The iPad for Photographers: Master the Newest Tool

The iPad
for Photographers
Third Edition
Master the Newest Tool in Your Camera Bag
Jeff CArlson
Peachpit Press
The iPad for Photographers:
Master the Newest Tool in Your Camera Bag, Third Edition
Jeff Carlson
Peachpit Press
www.peachpit.com
To report errors, please send a note to errata@peachpit.com
Peachpit Press is a division of Pearson Education
Copyright © 2014 by Jeff Carlson
Senior Editor: Susan Rimerman
Production Editor: Tracey Croom
Copyeditor/Proofreader: Scout Festa
Indexer: Karin Arrigoni
Composition: Jeff Carlson
Cover Design: Mimi Heft
Interior Design: Mimi Heft
Cover Image: Jeff Carlson
Notice of Rights
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of
the publisher. For information on getting permission for reprints and excerpts, contact permissions@
peachpit.com.
Notice of Liability
The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis, without warranty. While every
precaution has been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the author nor Peachpit shall
have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be
caused directly or indirectly by the instructions contained in this book or by the computer software
and hardware products described in it.
Trademarks
iPad is a registered trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Many of
the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as
trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and Peachpit was aware of a trademark
claim, the designations appear as requested by the owner of the trademark. All other product names
and services identified throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of
such companies with no intention of infringement of the trademark. No such use, or the use of any
trade name, is intended to convey endorsement or other affiliation with this book.
ISBN 13: 978-0-133-88847-8
ISBN 10: 0-133-88847-9
987654321
Printed and bound in the United States of America
For Steve. Thank you.
Acknowledgments
It’s fabulous to experience a whisper of an idea turn into a completed
book, but without the encouragement and assistance of many people, that
whisper could easily have dissipated into the ether. I owe a lot of gratitude,
and no doubt coffees or martinis (or both) to the following good folks.
Susan Rimerman, Ted Waitt, Cliff Colby, Nancy Aldrich-Ruenzel, Nancy
Davis, Scott Cowlin, Sara Jane Todd, and everyone else at Peachpit Press
who encouraged this project and made it happen.
Mimi Heft designed the book and provided first-class templates in which
I could work. Unlike many authors, I write directly into the book’s layout
using Adobe InDesign, so working in a template that’s properly styled and
professionally designed is a privilege.
My editing and production team, led by Susan Rimerman, made all the
practicalities happen: Scout Festa made me wish I could write as fast and
as sharp as she’s able to copyedit my text; Karin Arrigoni managed the
crush at the end of the project to produce a top-rate index; and Tracey
Croom put her production talents to good use shepherding the laid-out
files and keeping my work on the up-and-up.
Chris Morse and Chris Horne gave me access to pre-release versions of
their app Photosmith in previous editions, and Brian Gerfort helped me
better understand the underpinnings of how iOS works with images.
Glenn Fleishman helped maintain my link to the outside world as virtual
officemate—and occasional in-person lunch or coffee companion—and
patiently listened to my laments and successes.
Dana and David Bos granted permission for me to use photos I’ve shot of
their daughter, Ainsley.
Jackie Baisa contributed advice and insight into professional workflows.
Peter Loh provided invaluable photo studio equipment.
Tor Bjorklund donated the wood used in many of the studio photos.
Mason Marsh helped with information about using Wi-Fi–equipped
cameras.
Kim Carlson served as a fantastic photographer’s assistant and propmaster,
but most importantly kept me sane and supported this project from my
first inkling of an idea.
And Ellie Carlson continues to serve as a great model and a good sport
when I turn the camera on her. She’ll thank me when she’s older. Right?
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Can You Really Leave the Laptop Behind? . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Which iPad Should You Use? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
What’s New in the Third Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Notes About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Chapter 1 Capture
Photos with the iPad
3
Shoot with the Camera App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Shoot with Advanced Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Set Focus and Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Filters and Editing in Camera Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Time Your Shots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Shoot HDR Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Create a Panorama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 2 Build
an iPad Photo Workflow
Raw vs. JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shoot JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shoot Raw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shoot Raw+JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3 The
iPad on Location
11
12
13
14
16
21
Prepare for a Photo Shoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Find Photo Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Use GPS to Mark Locations to Revisit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Keep Reference Materials Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Review Photos in the Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Import Using the iPad Camera Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Import from a memory card or camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
The Secretly Versatile iPad USB Camera Adapter . . . . . . 28
What About Importing from
CompactFlash (CF) Cards? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Import from an iPhone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Import Wirelessly from the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Shoot and import wirelessly using ShutterSnitch . . . . . . 31
ShutterSnitch as Photographer’s Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Import wirelessly from another iOS device . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Record Location Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Record Location Using Geotag Photos Pro . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Record Location Using GeoSnitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Record Reference Photos Using the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Back Up Your Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
iCloud Photo Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Other Cloud Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Automatic photo uploads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Manual photo uploads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Portable Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Dedicated media storage devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Seagate Wireless Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Kingston MobileLite Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chapter 4 The
iPad in the Studio
45
Control a Camera from the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Tethered Shooting Using Capture Pilot HD . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Wireless Remote Control Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Compose and shoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Use Live View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Use bracketing/HDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Shoot at specified intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Triggertrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Control a Wireless Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Control Another iOS Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Make a Stop-Motion or Time-Lapse Video . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Create a Stop-Motion Video in iStopMotion . . . . . . . . . . 54
Create a Time-Lapse Video in iStopMotion . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Mount the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Tether Tools Wallee System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
The Stump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Extend Your Computer Desktop with Air Display . . . . . . 59
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The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Chapter 5 Rate
and Tag Photos
61
Rate and Tag Using Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Import Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Importing from ShutterSnitch into Photosmith . . . . . . . . 63
Rate Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Rate multiple photos simultaneously . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Assign Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Create or assign keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Build keyword hierarchies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Remove keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Edit Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Create metadata presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Filter Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Filter by metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Change the sort order and criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Filter using Smart Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Group Photos into Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Sync with Photoshop Lightroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Set up the Photosmith publish service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Sync photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Apply Develop settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Apply a metadata preset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Sync keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Sync photos from Lightroom to Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . 77
Export to Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Export to Other Destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Dropbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
XMP Export . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
PhotoCopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Delete Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
The Proxy JPEG Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Rate and Tag Using PhotosInfoPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Import Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Rate a Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Contents
vii
Add Metadata to a Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Add Metadata to Multiple Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Export Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Rate and Tag Using Editing Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Rate Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Add IPTC Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Create and use IPTC sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Export IPTC Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Sync and Flag Photos in Adobe Lightroom mobile . . . . . . 88
Create and Sync Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Add photos to a collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Remove photos from a collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Remove a Collection from Lightroom mobile . . . . . . . . . . 91
Flag Photos as Picks or Rejects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Review and Rate in PhotoScope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Chapter 6 Edit
Photos on the iPad
95
Make Photo Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Edit Photos in the Photos App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
An Important Note About Color Management . . . . . . . . 98
Edit Photos in Snapseed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Adjust Tone and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Adjust Specific Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Apply Creative Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Edit Photos in Photogene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Adjust Tone and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Adjust brightness and contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Adjust color cast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Adjust white balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Adjust saturation and vibrance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Apply Selective Edits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Apply Creative Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
viii
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Edit Photos in iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Straighten the image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Crop the frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Adjust Exposure and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Brightness and contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Adjust Specific Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Apply Creative Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Edit Photos in Adobe Lightroom mobile . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
How Lightroom mobile Syncing Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Adjust Tone and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
White Balance, Temperature, and Tint . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Contrast and Clarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Saturation and Vibrance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
The Helpful Histogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Apply Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Apply Previous Edits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Reset Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Lightroom mobile’s Offline Editing Mode . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Edit Raw Files Directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Retouch Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Photogene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Handy Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Chapter 7 Edit
Video on the iPad
133
Work with Projects in iMovie for iOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Open an Existing Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Apply a Fade In or Fade Out to the Movie . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Add Video to a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Add Clips from the Media Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Capture Video Directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Contents
ix
Import from an iPhone or iPod touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Edit Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Play and Skim Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Edit Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Move a clip on the timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Trim a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Split a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Delete a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Use the Precision Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Edit Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Add a Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Add a title to just a portion of a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Specify a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Add and Edit Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Edit the Ken Burns Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Disable the Ken Burns effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Edit Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Change a Clip’s Volume Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Add Background Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Add automatic theme music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Add a background music clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Add a Sound Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Move audio clips between
foreground and background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Add a Voiceover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Share Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Share to the Camera Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Send the Project to a Device via AirDrop . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Send the Project to a Device via iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Export a project to iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Import the project into iMovie
on another iOS device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
x
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Chapter 8 Build
an iPad Portfolio
157
5 Steps to Create a Great Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
iPad or iPad mini for Portfolios? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Prepare Images for the Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Apple Aperture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Adobe Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Create an action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Batch-process files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Adobe Photoshop Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Apple iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Create Your Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Using the Built-in Photos App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Create and Populate Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Add Photos to a Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Load from iPad media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Load from iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Load from Dropbox or Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Edit a Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Reorder images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Choose a gallery thumbnail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Customize the Opening Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Present Your Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Rate and Make Notes on Photos in Portfolio for iPad . 175
Present on the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Present on an External Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Wired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Chapter 9 Share
Photos
181
Upload Images to Photo-Sharing Services . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Upload from Editing Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Upload from Snapseed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Contents 
xi
Upload from Photogene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Share to the Web from Lightroom mobile . . . . . . . . . . 184
To Watermark or Not? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
iCloud Photo Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Upload Photos Using Services’ Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Flickr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Camera Awesome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
500px and PhotoStackr for 500px . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Email Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Share a Single Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Share Multiple Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Share Photos Using Adobe Revel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Import Photos to a Revel Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Rate and Edit Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Collaborate with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Print Photos from the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Print from Nearly Any App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Order Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Appendix App
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Reference
1:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
Capture Photos with the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
The iPad on Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
The iPad in the Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Rate and Tag Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Edit Photos on the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Edit Video on the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Build an iPad Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Share Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Index xii
199
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
209
Introduction
Photographers carry gear. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a pro with
multiple camera bodies and lenses or a casual shooter with an ever-present
point-and-shoot camera—there’s always stuff to pack along. And if you’re
traveling or away from your office or studio, part of that gear typically
includes a laptop for reviewing and backing up the photos you take. Too
often I’ve heard friends who are about to go on vacation moan that they
need to bring a bulky computer just to handle their digital photos.
