© Engineering TAC Xenta 527 - Schneider Electric Buildings

TAC Xenta
©
Engineering TAC Xenta 527
TAC Xenta
©
Engineering TAC Xenta 527
Copyright © 2004 TAC AB. All rights reserved.
This document, as well as the product it refers to, is only intended for licensed users. TAC AB owns the copyright of this document and reserves
the right to make changes, additions or deletions. TAC AB assumes no responsibility for possible mistakes or errors that might appear in this
document.
Do not use the product for other purposes than those indicated in this document.
Only licensed users of the product and the document are permitted to use the document or any information therein. Distribution, disclosure,
copying, storing or use of the product, the information or the illustrations in the document on the part of non-licensed users, in electronic or
mechanical form, as a recording or by other means, including photo copying or information storage and retrieval systems, without the express
written permission of TAC AB, will be regarded as a violation of copyright laws and is strictly prohibited.
Trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Microsoft® and Windows® are registered trademarks of
The Microsoft Corporation.
Trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
TAC Vista®, TAC Menta®, TAC Xenta® and TAC I-talk® are registered trademarks of TAC AB.
TAC Xenta, Engineering TAC Xenta 527
Contents
Contents
INTRODUCTION
1
About this Manual
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
Structure .....................................................................................................................
Typographic Conventions ..........................................................................................
Prerequisites ...............................................................................................................
How to Use this Book ................................................................................................
9
9
10
10
11
GETTING STARTED
2
3
4
5
6
Configuration Instructions
15
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
15
15
17
18
19
Preparing to Configure the Xenta 527 .......................................................................
Setting the IP Address for the TAC Xenta 527..........................................................
Connecting the Xenta 527 to Your Network..............................................................
Using a Proxy Server .................................................................................................
Working With Firewalls.............................................................................................
Logging Into the TAC Xenta 527
21
3.1
3.2
21
21
Connecting Through a Web Browser.........................................................................
Using a Self-Signed Certificate..................................................................................
Setting Up I/NET Communications
25
4.1
4.2
25
27
Defining I/NET Host IP Addresses............................................................................
Defining Host Masks..................................................................................................
Securing the Web Server
29
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
29
31
32
33
33
36
Setting up Password-protected User Accounts ..........................................................
Assigning User Access Rights ...................................................................................
Logging Failed Login Attempts .................................................................................
Extending Time Between Failed Login Attempts......................................................
Configuring Secure Socket Layer Connections .........................................................
Preventing Remote Configuration Clients from Altering Parameters .......................
Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
39
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.6.1
6.6.2
39
40
42
44
45
47
47
49
Using XBuilder ..........................................................................................................
Creating a Project That Will Include I/NET Items ....................................................
Converting and Importing I/NET SAV Files .............................................................
Updating Your Project with New I/NET SAV Files..................................................
Displaying Dynamic I/NET Alarms and Events from Web Pages ............................
Using I/NET Point Signals.........................................................................................
Mapping I/NET Point Signals to Web Pages .............................................................
Mapping I/NET Point Signals to Graphic Pages........................................................
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Contents
6.7
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.8
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Using I/NET Page Links ............................................................................................
Linking an I/NET Trend Log to a Graphic Page........................................................
Linking an I/NET Time Schedule to a Graphic Page.................................................
Using the Find Function .............................................................................................
54
54
58
62
REFERENCE
7
8
9
I/NET Objects in XBuilder
67
7.1
7.2
7.3
68
68
69
Network Objects.........................................................................................................
Point Signals...............................................................................................................
Page Links ..................................................................................................................
DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
73
8.1
8.2
73
74
Launching the Utility from an Explorer Window ......................................................
Running the Utility from the Command Line ............................................................
History Logs
77
9.1
9.2
77
77
Occurrences of I/NET System and Web Server Alarms and Events..........................
Records of Individuals Who Modified an Alarm Status ............................................
10 Storing Data on the Xenta 527
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.3.1
10.3.2
79
Data Limits .................................................................................................................
Web Server Data.........................................................................................................
Protecting Stored Data................................................................................................
Maintaining Data During Power Interruptions...........................................................
Backing Up and Restoring Data .................................................................................
79
79
79
79
79
APPENDIX
A
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
85
B
Troubleshooting
87
Index
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91
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INTRODUCTION
1
About this Manual
TAC Xenta, Engineering TAC Xenta 527
1
1 About this Manual
About this Manual
This manual describes the configuration and operation of the TAC
Xenta 527. For information on supporting products, please refer to the
manual for the product in question.
The TAC Xenta 527 provides the same capabilities as the Xenta 511, as
well as additional features that support the use of I/NET systems. The
focus of this manual is to explain the features that are unique to the
Xenta 527. For an explanation of the features that are common to both
the Xenta 511 and Xenta 527, refer to the Xenta 511 documentation.
