Compaq AlphaServer GS60E Installation guide

AlphaServer GS60E and GS140
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Order Number: EK-TUNLP-SF. B01
This document describes the hardware configuration rules and
the console firmware commands and environment variable settings needed to run multiple instances of an operating system on
Compaq AlphaServer GS60E and GS140 systems.
Compaq Computer Corporation
Second Printing, August 1999
The information in this publication is subject to change without notice.
COMPAQ COMPUTER CORPORATION SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR TECHNICAL OR EDITORIAL ERRORS OR OMISSIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, NOR FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES RESULTING FROM THE FURNISHING, PERFORMANCE, OR USE
OF THIS MATERIAL.
This publication contains information protected by copyright. No part of this publication may be photocopied or reproduced in any form without prior written consent from Compaq Computer Corporation.
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© 1999 Compaq Computer Corporation.
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Corporation. Alpha, AlphaServer, OpenVMS, and StorageWorks are registered in the U.S Patent and
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Corporation. UNIX is a registered trademark in the U.S. and other countries, licensed exclusively
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respective companies.
FCC Notice: The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency
energy. The equipment has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against
such radio frequency interference. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause interference in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be
required to correct the interference. Any modifications to this device—unless expressly approved by
the manufacturer—can void the user’s authority to operate this equipment under part 15 of the FCC
rules.
Shielded Cables: If shielded cables have been supplied or specified, they must be used on the system
in order to maintain international regulatory compliance.
Warning! This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
Achtung! Dieses ist ein Gerät der Funkstörgrenzwertklasse A. In Wohnbereichen können bei Betrieb
dieses Gerätes Rundfunkstörungen auftreten, in welchen Fällen der Benutzer für entsprechende Gegenmaßnahmen verantwortlich ist.
Attention! Ceci est un produit de Classe A. Dans un environnement domestique, ce produit risque de
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Contents
Preface
Chapter 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1-2
1-4
1-6
Configuration Rules
Overview of Configuration Requirements
Example of a Partitioned GS60E System
Example of a Partitioned GS140 System
Module Configuration
Memory Allocation
Two Partitions
Three Partitions (GS140 Only)
DWLPB PCI Card Cages and Hose Connections
DWLPB Configuration for GS140 Systems
DWLPB Configuration for GS60E Systems
KFE72-DA Adapters and Attached Console Terminals
CD-ROM Drives for Partitions
Attaching Floppy Drives for Secondary Partitions (Optional)
Moving One Floppy Drive Between Partitions (Optional)
Moving a Floppy Drive on a GS140 System
Moving a Floppy Drive on a GS60E System
Chapter 3
3.1
3.2
3.3
Introduction
Reasons for Partitioning
Important Considerations for Partitioned Systems
Overview of the Partitioning Process
Chapter 2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.5.1
2.5.2
2.6
2.6.1
2.6.2
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.10.1
2.10.2
vii
2-2
2-4
2-6
2-8
2-10
2-10
2-12
2-14
2-14
2-16
2-18
2-20
2-22
2-24
2-24
2-26
Environment Variable Settings
Environment Variables Used
Detailed Directions for lp_cpu_mask
Detailed Instructions for lp_io_mask
3-2
3-4
3-8
iii
Chapter 4
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Primary Console: Check Configuration
4-2
Step 1: Create and Initialize Environment Variables from the
Primary Console
4-6
Step 2: Initialize Partitions from the Primary Console;
Boot/Install OS in Partition 0
4-8
Step 3: Set and Initialize Environment Variables,
Boot/Install from Secondary Consoles
4-10
Chapter 5
5.1
5.2
5.2
5.3
5.4
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical
Partitions
Tips and Troubleshooting
Setting auto_action Within Partitions
How to Stop a Hung Secondary Partition
Halting All Partitions to Reconfigure
Correcting Errors in Environment Variables
Using Tools to Debug a Partition
5-2
5-4
5-6
5-8
5-10
Index
Examples
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
iv
Check Configuration from Primary Console
Initial Commands from the Primary Console
Initializing the Partitions
Using the Secondary Consoles
Halting a Hung OS Instance in Partition 0
Halting a Hung OS Instance in Secondary Partitions
All Consoles: Shut Down Operating System
Primary Console: Disable Partitions and Reset EVs
Correcting a Bad Bit Mask
4-2
4-6
4-8
4-10
5-4
5-4
5-6
5-6
5-8
Figures
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
5-1
5-2
Maintaining Multiple Instances at Separate Consoles
Consolidating Resources by Using Partitioning
Reset: Use Caution with Partitioned Systems
Overview of Using Logical Partitions
Example Configuration (Front View of Cabs)
Example Configuration (Rear View of Cabs)
Module Configuration
Memory Allocation with Two Partitions
Memory Allocation with Three Partitions
DWLPB PCI Card Cages
Hose Numbering Scheme for I/O Modules
KFE72-DA Adapters
Placement of RRDxx-VA Disks
Floppy Drive Connector on KFE72-DA Adapter
Relevant Connectors on KFE72s and DWLPBs
Environment Variables and lpinit Command
Construction of Three-Partition CPU Bit Mask
Construction of Two-Partition CPU Bit Masks
Construction of Three-Partition I/O Bit Masks
Construction of Two-Partition I/O Bit Masks
Setting auto_action to Halt in Each Partition
Debugging One Partition
1-1
1-2
1-4
1-6
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-8
2-10
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-16
2-18
2-20
3-2
3-4
3-6
3-8
3-9
5-2
5-10
Tables
1
2-1
2-2
3-1
Related AlphaServer GS140 Documentation
Requirements for a Three-Partition System
Requirements for a Two-Partition System
Environment Variables for Logical Partitions
viii
2-2
2-3
3-3
v
vi
Preface
Intended Audience
This manual is written for anyone wishing to understand the concepts and requirements of logical partitions for a Compaq AlphaServer GS60E or GS140
system, as well as how to use the console firmware to define them.
Document Structure
This manual uses a structured documentation design. Topics are organized into
small sections for efficient online and printed reference. Each topic begins with
an abstract. You can quickly gain a comprehensive overview by reading only
the abstracts. Next is an illustration or example, which also provides quick reference. Last in the structure are descriptive text and syntax definitions.
This manual has five chapters, as follows:
•
Chapter 1, Introduction, gives an overview of logical partitions.
•
Chapter 2, Configuration Rules, describes the hardware you need to run
logical partitions.
•
Chapter 3, Environment Variable Settings, describes the environment
variables used to define logical partitions for an operating system.
•
Chapter 4, Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions,
describes the sequence of console firmware commands you need to use to
enable logical partitioning and boot/install the operating system.
•
Chapter 5, Tips and Troubleshooting, gives pointers on how to perform
common operations, correct problems, and run tools to debug a partition.
System Options
The Systems and Options Catalog describes all options for AlphaServer GS60E
and GS140 systems. In addition, Compaq maintains a list of the latest supported options on the Internet, which you can access as follows:
Using a Web browser, follow links from the URL:
http://www.compaq.com/alphaserver/
vii
Conventions Used in This Document
Icons. Icons similar to those shown below are used in illustrations for designating part placement in the system described. A shaded area in the icon shows
the location of the component or part being discussed.
GS60E
Front
Rear
GS140
Front
Rear
BX-0099D-99
viii
Documentation Titles
Tables 1 and 2 list the books in the AlphaServer GS60E and GS140 documentation set and operating system documentation that you may find useful. Table 3
lists related software manuals.
Table 1 Related AlphaServer GS60E Documentation
Title
Order Number
Operations Manual
EK–GS60E–OP
Installation Guide
EK–GS60E–IN
Service Manual
EK–GS60E–SV
H7506 Installation Card
EK–H7506–IN
RRDCD Installation Card
EK–RRDXX–IN
GS60/8200 to GS60E Upgrade Manual
EK–GS60E–UP
Release Notes
EK–GS60E–RN
KFE72 Installation Guide
EK–KFE72–IN
Table 2 Related AlphaServer GS140 Documentation
Title
Order Number
Hardware User Information and Installation
Operations Manual
EK–T8030–OP
Service Information Kit
Service Manual
QZ–00RAC–GC
EK–T8030–SV
Reference Manuals
System Technical Manual
EK–T8030–TM
System Technical Manual Supplement: CPU
System Technical Manual Supplement: Memory
DWLPA/DWLPB PCI Adapter Technical Manual
EK–T8030–TS
EK–MS7CC–TS
EK–DWLPA–TM
ix
Table 2 Related AlphaServer GS140 Documentation (Continued)
Upgrade Manuals
KN7CG CPU Installation Card
MS7CC Memory Installation Card
KFTHA System I/O Module Installation Card
KFTIA Integrated I/O Module Installation Card
EK–KN7CG–IN
EK–MS7CC–IN
EK–KFTHA–IN
EK–KFTIA–IN
AlphaServer 8400 Upgrade Manual
EK–T8430–UI
DWLPA/DWLPB PCI PIU Installation Guide
EK–DWL84–IN
KFE72 Installation Guide
EK–KFE72–IN
Table 3 Related Software Manuals
Software Manuals
Tru64 UNIX Installation Guide
Tru64 UNIX System Administrator’s Guide
Tru64 UNIX Release Notes
DECevent Installation Guide
x
AA–DECUX–IN
Chapter 1
Introduction
Partitioning is defined as the capability to run multiple copies, or instances, of an
operating system on one hardware system. Each instance is maintained at a
separate console monitor, as shown for two partitions in Figure 1–1. The
Compaq AlphaServer GS140 system supports up to three partitions; the
Compaq AlphaServer GS60E supports two partitions.
