About Your AirPort Card

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
About Your AirPort Card
Includes information about
the AirPort Card and AirPort software
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About Your AirPort Card
With the AirPort Card installed in your computer, you can do the following:
m Access an AirPort network at home, school, or work and use it to browse the Internet,
send and receive email, and more.
m Set up a Computer-to-Computer network between two or more AirPort-equipped
computers, which you can use to transfer files or play multiplayer games.
Set up an AirPort network using an AirPort Base Station, available from your Apple-authorized
dealer or the Apple Store at store.apple.com
Important If you purchased the AirPort Base Station at the same time as your AirPort Card,
install the AirPort Card and then set up the AirPort Base Station using the instructions
provided with the base station. The AirPort Setup Assistant described in this booklet is the
same one used to set up the AirPort Base Station. To set up the AirPort Base Station and
configure your computer to access the AirPort network it creates, you only need to use the
AirPort Setup Assistant once.
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About AirPort
AirPort technology offers a simple, fast, and affordable way to provide wireless Internet
access anywhere in your home, classroom, or small office. Instead of using traditional cables
to create a network, AirPort uses wireless local area network (LAN) technology to provide
wireless communication between computers.
How AirPort Works
In a traditional network, computers are connected through a series of wires that transfer
information among them. With AirPort, data is transferred between computers over a
wireless network using radio waves.
There are two ways to create a wireless network. You can use an AirPort-equipped computer
to create a temporary Computer-to-Computer network, which other AirPort computers
within range can join. Or you can create a more permanent wireless network using a base
station. In this kind of network, all wireless communication goes through the base station to
other computers on the network or to the Internet.
How AirPort Provides Wireless Internet Access
The following are ways that you can use AirPort technology to provide Internet access to
AirPort-equipped computers:
m Connect an AirPort Base Station (available from your Apple-authorized dealer or the Apple
Store at store.apple.com) to an existing network that already has Internet access, such as
in a school or small office.
m Connect a telephone line, cable modem, or DSL modem to an AirPort Base Station. The
AirPort Base Station establishes an Internet connection and also creates a wireless
network through which multiple computers can access the Internet.
Note: To use AirPort to access the Internet, you must have an account with an Internet
service provider (fees may apply). Some Internet service providers (ISPs) are not currently
compatible with AirPort. Though some ISP accounts that use connection scripts or terminal
login windows are not supported, certain AirPort-compatible connection scripts have been
provided and can be selected in the AirPort Setup Assistant or AirPort Admin Utility.
For more information on using AirPort with your Internet account, contact your ISP or go to
the AppleCare Knowledge Base at kbase.info.apple.com
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Setting Up Your Computer to Use AirPort
Step 1: Do You Need to Install the AirPort Card?
If you ordered your AirPort Card with your new computer, the AirPort Card is already
installed. If the AirPort Card came in a separate kit, you need to install it yourself. Instructions
for installing the AirPort Card are in the manual that came with your computer. You can also
find them on the Apple Support Web site at www.apple.com/support
The AirPort Card is not a standard PC Card. If you are installing an AirPort Card in a
PowerBook computer, follow the installation instructions in the manual that came with your
PowerBook. Don’t install the AirPort Card in your PowerBook’s PC Card slot.
The AirPort Card has been designed so that you can install it yourself. If, after
reading the instructions, you feel uncomfortable about installing the card, you can have an
Apple-authorized service provider install it for you. If you follow the instructions, you
should not be concerned about damaging your computer. However, if you do attempt to
install the AirPort Card yourself, any damage you may cause to your equipment will not be
covered by the limited warranty on your computer. See an Apple-authorized dealer or
service provider for additional information about this or any other warranty question.
Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions
on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for service.
Warning
Do I need to know the AirPort ID of my AirPort Card?
