its flash.
Note:
3.2.2.1
The following descriptions assume no errors during the boot process.
Cold Boot
During a cold boot, the peripheral controller is the first device powered up. It performs the following steps:
1. Boots the bootloader image located in its own flash.
2. Turns on an LED to confirm the button press by the user.
3. Powers up the main processor but leaves it in reset.
4. Initializes the main processor.
5. Continues running its own software.
Once out of reset, the main processor performs the following tasks:
6. Initializes the 7535’s SDRAM and flash memory.
7. Loads its copy of the bootloader from the NAND flash into RAM.
8. Communicates back to the peripheral controller that everything is okay.
9. Jumps to the bootloader.
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Other Power Transitions
The bootloader performs minimal initialization and waits until it gets a ‘Go’
message back from the peripheral controller, after which it:
10. Fully initializes itself.
11. Writes a message on the terminal screen and the console port.
12. Loads the OS image into RAM.
13. Runs the OS image.
While the Windows CE image is being loaded into RAM, a splash screen is displayed on the terminal’s display.
A cold boot can also be triggered by selecting Blue + 0 to get the start menu, then
selecting Shut Down, Cold Reset.
3.2.2.2
Warm Boot
The warm boot is a complete cycle transition from Run to Suspend to Run. When
transitioning from Run to Suspend, all applications are closed, but working RAM is
not cleared and the file system is preserved. A warm boot resumes with working
RAM and a file system, whose contents have been preserved from a previous session.
A warm boot can be triggered by selecting Blue + 0 to get the start menu, then
selecting Shut Down, Warm Reset.
3.2.3 Other Power Transitions
3.2.3.1
Suspend
A transition to the Suspend state (stopping the microprocessor) occurs when:
•
There is a timeout of the user-input inactivity timer, or
•
External power is removed, and the battery is low.
Suspend is the usual state of the terminal when it is ‘turned off’. It can be triggered
by the user in two ways:
•
by pressing Blue + 0 to get the start menu, then selecting Shut Down,
Suspend.
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User Interface
•
by pressing the OFF key-combination Blue + Enter.
If the unit is running on battery power, and the remaining battery power drops to
critical levels as reported by the battery pack, the system will transition gracefully to
the Suspend state, and no data will be lost.
If the unit is running on external power without a battery installed, and external
power is removed, the system will make a ‘non-graceful’ transition to the Suspend
state. The object store is preserved, the file system in flash is intact, but registry
changes that have not been stored in the registry files in flash are lost, running applications are lost, unsaved data is lost. Restart from this state is a cold boot.
3.2.3.2
Resume
During a Resume transition from the Suspend state, the boot process starts in the
same way as a cold boot. When going into Suspend, the main operating system
writes a value into the Power Management Scratch Pad register. This value can be
“run the main operating system on resume” or “run the boot loader on resume”.
When a value is read from this register on resume that corresponds to the value for
“run the main operating system on resume”, the bootloader jumps to the OS image
in RAM, and the boot continues. If the value read corresponds to the value “run the
boot loader on resume”, the bootloader continues to run, giving the user a command
prompt.
The user can go to the bootloader’s command prompt manually by:
•
pressing and holding the Scan, Blue, and Enter keys simultaneously
for 6 seconds
•
selecting Blue + 0 to get the start menu, then selecting Shut Down,
Bootloader.
3.2.4 User Interface
During the boot process, indicators let the user know what is happening:
32
•
When the user presses the ON button, the four LEDs turn on momentarily
to confirm the button press.
•
When the bootloader is loaded and running on the main processor, a
message is displayed on the terminal’s screen and on the console port.
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User Interface
•
When the main operating system is loaded and run, a splash screen is
displayed on the terminal’s screen.
•
At the end of the boot process, the 7535’s shell is displayed on the screen.
Status messages are written to the 7535’s serial console ports during the boot process. The peripheral controller and the main processor console ports are multiplexed
on the same physical port. They use different command prompts to let the user know
which processor is displaying the status message.
The peripheral controller can display the following messages on the console port:
•
Starting BooSt
•
No image in the NAND flash
•
No/Invalid image on CF card
•
PXA250 jumping to BooSt
The main processor (the PXA250) can display the following messages on the
console port:
•
Starting BooSt
•
Recovering from sleep
•
PXA250 jumping to Windows CE
•
Going to BooSt prompt
•
Valid image in flash date code = <date code>
•
Invalid image in flash
•
Valid image on CF card date code = <date code>
•
Invalid image on CF card
The user has also been given the ability to adjust when certain transition times are
affected. This is done using the Power Properties applet in the Windows Control
Panel. One of two power schemes, ‘AC Power’ or ‘Battery Power’ can be chosen.
The following options can be changed by the user:
•
Switch To Suspend
This is the amount of time the unit is idle before the unit executes the Runto-Suspend transition. This setting is on the Schemes tab of the Power Properties dialog. Possible settings are: Never, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, and 30 minutes.
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Chapter 3: The Software
The Shell
•
Suspend Threshold
This is the percentage of battery charge left when the unit executes the Runto-Suspend transition. This setting is on the Suspend Threshold tab of the
Power Properties dialog. Possible settings are: 0 to 50 percent, in 5% steps.
3.3 The Shell
3.3.1 Overview
The shell is responsible for providing an interface to the user for access to the terminal’s applications, files, and configuration. It also monitors and provides notifications to the user about the system state.
3.3.2 System Structure
The shell is the first user application run by the system. It registers several windows
with the operating system and has several responsibilities defined by the OS. These
responsibilities include monitoring system memory and power levels. Along with
the tasks that are required by the OS, the shell is responsible for providing the user
with usability features. These features include a notification area, a window that displays currently running tasks and a method to run applications.