Figure 1–1 Maintaining Multiple Instances at Separate Consoles
Tru64 UNIX
running on:
2 CPU modules
1 4-Gbyte Memory
1 KFTHA I/O module
Tru64 UNIX
running on
1 CPU module
1 2-Gbyte memory
1 KFTHA I/O module
Primary Console
Secondary Console
BX0502D-99
Introduction
1-1
1.1
Reasons for Partitioning
Partitioning can be used for various reasons, including the consolidation of computing resources into one system or increasing the efficiency of an existing system.
Figure 1–2 Consolidating Resources by Using Partitioning
BEFORE
Small server
running office
applications
Server
running 24/7
air pollution
monitoring and
simulation for
greater
Los Angeles
AFTER
Partition 0
AlphaServer GS140
running 3 instances of
Compaq Tru64 UNIX
using logical partitions
Partition 1
Medium-sized server
running audio-visual design
group
1-2
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Partition 2
BX-0199-99
With logical partitioning, you can divide computing resources into as many as
three distinct partitions. Partitioning can be used for a variety of reasons, including:
•
Consolidation of several different computing requirements into one hardware system, thereby reducing floor space requirements, power consumption, and air conditioning costs. Figure 1–2 shows an example of how an enterprise whose computing needs are met by three different systems can accomplish the same work with one system (a GS140) using logical partitions.
Logical partitions can be used to run different applications that require different configuration and tuning of the operating system.
•
Increasing the efficiency of an existing system. For example, a facility may
have one particularly I/O intensive (or compute intensive) application and a
variety of other applications without such demands. With partitioning, you
can allocate the resources needed to provide the two separate environments
required. More I/O (or CPU) modules can be allocated to the I/O (or compute) intensive application and the other applications limited to a smaller
set of resources, and both environments run at the same time.
Introduction
1-3
1.2
Important Considerations for Partitioned Systems
Here are some important considerations for partitioned AlphaServer
GS60E/GS140 systems.
Figure 1–3 Reset: Use Caution with Partitioned Systems
Reset
Don't forget to shut down the
Operating System in all partitions!
Primary Console
Secondary
Con
sole
s
(powerup
display)
.
..
P00>>>
Running OS
goes
Poof!
Running OS
goes
Poof!
BX-0100F-99
1-4
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
There are some important things to be aware of when running multiple instances of operating systems on separate partitions on AlphaServer GS60E/
GS140 systems:
•
Reset Keyswitch Position (GS140) or Reset Pushbutton (GS60E).
Once partitions are up and running separate instances of the operating system, turning the control panel keyswitch to the Reset position (GS140) or
pushing the Reset pushbutton (GS60E) causes the system to initialize, stopping whatever is going on in all partitions. To halt operations in an orderly manner, you must shut down the operating system for each of
the partitions at the appropriate console terminal and then use Reset.
•
Init Command. Issuing the init command at the console terminal for any
partition causes a complete reinitialization of all partitions defined for the
system, with results as described for Reset, above. With the init command,
however, the firmware displays a prompt asking you to confirm that you
want to reset all partitions before any action is taken.
•
Ctrl/P. At the primary console, you can halt a hung instance of the operating system by using the Ctrl/P keystroke, returning to the console prompt.
Secondary partitions continue uninterrupted. Ctrl/P does not work from
secondary consoles, but you can stop processing in secondary partitions by
issuing a stop n command to halt a CPU from another partition, as discussed further in Chapter 5.
Introduction
1-5
1.3
Overview of the Partitioning Process
To define logical partitions, you need to check the hardware configuration, assign modules to partitions as desired, initialize the partitions,
and install the operating system.
Figure 1–4 Overview of Using Logical Partitions
Obtain Required Hardware, Firmware,
and Operating System
(see Chapter 2)
Set Logical Partitioning
Environment Variables
(see Chapter 3)
Set Up, Initialize, and Boot
Logical Partitions
(see Chapter 4)
Troubleshoot as Necessary
(see Chapter 5)
BX-0199A-99
1-6
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
There are hardware, firmware, and software requirements and restrictions to
meet before you can run logical partitions. Chapter 2 describes the major
hardware configuration rules as of this printing. However, you should check the
Systems and Options Catalog for the most up-to-date information on the hardware, firmware, and software required. The Systems and Options Catalog also
lists hardware that is not supported for partitioned systems and must be removed from your system before partitions will run. The Systems and Options
Catalog is available on the web at http://www.compaq.com/alphaserver/.
Defining logical partitions involves setting certain environment variables. Settings for these environment variables are discussed in Chapter 3.
A sequence of console commands must be issued to set environment variables
and to initialize logical partitions before installation of an instance of the operating system in each partition. These commands are described in Chapter 4.
See also the information on logical partitioning in the Tru64 UNIX System Administrator’s Guide for information on how to initialize logical partitions and
boot and install the operating system.
Once partitions are up and running separate instances of an operating system,
maintenance and troubleshooting will likely be done from each partition’s console terminal. For example, a hardware error may cause one instance of the
operating system to crash. If the proper installations have been made, you can
run DECevent from the problem partition to debug.
However, some conditions (such as upgrading your system’s console firmware,
or to include new modules or other hardware) require shutting down each instance of the operating system and disabling partitions temporarily until the
situation is taken care of. This procedure is described in Chapter 5.
Introduction
1-7
Chapter 2
Configuration Rules
To define logical partitions for AlphaServer GS60E/GS140 systems, you must
have certain hardware. Other hardware normally supported on AlphaServer
GS60E/GS140E systems are not supported with logical partitions. Check the
Systems and Options Catalog for up-to-date information. This chapter describes
the hardware requirements at the time this manual was printed. Sections include:
•
Overview of Configuration Requirements
•
Example of a Partitioned GS60E System
•
Example of a Partitioned GS140 System
•
Module Configuration
•
Memory Allocation
•
DWLPB PCI Card Cages and Hose Connections
•
KFE72-DA Adapters and Attached Console Terminals
•
CD-ROM Drives for Partitions
•
Attaching Floppy Drives for Secondary Partitions (Optional)
•
Moving One Floppy Drive Between Partitions (GS140 – Optional)
Configuration Rules 2-1
2.1
Overview of Configuration Requirements
Here are the minimum and maximum configurations for partitioned
systems.
Table 2–1 Requirements for a Three-Partition System (GS140 Only)
Partition 0
Partition 1
Partition 2
Min
Max
Min
Max
Min
Max
CPU modules
1
1
1
1
1
1
Memory module size
512
MB
4 GB
512 MB
4 GB
512 MB
4 GB
Memory modules
1
1
1
1
1
1
I/O modules
1
1
1
1
1
1
DWLPB
1
4
1
4
1
4
KFE72-EA
0
1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
KFE72-DA
N/A
N/A
1
1
1
1
BA35x
1
See footnote2
1
See
footnote²
1
See footnote²
Disk Drives
2
See footnote3
2
See
footnote³
2
See footnote³
RRD4x
CD-ROMs
1
N/A
0
1
0
1
Floppy4
0
1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
1
1
Logical partitions support KN7CG (GS140) processors only.
As many as you need, based on the number of SCSI controllers.
3
Depends on the number of StorageWorks shelves in your configuration.
4
Only required to run utilities such as the RAID Configuration Utility (RCU). (You can
move one floppy between partitions, if necessary, as described in Section 2.9.)
2
2-2
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Table 2–1 lists the minimum requirements and maximum restrictions for three
logical partitions; Table 2–2, for two partitions.
Table 2–2 Requirements for a Two-Partition System (GS140 or GS60E)
Partition 0
CPU modules1
Partition 1
Min
Max
Min
Max
1
5² (for GS140)
or
2² (for GS60E)
1
5² (for GS140)
or
2² (for GS60E)
Memory module
size
512
Mbyte
4 Gbyte
512 Mbyte
4 Gbyte
Memory modules2
1
5 (for GS140)
or
2 (for GS60E)
1
5 (for GS140)
or
2 (for GS60E)
I/O modules²
1
2
1
2
DWLPB
1
8
1
8
KFE72-EA/LA
0
1
N/A
N/A
KFE72-DA
N/A
N/A
1
1
1
See footnote 4
1
See footnote 4
Disk Drives5
2
See footnote 5
2
See footnote 5
RRD4x CD-ROMs
1
N/A
1
N/A
0
1
N/A
N/A
3
BA35x
4
6
Floppy
1
Logical partitions support KN7CG (GS60E/GS140) processors only.