If you are going to use your computer on a large AirPort network, such as in a school or
office, you may need to provide the AirPort ID (sometimes known as the MAC address) of
your AirPort Card to your network administrator. Your network administrator can use the
AirPort ID to provide an extra level of security for the network. The AirPort ID is 12
characters printed on a label on the AirPort Card. You can also find your AirPort ID this way:
m In Mac OS X, choose AirPort from the Configure pop-up menu of the Network pane of
System Preferences, and click the AirPort tab.
m In Mac OS 9, open the AirPort application, located in the AirPort folder in the Apple Extras
folder, inside the Applications (Mac OS 9) folder on your hard disk. Then click the
Settings arrow.
Do I need to install an AirPort antenna?
No. The antenna used by the AirPort Card is already built into your computer.
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Step 2: If Necessary, Set Up the AirPort Base Station
If you purchased the AirPort Base Station at the same time as your AirPort Card, do the
following:
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Install the AirPort Card in your computer.
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Skip the rest of the steps in this booklet and set up the AirPort Base Station using the
instructions provided with the base station.
The AirPort Setup Assistant described in the next step is the same one used to set up the
AirPort Base Station. To set up the AirPort Base Station and configure your computer to
access the AirPort network, you only need to use the AirPort Setup Assistant once.
Step 3: Set Up Your Computer to Use AirPort
If you are going to use your computer with an AirPort network that is already established
(such as in a school or office), do the following:
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Install the AirPort software using the CD provided with the AirPort Card.
m If you ordered the AirPort Card with your new computer, the AirPort software is already
installed. You may not have a separate AirPort CD.
Note: To make sure that your computer has the latest version of the AirPort software
installed, check the Apple AirPort Web site at www.apple.com/airport
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Open the AirPort Setup Assistant, located in the Utilities folder, in the Applications folder on
your hard disk in Mac OS X. In Mac OS 9, the Setup Assistant is located in the AirPort folder
in the Apple Extras folder, inside the Applications (Mac OS 9) folder on your hard disk. Select
“Set up your computer to join an existing AirPort network” to configure your computer to
access an existing AirPort network.
If an error message says the AirPort Card is not detected:
m Shut down your computer and make sure the AirPort Card is oriented properly and that it
is completely inserted into the AirPort Card slot. Make sure the AirPort antenna is securely
connected to the card and the connector on the other end of the card is firmly inserted
into the connector in the AirPort Card slot.
If you are unable to detect the network you want to connect to:
m Make sure that you are in range of an AirPort Base Station. The typical range for AirPort
communication is up to 50 meters (168 feet) in any direction from the base station.
m Try to move away from possible sources of interference, such as microwave ovens and
metal walls, that may be preventing you from connecting to the network. For a complete
list of sources of interference, see the document “Designing AirPort Networks 2,” located
on the AirPort software CD for Mac OS X, and in the AirPort folder in the Apple Extras
folder, inside the Applications (Mac OS 9) folder on your hard disk in Mac OS 9.
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Step 4: Join a Wireless Network
To join an AirPort wireless network in Mac OS X, choose a network from the AirPort status
icon in the menu bar. In Mac OS 9, choose a network from the AirPort Control Strip module.
If you are joining a closed network, enter the password to the network.
Joining a 128-Bit Encrypted Wireless Network
If you want to join a wireless network that requires 128-bit encryption, you have two options
for entering a password, depending on the password scheme the network administrator has
set up.
If you were given a password that is 13 characters, use double quotation marks before and
after the password. Thirteen-character passwords are usually case-sensitive.
Example: "password12345"
If you were given a password that is 26 characters, put a dollar sign ($) before the password.
Example: $12345678901234567890abcdef
If you need additional information on your 128-bit password, contact your network
administrator.
Setting Up a Wireless Network With Your Computer
If you create a Computer-to-Computer wireless network or set up your computer to be a
software base station, by default AirPort uses 40-bit encryption when you use a password to
protect your network. Computers with 128-bit cards access the network using 40-bit
encryption. If you want to require 128-bit encryption on your network, use the 128-bit
password scheme of 13 characters in double quotation marks. Only computers with 128-bit
cards can join your network.
Software base stations are not supported in Mac OS X.
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What’s Next?
Additional AirPort Software
In addition to the AirPort Setup Assistant, you can use the following software to work
with AirPort.
