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MTLC-16
Music Tutor Lab Controller
Owner’s Manual
and User’s Guide
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Roland Corporation U.S., 5100 S. Eastern Avenue, Los Angeles CA 90040-2936
www.rolandus.com
2944US
Copyright © 2001 ROLAND CORPORATION
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without
the written permission of ROLAND CORPORATION.
Educator’s Foreword
Welcome to the Roland family! We want to thank you for making the Roland MTLC-16 Lab Communication Console a
vital part of your classroom environment.
As educators in the 21st-century, we are faced with ever-growing competition for our students’ time and focus.
Listening to CDs and MP3s, watching movies and videos, and interacting with computers and the Internet, are all
examples of activities that are replacing the time students used to spend learning musical instruments. Because today’s
children are exposed to technology on a daily basis, they accept it as part of the natural landscape. They pursue information in an interactive manner, and they tend to reject old-style broadcast learning. As a result, we as music educators
must utilize technology so that teaching is more effective and learning is more fun.
Listening to CDs and MP3s is aurally stimulating. Watching movies and videos is visually stimulating. Interacting with
computers and the internet is mentally stimulating. This is why so many music teachers find it difficult to get students
excited about learning a musical instrument—especially in a traditional manner. If you could simultaneously listen to
the music of Mozart, follow the score, and share the experience with friends, why would you want to practice solo
scales and chords? The “interactive-generation” finds multimedia experiences more fulfilling.
Thanks to the MTLC-16, learning a musical instrument does not have to be boring—it can actually be fun! The MTLC16 is a lab communication console that combines aural and visual reinforcement of musical concepts with the Music
Tutor Philosophy. This includes performance-quality stereo sounds, as well as the ability to interact with musical notation (both intuitively and creatively), seamless integration of musical examples from SMFs or any audio source, and the
ability to visualize transposed scores and create altered arrangements. While this technology is state-of-the-art, it is
very easy to use—absolutely intuitive! Learning and playing take precedence over memorizing features and, as a result,
the MTLC-16 is virtually transparent to the teacher and student.
This is why the Roland MTLC-16 Lab Communication Console is a perfect group piano teaching tool. With it, the focus
is on learning and playing, incorporating technology in a way that is effective and enjoyable. Product features may be
important to a roomful of engineers, but we as music educators need practical tools. The Roland MTLC-16 Lab
Communication Console makes music learning aurally, visually, and mentally stimulating—like listening to CDs and
MP3s, watching movies and videos, or interacting with computers and the Internet. This is why both teachers and students embrace it as a perfect group piano teaching tool.
1
MTLC-16 Features
What Is It?
The MTLC-16 is an integrated stereo hardware/software lab teaching system that includes animated music notation, an
electronic gradebook, and drag ‘n’ drop classroom management tools. It consists of several integrated components.
The MTLC-16 is a “break-out” product for group piano teaching. It features stereo sound, computerized record-keeping, and most important—visual display of all music lessons and literature. The MTLC-16 provides research-class technology to tutor music reading skills. Improved reading skills—long an elusive goal—are not only possible, but readily
attainable for all students, especially those needing remediation.
This technology-enhanced learning can continue beyond the classroom door. The visual core of the MTLC-16 is available for student purchase. Imagine the progress possible when students have this visual tutor guiding them wherever
they practice. Check with your local Roland dealer or your college/university bookstore.
Stereo Music Lab Communication Console
•
•
•
•
•
Communicate with up to 16 students in stereo, expandable to 32 students
Set-up easily using supplied connectors, cables, and headsets
Drill students alone, in groups, or in pairs
Create up to four separate student groups
Record student performances to an optional cassette or CD player/recorder
Virtual Lab Controller and Classroom Manager
•
•
•
•
Control all MTLC-16 functions from a PC
Use preset or user-created classroom configurations
Monitor classroom rosters and grades via computer
Instantly recall student groupings and communication settings
Visual Music Tutor
• Enhance group lessons with SMF disk playback and visual notation display
• Provide interactive music tutorials
• Record, printout and assess student performances
Virtual Sound Canvas, a GS software synthesizer
• Provide orchestrated accompaniments from 902 instrument sounds (including 26 drum kits)
• Upgrade the built-in wave-table synthesizer so SMF arrangements sound more musical on your PC
Comprehensive Group Teaching Tool
• Begin group teaching immediately by following the “Survivor’s Guide to the MTLC-16”
• Understand and apply several innovative group teaching technologies by reading the comprehensive
owner’s manual
• Learn more about group teaching through the Annotated Bibliography of Group Teaching
Expandable Music Lab Controller
• Communicate with up 32 students in stereo by combining two MTLC-16 lab controllers
• Reinforce musical concepts by adding an overhead TV-monitor (S-Video), a flat-panel LCD,
or a gas-plasma screen
• Capture student or teacher performances via MIDI by adding a USB-equipped MIDI interface
• Experience hands-free teaching by adding a wireless mouse and/or headset
2
MTLC-16 Features
What Is Included?
The MTLC-16 Music Tutor Lab Controller is accompanied by a complete package of hardware, software, cables, and
headphone/microphones, and comprehensive print materials—everything you need, whether you are a veteran group
piano pedagogue, or a college/university teaching assistant conducting your very first class. Particularly important are
the print materials, written by experienced keyboard educators. Included are the Owner’s Manual with step-by-step
instructions, an annotated bibliography of books and articles on group keyboard teaching, and a “Survivor’s Guide” to
help master the few technology components.
Hardware
Qty.
MTLC-16 Lab Communication Console .........................................................................................................(1)
MTLC-16 AC Adapter .......................................................................................................................................(1)
MTLC-1 Student Communication Boxes........................................................................................................(16)
RJ-45 Cables .......................................................................................................................................................(16)
Stereo headsets with built-in Microphone ....................................................................................................(17)
1/4” to 1/4” Stereo Audio Cable .....................................................................................................................(1)
9-Pin Din Serial Computer Connector ............................................................................................................(1)
Software
Qty.
Installation CD ....................................................................................................................................................(1)
including:
Virtual MTLC-16 Lab Communication Package
V-MT1 Visual Music Tutor
VSC-88H Virtual Sound Canvas, v. 3.01
Printed Materials
Qty.
MTLC-16 Lab Communication Console Owner’s Manual ..........................................................................(1)
V-MT1 Visual Music Tutor Owner’s Manual..................................................................................................(1)
VSC-88H Visual Sound Canvas Owner’s Manual ........................................................................................(1)
MTLC-16 QuickStart “Survivor’s Guide” ......................................................................................................(1)
Current Software Catalog ..................................................................................................................................(1)
3
MTLC-16 Features
What Are the Options?
There are several options to optimize your teaching lab. You may use standard recording technologies like cassette and
CD-players, or add a hard-disk recorder for even more advanced functions.
However, while the Monitor section below lists options, please consider the visual monitors carefully—since students
will be following these visual displays very closely in each class. Whether you select an S-video TV monitor, sleek LCD
panels, a large gas plasma display, or an “In Focus” projector, size and image quality are extremely important—you
may want to splurge a bit. Also listed as an option, the USB-to-MIDI interface, is another must-have. This connector utilizes the graphic displays in the “Rehearsal Window,” as well as enabling in-class recording. The USB has rapidly
become the standard interface; it is both inexpensive and easily installed.
External Audio Player/Recorder
Cassette Player/Recorder
CD Player/Recorder
Hard-Disk Player/Recorder.
Visual Monitor(s)
TV(s) (S-Video)
PC VGA Monitor(s)
LCD Panel(s)
Gas Plasma Screen(s)
Audio Monitor(s)
Speaker(s) (preferably wall mounted)
Amplifier(s) (one per speaker)
USB MIDI Interface
MIDI Sport 2x2 (www.midiman.com)
4
Contents
Educator’s Foreword .....................................................................................1
MTLC-16 Features ..........................................................................................2
What Is It?....................................................................................................................................................................2
What Is Included?.......................................................................................................................................................3
What Are the Options? ..............................................................................................................................................4
Table of Contents...........................................................................................5
Names of Things and What They Do..............................................................6
Music Lab Installation Guide..........................................................................8
Music Lab Installation ...............................................................................................................................................8
MTLC-16 Installation ................................................................................................................................................9
Test Components .....................................................................................................................................................10
Chapter 1–The Visual Music Tutor Advantage...............................................12
Developing Solid Reading Skills ............................................................................................................................12
Putting the Visual Tutor to Work ...........................................................................................................................12
Making Reading More Successful–A Few Tips ....................................................................................................13
PREVIEW playing .........................................................................................................................................13
SLOW playing ................................................................................................................................................13
OUTLINE playing—selectively reading the entire score while the SMF is playing............................13
SHADOW playing—“air play” reading of the piece while the SMF is playing...................................13
PARALLEL SIGHTREADING methods—The Best Readers are Frequent Readers ............................14
Chapter 2–Surviving Your First Class ............................................................15
Survival Checklist–Before the Class ......................................................................................................................15
The Class....................................................................................................................................................................16
Chapter 3–Operating the MTLC-16 ...............................................................19
Chapter 4–Operating the Virtual MTLC-16....................................................27
Virtual Lab Control ..................................................................................................................................................27
Classroom Management..........................................................................................................................................30
Gradebook .................................................................................................................................................................31
Hardware Detection.................................................................................................................................................32
Chapter 5–Operating the V-MT1 (Visual Music Tutor) ....................................33
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography .....................................................36
Articles .......................................................................................................................................................................36
Books ..........................................................................................................................................................................38
Dissertations and Theses .........................................................................................................................................41
Additional References..............................................................................................................................................42
Appendix ....................................................................................................43
Installing the USB MIDISport Interface ................................................................................................................43
Warranty ....................................................................................................................................................................45
5
Names of Things and What They Do
1 [Tape In] Button
Broadcasts audio from any external audio source (e.g.
tape player, CD player, or rhythm machine) to all headphones. When this button is engaged, each student can
listen to and play along with the audio material. Pressing
this button cancels the “Aux In” button (page 24).
2 [Aux In] Button
Broadcasts audio from any external audio source (e.g.
tape player, CD player, or rhythm machine) to all headphones. When this button is engaged, each student can
listen to and play along with the audio material. Pressing
this button cancels the “Tape In” button (page 24).
3 [Pairs] Button
Connects adjacent students (i.e. Student “1” with Student
“2”, Student “3” with Student “4”, etc.) for duet-style
practicing. When this button is engaged, adjacent students can listen to, talk to, and play along with their partner (page 22).
4 [Group Assign A, B, C, D] Buttons
Connect selected students for group-style practicing.
When one of these buttons (i.e. A, B, C, or D) is held down
and student number buttons are engaged, the selected
6
students can listen to, talk to, and play for (or along with)
the other selected students (page 21).
5 Student [1-16] Buttons
Establish two-way communication between teacher and
student(s). When one (or several) of these buttons is
engaged, the selected student(s) can listen to, talk to, and
play for (or along with) the teacher. The “Mic” button
must be engaged to activate the teacher’s microphone
(page 20).
6 [All] Button
Establishes one-way communication between teacher and
students. When this button is engaged, all students can
listen to and play for (or along with) the teacher. Students
will not hear other students keyboards and microphones.
The “Mic” button must be engaged to activate the teacher
microphone (page 23).
7 [Group Comm A, B, C, D] Buttons
Establish two-way communication between teacher and
students in a selected group. When one (or several) of
these buttons is engaged, the selected student group(s)
can listen to, talk to, and play for (or along with) the
teacher. The “Mic” button must be engaged to activate the
Names of Things and What They Do
teacher’s microphone (page 21).
17 [Power Jack]
8 [Mute] Button
Connects the MTLC-16 to the supplied AC power adapter.
Silences all student instruments. When this button is
engaged, students can only listen to the teacher’s instrument and microphone, or external audio material via
“Tape In” or “Aux In” (page 25).
18 [Mon. Out] Jacks
9 [Mic] Button
Activates the teacher’s microphone. When this button is
engaged, the selected student(s) or group(s) can listen to
the teacher’s microphone (page 20).
10 [Student Broadcast] Button
Broadcasts two-way communication between teacher and
selected student(s) to all headphones. When this button is
engaged, selected student(s) can listen to, talk to, and play
for (or along with) the teacher while the remaining students listen (page 23).
11 [Phones] Slider
Adjusts the teacher’s headphones level. Slide the slider
towards the top of the MTLC-16 to increase the level and
slide the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 to
decrease the level (page 19).
12 [Inst] Slider
Adjusts the teacher’s instrument level. Slide the slider
towards the top of the MTLC-16 to increase the level and
slide the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 to
decrease the level (page 19).
13 [Mic] Slider
Adjusts the teacher’s microphone level. Slide the slider
towards the top of the MTLC-16 to increase the level and
slide the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 to
decrease the level (page 19).