The iPad is changing all that.
It’s a fantastic device to take into the field. The iPad Air measures less
than a quarter of an inch thick and weighs about 1 pound. The iPad mini
is the same thickness and only three-quarters of a pound. (The iPad 2 and
third- and fourth-generation iPads aren’t much thicker or heavier.) With the
addition of an inexpensive iPad camera adapter, you can import photos
directly from a camera or memory card and view them on the iPad’s highresolution Retina color screen, revealing details that the relatively puny
LCD on the back of your camera may obscure. More important, a rich array
of photography apps and related products is adding to the list of things
the iPad can do with those photos: rate and add keywords, perform color
adjustments, retouch blemishes, and share the results online.
Oh, and don’t forget everything else the iPad makes possible: browsing
the Web, accessing your email, reading ebooks, playing movies and music,
and, as they say, so much more.
Can You Really Leave the Laptop Behind?
Although the iPad can do a lot that you would have needed a laptop to
do just a few years ago, there are still some important limitations that you
should keep in mind when you decide whether a laptop stays at home.
If you’re generating a significant amount of image data, storage becomes
a problem. As this book goes to press, the current highest-capacity iPad
holds 128 GB. You can free up some memory by removing apps, music,
videos, and the like, but if you’re filling multiple 16 GB or 32 GB cards
Introduction

xiii
with photos, the iPad won’t work as a repository of your shots. (But I detail
several workarounds and workflows in Chapter 2.)
One solution is to buy a lot of memory cards and use them as you would
film canisters. The originals stay on the cards, while the keepers remain
on the iPad; you delete the ones you don’t want as you cull through them.
Fortunately, memory cards are inexpensive now. Unfortunately, they’re small
and easy to lose. Make sure you know where they are, label them accurately,
and keep them protected. Most important, make sure you have some system
of backing up your images; options include uploading them to online photo
storage services or transferring them wirelessly to a Wi-Fi–enabled hard disk
like the Seagate Wireless Plus.
If you capture raw-formatted images, you won’t benefit from the same
level of editing that a dedicated application on a desktop computer can
offer. With a few exceptions, all image editing occurs on JPEG versions of
the raw files, and exports as JPEG files (see Chapter 6 for more details).
So, to answer my question, in many circumstances yes, you can leave the
laptop behind. If you’re going to trek across Africa for four weeks, that’s
not ideal (but it is possible), but for most day trips or short vacations, the
iPad makes a great companion.
Which iPad Should You Use?
If you don’t already own an iPad, or you’re looking to upgrade from an
older model, here are some guidelines for choosing one that will be a
worthwhile addition to your camera bag.
For the reasons mentioned, I recommend getting the highest-capacity
iPad that’s available (and that you can afford). That gives you plenty of
room to store photos and apps; some image editors make a copy of a
photo to work with, so you could easily fill a couple of gigabytes just
editing. Plus, it’s an iPad, not just an extra hard disk, so you’ll want to store
music, movies, books, and all sorts of other media. If you’re on a budget,
get at least a 32 GB capacity model—the 16 GB configureation, in my
view, is now barely enough storage for general use, much less as a photo
companion.
xiv
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Size and weight are also extremely important factors. Until last year, you
bought whatever iPad was available, because they were all mostly the
same. But then Apple introduced the svelte and light iPad mini, which
is really a great traveling size. The tradeoff is that the iPad mini’s screen
measures 7.9 inches (versus 9.7 inches for the regular iPad). The entry-level
iPad mini doesn’t have a high-resolution Retina display, so I’d say skip that
and go for the Retina version. The size is definitely compelling, and it’s fine
for reviewing and editing images.
You also need to determine whether you want to buy a model that connects
to the Internet via Wi-Fi only or that also connects via cellular networking.
For photographic uses, cellular isn’t as important, because you may burn
up your data allotment quickly if you transfer images to sharing sites or to
online backup sources like Dropbox. (And it’s turning out that even when a
cellular provider offers “unlimited” data plans, they’re not really unlimited.)
Depending on where you’re shooting, though, cellular can be helpful for
looking up locations, checking weather reports, and other on-the-spot uses.
(Then again, you may already have an iPhone or other smartphone that can
handle those tasks.) I find the cellular capability useful in general iPad use,
but not necessarily for photo-related uses.
In terms of which iPad model to get if you don’t own one yet, I’d argue
for the latest model. As I write this, Apple sells the iPad Air and iPad mini
with Retina displays, the iPad mini with a standard display, and the fourthgeneration Retina iPad as the low-cost point of entry for the larger size.
The iPad 2, which was discontinued shortly before this book went to press,
is a fine model for photographers (it’s what I used to write the first edition
of this book), but your investment will last longer if you buy a newer model.
The original iPad will also work in some cases, but just barely—its older
processor and small amount of working memory prevent it from running
iOS 6, and many developers (at Apple’s insistence) are starting to phase out
support for older versions of the operating system.
What’s New in the Third Edition
As more photographers and developers have adopted the iPad, more and
better uses for it as a photo companion continue to appear. This third
Introduction
xv
edition of the book includes a host of new or changed material. Here are
some highlights.
First of all, the biggest change to the iPad, apart from new hardware in
the last year, has been the shift to iOS 7. All of the screenshots have been
updated for apps that adopted the new iOS appearance, and I’ve edited
the sequences dealing with Apple’s Photos app, which changed in a few
ways from the previous version.
When I talk to people at conferences and online, most of their questions
are centered around workflow. The way the iPad handles raw files, in
particular, creates interesting situations for processing photos in the field.
So, I’ve broken the extensive workflow explanations and diagrams into
their own chapter (Chapter 2).
The options for transferring photos wirelessly from the camera to the iPad
continue to increase as camera manufacturers are finally starting to build
wireless hardware into their products. Chapters 3 and 4 still focus on the
Eyefi wireless SD cards and the CamRanger remote device, but now also
include an example of controlling Wi-Fi cameras (in this case, a Fuji X-T1).
Chapter 5 still focuses on Photosmith and PhotosInfoPro for adding
important metadata to photos, but I added an intriguing new app called
PhotoScope, which lets you access Aperture and iPhoto libraries live when
your iPad is on the same network.
The biggest addition to the book is Adobe Lightroom mobile, which
I detail in Chapters 5 and 6. This app, which is free for people who
subscribe to one of Adobe’s Creative Cloud subscription plans, really
is Lightroom on the iPad—albeit in a stripped-down, version 1.0 form.
You won’t find metadata tagging or rating (yet), but it does include all
the Develop adjustments found in Lightroom’s Basic panel. The best
part is that photo collections you mark in Lightroom are synchronized
automatically with Lightroom mobile: Edit a photo on the iPad and the
changes are brought back to Lightroom within a a minute or so.