Note
We are continuously improving and correcting our documentation.
This manual may have been updated.
Please check our Docnet site at www.tac.com for the latest version.
1.1
Structure
The manual is divided into the following parts:
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•
Introduction
The Introduction section contains information on how this manual
is structured and how it should be used to find information in the
most efficient way.
•
Getting Started
The Getting Started section contains a step-by-step description of
how to engineer or carry out different tasks. It also gives you
guided instructions on how to complete a sample project. If you
want more information, see the corresponding chapter in the Reference section of the manual.
•
Reference
The Reference section contains more comprehensive information
about various parts of the Getting Started section. It also provides
you with information on alternative solutions not covered by the
Getting Started section.
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1 About this Manual
1.2
TAC Xenta, Engineering TAC Xenta 527
Typographic Conventions
Throughout the manual the following specially marked texts may occur.
!
Warning
Alerts you that failure to take, or avoid, a specific action might result
in physical harm to you or to the hardware.
Caution
Alerts you to possible data loss, breaches of security, or other more
serious problems.
Important
Alerts you to supplementary information that is essential to the completion of a task.
Note
Alerts you to supplementary information.
Tip
Alerts you to supplementary information that is not essential to the
completion of the task at hand.
1.3
Prerequisites
To be able to profit from the contents in this manual, you are recommended to read the following manuals:
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•
TAC Xenta® 511 and 911 Handbook, document no. 0-004-7870-0
•
Engineering TAC Xenta 511, document no. 0-004-7845-3
•
Operating TAC Xenta 511, document no. 0-004-7846-1.
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1.4
1 About this Manual
How to Use this Book
This document follows a standard style indicating keystrokes, cursor
movement, navigation, and data entry. TAC software is intended to be
used primarily with a mouse. However, you may use keyboard equivalents as indicated below.
Filenames
Filenames appear in this manual as they appear on the screen of your
computer. To further identify them as files, they appear as uppercase,
italicized letters with any file extensions included. For instance, the configuration file used by your computer upon start up is shown as CONFIG.SYS.
Menu Commands
Menu selections are shown in bold font with initial capitalization as in
Edit. A menu item with the arrow symbol (>) indicates another menu
level.
Keystrokes
Keystrokes are shown in bold surrounded by square brackets. For example, the Y key is shown as [Y], and the Enter key is shown as [Enter].
Certain standard keys are used within the application to perform certain
system functions within editors, message boxes, etc. These are the
[Enter], [Esc], [Tab], and Up and Down Arrow keys.
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•
[Enter] Key — Use this key to accept or activate a function, typically a highlighted button.
•
[Esc] Key — Use this key to cancel an action or editor. You may
use the [Esc] key to back up from successive levels of windows
until you return to the main application window.
•
[Tab] Key — Use this key to cycle through the available active
buttons or entry fields in an editor or screen.
•
Up/Down Arrows — Use these keys to move the highlighted
selection from one item to another in the various list, drop-down,
and combo boxes found in the editors.
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1 About this Manual
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GETTING STARTED
2
Configuration Instructions
3
Logging Into the TAC Xenta 527
4
Setting Up I/NET Communications
5
Securing the Web Server
6
Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
TAC Xenta, Engineering TAC Xenta 527
2 Configuration Instructions
2
Configuration Instructions
2.1
Preparing to Configure the Xenta 527
Before you begin configuring the TAC Xenta 527, take time to gather
crucial network information. First determine whether fixed IP address
or DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) will be used. If
DHCP is used, the TAC Xenta 527 IP address will be assigned by the
DHCP server.
Gather the following additional information:
2.2
•
IP address (If fixed; e.g. 172.20.4.21):
•
Subnet mask (If fixed; e.g. 255.255.0.0):
•
Default Gateway (e.g. 172.20.2.100):
•
DNS (e.g. 192.165.248.22):
•
Web site name:
•
Domain name:
•
Host name:
Setting the IP Address for the TAC Xenta 527
In order to set the IP Address for the TAC Xenta 527, you will need to
connect a serial cable between the Xenta 527 and your PC workstation.
You can then use a terminal emulator such as Hyperterminal within
Windows to communicate with the Xenta 527.
9600 bps
8 data bits
no parity
1 stop bit
no flow control
A RS232 B
10Base-T
TAC Xenta Programming Serial Kit,
part no. 0-073-0920
Fig. 2.1: Using a Terminal Emulator to Communicate with the
TAC Xenta 527
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2 Configuration Instructions
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1
Connect a serial cable between the PC and the Xenta 527 RS232 B
port.