14 [Tape In/Aux In] Slider
Adjusts the “Tape In” and “Aux In” levels. Slide the slider towards the top of the MTLC-16 to increase the level
and slide the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 to
decrease the level (page 24).
15 [Mon. Out] Slider
Adjusts the MTLC-16’s monitor output level. Slide the
slider towards the top of the MTLC-16 to increase the
level and slide the slider towards the bottom of the
MTLC-16 to decrease the level. This slider is only active
when an external recording device and/or an external
speaker system is connected to the MTLC-16 via the “Rec.
Out” and “Mon. Out” jacks respectively (page 25-26).
Connect the MTLC-16 to an external speaker system (e.g.
stereo power-amp with speakers) (page 10).
19 [Rec. Out] Jacks
Connect the MTLC-16 to an external stereo recording
device (e.g. tape recorder, CD recorder, or hard disk
recorder) (page 10).
20 [Aux. In]/[Tape In] Jacks
Connect the MTLC-16 to external stereo audio sources
(e.g. tape player, CD player, or rhythm machine) (page
10).
21 [Teacher Instrument] Jacks
Connect the MTLC-16 to the teacher’s instrument. (page
9).
22 [To Slave] Connector
Connects the MTLC-16 (“Master”) to another MTLC-16
(“Slave”) for a total of 32 student stations (page 10).
23 [To Computer] Connector
Connects the MTLC-16 to a computer. When a computer
is connected to the “To Computer” connector, all of the
MTLC-16’s buttons can be controlled via computer (page
10).
24 Student Instrument [1-16] Connectors
Connect the MTLC-16 to all student stations via RJ-45
cables and MTLC-1 Student Connector Boxes (page 9).
25 [Master On/Off] Switch
Toggles between “Master” and “Slave” status. When this
button is engaged, the MTLC-16 functions as the “Master”
communication console. When this button is not
engaged, the MTLC-16 functions as the “Slave” communication console (page 10).
26 [To Expander] Connector
Connects the MTLC-16 to another MTLC-16 for a total of
32 student stations (page 10).
27 [Teacher] Headset Jacks
Connect the teacher’s headset microphone (blue plug) and
teacher’s headset stereo phones (black plug).
16 [Power Switch]
Turns the MTLC-16 on and off.
7
Music Lab Installation Guide
Music Lab Installation
Room Preparation
When preparing a music teaching lab, there are many factors to consider. For example, the size and shape of the room,
the availability of lighting and power outlets, as well as a room’s ventilation and temperature control need to be
addressed. Please consider the following physical and electrical requirements before installing your music teaching lab.
Physical Space Requirements
Make sure there is sufficient space for all musical instruments, hardware, benches, and students. Full-size, freestanding keyboards (88-keys) require 22 square feet (including a bench and space for the student.) “Slab” keyboards (less than 88 keys) may require much less space.
•
• Create an effective floor plan that ensures a clear “line-of-sight” from all student keyboards to the teacher. While
this is not always possible due to the constraints of a given room, it is a good ideal.
• Include a large desk or table next to the teacher keyboard if possible. This provides the teacher easy access to the
communication console and/or the computer.
• Be sure that there is adequate space behind the teacher station. This allows the teacher to move easily from the
teacher station to the student stations.
• Shade music lab windows to regulate sunlight. Avoid bright or direct sunlight in the lab, because heat generated
by sunlight can overheat the Communication Console. Room temperature should not exceed 85 degrees during
normal use. The ideal physical space will allow for regulated temperature and humidity.
• Use anti-static, or static-resistant, carpet on the floors whenever possible to lower the noise-level in your lab.
Electrical Requirements
Once the floor plan is defined, determine the number of electrical outlets and power strips needed to supply
power to all devices. Isolate the MTLC-16 Communication Console from devices such as computers or lights by
plugging the devices into separate 120v wall plug receptacles. Plugging computers or rheostatic lights into the
same receptacle as the MTLC-16 could cause disturbing noise and hum during operation. Use only the supplied
A/C power adapter; using other A/C adapters can damage the unit and void the warranty.
•
• Use surge protectors on all electronic equipment in the music lab. This includes the MTLC-16 Lab Controller, the
teacher’s instrument and computer, the student keyboards, and all external audio devices. Check the voltage and
amperage requirements for the equipment being installed and consult with building engineering staff regarding
the level of required electrical service needed.
• Set the main power switch of the Music Tutor Lab Controller to the “Off” or “Out” position before connecting the
A/C power adapter to a 120v wall plug receptacle. Use only the A/C power adapter supplied with the Music
Tutor Lab Controller; using other A/C adapters can damage the unit and void the warranty.
• For further protection against electrical surge damage, disconnect all A/C power adapters from the wall plug
receptacle during school vacations or summer breaks.
Equipment Checklist
The MTLC-16 includes all of the components needed to connect up to (16) student instruments and (1) teacher instrument. It also includes all of the software needed to control the communication console via computer, to provide visualized learning tools, and to keep track of class rosters and grades. Before installing the MTLC-16, be sure you have the
following components:
Hardware
8
Music Lab Installation Guide
MTLC-16 Lab Communication Console .........................................................................................................(1)
MTLC-16 AC Adapter .......................................................................................................................................(1)
MTLC-1 Student Communication Boxes........................................................................................................(16)
RJ-45 Telephone-Type Connectors...................................................................................................................(16)
Headsets with built-in Microphone ................................................................................................................(17)
1/4” to 1/4” stereo audio cable .......................................................................................................................(1)
9-Pin Din Serial Computer Connector ............................................................................................................(1)
Software
Installation CD ....................................................................................................................................................(1)
including:
VMTLC-16 Virtual Music Tutor Lab Controller software
V-MT1 Visual Music Tutor software
VSC-88H Virtual Sound Canvas software
Printed Materials
MTLC-16 Music Tutor Lab Controller Owner’s Manual ..............................................................................(1)
V-MT1 Visual Music Tutor Owner’s Manual .................................................................................................(1)
VSC-88H Visual Sound Canvas Owner’s Manual ........................................................................................(1)
MTLC-16 QuickStart or “Survivor’s Guide” ..................................................................................................(1)
Current Software Catalog .................................................................................................................................(1)
MTLC-16 Installation
Set Up the Music Lab
• Place the teacher’s instrument in the front and center of the lab.
• Place the Music Tutor Lab Controller(s) (MTLC-16), computer (if used), and external playback/recording devices
(if used) on a table next to the teacher’s instrument.
• Place student instruments in rows facing the teacher’s instrument (row configuration is optional). Allow extra
space behind each instrument for instructional purposes.
• Place audio monitor(s) (if used) to the side of the teacher’s instrument facing the student instruments.
• Place the visual monitor(s) (if used) on a podium or wall mount near the teacher’s station facing the student
instruments.
• Connect all devices to an AC power strip as described in “Electrical Requirements” above.
Connect Cables
• Place one student communication box on each student instrument and insert the attached 1/4” plug into the headphone jack of each student instrument as you proceed with the installation.
• Number the student communication boxes (MTLC-1) “1” – ”16.”
• Connect each student communication box to the corresponding numbered outputs on the MTLC-16 using the supplied RJ-45 cables.
• Connect the headphone jack on the teacher’s instrument to the “Teacher Instrument Left/Stereo” jack on the
MTLC-16 using the supplied TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) cable.
9
Music Lab Installation Guide
• Set the “Master On/Off” button on the MTLC-16 to the “On” (“Master”) position.
• Connect the optional computer to the “To Computer” jack on the MTLC-16 using the supplied 9-pin serial cable. If
sound from the computer (i.e. SMF playback) needs to be broadcast to the class, connect the computer’s headphone output to the “Aux. In” jack on the MTLC-16 using the appropriate cable (e.g. 1/8” to RCA cable.)
• Connect the 9-pin “To Computer” jack on the optional second MTLC-16 to the 9-pin “To Slave” jack on the first
MTLC-16. Set the “Master On/Off” button on the second MTLC-16 to the “Off” (“Slave”) position. Connect the
“To Expander” jack on the second MTLC-16 to the “To Expander” jack on the first MTLC-16 using a supplied
RJ-45 cable.
• Connect the “Output L/R” jacks on the optional external playback/recording device to the “Tape In” jacks on the
MTLC-16. Connect the “Input L/R” jacks on the playback/recording device to the “Rec. Out” jacks on the MTLC16.
• Connect the Left and Right inputs on the optional external audio monitors to the “Mon. Out” jacks on the MTLC16.
• Connect the optional audio monitor(s) to the “Mon. Out” jacks on the MTLC-16 using the appropriate cable(s) (e.g.
RCA to 1/4”.)
• Connect the optional visual monitor(s) to the monitor out jack on the computer using the cable(s) suggested in the
computer and/or monitor’s manual.
• Connect a headset to each student communication box, as well as to the MTLC-16 (the jacks are on the left side of
the MTLC-16.) Make sure both the “Mic” and “Phones” plugs are inserted.
Install Software
• Power up your Windows
®
computer; if it is already powered up, please make certain to close all programs, so
none are running during the install procedure.
• Disable your computer's virus-protection software
• Insert the self-installing MTLC-16 CD-ROM into the tray of your computer's CD-ROM drive
• Wait until the auto-run program begins to run; it will bring you to the Installation Wizard.
• Follow the prompts; at the end of the process, you will be asked to restart the computer.
• Restart the computer; it is now ready to be used with your MTLC-16 Music Tutor Lab Controller
At this point, you may want create shortcuts on your desktop, so you can quickly open the programs. It is recommended that you create a shortcut for the MTLC-16 program wherever it is most convenient for you: the Start Menu, the Task
Bar, or the Desktop itself. You will not need one for either the Visual Music Tutor (V-MT1) or the Virtual Sound Canvas
(VSC-88), because these programs are automatically activated from within the MTLC-16 controller software.
Test Components
After all music lab equipment is placed, the cables are connected, and the software is installed, test each music lab component using the following procedure.
Power Up All Music Lab Components
• Student Instruments
• Teacher’s Instrument
10
Music Lab Installation Guide
• External Playback/Recording Device(s)
• Visual Monitor(s)
• Computer
• MTLC-16
• Audio Monitor(s)
Test the Teacher’s Station
A) Set the output level on the teacher’s instrument to maximum (this gives the best signal-to-noise response.)
B) Set the “Mic”, “Inst”, and “Phones” sliders on the MTLC-16 to their maximum setting.
C) Put on the teacher’s headset and play a few notes on the teacher’s instrument. You should hear what you are
playing. If you do not hear anything, check the teacher’s instrument and teacher’s headset connections.
D) Press the “Mic” button on the MTLC-16 and say something. You should hear what you are saying. If you do
not hear anything, check the teacher’s headset connections.
Test Student Stations
A) Press the “All” button on the MTLC-16.
B) Play a few notes on the teacher’s instrument while an assistant listens at student station #1. The assistant
should hear what you are playing. If the assistant does not hear anything, check the student communication
box to MTLC-16 “1” connections.
C) Have an assistant adjust the output level on student instrument #1 to maximum (this gives the best signal-tonoise response.)
D) Have the assistant play a few notes on student instrument #1. The assistant should hear what he or she is
playing. If the assistant does not hear anything, check the student instrument to student communication box
connections.
E) Have the assistant say something. The assistant should hear what he or she is saying.
F) Make adjustments in headphone and microphone levels with the level-control knobs on the side of the student
communication box. All communication boxes should be adjusted to equal audio levels.
G) Repeat steps B – F above for each remaining student station.
Secure Equipment and Cables
If all of the components are functioning properly, finalize the placement of all equipment.
• Attach each student communication box to the furniture or student keyboard, near the headphone jack on the
instrument, using screws or velcro.
• Secure all power outlets and power cords.
• Secure all communication cables by either tying them together or placing them in wiring channels to avoid hazards in the classroom setting.
• Care should be taken to make sure that all cords and cables be secured in a neat and orderly fashion to avoid tripping over them and pulling them out of their sockets, which can cause damage.
11
Chap. 1–The Visual Music Tutor Advantage
Developing Solid Reading Skills
To pass a school’s piano proficiency exam, one typically needs to play the Star-Spangled Banner, demonstrate basic harmonization and improvisation skills, and perform two-handed keyboard pieces. All these tasks require two basic skills:
READING and RESPONDING accurately, in time.
It is suggested that development of eye-hand coordination is the critical skill in basic keyboard reading, and today has
been made achievable like never before. At a student’s first glance at a music score, the eyes can and should be guided—visually tutored—to follow the score and the fingers be trained to rhythmically, accurately respond. Whether the
music score is treble or bass staff only, the full grand staff or a lead sheet, it is the eyes that should lead. This guiding
and pacing of the eyes will almost “force” the timely visual recognition of notes and patterns. Then fingers will be
coaxed to follow accurately and in time.