The shell is a multithreaded application. Information is passed between the threads
using Windows CE graphical window and event system (GWES) and shell-defined
message types. Certain parts of the shell must register with the OS to receive special
messages.
3.3.2.1
The System Monitor
The system monitor task contains one window to receive messages and can potentially be multithreaded. Each thread can be used to monitor a system resource. The
initial design has only one thread that monitors system memory and power. This
thread is woken up periodically and checks the system resources.
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System Structure
Memory Monitoring
When the free memory drops below a configurable limit, the shell sends a ‘hibernate’ message to the last used application window. Application windows are supposed to reduce their memory consumption when they receive this message. If the
free memory situation has not improved, the system monitor will send hibernate
messages to the other windows.
Power Monitoring
The power monitor provides two different means of feedback to the user.
The first method of feedback is a battery-gauge icon in the system tray. This icon,
which resembles a battery, shows the level of charge left in the main battery.
When the battery is fully charged the icon is completely green, when the battery is
completely discharged, the battery is red. The other levels in between vary in the
amount of green and red in the battery icon (for example, at 60% charge level the
battery is 3/5 green and 2/5 red). The shades of red and green will be chosen so that
they display as light and dark on a monochrome display.
The battery-gauge icon is replaced with a icon displaying a power connector when
the terminal is connected to external power and is not charging. It is replaced with
an icon displaying a battery with a lighting bolt when the terminal is connected to
external power and the battery is being charged.
The second method of feedback is the display of popup messages when the main
battery level drops below a certain limit or the battery life has been exceeded.
Security Monitoring
The system monitor thread is also responsible for the current security level on the
terminal.
The terminal has three security levels: User, Teklogix, and Supervisor. The system
monitor task monitors the security level and will display an icon in the system tray if
the terminal is in the Teklogix or Supervisor level. Any application that needs to set
or get the current security level should do it through a shell API that will be handled
by the system monitor task.
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Chapter 3: The Software
System Structure
3.3.2.2
The Desktop
Desktop
System Tray
Task Bar
The desktop provides the user with a starting point to access the terminal’s file
system (through a link to Windows Explorer), and configuration (through a link to
the Control Panel).
The user may also put any applications or files in the \Windows\desktop folder
and they will be displayed on the desktop. This gives the user quick and easy access
to files and applications they might use frequently.
Important:
This folder resides in RAM, and its contents will be lost during a
cold boot.
The desktop window is also implicitly registered with the OS by naming itself
‘DesktopExplorerWindow’. The OS uses it to hide applications. Because Windows
CE does not support true minimization, any minimized windows are just placed
behind the desktop.
The Taskbar
The taskbar is a window drawn across the bottom of the terminal’s screen. The
taskbar has its own thread, and runs its own window, the system tray window, and
the task manager dialog box.
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System Structure
The taskbar registers itself with the OS. The OS sends the taskbar two kinds of
special messages:
•
application creation and destruction events.
•
certain key presses and key sequences.
Application creation and destruction events can be used for displaying buttons on
the taskbar for running applications.
Key presses and key sequences can be used by the shell for any purpose.
The taskbar displays the Task Manager on receiving Alt + Esc, cycles running
application windows on receiving Alt + Tab; and it displays the start menu on
receiving a Menu (Blue + 0) key press. This start menu can be used to access
certain shell features.
The taskbar is also responsible for displaying the start menu when the Menu key
combination is pressed.
The System Tray
The system tray is a window within the taskbar. It registers a callback with the OS.
Once registered the OS will forward messages sent by applications to display notification icons (Shell_NotifyIcon()) to the system tray.
The system tray task processes these messages and draws the notification icons in
the system tray window. The system tray also forwards any mouse or touch events
on the icons back to the window that registered them. The system tray also displays
the current time in its window when configured to do so.
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Chapter 3: The Software
System Structure
The Task Manager
The task manager is a dialog box that is created on startup but is only displayed
when the user requests it (by pressing Blue + 0, then T, or by pressing Alt + Esc, or
by selecting Start Menu, Task Manager). When it is displayed, it lists the currently
running applications. It allows the user to start a new application, close a running
application, or bring a running application to the foreground.
When attempting to close an application, the task manager sends it a close message.
If the application does not close, the task manager checks to make sure they can
close this application and ask the user if they really want to kill it. If the user
answers yes, the task manager kills the application’s process.
3.3.2.3
The User Interface
The desktop contains icons for shortcuts to the most commonly access files and
folders. At the bottom of the desktop is the taskbar. On the right side of the taskbar is
the system tray. The system tray window does not have an outline but is only as tall
as the taskbar and as wide as the icons it is displaying. The taskbar and the system
tray can be configured to display on any edge of the screen.
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3.3.2.4
Navigation
The shell and the standard start menu are fully navigable using the keyboard. The
following table outlines special keys and key combinations for the shell.
Operation
Key Or Key Combination
Navigation
Arrow pad
Open / Forward / Exit and save
Enter
Close / Exit and don't save
Esc
Back
Bksp
Focus Cycle (dialog boxes)
Tab
Select / Button press
Space
Start Menu
Blue + 0
Task Manager
Blue + 0, then T;
Alt + Esc
Cycle Tasks
Blue + 0, then C;
Alt + Tab
Go to System Tray
Blue + 0, then Y
Show Desktop
Blue + 0, then D
Change security level
Blue + 0, then S
Show power information
Blue + 0, then P
The shell is fully navigable by touch, except there is no means of bringing up the
start menu.
3.3.2.5
Colour Schemes
The shell uses system-defined colour types to display the desktop and the taskbar.