(The timing of Lightroom mobile inspired me to write a stand-alone ebook
for Peachpit Press called Adobe Lightroom mobile: Your Lightroom On
the Go. It’s available from Peachpit directly; you can find it and my other
books at http://jeffcarlson.com/my-books/.)
There are lots of little changes here and there that aren’t worth calling out
specifically, so in short I’ll say: I’m proud that this is a meaty update to the
first edition.
xvi
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Notes About This Book
As you read, you’ll run into examples where I’ve adopted general terms or
phrases to avoid getting distracted by details. For example, I frequently
refer to the “computer” or the “desktop” as shorthand for any traditional
computer that isn’t the iPad. Although the iPad is most certainly a computer,
I’m making the distinction between it and other computing devices, such
as laptops, towers, all-in-one machines, and other hardware that runs OS X
or Windows. When those details are important to a task, I note specific
applications or computers.
The same general rule applies to iPad models. The iPad mini, despite its size,
is still a fully functional iPad, so when I refer to “iPad” in general it applies to
the iPad mini as well as to the larger, flagship model.
I also assume you’re familiar with the way an iPad works—using gestures
such as taps and swipes, syncing with a computer, connecting to the Internet,
charging the battery, and otherwise taking care of your tablet. If you’re
brand new to the iPad, allow me a shameless plug as I encourage you to
buy my iPad Pocket Guide (also from Peachpit Press).
Don’t be surprised when you frequently run across the phrase “As I
write this.” Both the iPad and the software useful to photographers are
advancing rapidly, which makes this an exciting topic to cover.
I mention many apps throughout the book, so instead of cluttering up the
text with Web addresses, you’ll find links in the App Reference appendix at
the end of the book.
To stay abreast of the changing field, be sure to visit the companion site
for this book, www.ipadforphotographers.com, where I post updates
and information related to the newest tool in your camera bag. I’ve also
set up an iPad for Photographers community on Google+ for readers
and others to share photos and conversation: https://plus.google.com/
communities/111822708330207901957.
Lastly, please sign up for my low-volume newsletter, where I keep readers
abreast of new projects and giveaways: http://eepurl.com/KYLFv.
Have fun shooting, and please feel free to contact me at the sites above
with feedback!
Introduction

xvii
CHapter 4
The iPad
in the Studio
An iPad is a great photographer’s companion in the field,
but it doesn’t have to sit dormant when you’re back at home or in
a studio. The techniques covered in Chapter 3, such as importing
photos using the iPad camera adapters or wireless devices, still
apply when you’re no longer on location. Other possibilities open
up when you’re not trying to minimize your equipment footprint.
The iPad can work alongside your camera, t­ riggering the camera
shutter, providing clients or visitors a window to a photo shoot
(without them peeking directly over your shoulder), or even controlling a remote iPhone or iPod touch to capture photos or create
stop-motion or time-lapse movies. And with a new crop of wireless
accessories, you don’t even need a computer (and its cables) in the
room with you.
45
Control a Camera from the iPad
Often when you’re working in a studio, the camera is tethered to a computer. This arrangement allows you to import photos directly into software
such as Lightroom or Aperture, review shots as they come from the camera, and skip the separate import step entirely. So where does the iPad fit
in this situation?
If you’re shooting products, food, or other compositions that require the
camera to remain locked down, you can trigger the shutter, change exposure settings, and more from the iPad without touching the camera. With
wireless devices like the CamRanger and iUSBportCamera, or cameras with
built-in Wi-Fi and an iOS app to control them, you won’t trip on a tether
cable as you move around.
An iPad also works well when clients or others want to see your output as
the photo shoot progresses. If it’s inconvenient to have them hovering over
your shoulder, you can hand over the iPad and encourage them to relax on
a couch situated a comfortable distance away from the camera.
Wireless Remote Control Devices
As I write this in April 2014, two devices on the market can control a DSLR
from the iPad. The CamRanger ($299) and the iUSBportCamera ($199)
attach to your Canon or Nikon DSLR’s USB port. Both create their own
wireless network, to which you connect using the iPad. You then control
the camera using an app. By way of example, I focus on using the CamRanger in this chapter.
Tethered Shooting Using Capture Pilot HD
If you prefer to shoot tethered to a computer in the studio but want to incorporate the iPad, look to Capture Pilot HD, which works with Phase One’s $299
Capture One software for Mac or Windows. Capture Pilot HD is free to use with
Capture One, allowing you (or a client) to view, rate, and tag images as they’re
captured. A $14.99 in-app purchase unlocks the ability to control the camera and
shoot from the iPad.
46
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Compose and shoot
In many respects, your digital camera is already a computer, so why not
use another computer to control the camera’s settings and fire the shutter?
In the device’s app, use the following controls (4.1, on the next page).
Some items can’t be adjusted, depending on the camera model. For example, some cameras don’t let you change the exposure mode in software,
because that setting is a physical knob on the camera. Also, as you would
expect, the mode determines which settings are active—in Shutter Priority
mode (“S” on Nikon models, “Tv” on Canon cameras), the aperture can’t
be set, because that’s a value the camera calculates based on the desired
shutter speed and ISO.
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
47
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
4.1 The CamRanger interface
A. Shutter Speed. Tap the Shutter Speed button to specify how long the
shutter remains open.
B. Aperture. Tap the current Aperture setting to choose an f-stop from
the list of possible values. The popover that appears shows only the
settings that are available to the current lens.
C. ISO Speed. Tap this button to choose the level of light sensitivity.
D. Metering Mode. Tap to select how the camera calculates exposure.
E. Drive Mode. Tap to set how many shots are taken during a capture,
including time delay and remote trigger options.
F. White Balance. Tap to select one of the color temperature presets.
G. Image Quality. Switch between available quality and format options.
48
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
H. Auto Focus Mode. Set how the camera determines where to focus.
I.
Exposure Compensation. Choose from the range of positive and
­negative exposure adjustments.
J. Live View. See what the camera is seeing.
K. Movie Mode. Control video recording.
L. Movie Auto Focus. Tap to toggle between auto and manual focus in
Movie mode.
M. Capture. Tap this button when you’re ready to capture a shot.
CC
Tip The options that are enabled depend on whether the camera is in PC
or Cam USB mode. Tap the Settings button, tap Connection/Network,
and change the Connection Mode to PC; that lets you change settings like
Mode despite what the camera’s physical knobs are set to.
Use Live View
On supported cameras, tap the Live View button to get a live feed of what
the camera’s image sensor is seeing.
The CamRanger software can take advantage of the camera’s auto-focus
features: Tap the image preview to set the Auto Focus point, or tap the
Focus button at the top of the screen for more specific focus control (Focus
Nearer, Focus Farther, and Focus Stacking) (4.2).
4.2 Focus controls in
CamRanger
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
49
CC
Tip Since the image needs to travel across the wireless network from the
camera to the iPad, expect a little lag when using Live View. It’s not terrible, but it’s not as smooth as looking through the camera’s viewfinder. If
the camera is locked down, that isn’t a problem. Shooting handheld action
proves to be more difficult.
CC
Tip The CamRanger doesn’t automatically save photos on the iPad. Select
a shot you’ve taken, and tap the Save button to copy it to the Camera Roll.
Use bracketing/HDR
The remote camera devices tap into your camera’s ability to shoot a
succession of three photos with different exposures (the current one,
overexposed, and underexposed), a feature known as “bracketing.” HDR
(high dynamic range) images, for example, are created with three or more
images at varying exposures. (However, the app doesn’t merge the shots
into a single HDR image; “HDR” is just shorthand for bracketing.)
1. Put the camera into its manual shooting mode.
2. In CamRanger, tap the HDR button to reveal the feature’s options
(4.3).
3. Set which variable is locked using the Property control: Aperture,
Shutter Speed, or ISO Speed. If Aperture is selected, for instance, the
camera will adjust the shutter speed and ISO to achieve the exposure
change, leaving your chosen aperture constant.
4. Tap the Start Value button and choose a setting that establishes a
decent exposure for the image, as if you were shooting just one shot.
4.3 Bracketing/HDR
options
50
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
5. Choose how many exposures will fire using the Number of Shots
button.
6. Drag the first slider to specify the variance in f-stops between each
shot. For example, a setting of 1 would give you an image at the
­current exposure, one at +1, and one at –1. The higher the value, the
broader the difference in exposure will be in the set of shots.
7. Tap the Start button to fire the shots.
Shoot at specified intervals
An intervalometer captures a series of shots at a specified interval. This
automation lets you create a series of time-lapse shots.
1. Tap the Timer button
(4.4).