Two computer-age developments are now applied exclusively in Roland’s new MTLC-16 to achieve this improved
music reading, from the first lesson onward to the development of good reading habits. Both developments are commonplace computer technologies: the Standard MIDI File (SMF) and a Visual Music Tutor. The first, an SMF or digital
music recording, allows the student to pace the reading/learning at any suitable tempo. The second, the V-MT, extends
that flexibility by displaying the digital music so the eyes are compelled to follow along, again at the computer-guided
tempo. This practical monitoring of eye-hand coordination eliminates common reading problems, instilling proficient,
accurate reading.
A failsafe visual tutor is important, since the challenge for a keyboard student, whether, private or group, is a complex,
recurring four-step process. First the EYE must sense the pattern; second, the BRAIN must make sense of it; third, the
FINGERS must respond—and fourth, must do so IN TIME.
Research into the eye movements of keyboard players has detected many ways to monitor and train the eyes: a tachistoscope, a moving mask, a pointed finger, and others. The goal of each is to “nudge” the eyes along. Smooth, regulated
movements are the goal, pacing the eye movement from left to right, measure-by-measure, “scrolling” downward one
staff at a time. Fluent sightreaders typically avoid uncontrolled eye movements, particularly movements shifting backward, and concentrate on looking ahead.
Putting the Visual Tutor to Work
From the first glance of the music, the SMF and Visual Tutor work together to guide the eyes, whether a concept piece,
exercise or tune. The process in short: 1) Play the SMF slowly enough so the student can follow, the first time without
accompaniment tracks. 2) As skill improves, play the SMF with rhythm. 3) Finally, with increased skill and accuracy, the
student adds the orchestra. Of course, the student could be following along in the score, but following the on-screen
notation adds two important elements: a bouncing ball and colored note heads to attract and guide the eye, and automatic “page turns” to allow the students to read ahead.
This visual eye training displays an entire score and is available with the Notation Screen (function key F2), Rehearsal
Screen (F3) or Tone/Mixer Panel (F4). This visual coaching is also suitable when practicing with Markers A & B. A practice loop can help a student painstakingly polish a segment, over and over. The visual reinforcement helps focus both
the reading task, as well as the finger pattern.
There are several options that help visually reinforce the SMF being heard through the MTLC-16. The actual note display is re-sizable so the class can focus on the segment being read. Another option notates all sharps and flats in color—
a practical reminder of those easily-overlooked first sharps and flats that occur in keys of G and F major. All in all, the
flexible visual guide in Roland’s Music Tutor is a landmark in developing strong reading skills in a group keyboard
instruction.
12
The Visual Music Tutor Advantage
Making Reading More Successful—A Few Tips
It is beyond the scope of this brief text to outline everything involved in developing sightreading technique, but here
are a few pointers that can be practically implemented in every MTLC-equipped piano lab, as well as being used in
every computer- or disk-assisted rehearsal session.
PREVIEW playing
If you look before you leap, you will not be surprised. A mental “read-through” will locate familiar and troublesome parts that can be understood before actually trying to get the fingers moving accurately and in time. Just one
brief “look through.” This “look through” is enhanced further if the SMF is playing along.
SLOW playing
Merely playing a piece, either hands separately or together, at a reduced tempo will prepare the students for the
real playing. This is as critical as a preview. However, the writer’s experience as a teacher and as a student indicates that both the PREVIEW and SLOW run-throughs will most likely be ignored. As teachers, we must remember that the learners want only one thing—they want to PLAY! So, we may want to assume that students will
ignore the first two steps. With that in mind, let’s play!
OUTLINE playing—selectively reading the entire score while the SMF is playing
The SMF provides the rhythmic and musical propulsion; the student is visually “forced” to play selected notes (a
sketch or outline of the piece) in a visually guided rhythm
• Play only FIRST BEAT of each measure
• Play only FIRST AND THIRD BEATS of each measure (either duple or triple meter)
• Play ALL BEATS
• Play ALL NOTES, including subdivisions
• At the end of this short process, students or entire class have been visually guided through four separate playthroughs
SHADOW playing—“air play” reading of the piece while the SMF is playing
Again, the SMF provides the propulsion while an “imaginary” perfect performance takes place—no wrong notes
are possible.
• Move the fingers on top of keys without actually depressing any keys.
• “Play” along with these activities:
a) sing the note names,
b) sing the finger numbers, and
c) name each interval and direction
• Now, when the actual playing begins, the eyes have already read the score several times, and the fingers are
“itching” to play
13
The Visual Music Tutor Advantage
PARALLEL SIGHTREADING methods—The Best Readers are Frequent Readers
Good reading habits will be strengthened further by using the following two strategies: 1) insisting that the class
methods and materials have correlating disks, and 2) have students read through other parallel methods with
visual/SMF guidance.
Possible parallel methods/materials could be:
1) If the class text is Alfred's Piano Course for Adults, then one might use the chapters in PDM: Piano for the
Developing Musician that use parallel concepts. So, when the class was learning the dotted quarter-eighth pattern in
the text, supplementary—and parallel—reading materials from another book would not only reinforce the concepts, but provide fresh new examples for reading.
2) For younger classes using Alfred's Group Piano Method, parallel reading materials would be those from Bastien
Piano Basics, Hal Leonard Student Piano Method, Noona's Comprehensive Piano Method, or any other disk-based
method. Again, the emphasis is simple: the more one reads, the better one reads!
• By insisting that the class method is accompanied by SMFs, every student has an individual, visual guide to
help develop good reading. In addition, the Visual Tutor serves as a teaching assistant for the teacher.
• A parallel reading method is an important adjunct; however, one must keep in mind that these “read
throughs” are not aiming for perfection but, rather, the visual/tactile process. Either the OUTLINE or SHADOW options are suitable.
• Provide students with a list of supplementary book/disk publications that they can read through, emphasizing popular or standard tunes
• Use other tutorial SMF disks for reading practice, especially the correlating POPULAR MUSIC materials from
FJH Piano Adventure series, the Alfred Basic Piano Course, or the Hal Leonard Student Piano Method. In addition, both the Looney Tunes and the Performance Plus series from Warner Bros. provide interesting, enjoyable
and challenging reading materials. Best of all, students will enjoy reading through these tunes; they'll probably forget they are learning.
• Finally, there are two more SMF series, the first with accompanying books, the second without books. By using
these SMFs with the Visual Music Tutor, students will be compelled to read along with professionally-recorded MIDI files. In addition, the subtle propulsion of the SMF playback provides pressure to "keep up with the
ensemble," further strengthening keyboard reading skills.
14
Chap. 2–Surviving Your First Class
Survival Checklist–Before the Class
❏ Two months before: Order your texts and disks. As stated in the previous chapter, it is imperative that you use the
basic technology of an SMF-accompanied text. Several publishers' texts with accompanying disks are listed below.
• Alfred
Basic Group Piano Course, Books 1-4
Group Piano for Adults, Books 1-2
Piano 101, Books 1-2
Piano 101, The Short Course
• Stipes
Keyboard Musicianship, 7th edition, Books I & II,
• Wadsworth
Piano for the Developing Musician, 5th edition
Piano for Pleasure, 4th edition
Supplementary materials from various publishers
• Turbo Music’s You're the Star series (distributed by Hal Leonard)
• Performance Plus series (Warner Bros.)
❏
One month before: Order Visual Music Tutor (V-MT1) for student purchase at bookstore. Research suggests a vast
improvement in reading skill and retention when a student uses music tutor disks (SMFs) to guide their progress.
By requiring students to use a visual tutor as they study, one will see significant skill improvements.
❏
The day before: Make certain all things are in place, and have a “technical rehearsal” to determine that all connections are working
A) Verify that all Text, syllabi and disks are in class (or in bookstore for student purchase)
B) Type student names into virtual gradebook. You may use the import text option to simplify the process.
C) Verify all MIDI & visual connections are working
D) Make printed notes for yourself of all common MTLC-16 functions
❏
30 minutes before class: Have another “technical rehearsal” to verify that everything is operational and in place—
books, disks, connections, volume levels, and visual display
A) Random check of audio communication with student stations
B) Technical check of SMFs
C) Technical check of monitors
D) Technical check of MIDI communication between computer and teacher keyboard
15
Surviving Your First Class
The Class
Make certain you have the following materials conveniently located.
A) Printed materials: teacher’s books and disks, and all relevant handouts
B) Verify that students have all their materials
1) Text with interactive disks
2) V-MT1
3) Additional SMFs/Books per syllabus
Talking to the class:
To survive the first round of teacher-class communication, press ALL and the Microphone button; now the student can
hear both your instrument and your voice. If this is your first class, and you find yourself inching toward panic mode,
press MUTE. This will silence all student instruments and voice communication. For more detailed description of the
communication options, see either the 11” X 17” (folded in half) “Survivor’s Guide” or the next section of this manual.
Playing your first SMF:
The following options are the easiest to get started, and this assumes that a number of student eyes are watching you
intently.
A) Insert the SMF disk for your text into the disk drive of the digital piano, select the song, adjust the tempo and
PLAY. Merely hearing the music will focus student attention on the music. OR
B) Insert the SMF disk into the disk drive of the computer, open the MTLC-16 software and then click on “Visual
Music Tutor” in the menu bar, and navigate the File menu until you select the desired song. Now, press the
SPACE BAR. The music begins and students can concentrate on the music being learned.
Interactive models for successful learning:
Establishing an interactive routine that uses SMF recordings, reinforced with visual cues, will help improve student
progress.
Basics
A) Listen to song—ALL tracks on
B) Listen to song a slower tempo—MUTE Tracks R, 1, & 2, so only Tr. 3 & 4 are playing
1) Hands separately
2) Hands together
Shadow Play—“air play” or mentally read through the piece while the SMF plays
A) Moving fingers on top of keys without actually depressing any keys
B) Other non-playing activities to mentally play the piece:
1) sing notes names
2) sing finger numbers
3) naming intervals and direction
16
Surviving Your First Class
C) When the actual playing begins, the eyes have read the score several times, and the fingers have been
“itching” to play
D) Using various tempi & track configurations
1) SLOWLY, without SMF, either hands separately or together
2) Increase tempo gradually as skill permits
3) Add rhythm track (Track R)
a) Slow R.H.
b) Slow L.H.
4) Add orchestra track (Track 2)
a) Slow R.H.
b) Slow L.H.
5) Mute piano parts
6) Find difficult spots & use Markers
a) Set Marker A
b) Set Marker B
c) Turn on Repeat or “loop” button, and practice this spot until it is polished
d) Turn Repeat button off, and continue playing
e) Clear Markers A & B
Outline Play—slowly play only selected notes as they occur, while listening to the musical flow
of the tempo-reduced SMF
A) First beat only
B) First and third beats
C) All main beats
D) All notes
E) Using various tempi & track configurations
1) SLOWLY, without SMF, either hands separately or together
2) Increase tempo gradually as skill permits
3) Add rhythm track (Track R)
a) Slow R.H.
b) Slow L.H.
4) Add orchestra track (Track 2)
a) Slow R.H.
b) Slow L.H.
5) Mute piano parts
17
Surviving Your First Class
6) Find difficult spots & use Markers
a) Set Marker A
b) Set Marker B
c) Turn on Repeat or “loop” button, and practice this spot until it is polished
d) Turn Repeat button off, and continue playing
e) Clear Markers A & B
F) Play a tempo
1) Since you are near-perfection now, congratulate yourself, or
2) Locate remaining difficult spots and user Markers A & B for additional spot practice
18
Chap. 3–Operating the MTLC-16
The Lab Communication Console is the heart of the MTLC-16 Music Lab. It provides routing capabilities similar to
those of a telephone switchboard. For example, when a teacher needs to hear a particular student, or group of students,
he or she can do so from the MTLC-16. When a teacher needs to arrange the class into four groups of four for quartetstyle playing, he or she can do so from the MTLC-16. While rewiring a music lab for alternate configurations seems difficult, it is actually quite simple. With the MTLC-16, the following applications are all possible from the Communication
Console.
Instructor Level Control
Purpose
Allows the teacher to adjust the level of his or her microphone, instrument, and headphones for comfort and
usability.
Procedure
Teacher’s Microphone
While speaking into the teacher’s microphone, set the “Mic” slider at a comfortable listening level. Sliding the slider towards the top of the MTLC-16 increases the listening level and sliding the sliders towards the bottom of the
MTLC-16 decreases the listening level.
Teacher’s Instrument
While playing the teacher’s instrument, set the “Inst” slider at a comfortable listening level. Sliding the slider
towards the top of the MTLC-16 increases the listening level and sliding the sliders towards the bottom of the
MTLC-16 decreases the listening level.