The total number of modules connected to the TLSB must not exceed 9 (CPU, I/O, and
memory) for GS140 systems or 7 (CPU, I/O, and memory) for GS60E systems.
3
Configuration depends on number of I/O hoses available.
4
The maximum is as many as you need, based on the number of SCSI controllers.
5
The maximum depends on the number of StorageWorks shelves in your configuration.
6
Only required to run utilities such as the RAID Configuration Utility (RCU). (On
GS140 systems, you can move one floppy between partitions, if necessary, as described in
Section 2.9. )
2
Configuration Rules 2-3
2.2
Example of a Partitioned GS60E System
These illustrations give an overview of some of the interplay between
the number of hardware modules, DWLPB adapters, KFE72-DA adapters, and KZPBA adapters that you will need to consider in configuring
your AlphaServer GS60E system to run logical partitions.
Figure 2–1 Sample GS60E Configuration
Front
Rear
TLSB
Card
Cage
Fan
CD-ROM
Housing
Second
CD-ROM
KFE72-DA
adapter
PCI
Card
Cages
KZPBA-CA
adapters
Power
Supplies
AC Input
Box
CB1
CB2 CB3 CB4
CB5 CB6 CB7 CB8 CB9 CB10 CB11
Primary
console
connector
BX-0183Mm-99
2-4
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Figure 2–1 shows an example of an AlphaServer GS60E system with seven
modules. The GS60E has seven slots, which will only allow for two logical partitions. Two I/O modules are present, each attached to a DWLPB.
One DWLPB is shipped with the system. This DWLPB must be connected to
the I/O module in slot 8 of the TLSB. A second DWLPB with a KFE72-DA
adapter is needed to support logical partitions, to provide the connection to the
secondary console terminal. This DWLPB must be connected to any I/O module
other than the one in slot 8.
Two KZPBA-CA adapters are shown to support the two CD-ROM drives used as
console load devices for the two partitions.
If you wish to have floppy drives available for one or both partitions, you must
order two KFE72-LA adapters, one for each DWLPB.
Configuration Rules 2-5
2.3
Example of a Partitioned GS140 System
These illustrations give an overview of some of the interplay between
the number of hardware modules, DWLPB adapters, KFE72-DA adapters, and disks that you will need to consider in configuring your AlphaServer GS140 system to run logical partitions.
Figure 2–2 Sample GS140 Configuration (Front View of Cabs)
Main Cabinet
Expander Cabinet
CPU
CPU
CPU
MEM
BA35x
Disks
BA35x-FA
Personality Card
RRD4x Disks
BA35x
Disks
BA35x
Disks
BX-0183G-99
2-6
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Figures 2–2 and 2–3 show an example of an AlphaServer GS140 system with
nine modules. Three CPU modules, three memory modules, and three I/O modules would allow either 3 or 2 logical partitions, each running an instance of the
operating system.
The KFE72-DAs needed to support logical partitions are present. Two CD-ROM
drives are shown. Note that these CD-ROM drives protrude from the front of
the shelf, and can only be installed in the rightmost shelf position in the front of
either cabinet. In any other position, the drives will contact the crossbar support on the inside of the cabinet door and make it impossible to close.
Figure 2–3 Sample GS140 Configuration (Rear View of Cabs)
Expander Cabinet
Main Cabinet
MEM
MEM
KFTHA
KFTHA
KFTIA
BA35x
Disks
PCIs
(front)
PCIs
(front)
Floppy
Com1/2
SIO
Floppy
Com1/2
SIO
KFE72-DAs
BX-0183F-99
Configuration Rules 2-7
2.4
Module Configuration
Partitions are constructed of a number of CPUs, memory, and I/O modules. Each partition must have at least one of each type.
Figure 2–4 Module Configuration
AlphaServer GS60E
AlphaServer GS140
Front
Front
5 6 7 8
Memory
Modules
Power
Filter
I/O Modules
Centerplane
(TLSB)
45 6 7 8
Centerplane
(TLSB)
Memory
Modules
Power
Filter
2 1 0 Slot
Processor Modules
I/O Modules
3
2 1 0 Slot
Processor Modules
BX-0111G-99
2-8
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Logical partitions are divided on hardware module boundaries. For example,
each CPU module contains two CPUs, but you cannot have one CPU in one partition, and the other CPU in another. Both CPUs on a module must be in the
same partition.
Each partition must have at least one CPU module, one memory module, and
one KFTIA or KFTHA I/O module. The combined partitions may include up to
nine modules (the limit of the TLSB card cage).
•
CPU modules are installed beginning in slot 0 and proceed upward by slot
number.
•
I/O modules are installed beginning in slot 8 and proceed downward, to a
limit of three I/O modules.
•
Memory modules are installed beginning in the next-highest slot above the
CPU module(s) and proceed upward until all modules are installed, up to
slot 5 or 6 (depending on whether three or two I/O modules are installed, respectively).
Note that in a three-partition system, there can only be three CPU modules,
three memory modules, and three I/O modules, since partitions allocate whole
modules and the total number of slots available is 9. The memory modules can
be of various sizes; disable interleaving for any configuration (set interleave
none). Figure 2-4 shows the allowed configuration for modules in the TLSB
card cage.
Allocating Modules to Partitions
Chapter 3 tells how you set console firmware environment variables to define
which CPU and I/O modules are contained in any particular logical partition.
You can allocate CPU modules and I/O modules to partitions in any configuration you desire, as long as each partition has at least one I/O module and one
CPU module.
You specify memory mode for partitioning as isolate, which tells the console
firmware to distribute memory modules between partitions at module boundaries. This is described in more detail in the next section.
Configuration Rules 2-9
2.5
Memory Allocation
2.5.1
Two Partitions
The console firmware assigns memory to partitions such that an asnear-to-equal-as-possible amount of memory is given to each partition.
Figure 2–5 Memory Allocation with Two Partitions
A.
Two (or four) memories of the same size: 1 (or 2) memories to each partition.
B.
Three or five memories of same size: largest amount of memory to partition 0,
next-largest to partition 1.
(2)
(1)
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
Partition 0
Partition 1
Partition 0
Partition 1
2-Gbyte
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
1-Gbyte
1-Gbyte
(Partition 1 has
more memory)
1-Gbyte
1-Gbyte
2-10
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
4-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
1-Gbyte
(Partition 1 has
more memory)
Partition 0
Partition 1
Partition 0
Partition 0
Partition 1
Partition 1
C. Two to five memories of varying size: largest module to partition 0,
smallest module to partition 1, the rest allocated as equally as possible.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(Partition 0 has
more memory)
BX-0199D-99
When you are defining two partitions, you may have from two to three memory
modules (GS60E system) or from two to five memory modules (GS140 system),
depending on the number of CPU and I/O modules in the system. Memory is
always allocated on module boundaries. Set the interleave environment variable to none, as noted in Chapter 4.
The console firmware allocates the largest sized module to partition 0, and the
smallest module to partition 1. It then attempts to distribute the remaining
modules such that as equal an amount is given to both partitions as is possible.
Figure 2–5 shows some examples. Item A declares that when there are an even
number of modules of equal size, the memory is divided equally. Item B illustrates an odd number of modules of equal size. Here, the distribution is as
equal as possible, with the largest amount of memory going to partition 0, and
the next-largest, to partition 1.
Item C shows some examples of a series of modules of varying size. In general,
the largest memory module is allocated to partition 0, and the smallest, to partition 1. The remaining modules are divided so as to make the allocation for the
two partitions as equal as possible. When a situation arises to make both partitions unequal with the same ratio, the firmware makes partition 0 the largest
partition (case 3, below).
1. Here, the 4 -Gbyte memory is allocated to partition 0, and the 1-Gbyte
memory is allocated to partition 1. There are two remaining 2-Gbyte modules, and they are distributed so as to make the partitions as equal as possible, giving both 2-Gbyte modules to partition 1, creating partition 0 with 4
Gbytes and partition 1 with 5 Gbytes.
2. Here, a 2-Gbyte memory is allocated to partition 0, and the 1-Gbyte memory
is allocated to partition 1. The remaining 2-Gbyte memory is given to partition 1, since a 3-Gbyte/2-Gbyte allocation is more equal than allocating 4
Gbytes to partition 0 and 1 Gbyte to partition 1.
3. Here, a 2-Gbyte memory is allocated to partition 0, and a 1-Gbyte memory is
allocated to partition 1. Either way the remaining 2-Gbyte memories are
allocated (both to partition 1, or 1 to partition 0 and 1 to partition 1), the
memory allocation will be 3 Gbytes/2 Gbytes, so the default is to make partition 0 the largest partition.