2. To pause before the first capture, set a time using the Initial Delay
control.
3. Tap the Number of Shots button, and enter a number in the text field
to dictate how many captures are made during the session.
4. Tap the Shot Delay button, and choose the duration between shots in
hours, minutes, and seconds (up to 59:59).
5. Tap the Start button to start the intervalometer.
CC
Tip The CamRanger stores the intervalometer settings on the device, so
once you’ve started it, the iPad doesn’t need to be on or even connected.
4.4 CamRanger’s
Timer controls
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
51
Triggertrap
If $200–$300 is too costly but you still want to control your DSLR from the
iPad, the $30 Triggertrap is a great option. It doesn’t give you a live view
from the camera—in fact, you don’t see any photos at all—but it does offer
many methods of triggering the shutter. The Triggertrap app is free; the
$30 is to purchase a dongle that’s compatible with your camera.
Yes, you can remotely capture a shot of a specific duration, but that’s just
the start. Triggertrap uses the iPad (or iPhone) sensors to do things like fire
the shutter when a loud noise (such as a clap, whistle, or tap) occurs (4.5),
fire when you are driving and want a shot captured out the window every
20 kilometers, and fire when a person enters the picture (for cameras that do
not offer built-in facial recognition).
4.5 Trigger the
­shutter based on
noise level.
Triggertrap is also ideal if you want extreme control over time-lapse and
long-exposure photography. The Wi-Fi Master mode works with another
iOS device to control Triggertrap remotely (for example, when you want to
capture starfields but would prefer to sit inside a cabin where it’s warm).
CC
Tip For some creative shooting, check out the Triggertrap Flash Adapter,
an add-on that lets you shoot high-speed photos (water droplets, glass
breaking) using the strobes you likely already own.
52
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Control a Wireless Camera
I believe that it won’t be long before most cameras will incorporate some
sort of wireless control. I’m happy to report that manufacturers have
started building Wi-Fi connectivity into their cameras (4.6). The apps vary
in their capabilities, but mostly they offer the same shooting features
described earlier in this chapter. They also take advantage of the iPad’s
sensors, such as pulling location data and applying it to photos on the
camera’s memory card.
4.6 The FujiFilm
­Camera Remote app
establishes a live link
to the camera (a Fuji
XT-1, in this case).
Control Another iOS Device
I’ve focused on controlling a DSLR so far in this chapter, but if you own an
iPhone (or iPod touch, or another iPad), you already have a pretty good
camera available. Blux Camera for iPad, which I mentioned in Chapter 1,
has a companion app, called Blux Lens, that enables the iPhone to be a
remote camera. As long as both devices are on the same Wi-Fi network,
Blux Lens becomes the camera and the iPad acts as the controller.
Choose one to act as the camera and one to act as the remote, and you
can then fire the shutter; lock focus, exposure, and white balance; and set
a timer. And, of course, it offers a range of filters to change the look of the
captured photo.
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
53
Make a Stop-Motion or
Time-Lapse Video
Since a studio offers a controlled workspace, you don’t have to deal with
the whims of natural light or environment. Several apps feature an intervalometer for firing off shots at specific intervals, which can then be combined
into a time-lapse video later. But here I want to focus on a clever app that
makes the process of creating time-lapse or stop-motion videos easy on
the iPad. iStopMotion for iPad by Boinx Software ($9.99) can use the iPad’s
built-in camera or an iPhone (or iPod touch) with the help of the iStop­
Motion Remote Camera app.
Create a Stop-Motion Video in iStopMotion
Although you could use the iPad or an iPhone to snap a bunch of photos and
then stitch them together to make a stop-motion video, iStopMotion makes
the process painless.
1. In iStopMotion, tap the New (+) button to create a new project.
2. Tap the Cameras button at the top right area of the toolbar and
choose the front or back camera.
If you’re using another iOS device as a remote camera, first launch the
free iStopMotion Remote Camera app there. Then, on the iPad, select
the name of the camera device. Lastly, tap the Accept button on that
device to establish the connection.
3. On the iPad or the other device, drag the Focus indicator to a spot
where you want the focus to be locked (4.7). You can also tap the Exposure button at the top of the screen and identify an area on which to
base the exposure level.
CC
Tip You’ll want to shoot where the lighting is consistent, but also make sure
you set the Exposure indicator to an area of the scene that’s not likely to
contain moving elements; they’ll throw off the color in those frames.
4. Tap Done to exit the camera settings screen.
54
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
5. Tap the Clip Settings button (the gear icon) to set playback speed
(frames per second) and how the editing environment appears. Tap
the Show button and choose the middle option, which uses an “onion
skin” mode to show the last frame and a ghosted rendition of the live
video so you can see what the next frame will look like (4.8).
6. Set your scene, and then tap the Capture button to take a shot.
7. Reposition elements in the frame.
8. Tap the Capture button to grab the next frame.
9. Continue adjusting your elements and capturing photos until the scene
is complete. Tap the Play button at any time to review what you’ve
shot so far.
You can jump back to any frame to re-take it (make sure you line up your
elements accurately), or you can delete a frame by selecting it, tapping
the Actions button (the wrench icon), and then tapping the Delete Frame
button.
4.7 Lock focus in iStopMotion for iPad.
4.8 See the relative position of objects between shots.
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
55
Create a Time-Lapse Video in iStopMotion
Stop-motion animations require a lot of work and even more patience to
do well. A time-lapse video, by contrast, needs just patience and an interesting place to point the camera. iStopMotion can automatically fire off a
shot at an interval you choose, ranging from 0.1 second to 99.9 seconds.
1. Set up your iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch where you want to capture
action over a period of time.
2. Choose a camera from the Cameras popover.
3. Tap the Time Lapse button to the right of the Cameras button.
4. Make sure Time Lapse is selected under Mode.
5. Drag the dials to select an interval, then tap outside the popover to
dismiss it (4.9).
6. Tap the Capture button to start capturing the scene. The button
doubles as a countdown timer while waiting for the next shot (4.10).
7. Tap the Capture button again to stop recording frames.
CC
Tip Tapping anywhere near the Capture button works, too—you don’t have
to hit the button perfectly centered.
4.9 Specify Time Lapse settings.
56
4.10 The Capture button counts the time to the next shot.
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Mount the iPad
The iPad’s portability can sometimes be a hindrance when you’re shooting
in the studio. Your hands are probably already full with camera gear—you
don’t want to set that down to pick up the iPad, or have to crane over a
tabletop to view the screen without reflections from overhead lights. That’s
when mounting the iPad is useful.
Although there is no shortage of cases and stands for the iPad, I favor two
options: a secure mount that was designed to integrate into a photographer’s collection of stands and arms, and a simple desk mount that props
up my iPad nearly all the time it’s close to my computer. I encourage you
to explore the market for options, which change often. For example, if you
also dabble in music, a number of attachments designed for performance
stands could also work to hold the iPad in place, to set it up as a teleprompter, to play relaxing music for clients or subjects, and for other uses.
Tether Tools Wallee System
The Wallee Connect system from Tether Tools consists of two parts: a case
that connects to the back of the iPad (see the next page), and the Wallee
Connect, a sturdy adapter that secures to the case and features holes and
threads to connect it to tripods, heads, and lighting stands (4.11). The Connect Kit, which includes the case and the Connect, costs about $120.
4.11 Wallee Connect
Threads for tripods and light stands
Locking mechanism
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
57
The Stump
Hundreds of iPad stands exist on the market now, ranging from simple plastic kickstands to large suction cups, but there’s one that’s proved invaluable
to how I work. I often want to prop the iPad next to my computer or on a
shelf or table near where I’m shooting. The Stump is a $25 angled piece of
heavy material covered in rubber that puts the iPad into three positions, in
either portrait or landscape orientation (4.12).
It sounds almost too simple, I’ll grant you. I received one in a bag of goodies for speaking at a conference and figured I’d toss it fairly soon. However,
it’s currently lifting my iPad more often than the Smart Cover I bought.
Whether it’s for during a shoot or for working next to your computer later,
the Stump is a great little addition.
58
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
4.12 The Stump is
simple, portable, and
quite useful.
Extend Your Computer Desktop with Air Display
Here’s a neat way to take advantage of the iPad’s screen real estate when you’re
back at your computer processing images: Set it up as a second display. Avatron’s
Air Display ($9.99) communicates between your computer and iPad via Wi-Fi
to extend the computer’s desktop (4.13). Stash Photoshop panels on the iPad’s
screen to get them out of the way, or keep email and Twitter windows off to the
side, leaving more space for working with your photos.