Teacher’s Headphone
While playing the teacher’s instrument and/or speaking into the teacher’s microphone, set the “Phones” slider at
a comfortable listening level. Sliding the slider towards the top of the MTLC-16 increases the listening level and
sliding the sliders towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 decreases the listening level.
Details
These sliders are most commonly used for adjusting the level of the teacher’s microphone, instrument, and headphones
for comfort and usability. However, the microphone and instrument sliders also affect recording levels when “Mon.
Out” is used for Lab Performance Recording.
• The selected student hears: “Mic” and “Instr” level changes.
• The teacher hears: “Mic,” “Instr,”and “Phones” level changes.
• The unselected student hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
19
Operating the MTLC-16
Single Student Practice
Purpose
Allows students to practice privately.
Procedure
The controller defaults to this mode when the power is turned on and no buttons are pressed.
Details
This application is most commonly used for single student practice. However, the teacher can monitor or communicate
with any student by following the instructions for “Single and Multiple Student Monitoring and Communication.”
• Each student hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
Single and Multiple Student Monitoring and Communication
Purpose
Allows the teacher to listen to, talk to, or play the teacher’s instrument for selected students.
Procedure
A) Press the “Mic” button on the upper right corner of the MTLC-16 to activate the teacher’s microphone. The
LED next to the “Mic” button will light when the teacher’s microphone is activated.
B) Press a student’s number button (“1-16”) on the lower row of the MTLC-16 to monitor or communicate with
the selected student. The LED above a student’s number button will light when the student is selected.
C) Press several student number buttons to monitor or communicate with multiple students simultaneously.
Details
This application is most commonly used for monitoring or communicating with a single student while the remaining
students practice privately. However, the teacher can monitor or communicate with several students simultaneously by
selecting several student number buttons.
• The selected student hears: the teacher’s instrument and microphone, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: the selected student’s instrument and microphone, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The unselected student hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
20
Operating the MTLC-16
Group Practice
Purpose
Allows student groups to practice privately.
Procedure
A) Assign student(s) to a group
i)
While holding down a “Group Assign” button (A, B, C, or D), press a student’s number button (“1-16”) on the
lower row of the MTLC-16.
ii) Repeat for each student in the group.
B) Unassign student(s) from a group
i)
While holding the “Group Assign” button (A, B, C, or D) you wish to alter, press the student’s number button
(“1-16”) you wish to unassign on the lower row of the MTLC-16.
ii) Repeat for each student you wish to unassign.
Details
This application is most commonly used for group-style practice. However, the teacher can monitor or communicate
with any group by following the instructions for “Group Monitoring and Communication.”
• Each student assigned to a group hears: the instruments and microphones of other students assigned to the group,
and his or her own instrument and microphone
• The teacher hears: his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The unassigned student hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
Group Monitoring and Communication
Purpose
Allows the teacher to listen to, talk to, or play the teacher’s instrument for selected groups.
Procedure
A) Press the “Mic” button on the upper right corner of the MTLC-16 to activate the teacher’s microphone. The
LED next to the “Mic” button will light when the teacher’s microphone is activated.
B) Assign students to a group (A, B, C, or D) by following the instructions under “Group Practice.”
C) Press a “Group Comm” button (A, B, C, or D) on the lower right corner of the MTLC-16 to monitor or communicate with the selected group. The LED next to the “Group Comm” button will light when the group is selected.
D) Press several “Group Comm” buttons to monitor or communicate with multiple groups.
21
Operating the MTLC-16
Details
This application is most commonly used for monitoring or communicating with a single group while the remaining
groups practice privately. However, the teacher can monitor or communicate with several groups simultaneously by
selecting several “Group Comm” buttons.
• Each student assigned to a selected group hears: the teacher’s instrument and microphone, the instruments and
microphones of other students assigned to the group, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: the instruments and microphones of all students in the selected group(s), and his or her own
instrument and microphone.
• The unassigned student hears only his or her own instrument and microphone.
Pairs (Duet-Style) Practice
Purpose
Allows adjacent students (1 and 2, 3 and 4, … 15 and 16) to practice privately.
Procedure
Press the “Pairs” button. The LED next to the “Pairs” button will light when “Pairs” is selected.
Details
This application is most commonly used for duet-style practice. However, the teacher can monitor or communicate
with any pair by following the instructions for “Pairs (Duet-Style) Monitoring and Communication.”
• Each student pair hears: the instrument and microphone of the adjacent student, and his or her own instrument
and microphone.
• The teacher hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
Pairs (Duet-Style) Monitoring and Communication
Purpose
Allows the teacher to listen to, talk to, or play the teacher’s instrument for selected pairs.
Procedure
A) Press the “Mic” button on the upper right corner of the MTLC-16 to activate the teacher’s microphone. The
LED next to the “Mic” button will light when the teacher’s microphone is activated.
B) Press the “Pairs” button. The LED next to the “Pairs” button will light when “Pairs” is selected.
C) Press one of the adjacent students’ number buttons to monitor or communicate with the selected pair (e.g.
Press “1” to select students “1 and 2.”) The LEDs above the selected pair will light when one of the students in
the pair is selected.
D) Press several adjacent students’ number buttons to monitor or communicate with multiple pairs simultaneously.
22
Operating the MTLC-16
Details
This application is most commonly used for monitoring or communicating with a single pair while the remaining pairs
practice privately. However, the teacher can monitor or communicate with several pairs simultaneously by selecting
several student number buttons.
• Each student pair hears: the instrument and microphone of the teacher, the instrument and microphone of the
adjacent student, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: the instruments and microphones of all students in the selected pair(s), and his or her own
instrument and microphone.
• The unselected pair hears: the instrument and microphone of the adjacent student, and his or her own instrument
and microphone.
Class Communication
Purpose
Allows the teacher to talk to or play the teacher’s instrument for all students.
Procedure
A) Press the “Mic” button on the upper right corner of the MTLC-16 to activate the teacher’s microphone. The
LED next to the “Mic” button will light when the teacher’s microphone is activated.
B) Press the “All” button on the lower right corner of the MTLC-16. The LED above the “All” button, as well as
all of the LEDs above the student number buttons, will light when “All” is activated.
Details
This application is most commonly used for communicating with all students.
• All students hear: their own instrument (unless “Mute” is depressed) and microphone, and the teacher’s instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: only his or her own instrument and microphone.
Student Broadcasting
Purpose
Allows the class to hear a selected student’s instrument and microphone for the purposes of demonstration or
example.
Procedure
A) Press the “Student Broadcast” button on the upper right corner of the MTLC-16. The LED next to the “Student
Broadcast” button will light when “Student Broadcast” is selected.
B) Press a student’s number button (“1-16”) on the lower row of the MTLC-16 to broadcast the student’s instrument and microphone to the entire class. The LED above a student’s number button will light when the student is selected.
23
Operating the MTLC-16
C) Press several student number buttons to broadcast multiple students to the class.
Details
This application is most commonly used for broadcasting a single student’s instrument and microphone to the class.
However, the teacher can broadcast several students simultaneously by selecting several student number buttons.
• The selected student hears: the teacher’s instrument and microphone, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: the selected student’s instrument and microphone, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
• The unselected student hears: the teacher’s instrument and microphone, the broadcasting student’s instrument
and microphone, and his or her own instrument and microphone.
External Audio Broadcasting
Purpose
Allows the teacher to broadcast an external audio source (e.g. drum machine, CD player, MP3 player, etc.) to the
class.
Procedure
A) Press the “Tape In” or “Aux In” button on the upper left corner of the MTLC-16 (Pressing “Tape In” cancels
“Aux In” and pressing “Aux In” cancels “Tape In.”) The LED next to the “Tape In” or “Aux In” button will
light when either button is selected.
B) Press play on the external audio source.
C) Set the “Tape/Aux In” slider at a comfortable listening level. Sliding the slider towards the top of the MTLC16 increases the listening level and sliding the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 decreases the listening level.
Details
This application is most commonly used for broadcasting an external audio source to the class while the class listens
and/or plays along in private. However, the teacher can also listen to, talk to, or play the teacher’s instrument for
selected students, pairs, or groups by following the instructions above for the intended application.
• All students hear: the external audio source (via “Tape In” or “Aux In”), and their own instrument and microphone.
• The teacher hears: the external audio source (via “Tape In” or “Aux In”), and his or her own instrument and
microphone.
24
Operating the MTLC-16
Lab Performance Recording
Purpose
Allows the teacher to record: the teacher’s instrument and microphone, a selected student’s instrument and microphone, a selected pair’s instrument and microphone, a selected group’s instruments and microphones, and/or an
external audio source.
Procedure
A) Be sure an external audio player/recorder is connected to the “REC. OUT” jacks on the back of the MTLC-16
as described in the “Music Lab Installation Guide.”
B) Select student(s), pair(s), group(s), or an external audio source to be recorded by following the instructions for
“Single and Multiple Student Monitoring and Communication,” “Group Monitoring and Communication,”
“Pairs (Duet-Style) Monitoring and Communication,” “Class Communication,” “Student Broadcasting,”
and/or “External Audio Broadcasting.”
C) Set the “Tape/Aux In,” “Mic,” and/or “Inst” sliders at comfortable listening levels. Sliding the sliders towards
the top of the MTLC-16 increases the listening level and sliding the sliders towards the bottom of the MTLC-16
decreases the listening level.
D) Press record (or play and record) on the external audio source.
E) While playing the instrument and/or speaking into the microphone being recorded, set the “Mon Out” slider
at a satisfactory recording level. Sliding the slider towards the top of the MTLC-16 increases the recording
level and sliding the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 decreases the recording level.
F) Begin the lab performance.
Details
This application is most commonly used for recording a selected student, pair, or group’s lab performance while the
remaining students practice privately. However, the teacher can record several students, pairs, or groups simultaneously by selecting several student number buttons or “Group Comm” buttons simultaneously. The teacher can also broadcast a performance to the class by pressing the “Student Broadcast” button. The LED next to the “Student Broadcast”
button will light when “Student Broadcast” is selected.
Student Instrument Muting
Purpose
Allows the teacher to turn off all student instruments when communicating with the class.
Procedure
Press the “Mute” button on the right half of the MTLC-16. The LED next to the “Mute” button will light when
“Mute” is selected.
25
Operating the MTLC-16
Details
This application is most commonly used for muting student instruments while the teacher is demonstrating. However,
selected student instruments can be un-muted (while the others remain muted) by pressing the student’s number button.
• All students hear: the teachers instrument and microphone, and/or an external audio source (if “Tape In” or “Aux
In” is depressed.)
• The teacher hears: his or her own instrument and microphone, and/or an external audio source (if “Tape In” or
“Aux In” is depressed.)
Classroom Speaker Monitoring
Purpose
Allows the MTLC-16 to function without headphones for demonstration purposes.
Procedure
A) Be sure an external audio monitoring system (preferably stereo) is connected to the “Mon. Out” jacks on the
back of the MTLC-16 as described in the “Music Lab Installation Guide.”
B) Set the external audio monitoring system at a comfortable listening level.
C) Select student(s), pair(s), group(s), or an external audio source (i.e. “Tape In” or “Aux In”) to be broadcast to
the class by following the instructions in sections: “Single and Multiple Student Monitoring and
Communication,” “Group Monitoring and Communication,” “Pairs (Duet-Style) Monitoring and
Communication,” “Class Communication,” “Student Broadcasting,” and/or “External Audio Broadcasting.”
D) Set the “Tape/Aux In,” “Mic,” and/or “Inst” sliders at comfortable listening levels. Sliding the sliders towards
the top of the MTLC-16 increases the listening level and sliding the sliders towards the bottom of the MTLC-16
decreases the listening level.
E) While playing a selected instrument(s) and/or speaking into the microphone(s) being broadcast to the class,
set the “Mon Out” slider at a satisfactory listening level. Sliding the slider towards the top of the MTLC-16
increases the listening level and sliding the slider towards the bottom of the MTLC-16 decreases the listening
level.
F) Adjust the audio monitoring system if needed.
Details
This application is most commonly used for broadcasting a selected student, pair, or group to the class via external
audio monitors. However, the teacher can broadcast several students, pairs, or groups simultaneously by selecting several student number buttons or “Group Comm” buttons.
26
Chap. 4–Operating the Virtual MTLC-16
The Virtual Communication Console (VMTLC-16) is a computer-based remote control for the MTLC-16’s Lab
Communication Console and more. It not only provides remote control of the Lab Communication Console, but also
adds classroom customization and gradebook options. For example, when a teacher needs to hear a particular student
play along with a standard MIDI file orchestration, he or she can do so from a computer without touching the Lab
Communication Console. When a teacher needs to store several classroom rosters, complete with student names and
grades, he or she can do so from a computer without using a traditional gradebook. Moreover, controlling all of the Lab
Communication Console’s buttons, customizing classroom configurations, and recalling gradebook information from a
computer is actually quite simple. With the VMTLC-16 software, the following applications are all possible from a computer.