Configuration Rules 2-11
2.5.2
Three Partitions (GS140 Only)
Three-partition systems require at least three memory modules. Each
partition is allocated one module. Memory modules are allocated in
decreasing size order.
Figure 2–6 Memory Assignment with Three Partitions
Three partitions, three memories:
A. Memories all the same size: 1 memory to each partition.
B. Memories of different size: largest memory to partition 0,
next-largest to partition 1, smallest to partition 2.
1-Gbyte
4-Gbyte
2-Gbyte
Partition 2
Partition 0
Partition 1
BX-0199C-99
2-12
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
When you are defining three partitions, three memory modules are always
needed. They may or may not be of the same size. Figure 2–6 shows some examples of how memory is divided in this case.
When all three memories are of the same size, one is allocated to each partition.
When the memories are of different size, the largest memory is assigned to partition 0; the next largest (or equal), to partition 1, and the next largest (or
equal), to partition 2.
Again, set the interleave environment variable to none, as noted in Chapter 4.
Configuration Rules 2-13
2.6
2.6.1
DWLPB PCI Card Cages and Hose Connections
DWLPB Configuration for GS140 Systems
One DWLPB PCI card cage is required for each secondary partition on
a GS140 system.
Figure 2–7 DWLPB PCI Card Cages for GS140 Systems
Main Cabinet (Rear)
Hoses for
partitions
connected to any
slot of KFTHA (or
only hose slot of
KFTIA)
DWLPB PCI
for each partition
Optional
KFE70
or KFE72-EA
for Partition 0
2-14
KFE72-DAs required
for Partitions 1 and 2
Floppy
Com1/2
SIO
Floppy
Com1/2
SIO
Floppy
Com1/2
SIO
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
BX-0183I-99
Each AlphaServer GS140 system may have a DWLPB PCI card cage with either
a KFE70 adapter (standard I/O) or a KFE72-EA adapter (for graphics support)
installed. This is only necessary if you wish to have the floppy drive installed
near the front panel switches in the main cabinet. The I/O hose for this PCI
must be connected to the I/O module in TLSB slot 8.
An additional DWLPB PCI card cage must be installed in the system for each
secondary partition. These DWLPBs hold the KFE72-DA adapters needed for
the additional serial console terminals for secondary partitions.
Figure 2–7 shows three DWLPBs, one with a KFE70. If used, the KFE70 must
be in a DWLPB connected to the I/O module in slot 8 of the TLSB bus, as
shown. The two other DWLPBs with KFE72-DAs for secondary partitions may
be connected to any hose on any I/O module assigned to the partition. See
Figure 2–8 for hose numbers for the various I/O slots.
The DWLPA/DWLPB PCI PIU Installation Guide tells how to install DWLPB
PCI card cages.
Figure 2–8 Hose Numbering Scheme for I/O Modules
Centerplane
C0 C4
C8
C3
C7
C11
8
7
6
5
4
TLSB node
BX-0164-94
Configuration Rules 2-15
2.6.2
DWLPB Configuration for GS60E Systems
Two DWLPB PCI card cages are required for GS60E systems to support
logical partitions.
Figure 2–9 DWLPB PCI Card Cages for GS60E Systems
Rear
TLSB
Card
Cage
Fan
KFE72-DA
adapter
PCI
Card
Cages
AC Input
Box
KZPBA-CA
adapters
CB1
CB2 CB3 CB4
CB5 CB6 CB7 CB8 CB9 CB10 CB11
Primary
console
connector
BX-0183Ma-99
2-16
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Each AlphaServer GS60E system comes with one DWLPB PCI card cage. The
I/O hose for this PCI must be connected to the I/O module in TLSB slot 8.
An additional DWLPB PCI card cage must be installed in the system for the
secondary partition. This DWLPB holds the KFE72-DA adapter needed for the
additional serial console terminal for the secondary partition.
Figure 2–9 shows two DWLPBs, one with a KFE72-DA adapter. The DWLPB
for the primary partition must be connected to the I/O module in slot 8 of the
TLSB bus, as shown. The other DWLPB, with a KFE72-DA for a secondary
partition, may be connected to any hose on another I/O module assigned to the
partition. See Figure 2–8 for hose numbers for the various I/O slots.
The DWLPA/DWLPB PCI PIU Installation Guide tells how to install DWLPB
PCI card cages.
Configuration Rules 2-17
2.7
KFE72-DA Adapters and Attached Console
Terminals
One KFE72-DA adapter is required for each logical partition beyond
partition 0. The KFE72-DA provides the port to connect an additional
serial console terminal.
Figure 2–10 KFE72-DA Adapters
Serial Terminal
Connector
H8571-J
Connector
2
1
COM1
0
Front Panel Slot
UN-0302B-99
2-18
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
On GS60E systems, the connection for the primary console terminal is located at
the rear of the system, above the AC power input box on the left side. On
GS140 systems, the connection for the primary console terminal is on the control panel of the GS140. You may also have a KFE70 or KFE72-EA adapter
connected to the TLSB in slot 8 to provide floppy support on the GS140, or a
KFE72-LA adapter to provide floppy support on the GS60E. This is optional,
however.
On both the GS60E and GS140, you must also have one KFE72-DA adapter for
each secondary partition, installed in a separate DWLPB PCI card cage. The
KFE72-DA adapter consists of three modules installed in slots 0, 1, and 2 of the
PCI card cage. See the KFE72 Installation Guide (EK-KFE72-IN) for instructions on how to install all variants of KFE72 adapters.
The console terminals for secondary partitions on the GS140 and the GS60E are
connected to the COM1 port of each KFE72 adapter, in slot 1 of the PCI card
cage, as shown in Figure 2–10.
The primary and secondary console devices can be character-cell video terminals or serial line connections to another system or terminal concentrator. Supported graphics devices can be used by the operating system’s windowing software on any partition.
Configuration Rules 2-19
2.8
CD-ROM Drives for Partitions
On a GS140 system, the CD-ROM drive for partition 0 is located near
the control panel on the front of the machine. You may install
RRD43/44/45/46/47-VA CD-ROM drives for each secondary partition in
the rightmost shelf at the front of either the main cabinet or the expander cabinet. On a GS60E system, the CD-ROM drive for partition 0
is located at the front of the system below the fan. You can install a
second CD-ROM drive for the secondary partition below the first one.
Figure 2–11 Placement of RRD4x-VA Drives on a GS140 System
Main Cabinet (Front)
CD-ROM for
Partition 0
Floppy for
Partition 0
(optional)
BA35x-FA
Personality Card
RRD4x Drives
for Secondary
Partitions
BX-0183H-99
2-20
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
For a GS140 system, you can install one RRD46/47-VA CD-ROM drive for each
secondary partition in your system, if, for example, you have no network
adapter or installation server available and want to boot from a CD-ROM in
each partition.
For a GS140, if you put these disks in the main or expander cabinets, they must
occupy the rightmost shelf at the front of the cabinet. They protrude from the
shelf, and the front door will not close if they are in other shelves.
For a GS60E system, you can install a KZPBA-CA adapter and a second CDROM drive (part number 3X-RRDRX-AA) for the secondary partition in your
system.
Figure 2–12 CD-ROM Drives in a GS60E System
Front
TLSB
Card
Cage
Fan
CD-ROM/
Floppy
Housing
Second
CD-ROM
Power Supplies
BX-0183Mb-99
Configuration Rules 2-21
2.9
Attaching Floppy Drives for Secondary Partitions
(Optional)
You may wish to install floppy drives on your KFE72-DA adapters on
GS140 systems. To include floppy drives on your GS60E system, you
need a KFE72-LA adapter for each partition for which you wish to add
floppy support. (The KFE72-LA would replace the KFE72-DA in the
secondary partition.)
Figure 2–13 Floppy Drive Connector on KFE72-DA Adapter
J2
Floppy power
J1
Keyboard
(not used)
Floppy
drive
Mouse
(not used)
2
1
0
COM1
Not used
COM2 (not used)
UN-0302A-99
2-22
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
On GS140 systems you may install a floppy drive off of the floppy drive port on
the connector module of the KFE72-DA (in front panel slot 2 of the PCI card
cage), as shown in Figure 2–13.
If you only have one floppy drive on your GS140 system, and wish to move it
between partitions, see Section 2.10.
To include floppy drives on your GS60E system, you need a KFE72-LA adapter
for each partition for which you wish to add floppy support. (The KFE72-LA
would replace the KFE72-DA in the secondary partition.)
You can only use one floppy drive at a time when running utilities such as RCU,
even if you have two on your system. If you have two floppy drives installed on
either a GS140 or GS60E system and wish to use one, you must first remove
power from the DWLPB to which the other floppy is connected. Unplug the 48V
power input cable to the DWLPB, next to the hose connection on the DWLPB.