Speaking of Photoshop, the Adobe Nav app for the iPad can be helpful without
invoking screen sharing. When running Photoshop CS5 or later on the computer,
Adobe Nav ($1.99) accesses tools off to the side, offering more workspace on
your computer.
4.13 Use the iPad as an external monitor with Air Display.
CHAPTER 4: The iPad in the Studio
59
INDEX
360p resolution, 154
500px app, 188, 206
540p resolution, 154
720p resolution, 154
1080p resolution, 154
A
Adobe Creative Cloud, xvi
Adobe Lightroom mobile. See
Lightroom mobile
Adobe Lightroom mobile: Your
Lightroom on the Go, 119
Adobe Nav app, 59, 203
Adobe Photoshop. See Photoshop
Adobe Photoshop Elements. See
Photoshop Elements
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. See
Photoshop Lightroom
Adobe Revel app, 192–195, 206
AE/AF Lock indicator, 4
Air Display app, 59, 203
AirDrop, 137, 154
AirPlay, 150, 179
AirPrint technology, 195
albums
adding photos to, 39
All Imported, 27, 81
creating, 39, 167
Facebook, 183
Flickr, 187
Imported Photos & Videos, 27
Last Import, 27, 41, 81
naming, 39
Photo Stream, 39, 186
Snapseed, 182–183
viewing photos in, 146
Aperture
exporting photos from, 162–163
Import GPS feature, 36
PhotoScope app, 93
reviewing/rating photos, 93
app reference, 199–208
App Store, 167
Apple Aperture. See Aperture
Apple Fairplay DRM scheme, 150
Apple iPhoto. See iPhoto
Apple iTunes Match service, 150
Apple TV, 150, 179
apps
500px, 188, 206
Adobe Nav, 59, 203
Adobe Revel, 192–195, 206
advanced, 5–9
Air Display, 203
AutoStitch Panorama for iPad, 9, 200
Blux Camera for iPad, 7, 53, 200, 203
Blux Lens, 53, 203
Box, 171, 200
Camera, 4–5
Camera Awesome, 188, 206
Camera+ for iPad, 6–7, 200
Camera Remote, 53
CamRanger, 46–51, 200, 203
Capture Pilot HD, 46, 203
Carousel, 40
Dark Sky, 22, 200
Dropbox. See Dropbox
Easy Release, 23, 201
Flickr, 201
FlickStackr, 187, 207
FujiFilm Camera Remote, 53, 203
GarageBand, 28, 201
GeoSnitch, 34, 35–36, 201
Geotag Photos Pro, 34–35, 201
Google Plus, 40, 41, 201
Handy Photo, 129–130, 205
HyperDrive Colorspace UDMA 2, 201
image pixel size and, 160
iMovie. See iMovie for iOS
Ink Cards, 197, 207
iStopMotion for iPad, 54–56, 204
iStopMotion Remote Camera, 54, 204
iUSBportCamera, 204
Kingston MobileLite, 201
Lightroom. See Lightroom mobile
Loom, 40
Messages, 192
Microsoft OneDrive, 201
Music, 150
Phase One, 46
photo editing, 7, 182–185
photo service, 187–188
Index
209
apps, continued
Photogene. See Photogene app
Photogene Books, 207
PhotoRaw, 127, 205
PhotoRaw Lite, 205
Photos. See Photos app
PhotoScope, xvi, 93, 204
PhotosInfoPro, 81–84, 204
Photosmith. See Photosmith app
PhotoStackr 500px, 188, 207
PhotoSync, 33, 202
Picturelife, 202
Pin Drop, 23, 202
Pinnacle Studio, 134, 206
piRAWnha, 96, 127, 205
PlainText, 202
PopBooth Photo Booth, 197, 207
Portfolio for iPad. See Portfolio
for iPad app
Portfolio Loader, 169
printing from, 195–197
Rego, 202
remote photo, 46–53
Seagate Media, 202
ShutterSnitch, 31–33, 35, 36, 63, 202
Sincerely Ink, 197
Skype for iPad, 28, 202
SlowShutter, 7
SmugMug, 188, 207
SmugShot, 188
Snapseed. See Snapseed app
SoftBox Pro, 202
Stuck On Earth, 22
for studio use, 45–59
SugarSync, 202
Triggertrap, 52, 204
TrueHDR, 8, 200
Walgreens for iPad, 197, 208
weather-related, 22, 200
Artistic effects, 117
aspect ratio, 97, 113, 119
audio
adjusting volume, 148
background music, 148, 149–150
fading, 150
in movies, 148–152
moving clips forward/backward, 151
recording in iMovie, 151
210
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
sound effects, 118, 148, 151
sounds while editing, 118
voiceovers, 152
audio clips, 148–151
audio tracks, 149, 152
Auto-Lock setting, iPad, 33
AutoStitch Panorama for iPad, 9, 200
Avatron Air Display, 59
B
background music, 148, 149–150
backups
dedicated storage devices, 42
to Dropbox, 38, 40, 41
to hard disks, 42–43
to iCloud Photo Stream, 38–39
importance of, 38
to Kingston MobileLite Wireless, 43
on memory cards, 36
online services for, 40–41
overview, 36–38
portable storage for, 42–43
to Seagate Wireless Plus, 42–43
wireless connections and, 38
batch-processing images, 164–165
Beam button, 118
black levels, 105
black values, 122
black and white effects, 118, 125
black and white photos, 118, 125
Blux Camera for iPad app, 7, 53, 200, 203
Blux Lens app, 53, 203
Box app, 171, 200
Box service, 169
bracketing, 50–51
brightness
adjusting in iPhoto, 114–115
adjusting in Lightroom mobile, 122
adjusting in Photogene, 105–107
adjusting in Snapseed, 102
Brightness setting, iPad, 102
brush tools
Handy Photo, 130
iPhoto, 116–117
Photogene, 109
Brushes and Effects tools, 116–117
Burst mode, 7
C
cables
component, 176
considerations, 30, 46
display, 176
HDMI, 176
iPhone sync, 29
USB, 25
VGA, 176
Camera app, 4–5
Camera Awesome app, 188, 206
Camera Connection Kit
connecting microphone/
headset, 28, 152
importing photos with, 24–29
importing video with, 137
Camera+ for iPad, 6–7, 200
Camera Remote app, 53
Camera Roll
adding photos to collections, 90
automatic photo uploads, 40–41
considerations, 4, 41
Dropbox uploads, 40
iCloud uploads, 38
Lightroom mobile and, 90
moving clips to, 137
Photo Stream, 38
Photo Stream uploads, 186
sharing iMovie projects to, 154
camera sensors, 105
Camera Switch button, 4, 5
cameras
controlling from iPad/iPhone, 46–53
importing photos from, 25–28
iPhone vs. iPad, 118
tethered, 46, 57–58
wireless, 30, 53
CamRanger app, 46–51, 200, 203
CamRanger device, 46
Capture Pilot HD app, 46, 203
capturing video, 4, 137
card readers, 43
Carousel app, 40
CF (CompactFlash) card readers, 28
clarity, 123
Clip Settings window, 148
clipping, 122, 124
clips. See audio clips; video clips
cloud services, 40–41
automatic photo uploads, 40–41
for backups, 40–41
Dropbox. See Dropbox
Flickr, 22, 40, 187, 191, 201
Google Plus, 40, 41, 201
iCloud. See iCloud
manual photo uploads, 41
Microsoft OneDrive, 40, 201
overview, 40
Picturelife, 40, 202
CNN iReport, 153
collections, 73, 77, 88–91
color
adjusting, 96
adjusting in iPhoto, 115–116
adjusting in Lightroom mobile, 121–124
adjusting in Snapseed, 100–103
in portfolios, 160
saturation, 96, 108, 115, 124, 160
vibrance, 96, 108, 124
color cast, 108
color management, 98, 160, 195
color temperature, 96, 108, 109, 116,
121–122
CompactFlash (CF) card readers, 28
component cables, 176
compression, 14, 183
contrast
adjusting in iPhoto, 114–115
adjusting in Lightroom mobile, 123
adjusting in Photogene, 105–107
adjusting in Snapseed, 102
cropping photos
considerations, 96, 160
in iPhoto, 113
in Lightroom mobile, 119, 120
in Photogene, 104
in Photos app, 97
in Snapseed, 99
D
Dark Sky app, 22, 200
dedicated storage devices, 42
deleting collections, 91
deleting photos, 80, 91
Index
211
digital cameras. See cameras
Direct Mode, 31
disks. See hard disks
display. See monitors
DRM scheme, 150
Dropbox
adding photos to gallery, 168–171
automatic photo uploads, 40–41
backing up to, 38, 40, 41
considerations, 40, 182
copying photos to, 40–41, 78–79
obtaining, 200
“printing” to, 196
reference material storage, 23
sharing photos via, 168–171
transferring photos from
Photosmith, 78–79
dropbox.com, 169
droplets, 165
DSLR cameras. See cameras
E
Easy Release app, 23, 201
editing
images. See image editing
video. See video editing
effects
artistic, 117
black and white, 118, 125
