Proxim Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter 802.11a User`s guide

Harmony
Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter
User's Guide
2
Copyright
© 2002 Proxim Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA. Covered by one or more of the following U.S. patents: 5,231,634;
5,875,179; 6,006,090. This user’s guide and the software described in it are copyrighted with all rights
reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system,
or translated into any language in any form by any means without the written permission of Proxim
Corporation.
Trademarks
Harmony, the Harmony logo, 2X, Proxim, and the Proxim logo are trademarks of Proxim Corporation. All other
trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Limited Warranty, Disclaimer, Limitation Of Liability
For a period of three (3) years from the date of purchase by the retail customer, Proxim warrants the Harmony
802.11a CardBus Card (Model 8450) and the Harmony 802.11a PCI Card (Model 8150) against defects in
materials and workmanship. Proxim will not honor this warranty if there has been any attempt to tamper with
or remove the product’s external foil label.
This warranty does not cover and Proxim will not be liable for any damage or failure caused by misuse, abuse,
acts of God, accidents, or other causes beyond Proxim’s control, or claim by any entity other than the original
purchaser.
If, after inspection, Proxim determines there is a defect, Proxim will repair or replace the Harmony 802.11a
network adapter at no cost to you. To return defective merchandise to Proxim, please call Proxim Technical
Support at 1-408-731-2640 to obtain a Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA) number.
In no event shall Proxim Corporation be responsible or liable for any damages arising:
•
•
•
From the use of the product
From the loss of use, revenue or profit of the product
As a result of any event, circumstance, action, or abuse beyond the control of Proxim Corporation
Whether such damages be direct, indirect, consequential, special, or otherwise and whether such damages
are incurred by the person to whom this warranty extends or a third party.
Warranty Return Policy
If you have a problem with a Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card (Model 8450) or a Harmony 802.11a PCI Card
(Model 8150), please call Proxim Technical Support at 1-408-731-2640. Proxim Technical Support will assist
with resolving any technical difficulties you may have with your Proxim product.
After calling Proxim Technical Support, if your product is found to be defective, you may return the product to
Proxim after obtaining an RMA (Return Merchandise Authorization) number. The product must be returned in
its original packaging. The RMA number should be clearly marked on the outside of the box. Proxim cannot be
held responsible for any product returned without an RMA number, and no product will be accepted without an
RMA number.
FCC WARNING
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by
one or more of the following measures:
•
•
•
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that which the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1)
This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter User’s Guide
Part # 2050.0471
Rev. 01
3
Declaration of Conformity
Déclaration de Conformité
Konformitätserklärung
The Manufacturer:
Proxim Europe B.V.
Le Constructeur:
Der Hersteller:
Address:
Addresse:
Addresse:
Prins Bernhardplein 200
1097 JB, P.O. Box 94071,
1090 GB Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Declares that the Product:
Déclare que le Produit:
Erklärt, dass das Produkt:
Type:
Models:
Harmony 802.11a
8450 CardBus Card
8150 PCI Card
meets the essential requirements according to article 3 of the following EC-Directive:
est conforme aux exigencies essentielles d’article 3 de la Directive CE:
die grundlegenden Anforderungen gemäâ Artikel 3 der nachstehenden EU-Richtlinie erfült:
Directive 1999/5/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 09
March 1999 relating to Radio and Telecommunications Terminal
Equipment (R&TTE), including the mutual recognition of their conformity.
Directive 1999/5/EC du Parlement Europeen et du Conseil du 09 mache 1999
concernant les radio et equipments terminaux de telecommunications, incluant la
reconnaissance mutuelle de leur conformite.
Richtlinie 1999/5/EG des Europäischen Parlaments und des Rates vom 09. März 1999
über Funkanlagen und Telekommunikationsendeinrichtungen und die gegenseitige
Anerkennung ihrer Konformität.
and that the following harmonized standards have been applied:
et que les standards marmonises suivants ont ete appliqués:
und dass die folgenden harmonisierten Normen angewandt wurden:
EN301893-V1.1.1
/ January 2001
EN301489-17 V1.1.1 / September 2000
EN60950
/ December 2000
Equipment Class Identifier
This Product is a Class-2 under the scope of the R&TTE. Be aware that certain countries use other
frequencies or have special restrictions of use. This means that products bought elsewhere
might cause problems in the above these country(ies) and should be avoided. Consult your Post
Telegraph and Telephone office of your country for latest details.
Amsterdam, 18 March 2002
Place and Date of the declaration
Lieu et date de la declaration – Ort und Datum der Konformitätserklärung
Name and Signature
Nom et Signature – Name und Unterschrift
Carmelo S. Amarena
International Product Manager
Proxim Corporation & Proxim Europe B.V.
4
For Indoor Use Only
These products are for indoor use only.
Uniquement pour usage d'intérieur.
Somente para uso interno.
Solamente para el uso interior.
Per uso al coperto solamente.
Für Innen Verwendung nur.
Nemlig indendørs hjælp bare.
For indoor bruk bare.
För indoor användning enda.
Voor overdekt toepassing uitsluitend.
Indoor käyttöä varten vain.
Για την εσωτερική χρήση µόνο.
Product Approvals
Proxim will only ship products that are type approved in the destination country.
Refer to Proxim’s Web site at http://www.proxim.com/support/80211acertifications/ for a list of countries that
have approved Proxim’s 802.11a products. This Web site also details any special requirements that govern the
use of 802.11a products in a particular country.
An 802.11a product purchased for use in one country may not necessarily comply with the RF regulations in
another country.
Note to Italian Customers
Proxim’s 802.11a products sold in Italy may require a user license from the Italian ISPT. Products that are
deployed outdoors or are used for public purposes require an operating license. Products used within a private
domicile or for private use do not require a license.
5
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 - Introduction .................................................................................. 7
The Harmony Family .......................................................................................8
The Product Package .....................................................................................9
Harmony 8450 802.11a CardBus Card ......................................................9
Harmony 8150 802.11a PCI Card ...............................................................9
System Requirements .................................................................................. 10
Overview of Country-Specific Features ..........................................................11
Chapter 2 - Installation .................................................................................. 12
Pre-installation Considerations .................................................................... 12
Regulatory Warnings .............................................................................. 12
Windows ME and Windows 98 SE Installation CD Requirement .............. 13
Windows NT Laptops Require a Plug-and-Play Utility .............................. 14
Note to Customers Using a Laptop Without a CD-ROM Drive ................... 14
Installation Instructions ................................................................................15
Windows 98SE/ME/2000/XP ..................................................................15
Windows NT ........................................................................................... 18
Related Topics ....................................................................................... 21
Upgrading to Version 1.4 .............................................................................. 22
Chapter 3 - Wireless Topologies ..................................................................... 23
Ad Hoc ......................................................................................................... 23
Infrastructure ............................................................................................... 24
Connecting to a Single AP ...................................................................... 24
Roaming Between Multiple APs .............................................................. 25
Chapter 4 - Configuration Parameters ............................................................ 27
The IEEE 802.11a Specification ..................................................................... 27
802.11a Software Parameters .......................................................................28
Network Mode .......................................................................................28
SSID ......................................................................................................28
Power Saving Mode ...............................................................................29
2X Mode ................................................................................................29
Roaming ................................................................................................29
Channel ................................................................................................. 30
Send Rate .............................................................................................. 31
Fragmentation ....................................................................................... 31
RTS/CTS ................................................................................................. 32
Security Options .................................................................................... 32
6
Chapter 5 - Harmony Utility ............................................................................ 36
Status Monitor Icon ..................................................................................... 36
Configuration Utility ..................................................................................... 37
Association Information ......................................................................... 37
Station Configuration ............................................................................. 39
Security ................................................................................................. 42
Network Traffic Statistics ........................................................................51
802.11a Networks .................................................................................. 54
Version Information ............................................................................... 57
Chapter 6 - Troubleshooting .......................................................................... 58
How to Obtain Help with Your LAN Installation ............................................. 58
Common Installation Problems .................................................................... 58
Windows 98/ME/2000/XP Troubleshooting ........................................... 59
Configuring Networking Clients and Protocols ........................................ 61
Uninstalling a Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter ........................................62
Range .......................................................................................................... 63
CardBus Card LED Indicators ........................................................................64
Common Technical Support Questions ........................................................ 65
Appendix A - Technical Specifications ............................................................. 68
Technical Specifications ..............................................................................68
Parameters .................................................................................................. 70
Appendix B - Technical Support and Training ................................................... 71
Index............................................................................................................ 72
7
Chapter 1
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of a Harmony 802.11a network adapter. These
products are high performance wireless LAN adapter cards that comply with the IEEE
802.11a standard. This means that they are interoperable with IEEE 802.11a
equipment from any manufacturer when operating in 802.11a mode. In addition, they
support 2XTM mode*, which provides data rates of up to 108 Mbps.
The Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card (Model 8450) and the Harmony 802.11a PCI Card
(Model 8150) support Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows Millennium Edition (ME),
Windows 98 Second Edition (SE), and Windows NT 4.0. Computers with a Harmony
802.11a network adapter installed “look” like standard network nodes to the
operating system.
The Harmony 802.11a network adapters can be used with other 802.11a devices to
form a stand-alone wireless Ad Hoc network* or used in conjunction with a Harmony
infrastructure to provide mobile clients with wireless access to an Ethernet network.
Proxim is the pioneer in wireless broadband networking. Proxim’s unmatched
expertise in radio networking technology, combined with the company’s extensive
experience serving the communication needs of the mobile computing user, have
kept Proxim at the forefront of the wireless LAN market.
*Available features vary by region/country.
Introduction
8
The Harmony Family
The Harmony network adapters are members of a product family that provides a
complete wireless networking solution.
• The Harmony Access Point Controller Model 7560 centralizes the management,
security, and filtering capabilities of a wireless LAN. The Access Point (AP) Controller communicates with Harmony Access Points over the Ethernet network to
provide wireless network access for mobile clients. The AP Controller can support
multiple APs, even if each AP complies with a different wireless standard.
•
The Harmony Access Point is a networking bridge that operates at Layer 2 of the
OSI networking model. Working alone or in conjunction with a Harmony AP Controller, the AP forwards packets between its radio and the Ethernet network.
Three types of the Harmony Access Point are available to support the IEEE
802.11a, IEEE 802.11b, or OpenAir wireless standard: the 802.11a Access Point
Models 8569/8570/8571, the 802.11b Access Point Models 8550/8551 and the
OpenAir Access Point Model 7550.
•
The optional Harmony Power System Model 7562 provides DC power to Harmony
APs over the unused pins of a twisted pair Ethernet cable.
•
The Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card Model 8450 is a wireless LAN adapter that
fits into a 32-bit CardBus slot in a laptop computer and complies with the IEEE
802.11a standard.
•
The Harmony PC Card is a wireless LAN adapter that fits into a PCMCIA Type II slot
in a laptop computer. Two models are available to support the IEEE 802.11b
(8430 Series) or OpenAir (7430 Series) wireless standard.
•
The Harmony CompactFlash Card is a wireless LAN adapter that fits into a
CompactFlash slot in a Pocket PC. Two models are available to support the IEEE
802.11b (Model 8630) or OpenAir (Model 7630) wireless standard.
•
The Harmony PCI Card is a wireless LAN adapter that fits into a standard PCI
expansion slot. Two models are available to support the IEEE 802.11a (Model
8150) or 802.11b (Model 8110) wireless standard.
•
The Harmony OpenAir USB Adapter Model 7230 is an OpenAir-compliant wireless LAN adapter that connects to a Windows 98/ME/2000 computer’s Universal
Serial Bus (USB) port.
Introduction
9
The Product Package
The items included with each Harmony 802.11a network adapter are listed below. If
any of these items are missing or damaged, please contact your reseller or Proxim
Technical Support.