Virtual Lab Control
After opening the VMTLC-16 software on your computer, you can control all of the Lab Communication Console’s buttons from the computer by clicking on button icons that appear on the screen. These button icons function just like the
physical buttons on the Communication Console. Click them once to engage the button and click them again to disengage the button (an LED icon next to the button icon will light when the corresponding button icon is engaged.)
The only button icons that function differently from the physical buttons on the console are the “Group Assign” button
icons (i.e. A, B, C, D). With these button icons, instead of holding down a “Group Assign” button (i.e. A, B, C, D) while
selecting students, click on a “Group Assign” button icon to engage it, click on selected student number button icons to
assign students to the group, and then click on the “Group Assign” button again to disengage it.
While selecting icons on the screen is the simplest way of using the VMTLC-16, there are additional ways of controlling
the Lab Communication Console from the computer. These include selecting button functions from drop-down menus,
or pressing a corresponding computer keyboard “shortcut” (a key or keys on the computer keyboard that act just like
button icons). With this in mind, the following are applications related to Virtual Lab Control including button icons,
drop-down menus, and shortcut equivalents of the Communication Console’s buttons.
Roster – Student Selection
A) Click a student number button icon (i.e. keyboard icon), or
B) Click “Roster” in the menu-bar and click a student in the drop-down menu, or
C) Press Alt+R, and then use the arrow keys to select a student from the drop-down menu.
Options – Additional Buttons Control
Group Assign A, B, C, and D
A) Click a “Group Assign” button icon (i.e. A, B, C, D), or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Group Assign” (i.e. A, B, C,D) from the drop-down menu, or
C) Press Alt+O, and then use the arrow keys to select “Group Assign” (i.e. A, B, C, D), or
D) Press Ctrl+F1, Ctrl+F2, Ctrl+F3, or Ctrl+F4.
Group Comm A, B, C, and D
A) Click a “Group Comm” button icon (i.e. A, B, C, D), or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Group Comm” (i.e. A, B, C, D) from the drop-down menu, or
C) Press Alt+O, and then use the arrow keys to select “Group Comm” (i.e. A, B, C, D), or
D) Press F1, F2, F3, or F4.
27
Operating the Virtual MTLC-16
Mic
A) Click the “Mic” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Mic,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Mic,” or
D) Press Ctrl+M.
Mute
A) Click the “Mute” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Mute,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Mute,” or
D) Press Ctrl+U.
Student Broadcast
A) Click the “Student Broadcast” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Student Broadcast,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Student Broadcast,” or Press Ctrl+T.
Pairs
A) Click the “Pairs” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Pairs,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Pairs,” or
D) Press Ctrl+T.
Clear All
A) Click the “Clear All” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Clear All,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Clear All,” or
D) Press Ctrl+Z.
Tape In
A) Click the “Tape In” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Tape In,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Tape In,” or
D) Press Ctrl+I.
Aux In
A) Click the “Aux In” button icon, or
B) Click “Options” in the menu-bar and select “Aux In,” or
C) Press Alt+O and then use the arrow keys to select “Aux In,” or
D) Press Ctrl+A.
28
Operating the Virtual MTLC-16
Static/Adjustable – VMTLC-16 Display Customization
When the VMTLC-16 software is loaded, the computer screen should be in the “Static” mode. This means the computer
screen looks and functions like its hardware counterpart, the MTLC-16 Communication Console. However, when you
click “Adjustable” in the menu-bar, the computer screen switches to the “Adjustable” mode. This means the user can
customize the screen, by adding names to student stations and changing the location of the student station icons, to better emulate the physical arrangement of students in the Music Lab.
While arranging student/teacher station icons on the screen takes a little setup time, it can be accomplished quickly
and easily with the following buttons and icons.
[Arrange/Control] Button
A) Click “Adjustable” in the menu-bar to put the VMTLC-16 into the “Adjustable” mode (when the VMTLC-16 is
in the “Adjustable” mode, the “Arrange” button will appear in the lower left corner of the computer screen,
next to the “Capture” and “Clear All” buttons)
B) Click the “Arrange” button icon (the “Arrange” button icon should now say “Control”)
C) Click a student station icon (over the student station number and not over the keyboard icon) and hold. Then
Drag the student station icon to the desired location on the screen and release.
D) Repeat step “c” for each student station (NOTE: the teacher’s station can also be moved.)
E) Right-click on a Student Station Icon and select “Delete Keyboard” to delete unused student station icons.
F) Click the “Control” button icon when all student station icons have been placed.
G) Be sure to save the current classroom configuration by following the instructions under “Classroom
Management: Save Class As.”
Box # [1] or [2] Buttons
When two MTLC-16 Communication Consoles are hooked together using the supplied cables (see the “Music Lab
Installation Guide” for details), the VMTLC-16 software can accommodate (32) student stations. However, only sixteen
student stations will appear on the screen at one time. To see the remaining stations, do the following.
A) Click on the Box # “2” icon on the lower half of the screen to see Box # 2’s (16) student station icons.
B) Click on the Box # “1” icon on the lower half of the screen to see Box # 1’s (16) student station icons.
29
Operating the Virtual MTLC-16
Classroom Management
Roster – Adding Student Names
A) Right-click on a student station icon (over the keyboard icon not the student station number.)
B) Type the student’s name in the pop-up dialogue box: first name first, followed by a space, and then the last
name (NOTE: only letters and numbers are allowed.)
C) Press “enter.” The student’s first name should now appear under the student station icon.
File
The VMTLC-16 stores, retrieves, and displays classroom configurations for up to 25 classes. This means all associated
information—including names, student station icon locations, and gradebook information—can be saved to the computer’s disk drive for recall at any time.
New Class
Creates a classroom configuration file on the computer’s disk drive.
A) Click “File” in the menu-bar and select “New Class,” or
B) Press Alt+F and then press “N,” or
C) Press Alt+F and then use the arrow keys to select “New Class.”
D) Type the class name and press enter (or click “OK.”)
Open Class
A) Opens a previously saved classroom configuration.Click “File” in the menu-bar and select “Open Class,” or
B) Press Alt+F and then press “O,” or
C) Press Alt+F and then use the arrow keys to select “New Class,” or
D) Press Ctrl+O.
E) Click a class name and press “Enter” (or click “OK.”)
Save Class
Saves the current classroom configuration to a file on the computer’s disk drive.
A) Click “File” in the menu-bar and select “Save Class,” or
B) Press Alt+F and then press “V,” or
C) Press Alt+F and then use the arrow keys to select “Save Class,” or
D) Press Ctrl+S.
E) If the current classroom configuration has not been saved previously, type the class name and press enter (or
click “OK.”)
Save Class As
Saves the current classroom configuration to a file on the computer’s disk drive.
A) Click “File” in the menu-bar and select “Save Class As,” or
B) Press Alt+F and then press “E,” or
C) Press Alt+F and then use the arrow keys to select “Save Class As.”
D) Type the class name and press enter (or click “OK.”)
30
Operating the Virtual MTLC-16
Delete Class
Deletes the current classroom configuration file from the computer’s disk drive.
A) Click “File” in the menu-bar and select “Delete Class,” or
B) Press Alt+F and then press “D,” or
C) Press Alt+F and then use the arrow keys to select “Delete Class.”
D) Click the class name and press enter (or click “OK.”)
Exit
Closes the current classroom configuration file and the VMTLC-16 Software.
A) Click “File” in the menu-bar and select “Exit,” or
B) Press Alt+F and then press “X,” or
C) Press Alt+F and then use the arrow keys to select “Exit,” or
D) Press Ctrl+X.
E) If the current classroom configuration has not been saved previously, type the class name and press enter (or
click “OK.”)
Gradebook
In order to open the “Gradebook,” the current “Class” must be saved. To save the current class, see “Save Class” under
“File” above. Once the current class is saved, click “Gradebook” in the menu-bar. A new window will appear with the
following items.
Assignment Column
Allows the teacher to enter assignment titles (e.g. test name, performance name, etc.) for each student.
A) Click a student name in the student name box located in the upper left corner of the screen.
B) Click a blank cell in the Assignment Column.
C) Type an assignment title.
D) Press “Tab.”
Score Column
Allows the teacher to enter numbered assignment scores for each student.
A) Click a student name in the student name box located in the upper left corner of the screen.
B) Click a blank cell in the Score Column.
C) Type a numbered score.
D) Press “Tab.”
31
Operating the Virtual MTLC-16
Notes Column
Allows the teacher to enter notes (e.g. “Needs two-hand work,” “Don’t forget to test!,” etc.) for each student.
A) Click a student name in the student name box located in the upper left corner of the screen.
B) Click a blank cell in the Notes Column.
C) Type a note.
D) Press “Tab.”
Average Column
Numbered scores from the “Score Column” are averaged in this column.
[Print Student] Button
Prints the selected student’s gradebook records.
A) Click a student name in the student name box located in the upper left corner of the screen.
B) Click the “Print Student” button.
Hardware Detection
TX = “Transmit”
This virtual LED blinks when the VMTLC-16 software is “transmitting” messages to the connected communication console.
RX = “Receive”
This virtual LED blinks when the VMTLC-16 software is “receiving” messages from the connected communication console.
CD = “Carrier Detect”
This virtual LED lights when the VMTLC-16 software detects (“carrier detect[s]”) the connection of the communication
console.
[Capture] Button
Makes the on/off status of the VMTLC-16’s buttons match the on/off status of the connected communication console’s
buttons.
32
Chap. 5–Operating the V-MT1 (Visual Music Tutor)
MIDI Song Files, Notation and WYSIWYG*—the Visual Imperative
Soon after MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) was introduced in 1983, software publishers began using MIDI’s
®
®
power to display notes of a song file as graphic, print-worthy notation—instant music publishing. Finale and Sibelius
are but two examples of successful music notation companies. But the primary output of these programs—and
sequencing programs—is the static, printed page.
The V-MT1 is a visual sequencing/notation program, a powerful tool that is remarkable for two reasons: what it does,
and almost more importantly, what it does NOT do.
What it does:
The V-MT1 plays back Standard MIDI Files (SMFs) of both type 1 and type 0. This interactive data is used to help
students learn. Typical student-teacher interactions made possible by MIDI: recordings can be adjusted, so the
tempo is slower; the recording’s orchestration can be turned off for greater learning focus; and the MIDI file’s
notation can be instantly displayed in a dynamic, animated musical score that unfolds in tempo, as the recording
is played back. This user-adjustable music score guides the student through the piano class, the method book, the
exercises, the ensembles or some of those “for fun” pieces.
What it does NOT do:
While the V-MT1 quickly and easily prints music scores from a MIDI file (except those including copyright
notices), it is designed primarily for on-screen display to fluently guide and tutor the music learner’s eyes. Its
sequencing functions are limited to the basics one would encounter in a real-time classroom situation, such as
recording a pattern or melody and then playing it for the class. The notation functions are similarly simplified:
recording a tune and displaying it in easily re-sized notation for all the class to visualize. To edit any SMF created
by the Visual Music Tutor, these “after-class” edits can easily be handled by any suitable sequencing or notation
®
program, such as Cakewalk , Finale or Sibelius.
*WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) is an acronym from early computing years when printed documents began
to accurately reflect that of the on-screen display.
Function 1 (F1) the Panel View
F1 is the simple “panel view” that allows users to easily play an SMF. Its transport
controls closely resemble those of a cassette tape player, with a few additional conveniences for music learning. Learning features include: BWD and FWD buttons to
reverse or advance the recording one measure at a time, + and – buttons to allow
simple tempo changes, metronome button for providing a “Professor. Rhythm,” and
transpose button to allow any recording to be played back in any key.
WHY: For simplest playback, most often when students have already learned the piece, this panel view lets learners follow an interactive audio track. This is also suitable for “already fluent readers” who may prefer to follow a
static printed score on the music rack.
HOW: Press F1 (function button #1) or the upper left icon in the menu bar.
33
Operating the VMT-1 (Visual Music Tutor)
Function 2 (F2) the Notation View
F2 is the first “notation view” that will visually guide the student as s/he learns
or plays along with an SMF. This view displays the music notation of any music
file, and can be re-sized in two ways: the actual notehead size can be enlarged or
reduced, and each measure can be made wider or narrower. The V-MT’s visual
component is enhanced further by two guides for the music reader: a bouncing
ball, following the gentle arc of a “conductor” imparts a musical flow: As the
actual notes of the SMF are being played, those notes are indicated in red. The
bouncing ball and these red notes lead the eye along the staff, helping to establish solid reading habits. Further, a userselectable option allows sharps and flats to be displayed in color—another way to continually remind learners of the
key signature.