The user can use the Appearance tab of the Display control-panel applet to adjust
these colours. Applications can use the Windows system-colours API to change
them.
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Chapter 3: The Software
Power Management
3.3.2.6
Differences
The customized Psion Teklogix shell is an enhanced version of the Handheld PC
(HPC) shell, which is similar to the shell on the desktop version of Windows. There
are some modifications to account for differences between the typical HPC and the
7535’s screen size and requirements. The major differences between the HPC shell
and Psion Teklogix’ shell on the 7535 are:
•
The HPC shell is optimized for 480x240 pixel displays, while Psion Teklogix’ shell is optimized for both 240x320 and 320x240 displays.
•
The HPC shell has a 26-pixel taskbar, Psion Teklogix’ shell reduces this to
18-pixels to maximize the desktop (work) area.
•
Psion Teklogix’ shell does not have a start button. Any important links
should be on the desktop.
•
Psion Teklogix’ shell does not have tabs on the taskbar for the running
applications.
•
Psion Teklogix’ shell uses the Menu key-combination (Blue + 0) to display
a start menu with shortcuts to frequently used features.
3.3.2.7
Error Messages
The shell uses the Windows CE standard error messaging system to display major
errors and uses on screen message boxes to display runtime errors.
3.4 Power Management
The Power Manager acts as a mediator between devices, applications, and defined
OS power states. It implements the following set of rules for facilitating communication between those three parties:
40
•
OS power states impose maximum power consumption limits on all
devices.
•
Applications impose minimum power consumption limits on specific
devices to obtain minimum performance levels.
•
The Power Manager allows devices to intelligently manage their own
power as long as they keep their power levels between the maximum and
minimum limits.
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Chapter 3: The Software
The Filesystem
•
If the minimum power consumption limit is set higher than the maximum,
the power of the device will remain elevated for as long as the application
requires the device.
•
If the OS transitions to a suspended power state, application-imposed
minimum power limits will be set aside while the OS is suspended.
3.5 The Filesystem
The filesystem of the 7535 appears as one unified space. However it is composed of
several different types of memory: internal RAM, internal flash, and installed
memory cards.
When the 7535 cold-boots, the bootloader installs the operating system into RAM.
The resulting filesystem—the \Windows, \Program Files, \My Documents directories and so on—resides in RAM, and is cleared during a cold boot.
Note:
In normal usage, the 7535 is not cold-booted. Unlike many computers, the
unit is merely suspended when it is not in use, and the RAM retains its
contents.
The 7535’s internal nonvolatile flash memory and any available memory cards are
made available to this filesystem. That part of the 7535’s internal flash memory
available to the user appears as the \Flash Disk folder. Each partition on a
memory card appears as a separate folder under the root folder. (Most memory cards
have one partition by default; this can be changed through the Storage Manager.)
Memory-card folders are named as follows:.
Type Of Card
Name Of First Or Only Partition
Name of Second And Later
Partitions
SD Card or
MMC
\SD-MMC Card
\SD-MMC Card2,
\SD-MMC Card3...
Compact Flash
card
\CF Card
\CF Card2,
\CF Card3...
3.6 Locations Of Applications
Applications may be located in several places in the 7535.
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Chapter 3: The Software
Locations Of Applications
An application can be installed either to RAM or to flash memory. If the application
is installed to RAM, it is completely lost when the unit is cold-booted.
The default directory for files installed through ActiveSync’s Application Manager
is \Program Files\<appname>, where <appname> is the name of the program. On
the 7535, this directory resides in RAM and will be lost during a cold or warm boot.
The application may be installed into flash, but only if the application can be run
from some folder other than the \Windows folder, which is not placed in the flash
file system.
If the application is installed into the 7535’s internal flash memory in the folder
\Flash Disk, the application will remain in the 7535, even after a cold or warm
boot.
Application executables placed in \Flash Disk\Startup will be automatically
started when the operating system starts after a cold boot. This will not happen after
a resume from suspend.
Applications may be placed as .cab files in \Flash Disk\Startup. When the
7535 cold-boots, it will automatically install any .cab files located in this folder.
Applications may also be placed in memory cards.
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CONNECTING
4
4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2 USB Serial Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.3 Bluetooth Wireless Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
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Chapter 4: Connecting
Overview
4.1 Overview
This chapter provides connection information specific to the 7535, for connecting to
the device through the following methods:
•
USB serial link. See section 4.2 on page 46.
•
Bluetooth short-range wireless link. See section 4.3 on page 48.
The ActiveSync software from Microsoft can be used to establish communication
with the device, once the physical connection has been made.
Once an ActiveSync connection has been made over a USB serial link, ActiveSync
can be used over a wireless connection such as Bluetooth. Software can then be
deployed as described in the Developers’ Guide.
4.1.1 Setting Up ActiveSync
ActiveSync allows you to connect the 7535 to a PC through USB or Bluetooth communication. File transfers, file synchronization and sending e-mail can all be done
via ActiveSync.
Important:
ActiveSync must be connected and synchronized, and a ‘Partnership’ set up, through USB at least once before other connection
types are possible.
Install the most recent version of ActiveSync on your PC (check the Microsoft
website for the latest software).
Connection Types
There are two types of connection provided for by ActiveSync:
•
Guest - A guest connection allows file transfers. No synchronization is performed. If the 7535 is password protected, the password prompt will appear
when connecting as guest.
•
Partnership - A partnership connection allows for synchronization of files,
e-mail and other data. If the 7535 is password protected, a password prompt
will appear before allowing synchronization.
You can disconnect any ActiveSync connection by double-clicking on the blue icon
in the 7535’s system tray and selecting the Disconnect button from the dialog.