Harmony 8450 802.11a CardBus Card
Each Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card Model 8450 comes with the following:
• One 802.11a CardBus Card with two integral 1.5 dBi antennas that provide built-in
diversity (antennas are inside the casing and not visible to the user)
•
One Harmony 802.11a Installation CD-ROM containing Proxim software and
utilities and this user’s guide in Portable Document Format (PDF)
•
One Harmony 8450 802.11a CardBus Card Quick Start Guide
Harmony 8150 802.11a PCI Card
Each Harmony 802.11a PCI Card Model 8150 comes with the following:
• One 802.11a PCI Card with two integral 1.5 dBi antennas that provide built-in
diversity (one antenna is attached to the card via a 55" cable; the other antenna
is attached directly to the card’s bracket)
•
One Harmony 802.11a Installation CD-ROM containing Proxim software and
utilities and this user’s guide in Portable Document Format (PDF)
•
One Harmony 8150 802.11a PCI Card Quick Start Guide
Introduction
10
System Requirements
To begin using a Harmony 802.11a network adapter, you must have the following
minimum requirements:
• A computer that meets the following specifications:
• Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows Millennium Edition (ME), Windows 98
Second Edition (SE), or Windows NT (Service Pack 6 or later)* installed
• CardBus Card users: PC Card expansion slot (32-bit CardBus)
• PCI Card users: PCI (Peripheral Components Interconnect) expansion slot
• At least 64 MB of memory
• A 300 MHz processor or higher
•
At least one other IEEE 802.11a-compliant device
• Adapters sold in Europe require an 802.11a-compliant Access Point
(peer-to-peer Ad Hoc mode is not available in Europe)
*A Windows NT laptop must have a third-party Plug-and-Play utility (such as
Systemsoft’s CardWizard) to install the Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card.
Introduction
11
Overview of Country-Specific Features
This user’s guide provides information on how to install and use the Harmony 802.11a
CardBus Card and the Harmony 802.11a PCI Card. Product features vary by
region/country. The following table summarizes the product differences based on
region:
U.S./Canada
Europe
Japan/Singapore
2X Mode
Available
Not available
Not available
Ad Hoc Mode
Available
Not available
Available
Number of Channels
8
(3 in 2X Mode)
8
4
12
Chapter 2
Installation
This chapter describes how to install a Harmony 802.11a network adapter and
software in a computer running Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows Millennium
Edition (ME), Windows 98 Second Edition (SE), or Windows NT 4.0 (SP 6 or later).
Note:
Run the Harmony Installation program before installing the 802.11a network
adapter in the computer.
Pre-installation Considerations
Review the following pre-installation considerations before installing a Harmony
802.11a network adapter.
Regulatory Warnings
FCC Guidelines
Model 8150 802.11a PCI Card Users:
It is the responsibility of the installer and users of the Harmony 802.11a PCI Card
Model 8150 to guarantee that the antennas are operated at least 20 centimeters from
any person. This is necessary to insure that the product is operated in accordance
with the RF Guidelines for Human Exposure which have been adopted by the Federal
Communications Commission.
Radio Frequency Interference Requirements
The Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card, Model 8450, and the Harmony 802.11a PCI Card,
Model 8150, operate in the frequency range of 5.15 to 5.35 GHz; they are restricted to
indoor use due to their operation in the 5.15 to 5.25 GHz frequency range.
FCC 15.407(e) requires that these devices be used indoors in the frequency range of
5.15 to 5.25 GHz to reduce the potential for harmful interference to co-channel Mobile
Satellite systems. Therefore the devices should be used indoor only for channel 36,
40, 44, and 48 and when 2X mode is enabled, channel 42 and 50.
Installation
13
High power radars are allocated as primary users of the 5.25 to 5.35 GHz and 5.65 to
5.85 GHz band. These radar stations can cause interference with and/or damage the
Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card and/or Harmony 802.11a PCI Card.
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
We, Proxim Corporation,
935 Stewart Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94085 USA
408-731-2700
declare under our sole responsibility that the Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card, Model
8450, and the Harmony 802.11a PCI Card, Model 8150, comply with Part 15 of FCC
Rules. Operation of either product is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this
device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Industry Canada Guidelines
Model 8150 802.11a PCI Card Users:
The Harmony 8150 802.11a PCI Card has been designed to operate with an antenna
having a maximum gain of 3 dBi. Antenna having a higher gain is strictly prohibited
per regulations of Industry Canada. The required antenna impedance is 50 ohms. To
reduce potential radio interference to other users, the antenna type and its gain
should be so chosen that the equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) is not
more than that required for successful communication. The installer of this radio
equipment must ensure that the antenna is located or pointed such that it does not
emit RF field in excess of Health Canada limits for the general population; consult
Safety Code 6, obtainable from Health Canada’s website http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/rpb.
Windows ME and Windows 98 SE Installation CD Requirement
Before beginning the installation of an 802.11a network adapter, confirm that you
have a Windows 98 SE or Windows ME installation CD available (depending on the
computer’s operating system). Windows 98/ME users may be prompted to insert a
Windows CD during the installation.
You should not need a Windows CD when installing an 802.11a network adapter in a
Windows XP, 2000, or NT computer.
If you do not have a Windows 98/ME CD, it is possible that you already have the
Windows installation files on your hard disk. These Windows installation files are
known as Windows Cabinet or CAB files. The Cabinet files are commonly located in
C:\WINDOWS\OPTIONS\INSTALL\ or C:\WINDOWS\OPTIONS\CABS\.
Note:
Windows 98/ME users may need the Windows CD or Cabinet files to complete the installation of an 802.11a network adapter. Proxim recommends
that you do not proceed with the installation until you have confirmed that
you have one of these Windows installation media available.
Installation
14
Windows NT Laptops Require a Plug-and-Play Utility
A Windows NT laptop must have a third-party Plug-and-Play utility installed in order to
use the 802.11a CardBus Card. One popular Plug-and-Play utility for Windows NT 4.0
is CardWizard from SystemSoft. See http://www.systemsoft.com for details.
Note to Customers Using a Laptop Without a CD-ROM Drive
If you are installing the 802.11a CardBus Card in a laptop that does not have a CD-ROM
drive or if your CD-ROM drive is an external device that shares a single CardBus slot
with network adapter cards, you should follow the steps below prior to installing the
802.11a CardBus Card:
1. Windows 98/ME users: Confirm that the Windows cabinet (CAB) files are
installed on the computer. The CAB files are typically located in
C:\WINDOWS\OPTIONS\INSTALL\ or C:\WINDOWS\OPTIONS\CABS\.
2.
Windows 98/ME users: If the computer does not have the CAB files installed,
copy the Win98 or Win9x folder found on the Windows CD-ROM to a temporary
folder on the computer.
3.
Copy the contents of the Harmony 802.11a Installation CD-ROM to a temporary
folder on the computer. Alternatively, you may download the software from
Proxim’s Web site at http://www.proxim.com/support/.
4.
Follow the installation instructions contained in this chapter. When the
instructions call for either the Windows CD or the Harmony Installation CD, search
the CAB files or the temporary folders you created in Steps #2 and 3.
5.
When the installation is complete, remove the temporary folders you created in
Steps #2 and 3 from the computer’s hard drive.
Installation
15
Installation Instructions
Refer to the set of instructions that correspond to your computer’s operating system.
Windows 98SE/ME/2000/XP
The instructions below describe how to install a Harmony 802.11a network adapter by
running the Harmony Installation program before inserting the adapter into the
computer. The Harmony Installation program installs the Harmony Utility first, and
then it installs the Harmony 802.11a network adapter and driver. If you inserted an
802.11a adapter before running the Harmony Installation program, see “Adapter
Inserted Before Running the Installation Program” on page 59 for instructions.
Follow these steps to install a Harmony 802.11a network adapter in a Windows 98 SE,
Windows ME, Windows 2000, or Windows XP computer.
1. Turn on the computer and logon to Windows, if applicable.
2.
Insert the Harmony Installation CD into the computer’s CD-ROM drive.
3.
If the Harmony Installation program does not launch automatically, run
SETUP.EXE from the Harmony Installation CD to launch the program, shown in the
following example.
4.
Click Next to continue.
5.
Select a destination folder for the Harmony Utility files and click Next to continue.
Installation
16
6.
Enter a name for the utility’s Program Manager group and click Next.
7.
Click Next to install the utility.
8.
Click Finish to view additional information about the utility.
Note:
9.
To avoid viewing the additional information, uncheck the Read Harmony
configuration instructions box before clicking Finish.
Click Finish to complete the Harmony Utility installation and to continue the
installation of a Harmony 802.11a network adapter.
10. The Harmony Device Setup wizard will prompt you to insert a Harmony 802.11a
network adapter, as shown below.
Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card users: Insert the CardBus Card into an available
CardBus slot and proceed to Step #11.
Harmony 802.11a PCI Card users: Follow these steps:
• Click Cancel.
• Shut down the computer, unplug its power cord from the wall outlet, and
remove the computer cover.
• Locate an unused PCI slot and refer to your PC’s manual for instructions on how
to remove the plate that covers the slot (if applicable).
• Feed the card’s antennas through the PCI slot and out the back of the
computer.
• Align the PCI Card over the empty slot and firmly insert the card into the slot.
See page 59 for a sample illustration.
Installation
17
• Secure the card’s metal bracket to the computer following the directions provided in your PC’s manual and replace the computer cover.
• Plug the computer’s power cord back into the wall outlet.
• Attach the cabled antenna to the antenna base and place it on top of your
desk, computer, or monitor.
• Turn on the computer and proceed to Step #11.
11. Follow the on-screen instructions to install the network adapter. Note the
following:
• Windows XP users: If prompted, select Install the software automatically
(Recommended) and click Next.
• Windows 98/ME users: If prompted to identify the location of the file
Prox11a.sys or Netpr11a.cat, direct the installation wizard to search the Harmony Installation CD.
• Windows 98/ME users: Insert the Windows installation CD if prompted. If you
do not have a Windows installation CD, see “Windows ME and Windows 98 SE
Installation CD Requirement” on page 13.
12. Restart the computer if prompted. Otherwise, click Close when prompted that
the Harmony 802.11a network adapter has been properly configured.
Note:
If the Harmony Device Setup program or Windows Networking reports that
the Harmony 802.11a network adapter has not been properly configured, follow the on-screen instructions and refer to Chapter 6 for troubleshooting
suggestions.
13. The Harmony Utility’s Status Monitor icon will appear in Windows Taskbar, as
shown below.
14. The Harmony 802.11a network adapter is now ready for use. Use the Harmony
Utility (described in Chapter 5) to configure the adapter and determine if it is
communicating with other 802.11a devices.
Note:
PCI Card users with Windows XP may need to enable Harmony Configuration
before using the Harmony Utility. See “Note to Windows XP Users” on
page 41 for details.
If you have one or more 802.11a Access Points, configure the Harmony 802.11a
network adapter’s Network Mode to Infrastructure. If your network consists of only
802.11a client adapters, set Network Mode to Ad Hoc.
Note:
Products sold in Europe do not support Ad Hoc mode.
For more information on Ad Hoc and Infrastructure networks, see Chapter 3 beginning
on page 23 and “Network Mode” on page 28. Also, see “Related Topics” on page 21.
Installation
18
Windows NT
Follow these steps to install a Harmony 802.11a network adapter in a computer
running Windows NT 4.0 (Service Pack 6 or later).
1. Turn on the computer and logon to Windows, if applicable.
2.
Insert the Harmony Installation CD into the computer’s CD-ROM drive.
3.
If the Harmony Installation program does not launch automatically, run
SETUP.EXE from the Harmony Installation CD to launch the program, shown in the
following example.
4.
Click Next to continue.
5.
Select a destination folder for the Harmony Utility files and click Next to continue.
6.
Enter a name for the utility’s Program Manager group and click Next.
7.
Click Next to install the utility.
8.
Click Finish to view additional information about the utility.
Note:
9.
To avoid viewing the additional information, uncheck the Read Harmony
configuration instructions box before clicking Finish.
Click Finish to complete the Harmony Utility installation and to continue the
installation of a Harmony 802.11a network adapter.
Installation
19
10. Click Install when prompted by the Harmony Device Setup screen, shown below.
Note:
Proxim recommends that you let the installation wizard install the card for
you. However, if you want to install the adapter manually, click Control
Panel to open the Network screen’s Adapter window. Click OK after you
have manually installed the adapter to return to the installation wizard.
11. When the Microsoft TCP/IP Properties screen appears, select the Harmony
802.11a Network Adapter from the list of network adapters and configure its IP
settings (as required by your network).
Installation
20
12. Click OK to save the TCP/IP settings.
13. Click No when prompted to restart the computer.
14. Click OK to close the Harmony Device Setup screen.
15. Shut down the computer.
16. Install the Harmony 802.11a network adapter in the computer.
Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card users: Insert the CardBus Card into an available
CardBus slot. The laptop must have a third-party Plug-and-Play utility installed.