In this view, one can still access the transport controls—RESET, BWD, FWD; change the TEMPO or TRANSPOSITION;
and mute unwanted TRACKS.
WHY: As new concepts, exercises or tunes are introduced to a class, this window provides the most score options,
as well as the largest notation window—up to four grand staves at one time. One gets the best display when the
active window is maximized. The F2 “moving score” options will visually prompt students to move their eyes
along with music, as well as highlighting the oft-forgotten black keys (sharps or flats) in other colors. This colored
sharp/flat option can be turned off as skills progress.
HOW: Press F2 (function button #2) or the second icon in the upper left corner of the file menu. This window
allows adjustments of tempo, transposition, tracks being played, as well as note size and measure width.
Function 3 (F3) the Rehearsal View
F3 is the “rehearsal view.” While it also contains the transport controls and “animated notation,” the bar graph immediately below the music staff is the important feature. It displays both velocity (dynamics) and duration (note length) of the
SMF recording in a turquoise bar graph; immediately below that bar graph is
another salmon bar graph that displays the user’s performance. A learner or entire
class can now visualize the difference between whole and quarter notes, legato
and staccato touches, and many other musical nuances. It’s also helpful for
advanced students to visually note the dynamic contours of scales, phrases or ornaments.
WHY: This window is particularly helpful to display differences between staccato and legato, as well as dynamic
contours within a musical phrase
HOW: Press F3 (function button #3) or the third icon in the upper left menu bar. You may adjust tempo, transposition, tracks being played, as well as note size and measure width.
34
Operating the VMT-1 (Visual Music Tutor)
Function 4 (F4) the Tone or “Mixer” Window
In addition to all the interactive playback functions—tempo, track mute and transposition, this window allows the learner to focus on one particular track at a time, to
play along, to change timbre, or print out that one part. In addition, the easily used
“mixer” allows users to re-balance the volume levels, re-orchestrate the recording, or
solo any individual part.
WHY: These simple mixing options allow teacher or student to be the “producer” and alter any part of the piano or orchestrated parts. These alterations may illustrate a musical concept, may
highlight a passage, or may be used for an “I wonder how it would sound if…” exploration.
HOW: Press F4 (function button #4) or click on the fourth icon from the left (in the menu bar). In this view, you
may also adjust tempo, transposition, tracks being played, as well as note size and measure width.
For More Information
For additional information about the Visual Music Tutor’s functions, see the accompanying Owner’s Manual. It will
walk you through the functions listed above, plus describe additional tutoring options for all SMFs.
For a brief outline of commonly used functions, refer to the 11 x 17 Survivors Guide. It will cover the most frequently
used operations of this important Music Tutor program.
35
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
When piano teachers begin teaching in groups, they realize a number of differences between private lessons and
“instructing the masses.” Because of this, many articles
and books have been written to describe effective techniques for class teaching. The following annotated bibliography first appeared in the Winter 2001 Roland Keyboard
Educator. It is reprinted by permission.
Group piano instruction is currently experiencing a resurgence of attention in the United States. The opportunities
for group dynamics and peer interaction make group
study an appealing option for the independent teacher.
Benefits include additional time to spend with the students in a group class, incorporating more elements of a
well-rounded musical education in a group setting, and
increased income for the teacher. Group piano is at the
forefront in the field of pedagogy, and the Music Teachers
National Association and Roland Corporation support the
philosophy and tenets of group teaching. MTNA devoted
an entire day of its conference (Pedagogy Saturday March,
1999) to discussions on the topic. Recent articles in keyboard journals and magazines continue to highlight the
changes that continue to occur in the area of group piano.
The purpose of this article is to provide an organized list
of material on the topic of group piano accessible to the
independent teacher. The focus is mainly on materials
published since 1980, although a few older yet still valuable sources have been included due to their timeless
nature. We hope that teachers will find in these materials
new ideas and suggestions for group teaching in their
own studios.
Articles
Allen, Alana. “How I Became a Group Piano Teacher.”
Roland Keyboard Educator Vol. 4, No. 2 (Spring,
2000): pp.4-5.
The shift from teaching privately to heading a studio of nearly 100 students organized into groups is addressed in this report. Beginning with
grouping her students into teams of four, the author expanded her facilities, increased her income, and incorporated technology to support her
growing list of interested clients. Her use of Roland technology is highlighted, and suggestions for obtaining equipment and using
sequencers and computers in the piano study are offered.
Benedict, Michaele. “Try a New Approach.” Clavier Vol.
33, No. 10 (December, 1994): pp.33-34.
With the reduction of arts programs in the schools, group lessons gain
importance as a venue by which a greater number of piano students
can be reached more effectively. Benedict offers thoughts on the value
of extended lesson times, supervised practice sessions, equipment
use, and motivation through a merit system, which can be applied to
the group class.
Bennett, Beulah Varner. “The Group – Ideal for Teaching
Fundamentals.” Clavier Vol. 11, No. 10 (December,
1972): pp.38-41.
This article centers on the idea of using the group class as a place to
build a strong musical foundation for the piano student. Due to the time
limitations of the private lesson and the amount of information to be
covered, the teacher may often omit aspects of a comprehensive musical education that can be incorporated into a longer class period.
These skills include ear training, singing, rhythm drill, orientation of the
keyboard and grand staff, and development of a musical vocabulary of
terms. Each of these areas is isolated and discussed with reference to
appropriate concepts and activities that may be used to strengthen
these specific areas of musical understanding. Ideas show great potential for use by the independent group piano teacher.
Bianchi, Louise. “For Success: Make Your Program
Match Your Group.” Piano Quarterly 101 (Spring,
1978): pp.19-22.
This article should be on every group teacher’s “must read” list. The
information is presented in a question/answer format, with the questions chosen by Bianchi as the most common teacher concerns about
group piano classes. Six areas of concern are met with advice from the
author. The opinions expressed in the answers are honest and helpful,
and explanations are supported by examples from Bianchi’s own experiences.
The opening questions deal with the common concerns of appropriate
grouping and the possible need for periodic regrouping. Bianchi states
her lack of support for regrouping, and instead encourages teachers to
consider restructuring the lessons to meet the needs of the class.
Questions also deal with the frequency of class meetings, preferences
for the combination of group and private lessons, and the most beneficial number of students to have in a piano class. Perhaps the most
informative answer comes to the question, “How long do you continue
with group lessons?” Bianchi answers this with an example from her
teaching experience, which may serve as inspiration to those struggling with the complexities of a class that has been together for a
greater length of time. Numerous reasons are given in this article not
only for using groups in the education of piano students, but also for
continuing those groups in ways that aid the students in becoming
strong, well-rounded musicians.
Burkett, Thomas A. “The Challenge of Group Piano
Teaching and the Rewards.” Music Educators
Journal Vol. 69 (November, 1982): pp.31-33.
The various combinations of private and group lessons that may be
used are approached in this article, with specific attention given to
combinations that may work best for the teacher making the transition
36
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
from private to group teaching. Musicianship classes, repertoire classes, ensemble work, and technique sessions are offered as ways of
blending private and group instruction. Particularly useful is the second
half of the article, which goes into detail concerning the group teaching
skills needed by the effective class teacher. Grouping techniques, lesson organization, understanding the learning process, and leading the
group are all carefully explained. Those teachers looking for information on the beginning steps for developing a group program will want to
read this article.
Carson, Carolyn. “Put a Little Classroom in Your
Teaching.” Clavier Vol. 20, No. 9 (November, 1981):
p.44.
This brief article contains ideas for enhancing group lessons through
motivation, creative activities and studio decoration. A short list of
resources for the classroom teacher is given at the end of the article.
This source serves mainly to start the flow of ideas concerning effective organization of the group studio.
Cheek, Sharon. “Misconceptions About Group
Teaching.” Roland Keyboard Educator Vol. 3, No. 4
(Fall, 1999): pp.8-10, 14.
Nine common misconceptions by parents and teachers are met with
logical and innovative answers in this article. Many of the misconceptions stated are likely to be heard from parents or other teachers at
some point, and knowledge of the facts supporting group piano instruction may be of great use to the independent teacher incorporating
group lessons into the studio. Lack of private attention, varying learning speeds of students, and problems with individual technique are
answered in such a way as to strengthen the argument for the use of
group piano lessons by more and more teachers.
Chronister, Richard. “The Challenge of Group
Teaching.” Clavier Vol.15, No. 8 (October, 1976):
pp.40-42.
Chronister reveals some misconceptions about group piano teaching in
this article. Lack of extensive equipment is dismissed with the following
comment: “A great deal of equipment, including expensive electronic
labs, used badly diminishes the success of the teacher. One piano
used effectively can produce marvelous results.” Instead, the author
places importance on the teacher’s ability to teach a group as a class
and not merely a collection of individuals. Ideas for sightreading, introducing new concepts, repertoire work, and performance opportunities
are offered with special consideration to teaching the class as a cohesive group. Some of the pitfalls of the beginning group teacher may be
allayed by applying Chronister’s ideas.
Chronister, Richard. “Does Group Piano Help You Teach
Reading?” Keyboard Companion (Winter, 1996):
pp.12-16.
Chronister poses a question concerning the link between group piano
study and the development of reading skills, which is answered by
Christopher Hepp and Christine Hicks, Kathy Nafius, and Sue Collier.
Hepp points to specific areas in which group instruction boosts students’ reading skills, including development of the musical area of
reading (utilizing rhythm drills, flashcards, step-skip exercises, etc.)
and a group activity he refers to as tachistoscoping. The second
answer to Chronister’s question is aimed more at the psychological
benefits of group study with additional information given on reading
activities for teams, partners and relay tasks.
Fairchild, Judith A. “Teacher’s Guide to More Effective
Group Piano Study.” Piano Guild Notes (May/June,
1996): pp.4-6.
Despite this article’s limitations due to its adherence to one specific
method, the novice group teacher will appreciate the specific guidelines presented in this outline format. Objectives of beginning piano
study are listed, and the “Ten Positive Aspects of Group Piano” may be
used in extolling the benefits of group study to the parents of your students. Brief plans for ten lessons are given, with the target class being
beginning students (ages 8-10) in one-hour sessions. The scope of
assignments in a group setting, a detailed plan for the first class meeting, and suggestions for musicianship study are examined.
Hardy, Diane. “Group Teaching – A Complete
Preparation.” American Music Teacher
(September/October, 1980): pp.18-19.
A basic introduction to the use of group teaching in the independent
studio is offered with guidelines for pacing, sequencing, discipline, and
activity selection. This particular teacher schedules three private lessons and one group lesson per month for each student. The group
takes place in the early morning, when schedules are open and attention spans are greatest. An itinerary of a sample class includes drill,
ensemble playing, theory games, listening activities, sight-reading, performing, composing and ear training. By presenting the group class as
a privilege for the piano student, teachers may find their students excited about learning important musical concepts.
Jenks, Linda. “Group Piano Techniques for the Private
Teacher.” American Music Teacher Vol. 34, No. 2
(1984): pp.10-14.
Common issues associated with group piano instruction are met in this
article. Included are discussions on classroom management, financial
considerations, areas of teaching focus and varied uses of class piano.
Noteworthy is Jenks’ inclusion of a typical class piano experience,
which takes the reader through an entire class meeting from the arrival
of the students to previewing new assignments. The paragraphs dealing with outfitting a piano lab both encourage group piano for those not
possessing a technological studio, and outline the process through
which teachers may obtain a fully-equipped piano lab.
Johnson, Rebecca. “Group Lessons: They’re Not Just for
Beginners.” Clavier Vol. 20, No. 10 (December,
1981): p.27.
Positive results of group teaching for more advanced students are the
main focus of this article. Many teachers associate group study in
37
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
piano with beginners, but Johnson describes her favorable use of
group instruction with intermediate and advanced students as well. The
benefits of group study to younger students apply equally to older children and youth. Among these benefits, Johnson mentions increased
knowledge of repertoire, development of musicianship, improved listening skills, better technique, increased musical sensitivity and rhythmic
stability, and greater creativity and independence of thought.
Lee, Patricia Taylor. “Making the Most of Your Teaching
Day.” Clavier Vol. 20, No. 8 (October, 1981): pp.5455.
Ideas are presented for incorporating group lessons into the studio as
a supplement to some type of individual teaching or as a replacement
for the private lesson. The discussion of the value of repertoire/theory
classes, partner lessons, and technique/keyboard skills/theory lessons
gives the studio teacher many options to explore in the addition of
group lessons to the private studio. Benefits of group dynamics are listed, and scheduling ideas are also put forth by Lee in a concise, yet
helpful manner.
Loris, Susan. “Creative Ideas for Group Lessons.”
Clavier Vol. 33, No. 4 (April, 1994): pp.37-40.