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Chapter 4: Connecting
USB Serial Connections
Double-click the PC Connection icon in the Control Panel. The PC Connection
Properties dialog appears. Verify that the checkbox that allows connection to the
desktop is checked:
“Connect Using” specifies the port to be used for connecting to the PC:
•
USB specifies using the USB Type-B (client) port of the 7535. This port is
provided on the Portable Docking Module.
•
Bluetooth specifies using the internal Bluetooth connection of the 7535 (if
present). This connection may have a different name.
To change the connection type, click on the Change Connection... button and select
the connection from the dropdown list.
4.2 USB Serial Connections
The USB architecture defines a “host” device that can communicate with up to 127
client devices through a serial connection. When the host device powers up, it
queries the USB bus, identifying devices.
USB serial connections are available at a number of different data rates.
•
“High speed” USB devices communicate at 480 Mb/s.
•
“Full speed” USB devices communicate at 12 Mb/s.
•
“Low speed” USB devices communicate at 1.5 Mb/s.
USB devices may be self-powered, or powered through the USB cable.
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USB Serial Connections
Any device that draws less than 100 mA from the USB cable is called a “low-powered” device; this includes self-powered devices that need no power, as well as
devices such as tablets and mice that need little power.
Devices that draw more than 100 mA from the USB cable are called “high-powered” devices. The USB cable must be connected to another device that can supply
this power.
The 7535’s Portable Docking Module is not rated to supply power to high-powered
USB devices.
USB cables can have two types of connectors. The ‘type-A’ connectors, found
on USB host devices such as desktop computers, are wide and flat. The ‘type-B’
connectors, found on peripherals, are narrower and squarer.
USB cable lengths are limited. Full-speed cables are a maximum of 5 m long.
To connect using ActiveSync via USB:
1. Connect the USB cable to the USB type-A port on your computer.
2. Connect the other end of the USB cable to the 7535’s USB type-B port.
This port is the square connector on the left side of the Portable
Docking Module (labelled with the
symbol).
On the 7535...
3. Open the 7535’s Control Panel.
4. Double-click on the PC Connection icon. The PC Connection dialog
opens.
5. Verify that the Use Connection checkbox is checked and that the unit
will connect using USB.
On the development PC...
6. Double-click on the ActiveSync icon in the system tray. The ActiveSync menu appears.
7. Select Connection Settings. The Connection Settings dialog appears.
8. Place a checkmark in the checkbox labeled Allow USB connection
with this desktop computer.
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Chapter 4: Connecting
Bluetooth Wireless Connections
9. Press OK. The Settings dialog disappears.
10. Select File, Get Connected. The Get Connected wizard appears.
11. Press Next. ActiveSync searches for a connection.
On the 7535...
12. Select Start, Programs, ActiveSync, direct. A dialog appears, indicating that the 7535 is attempting to connect.
13. A successful connection is indicated by a blue icon
in the 7535’s
system tray. The 7535 and the PC will also play sounds to indicate that
they are connected, if sound is enabled on the devices.
4.3 Bluetooth Wireless Connections
Bluetooth wireless connections use a short-range wireless link to implement peerto-peer “piconets” of up to seven devices.
Each device on the piconet is identified by a three-digit MAC. An individual device
can be a member of more than one piconet. Different piconets are distinguished by
different frequency-hopping codes. Bluetooth radios use FHSS in the unlicensed
2.4-GHz ISM band.
Bluetooth radios are divided into three power classes:
Power Class
Maximum Output
Power
1
100 mW
(20 dBm)
2
2.5 mW
(4 dBm)
3
1 mW
(0 dBm)
Table 4.1 Bluetooth Power Classes
Bluetooth connections can run at up to 740 kb/s, with a range of up to 10 metres for
classes 2 and 3, and 100 metres for class 1.
To connect using Bluetooth, you will need:
48
•
A 7535 with an internal Bluetooth card.
•
A PC with Bluetooth and ActiveSync.
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Chapter 4: Connecting
Bluetooth Wireless Connections
•
An existing ActiveSync partnership between the 7535 and the PC. This
partnership must be established through the USB connection.
To connect:
1. Select Blue + 0. The Start Menu opens.
2. Select Settings. The Control Panel opens.
3. Double-click on the Bluetooth Device Properties icon.
The Bluetooth Manager dialog opens.
4. Ensure that the development PC is powered on and that its Bluetooth
radio is enabled.
5. Click on the Scan Device button and wait for the 7535 to complete its
scan (approximately 20 seconds). Services offered by discovered
devices, such as the PC, will be displayed in the list box. Each service
of a device receives a separate entry:
If the discovered device has been given a unique name by its owner,
that name is used to identify it.
Note:
You can change the device-name and description of your 7535’s radio by
clicking on the System icon in Control Panel, which will open the System
Properties page. Click on the Device Name tab to access the menu and
change your settings. Then click on OK.
Although the name will have changed in the Property screen, the radio only
reads it on boot-up. Therefore, for the changes to take effect, you must coldboot or warm-boot the 7535.
6. A discovered device may display several service profiles that it can use
to communicate. Supported services that can be activated include: dialup networking service, serial connection for printing, and LAN access
using PPP.
7. Highlight the PC’s service profile in the list, then double-click on it. A
properties menu appears.
8. Select Active to make this service active.
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Chapter 4: Connecting
Bluetooth Wireless Connections
9. Select Trusted to make this service trusted. A dialog appears asking
whether authentication is needed.
10. If authentication is needed for the service, click Yes, then enter the PIN.
When the 7535 tries to connect with a remote device that has Authentication enabled, you will be prompted to verify the PIN. The Authentication Request dialog will appear. Enter the PIN, press OK, and the
devices will be connected.
