man pages section 6: Demos
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December 2002
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Contents
Preface
5
Introduction
Intro(6)
11
12
Games and Demos
x_buttontest(6)
x_dialtest(6)
Index
13
14
15
17
3
4
man pages section 6: Demos • December 2002
Preface
Both novice users and those familar with the SunOS operating system can use online
man pages to obtain information about the system and its features. A man page is
intended to answer concisely the question “What does it do?” The man pages in
general comprise a reference manual. They are not intended to be a tutorial.
Overview
The following contains a brief description of each man page section and the
information it references:
■
Section 1 describes, in alphabetical order, commands available with the operating
system.
■
Section 1M describes, in alphabetical order, commands that are used chiefly for
system maintenance and administration purposes.
■
Section 2 describes all of the system calls. Most of these calls have one or more
error returns. An error condition is indicated by an otherwise impossible returned
value.
■
Section 3 describes functions found in various libraries, other than those functions
that directly invoke UNIX system primitives, which are described in Section 2.
■
Section 4 outlines the formats of various files. The C structure declarations for the
file formats are given where applicable.
■
Section 5 contains miscellaneous documentation such as character-set tables.
■
Section 6 contains available games and demos.
■
Section 7 describes various special files that refer to specific hardware peripherals
and device drivers. STREAMS software drivers, modules and the
STREAMS-generic set of system calls are also described.
5
■
Section 9 provides reference information needed to write device drivers in the
kernel environment. It describes two device driver interface specifications: the
Device Driver Interface (DDI) and the Driver⁄Kernel Interface (DKI).
■
Section 9E describes the DDI/DKI, DDI-only, and DKI-only entry-point routines a
developer can include in a device driver.
■
Section 9F describes the kernel functions available for use by device drivers.
■
Section 9S describes the data structures used by drivers to share information
between the driver and the kernel.
Below is a generic format for man pages. The man pages of each manual section
generally follow this order, but include only needed headings. For example, if there
are no bugs to report, there is no BUGS section. See the intro pages for more
information and detail about each section, and man(1) for more information about man
pages in general.
NAME
This section gives the names of the commands or
functions documented, followed by a brief
description of what they do.
SYNOPSIS
This section shows the syntax of commands or
functions. When a command or file does not exist
in the standard path, its full path name is shown.
Options and arguments are alphabetized, with
single letter arguments first, and options with
arguments next, unless a different argument order
is required.
The following special characters are used in this
section:
6
man pages section 6: Demos • December 2002
[ ]
Brackets. The option or argument
enclosed in these brackets is optional. If
the brackets are omitted, the argument
must be specified.
. . .
Ellipses. Several values can be provided
for the previous argument, or the
previous argument can be specified
multiple times, for example, "filename
. . ." .
|
Separator. Only one of the arguments
separated by this character can be
specified at a time.
{ }
Braces. The options and/or arguments
enclosed within braces are
interdependent, such that everything
enclosed must be treated as a unit.
PROTOCOL
This section occurs only in subsection 3R to
indicate the protocol description file.
DESCRIPTION
This section defines the functionality and behavior
of the service. Thus it describes concisely what the
command does. It does not discuss OPTIONS or
cite EXAMPLES. Interactive commands,
subcommands, requests, macros, and functions are
described under USAGE.
IOCTL
This section appears on pages in Section 7 only.
Only the device class that supplies appropriate
parameters to the ioctl(2) system call is called
ioctl and generates its own heading. ioctl calls
for a specific device are listed alphabetically (on the
man page for that specific device). ioctl calls are
used for a particular class of devices all of which
have an io ending, such as mtio(7I).
OPTIONS
This secton lists the command options with a
concise summary of what each option does. The
options are listed literally and in the order they
appear in the SYNOPSIS section. Possible
arguments to options are discussed under the
option, and where appropriate, default values are
supplied.
OPERANDS
This section lists the command operands and
describes how they affect the actions of the
command.
OUTPUT
This section describes the output – standard output,
standard error, or output files – generated by the
command.
RETURN VALUES
If the man page documents functions that return
values, this section lists these values and describes
the conditions under which they are returned. If a
function can return only constant values, such as 0
or –1, these values are listed in tagged paragraphs.
Otherwise, a single paragraph describes the return
values of each function. Functions declared void do
not return values, so they are not discussed in
RETURN VALUES.
ERRORS
On failure, most functions place an error code in
the global variable errno indicating why they
failed. This section lists alphabetically all error
codes a function can generate and describes the
conditions that cause each error. When more than
Preface
7
one condition can cause the same error, each
condition is described in a separate paragraph
under the error code.
USAGE
This section lists special rules, features, and
commands that require in-depth explanations. The
subsections listed here are used to explain built-in
functionality:
Commands
Modifiers
Variables
Expressions
Input Grammar
8
EXAMPLES
This section provides examples of usage or of how
to use a command or function. Wherever possible a
complete example including command-line entry
and machine response is shown. Whenever an
example is given, the prompt is shown as
example%, or if the user must be superuser,
example#. Examples are followed by explanations,
variable substitution rules, or returned values. Most
examples illustrate concepts from the SYNOPSIS,
DESCRIPTION, OPTIONS, and USAGE sections.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
This section lists any environment variables that
the command or function affects, followed by a
brief description of the effect.