See “Windows NT Laptops Require a Plug-and-Play Utility” on page 14 for details.
Harmony 802.11a PCI Card users: Follow these steps:
• Unplug the computer’s power cord from the wall outlet.
• Remove the computer cover.
• Locate an unused PCI slot and refer to your PC’s manual for instructions on how
to remove the plate that covers the slot (if applicable).
• Feed the card’s antennas through the PCI slot and out the back of the
computer.
• Align the PCI Card over the empty slot and firmly insert the card into the slot.
See page 59 for a sample illustration.
• Secure the card’s metal bracket to the computer following the directions provided in your PC’s manual and replace the computer cover.
• Plug the computer’s power cord back into the wall outlet.
• Attach the cabled antenna to the antenna base and place it on top of your
desk, computer, or monitor.
17. Turn on the computer.
18. The Status Monitor icon will appear in Windows Taskbar, as shown below.
19. The Harmony 802.11a network adapter is now ready for use. Use the Harmony
Utility (described in Chapter 5) to configure the adapter and determine if it is
communicating with other 802.11a devices.
Note:
If Windows Networking reports that the Harmony 802.11a network adapter
has not been properly configured, follow the on-screen instructions and
refer to Chapter 6 for troubleshooting suggestions.
If you have one or more 802.11a Access Points, configure the 802.11a adapter’s
Network Mode to Infrastructure. If your network consists of only 802.11a adapters, set
Network Mode to Ad Hoc. For more information on Ad Hoc and Infrastructure
networks, see Chapter 3 beginning on page 23 and “Network Mode” on page 28.
Note:
Products sold in Europe do not support Ad Hoc mode.
Installation
21
Related Topics
•
See Chapter 4 beginning on page 27 for a discussion of the 802.11a configuration
parameters.
•
Refer to Chapter 5 beginning on page 36 for information on how to use the
Harmony Utility.
•
See “Configuring Networking Clients and Protocols” on page 61 for information
on how to configure a networking protocol like TCP/IP (to set the card’s IP parameters).
Installation
22
Upgrading to Version 1.4
If you already have an earlier version of the Harmony 802.11a software installed,
follow these steps to upgrade to version 1.4:
1. Insert the Harmony Installation CD into the CD-ROM drive. If you do not have a
CD that contains software version 1.4, you can download the software from
Proxim’s Web site at http://www.proxim.com/support/.
2.
Double-click SETUP.EXE to begin the software upgrade.
3.
Click the Upgrade button when prompted that the Harmony 802.11a Utility is
already installed on the computer, as shown below.
4.
When prompted, click OK to restart the computer.
After the computer reboots, the Harmony 802.11a network adapter will be using
software version 1.4.
23
Chapter 3
Wireless Topologies
Harmony wireless products look and operate similar to Ethernet products. The only
difference is that a radio replaces the wire between various nodes. This means that all
of your existing applications that operate over Ethernet will work with Harmony
without any special wireless networking software. The Harmony 802.11a network
adapters support several network topologies, which are described in this chapter.
Ad Hoc
Two or more computers easily establish an ad hoc network when the units are in range
of each other. Each computer can dynamically connect and reconnect to the others
with no additional configuration, using off-the-shelf peer-to-peer network operating
systems, as illustrated in Figure 1.
Figure 1 Ad Hoc
To use a Harmony 802.11a network adapter as a member of an Ad Hoc network with
other 802.11a-compatible cards, configure the adapter to operate in Ad Hoc mode.
See “Network Mode” on page 28 for details.
Note:
Products sold in Europe do not support Ad Hoc mode.
Wireless Topologies
24
Infrastructure
Many companies have an existing Ethernet or wired LAN infrastructure and want to be
able to extend that capability to wireless nodes. This is accomplished by installing
one or more Harmony 802.11a Access Points on the Ethernet network. You can also
add a Harmony Access Point Controller to the network to simplify Access Point
management and take advantage of additional features. See the Harmony Access
Point Controller User’s Guide for more information.
Connecting to a Single AP
Figure 2 depicts a Harmony network that uses a single Access Point (AP) in
Independent mode (without a Harmony Access Point Controller). See the Harmony
802.11a Access Point User’s Guide for more information on Independent mode.
Figure 2 Single AP
Wireless Topologies
25
Roaming Between Multiple APs
For larger environments, Harmony 802.11a client devices may roam from one Harmony
802.11a Access Point to another while maintaining the same network connection. The
802.11a Access Points establish coverage areas or cells similar in concept to those of
a cellular phone network. The mobile clients will connect to any 802.11a Access Point
that is within range.
Figure 3 Roaming
Each Harmony 802.11a Access Point within a roaming network must have a unique,
independent Channel, but all must have the same SSID and security settings (if
applicable).
Mobile clients equipped with a Harmony 802.11a network adapter are configured to
operate in Infrastructure mode and have the same SSID and security settings as the
Access Points. Alternatively, the mobile client may use an SSID of “any” to associate
with any available Access Point, regardless of the Access Point’s SSID.
Wireless Topologies
26
As the mobile client seamlessly switches from cell to cell, its network connectivity is
preserved. The user can move freely between the Harmony 802.11a Access Points on
the network. When the roaming client leaves the transmission range of one 802.11a
Access Point, the software automatically polls the other 802.11a Access Point(s) in the
same Extended Service Set (ESS) to continue the network connection.
Note:
The Access Points’ cells must overlap to ensure that there are no gaps in coverage so that the roaming client will always have a connection available.
See Figure 3 for an example of a roaming Infrastructure network that includes a
Harmony Access Point Controller. A network that has one or more Harmony Access
Point Controllers provides additional security and management features, such as AP
Groups and the Harmony Security Protocol. In addition, you can install Harmony
802.11a Access Points on different IP subnets from the AP Controller, allowing mobile
users to roam across routers. For more information on the Harmony AP Controller and
Access Points, refer to the Harmony Access Point Controller User’s Guide.
Guidelines for Roaming
•
A Harmony 802.11a client can only roam between 802.11a Access Points. An
802.11a client cannot communicate with Harmony 802.11b or OpenAir Access
Points.
•
All 802.11a Access Points must have the same SSID.
•
All workstations with Harmony 802.11a client adapters installed must use either
an SSID of “any” or the same SSID as the Access Points that they will roam
between.
•
All 802.11a Access Points and clients must have the same security settings to
communicate.
•
The Access Points’ cells must overlap to ensure that there are no gaps in coverage
and to ensure that the roaming client will always have a connection available.
•
Access Points in the same vicinity should each use a unique, independent Channel to avoid potential interference.
•
Access Points that use the same Channel should be installed as far away from
each other as possible to reduce potential interference.
27
Chapter 4
Configuration Parameters
This chapter provides information on the 802.11a wireless standard and describes the
Harmony 802.11a configuration parameters.
The IEEE 802.11a Specification
In 1997, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) adopted the 802.11
standard for wireless devices operating in the 2.4 GHz frequency band. This standard
includes provisions for three radio technologies: direct sequence spread spectrum,
frequency hopping spread spectrum, and infrared. Devices that comply with the
802.11 standard operate at a data rate of either 1 or 2 Mbps.
In 1999, the IEEE modified the 802.11 standard to support devices operating in the
5 GHz frequency band, calling this new standard “802.11a.” 802.11a devices are not
backwards compatible with 2.4 GHz 802.11 or 802.11b devices. 802.11a radios use a
radio technology called Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) to
achieve data rates of up to 54 Mbps.
In addition, the Harmony 802.11a network adapters support 2XTM Mode. This mode is
not part of the IEEE 802.11a specification but it allows data rates of up to 108 Mbps.
See “2X Mode” on page 29 for details. 2X Mode is not available in all countries.
Configuration Parameters
28
802.11a Software Parameters
The following configuration parameters are available for a Harmony 802.11a network
adapter. Refer to Chapter 5 for instructions on how to change these configuration
settings using the Harmony Utility.
Network Mode
Network Mode configures a Harmony 802.11a network adapter to operate in either Ad
Hoc mode or Infrastructure mode.
When set to Ad Hoc, all Harmony 802.11a devices must have the same SSID, Channel,
and WEP Keys (if WEP is enabled) to communicate. An Ad Hoc network is a wireless
network that consists of only 802.11a client adapters (i.e., a network that does not
have an Access Point).
Note:
Products sold in Europe do not support Ad Hoc mode.
When set to Infrastructure mode, an 802.11a network adapter must have the same
SSID and security settings as the Access Points on the network to communicate. An
Infrastructure network is any network that includes one or more 802.11a Access
Points. By default, the adapter operates in Infrastructure mode.
SSID
The SSID (Service Set ID), which is also referred to as the ESSID (Extended Service Set
ID), is a text string that all members of the same 802.11a network share.
The SSID may be up to 32 alphanumeric characters long, including spaces. Also,
when configured to “any,” a Harmony 802.11a network adapter can communicate with
any available Access Point regardless of the Access Point’s SSID.
In an Infrastructure network, the SSID must match on all Harmony 802.11a Access
Points and 802.11a clients (unless a client’s SSID is “any”). Devices that do not share
the same SSID cannot communicate.
In an Ad Hoc network without an Access Point, each 802.11a device must have the
same SSID to participate in the network. A node cannot use the “any” SSID to join an
Ad Hoc network.
By default, an 802.11a adapter’s SSID is set to “any”.
Configuration Parameters
29
Power Saving Mode
The Harmony 802.11a network adapters support optional power management to
conserve battery life. Power Saving Mode is only available if the adapter is operating
in Infrastructure mode.
When Power Saving Mode is set to Normal or Maximum, a Harmony 802.11a network
adapter enters a “doze” mode where the card becomes inactive and only wakes up
periodically to receive control messages from the Access Point. The card wakes up
more often in Normal mode than in Maximum mode so a card in Normal mode will
respond sooner to network requests than a node in Maximum mode. However,
Maximum mode draws less power than Normal mode.
When an Access Point receives a packet destined for a dozing client, it buffers the
packet and includes a notification within its control message to alert the client that a
packet is waiting for it. Once the card receives the control message, it polls the Access
Point to request that the buffered packet be sent to it.
2X Mode
The Harmony 802.11a network adapters support 2XTM mode, a high-speed operating
mode that can provide data rates of up to 108 Mbps, twice the speed of standard
802.11a devices. By default, 2X mode is disabled.
Note:
Products sold in Europe, Japan, and Singapore do not support 2X mode.
When 2X mode is disabled, a Harmony 802.11a adapter complies with the IEEE
802.11a standard, can operate on one of eight Channels, and can achieve speeds of
up to 54 Mbps.
When 2X mode is enabled, a Harmony 802.11a adapter does not comply with the IEEE
802.11a standard, can operate on one of three Channels, and can achieve speeds of
up to 108 Mbps.
Note:
You must configure all devices in the same network to use 2X mode. A
device in 2X mode cannot communicate with a device in 802.11a mode.
Roaming
The Roaming parameter allows you to determine how tolerant a Harmony 802.11a
adapter is to radio phenomena that can cause the unit to roam from one Access Point
to another in order to maintain a strong wireless connection.
In areas with many 802.11a Access Points that provide heavy overlapping coverage,
set this parameter to Fast to maintain high throughput for each wireless adapter.
In most networks, set Roaming to Normal. Wireless adapter throughput will not
change noticeably, and an overabundance of Access Points is not required.
If the coverage area provided by 802.11a Access Points is sparse, set Roaming to Slow.
Harmony adapters will not roam until they are nearly out of range of the Access Point
with which they are associated.
Configuration Parameters
30
Channel
802.11a devices spread a radio signal over a range of frequencies. The IEEE 802.11a
specification allocates the available frequencies in the 5 GHz band into a series of
operating Channels that are identified by a Channel number and a center carrier
frequency.
An 802.11a network adapter configured for Infrastructure mode receives a Channel
assignment from its Access Point. You cannot configure the Channel for an adapter
operating in Infrastructure mode.
For an Ad Hoc network, all nodes must use the same Channel to communicate. You
can configure the adapter to scan multiple Channels to locate an Ad Hoc network or
you can configure it to use a specific Channel. See “Station Configuration” on
page 39 for details.
The number of available Channels varies by region.