11. Press OK. The Bluetooth Manager disappears, and the Control Panel
reappears.
12. Double-click on the PC Connection icon. The PC Connection
Properties dialog appears.
13. Press the Change Connection button. The Change Connection dialog
appears.
14. Select Bluetooth from the dropdown list in the Change Connection
dialog.
15. Press OK. The Change Connection dialog disappears, revealing the PC
Connection Properties dialog.
16. Press OK. The Control Panel reappears.
On the PC...
17. Select File, Connection Settings in the ActiveSync window, or
double-click on the ActiveSync icon in the system tray. The ActiveSync
menu appears.
18. Select Connection Settings. The Connection Settings dialog appears.
19. Place a checkmark in the checkbox labeled Allow serial cable or
infrared connection to this COM port.
20. Select the COM port assigned to the Bluetooth radio.
21. Press OK. The Settings dialog disappears.
22. Select File, Get Connected. The Get Connected wizard appears.
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Bluetooth Wireless Connections
23. Press Next. ActiveSync searches for a connection.
On the 7535...
24. Click on the Start button, then Programs, then ActiveSync, and select
remote from the ActiveSync submenu. A dialog appears, indicating
that the 7535 is attempting to connect.
25. A successful connection is indicated by a blue icon
in the 7535’s
system tray. The 7535 and the PC will also play sounds to indicate that
they are connected, if sound is enabled on the devices.
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51
REINSTALLING THE OS
5
5.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
5.1.1 Displaying The Datecode Of The Operating System . . . . 55
5.2 Serial Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
5.2.1 Equipment Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
5.2.2 Upgrading The Software Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
5.3 USB Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
5.3.1 Equipment Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
5.3.2 Upgrading The Software Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
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Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
Overview
Displaying The Datecode Of The Operating System
5.1 Overview
This section describes what you need to do to replace the operating system on your
7535.
The OS software image on a 7535 contains the Windows CE .NET operating system
(OS), the .NET runtime engine, and all the software included with the 7535. It may
also include Open TekTerm (Psion Teklogix’ terminal emulator program), or the
Jeode Java Virtual Machine (JVM).
OS images are available from Psion Teklogix in several slightly-different variants:
•
with the .NET runtime engine (part number 1000891x)
•
with the .NET runtime engine and TekTerm (part number 1000973x)
•
with the .NET runtime engine and the Jeode JVM (part number 1000892x)
where x indicates the revision level, starting with A.
These variants may be distinguished as follows:
•
The variant with TekTerm has the TekTerm icon
on the desktop.
•
The variant with the Java Virtual Machine has Jeode EVM in its Programs
menu. (Press Blue + 0, then select Programs, to reach this menu.)
A Windows registry key is set corresponding to these variants. The key
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Teklogix\CurrentVersion\ImageContents
is set to ‘SDK Image’, ‘TekTerm Image’ or ‘Java Image’, depending on the variant.
On rare occasions, it may be necessary to replace the 7535’s bootloader software or
the software in its peripheral controller. Contact Psion Teklogix support for assistance (see Appendix A: Support Services And Worldwide Offices for details).
5.1.1 Displaying The Datecode Of The Operating System
There are a few ways to display the datecode of the operating-system software in the
7535. The version of this software is reported as a date code from the day the software was built. The date code of the software image can be found using any of the
following methods:
•
When running the TekTerm program, press Ctrl + Alt + 0 to show TekTerm’s Display Menu. TekTerm displays the date code of the software.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
55
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
Serial Download
Equipment Needed
•
Enter the Control Panel, select the System icon, and open the Properties
tab. The item for “WinCE Code” displays the datecode of the OS image.
•
Hold down the 7535’s Scan, Blue and Enter buttons for 6 seconds. The
7535 boots into its boot loader and displays the datecode of the OS image.
5.2 Serial Download
This section explains how to replace the operating-system software image on a 7535
through a serial cable.
5.2.1 Equipment Needed
Replacing the software image serially requires the following items:
•
The new software image. The software image can be obtained from Psion
Teklogix.
•
A PC with an available serial connection.
•
A 7535 Portable Docking Module (PDM), which has a serial port that connects to the 7535’s console port.
•
Serial communications software that can handle Y-modem file transfer.
•
A serial cable. This cable, available as Psion Teklogix part number
9003659, has a 9-pin D-connector on both ends.
5.2.2 Upgrading The Software Image
The software image on a 7535 is upgraded by rebooting the device into the BooSt
bootloader, copying the OS image file to the 7535, then rebooting the device. The
7535’s boot loader loads and runs the new OS image file.
The new OS image file must be named 753xOS.img.
The following steps explain the process for upgrading the OS software image in a
7535 using a serial connection and a Portable Docking Module:
On the 7535...
1. Press and hold the Scan, Blue and Enter buttons simultaneously for six
seconds. The 7535 reboots to the BooSt bootloader and displays text
similar to the following:
56
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
Serial Download
Upgrading The Software Image
Psion Teklogix 7535 BooSt.
Copyright Psion Teklogix Inc. 2002, 2003
Starting BooSt...
Graphical console connected.
CPU (rev = 0x6) clock 400 MHz
Psion Teklogix 7535 rev B
NAND flash: 32 MB (Samsung K9F5616U0B), 15 MB reserved for OS
partition
RAM: 64 MB
BooSt version I173o (0x3F68A35F)
PCon version I193n
Keyboard version 3
Boot code image info: size = 235296
BooSt OS for 753x
Build version I173o
SDMMC: SD Card 4 bit data bus enabled
753xOS.img image info: size = 12601941
753x Windows CE.NET
K053r
BooSt key combo detected.