(See Figure 2–14 for the location for a DWLPB on a GS140; the orientation for
the GS60E would be as shown in Figure 2–14, rotated 90° to the right). Note
that both DWLPBs can be connected while you are running the operating system.
Configuration Rules 2-23
2.10 Moving One Floppy Drive Between Partitions
(GS140 Only – Optional)
This section tells how to move a single floppy from one partition to another on GS140 systems, to run RCU for each partition, for example,
when you have only one floppy drive in your configuration.
2.10.1 Moving a Floppy Drive on a GS140 System
Figure 2–14 Relevant Connectors on KFE72s and DWLPBs for the
GS140
DWLPB
KFE72
Floppy power
and signal ports
48V power
connectors
Hose
Floppy
power
Floppy
signal
port
KFE72-DA
Adapter
Front panel slot
2
1
0
BX-0183J-99
2-24
Getting Started with Logical Partitions
If you need to run configuration utilities from various partitions, and have only
one floppy drive, you can attach it to separate partitions as follows:
1. Shut down the operating system instances in each partition.
2. Disable partitions and reinitialize the system to a nonpartitioned state, as
described in Section 5.3. You may wish to record the environment variable
information and use it when you re-enable partitions.
3. Power the system down.
4. Disconnect the floppy power and signal cables from the KFE70 or KFE72EA on partition 0 and reattach them to the KFE72-DA that resides on the
KFTIA or KFTHA of the partition you want to configure. See the left side of
Figure 2–14 for the location of these power and signal cables.
5. Remove power from any other DWLPB that contains a KFE72 (see the right
side of Figure 2–14).
6. Power up the system.
7. Run the desired utilities, inserting the floppy and running it from the floppy
drive you just moved.
8. Power the system down.
9. Reconnect 48V to any DWLPB that you removed in step 5.
10. Move floppy drive to whichever partition you want it on.
11. Power up the system.
12. Initialize the partitions. If you need to make any changes to partitionspecific environment variables, make sure the primary partition and secondary partition’s auto_action environment variable is set to halt so that you
can make these changes from each console terminal.
Configuration Rules 2-25
Chapter 3
Environment Variables that Create
Logical Partitions
You define what resources are allocated to each partition by creating or setting
environment variables. Before showing the sequence of these commands (see
Chapter 4), you should understand in detail the significance of these environment variables and their settings, as described in this chapter. Sections include:
•
Environment Variables Used
•
Detailed Directions for lp_cpu_mask
•
Detailed Instructions for lp_io_mask
Environment Variables that Create Logical Partitions
3-1
3.1
Environment Variables Used
Four environment variables and the lpinit command define partitions.
Figure 3–1 Environment Variables and lpinit Command
P0
Environment Variables
define:
P1
1. Number of partitions:
lp_count (0, 2, or 3)
2. CPU modules in each partition:
lp_cpu_mask* (bit mask)
P1
P0
3. I/O modules in each partition:
lp_io_mask* (bit mask)
P0
P1
4. Memory mode:
lp_mem_mode isolate
lpinit command
initializes partitions defined
3-2 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
P0
P1
P00>>> lpinit
BX-0100G-99
You define values for one environment variable to define the number of logical
partitions on your system, one to set the memory mode, and two for each partition that define the CPU and I/O modules in each partition. The lpinit command (described in context in Chapter 4) initializes the logical partitions defined. Figure 3–1 and Table 3–1 give an overview of the environment variables
and what they do. Environment variable settings for the CPU and I/O masks
are discussed in detail in following sections of this chapter. (Memory allocation
is discussed in detail in Section 2.5.)
Table 3–1 Environment Variables for Logical Partitions
Environment
Variable
Definition
lp_count n
The number of logical partitions you wish to create on the
system. At the start of creating logical partitions, you set
this value to 0. Later, as described in Chapter 4, you define
the number of logical partitions desired. 0 indicates the
traditional symmetric multiprocessing system. Possible
values are 0 (partitions disabled), 2 (for two partitions), or 3
(for three partitions, allowable only on GS140 systems).
lp_cpu_mask* x
For the *, you supply the number of the partition, which
may be 0, 1, or 2. (The value 2 is only possible with GS140
systems.) The value x gives a binary mask indicating which
CPUs you want included as part of the instance. Although
the mask selects individual CPUs, assignments must align
with module boundaries. See Section 3.2 for detailed examples.
lp_io_mask* x
For the *, you supply the number of the partition, which
may be 0, 1, or 2. (The value 2 is only possible with GS140
systems.) The value x gives a binary mask indicating the
slot number of the I/O module or modules to be reserved
for the use of a particular instance. Detailed examples are
given in Section 3.3.
lp_mem_mode x
The value of x must be isolate.
Environment Variables that Create Logical Partitions
3-3
3.2
Detailed Directions for lp_cpu_mask
The lp_cpu_mask environment variable is set to a value that creates a
binary mask in which a bit set to 1 indicates that an individual CPU
belongs to a partition. Recall that there are two CPUs per module, and
that partitions must contain whole modules.
Figure 3–2 Construction of Three-Partition CPU Bit Mask (GS140 Only)
Partition 0
6
Slot No.
CPU No.
5
3
2
1
0
13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Bits set ...
0 0 0 0 1 1
6
Slot No.
CPU No.
5
Partition 1
4
3
2
1
= hex value 3
0
13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Bits set ...
1 1 0 0 0 0
6
Slot No.
CPU No.
Bits set
4
5
Partition 2
4
3
2
1
= hex value 30
0
13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
...
0 0 1 1 0 0
= hex value C
BX-0100B-99
3-4 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Note that you must assign CPUs to a partition on module boundaries. CPU
modules can be assigned to partitions in any order.
Three-Partition System
For a three-partition system, three CPU modules is the maximum allowed
(since there must also be three memories and three I/O modules, and the total
number of slots is 9.) In this case, assigning CPUs to partitions is fairly
straightforward. Again, the CPUs in slot 0 must be assigned to partition 0. The
CPUs in slots 1 and 2 can be assigned as desired. Figure 3–2 shows the construction of a bit mask for three partitions, with the CPUs in slot 0 assigned to
partition 0, the CPUs in slot 2 assigned to partition 1, and the CPUs in slot 1
assigned to partition 2. You would use the console commands:
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask0 3
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask2 30
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask1 C
NOTE: Once the desired environment variables have been created with
create –nv, you can set them to different values with the set command.
Environment Variables that Create Logical Partitions
3-5
Figure 3–3 Construction of Two-Partition CPU Bit Masks
Partition 0: CPU Module in Slot 0
(GS60E range)
6
Slot No.
Bit No.
Bits set
5
4
3
2
1
0
13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
...
0 0 0 0 1 1
= hex value 3
Partition 1: CPU Modules in Slots 1, 2, and 3
6
Slot No.
Bit No.
Bits set
5
4
3
2
1
0
13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
...
1 1 1 1 0 0
= hex value 3C
Partition 0: CPU Modules in Slots 0, 1, and 3
(GS140 range)
6
Slot No.
5
Bit No.
Bits set
4
3
2
1
0
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
...
0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1
= hex value CF
Partition 1: CPU Modules in Slots 2 and 4
6
Slot No.
Bit No.
Bits set
5
4
3
2
1
0
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
...
11 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
= hex value 330
BX-0100C-99
3-6 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Two-Partition System (GS60E or GS140)
A two-partition system has more possibilities for CPU allocation. For GS140
systems, from two to five slots may be occupied by CPU modules in TLSB slots
0 – 4. For GS60E systems, two to three slots may be occupied by CPU modules
in TLSB slots 0 – 2. Again, the CPUs in slot 0 must be assigned to partition 0.
Other than that, there are no restrictions.
The top portion of Figure 3–3 shows an allocation for a GS60E system with
three CPU modules in slots 0, 1, and 2. The CPUs in slot 0 are included in partition 0, and the CPUs in slots 1 and 2 are included in partition 1. The console
commands used to create the appropriate masks are:
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask0 3
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask1 3c
The bottom portion of Figure 3–3 shows an allocation for a GS140 system with
five CPU modules in slots 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The CPUs in slots 0, 1, and 3 are
included in partition 0, and the CPUs in slots 2 and 4 are included in partition
1. You would use the following console commands to create such an allocation:
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask0 cf
P00>>> create –nv lp_cpu_mask1 330
NOTE: Once the desired environment variables have been created with
create –nv, you can change their values with the set command.
Environment Variables that Create Logical Partitions
3-7
3.3
Detailed Instructions for lp_io_mask
The lp_io_mask environment variable is set to a hexadecimal mask in
which the bit position of a 1 indicates the slot in which the I/O module
resides.
Figure 3–4 Construction of Three-Partition I/O Bit Masks (GS140 Only)
Partition 0
Slot No.