For United States and Canada:
An 802.11a network adapter can use one of eight Channels in 802.11a-compliant
mode: Channel 36 (5.18 GHz), Channel 40 (5.20 GHz), Channel 44 (5.22 GHz),
Channel 48 (5.24 GHz), Channel 52 (5.26 GHz), Channel 56 (5.28 GHz), Channel 60
(5.30 GHz), or Channel 64 (5.32 GHz).
An 802.11a network adapter can use one of three Channels in 2X mode: Channel 42
(5.21 GHz), Channel 50 (5.25 GHz), or Channel 58 (5.29 GHz).
If you wish to install multiple Ad Hoc networks in the same vicinity, Proxim
recommends that you configure each network with a unique Channel to avoid
interference between networks. Keep in mind that each Channel in 2X mode overlaps
multiple Channels in 802.11a mode. For example, if an Ad Hoc network in 2X mode is
using Channel 50, do not configure nearby networks in 802.11a mode for Channel 42,
48, 52, or 56.
Note:
See “Radio Frequency Interference Requirements” on page 12 for important
regulatory information concerning Channel selection.
For Europe:
An 802.11a network adapter can use one of eight Channels: Channel 36 (5.18 GHz),
Channel 40 (5.20 GHz), Channel 44 (5.22 GHz), Channel 48 (5.24 GHz), Channel 52
(5.26 GHz), Channel 56 (5.28 GHz), Channel 60 (5.30 GHz), or Channel 64 (5.32 GHz).
Adapters sold in Europe will automatically receive a Channel assignment from their
Access Points. These adapters do not support Ad Hoc mode.
For Japan:
An 802.11a adapter can use one of four Channels: Channel 34 (5.17 GHz), Channel 38
(5.19 GHz), Channel 42 (5.21 GHz), or Channel 46 (5.23 GHz). If you wish to install
multiple Ad Hoc networks in the same vicinity, Proxim recommends that you configure
each network with a unique Channel to avoid interference between networks.
Configuration Parameters
31
For Singapore:
An 802.11a network adapter can use one of four Channels: Channel 36 (5.18 GHz),
Channel 40 (5.20 GHz), Channel 44 (5.22 GHz), or Channel 48 (5.24 GHz). If you wish
to install multiple Ad Hoc networks in the same vicinity, Proxim recommends that you
configure each network with a unique Channel to avoid interference between
networks.
Send Rate
The IEEE 802.11a specification supports eight data rates: 54 Mbps, 48 Mbps,
36 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 18 Mbps, 12 Mbps, 9 Mbps, and 6 Mbps. Harmony’s 2X mode
supports eight data rates: 108 Mbps, 96 Mbps, 72 Mbps, 48 Mbps, 36 Mbps,
24 Mbps, 18 Mbps, and 12 Mbps.
As a mobile client travels away from an 802.11a Access Point (when in Infrastructure
mode) or from other 802.11a nodes (when in Ad Hoc mode), the data rate
automatically decreases in order to maintain a usable radio connection.
For example, in an Infrastructure network that is using 2X mode, a client that is close
to an Access Point may operate at 108 Mbps, but a client that is far away from the
Access Point may operate at 12 Mbps.
By default, a Harmony 802.11a network adapter automatically adjusts the transmit
rate depending on the mode of operation (802.11a-compliant or 2X). However, you
can also manually configure a specific send rate that an adapter will use.
For example, if you configure the Send Rate to 36 Mbps, a Harmony 802.11a adapter
will operate at 36 Mbps.
Fragmentation
The Harmony 802.11a network adapters support an optional feature called
Fragmentation. In harsh radio environments, 802.11a devices may have difficulty
transmitting large packets that exceed a certain size. However, when Fragmentation is
enabled, an 802.11a device can break up large packets into a number of smaller
packets (called “fragments”) that can be successfully transmitted to another 802.11a
device. The receiving 802.11a device then reassembles the original packet once it has
received all of the fragments.
You can configure a Harmony 802.11a network adapter to never use Fragmentation or
to fragment only those packets that exceed a certain size. For example, if the
Fragmentation Threshold is set to 1000 Bytes, then a sending radio will fragment any
packet 1000 Bytes or larger before transmitting.
The Fragmentation Threshold supports a range between 256 and 2345 Bytes. If set to
256, then a sending radio will fragment all packets 256 Bytes or larger. If set to 2345,
then a sending radio will fragment only those radio packets that are 2345 Bytes or
larger.
By default, Fragmentation is disabled.
Configuration Parameters
32
RTS/CTS
The 802.11a standard supports optional RTS/CTS communication based on packet
size. By default, RTS/CTS communication is disabled.
Without RTS/CTS, a sending radio listens to see if another radio is already using the
medium before transmitting a data packet. If the medium is free, the sending radio
transmits its packets. However, there is no guarantee that another radio is not
transmitting a packet at the same time, causing a collision.
When RTS/CTS occurs, the sending radio first transmits a Request to Send (RTS)
packet to confirm that the medium is clear. When the receiving radio successfully
receives the RTS packet, it transmits back a Clear to Send (CTS) packet to the sending
radio. When the sending radio receives the CTS packet, it sends the data packet to
the receiving radio. The RTS and CTS packets contain a reservation time to notify
other radios that the medium is in use for a specified period. This helps to minimize
collisions.
While RTS/CTS adds overhead to the radio network, it is particularly useful for large
packets that take longer to resend after a collision occurs.
You may configure a Harmony 802.11a network adapter to never use RTS/CTS (i.e.,
disable RTS/CTS) or to use RTS/CTS for packets over a certain size. For example, if the
RTS/CTS Threshold is set to 1000 Bytes, then a sending radio will use RTS/CTS before
transmitting any packet 1000 Bytes or larger.
The RTS/CTS Threshold parameter supports a range between 1 and 2345 Bytes. When
set to 1, a sending radio will use RTS/CTS before transmitting any packet.
Security Options
The Harmony 802.11a adapters offer four security options: No Security, Use WEP for
Authentication and Encryption, Use the Harmony Security Protocol, and 802.1x.
WEP Encryption and Authentication
The IEEE 802.11a standard specifies an optional encryption feature, known as Wired
Equivalent Privacy or WEP, that is designed to provide a wireless LAN with a security
level equal to what is found on a wired Ethernet network. WEP encrypts the data
portion of each packet exchanged on the 802.11a network using a 64-bit, 128-bit, or
152-bit encryption key (also known as a WEP Key). In addition, Harmony 802.11a
devices use WEP with Shared Key Authentication to prevent unauthorized devices
from associating with an 802.11a network.
When WEP is enabled, two 802.11a devices must have the same WEP Keys and both
devices must be configured to support WEP in order to communicate. If one device is
configured to use WEP for Authentication and Encryption but a second device is not,
then the two devices will not communicate, even if both devices have the same WEP
Keys.
Configuration Parameters
33
WEP Keys
An 802.11a device with WEP enabled uses a WEP Key to encrypt and decrypt
information. A user must manually enter the network’s WEP Keys on each 802.11a
device. If the WEP Keys do not match on two radios, no data communication will take
place between these devices.
A Harmony 802.11a network adapter can support up to four WEP Keys (all four Keys
must have the same Key Size). A Harmony 802.11a adapter can decrypt information
that was encrypted with any of its four WEP Keys, but it will only use the Default Key to
encrypt outgoing information.
For 64-bit encryption, a WEP Key is 10 hexadecimal digits (0-9 and A-F); for 128-bit
encryption, a WEP Key is 26 hexadecimal digits (0-9 and A-F); and for 152-bit
encryption, a WEP Key is 32 hexadecimal digits (0-9 and A-F).
Note:
When WEP is enabled, Proxim recommends that you configure all 802.11a
devices in the Extended Service Set with the same WEP Keys in the same
order (but the devices do not need to use the same default Key).
Harmony Security Protocol
The Harmony Security Protocol automates encryption management, assigning a
unique and dynamic WEP Key to each user. The Harmony Security Protocol includes
the following features:
• Uses 152-Bit WEP Encryption
•
Generates a unique WEP Key for each user that is valid only for the current network session
•
Periodically renews the user’s Harmony session and assigns a new WEP Key
without requiring any end user interaction
•
Incorporates the end user’s logon prompt into Microsoft Windows’ standard
logon procedure on the client device
Each Harmony device plays a role in the Harmony Security Protocol: the AP Controllers
maintain a database of user name and passwords to authenticate users; the Access
Points block all network traffic to or from a client until after the user has been
successfully authenticated by the Harmony System; and the Harmony client adapters
include a software utility that incorporates the Harmony logon prompt into the
standard Windows logon procedure.
When the Harmony Security Protocol is enabled on a client adapter, the user is
prompted to enter his or her Harmony User Name and Password during boot up, either
immediately before or after the Windows logon prompt (depending on the device
configuration).
Once the user has been authenticated by the Harmony System, the 802.11a adapter
receives a unique 152-bit WEP Key from the Harmony System, and it can begin to
exchange data with the Ethernet network. Refer to the Harmony Access Point
Controller User’s Guide for more information on the Harmony Security Protocol.
Configuration Parameters
34
Harmony Security Protocol Guidelines
• If you want to use the Harmony Security Protocol on your network, you must
enable the protocol on all of your network’s Harmony 802.11a Access Points and
Harmony 802.11a clients.
•
At this time, the Harmony Security Protocol’s client application supports
Windows 98 SE, Windows ME, Windows 2000 Professional, and Windows XP.
The protocol does not support Windows 2000 Server or Windows NT 4.0.
•
The Harmony Security Protocol is only available for clients that are operating in
Infrastructure mode.
•
The Harmony Security Protocol requires that you have one or more Access Point
Controllers installed on the network.
•
A network administrator who manages the network’s Harmony Access Point
Controller(s) must assign each user a Harmony User Name and Password and
enter this information into the Harmony System’s User Database. Refer to the
Harmony Access Point Controller User’s Guide for details.
•
If you enable the Harmony Security Protocol, you do not need to configure WEP
Keys on an 802.11a client (the Harmony System will generate keys for you).
802.1x
802.1x is an IEEE security standard for authenticating users on local area networks
based on the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP). For more information on this
standard, refer to the IEEE Web site at http://www.ieee.org/.
On a wireless LAN with 802.1x enabled, an Access Point will block all traffic from a
wireless client until after the user has been authenticated by the network’s RADIUS
(Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) server. Proxim supports the following
RADIUS servers for use with Harmony 802.11a products:
• Microsoft Windows 2000 Internet Authentication Service (IAS) Server
• Funk Odyssey Server
Note:
You may also need to install additional components based upon the server’s
requirements and EAP authentication type. For example, EAP-TLS requires a
Certificate Authority (CA) and that digital certificates be installed on the
RADIUS server and each wireless client.
EAP is a flexible protocol which does not specify an authentication type. The available
authentication types will vary based upon your RADIUS server and your client
software; many offer advanced features such as mutual authentication between client
and server and data encryption. For data encryption, a RADIUS server generates a
unique WEP Key for each user following authentication. This WEP Key is used to
encrypt unicast packets between the Access Point and wireless client. To encrypt
broadcast packets, the Access Point and its clients use the AP’s configured Global
WEP Keys.
Configuration Parameters
35
The Harmony Utility does not include configuration settings for 802.1x. To enable
802.1x support and configure 802.1x settings (like EAP authentication type), you need
to use a client utility provided by a RADIUS server manufacturer, like Microsoft or Funk
Software. Refer to Microsoft’s (http://www.microsoft.com/) and Funk Software’s
(http://www.funk.com/) Web sites or the documentation that came with your 802.1x
solution for details. Also, see “802.1x” on page 49 for additional configuration
information.
36
Chapter 5
Harmony Utility
Proxim provides a software utility that simplifies the management and configuration
of a Harmony 802.11a network adapter. Chapter 2 describes how to install the utility.
This chapter describes how to use the Harmony Utility after it has been installed.
Status Monitor Icon
After you have installed the utility, the Status Monitor icon will appear in the Windows
Taskbar. If the adapter cannot locate an Access Point (AP) or Ad Hoc network (either
because the 802.11a settings do not match or the other devices are out of range), the
icon will appear as follows:
When the adapter is associated with an AP or has joined an Ad Hoc network, the icon
will appear as follows (blue line connecting the two antennas):
When connected to an 802.11a network, you can view additional information about
the adapter’s status when the mouse cursor is placed over it, as shown below.