film grain, 118
in iPhoto, 117–118
Ken Burns effect, 146–147
presets for, 96
sepia, 118
in Snapseed, 103
sound, 118, 148, 151
vignettes, 118
vintage, 117
emailing photos, 189–192, 194
exporting items
iMovie projects to iTunes, 154–155
IPTC data, 87
metadata, 84
exporting photos. See also uploading
photos
from Aperture, 162–163
to Dropbox, 40–41, 78–79
from iPhoto, 166–167
212
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
from Lightroom, 78, 161–162
PhotoCopy option, 80
from Photoshop, 163–165
from Photoshop Elements, 165–166
with PhotosInfoPro, 84
from Photosmith, 78–80
XMP export, 79–80
exposure
adjusting in iPhoto, 114–115
adjusting in Lightroom mobile, 122–123
adjusting in Photogene, 105–107
long, 7, 52
setting, 6
Eyefi cards, 30–33, 63
F
Face Balance option, 116
Facebook
photo albums, 183
privacy controls, 183
sharing movies via, 153
uploading images to, 182–185
Fairplay DRM scheme, 150
files
GPX, 34, 35
JPEG, xiv, 12–14, 18, 84, 127
PDF, 23
raw. See raw images
XMP, 79–80, 84
FileXchange method, 63, 80
film grain, 118
filtering photos
considerations, 7
by criteria, 71
by metadata, 70
in Photosmith, 70–72
with Smart Groups, 71–72
by sort order, 71
viewing filter effects, 98
FingerPrint utility, 196
flagging photos, 92
flash, 4, 52
Flickr, 22, 40, 187, 191, 201
FlickStackr app, 187, 207
focus, 4, 6, 49
focus point, 4
FujiFilm Camera Remote app, 53, 203
G
galleries
adding photos to, 168–171
creating, 168
editing, 172–173
populating, 168
presenting, 175–179
thumbnails, 172, 173, 177
GarageBand app, 28, 201
geolocation data, 22–23, 34–36, 82, 83
GeoSnitch app, 34, 35–36, 201
Geotag Photos Pro app, 34–35, 201
Global Positioning System. See GPS
GoodReader app, 23
Google Plus app, 40, 41, 201
Google Plus iPad community, xvii
Google searches, 22
GPS (Global Positioning System), 23, 34
GPS adapters, 34
GPS eXchange format (GPX) files, 34, 35
GPX (GPS eXchange format) files, 34, 35
grid, onscreen, 4, 5
grouping photos
into collections, 73, 77
Smart Group feature, 71–72
gyroscope, 113
H
Handy Photo app, 129–130, 205
hard disks
backups and, 36
considerations, 37, 42
dedicated storage devices, 42
HyperDrive Colorspace UDMA, 42, 201
Seagate Wireless Plus, 42–43, 202
HD televisions, 150
HDMI cables, 176
HDR (high dynamic range), 8
HDR button, 8
HDR images, 4, 8, 50–51
HDR Scape filter, 8
headsets, 28, 152
healing tools, 109, 127–130
high dynamic range. See HDR
highlights
adjusting in iPhoto, 115
adjusting in Lightroom mobile, 122
adjusting in Photogene, 106
clipping, 107
histogram, 105, 107, 124
HyperDrive Colorspace UDMA, 42, 201
I
iCloud
Photo Stream, 38–39, 186
syncing music, 150
image editing, 95–130
brightness. See brightness
color. See color
contrast. See contrast
cropping. See cropping photos
enhancing photos, 98
with Handy Photo, 129–130
healing tools, 109, 127–130
with iPhoto, 111–118
JPEG files, 14
with Lightroom mobile, 119–126
overview, 95, 96
with Photogene, 104–111
with Photos app, 97–98
presets, 96, 103, 110–111
raw files, 14–16, 96, 127
recomposing. See recomposing
photos
red-eye correction, 98
retouching photos, 96, 128–130
rotating photos. See rotating photos
selective edits, 109–110
with Snapseed, 99–103
straightening. See straightening
photos
tone. See tone
image stabilization, 6
images. See photos
iMessage instant messaging, 192
iMovie for iOS, 133–155. See also video
audio features. See audio
capturing video directly, 137
considerations, 135
editing process. See video editing
getting video into, 136–137
interface, 135
Ken Burns effect, 146–147
Media Library, 135
microphones, 28
Index
213
iMovie for iOS, continued
obtaining, 201, 205
opening project browser, 134
playhead, 135, 138
playing video, 138, 153
previewing video, 137
skimming video, 138
timeline, 135, 136–140, 152
Viewer, 135, 138
iMovie projects. See also movies;
video clips
adding background
music, 148, 149–150
adding clips from Media
Library, 136–137
adding photos to, 145–147
adding titles, 142–143, 153
adding video to, 136–137
adding voiceovers, 152
applying fade in/out, 135
audio in. See audio; audio clips
capturing video directly, 137
choosing themes for, 134
creating, 134
editing. See video editing
exporting to iTunes, 154–155
getting information about, 134
importing video from iPhone/
iPod touch, 136, 137
Ken Burns effect, 146–147
location data, 144–145
opening existing, 134
playing, 138, 153
resolution, 154
reversing actions, 145
sending to devices via iTunes, 154–155
sharing options, 153–155
skimming, 138
theme music, 149
transitions, 140, 141, 142
using Precision Editor, 141
working with timeline, 135,
136–140, 152
importing photos
from camera, 25–28
considerations, 30
Direct Mode, 31
with iPad Camera Connection
Kit, 24–29
214
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
from iPhone, 29
from memory card, 25–28
from other iOS device, 33
with PhotosInfoPro, 81
with Photosmith, 62–63
to Revel library, 192–193
with ShutterSnitch, 31–33, 63
wirelessly, 30–33
importing video, 136, 137
Ink Cards app, 197, 207
International Press Telecommunications
Council. See IPTC
intervalometer, 51
iOS 7, xvi
iOS devices. See also specific devices
controlling, 53
importing video from, 136
Photo Stream, 38–39, 186
as remote camera, 54
screenshots captured, 38
sharing iMovie projects with, 154–155
iPad. See also iOS devices
audio, 118
Auto-Lock setting, 33
camera, 118
capabilities of, xiii
cases/stands, 57–59
cellular vs. Wi-Fi, xv
considerations, xiii–xiv, 3
controlling DSLR cameras from, 46–53
controlling iOS devices from, 53
deleting photos from, 80
as external monitor, 59
HDR mode, 8
on location, xiii–xiv, 21–43
memory, xiii–xiv, 42, 175
models, xiv–xv, xvii
mounting, 57–59
new/changed features, xv–xvi
photo capacity, 80
printing photos from, 195–197
resolution, 160
Retina display, xiii, xv
size/weight, xv
using in studio, 45–59
workflow, 11–19
iPad 2, 3, 144
iPad adapters, 176
iPad Air, xv
iPad camera. See cameras
iPad Camera Connection Kit
connecting microphone/
headset, 28, 152
importing photos with, 24–29
importing video with, 137
iPad for Photographers community, xvii
iPad mini
considerations, xv, xvii, 3, 77
Lightning adapters, 24
on location, 21, 24
for portfolios, 159
iPad Pocket Guide, xvii
iPad portfolio. See portfolios
ipadforphotographers.com, xvii
iPhone. See also iOS devices
controlling DSLR cameras from, 46–53
importing photos from, 29
importing video from, 136, 137
location data, 23
panorama feature, 9
iPhone camera, 118
iPhone sync cable, 29
iPhoto, 111–118. See also Photo
Library
adjusting color, 115–116
adjusting exposure, 114–115
adjusting specific areas, 116–117
brightness adjustment, 114–115
Brushes and Effects tools, 116–117
considerations, 111
contrast adjustment, 114–115
creative effects, 117–118
cropping photos, 113
exporting images from, 166–167
image editing in, 111–118
obtaining, 205
recomposing photos, 112–113
Revert, 111
Show Original, 111
showing/hiding thumbnails, 112
straightening photos, 112–113
tone adjustment, 114, 116
iPod touch. See also iOS devices
controlling DSLR cameras from, 46–53
importing video from, 136
IPTC fields, 68, 87
IPTC information, 86–87
IPTC sets, 86–87
ISO setting, 32
iStopMotion for iPad app, 54–56, 204
iStopMotion Remote
Camera app, 54, 204
iTunes
accessing music library, 149, 150