In Mac OS X
AirPort Admin Utility
The AirPort Admin Utility, located in the Utilities folder inside the
Applications folder, is an advanced tool used to set up and manage
the AirPort Base Station. Use the AirPort Admin Utility to adjust
network, routing, and security settings, and other advanced options.
AirPort status icon in the menu bar
Use the AirPort status icon to switch quickly between AirPort
networks, monitor the signal quality of the current network, and
turn AirPort on and off.
In Mac OS 9
AirPort
Use the AirPort application, located in the Apple (K) menu, to switch
between AirPort networks, connect and disconnect your AirPort Base
Station from the Internet, set up a Computer-to-Computer network,
and adjust settings for an AirPort software base station.
AirPort Admin Utility
The AirPort Admin Utility, located in the AirPort folder inside the
Apple Extras folder, is an advanced tool used to set up and manage
the AirPort Base Station. Use the AirPort Admin Utility to adjust
network, routing, and security settings, and other advanced options.
AirPort Control Strip module
You can use the Control Strip to switch quickly between AirPort
networks, monitor the signal quality of the current network, and
turn AirPort on and off.
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For more information on AirPort, see AirPort Help in the Help Center, available in the Help
menu. There you will find information on setting up an AirPort network using an AirPort Base
Station, editing base station settings, avoiding sources of interference, locating additional
information on the Internet, and more.
For information on specific items in any of the AirPort applications, choose Show Balloons
from the Help menu. Then point to the item that interests you.
For in-depth information on configuring AirPort networks, see the “Designing AirPort
Networks 2” document, located in the AirPort folder inside the Apple Extras folder on your
hard disk in Mac OS 9, or on the CD that came with your AirPort Card.
In addition to AirPort Help, Balloon Help, and “Designing AirPort Networks 2,” you can find
more information at the following Apple Web sites:
m The Apple AirPort Web site at www.apple.com/airport
m The Apple Support Web site at www.apple.com/support
AirPort Card Specifications
m Wireless Data Rate: Up to 11 megabits per second (Mbps)
m Range: Up to 50 meters (168 feet) radius from the base station in typical indoor use
(varies with building)
m Frequency Band: 2.4 gigahertz (GHz)
m Radio Output Power: 15 dbm (nominal)
m Standards: Compliant with 802.11 HR Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS)
11 Mbps standard and 802.11 DSSS 1 and 2 Mbps standard
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Communications Regulation Information
FCC Declaration of Conformity
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This
device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation. See instructions if interference to radio or television reception is
suspected.
Radio and Television Interference
The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not
installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with
radio and television reception.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with
the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection
against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur
in a particular installation.
You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops,
it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices.
If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by
using one or more of the following measures:
m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.
m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio.
m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio.
m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain
the computer and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)
If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support information that
came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for additional suggestions.
Important Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the FCC
Certification and negate your authority to operate the product.
This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple peripheral devices and
Apple shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use Apple peripheral
devices and shielded cables and connectors between system components to reduce the possibility of causing
interference to radios, television sets, and other electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the
proper shielded cables and connectors through an Apple-authorized dealer. For non-Apple peripheral devices,
contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance.
Responsible party (contact for FCC matters only): Apple Computer, Inc., Product Compliance,
1 Infinite Loop M/S 26-A, Cupertino, CA 95014-2084, 408-974-2000.
Exposure to Radio Frequency Energy
The radiated output power of the optional AirPort Card is far below the FCC radio frequency exposure limits.
Nevertheless, it is advised to use the wireless equipment in such a manner that the potential for human contact
during normal operation is minimized.
Industry Canada Statement
This Class B device meets all requirements of the Canadian interference-causing equipment regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la Class B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur
du Canada.
Europe–EU Declaration of Conformity
This device complies with the specifications ETS 300 328 and ETS 300 826, following the provisions of the EMC
Directive 89/336/EEC.
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© 2001 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved.
AirPort, Apple, the Apple logo, Mac, and PowerBook are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.
Apple Store and Balloon Help are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.
034-2009-A
Printed in Taiwan