OS load skipped.
Touch calibration read from EEPROM successful
PDM connected to docking port
nand0-0 mounted: size = 16220160 (31680 * 512)
753x boot menu
-------------1) Run main OS
!) Clean start main OS
2) Begin YMODEM load
3) Show configuration
4) Audio test
5) Display test
6) RAM test
7) Erase flash file system
Command>
2. Connect the 7535 to the development PC using the serial cable. One
end of the serial cable plugs into the PC’s serial port and the other end
of the cable plugs into the serial port on the Portable Docking Module.
On the development PC...
3. Rename the OS software image from the part number under which it
was provided (such as 1000932A1.img) to 753xOS.img.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
57
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
Serial Download
Upgrading The Software Image
4. Set the serial communications software for the port where the serial
cable is connected. Use 8 data bits, no parity, one stop bit (8N1), a data
rate of 115 200 bits per second, and no flow control.
5. Start the serial communications software.
6. Press Enter. The 7535 echoes a menu to the PC’s screen through the
communications software. This menu is also displayed on the 7535’s
own screen.
In the communications software on the PC, or on the 7535...
7. Press 2 to begin a Y-modem transfer. The 7535 displays:
Attempting YMODEM receive to BooSt loader...
CCCCCCCCCCC
On the PC...
8. Select the OS image file for serial transfer, using Y-modem protocol.
9. Start the download. The 7535 receives the image file and places it in its
internal flash storage, then displays messages similar to the following:
YMODEM successfully received 0x115A880 bytes.
Load copy to nand0 info: size = 12601941
753x Windows CE.NET
K053r
Load completed successfully.
nand0-0 mounted: size = 15728640 (30720 * 512)
Command> load "/nand0-0/753xOS.img" run
Loading "/nand0-0/753xOS.img"...
Load RAM image info: size = 12601941
753x Windows CE.NET
K053r
Loading 9% complete...
Loading 29% complete...
Loading 48% complete...
Loading 68% complete...
Loading 92% complete...
Loading 100% complete...
Resetting to RAM module.
The 7535 automatically reboots copies the newly-loaded operating
system to RAM, then runs it.
58
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
USB Download
Equipment Needed
Note:
You may need to reconfigure any changes done to the system configuration through the Control Panel. The registry will be set to default values if
the new OS determines that the previously-existing registry values are not
compatible.
5.3 USB Download
This section explains how to replace the operating-system software image in a 7535
through a USB cable.
5.3.1 Equipment Needed
Replacing the software image requires the following items:
•
The new software image. The software image can be obtained from Psion
Teklogix. It has the part number 1000428x (where x is the version).
•
A PC with an available USB Type-A connection
•
A 7535 Portable Docking Module (PDM), with a USB Type-B port.
•
A USB A/B cable.
5.3.2 Upgrading The Software Image
The software image on a 7535 is upgraded by rebooting the device into the BooSt
boot loader, copying the OS image file to the 7535, then rebooting the device. The
7535’s boot loader loads and runs the new OS image file.
When the 7535 is booted into BooSt and connected to a PC using a USB cable, a
drive labeled “Removable Disk” appears on the PC. This drive contains the 7535
software image. To upgrade the software image simply copy the new software
image (which must be named 753xos.img) to this drive.
Important:
Before connecting a 7535 to your PC using USB, you must update
the USB .inf file on your PC. This can be done by running the USB
Setup program included on the SDK CD.
The USB Setup program, with part number 1000997x, can also be
downloaded from the Psion Teklogix developers’ web site at
http://www.psionteklogix.com/developers/ .
The following steps explain the process for upgrading the software image in a 7535
connected through USB using a Portable Docking Module:
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
59
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
USB Download
Upgrading The Software Image
1. Hold down the Scan, Blue and Enter buttons simultaneously for 6
seconds. The 7535 reboots to the BooSt bootloader and displays text
similar to the following:
Psion Teklogix 753x BooSt.
Copyright Psion Teklogix Inc. 2002, 2003
Starting BooSt...
Graphical console connected.
CPU (rev = 0x5) clock 400 MHz
Psion Teklogix 7535 rev B
NAND flash: 32 MB (Samsung K9F5616U0B), 15 MB reserved for OS
partition
RAM: 64 MB
BooSt version I173o (0x3F68A35F)
PCon version I193n
Keyboard version 3
Boot code image info: size = 235296
BooSt OS for 753x
Build version I173o
SDMMC: SD Card 4 bit data bus enabled
753xOS.img image info: size = 12601941
753x Windows CE.NET
K053r
BooSt key combo detected.
OS load skipped.
Nothing connected to tether port
PDM connected to docking port
nand0-0 mounted: size = 16220160 (31680 * 512)
753x boot menu
-------------1) Run main OS
!) Clean start main OS
2) Begin YMODEM load
3) Show configuration
4) Audio test
5) Display test
6) Touch test
7) RAM test
Command>
2. Connect the 7535 to your PC using the USB cable.
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7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
USB Download
Upgrading The Software Image
The A end of the USB cable plugs into your PC and the smaller square
B end of the cable plugs into the portable docking module connected to
the 7535. When the USB connection is established, a new drive appears
on your PC named “Removable Disk”.
The 7535 displays the following line on the console:
nand0-0 removed
Command>
That part of the 7535’s flash memory which stores the operating-system
image and is normally accessible only by the bootloader has been dismounted and made available to the bootloader’s USB driver.
The regular bootloader commands (1 and !) to load and run the main
operating system will not work, and will give an error that there is no
operating-system image available.
3. Rename the Software Image from the part number under which it was
provided (such as 1000428A1.img) to 753xOS.img.