file sharing, 170, 171
loading images into gallery, 170, 171
sharing iMovie projects via, 154–155
iTunes Match service, 150
iUSBportCamera, 46, 204
J
JPEG compression, 14
JPEG files, xiv, 12–14, 18, 84, 127
JPEG format
capturing photos in, 13–14
considerations, xiv, 12, 14, 96
pros/cons, 14
proxy JPEG workflow, 80
vs. raw format, 12–19
JPEG previews, 14, 16, 96, 127
K
Ken Burns effect, 146–147
keyboards, 28
keyword hierarchies, 67
keywords
assigning with PhotosInfoPro, 82, 83
assigning with Photosmith, 66–67
considerations, 61, 62, 66
Lightroom and, 61, 76–77
metadata presets and, 69
removing, 67, 82
syncing, 76–77
Kingston MobileLite app, 201
Kingston MobileLite Wireless device, 43
L
LePage, Rick, 23
Lightning to USB Camera Connector, 137
Lightning adapters, 24
Index
215
Lightroom mobile
adding photos to collection, 90
adjusting clarity, 123
adjusting color, 121–124
adjusting contrast, 123
adjusting exposure, 122–123
adjusting saturation, 124
applying previous edits, 125
color temperature, 121–122
considerations, xvi, 119
creating/syncing collections, 88–89
cropping photos, 119, 120
Develop controls/settings, 76, 121,
124, 125–126
flagging photos as picks/rejects, 92
histogram, 124
image editing in, 119–126
metadata and, 76, 92
navigating photos, 91
obtaining, 204, 205, 206
offline editing, 126
portfolio display, 167
presets, 125
recomposing photos, 119–126
removing collections from, 91
removing photos from collection, 91
reset adjustments, 126
rotating photos, 119
sharing to Web from, 184
straightening photos, 119
synchronizing photos, 88–89, 120
tint adjustments, 121–122
tone adjustment, 121–124
white balance, 121–122
Lightroom program. See Photoshop
Lightroom
Live View option, 49–50
location data, 22–23, 34–36
location releases, 23
locations, photo, 22–23, 34–36
Lock button, 176
logo screen/page, 174, 178
Loom app, 40
lossy compression, 14
216
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
M
Media Library
adding clips from, 136–137
interface, 135
sound effects in, 151
viewing photos in, 146
memory card adapter, 24–25
memory card readers, 28
memory cards
for backups, 36
capacity, 30
considerations, xiii, xiv, 25–28
deleting images from, 27
Eyefi, 30–33, 63
importing photos from, 25–28
SD cards, 24–27
wireless, 30–33
memory, iPad, xiii–xiv, 42, 175
Messages app, 192
metadata
adding with PhotosInfoPro, 82–83
editing, 68–69
exporting, 84
IPTC information, 68, 82, 86–87
JPEG files and, 18
Lightroom and, 76, 92
in Photosmith, 68–69, 76
presets, 68–69, 76
raw files and, 14, 79–80
microphones, 28, 152
Microsoft OneDrive app, 201
Microsoft OneDrive service, 40, 201
midtones, 123
MMS (multimedia messaging
service), 192
MobileLite Wireless, 43
model releases, 23
modes, 4, 5
monitors
cables, 176
color management, 98
iPad as external monitor, 59
presenting portfolio on, 176–179
movies. See also iMovie entries; video
adding photos to, 145–147
audio in. See audio; audio clips
background music in, 148, 149–150
choosing themes for, 134
editing. See video editing
fading in/out, 135
Ken Burns effect, 146–147
playing, 138
previewing, 137
sharing options, 153–155
skimming, 138
theme music, 149
titles, 142–143, 153
transitions, 140, 142
voiceovers, 152
Mpix.com, 197
multimedia messaging
service (MMS), 192
Music app, 150
music, background, 148, 149–150
N
networks, wireless, 30, 38, 46, 179
New Collection button, 73
newsletter, xvii
notes, photos, 175
O
onscreen grid, 4
ordering prints, 197
P
paint effects, 116–117
panorama images, 4, 9, 200
passcode, 176
PDF files, 23
Phase One app, 46
photo editing apps, 7, 182–185
Photo Library. See also iPhoto
Photogene and, 104
Photosmith and, 62–63
Snapseed and, 99
viewing with Photos app, 189
photo locations, 22–23, 34–36
photo service apps, 187–188
photo sharing services, 182–188
photo shoots. See shooting photos
Photo Stream, 38–39, 186
Photogene app
applying selective edits, 109–110
Auto button, 106
brightness adjustment, 105–107
color adjustment, 105–109
contrast adjustment, 105–107
cropping photos, 104
image editing in, 104–111
obtaining, 204, 207
presets, 110–111
printing photos, 197
rating photos, 85
raw format and, 104
recomposing photos, 104–105
retouching photos, 128–129
straightening photos, 104–105
tone adjustment, 105–109
uploading photos from, 183–184
watermarks, 185
Photogene Books app, 207
Photogene for iPad app, 205
PhotoRaw app, 127, 205
PhotoRaw Lite app, 205
photos
adding to movies, 145–147
in albums. See albums
backing up. See backups
batch-processing, 164–165
black and white, 118, 125
capacity, 80
capturing. See shooting photos
collections, 73, 77, 88–91
copying to Dropbox, 40–41, 78–79
copying to hard drive, 42–43
criteria, 71
cropping. See cropping photos
deleting from iPad, 80, 91
deleting from Photo Stream, 39
dimensions, 160
displaying in Photos app, 25–26
editing. See image editing
emailing, 189–192, 194
enhancing, 98
exporting. See exporting photos
filtering. See filtering photos
flagging in Lightroom mobile, 92
Index
217
photos, continued
galleries. See galleries
grouping. See grouping photos
HDR, 4, 8, 50–51
iCloud Photo Stream, 38–39, 186
importing. See importing photos
lining up with grid, 4, 5
location data, 22–23
metadata. See metadata
notes, 175
ordering prints, 197
panorama, 4, 9, 200
preparing for portfolio, 160–167
printing from iPad, 195–197
rating. See rating photos
raw format. See raw images
recomposing. See recomposing
photos
reference, 36
rejected, 64, 70, 82, 92
reviewing, 24–33
rotating. See rotating photos
screenshots, 38
sharing. See sharing photos
sharpening, 160, 162
shooting. See shooting photos
slideshows, 158, 167, 176
straightening. See straightening
photos
time-lapse, 51, 52
vignettes, 118
watermarks, 185
workflow, 11–19
zooming in on, 96
Photos app
considerations, 167
cropping photos, 97
displaying photos, 25–26
image editing in, 97–98
launching, 25
sharing photos, 189–192
straightening photos, 97
PhotoScope app, xvi, 93, 204
Photoshop, 163–165
Adobe Nav app, 59
batch-processing images, 164–165
creating actions, 163–165
exporting/processing images, 163–165
218
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
Photoshop Elements, 165–166
Photoshop Lightroom. See also
Lightroom mobile
exporting photos from, 161–162
exporting to Photosmith, 78
keywords and, 61, 67, 76–77
publishing service, 74, 75, 77
rating/tagging and, 61, 92
syncing with Photosmith, 74–78
PhotosInfoPro app, xvi, 81–84, 204
Photosmith app
assigning keywords, 66–67
copying photos to, 78
deleting photos, 80
export options, 78–80
as export target, 78
filtering photos, 70–72
importing photos from iPad, 62–63
importing photos from
ShutterSnitch, 63
obtaining, 204
photo collections, 73, 77
PhotoCopy option, 80
rating photos, 64–65
rejected photos, 64, 70
setting up, 74
Smart Group feature, 71–72
sorting photos, 71
syncing keywords, 76–77
syncing with Lightroom, 74–78
transferring photos to Dropbox, 78–79
XMP export, 79–80
Photosmith plug-in, 74, 75
Photosmith publish service, 74, 75, 77
photosmithapp.com, 74
PhotoStackr 500px, 188, 207
PhotoSync app, 33, 202
Picturelife app, 202
Picturelife service, 40, 202
Pin Drop app, 23, 202
Pinnacle Studio app, 134, 206
piRAWnha app, 96, 127, 205
pixels, blown, 105
PlainText app, 202
playhead, 135, 138
playing video, 138, 153
podcasting, 28