If the adapter has the Harmony Security Protocol enabled and it is has not been
authenticated by the Harmony System, the icon will appear as follows (red line
connecting the two antennas):
Harmony Utility
37
Right-click the icon to view configuration options for the Status Monitor:
• Select Run 802.11a Configuration Utility from the drop-down menu to launch the
802.11a Configuration Utility. Double-clicking the icon also launches the utility.
•
Select Disable Device Radio to turn off the adapter’s radio. You should disable
the radio if you intend to use an 802.11a-equipped laptop on an airplane. A
check mark appears next to this option when the radio is disabled. Select this
option again to enable a disabled radio.
•
Select Remove Status Monitor From Task Bar to close the Status Monitor.
Configuration Utility
The Harmony Utility includes several tools for diagnostic and configuration purposes.
Each of the utility’s screens is described below. For additional information about the
Harmony Utility, click Help on any screen to view on-line Help documentation.
Association Information
The Association Information screen, shown in the example on the next page, displays
information about the adapter’s connection with the 802.11a network.
The Association Information screen reports the following statistics:
• Association State: This field reports if the adapter is communicating with an
Access Point (AP) or Ad Hoc network. When communicating with an AP, this field
reports “ASSOCIATED AP” and displays the AP’s physical address. When communicating with an Ad Hoc network, this field displays “JOINED AD HOC MODE.” If
no AP or Ad Hoc network is found, this field displays “NOT JOINED.”
•
Station Address: This field displays the adapter’s physical address (also known
as MAC address). This address is configured at the factory.
•
Channel (Freq): This field displays the current Channel and center frequency that
the adapter is using. See “Channel” on page 30 for details.
•
Harmony Security: Reports the status of the Harmony Security Protocol: “Disabled,” “Enabled,” “Not Authenticated,” “User Not Logged In,” “User Associated,” and “User is using Unique Encryption Key” (with time of login). The
Harmony Security Protocol only supports Infrastructure mode; if a client is in Ad
Hoc mode, this field reports: “Harmony Security does not support Ad Hoc Mode.”
This field is not visible on computers running Windows NT or Windows 2000
Server.
Harmony Utility
38
•
Send Signal Strength: The Signal bar displays the signal strength for the last
acknowledgment (ACK) received by the adapter. Signal strength is reported in
decibels (dB). The color-coded chart below the Signal bar indicates the relative
strength of the signal: a signal in the red or orange section indicates a weak connection; a signal in the yellow or light green section indicates a good connection;
a signal in the darker green section indicates an excellent connection.
•
Instantaneous Packets/Sec Sent: This statistic displays the current rate at which
the adapter is transmitting packets to another 802.11a device. This information
is represented as the number of packets sent per second by the adapter and is
plotted on the graph located below the Packets/sec field. Note that this statistic
will remain zero unless the adapter is transmitting data to another device.
•
Average Packets/Sec Sent: This statistic displays the average number of packets
transmitted by the adapter each second since the utility was launched.
Harmony Utility
39
•
Receive Signal Strength: The Signal bar displays the signal strength for the last
packet received by the adapter. Signal strength is reported in decibels (dB). The
color-coded chart below the Signal bar indicates the relative strength of the signal: a signal in the red or orange section indicates a weak connection; a signal in
the yellow or light green section indicates a good connection; a signal in the
darker green section indicates an excellent connection.
•
Instantaneous Packets/Sec Received: This statistic displays the current rate at
which the adapter is receiving packets from another 802.11a device. This information is represented as the number of packets received per second and is plotted on the graph located below the Packets/sec field. Note that this statistic will
remain zero unless the adapter is receiving data from another device.
•
Average Packets/Sec Received: This statistic displays the average number of
packets received by the adapter each second since the utility was launched.
Station Configuration
Click the Configuration tab to view the Station Configuration screen, shown below.
Harmony Utility
40
Edit the configuration parameters as necessary and click Apply to save your changes.
To change the operating Channel, Send Rate, RTS/CTS, and Fragmentation settings,
click the button labeled Advanced Configuration to display these parameters.
The configuration parameters are described in Chapter 4 beginning on page 27; some
options may not be available in all countries (see “Overview of Country-Specific
Features” on page 11 for details).
Note that the Channel selection box is unavailable when the Network Mode is set to
Infrastructure. When Network Mode is set to Ad Hoc, you can configure one or more
Channels for the adapter to scan. If you select multiple Channels, the adapter will
scan each Channel looking for an Ad Hoc network to join that uses the same SSID as
the adapter.
Harmony Utility
41
Note to Windows XP Users
Windows XP provides built-in support for wireless networks. Windows XP’s wireless
network management features are used in lieu of the Harmony Utility. For PCI Card
users, support for the Harmony Utility is disabled by default (i.e., Windows XP wireless
settings are enabled); for CardBus Card users, support for the Harmony Utility is
enabled by default (i.e., Windows XP wireless settings are disabled).
To turn Harmony Configuration on or off, check or uncheck the box labeled Enabled
Harmony Configuration (Disable Windows XP Settings) within the Station
Configuration screen.
When this option is disabled, the Station Configuration parameters, the Security
parameters, and the 802.11a Network screen’s features are unavailable within the
Harmony Utility (as shown in the example below).
Harmony Utility
42
Security
Click the Security tab to configure the adapter’s security settings. From within this
screen, you can enable WEP for Authentication and Encryption, enable the Harmony
Security Protocol, and configure the adapter’s WEP Keys. See “Security Options” on
page 32 for more information on these settings.
WEP for Authentication and Encryption
Follow these steps to enable WEP for Authentication and Encryption:
1. Select Use WEP for Authentication and Encryption from the Security Level box,
shown below.
2.
Click Configure WEP Keys.
3.
Select a Key Size from the drop-down menu (64 Bit, 128 Bit, or 152 Bit).
Harmony Utility
43
4.
Enter one to four WEP Keys in the fields provided, as shown in the following
example.
5.
Use only hexadecimal digits (i.e., 0-9 and A-F). For 64-bit encryption, enter
10 digits for each Key; for 128-bit encryption, enter 26 digits for each Key; for
152-bit encryption, enter 32 digits for each Key.
Note:
If you created a text file that contains the WEP Keys, click Read Keys to
upload those Keys to the adapter. See “Read Key File Format” on page 44 for
formatting information.
6.
Click OK to save the WEP Keys.
7.
Select one of the Keys you configured as the Default Key.
Harmony Utility
44
In the following example, Key 3 is the Default Key.
A Harmony 802.11a network adapter can decrypt information that was encrypted
with any of its four WEP Keys but it will only use the Default Key to encrypt
outgoing information.
8.
Click Apply or OK to save the new WEP settings.
9.
If you need to change a WEP Key at a later date, click Configure WEP Keys and
enter one to four new WEP Keys. Note that any Keys you entered previously will
not be visible (stars appear in place of the digits).
Read Key File Format
If you have multiple clients to configure, you can avoid having to enter each WEP Key
manually by creating a text file that contains the Keys. Once you have the text file, you
can upload the Keys to a client by clicking the Read Keys button found on the WEP
Keys Configuration screen.
Harmony Utility
45
To create the text file, use a text program such as Microsoft Notepad or WordPad. The
text file should have a “.txt” extension. The first line of the text file must read
“[WEP_KEY_VALUE]”. Then, enter one to four Keys in the following format:
“key#=<key value>”, where # indicates the Key number (1-4) and <key value> is the
specified Key’s hexadecimal digits.
Each Key must be contain hexadecimal digits only (0-9 and A-F), and you must use the
same number of digits for each Key. The number of digits depends upon the Key Size
you select in the WEP Keys Configuration screen:
• For 64 Bit, use 10 digits per Key.
• For 128 Bit, use 26 digits per Key.
• For 152 Bit, use 32 digits per Key.
The following example illustrates the WEP Key file format for 64-bit encryption:
[WEP_KEY_VALUE]
key1=1234567890
key2=0987654321
key3=ABCDEF1234
key4=ABCDEFABCD
Harmony Security Protocol
Follow these steps to enable the Harmony Security Protocol:
Note:
The Harmony Security Protocol is not available on computers running
Windows 2000 Server or Windows NT.
1.
Select Use Harmony Security Protocol within the Security Level box.
2.
Place a check mark in the Log on to Harmony Security before Windows Logon box
if you want to connect to the wireless network before logging on to the Windows
operating system.
Note:
You should enable the Log on to Harmony Security before Windows Logon
option if your computer connects to a Windows Domain Controller, connects
to a Novell network, automatically reconnects to shared network drives during Windows logon, or runs networking software (e.g., PC Anywhere) before
connecting to the network.
Harmony Utility
46
3.
Click Apply or OK to save the new security settings.
4.
Log off Windows or restart the computer.
5.
Log on to Windows when prompted (if the Log on to Harmony Security before
Windows Logon option is disabled).
6.
The Harmony logon prompt will appear. Enter your Harmony User Name and
Password in the fields provided.
Harmony Utility
47
The Windows 98/ME logon prompt is shown below.
Note:
7.
The Harmony logon prompt will not appear if your Windows User Name and
Password match your Harmony User Name and Password, you are within
range of a properly configured Access Point, and the Log on to Harmony
Security before Windows Logon option is disabled.
If you are not in range of a Harmony Access Point, place a check mark in the box
labeled Defer logon for current session if Access Point is out of range. The
Harmony software will store your User Name and Password and automatically
initiate the logon procedure without any user intervention once the 802.11a
network adapter has associated with an Access Point.
Harmony Utility
8.
48
If desired, click Change Password (Windows XP/2000 Professional) or Options...
(Windows 98/ME) to modify your Harmony user account. The Windows 98/ME
logon prompt is shown below.
• Enter a new password twice in the fields provided to change your Harmony
Password. The Password can be up to 32 characters and is case sensitive.
• To reset your Harmony Password to match your Windows Password, check the
box labeled Synchronize Password with Windows Logon.
9.
Click Logon to log on to the Harmony System.
10. Log on to Windows when prompted (if the Log on to Harmony Security before
Windows Logon option is enabled).
Note:
See “Common Technical Support Questions” on page 65 for troubleshooting
suggestions if you have difficulty logging onto the network.
Harmony Utility
49
802.1x
The Harmony Utility does not include configuration settings for 802.1x. To enable
802.1x support, you need to use a client utility provided by a RADIUS server
manufacturer, such as Microsoft or Funk Software.
Note:
Confirm that the Harmony Utility’s Security Level is set to No Security before
enabling 802.1x support using a third-party client utility.
As of the release of this user’s guide, Microsoft only provides 802.1x support for
Windows XP users; 802.1x support is built into the operating system. To enable
802.1x on a Windows XP computer, you need to disable the Harmony Configuration
options.
Follow these steps to enable 802.1x on a Windows XP computer:
1. Open the Harmony Utility.
2.
Click the Configuration tab.
3.
Remove the check mark from the box labeled Enabled Harmony Configuration
(Disable Windows XP Settings). This will disable the Harmony Configuration
options.
4.
Click OK to save this change and close the Harmony Utility.
5.
Click the networking icon in the Windows Taskbar to open Windows XP’s built-in
wireless network utility.
WinXP Networking Icon
6.
Click Properties (if associated with an AP) or Advanced (if not associated).
Harmony Utility
50
7.
Click the Authentication tab.
8.
Configure the 802.1x settings. Contact your network administrator or refer to
Windows XP’s on-line Help if you need assistance configuring these settings.
Note:
9.
Depending on the network’s EAP authentication type, your network administrator may need to provide you with a smart card or install a digital certificate
on your computer.
Click the Wireless Networks tab.
10. Access the Wireless Network Properties for your network.
• If your network is listed in Available networks, highlight it and click Configure.
• If your network is listed in Preferred networks, highlight it and click Properties.
• If your network is not listed, click Add and enter the network’s SSID.
11. Configure the network’s WEP settings.
Note:
If your EAP type supports dynamic WEP keys, place a check mark next to the
Data encryption (WEP enabled) and The key is provided for me automatically options.
12. Click OK twice to exit the network’s properties window.
Harmony Utility
51
Network Traffic Statistics
Click the Statistics tab to view information about the number of packets sent and
received by the adapter, as shown below.