Bits set
876543210
... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 = hex value 100
Partition 1
Slot No.
876543210
...
0
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 = hex value 80
Bits set
Partition 2
Slot No.
876543210
Bits set ... 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 = hex value 40
BX-0100D-99
A three-partition system requires three I/O modules (either one KFTIA plus two
KFTHA modules, or three KFTHA modules), one module for each partition.
Figure 3–4 shows the bit locations for assigning the I/O module in slot 8 to partition 0, the I/O module in slot 7 to partition 1, and the I/O module in slot 6 to
partition 2. The console commands issued to create such partitioning are:
create –nv lp_io_mask0 100
create –nv lp_io_mask1 80
create –nv lp_io_mask2 40
3-8 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Two-partition systems may have two or three I/O modules.
Figure 3–5 gives two examples of three-I/O-module, two-partition systems. The
first shows partition 0 with one I/O module in slot 8, and partition 1 with two
modules in slots 6 and 7. The console commands are:
create –nv lp_io_mask0 100
create –nv lp_io_mask1 c0
The bottom of Figure 3–5 shows a two-partition system with the I/O modules in
slots 8 and 6 assigned to partition 0, and the I/O module in slot 7 assigned to
partition 1. The console commands used to create such partitioning are:
create –nv lp_io_mask0 140
create –nv lp_io_mask1 80
Figure 3–5 Construction of Two-Partition I/O Bit Masks
Partition 0
Slot No.
Bits set
876543210
... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 = hex value 100
Partition 1
Slot No.
876543210
= hex value C0
Bits set ... 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Partition 0
Slot No.
Bits set
876543210
... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 = hex value 140
Partition 1
Slot No.
876543210
= hex value 80
Bits set ... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BX-0100E-99
Environment Variables that Create Logical Partitions
3-9
Chapter 4
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting
Logical Partitions
The sequence of console commands used to define and initialize partitions is
described in this chapter. Sections include:
•
Primary Console: Check Configuration
•
Step 1: Create and Initialize Environment Variables from the Primary
Console
•
Step 2: Initialize Partitions from the Primary Console; Boot/Install OS in
Partition 0
•
Step 3: Set and Initialize Environment Variables, Boot from Secondary
Consoles
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions 4-1
4.1
Primary Console: Check Configuration
Before you define any partitions, check to make sure you have all you
need to support partitions as you wish to configure them.
Example 4–1 Check Configuration from Primary Console
ff.fe.fd.fc.fb.fa.f9.f8.f7.f6.f5.f3.f2.f1.f0.
➊
ef.ee.ed.f4.
20.21.22.23.24.25.26.27.a2.a4.a5.a7.a8.a9.ec.eb.ea.e9.e8.e7.e6.e5.e3.
F
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C
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A
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NODE #
TYP➋
ST1
BPD
ST2
BPD
ST3
BPD
C0 PCI +
C1 PCI +
EISA +
C4 PCI +
EISA +
C5
C6
C7
C8 PCI +
EISA +
C9
C10
C11
.
.
. C0 B0 A0
.
.
.
ILV
➏
.
.
. 1GB 1GB 1GB
.
.
.
3GB
Compaq AlphaServer GS140 6-6/525/4, Console V5.4-18 30-APR-1999 16:24:17
SROM V2.1, OpenVMS PALcode V1.53-5, Tru64 UNIX PALcode V1.48-4
System Serial = qv, OS = Tru64 UNIX, 21:20:07 March 15, 1999
Configuring Graphics
Configuring I/O adapters...
isp0, slot 0, bus 0, hose0
.
.
.
[configuration display continues]
[Continued on following page]
4-2 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
➌
➍
➎
➐
From the primary console terminal, check the configuration. You can do this
either from the power-up display (see Example 4–1 for a GS140 display) or by
using a show config command.
➊
The AlphaServer GS60E/GS140 power-up display includes (as long as a
CPU module is in slot 0) test numbers as testing proceeds, so that if
the system fails, the user or field service engineer can determine the
point during testing that the system failed.
➋
The TYP line of the power-up display shows three CPUs, three memories, and three I/O modules, so the TLSB hardware supports three partitions.
➌, ➍, A DWLPB (PCI) is installed in hose 1 (C1) of the KFTIA in slot 8, and
and ➎ in the topmost hoses (C4 and C8) of the KFTHAs in slots 7 and 6 respectively.
➏
Three separate interleave sets (A, B, and C) are shown, which indicates
the interleave environment variable is set to none.
➐
Check the version of the console firmware to make sure it supports
logical partitions. (See the Systems and Options Catalog for information on the version of the firmware supporting logical partitions.)
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions 4-3
Example 4–1 Check Configuration from Primary Console (Continued)
P00>>> sho config
TLSB
0++
1++
2++
3+
4+
5+
6+
7+
8+
➊
Name
Type
Rev
KN7CG-AB
KN7CG-AB
KN7CG-AB
MS7CC
MS7CC
MS7CC
KFTHA
KFTHA
KFTIA
8025
8025
8025
5000
5000
5000
2000
2000
2020
0000
0000
0000
0B04
0000
0000
0D03
00D3
0000
Mnemonic
kn7cg-ab0
kn7cg-ab1
kn7cg-ab2
ms7cc0
ms7cc1
ms7cc2
kftha1
kftha0
kftia0
C0 Internal PCI connected to kftia0
0+
QLogic ISP1020
10201077 0001
1+
QLogic ISP1020
10201077 0001
2+
DECchip 21040-AA
21011 0024
4+
QLogic ISP1020
10201077 0001
5+
QLogic ISP1020
10201077 0001
6+
DECchip 21040-AA
21011 0024
pci0
isp0
isp1
tulip0
isp2
isp3
tulip1
C1 PCI connected to kftia0
pci1
0+
3+
SIO
VGA
Controllers on SIO
0+
DECchip 21040-AA
1+
FLOPPY
2+
KBD
3+
MOUSE
4828086
D1011
21011
2
3
4
0015
0022
sio0
vga0
sio0
0024
0000
0000
0000
tulip2
floppy0
kbd0
mouse0
EISA connected to pci2 through sio0
C4 PCI connected to kftha0
0+
SIO
4828086
7+
QLogic ISP1040B
10201077
8+
DECchip 21140-AA
91011
A+
QLogic ISP1040B
10201077
B+
KZPSA
81011
0+
1+
2+
3+
6+
Controllers on SIO
DECchip 21040-AA
FLOPPY
KBD
MOUSE
TOY
21011
2
3
4
7
eisa0
0015
0005
0022
0005
0000
pci2
sio1
isp4
tulip4
isp5
kzpsa0
0024
0000
0000
0000
0000
sio1
➌
tulip3
floppy1
kbd1
mouse1
toy1
EISA connected to pci2 through sio1
4-4 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
eisa1
➋
➌
Example 4–1 Check Configuration from Primary Console (Continued)
C8 PCI connected to kftha1
0+
SIO
4828086
3+
VGA
D1011
6+
QLogic ISP1040B
10201077
7+
QLogic ISP1040B
10201077
8+
DECchip 21041-AA
141011
9+
DECchip 21140-AA
91011
A+
KZPSA
81011
B+
Mylex DAC960
11069
0+
1+
2+
3+
6+
Controllers on SIO
DECchip 21040-AA
FLOPPY
KBD
MOUSE
TOY
21011
2
3
4
7
0015
0022
0005
0005
0021
0022
0000
0002
pci3
sio2
vga1
isp6
isp7
tulip6
tulip7
kzpsa1
dac3
0024
0000
0000
0000
0000
sio2
tulip5
floppy2
kbd2
mouse2
toy2
EISA connected to pci3 through sio2
➌
eisa2
Use the show config command to ensure that the correct CPU modules are
present and that there are sufficient DWLPB PCI card cages with KFE72-DA
adapters for the desired number of partitions.
➊ After power-up completes, issue the show config command from the console prompt.
➋ The processors are KN7CG processors.
➌ Ensure that there are enough PCI card cages with KFE72-EA/LA and
KFE72-DA adapters attached. Note that the listing for the C1 hose attached to the KFTIA has a VGA monitor card, indicating that this is a
KFE72-EA. (On a GS60E, this would be a KFE72-LA.) The SIO listings for
the DWLPBs connected to slots 7 and 6 show modules consistent with
KFE72-DAs.
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions 4-5
4.2
Step 1: Create and Initialize Environment Variables from the Primary Console
Create (or set) a series of environment variables from the primary console terminal.