PopBooth Photo Booth app, 197, 207
portable storage. See hard disks
Portfolio for iPad app. See also
portfolios
creating portfolio, 167–174
obtaining, 206
opening screen, 174, 178
photo notes, 175
presenting portfolio, 175–179
Portfolio Loader app, 169
portfolios, 157–179. See also
slideshows
advantages of, 157
color issues, 160
considerations, 157, 167
creating, 167–174
galleries. See galleries
iPad vs. iPad mini, 159
Lightroom mobile, 167
multiple, 159
online, 159
opening screen, 174, 178
preparing images for, 160–167
presenting, 175–179
tips for, 158–159
updating, 159
wired connections, 176–178
wireless connections, 179
Precision Editor, 141
presets
image editing, 96, 103, 110–111
iPhoto effects, 117–118
Lightroom mobile, 125
metadata, 68–69, 76
Photogene app, 110–111
Presto (Collobos Software), 196, 207
previews
JPEG, 14, 16, 96, 127
Smart Previews, 120, 126
video, 137
printing photos, 195–197
printing utilities, 195–197, 207
Printopia utility, 196, 207
prints, ordering, 197
projectors
wired connections to, 176–178
wireless connections to, 179
projects, iMovie. See iMovie projects
proxy JPEG workflow, 80
R
rating photos
in Adobe Revel, 193
considerations, 61, 62
Lightroom and, 61, 92
in Photogene, 85
in PhotoScope, 93
in PhotosInfoPro, 81–82
in Photosmith, 64–65
in Portfolio for iPad, 175
raw format
capturing photos in, 14–16
considerations, xiv, 12, 14, 16
vs. JPEG format, 12–19
Photogene and, 104
pros/cons, 16
raw images
considerations, 30, 62
described, 12
editing, 14–16, 96, 127
geo-tagging and, 35
metadata and, 14, 79–80
Raw+JPEG format
capturing photos in, 16–19
considerations, 12, 26, 96
importing, 26
pros/cons, 18
recomposing photos
considerations, 96
in iPhoto, 112–113
with Lightroom mobile, 119–126
in Photogene, 104–105
in Snapseed, 99
record button, 4
recording video, 4, 137
red-eye correction, 98
reference materials, 23
reference photos, 36
Rego app, 23, 202
releases, model, 23
remote camera, 54–56
remote control devices, 46–53
remote photo apps, 46–53
resolution, 154, 160
Retina display, 160, 161
retouching photos, 96, 128–130
Revel, 192–195
Index
219
“revisit” tags, 23
rotating photos
in iPhoto, 112–113
in Lightroom mobile, 119
in Photogene, 104–105
in Photos app, 98
in Snapseed, 99
S
saturation, 96, 108, 115, 124, 160
screen. See monitors
screenshot capture, 38
SD card adapter, 24–25
SD cards, 24–27
Seagate Media app, 202
Seagate Wireless Plus disk, 42–43, 202
searches, Google, 22
sepia effects, 118
shadows, 105, 106, 115, 122
Share button, 118
Shared Photo Stream, 186
sharing items
iMovie projects, 153–155
via AirDrop, 137, 154
video to Camera Roll, 137, 154
sharing photos, 181–197. See also
uploading photos
between devices, 118
emailing photos, 189–192, 194
photo sharing services, 182–188
via Adobe Revel, 192–195
via Box, 171
via Dropbox, 168–171
via iCloud Photo Stream, 186
via iTunes, 170, 171
via Lightroom mobile, 184
sharpening images, 160, 162
shooting photos
with Camera app, 4–5
with Camera+ for iPad, 6–7
finding photo locations, 22
preparing for, 22–23
timer, 7
shooting video, 4
shutter button, 4, 5
220
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
shutter speed, 7
ShutterSnitch app, 31–33, 35, 36, 63, 202
Sincerely Ink Cards app, 197, 207
skin tones, 116
Skype for iPad app, 28, 202
slideshows, 158, 167, 176. See also
portfolios
SlowShutter app, 7
Smart Group feature, 71–72
Smart Previews, 120, 126
SmugMug app, 188, 207
SmugShot app, 188
Snapseed app
brightness adjustment, 102
contrast adjustment, 102
cropping photos, 99
HDR Scape filter, 8
image editing in, 99–103
obtaining, 205, 208
previewing edits, 100
recomposing photos, 99
uploading photos from, 182–183
SoftBox Pro app, 202
sorting photos, 71
sound. See audio
sound effects, 118, 148, 151
special effects. See effects
splitting clips, 140
stabilization, image, 6
stands, 57–59
star ratings. See rating photos
star trail effect, 7
stop-motion video, 54–55
store locations, 23
straightening photos
in iPhoto, 112–113
in Lightroom mobile, 119
in Photogene, 104–105
in Photos app, 97
in Snapseed, 99
Stuck On Earth app, 22
studio, using iPad in, 45–59
The Stump, 58–59
SugarSync app, 202
sunrises, 22
sunsets, 22
sync cable, 29
T
tagging. See keywords
terminology, xvii
Tether Tools, 57–58
tethered cameras, 46, 57–58
The Photographer’s Ephemeris (TPE), 22
theme music, 149
themes, movies, 134
thumbnails
galleries, 173, 177
showing/hiding in iPhoto, 112
video, 140
time-lapse shots, 51, 52
time-lapse video, 54, 56
timeline, iMovie, 135, 136–140, 152
timer, 7, 51, 53, 56
tone
adjusting in iPhoto, 114, 116
adjusting in Lightroom
mobile, 121–124
adjusting in Photogene, 105–109
adjusting in Snapseed, 100–103
considerations, 96
Toshiba wireless memory cards, 30
TPE (The Photographer’s Ephemeris), 22
Transcend wireless memory cards, 30
transitions, video, 140, 141, 142
Triggertrap app, 52, 204
Triggertrap Flash Adapter, 52
trimming clips, 139
TrueHDR app, 8, 200
TVs
wired connections to, 176–178
wireless connections to, 179
Twitter, 130, 182
U
uploading photos. See also exporting
photos; sharing photos
Camera Awesome, 188
Dropbox, 38
to from editing apps, 182–185
Flickr, 187
iCloud Photo Stream, 38–39, 186
to photo sharing services, 182–185
from Photogene, 183–184
PhotoStackr 500px, 188
from Snapseed, 182–183
via photo service apps, 187–188
USB adapter, 24–25, 28
USB cables, 25
USB headsets, 28, 152
USB keyboards, 28
USB microphones, 28, 152
V
VGA cables, 176
vibrance, 96, 108, 124
vibrance control, 96
video, 133–155. See also iMovie
entries; movies
adding clips from Media
Library, 136–137
adding to iMovie projects, 136–137
audio in. See audio; audio clips
capturing directly, 137
editing. See video editing
importing from iPhone/
iPod touch, 136, 137
playing, 138, 153
previewing, 137
recording, 4, 137
resolution, 154
sharing options, 153–155
shooting, 4
skimming, 138
stop-motion, 54–55
thumbnails, 140
time-lapse, 54, 56
video clips. See also movies; video
adding titles to, 142–143, 153
deleting, 140–141
editing, 139–142
Ken Burns effect, 146–147
from Media Library, 136–137
moving on timeline, 139
splitting, 140
transitions between, 140, 141, 142
trimming, 139
video editing, 138–145
considerations, 133, 134
deleting clips, 140–141
editing audio clips, 148–152
Index
221
video editing, continued
moving clips, 139
with Precision Editor, 141
splitting clips, 140
transitions, 140, 141, 142
trimming clips, 139
video editors, 134
Video/Photo/Square option, 4
Viewer, 135, 138
vignettes, 118
Vimeo, 153
Vintage effects, 117
voiceovers, 152
volume, audio clips, 148
W
Walgreens for iPad app, 197, 208
Wallee Connect system, 57–58
watermarks, 185
weather, 22, 23
weather apps, 22, 200
website, companion to book, xvii
white balance
adjusting in iPhoto, 116
adjusting in Photogene, 108, 109
considerations, 96
Lightroom mobile, 121–122
222
The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition
white levels, 105
white values, 122
wired connections, 176–178
wireless cameras, 30, 53
wireless connections, 179
wireless keyboards, 28
wireless memory cards, 30–33
wireless networks, 30, 38, 46, 179
Wireless Plus disk, 42–43, 202
wireless printers, 195–196
wireless remote control devices, 46–53
workflow, 11–19
X
XMP export, 79–80
XMP files, 79–80
Y
YouTube, 153
Z
Zenfolio.com, 197