The default Statistics screen displays the following statistics:
• Unicast Packets Sent: This statistic reports the number of packets transmitted by
the adapter that were destined for a single network node.
•
Multicast Packets Sent: This statistic reports the number of packets transmitted
by the adapter that were destined for more than one network node.
•
Unicast Packets Received: This statistic reports the number of packets received
that were destined only for this adapter.
•
Multicast Packets Received: This statistic reports the number of packets received
that were destined for more than one network node.
You can view additional statistics by clicking Advanced Statistics, as shown on the
next page.
Harmony Utility
52
The advanced Statistics screen displays the following additional statistics:
Send
• Send Rate: This field reports the adapter’s current transmit rate.
•
Unicast Bytes Sent: This statistic reports the total number of bytes contained in
the unicast packets transmitted by the adapter.
•
Multicast Bytes Sent: This statistic reports the total number of bytes contained in
the multicast packets transmitted by the adapter.
•
Single Retries: After the adapter sends a packet, it waits for an acknowledgment
from the receiving radio to confirm that the packet was successfully received. If
an acknowledgment is not received within a fixed period of time, the adapter will
retransmit the packet. This statistic reports the number of packets that required
one retry before the adapter received an acknowledgment.
•
Multiple Retries: This statistic reports the number of packets that required more
than one retry before the adapter received an acknowledgment.
•
Excessive Retries: This statistic reports the number of packets that were not successfully transmitted because the adapter did not receive an acknowledgment
within the maximum number of retries.
Harmony Utility
53
•
Last ACK RSSI: This statistic reports the RSSI (Received Signal Strength) for the
last acknowledgment (ACK) received by the adapter. RSSI is reported in decibels
(dB) and typically ranges from 0 to 75. In general, an RSSI less than 15 indicates a
weak signal and an RSSI greater than 30 indicates a strong signal.
•
ACK Errors: This statistic reports the number of unicast transmit attempts for
which no acknowledgement (ACK) was received.
•
CTS Errors: This statistic reports the number of Clear To Send (CTS) errors. When
the adapter uses RTS/CTS before transmitting a packet, it first sends a Request to
Send (RTS) message to the packet’s recipient. The packet’s recipient then returns
a CTS message to the adapter. When the adapter receives the CTS, it sends the
packet to the recipient. However, if the adapter does not receive a CTS within a
fixed period of time, it will resend the RTS. After a fixed number of retries, the
adapter will record a CTS Error if a CTS has not been received.
•
Antenna A Success: The adapter provides antenna diversity. This means that it
automatically switches between its two antennas (referred to as Antenna A and
Antenna B) to provide the strongest possible signal to a receiving radio. This statistic reports the number of packets successfully transmitted using Antenna A.
•
Antenna B Success: This statistic reports the number of packets successfully
transmitted using Antenna B.
Receive
• Receive Rate: This field reports the data rate at which the adapter is currently
receiving packets sent by another 802.11a device.
•
Unicast Bytes Received: This statistic reports the total number of bytes contained
in the unicast packets received by the adapter.
•
Multicast Bytes Received: This statistic reports the total number of bytes contained in the multicast packets received by the adapter.
•
WEP Undecryptable: This statistic displays the number of packets that were discarded due to a problem during decryption, such as mismatched WEP Keys.
•
Bad Frame Checksum: This statistic displays the number of received packets that
failed the CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) of the Frame Check Sequence (FCS).
•
Last Frame’s RSSI: This statistic reports the RSSI (Received Signal Strength) for
the last packet received by the adapter. RSSI is reported in decibels (dB) and typically ranges from 0 to 75. In general, an RSSI less than 15 indicates a weak signal
and an RSSI greater than 30 indicates a strong signal.
•
Duplicate Frames: This statistic displays the number of duplicate packets
received by the adapter. When the adapter successfully receives a packet, it
sends an acknowledgment (ACK) to the transmitting node. If the ACK does not
reach the transmitting node within a specified period of time after it sent the
packet (due to interference or some other type of delay), it will resend the packet
to the recipient. In this case, the adapter then receives the packet a second time,
records that it received a duplicate packet, and sends an ACK again.
Harmony Utility
54
802.11a Networks
Click the 802.11a Networks tab to view the list of Access Points or Ad Hoc stations
within range of the adapter. In the example below, the utility detected one Access
Point and one Ad Hoc node.
Note:
To display only Access Points, uncheck the Display Ad Hoc stations box.
The 802.11a Networks screen reports the following information for each Access Point
or Ad Hoc node detected by the adapter:
• BSSID: This field reports the physical (or MAC) address of the detected Access
Point or the Basic Service Set ID of the detected Ad Hoc node.
•
SSID: This field reports the detected device’s SSID or Service Set Identifier. See
“SSID” on page 28 for more information.
•
Channel: This field displays the Channel used by the detected device. See
“Channel” on page 30 for more information.
•
Signal Strength: This field displays the strength of the radio signal received from
the detected 802.11a device.
Harmony Utility
55
If you want the adapter to associate with one of the detected Access Points or join the
same Ad Hoc network as one of the detected Ad Hoc nodes, highlight the node within
the device list and click Associate. The adapter’s Network Mode and/or SSID will
automatically change to match the selected device’s configuration settings.
In addition, you can use the Snoop Tool to monitor the amount of radio traffic in your
area or perform a Transmission Success Rate test with any of the detected Access
Points.
Note:
A drop-down menu appears when you right-click an entry within the 802.11a
Networks list. The menu contains Associate and Test Transmission options.
Snoop Tool
The Snoop Tool sweeps the available 802.11a Channels in the 5 GHz band and reports
the radio activity it detects. The tool scans each Channel in turn, as indicated by the
red outline. When a signal is detected, the tool displays the signal’s maximum and
average RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) value. This value is reported as a
percentage; a higher percentage means a stronger signal.
If there are no other 802.11a products operating in the area, received signals indicate
potential sources of interference. If there are 802.11a Access Point or Ad Hoc
networks operating nearby, the tool will report their signal strength.
Harmony Utility
56
Click one of the Channels in the Channel RSSI Map to determine if any 802.11a
devices are transmitting at that frequency. A selected Channel has a blue outline. If
one or more 802.11a Access Points are using the selected Channel, information about
these Access Points will appear in the APs on specific channel selected from RSSI
Map box. This is the same information that is reported in the 802.11a Networks
screen (BSSID, SSID, Channel, and Signal Strength).
To associate with one of the detected Access Points, highlight the Access Point’s entry
in the APs on specific channel selected from RSSI Map box and click Associate. The
802.11a adapter will automatically associate with the selected Access Point once the
Snoop Tool is closed.
Packet Transmission Success Rate
Select one of the detected Access Points in the 802.11a Networks screen and click the
Test button to determine the link quality between the adapter and the selected
device.
Note:
Performing a Transmission Test will reset the adapter’s statistics.
The Packet Transmission Success Rate screen displays the Network Name (i.e., SSID)
and MAC address of the selected Access Point.
The adapter sends a series of packets to the selected device and monitors the number
of replies it receives. This information is converted to a percentage and plotted on a
graph, as shown in the following example.
Harmony Utility
57
In addition, the utility displays the current success rate in the Instantaneous Success
field and the average success rate (since the beginning of the test) in the Average
Success field.
By default, the adapter uses a packet size of 500 Bytes and automatically switches
between all rates as necessary during the test (greater range generally means a lower
transfer rate). However, you can also specify a transfer rate and/or a packet size
(between 1 and 1500 Bytes) using the drop-down menu. If you change either the
Transfer Rate or the packet size, click Apply for these changes to take effect. Click
Close to exit the Packet Transmission Success Rate screen.
Note:
You can only perform a transmission test with an Access Point; you cannot
perform a transmission test with an Ad Hoc node.
Version Information
Click the About tab to view version information for the 802.11a driver and utility.
58
Chapter 6
Troubleshooting
The Harmony 802.11a network adapters are designed to be very easy to install and
operate. However, if you experience any difficulties, use the information in this
chapter to help diagnose and solve the problem. If you still cannot resolve the
problem, contact Proxim Technical Support as described in Appendix B, “Technical
Support and Training,” on page 71.
How to Obtain Help with Your LAN Installation
If you require assistance to install your LAN, Proxim can put you in touch with an
802.11a reseller in your area. The reseller is an expert in the design, installation, and
maintenance of LANs and will be able to examine your needs and recommend the
most cost-effective solution for your LAN whether you are installing a new LAN or
adding on to an existing one. For the location of the Harmony reseller nearest you,
contact Proxim at 1-800-229-1630 or 1-408-731-2700 and ask for the Sales
Department.
Common Installation Problems
Chapter 2 describes how to install a Harmony 802.11a network adapter in a computer
running Windows 98 Second Edition (SE), Windows Millennium Edition (ME),
Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows NT. This section provides suggestions to
resolve some of the common installation problems with a Harmony 802.11a network
adapter.
Troubleshooting
59
Windows 98/ME/2000/XP Troubleshooting
Adapter Inserted Before Running the Installation Program
If you inserted the Harmony 802.11a network adapter into a Windows computer before
running the Harmony Installation program, you can install the adapter using
Microsoft’s Add New Hardware Wizard (not available for Windows NT users).
Follow these steps:
Note:
PCI Card users should begin at Step #1. CardBus Card users should begin at
Step #8.
1.
Turn off the computer, unplug its power cord from the wall outlet, and remove the
computer cover.
2.
Locate an unused PCI slot and refer to your PC’s manual for instructions on how
to remove the plate that covers the slot (if applicable).
3.
Feed the card’s antennas through the PCI slot and out the back of the computer.
4.
Align the PCI Card over the empty slot and firmly insert the card into the slot, as
illustrated below.
5.
Secure the card’s metal bracket to the computer following the directions
provided in your PC’s manual and replace the computer cover.
6.
Plug the computer’s power cord back into the wall outlet.
Troubleshooting
60
7.
Attach the cabled antenna to the antenna base and place the antenna on top of
your desk, computer, or monitor.
8.
Turn on the computer and logon to Windows, if applicable.
9.
CardBus Card users: Insert the 802.11a adapter into an available CardBus slot.
10. Be patient while Windows automatically detects the adapter and launches the
Add New Hardware Wizard.
11. Insert the Harmony Installation CD into the computer’s CD-ROM drive.
12. Follow the on-screen instructions to install the Harmony 802.11a network adapter
using the Add New Hardware Wizard.
• Windows 98/ME users: Insert the Windows installation CD if prompted. If you
do not have a Windows installation CD, see “Windows ME and Windows 98 SE
Installation CD Requirement” on page 13.
13. If prompted, restart the computer and logon to Windows.
14. Run SETUP.EXE from the Harmony Installation CD to launch the Harmony Utility
Setup program.
15. Follow the on-screen instructions to install the Harmony Utility.
Refer to Chapter 5 beginning on page 36 for information on how to use the Harmony
Utility.
Adapter Not Listed in Device Manager
Follow these steps if you have installed an 802.11a network adapter but it doesn’t
appear as a network adapter in the Device Manager:
1. Open the Device Manager (located within the Control Panel’s System icon).
2.
Check the Other Devices category for a PCI Ethernet Controller or Ethernet
Controller entry.
3.
If the entry appears in the Other Devices category, highlight it and click Remove.
4.
Close the Device Manager.
5.
Shut down the computer and remove the Harmony 802.11a network adapter from
the computer.
6.
Follow the installation instructions in Chapter 2 to install the Harmony driver and
utility.
802.11a Network Adapter Not Installed Properly
If the Harmony Device Setup program or Windows Networking reports that the
Harmony 802.11a network adapter has not been properly installed or configured after
you have completed the Harmony Installation program, open the Device Manager and
locate the Harmony 802.11a entry in the Network adapters category.
Troubleshooting
61
If a yellow exclamation point (“!”) appears next to the Harmony 802.11a adapter’s
Device Manager entry, then the adapter is not working properly. Follow these steps:
1. Uninstall the adapter as described in “Uninstalling a Harmony 802.11a Network
Adapter” on page 62.
2.
Reinstall the adapter following the installation instructions in Chapter 2.
Configuring Networking Clients and Protocols
A Harmony 802.11a network adapter will bind to any existing networking components,
such as Client for Microsoft Networks and the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Refer to the
steps below that correspond to your computer’s operating system to configure the
adapter’s networking components.