Inventive ideas for fostering creativity in a group piano setting are given
in this article. Suggestions for tapping into the minds of students are
presented in the areas of theatrical works, rhythm exercises, theory
activities, listening sessions and improvisation activities. Not only are
the ideas proposed, but additional printed sources for use in the classroom are provided in the body of the article. The ideas expressed here
may be used to add excitement and interest to study, thus aiding in
guiding students on the path to becoming a well-rounded musician.
McCain, Claudia J. “From Private to Group Lessons.”
Clavier Vol. 27, No. 4 (April, 1988): pp.40-41.
This article is a real life chronicle of the transition of a teacher from private instruction to group lessons in the private studio. Practical advice
is given from conception of the new program to its realization. Partner
lessons are recommended as a starting point for the teacher unfamiliar
with group ideas, as it limits the number of students that are included,
but incorporates partner games, drills, and to a certain extent, classroom management. In McCain’s studio, partner lessons were combined with a weekly group lesson, and sample schedules are provided
to clarify the important step of time management. Suggestions for facility improvement and lesson content are also given. The author helps
make the process of change from private to group lessons approachable for the independent teacher.
Perdew, Amy, Nadine Cuff, and Karen Johnson. “How
and Why Boise Teachers Became Group Piano
Teachers.” Roland Keyboard Educator Vol. 4, No. 2
(Spring,2000): pp.16-19.
The excitement of group piano teaching is captured here by teachers
who have made the transition from private to group teaching. Each of
the three authors writes insightfully about the concerns and joys asso-
38
ciated with the development and continuation of a group program.
From the inspiration of a group piano workshop through outfitting a studio and scheduling lessons, the teachers illuminate some of the great
joys inherent in teaching piano students in groups. As Perdew states,
“Any time we share an experience with others it becomes more meaningful.”
A teacher’s creativity and teaching skills are tested when leading group
lessons, and the opportunity to teach in groups adds a spark of newness to even the most experienced teacher’s schedule. Classes from
preschool music readiness sessions to adult group lessons are mentioned. Students as well as the teachers find joy in studying piano with
others, and avenues for expression and motivation which may not be
as accessible in private study are opened.
Rowe, Charlotte. “Class Piano Lessons After 30 Good
Years.” Clavier Vol.38 (January999): pp.6-7.
This short article chronicles one teacher’s switch from private to group
teaching 30 years ago. The positive results of this transition will serve
as inspiration for those considering such a switch in their own studio.
The registration process, scheduling, fees and makeup lessons are
explained with ease in a way that can be utilized by other teachers.
Lesson content is approached, including work in technique, theory,
sightreading, repertoire and improvisation.
Stevens, Kay. “Interaction: The Hidden Key to Success
in Group Piano Teaching.” International Journal of
Music Education Vol.13 (1989): pp.3-10.
Interaction at a level perhaps only possible in a group class is the
focus of this article. The benefits of such interaction include motivation,
social acceptance, “peer learning,” cooperation and acclimation to performance situations. The various levels of interaction in a group class
are measured in this study, and combinations of teacher and student
talk, teacher and student demonstration, and musical responsiveness
are examined. Understanding of the various types of communication
and levels of learning occurring in the group piano studio may be
gained through study of the results of this research project.
Books
Agay, Denes, ed. Teaching Piano: A Comprehensive Guide
and Reference Book for the Instructor. New York:
Yorktown Music Press Inc., 1982.
Volume I of this two-volume set includes an article by Hazel Ghazarian
Skaggs entitled “Group Piano Teaching.” In this article, Skaggs lists
ideas for team teaching, a course of study and activities for group
piano lessons, games/rewards appropriate for groups, discipline, and
studio equipment for the group classroom. Good lists of the advantages and disadvantages of group study and positive and negative
aspects for the teacher are given in the article as well.
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
Bastien, James W. How to Teach Piano Successfully, 3rd
ed. San Diego, CA: Neil A. Kjos Music Co., 1995.
This pedagogy text presents what is perhaps the most comprehensive
information available about group piano study. Taken into account are
multiple levels of group study, issues pertaining to the group environment and student involvement, and examples illustrating the many
points made by Bastien. A few chapters in particular focus on the group
process. The pages that are the most valuable references for group
teachers are pp. 15-16, 30-31, and 82-94.
Pages 15-16 list some considerations for those wanting to teach piano
in groups. The questions are intended to provoke thought for the
potential group teacher. The teacher is queried as to his or her desire
to work with groups of children, ability to organize activities, skill in
developing interest in group learning, and belief that students will learn
as much in a group setting as they would in private study.
Scheduling issues are explored on pages 30-31. Combination group
and private lessons as well as small and large group lessons are
explored as viable options in the independent studio. Sample grids
illustrate hypothetical time and space arrangements for the studio offering group lessons.
In addition to information on class size, group activities and equipment,
Bastien includes a section on music readiness, and invites consideration of yet another possible group class in the piano studio. General
music concepts such as the musical alphabet, rhythm, and high and
low may be taught prior to serious concentration on the physical
aspects specific to piano playing. With this solid foundation of musical
knowledge, students may progress more quickly through the beginning
stages of piano study. In addition, exposure to the group setting in the
form of a music readiness class aids in the adaptation of a student to a
group class in piano. Photographs illustrate the activities and use of
equipment in a group piano studio.
Clark, Frances. Questions and Answers: Practical Advice
for Piano Teachers. Northfield, IL: The
Instrumentalist Co., 1992.
Clark addresses the subject of teaching methods in her well-known format of questions and answers in this noteworthy book (pages 183190). Questions posed by teachers range from the topic of group study
versus private to discussion of disruptive students in a class setting to
repertoire classes as a supplement for private piano lessons.
Enoch, Yvonne. Group Piano Teaching. London: Oxford
University Press, 1974.
Enoch’s chapter on planning the piano group covers the reasoning
behind group teaching, the number of pianos and students that are
ideal in a group, the number and length of lessons, classroom arrangement, preparation for teaching group piano, and the importance of
parental reports. Another chapter that may prove inspirational to the
group piano teacher is chapter eight, in which the author offers hints
and information to other teachers. This checklist is worth reading frequently, because it contains a number of items for teachers to remember or consider in group teaching. Many of these items are second
nature to the group teacher, but others may need constant notice and
work in order to become incorporated in the techniques of the teacher.
Some parts of this book are rather dated. For instance, a disclaimer
from the author at the beginning states that she stopped using dummy
keyboards since first printing of the book, even though they are promoted as a good teaching tool in the text. Also, chapters covering content of the first lesson, first term, first year and beyond focus on one
specific sequencing, which may not coincide with other teachers’
philosophies.
Kowalchyk, Gayle and E. L. Lancaster. Alfred’s Basic
Piano Library: Group Piano Course, Teacher’s
Handbook, Books 1-2. Van Nuys, CA: Alfred
Publishing Co., Inc., 1997.
Kowalchyk and Lancaster provide a course specifically designed for
group piano instruction. To be noted here is the eight-page supplement
in the front of the teacher handbook aimed at dealing with practical
issues of group teaching. This same supplement may be found in the
front of the teacher handbook to books 3-4 of this series as well.
General information concerning advantages of group teaching (a list of
sixteen items), types of groups, equipment needs for large and small
groups, the process of grouping students, and scheduling lessons is
useful to the independent teacher. Teachers may find the lesson planning segment especially valuable due to its focus on organizing the
lesson, classroom management, effective teaching techniques and
effective use of technology. The classroom management portion, in
particular, emphasizes suggestions for the teacher including the importance of eye contact, benefits of specific feedback, proper balance of
talking and playing, inclusion of every student, use of humor, and the
need for variety in student tasks. Effective teaching techniques applicable to specific areas like new concepts, ear training, technique, rhythm
drills, composition and improvisation, sight reading, and ensemble
work direct the teacher’s focus in appropriate and creative ways.
Lyke, James, Yvonne Enoch, and Geoffrey Haydon.
Creative Piano Teaching, 3rd ed. Champaign, IL:
Stipes Publishing Co., 1996.
Chapter four of Creative Piano Teaching is an essay by James Lyke
addressing the issue of private, group, or a combination of both in
piano study. Common falsehoods discouraging teachers from teaching
in groups such as lack of equipment and emphasis on keyboard skills
above performance are addressed and explained. Basic equipment for
group teaching is listed in the chapter, and independent teachers may
be surprised at the uncomplicated setting in which group piano may be
taught effectively. Lyke’s list of essentials for a working group teaching
situation is worth study by the teacher. Grouping, teaching without
“telling,” and modeling are among the items isolated by the author as
necessities for a well-run group piano class.
The combination approach to piano teaching where private lessons are
supplemented with musicianship classes is given consideration as well.
Specific guidelines for planning lessons with proper sequencing and
content are precise yet helpful to the group teacher. A sample pre-print-
39
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
ed planning form is found at the end of the chapter.
Mehr, Norman. Group Piano Teaching. Evanston, IL:
Summy-Birchard Co., 1965.
This practical handbook for the group teacher approaches group study
on a philosophical and educational level. The first chapter, “The
Dynamics of Group Teaching,” explores the variables at work in group
interaction. Chapter two, “Philosophy and Psychology of Music
Education,” presents general concepts of learning theory and process.
Important ideas concern the need to focus not only on the music but
also on the child, and the inherent ability present in every child.
Implications for group teaching involve the setting of standards and
sequencing of concepts. Chapter three presents a short list of do’s for
the group piano teacher.
Proceedings from Pedagogy Saturday III. Los Angeles,
CA: MTNA National Conference, March 20, 1999.
Available from MTNA.
The topic of MTNA Pedagogy Saturday III, “Three or More: Beyond the
Traditional Private Lesson,” echoes the emphasis on group teaching in
the field of pedagogy. More than 150 moderators and panelists contributed teaching ideas that reach beyond the private studio. Texts of
the speakers’ and panelists’ presentations along with reports of the
panel discussions are presented here and display the gamut of pedagogical thinking presently at work in the area of group teaching.
The four chapters in the volume cover “three or more” teaching, pedagogical and practical advantages of group instruction, necessary teaching skills for group teaching, and ways in which teachers may acquire
these necessary skills. Necessary skills discussed by the distinguished
panelists encompass basic psychological principles, group dynamics,
language, lesson design and assessment, learning styles, and personality profiles. Workshop attendance and membership in professional
organizations are two highly recommended ways in which teachers
may acquire effective group teaching skills.
Robinson, Helene and Richard L. Jarvis, ed. Teaching
Piano in Classroom and Studio. Washington:
MENC, 1967.
Despite its publication date, this resource from Music Educators
National Conference is one of the most insightful in terms of philosophy, group management, and principles of good teaching. Some segments of the book deal with group piano in the public schools, but
many others are directly applicable to group piano in the independent
studio. Five chapters in particular warrant consideration by the group
teacher.
Chapter one addresses the educational significance of piano study.
Basic philosophical foundations of group instruction are introduced and
explained. The aesthetics of music study are also included in this chapter, which may help the beginning group teacher to convince parents of
the value of group instruction.
Chapter two contains a fabulous list of advantages of group piano
study from an educational viewpoint. Social factors, creative activity
40
and ensemble experience are all listed as virtues of the group piano
class. A concluding paragraph in the chapter links these advantages
with recommendations for teachers and parents.
Chapter four examines the qualifications of a good piano class teacher.
Knowledge of the subject, ability to organize the subject, understanding of people and some distinct personal characteristics are identified
by the authors as important points for the effective teacher. As the
authors emphasize, however, some areas of competency may be
stronger than others, and group teachers may do a fine job with small
weaknesses in certain areas.
Strong recommendations should be made for study of the principles of
good piano teaching found in chapter six. Twenty-one principles are
listed, and as a group they define the basic tenets of music education
and education in general. Among the notable inclusions are the following ideas:
“Ask, rather than tell.”
“Give experience before rules whenever possible.”
“Relate new material to the familiar.”
“Introduce only one or two new kinds of learning at a time.”
Chapter eight encourages teacher flexibility and conviction in good
group management. Following segments address sightreading, technique and interpretation of piano literature in the group class. Appendix
B does a fine job of giving advice to parents on their involvement in
their child’s musical education.
Thompson, John et al. Teaching Piano in Classes: Expert
Opinions, Plans, and Advice for Practical Teachers.
Philadelphia, PA: Theodore Presser Co, 1932.
This 78-page booklet contains contributions from ten leading pedagogues of the 1930s. Despite its publication date, this resource contains pertinent information on a variety of topics concerning group
instruction. Of particular interest are articles by John Thompson (“How
to Make the Most of Class Piano Teaching”), Hope Kammerer (“The
Piano Class Teacher and the Parent”), Caroline Groll-Verhoeff (“Piano
Instruction Problems Solved Through Experience”), Mary Bush Hauck
(“Planning a Practical Piano Class”), and Addye Yeargain Hall (“The
Conduct of the Piano Class”).