4. Copy the file 753xOS.img to the “Removable Disk” drive on your
PC.
5. ‘Stop’ the Removable Disk drive.
Once the file copy has finished, the Removable Disk must be ‘stopped’
to properly save the new file. To do this, select the Unplug or Eject
Hardware icon in the system tray in the bottom right corner of your
PC, or use the Add/Remove Hardware option in the Control Panel
(follow the options to “Uninstall/Unplug a device”, and then
“Unplug/Eject a device”, then select the Mass Storage Device).
Important:
If the Removable Disk is not stopped, the 7535 image could become
corrupt causing the terminal not to boot properly.
If this happens, you must boot the 7535 into BooSt, connect it to
your PC with the USB cable, and format the Removable Disk (right
click on the drive and select the Format option).
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
61
Chapter 5: Reinstalling The OS
USB Download
Upgrading The Software Image
Once the Removable Disk has been properly stopped on the PC, the
BooSt Console displays a message similar to the following:
nand0-0 mounted: size = 16220160 (31680 * 512)
>
The flash memory containing the operating-system image has been
disconnected from the development computer and is now accessible by
the bootloader. The regular bootloader commands (1 and !) to load and
run the main operating system now work.
6. Reboot the 7535 by selecting option 1, “Run Main OS”, from the bootloader menu. The device boots into the new operating system.
Note:
62
You may need to reconfigure any changes done to the system configuration through the Control Panel. The registry will be set to default values if
the new OS determines that the previously-existing registry values are not
compatible.
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
APPENDIX
A
SUPPORT SERVICES AND WORLDWIDE OFFICES
Psion Teklogix provides a complete range of product support services to its customers worldwide. These services include technical support and product repairs.
A.1 Technical Support
Technical Support for Mobile Computing Products is provided via e-mail through
the Partner Program website. To reach the website, go to www.psionteklogix.com
and click on the Partner Program link, which takes you to the Partner Program page.
Then click on the Log-in button or the Register button, depending on whether you
have previously registered for Teknet or the Partner Program. (Your UserID and
password are the same for TekNet and the Partner Program.)
A.2 Product Repairs
International
For product repairs, please contact your local Psion Teklogix office (see
page A-2).
Canada/U.S.A
Canadian and U.S. customers can receive access to repair services, by calling
the toll-free number below, or via our secure website.
Note:
Customers calling the toll-free number should have their Psion Teklogix
customer number or trouble ticket number available.
Voice:
1 800 387-8898 (press option “2”)
Fax:
1 905 812-6304
Web Site:
http://service.psionteklogix.com
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
A-1
A.3 WORLDWIDE OFFICES
COMPANY HEADQUARTERS
AND CANADIAN SERVICE CENTRE
NORTH AMERICAN HEADQUARTERS
AND U.S. SERVICE CENTRE
Psion Teklogix Inc.
2100 Meadowvale Boulevard
Mississauga
Ontario
Canada L5N 7J9
Tel:
+1 905 813 9900
Fax:
+1 905 812 6300
E-mail: salescdn@psion.com
Psion Teklogix Corp.
1810 Airport Exchange Boulevard
Suite 500
Erlanger, Kentucky
USA 41018
Tel:
+1 859 371 6006
Fax:
+1 859 371 6422
E-mail: salesusa@psion.com
INTERNATIONAL SUBSIDIARIES
Psion Teklogix GmbH
Jakob Kaiser Straße 3
D-47877 Willich Münchheide
Deutschland
Tel:
+49 2154 9282 0
Fax:
+49 2154 9282 59
E-mail: info@teklogix.de
Psion Teklogix Danmark
Vesterballevej 4-6
7000 Fredericia
Danmark
Tel:
+45 76 24 0133
Fax:
+45 75 94 4679
E-mail: tedk@psion.com
Psion Teklogix S.A.
La Duranne
135 Rue Rene Descartes
BP 421000
13591 Aix-En-Provence
Cedex 3; France
Tel:
+33 4 42 90 88 09
Fax:
+33 4 42 90 88 88
E-mail: tekeuro@psion.com
Psion Teklogix AB
Stora Badhusgatan 18-20
411 21 Göthenburg, Sweden
Tel:
+46 31 13 15 50
Fax:
+46 31 13 57 80
E-mail: info@teklogix.se
A- 2
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
Psion Teklogix (UK) Ltd.
Bourne End Business Centre
Cores End Road
Bourne End
Buckinghamshire SL8 5AR, England
Tel:
+44 1628 648800
Fax:
+44 1628 648810
WWW: www.teklogix.co.uk
E-mail: tekuk@psion.com
Psion Teklogix Finland
Metsänneidonkuja 8
02130 Espoo
Finland
Tel:
+358 9 4307 8390
Fax:
+358 9 4307 8395
E-mail: tekeuro@psion.com
Psion Teklogix de Mexico, S.A. de C.V.
Sierra Mojada 626, 2º Piso
Col. Lomas Barrilaco, C.P. 11010
Mexico, D.F., Mexico
Tel.:
+5255 5 202 6802/6950
Fax:
+5255 5 202 4505
E-mail: salesusa@psion.com
Psion Teklogix Benelux
Nieuwe weg 1,
2070 Zwijndrecht
Belgium
Tel:
+32 3 250 22 00
Fax:
+32 3 250 22 20
E-mail: info@psionteklogix.be
Psion Teklogix Italia S.r.I
Via Galilei, 47
20092 Cinisello Balsamo
Milan, Italy
Tel:
+39 2 6604 5410
Fax:
+39 2 6604 5412
E-mail: tkxitalia@psion.com
Psion Teklogix España, S.L.