Windows XP/2000
Follow these steps to configure a Harmony 802.11a adapter’s networking clients and
protocols in a Windows XP or Windows 2000 computer:
1. Open the Control Panel’s Network and Dial-up Connections (Windows 2000) or
Network Connections (Windows XP) icon.
2.
Scroll through the list of network connections and right-click the Local Area
Connection that corresponds to the Harmony 802.11a adapter.
3.
Select Properties from the drop-down menu to view the connection’s properties
screen.
4.
Select a client or protocol from the list of installed components and click
Properties to configure its settings.
For example, if you want to assign the Harmony 802.11a adapter a static IP
address, highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties.
Note:
To add a new client or protocol, click Install... and follow the on-screen
instructions.
Windows ME/98 SE
Follow these steps to configure a Harmony 802.11a adapter’s networking clients and
protocols in a Windows 98/ME computer:
1. Open the Control Panel’s Network icon.
2.
Select a client or protocol from the list of installed components and click
Properties to configure its settings.
For example, if you want to assign the Harmony 802.11a adapter a static IP
address, highlight TCP/IP or TCP/IP -> Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter and
click Properties.
Note:
To add a new client or protocol, click Add... and follow the on-screen
instructions.
Troubleshooting
62
Windows NT
Follow these steps to configure a Harmony 802.11a adapter’s networking protocols in
a Windows NT computer:
1. Open the Control Panel’s Network icon.
2.
Click the Protocols tab.
3.
Select a protocol from the list of installed components and click Properties to
configure its settings.
4.
Select the Harmony 802.11a network adapter from the list of installed adapters.
5.
Configure the protocol as necessary.
6.
Click OK or Apply save your changes.
7.
Close the Network screen and restart the computer if prompted.
Note:
To add a new client or protocol, click Add... and follow the on-screen
instructions.
Uninstalling a Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter
Follow these steps if you need to uninstall a Harmony 802.11a network adapter:
Note:
You do not need to uninstall the current software to upgrade to the latest
Harmony software. See “Upgrading to Version 1.4” on page 22 for details.
1.
Right-click the Status Monitor and choose Remove Status Monitor From Task Bar.
2.
Open the Control Panel and double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
3.
Select Harmony 802.11a from the list of installed programs and click
Add/Remove... (Windows 98/ME/NT) or Change/Remove (Windows XP/2000).
4.
Select Automatic from the list of uninstall options and click Next.
5.
Click Finish to continue.
6.
Click Remove to remove the Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter.
7.
Click Close or OK after the Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter has been removed.
8.
If prompted, click Cancel to prevent the computer from restarting.
9.
Remove the following driver files, if present:
Note:
By default, Windows will hide some of these file types. Confirm that you
have configured Windows to show all files before assuming that these files
are not present. The Hidden Files option is available under the Folder
Options heading of the Windows Explorer’s View or Tools menu.
Troubleshooting
63
Windows 98/ME computers:
• C:\WINDOWS\INF\NETPR11A.INF
• C:\WINDOWS\INF\OTHER\PROXIM,INC.NETPR11A.INF
• C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\PROX11A.SYS
• C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\PROX11A.SYS
Windows NT computers:
• C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\PROX11AN4.DLL
• C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\PROX11AN4.SYS
Windows 2000 computers:
• C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\PROX11A.SYS
• C:\WINNT\INF\NETPR11A.INF
• C:\WINNT\INF\NETPR11A.PNF
Windows XP computers:
• C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\PROX11A.SYS
• C:\WINDOWS\INF\NETPR11A.INF
• C:\WINDOWS\INF\NETPR11A.PNF
10. Shut down the computer.
11. Remove the Harmony 802.11a network adapter from the computer.
Range
Every environment is unique with different obstacles, barriers, materials, etc., and,
therefore, it is difficult to determine the exact range that will be achieved without
testing. Radio signals may reflect off of some obstacles or be absorbed by others
depending on their construction.
The IEEE 802.11a specification supports eight data rates: 54 Mbps, 48 Mbps,
36 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 18 Mbps, 12 Mbps, 9 Mbps, and 6 Mbps. Harmony’s 2X mode
supports eight data rates: 108 Mbps, 96 Mbps, 72 Mbps, 48 Mbps, 36 Mbps,
24 Mbps, 18 Mbps, and 12 Mbps. Operation at 6 Mbps or 12 Mbps provides greater
range than operation at 54 Mbps or 108 Mbps.
Note:
Products sold in Europe, Japan, and Singapore do not support 2X mode.
By default, a Harmony 802.11a network adapter will automatically adjust the data rate
to maintain a usable radio connection. Therefore, in 802.11a mode a client that is
close to an Access Point may operate at 54 Mbps while a client that is on the fringe of
coverage may operate at 6 Mbps.
The Harmony 802.11a network adapters includes two integral antennas to support
antenna diversity, which can improve system reliability. Due to the characteristics of
radio waves, it is possible that one antenna may provide better performance than a
second antenna installed a short distance away.
Troubleshooting
64
The Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card includes two integral omnidirectional antennas.
Note that the coverage footprint of the CardBus Card’s antennas will vary depending
on the laptop’s design and the location of the CardBus slot in the computer.
The Harmony 802.11a PCI Card includes two integral omnidirectional antennas: one
antenna is attached directly to the card and the other is connected by a cable.
Proper antenna placement can help improve range. Here are some guidelines:
• Try to keep the adapter’s antennas free of obstructions (particularly metal
objects) and do not place a sheet of metal (like a filing cabinet) between two
antennas.
•
Use the Harmony Utility to evaluate the signal strength and link quality between
802.11a devices.
•
For PCI Card users: At the point where the Ethernet cable connects to the PCI
Card, position the cable so that it is perpendicular to the card’s attached antenna
until the cable is at least two or three inches away from the card’s bracket.
Note:
See the Harmony 802.11a Access Point User’s Guide for additional
suggestions.
CardBus Card LED Indicators
The Harmony 802.11a CardBus Card includes two green LED indicators on the top of
the card near the antenna.
These LEDs display the following behavior:
• Both LEDs are off when the adapter is not receiving power or when the Harmony
driver is not installed.
•
The LEDs blink in an alternating pattern when the adapter is searching for an
Access Point (in Infrastructure mode) or Ad Hoc network (in Ad Hoc mode).
•
The LEDs blink in unison every second when the adapter has associated with an
Access Point or joined an Ad Hoc network.
•
When there is network activity, the LEDs blink at a faster rate; the LEDs will blink
in unison more often as the adapter’s Send or Receive Rate increases.
Troubleshooting
65
Common Technical Support Questions
This section discusses some of the most common problems using a Harmony 802.11a
network adapter and offers possible solutions.
Symptom/Question
Possible Solution/Answer
I installed the adapter card in the
computer before running
SETUP.EXE. What should I do?
Follow the on-screen instructions to install
the adapter using Microsoft’s Add New
Hardware Wizard. When prompted, point
the Wizard to search the Harmony
Installation CD for driver files. Then, after
you have installed the driver, run SETUP.EXE
from the Harmony Installation CD to install
the Harmony utility.
My office has an existing 802.11b
network. Are the Harmony 802.11a
adapters compatible?
No. 802.11a devices are not compatible with
802.11b devices.
I want to install a Harmony 802.11a
network in my office that has an
existing 802.11b network. Will the
802.11a network interfere with the
802.11b network?
No. 802.11a and 802.11b devices will not
interfere with each other since they operate
at different frequencies. 802.11a devices
operate in the 5 GHz band, and 802.11b
devices operate in the 2.4 GHz band.
Is a Harmony 802.11a network
adapter compatible with 802.11a
products from other vendors?
Yes, the Harmony 802.11a adapters are
interoperable with 802.11a-compliant
products from other vendors. However, if
you use 2X mode to achieve data rates up to
108 Mbps, a Harmony 802.11a adapter is
only compatible with other 802.11a products
from Proxim.
In throughput tests, the 802.11a
network adapter doesn’t seem to
transfer data as quickly as I’d
expect.
Data rate is the raw signaling rate of a
networking device; it does not equal data
throughput. Actual data throughput is
always less than the data rate since some of
the available bandwidth is used to send
control messages and regulate activity over
the wireless medium. Also, throughput will
depend on several factors such as network
overhead, the file transfer program in use,
the computer’s operating system, and the
computer’s processor speed.
Troubleshooting
66
Symptom/Question
Possible Solution/Answer
How do I determine where to
install 802.11a Access Points to
ensure that users can access the
wireless network from anywhere in
my facility?
Proxim recommends that you perform a site
survey following the procedure outlined in
Proxim’s Introduction to Enterprise Wireless
Networking and Harmony Technical Training
class. If you would like to learn more about
the site survey procedure, you should
consider signing up for a Proxim Technical
Training class in your area. Refer to Proxim’s
Web site at http://training.proxim.com/ for
more information.
I’ve entered my Harmony User
Name and Password but I can’t log
on to the network.
Either your User Name or Password is
incorrect or you are not in range of an Access
Point. To determine whether or not you are
in range of an Access Point, click Cancel to
access the Windows desktop and locate the
Association State field within the Harmony
Utility. Then, log on to Windows again to
bring up the Harmony logon prompt.
If you are out of range of an Access Point,
check the Defer logon for current session if
Access Point is out of range box and click
Logon.
If your User Name or Password is incorrect,
contact your network administrator for
assistance.
I deferred my Harmony logon until
my computer was in range of an
Access Point. However, once the
802.11a adapter associated with
an Access Point, I could not access
the network.
Open the Harmony Utility’s Association
Information screen and locate the Harmony
Security Protocol field. If the field reports
“User is not authenticated,” then either your
User Name or Password is incorrect. Try
logging on to Windows again. If problems
persist, contact your network administrator
to confirm your User Name and Password.
Troubleshooting
67
Symptom/Question
Possible Solution/Answer
My Harmony User Name and
Password are synchronized with
my Windows User Name and
Password so the Harmony logon
prompt does not appear after I
logon to Windows. But now I want
to change my Harmony Password.
What can I do?
Change your Windows Password; the
Harmony logon prompt will reappear after
you log on to Windows once your Windows
Password and Harmony Password no longer
match. Otherwise, contact your network
administrator who can change your
Password via the Harmony System’s User
Database.
My computer can’t connect to a
network drive share when the
Harmony Security Protocol is
enabled.
You need to logon to Harmony Security first
before logging on to Windows to gain
immediate access to network resources.
Open the Harmony Utility’s Security screen
and place a check mark next to the Log on to
Harmony Security before Windows Logon
option. Then, save your changes and logon
to Windows again.
Do the Harmony adapters support
IEEE 802.1X Authentication?
Yes, but you cannot configure 802.1x using
the Harmony Utility; you need to use a
configuration utility supplied by your
RADIUS server vendor. Also, Windows XP
provides native support for the IEEE 802.1x
standard. See “802.1x” on page 34 and
page 49 for details.
How long will my battery last when
using the Harmony 802.11a
CardBus Card?
Battery life will vary from unit to unit and
depends on many factors including battery
type, length of battery life without the
CardBus Card inserted, and how frequently
the CardBus Card transmits and receives
data. Frequent network activity will drain
the battery faster than if the card were left
idle in doze mode. Configuring the CardBus
Card to use one of the Power Saving modes
will prolong battery life. However, you
should perform some tests under normal
operating conditions to accurately
determine a device’s battery life with the
802.11a CardBus Card.
68
Appendix A
Technical Specifications
The following technical specification is for reference purposes only. Actual product’s
performance and compliance with local telecommunications regulations may vary
from country to country. Proxim Corporation will only ship products that are type
approved in the destination country.