EXIT STATUS
This section lists the values the command returns to
the calling program or shell and the conditions that
cause these values to be returned. Usually, zero is
returned for successful completion, and values
other than zero for various error conditions.
FILES
This section lists all file names referred to by the
man page, files of interest, and files created or
required by commands. Each is followed by a
descriptive summary or explanation.
ATTRIBUTES
This section lists characteristics of commands,
utilities, and device drivers by defining the
attribute type and its corresponding value. See
attributes(5) for more information.
SEE ALSO
This section lists references to other man pages,
in-house documentation, and outside publications.
man pages section 6: Demos • December 2002
DIAGNOSTICS
This section lists diagnostic messages with a brief
explanation of the condition causing the error.
WARNINGS
This section lists warnings about special conditions
which could seriously affect your working
conditions. This is not a list of diagnostics.
NOTES
This section lists additional information that does
not belong anywhere else on the page. It takes the
form of an aside to the user, covering points of
special interest. Critical information is never
covered here.
BUGS
This section describes known bugs and, wherever
possible, suggests workarounds.
Preface
9
10
man pages section 6: Demos • December 2002
Introduction
11
Intro(6)
NAME
DESCRIPTION
12
Intro – introduction to games and demos
This section describes available games and demos.
man pages section 6: Demos • Last Revised 27 Mar 1992
Games and Demos
13
x_buttontest(6)
NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
x_buttontest – Xview demonstration and test program for SunButtons
/usr/demo/BUTTONBOX/x_buttontest
x_buttontest is an Xview application that displays a window with thirty two
buttons, corresponding to those on the SunButtons buttonbox. To determine if the
buttonbox has been set up correctly, select the Diagnostic button on the panel. If the
buttonbox is functional and correctly interfaced, each of the buttons will light in
sequence for about 1 second. Then "OK." is sent to the standard output of the demo
program. x_buttontest is now in its (default) interactive mode. Pressing a button
on the buttonbox highlights the corresponding button on the screen. Additionally,
x_buttontest sends a BDIOBUTLITE ioctl to the buttonbox in response to each key
press and key release, so that the button light is illuminated while the button is held
down.
If the serial communications become confused, as can happen when both the
buttonbox and the dialbox are operated at the same time, one or more button lights
may remain on after the button is released. Clicking on the Reset button on the panel
will unconditionally turn all the button lights off.
ATTRIBUTES
See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes:
ATTRIBUTE TYPE
Architecture
SEE ALSO
14
ATTRIBUTE VALUE
SPARC
bdconfig(1M), attributes(5), x_dialtest(6), bd(7M), streamio(7I)
man pages section 6: Demos • Last Revised 1 Jan 1997
x_dialtest(6)
NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
x_dialtest – Xview demonstration and test program for SunDials
/usr/demo/DIALBOX/x_dialtest
x_dialtest is an Xview application that displays a window with eight dials,
corresponding to the dials on the SunDials dialbox. To determine if the dialbox has
been set up correctly, turn a dial on the dialbox. If the dialbox is functional and
correctly interfaced, turning a dial by hand will make the corresponding dial in the
window turn a similar amount.
The dials do not have any notion of absolute angular position. It is changes in current
angular position that are sent to the host application. Thus there is no notion of
resetting the position of the dials on the dialbox hardware.
The Diagnostic button on the panel is a demo mode of the x_dialtest program. The
pointer of each of the dials in the window is rotated one full circle and then disappears
in turn. When all eight dials have been rotated, the display dial pointers are reset to
their previous rotational positions. The only diagnostic done on the dialbox is a
firmware self check. If this self check passes, then "OK." is sent to the standard output
of the demo program.
The Ram Dump button on the panel arranges to place some firmware data into the file
ram_dump.dat in the current directory. It is intended for factory diagnostics use and
is not publicly documented further.
ATTRIBUTES
See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes:
ATTRIBUTE TYPE
Architecture
SEE ALSO
ATTRIBUTE VALUE
SPARC
bdconfig(1M), attributes(5), x_buttontest(6), bd(7M), streamio(7I)
Games and Demos
15
x_dialtest(6)
16
man pages section 6: Demos • Last Revised 1 Jan 1997
Index
D
demos, introduction, 12
G
games, introduction, 12
I
introduction, games and demos, 12
X
x_buttontest — Xview demonstration and test
program for SunButtons, 14
x_dialtest — Xview demonstration and test
program for SunDials, 15
Xview demonstration and test program for
SunButtons — x_buttontest, 14
Xview demonstration and test program for
SunDials — x_dialtest, 15
17
18
man pages section 6: Demos • December 2002