Cityparc Ronda de Dalt
Ctra. Hospitalet 147-149
Edificio Atenas 2° 3ª
08940 Cornellà de Llobregat (Barcelona)
España
Tel:
+34 9 3475 0220
Fax:
+34 9 3475 0230
E-mail: teklogix@apdo.com
Psion Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd.
210 South Bridge Road
#03-01 Singapore 058759
Tel:
+65 673 58108
Fax:
+65 673 35990
E-mail: teksing@teklogix.com
Psion Teklogix B.V.
Venrayseweg 57,
5928 NZ Venlo
Nederlands
Tel:
+31 77 32400 44
Fax:
+31 77 32400 53
Psion Teklogix Africa
Postnet Suite 39, Private Bag x11
Halfwayhouse, 1685 Ground Floor East
Waterfall Edge Phase 2, Waterfall Park
Bekker Road MIDRAND 1685
South Africa
Tel:
+27 11 805 7440/1/2
Fax:
+27 11 805 7444
Psion Teklogix Systems India Pvt. Ltd.
M-74, 1st Floor, “M” Block Market
Greater Kailash-Il
New Delhi - 110048
India
Tel:
+91 11 26219257
Fax:
+91 11 26219076
E-mail: tekind@psion.com
Psion Teklogix Wireless Technologies (Shanghai) Ltd.
Unit 1507-08
Mingshen Building
No.3131 Kai Xuan Rd
Shanghai 200030
China
Tel:
+86 21 5407 1991
Fax:
+86 21 5407 1992
Psion Teklogix Taiwan Co., Ltd.
15FL-5, No. 366 Boai 2nd Road,
Tzuo Ying District, KAOHSIUNG 813
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Tel:
+886 7 558 2028
Fax:
+886 7 558 3328
E-mail: jerry.chen@teklogix.com
A.4 WORLD WIDE WEB
www.psionteklogix.com
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
A-3
INDEX
Boldface indicates a parameter, menu or sub-menu name.
A
ActiveSync 45
default installation folder 42
disconnecting 45
guest 45
partnership 45
applications
install to flash or RAM 42
B
Bluetooth connections 48
Bluetooth Manager 49
Bluetooth radio
changing device name 49
device service profiles 49
radio configuration 49–51
C
.cab files
in startup folder 42
cables
serial 19
colour schemes
for the shell 39
combinations
of keys for shell 39
connections
Bluetooth 48
USB serial 46
D
datecode
displaying for OS 55
desktop
defined 36
desktop icons
for shell 38
Device Name, changing 49
devices recognized
docking port 24
on tether port 19
differences
between Psion Teklogix and standard
shell 40
disconnecting ActiveSync 45
displaying OS datecode 55
distinguishing OS variants 55
docking port 13
devices recognized 24
pinout 24
resistance values 25
DUN service, Bluetooth 49
E
error messages 40
F
feedback
to user from power monitor 35
flash memory
internal 42
folder
ActiveSync default installation 42
card folder names 41
startup 42
"full-speed" USB
defined 46
G
guest 45
H
"high-powered" USB
defined 47
"high speed" USB
defined 46
K
key combinations
for shell 39
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
1
Index
L
LAN access using PPP service, Bluetooth
49
LED
charge 11
receive 12
scan 12
transmit 12
"low-powered" USB defined 47
"low speed" USB defined 46
M
memory
and application install location 42
card folder names 41
internal flash 42
memory monitor 35
messages
error 40
monitor
of memory 35
of power 35
of security 35
of system 34
N
names
of memory card folders 41
null-modem cable
part number 18
O
operating system
displaying datecode 55
distinguishing variants 55
image part numbers 55
registry keys for variants 55
replacement using RS232 serial 56
replacement using USB 59
OS variants
distinguishing 55
registry key 55
P
partnership 45
part number
DC power adapter 18
null-modem cable 18
OS image 55
2
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
portable docking module 18
portable docking module kit 18
power cord 18
serial cable 19
USB cable 18
pinout
docking port 24
RS232 serial 19
serial on PDM 19
tether port 20
generic serial device 23
scanner 21, 22, 23
ScanSee 24
USB 21
portable DC power adapter
part number 18
portable docking module
part number 18
portable docking module kit
part number 18
ports
docking port 13
on 7535 13
power cord
part number 18
power management 40
power monitor
feedback to user 35
power transition
run-to-suspend 31
Printer (serial service), Bluetooth 49
R
radio
Bluetooth 49–51
receive LED 12
registry key
for OS variants 55
replacement
of OS 56, 59
resistance values
docking port 25
tether port 20
RS232 cable
part number 18
RS232 serial
OS replacement using 56
run-to-suspend (power transition) 31
Index
S
security levels
on terminal 35
serial cable 19
part number 18
serial connections
USB 46
Serial service, Bluetooth 49
shell
colour schemes 39
defined 34
desktop icons 38
differences between Psion Teklogix and
standard 40
key combinations 39
location of taskbar 38
startup
.cab files 42
startup folder 42
system monitor 34
security levels 35
system tray
defined 37
"low-powered" defined 47
"low speed" defined 46
OS replacement using 59
serial connections 46
USB cable
part number 18
V
variants
distinguishing for OS 55
W
wireless connections
Bluetooth 48
T
taskbar
defined 36
location 38
task manager
defined 38
tether port
devices recognized 19
generic serial device pinout 23
pinout 20
resistance values 20
scanner pinout 21, 22, 23
ScanSee pinout 24
USB pinout 21
text conventions 3
transmit LED 12
turning on/off 16
U
USB
connector location
on 7535 PDM 47
"full-speed" defined 46
"high-powered" defined 47
"high-speed" defined 46
7535 Hardware Reference Guide
3