Technical Specifications
General
Compatibility ...................................Fully interoperable with IEEE 802.11a compliant
products in 802.11a mode
Warranty ..........................................3-years parts and labor (return to factory)
LED Indicators ..................................Two (2) LEDs indicate Power On, Sleep Mode,
Transmit Activity, Association and Power Off
Network Information
Security ...........................................40, 128 & 152-bit Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP)
data encryption; Harmony Security Protocol;
802.1x authentication
Network Architecture........................Supports Ad Hoc peer-to-peer networks and
communication to wired infrastructure networks
via Access Points
Installation & Diagnostics ................Complete configuration utility application
included; Utility surveys other wireless units and
reports signal strength; Desktop icon
continuously reports status
Operating System Support ...............Windows 98SE, 2000, ME, XP, NT 4.0
(Service Pack 6 or later)
69
Roaming...........................................Seamless among 802.11a compliant access
points, including across subnets via Harmony
AP Controller
Radio
Radio Data Rate ...............................54 Mbps, 48 Mbps, 36 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 18 Mbps,
12 Mbps, 9 Mbps, 6 Mbps in 802.11a mode;
108 Mbps, 96 Mbps, 72 Mbps, 48 Mbps,
36 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 18 Mbps, 12 Mbps
in 2X mode
Media Access Protocol......................IEEE 802.11a
Frequency Band................................5.15-5.35 GHz U-NII frequency band
(Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure)
Radio Type .......................................Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing
Modulation ......................................64 QAM, 16 QAM, QPSK, BPSK
Channels..........................................Varies by country. See “Channel” on page 30.
Antennas..........................................Both models provide built-in diversity with two
1.5 dBi integrated antennas
Environmental
Operating Temperature ....................0ºC to +60ºC
Storage Temperature ........................-65ºC to 150ºC
Humidity ..........................................5% to 95% non-condensing
Physical
Bus Interface ...................................32-bit CardBus for Model 8450;
PCI (Peripheral Components Interconnect) for
Model 8150
CardBus Card Voltage .......................3.3 Volts
Weight .............................................1.41 ounces (40 g)
70
Parameters
Parameter
Range
Default
Network Mode
Ad Hoc*, Infrastructure
Infrastructure
Power Saving
(Infrastructure only)
Off, Normal, Maximum
Off
2X Mode*
Enabled, Disabled
Disabled
SSID
Up to 32 characters
any
Channel
(Configurable in Ad
Hoc mode; assigned
by AP in Infrastructure
mode)
U.S. & Canada: In 802.11a mode:
Channels 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, &
64; in 2X mode: Channels 42, 50, & 58
Europe: Channels 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56,
60, & 64
Japan: Channels 34, 38, 42, & 46
Singapore: Channels 36, 40, 44, & 48
All selected
RTS/CTS
Enabled, Disabled
Disabled
RTS/CTS Threshold
1 to 2345
1
Send Rate
Automatic or select one of the following:
54 Mbps, 48 Mbps, 36 Mbps, 24 Mbps,
18 Mbps, 12 Mbps, 9 Mbps, and 6 Mbps
in 802.11a mode; 108 Mbps, 96 Mbps,
72 Mbps, 48 Mbps, 36 Mbps, 24 Mbps,
18 Mbps, and 12 Mbps in 2X mode
Automatic
(all rates in 802.11a
mode)
Fragmentation
Enabled, Disabled
Disabled
Fragmentation
Threshold
256 to 2345
2345
Security Level
No Security, Use WEP for Authentication
and Encryption, Use Harmony Security
Protocol
No Security
Key Size
64 Bit, 128 Bit, 152 Bit
64 Bit
WEP Keys
(When Security Level
is set to Use WEP for
Authentication and
Encryption)
Up to 4 Keys:
10 hexadecimal digits per key for 64 Bit,
26 hexadecimal digits per key for 128 Bit,
32 hexadecimal digits per key for 152 Bit
Blank
Default Key
One of the four configured WEP Keys
WEP Key 1
*Ad Hoc mode not available in Europe; 2X mode not available in Europe, Japan, or Singapore.
71
Appendix B
Technical Support and Training
If you are having a problem using a Harmony 802.11a network adapter and cannot
resolve it with the information in Chapter 6, gather the following information and
contact Proxim Technical Support:
•
What kind of network are you using?
•
What were you doing when the error occurred?
•
What error message did you see?
•
Can you reproduce the problem?
•
What version of the Harmony 802.11a driver are you using?
You can reach Proxim Technical Support by voice, fax, e-mail, or mail:
Tel:
Fax:
Web:
E-mail:
1-800-477-6946 (Toll-free in the U.S. and Canada)
1-408-731-2640 (International)
1-408-731-3676
http://www.proxim.com/
support@proxim.com
Proxim Corporation
Attn: Technical Support
935 Stewart Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94085
In addition, Proxim offers technical training courses across the United States
throughout the year that are designed to teach customers how to maximize the
benefits of Proxim products. These classes are taught by experienced Proxim Systems
Engineers and have a technical focus. For class and registration information, visit
Proxim’s Web site at http://training.proxim.com.
72
Index
A
ACK Errors .................................................................................... 53
Ad Hoc............................................................... 17, 20, 23, 28, 40, 70
Add New Hardware Wizard .......................................................... 59, 65
Alternate Installation Instructions ................................................. 59–60
Antenna .............................................................. 9, 17, 20, 60, 63–64
Diversity ....................................................................... 9, 53, 63
Placement ............................................................................. 64
Antenna Success ............................................................................ 53
Association Information ............................................................. 37–39
Association State ........................................................................... 37
Average Packets/Sec ...................................................................... 38
B
Bad Frame Checksum ...................................................................... 53
Battery Life .................................................................................. 67
BSSID .......................................................................................... 54
Bus Interface ................................................................................ 69
C
CardWizard .............................................................................. 10, 14
Certificate Authority (CA) ................................................................. 34
Certification ................................................................................... 4
Channel .................................................. 25, 26, 30–31, 37, 40, 54, 70
Client for Microsoft Networks ............................................................. 61
Common Installation Problems .................................................... 58–61
Common Technical Support Questions ........................................... 65–67
Configuration Parameters ...................................................... 28–35, 70
Configure WEP Keys ....................................................................... 42
CTS Errors ..................................................................................... 53
D
Data Rate .......................................................................... 31, 63, 69
Default Key ........................................................................ 33, 43, 70
Defer Logon for Current Session If Access Point Is Out of Range ............ 47, 66
Device Manager ............................................................................ 60
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum ..................................................... 27
Disable Device Radio ....................................................................... 37
Diversity ............................................................................. 9, 53, 63
73
Domain Controller .......................................................................... 45
Duplicate Frames............................................................................ 53
E
802.11a Networks ...................................................................... 54–57
802.11a....................................................................................... 27
Interoperability .................................................................... 7, 65
802.11b ...................................................................................... 65
802.1x .............................................................................. 34–35, 67
Configuration .................................................................... 49–50
Ethernet Controller ......................................................................... 60
Excessive Retries ........................................................................... 52
Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) ............................................. 34
F
FCC ......................................................................................... 2, 12
Fragmentation ......................................................................... 31, 40
Frequency Band ............................................................................ 69
Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum ................................................. 27
Funk Odyssey Server ...................................................................... 34
H
Harmony
802.11a Access Point ........................................ 8, 24–26, 28, 54–57
Access Point Controller .................................................... 8, 24, 26
Power System ........................................................................... 8
Security Protocol ...................................................... 33–34, 45–48
User Name and Password ..................................... 33–34, 46, 66, 67
Utility .............................................................................. 36–57
Status Monitor .............................................. 17, 20, 36–37, 62
I
IEEE 802.11a Standard. See 802.11a Standard
IEEE 802.11b Standard. See 802.11b
IEEE 802.1x. See 802.1x
Industry Canada ............................................................................. 13
Infrared....................................................................................... 27
Infrastructure ................................................ 17, 20, 24–26, 28, 40, 70
Installation Instructions
Windows 98/ME/2000/XP ..................................................... 15–17
Windows NT ...................................................................... 18–20
Instantaneous Packets/Sec .............................................................. 38
74
K
Key Size ................................................................................. 42, 70
L
Last ACK RSSI ................................................................................ 53
Last Frame’s RSSI ........................................................................... 53
LED Indicators (CardBus Card) .......................................................... 64
Link Quality ............................................................................ 56–57
Log on to Harmony Security before Windows Logon ........................... 45, 67
M
Media Access Protocol .................................................................... 69
Microsoft Windows 2000 Internet Authentication Service (IAS) Server ......... 34
Modulation .................................................................................. 69
Multicast Bytes Received .................................................................. 53
Multicast Bytes Sent ...................................................................... 52
Multicast Packets Received ............................................................... 51
Multicast Packets Sent..................................................................... 51
Multiple Retries............................................................................. 52
N
NETPR11A.CAT................................................................................ 17
NETPR11A.INF ............................................................................... 63
Network Mode .......................................................... 17, 20, 28, 40, 70
Network Name .............................................................................. 56
Network Traffic Statistics ............................................................. 51–53
Networking Client
Configuration .................................................................... 61–62
New Hardware Wizard. See Add New Hardware Wizard
Novell Network .............................................................................. 45
O
Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) .......................... 27, 69
P
Packet Transmission Success Rate ................................................ 56–57
Password .......................................................................... 33–34, 46
PC Anywhere ................................................................................. 45
PCI Ethernet Controller .................................................................... 60
Plug-and-Play Utility ................................................................... 10, 14
Power Saving Mode................................................................... 29, 70
Product Certification......................................................................... 4
Product Package ............................................................................. 9
75
Protocol
Configuration .................................................................... 61–62
PROX11A.SYS ............................................................................ 17, 63
PROX11AN4.SYS ............................................................................ 63
R
RADIUS Server ......................................................................... 34, 49
Range .................................................................................... 63–64
Read Keys ......................................................................... 43, 44–45
Receive Rate ................................................................................. 53
Regulatory Information and Warnings .......................................... 2–4, 12
Remove Status Monitor From Task Bar ................................................. 37
Roaming ........................................................................... 25–26, 29
RSSI ............................................................................................ 53
See also Signal Strength
RTS/CTS ............................................................................ 32, 40, 70
Run 802.11a Configuration Utility ........................................................ 37
S
Security Settings ...................................................................... 32–35
Configuration .................................................................... 42–50
Send Rate..................................................................... 31, 40, 52, 70
SETUP.EXE .................................................................... 15, 18, 60, 65
Signal Strength ........................................................................ 38, 54
See also RSSI
Single Retries ............................................................................... 52
Site Survey .................................................................................. 66
Snoop Tool ............................................................................. 55–56
Spread Spectrum .......................................................................... 27
SSID ................................................................ 25, 26, 28, 40, 54, 70
Station Address ............................................................................. 37
Station Configuration ................................................................ 39–41
Statistics. See Network Traffic Statistics
Status Monitor .......................................................... 17, 20, 36–37, 62
Synchronize Password with Windows Logon ......................................... 48
System Requirements ...................................................................... 10
T
TCP/IP ......................................................................................... 61
Technical Support........................................................................... 71
Technical Training........................................................................... 71
Temperature
Operating .............................................................................. 69
Test. See Packet Transmission Success Rate
76
Throughput .................................................................................. 65
Topologies.............................................................................. 23–26
Transmit Rate. See Send Rate
Troubleshooting Suggestions ...................................................... 58–67
2X Mode ...................................................................... 27, 29, 65, 70
U
Unicast Bytes Received .................................................................... 53
Unicast Bytes Sent ......................................................................... 52
Unicast Packets Received ................................................................. 51
Unicast Packets Sent ....................................................................... 51
Uninstall Instructions ................................................................ 62–63
Upgrade Instructions ...................................................................... 22
Use Harmony Security Protocol ............................................... 33–34, 70
Use WEP for Authentication and Encryption ...................... 32–33, 42–45, 70
User Database ......................................................................... 34, 67
User Name ......................................................................... 33–34, 46
V
Version Information ........................................................................ 57
Voltage ....................................................................................... 69
W
Warranty Information ........................................................................ 2
WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) .......................................... 32–33, 42–45
WEP Key ....................................................................... 33, 43–45, 70
WEP Undecryptable ......................................................................... 53
Windows 2000 .............................................................................. 10
Installation Instructions ........................................................ 15–17
Server ............................................................................. 34, 45
Windows 98/ME............................................................................. 10
Cabinet (CAB) Files ................................................................... 13
Installation CD ............................................................... 13, 17, 60
Installation Instructions ........................................................ 15–17
Windows NT ....................................................................... 10, 34, 45
Installation Instructions ....................................................... 18–20
Requires Plug-and-Play Utility ...................................................... 14
Windows XP .................................................................................. 10
Disable Harmony Configuration .................................................... 41
Enabling 802.1x ................................................................. 49–50
Installation Instructions ........................................................ 15–17
Wireless Topologies .................................................................. 23–26