Example 4–2 Initial Commands from the Primary Console
P00>>> show version
version
V5.4-18, 30 APR-1999 16:24:17
P00>>> show lp* ➋
P00>>>
➌
P00>>> create -nv lp_count 3
P00>>> create -nv lp_cpu_mask0 3
P00>>> create -nv lp_cpu_mask1 c
P00>>> create -nv lp_cpu_mask2 30
P00>>> create -nv lp_io_mask0 100
P00>>> create -nv lp_io_mask1 80
P00>>> create -nv lp_io_mask2 40
P00>>> create -nv lp_mem_mode isolate
➍
P00>>> show lp*
lp_count 3
lp_cpu_mask0 3
lp_cpu_mask1 c
lp_cpu_mask2 30
lp_io_mask0 100
lp_io_mask1 80
lp_io_mask2 40
lp_mem_mode isolate
➎
P00>>> set boot_reset off
P00>>> set interleave none
➏
P00>>> set os_type unix
➐
P00>>> set auto_action halt
➑
P00>>> init
4-6 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
➊
Begin to define logical partitions by issuing commands from the primary console
terminal. Example 4–2 shows a possible sequence. The steps are described below.
➊
Logical partitions require console firmware support. (See the Systems and
Options Catalog for the version necessary.) If you have not already done
so, verify that your system’s console revision number is the minimum or
greater by issuing the show version command. If the version is not at the
desired level, you need to update the console firmware. Obtain a console
CD with the latest version, and follow the instructions for the Loadable
Firmware Update (LFU) utility, as described in the AlphaServer GS140 or
8200/8400 Operations Manual or the AlphaServer GS60E Operations
Manual.
➋
Check to see if any lp_ environment variables have been set for this system. The example shows none have yet been created. If they had, the display would have indicated variables and their settings.
➌
Create (or set, if the lp_* environment variables have already been created) the desired environment variables. Create (or set) the CPU and I/O
masks to the values you want for each of your partitions. The example
shows three partitions. Use whatever values needed for your partitioning
scheme, as described in detail in Chapter 3.
➍
Issue a show lp* command to check the settings. If any mistakes were
made in the settings, correct them at this point.
➎
Set the boot_reset environment variable to off. This is necessary so that
booting a partition does not interfere with the operation of other, previously booted, partitions. If boot_reset were on, then a system-wide reset
is done when the boot command is executed from any partition. This reset
will immediately terminate operation of all partitions.
➏
Set the interleave environment variable to none.
➐
Set the environment variables pertaining to partition 0. In this case, the
os_type and auto_action environment variables are set.
➑
Issue an init command to restart the system with the new environment
variable settings.
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions 4-7
4.3
Step 2: Initialize Partitions from the Primary Console; Boot/Install OS in Partition 0
Initialize partition 0 and then initialize the secondary partition(s).
Boot and install the operating system in partition 0.
Example 4–3 Initializing the Partitions
P00>>> lpinit
➊
Partition 0: Primary CPU = 0
➋
Partition 1: Primary CPU = 2
Partition 2: Primary CPU = 4
Partition 0: Memory Base = 000000000
Size = 040000000
Partition 1: Memory Base = 040000000
Size = 040000000
Partition 2: Memory Base = 080000000
Size = 040000000
➍
No Shared Memory
LP Configuration Tree = 128000
starting cpu 2 in partition 1 at address 040010001 ➎
starting cpu 3 in partition 1 at address 040010001
starting cpu 4 in partition 2 at address 080010001
starting cpu 5 in partition 2 at address 080010001
P00>>> ➏
4-8 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
➌
Following the system reset, you are still issuing commands at the primary console. Perform the following actions:
➊ Issue the lpinit command to start the secondary partitions. The primary
console displays information on the partitions defined. The CPUs assigned
to each partition are listed, the memory ranges assigned are listed, a check
is made for interleaving, and the results displayed. Then the firmware
starts the CPUs in each partition, and displays that information as the partitions “come alive.” Initialization displays will begin to appear on the secondary consoles as well, as the separate initializations take place.
➋ As the partitions are initialized, the primary console displays information
about the partitions. As shown here, the primary, or boot processor, of each
partition is generally the lowest-numbered CPU in the partition.
➌ The base address and size of memory for each partition are listed.
➍ No shared memory indicates that the lp_mem_mode environment variable
has been set to isolate.
➎ This section of the display shows the CPUs being started in the secondary
partitions.
➏ You can now install (if the operating system has not yet been installed) or
boot the operating system. See the Tru64 UNIX Installation Guide for more
detail on booting and installing the operating system.
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions 4-9
4.4
Step 3: Set and Initialize Environment Variables,
Boot from Secondary Consoles
From each secondary console, set desired environment variables, initialize and boot the operating system.
Example 4–4 Using the Secondary Consoles
[initialization display]
P02>>> sho config
➊
Name
Type
Rev
KN7CG-AB
KN7CG-AB
KN7CG-AB
MS7CC
MS7CC
MS7CC
KFTHA
KFTHA
KFTIA
8025
8025
8025
5000
5000
5000
2000
2000
2020
0000
0000
0000
0B04
0000
0000
0D03
00D3
0000
kn7cg-ab0
kn7cg-ab1
kn7cg-ab2
ms7cc0
ms7cc1
ms7cc2
kftha1
kftha0
kftia0
C4 PCI connected to kftha0
0+
SIO
4828086
3+
VGA
D1011
5+
QLogic ISP1040B
10201077
6+
QLogic ISP1040B
10201077
7+
DECchip 21041-AA
141011
8+
Mylex DAC960
11069
0015
0022
0005
0005
0021
0000
pci0
sio0
vga0
isp0
isp1
tulip1
dac0
0024
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
sio0
tulip0
floppy0
kbd0
mouse0
com1
com2
toy0
TLSB
0++
1++
2++
3+
4+
5+
6+
7+
8+
0+
1+
2+
3+
4+
5+
6+
Controllers on SIO
DECchip 21040-AA
FLOPPY
KBD
MOUSE
COM1
COM2
TOY
21011
2
3
4
5
6
7
Mnemonic
➋
EISA connected to pci0 through sio0
eisa0
P02>>> set os_type unix
➌
P02>>> set auto_action boot
.
.
.
P02>>> show dev
➍
.
.
[locate the CD-ROM, if used to boot, and boot the operating system as you did
for partition 0]
4-10 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Once lpinit is executed from the primary console, initialization displays appear
at the secondary consoles.
➊ Note that the console prompt displays the processor number of the boot
processor for the secondary partition. Example 4–4 shows the user issuing
a show config command.
➋ Note that the show config displays the entire TLSB configuration, but
only the I/O configuration for this particular partition. In the example, a
PCI card cage is attached to hose C4 on the KFTHA in slot 7.
➌ Set any partition-specific local environment variables for the partition; that
is, any environment variables whose values may be different than those for
partition 0. These may include os_type, auto_action, bootdef_dev,
boot_osflags, for example.
➍ You can now install (if the operating system has not yet been installed) or
boot the operating system. See the Tru64 UNIX Installation Guide for more
detail on booting and installing the operating system.
NOTE: Do not try to change the lp_* environment variables from secondary
consoles.
Setting Up, Initializing, and Booting Logical Partitions 4-11
Chapter 5
Tips and Troubleshooting
This chapter describes some things you may want to do after you have defined
and initialized logical partitions on your system. Sections include:
•
Setting auto_action within Partitions
•
How to Stop a Hung Partition
•
Halting All Partitions to Reconfigure
•
Correcting Errors in Environment Variables
•
Using Tools to Debug a Partition
Tips and Troubleshooting 5-1
5.1
Setting auto_action Within Partitions
Here are some tips on setting the auto_action environment variable for
partitions.
Figure 5–1 Setting auto_action to Halt in Each Partition
Reset
Don't forget to shut down the
Operating System in all partitions!
Primary Console
Secondary
Con
sole
s
(powerup
display)
.
..
P00>>>lpinit
(powerup
display)
.
..
P02>>>
(powerup
display)
.
..
P04>>>
BX-0100H-99
5-2 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
In general, it is reasonable practice to set auto_action to halt in each partition
when you are first starting up logical partitions. Once you are sure that the
partitions have been defined as you wish, you can install and boot the operating
system in each partition. Once you have partitions running smoothly, you can
make changes to auto_action as desired.
Partition 0: auto_action Set to halt
If auto_action is set to halt in partition 0, then after partitions are initialized
with the lpinit command, turning the keyswitch to Reset or issuing an init and
answering “Y” to the prompt will cause the system to initialize with partitions
disabled. The primary console will halt at the console prompt; secondary consoles are disabled. You may then perform whatever actions you wish, and issue
an lpinit command to restart partitions as they were set previously, or as you
have changed them at the primary console.
If auto_action was set to halt at the secondary consoles, the secondary partitions will initialize and halt at the console prompt. If auto_action was set to
boot at the secondary consoles, the secondary partitions will initialize and boot
the operating system.
Partition 0: auto_action Set to boot
If auto_action is set to boot in partition 0, then after partitions are initialized,
turning the keyswitch to Reset or issuing an init and answering “Y” to the
prompt will cause the firmware to initialize the system with partitions disabled.