In his chapter, John Thompson provides the reader with an overview of
attributes and skills necessary for a good group piano teacher, among
them a background of knowledge in educational psychology, pedagogy
and various methods. Kammerer addresses the parental role in the
group lesson, with emphasis on parents’ “homework” and the help that
parents can give in the lesson and in the home. Groll-Verhoeff writes of
her transition from being a studio teacher to becoming a group teacher,
incorporating ideas about equipment, studio space and classroom
rules that may be of use to the group pedagogue. Hauck lists advantages of class instruction, along with ideas for the number of students
in a class, length of the lesson, a model for the development of a group
lesson and some particularly interesting general remarks. Hall discusses the teacher’s role as the conductor of the musical growth of the
class.
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
Dissertations and Theses
Diehl, Lily Pan. An Investigation of the Relative
Effectiveness of Group and Individual Piano
Instruction on Young Beginners in an Independent
Music Studio Utilizing an Electropiano Laboratory.
D.M.A. diss., University of Southern California,
1980.
This research study focuses on the effects of group and individual
piano instruction on musical achievement for piano students ranging
from the ages of six and a half to nine and a half. Five aspects of musical achievement were measured, including aural discrimination, knowledge of musical symbols, public performance, sightreading and transposition. Out of these five skills, the results in four categories were constant between private and group study. In sightreading, however, the
author found a significantly higher level of performance in the students
who received piano instruction in groups. Students of the age of eight
who studied in groups scored even higher than their private study
counterparts in the sightreading portion of the research. In addition,
males who studied in groups achieved a significant difference in the
category of public performance. This data may serve to direct the independent teacher toward group instruction, with particular emphasis on
the development of sightreading skills.
Magrath, Dorothy Jane. An Approach to the Teaching of
Theory/Musicianship Classes for the Pre-College
Pianist as a Supplement to Private Instruction.
D.M. diss., Northwestern University, 1982.
Emphasis on developing basic musical understanding beyond that
required to play a given piano piece is the focus in this dissertation.
Spiral learning, in which concepts are transferred from the piece in
which they were first encountered to other works, is advocated through
classes supplementing private piano lessons. A thorough integration of
concepts encompassing style, theory, analysis and aural awareness is
recommended.
Valuable sources contained in this dissertation include learning objectives, a curriculum and suggestions for teaching the previously mentioned concepts. Procedures and appropriate materials for attainment
of these objectives are proposed. Textbooks and workbooks that may
be useful to the teacher in a group setting are listed in one of the
appendices.
Rogers, William Forrest. The Effect of Group and
Individual Piano Instruction on Selected Aspects of
Musical Achievement. Ed.D. diss., Columbia
University, 1974.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different
modes of instruction on student achievement levels. Rogers measured
the students’ abilities in aural discrimination, knowledge of musical
symbols, sightreading, transposition and improvisation before and after
the period of study. Sixty-four students aged 7-9 participated in the
study, which took place in a school in Harlem, New York.
Results of the study indicated the group students tested higher in all
five areas of ability than their counterparts who had private instruction.
This may be attributed to several factors, including teacher training,
peer interaction, supervised practice and more instructional time for the
group piano students. Conclusions of the study focus on the greater
achievement levels of the group students; no measurable difference
was found in students of varying sex or age. An interesting point to
note is that participating teachers having experience in both group and
private methods unanimously favored group piano over the more traditional private instructional approach.
Shender, Marie. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a
Group Piano Program using Electronic Keyboard
and Computer Technology. Ed.D. diss, Columbia
Teachers College, 1998.
This study identifies the educational benefits and drawbacks of a sample group piano program through feedback from students, parents and
teachers associated with the program. Parents reported musical
growth through the program, and students expressed enjoyment of
group activities involving piano lessons, group songs and use of other
instruments. High motivation was cited as a benefit, while lack of individualized attention was mentioned as a problem. Competition
between students was regarded as healthy because it encouraged students to progress more quickly. Advantages and disadvantages of
group instruction are discussed, with recommendations given for students, parents and teachers taking part in piano classes. Integration of
technology into the group piano classroom is cited as a benefit, and
exposure to musical software in the home is also linked to increased
musical growth by the student.
Skiba, Marlene. Foundations of Group Piano for the
Independent Teacher. M.A. thesis, Northeastern
Illinois University, 1988.
Three main aspects of group teaching are discussed in this scholarly
yet accessible work. Group dynamics, the history of group learning and
a methodology for developing an effective group program in the private
studio serve as the headings for the three sections. Chapters 1-3 focus
on understanding the cognitive process, behavioral patterns and ways
in which the group teacher can channel competitive and cooperative
personalities to provide a conducive learning environment for the students. A great deal of historical background is included in this section.
The author deals with the task of explaining the role of the group and
the individual’s functions within an educational setting. Group cohesiveness is given careful consideration.
Chapters 4-6 contain an overview of the history of group learning. The
results of a statistical survey of members of the Illinois State Music
Teachers Association are given, and the interpretation of these results
is given at a later point in the thesis. A difference in the profiles of the
private and group teacher in the independent studio present points to
ponder. For instance, results indicate that group teachers tend to be
more schooled in the areas of psychology, child development, group
teaching and improvisation. They are more likely to have a teaching
studio outside of the home, and also may own more teaching aids than
the private teacher. Group teachers tend to be more innovative, more
achievement-oriented and more interested in group activities in all
41
Annotated Group Teaching Bibliography
areas of their lives. They incorporate more musicianship classes,
improvisation, accompanying, harmonization, ensemble work, theory
and ear training into their lessons than does the typical private teacher.
The last section covers almost every notable facet of group instruction
of interest to the independent teacher. Topics range from the teacher’s
personal qualifications to forming and maintaining groups of piano students. Many questions may be answered in this informative third section of Skiba’s thesis.
Additional References
Bradley, J. “Ideas for Great Group Piano Classes.”
American Suzuki Journal Vol.23, No. 3 (1995): pp.3637.
Lee, J. “Group Piano Lessons: A Practical Guide.” Music
Teacher Vol.60 (October, 1981): p.24.
Rose-Joubert, M. “Group Piano Teaching: The Other
Side of the Coin – A Personal Experience.” ISME
(1990): pp.204-207.
Williams, Roderick Rockhill. Group Piano Instruction:
Its Relationship to Private Piano Teaching. Ph.D.
diss., Columbia Pacific University, 1990.
42
Appendix
Installing the USB MIDISport Interface
Because the Virtual MTLC-16 software connects the serial port of the computer with the serial port on the MTLC-16 to
synchronize the software and hardware, it is essential that you connect the computer with the teacher's keyboard via a
suitable MIDI interface. Since the serial port is already occupied, the practical options are either the parallel (printer) or
the USB port. It is strongly recommended that you use the USB port, so you can use the parallel port for printing tasks
in your music lab. The Midiman USB MIDISPORT 2X2 interface is recommended, is self-powered, and installs easily. It
provides 2 IN and 2 OUT ports, handling all the MTLC/V-MT needs, as well as allowing room for some expansion at a
later date.
HARDWARE installation:
(On a PC: You must be running Windows 98 to properly use the MIDISport )
1) Attach the MIDISport to your USB port with the standard USB cable included with the MIDISport package.
2) A computer USB port is a small (1/8" x 3/8"), rectangular female connector, sometimes found in pairs.
3) Insert the male end of the USB cable into the USB port on the back of your computer.
4) Take the six-sided end of the USB cable and plug it in to the USB port on the back panel of the MIDISPORT.
This male end of your USB cable is almost square (1/4" x 1/4") and should fit into the female USB connector of
your MIDISport.
5) Power up your computer so you can install the software drivers.
SOFTWARE Installation
1) For the hardware to communicate with the software, you need to install the "drivers." A software driver is a
special, dedicated program that makes a MIDI interface accessible to a software application.
2) The complete instructions are included in a "Read Me" file included on the MIDISport CD-ROM. Read it carefully; the following text is a brief overview of the procedure.
3) Double click on the filename to open it. It will guide you through the instructions to properly install your driver software.
4) For complete installation instructions, you may also go to the website:
http://www.midiman.com/manuals/pdf/usb2x2man.pdf
CONNECTING the COMPUTER to the TEACHER KEYBOARD
1) Connect the MIDISport 2X2 to the computer via the USB port, using the cables provided
2) Connect the MIDI OUT of the teacher keyboard to the Input-A of the MIDISport with a MIDI cable of appropriate length; the shorter the better for this application.
3) Then connect Output-A of the MIDISport 2x2 to the MIDI IN of the teacher keyboard
4) Another MIDI OUT–Output-B—can be connected to additional keyboards or sound modules
5) Another MIDI IN–Input B—can be connected to an additional controller
IMPORTANT NOTE: To use the MIDISport, the USB/MIDI Thru switch should be in the IN position, so the MIDISport
will work as a MIDI interface
43
Appendix
Using the MIDISport with your MTLC-16
1) After the MIDISPORT driver has been installed, you will need to select that interface in the Visual Music Tutor
(V-MT1) software.
2) Open the V-MT1 software and navigate the File menu until you see the Options menu
3) Use the Options menu to pull down the Connection Setup option
4) Then proceed with the selection until you have selected the INput as MIDISport 2X2 and the OUTput as
MIDISport 2X2, taking care to select the options that correlate with the MIDI cables and connections that you
have made
5) Now you can record class examples, print them out, as well as illustrating touch and duration in the Rehearsal
window (F3)
44
Appendix
JLCooper Electronics Limited Factory Warranty
JLCooper Electronics (“JLCooper”) warrants this product to be free of defects in materials or workmanship for a period of 12
months from the date of purchase.
This warranty is non-transferable and the benefits apply to the original owner. Proof of purchase in the form of an itemized
sales receipt is required for warranty coverage.
To receive service under this warranty, customers in the United States should contact the JLCooper factory at (310) 322-9990
and talk to a service technician.
If necessary, a Return Authorization number may be issued.
For our customers outside the United States, it is recommended that you first contact your Dealer or Distributor, since they
may offer their own service or support policy.
If local support is not obtainable, please send a FAX to JLCooper’s Service Department at (310) 335-0110, with a detailed
description of the service required.
Upon issuance of return authorization, the product should be properly packed and shipped to Service Department, JLCooper
Electronics, 142 Arena St., El Segundo, CA 90245.
Please include the following: copy of the sales receipt, your name and address (no P.O. Boxes, please), a brief description of the
problem, and any other related items discussed with the service department and considered necessary to evaluate the product
or effect a repair. The return authorization number must be clearly written on the outside of the package.
JLCooper will, without charge for parts or labor, either repair or replace the defective part(s). Shipping costs are not covered
by this warranty.
JLCooper’s normal repair turn around time at the factory is approximately 15 business days, from receipt of product to shipping. Your actual turn around time will include return shipping.
Actual turn around time will vary depending upon many factors including the repeatability of the customer’s reported complaint, the availability of parts required for repair, the availability of related products needed to evaluate the product if necessary.
Priority services are available. These should be discussed with the service technician at the time the return authorization is
issued.
This warranty provides only the benefits specified and does not cover defects or repairs needed as result of acts beyond the
control of JLCooper including but not limited to: abuse, damage by accident/negligence, modification, alteration, improper
use, unauthorized servicing, tampering, or failure to operate in accordance with the procedures outlined in the owner’s manual; nor for acts of God such as flooding, lightning, tornadoes, etc.
THE DURATION OF ANY OTHER WARRANTIES, WHETHER IMPLIED OR EXPRESS, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, IS LIMITED TO THE DURATION OF THE
EXPRESS WARRANTY HEREIN. JLCOOPER HEREBY EXCLUDES INCIDENTAL AND CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO: LOSS OF TIME, INCONVENIENCE, DELAY IN PERFORMANCE OF THIS WARRANTY, THE LOSS OF USE OF THE PRODUCT OR COMMERCIAL LOSS, AND FOR
BREACH OF ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, APPLICABLE TO THIS PRODUCT. JLCOOPER SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES OR LOSS RESULTING FROM THE NEGLIGENT OR
INTENTIONAL ACTS OF THE SHIPPER OR HIS CONTRACT AFFILIATES. THE CUSTOMER SHOULD CONTACT THE SHIPPER FOR PROPER CLAIMS PROCEDURES IN THE EVENT OF DAMAGE OR LOSS RESULTING FROM SHIPMENT.
45
®ÂØÒňΠ®
MTLC-16
Music Tutor Lab Controller
Owner’s Manual
and User’s Guide
®ÂØÒňÎ
®
Roland Corporation U.S., 5100 S. Eastern Avenue, Los Angeles CA 90040-2936
www.rolandus.com
2944US
Copyright © 2001 ROLAND CORPORATION
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without
the written permission of ROLAND CORPORATION.