The firmware will then boot the operating system in the primary partition, and
issue an lpinit automatically to restart partitions. The secondary partitions
will come up.
If auto_action was set to halt at the secondary consoles, the secondary partitions will initialize and halt at the console prompt. If auto_action was set to
boot at the secondary consoles, the secondary partitions will initialize and boot
the operating system.
Tips and Troubleshooting 5-3
5.2
How to Stop a Hung Partition
You can halt a hung operating system instance in partition 0 by typing
Ctrl/P at the primary console. You can halt a hung operating system
instance in a secondary partition by issuing a stop n command from
another partition.
Example 5–1 Halting a Hung OS Instance in Partition 0
.
.
.
[operating system in partition 0 hung]
.
.
.
<Ctrl/P>
P00>>>
Example 5–2 Halting a Hung OS Instance in Secondary Partitions
.
.
.
[shut down operating system in partition 0]
.
.
.
P00>>> sho lp_cpu_mask1
lp_cpu_mask1 c
P00>>> stop 2
P00>>>
5-4 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
CAUTION: It is always recommended practice to shut down the operating
system before attempting to halt a partition. This may not
always be feasible, for instance, when an operating system instance
is hung. The procedures described here refer to that situation.
When an operating system instance hangs in partition 0, you can return to the
console prompt by typing Ctrl/P at the primary console terminal, as shown in
Example 5–1. The secondary partitions continue running. You can execute any
console firmware commands except the lpinit command without disturbing the
secondary partitions.
Example 5–2 shows how to halt execution of a hung operating system instance
in a secondary partition. Shut down the operating system in another partition
(in this case, partition 0) and use the stop n command there. You can determine the value of n by checking the lp_cpu_mask setting for the desired partition. The lowest even-numbered processor will be the primary processor for
that partition. See the figure below for CPU numbers allocated to the five possible slots available when using partitioning. In Example 5–2, the CPU bit
mask for partition 1 is set to c, indicating the two CPUs in slot 1, so the command stop 2 is issued. The user can then reboot the operating system in partition 0, and go on to debugging at partition 1’s secondary console.
Slot
4
Cpu No. 9 8
3
7 6
2
1
0
5 4
3 2
1 0
BX-0199K-99
Tips and Troubleshooting 5-5
5.3
Halting All Partitions to Reconfigure
You may wish to change the allocations set with the lp_* environment
variables, in effect reconfiguring your partitions. Shut down the operating system in each partition, reset the system, change the settings as
desired, reset the system, and issue an lpinit command.
Example 5–3 All Consoles: Shut Down Operating System
# /usr/bin/shutdown –h +5 “Shutting down to reconfigure partitions”➊
Example 5–4 Primary Console: Disable Partitions and Reset EVs
P00>>> set lp_count 0 ➋
P00>>> init
➌
Are you sure you want to reset ALL partitions? (Y/N)
.
.
.
➍
P00>>> set lp_count 2
P00>>> set lp_cpu_mask0 3
P00>>> set lp_cpu_mask1 30
P00>>> set lp_io_mask0 100
P00>>> set lp_io_mask1 c0
P00>>> set lp_mem_mode isolate
P00>>> set auto_action halt
➎
P00>>> init
.
.
.
➏
P00>>> lpinit
CPU 2, 3 not configured in any partition
➐
Partition 0: Primary CPU 0
Partition 1: Primary CPU 4
Partition 0 Memory Base 0000000000 Size 080000000
Partition 1 Memory Base 0800000000 Size 040000000
No Shared Memory
LP Configuration Tree 132000
Starting CPU 4 in partition 1 at address 080010001
Starting CPU 5 in partition 1 at address 080010001
5-6 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Y
➊ Shut down the operating system, using a command such as this one, at each
of the primary and secondary console terminals.
➋ Set the lp_count environment variable to 0 and issue an init to disable
partitioning on the system.
➌ You must use an init to reset the system so that all CPUs again run in partition 0. This will cause the environment variable changes made to be copied later to the CPUs in the secondary partitions when they are later initialized. Answer “yes” to the prompt asking if you really want to reset partitions.
➍ Set the other lp_* environment variables as desired. In this case, the example shows redefining the 3-partition system from previous chapters to a
2-partition system. You do not have to reset the CPU and I/O bit masks for
the old partition 2; they will be ignored because lp_count is set to 2.
➎ Initialize the primary partition.
➏ Initialize the secondary partitions.
➐ A message appears noting that CPUs 2 and 3 have not been assigned to any
partition. (We correct this error in the next section.)
Tips and Troubleshooting 5-7
5.4
Correcting Errors in Environment Variables
It is easy enough to make a mistake in setting bit masks for the lp_* environment variables. When you initialize partitioning, any unallocated
modules or doubly allocated modules will be noted at the primary console.
Example 5–5 Correcting a Bad Bit Mask
P00>>> init
➊
Are you sure you want to reset ALL partitions? (Y/<N>) Y
.
.
.
P00>>> set lp_cpu_mask0 f ➋
P00>>> lpinit
5-8 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
Continuing from the previous section, where the console firmware revealed that
CPUs 2 and 3 were not assigned to any partition, do an init to reset all partitions (➊). At ➋, correct the bit mask for partition 0 to include CPUs 2 and 3,
and issue an lpinit to initialize the partitions.
Tips and Troubleshooting 5-9
5.5
Using Tools to Debug a Partition
You can analyze crash dumps and run DECevent from a partition while
other partitions are operating normally.
Figure 5–2 Debugging One Partition
Partition 0
CRASH!
Partition 1
Partition 2
BX-0199L-99
5-10 Getting Started with Logical Partitions
A partition can crash, while other partitions remain up and running. You can
use the same tools to debug the problem partition as you would for a nonpartitioned system. You must first ensure that the tool has been installed on
each partition. For information on how to install DECevent, see the DECevent
Installation Guide.
Tips and Troubleshooting 5-11
Index
A
E
Auto_action environment variable,
4-7, 4-11 , 5-2
Environment variables
auto_action, 4-7, 4-11, 4-12, 5-2,
5-3
boot_osflags, 4-11
boot_reset, 4-7
bootdef_dev, 4-11
correcting errors in, 5-8
defining logical partitions, 3-2
example, 4-6
interleave, 2-9, 2-11, 2-13, 4-3, 4-7
lp_count, 3-3
lp_cpu_mask, 3-2, 3-3
lp_cpu_mask (detail), 3-4, 3-5
lp_io_mask, 3-2, 3-3
lp_io_mask (detail), 3-8, 3-9
lp_mem_mode, 3-2, 3-3
os_type, 4-7, 4-11
B
Boot_osflags environment variable,
4-11
Boot_reset environment variable,
4-7
Bootdef_dev environment variable,
4-11
C
CD-ROM drives, 2-20
Configuration
checking, 4-2
Configuration rules, 2-1–2-25
console devices, 2-19
DWLPB for GS140 systems, 2-14
DWLPB for GS60E systems, 2-16
example system, 2-4, 2-6
hose connections, 2-15, 2-16
KFE72 adapters, 2-18
secondary console terminals 2-18
TLSB modules, 2-8
Console devices, 2-18
Consolidating resources, 1-3
Ctrl/P, 1-5
D
DECevent, 5-10
F
Firmware version required, 4-7
Floppy drive
moving one between partitions,
2-24
H
Hose
usable positions, 2-15
Hung partition, stopping, 5-4
I
Increasing system efficiency, 1-3
Init command
cautions, 1-5
Index-1
Interleave environment variable,
2-9, 2-11, 2-13, 4-3, 4-7
Isolate (memory mode), 3-2, 3-3
K
KFE72-DA, 2-15, 2-17
configuration rules, 2-18, 2-19
KFE72-LA, 2-5, 2-23
L
Primary console
check configuration, 4-2
create and intialize environment
variables, 4-6
example commands, 4-2, 4-6
initialize partitions, 4-8,4-9
show config, 4-4
Primary console connection
GS60E and GS140, location, 2-19
Process overview, 1-7
lp_count, 3-2, 3-3
lp_cpu_mask, 3-2, 3-3, 3-4 –3-7
lp_io_mask, 3-2, 3-4, , 3-8, 3-9
lp_mem_mode, 3-2, 3-3
Lpinit command, 3-2, 4-8, 4-9
R
M
S
Memory allocation
two partitions, 2-10
three partitions, 2-12
O
Os_type environment variable, 4-7,
4-11
P
Partitions
reconfiguring, 5-6
Index-2
Reconfiguring partitions, 5-6
Reset keyswitch
cautions, 1-5
Secondary console
example commands, 4-10, 4-11
Secondary console connection
GS60E and GS140, location, 2-19
Secondary consoles
boot, 4-10, 4-11
set and initialize environment
variables, 4-10, 4-11
Secondary partitions
starting, 4-9
Systems and Options Catalog, 1-7