2
Within Windows, start a terminal emulator such as Hyperterminal.
username:root
password:root
dsh/>setip
DHCP enable
(yes/no) no
.
.
dsh/>restart
Fig. 2.2:
3
Log into the TAC Xenta 527 by entering a valid user name and
password.
4
Type setip to start the configuration script.
5
Answer the DHCP enable question as follows:
6
•
No - Choose this answer if you will assign a static IP address.
•
Yes - Choose this answer if you will allow the system to
assign the IP address.
Depending on the DHCP setting you chose, continue as follows:
•
•
If DHCP Enable = No, enter the following:
–
IP address
–
Subnet mask
If DHCP Enable = Yes, enter the following:
–
Default Gateway
–
DNS
–
Web site name
–
Domain name
–
Host name
7
Change root password (immediately or later, using passwd).
8
“Do you want to restart the IP interface?”
9
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Assigning the IP address using Hyperterminal
•
Answer Yes to make the changes effective immediately
•
Answer No to make the changes effective after the next 527
restart.
Exit by typing lo (log out) and pressing [Enter].
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2.3
2 Configuration Instructions
Connecting the Xenta 527 to Your Network
The TAC Xenta 527 integrates with I/NET and Vista networks by communicating with these systems across the Ethernet. The following figure
shows an example network configuration.
DMZ
Intranet
Internet
Firewall 1
Firewall 2
NPR
Xenta 527
Xenta 527
Option A
Option B
Install the Xenta 527
at either location
Router
Node
Node
Node
Node
Node
Node
I/NET Network
Vista Network
Fig. 2.3: Network Location Options for the Xenta 527
In order for the Xenta 527 to successfully establish communications
with your building control systems, certain network criteria must be
met. More specifically, the ports required for proper communication
with these systems must be open and available to the Xenta 527. The
TAC Xenta 527 uses the following communication ports:
•
Port 80 (http access)
•
Port 443 (https access)
•
Port 20/21 (FTP access)
•
Port 25 (SMTP access)
•
Port 80 (Status Viewer, Alarm Viewer and Graphics Viewer)
•
Port 1068 (LTA for Vista)
•
Port 161 (snmp access)
•
UDP Port 50069 (I/NET system access)
Note
You have the option of changing the HTTP, HTTPS, and Dynamic
variables communication Port settings. Refer to page 89 in Chapter B,
“Troubleshooting”, for more information.
Connect the Xenta 527 to your network at the desired location. If necessary, configure the network’s proxies/firewalls to allow for proper
communication. Refer to “Using a Proxy Server” and “Working With
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2 Configuration Instructions
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Firewalls” later in this chapter for general information about these
devices.
The figure above shows an example network and the location options
for the Xenta 527. Each location is described below.
Explanation of Option A:
The first location (see Fig. 2.3, option A) shows the Xenta 527 installed
in the DMZ between two firewalls (be aware that this may be logically
two firewalls but physically only one piece of hardware). This location
requires the following configuration:
•
Firewall 1: For security reasons, you may only want to open ports
80 and 443 from the internet. This is all that is necessary for internet access to the Xenta 527’s web interface.
•
Firewall 2: Open ports 20, 21, 25, 80, 161, and 443 from the intranet side. Also open port 1068 and UDP port 50069 from the DMZ
side to allow the Xenta 527 to communicate with I/NET and Vista
networks.
Explanation of Option B:
The second location (see Fig. 2.3, option B) shows the Xenta 527
installed on the network with no firewall between it and the building
control systems. This location requires that both firewalls allow traffic
through ports 80 and 443. The other ports are not required to be open on
either firewall since the Xenta 527 is installed at a network location that
allows it to communicate directly with I/NET and Vista networks.
2.4
Using a Proxy Server
A proxy server is a server that sits between a client application, such as
a web browser, and a target server. The proxy server intercepts all
requests to the target server. Proxy servers have two main purposes, as
described below.
Improve Performance:
Proxy servers can be configured to improve client request response time
by saving the results of all requests for a certain amount of time. If a client requests information that has been saved, the proxy server can
respond to the client request quickly with the stored information.
Filter Requests:
A proxy server can modify a client request before sending it on to the
server. When the server responds, the response also passes through the
proxy before it is forwarded on to the client. The proxy can modify the
headers in this response.
By intercepting and translating network transactions, a proxy server
can:
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2.5
2 Configuration Instructions
•
Protect the client by monitoring potentially dangerous transactions.
•
Enable the client to communicate using protocols that might not
be implemented by the client software.
•
Act as a gateway between a private network and a public network.
Working With Firewalls
A firewall is a system designed to prevent unauthorized access to or
from a private network. Firewalls can be implemented in both hardware
and software, or a combination of both. Firewalls are frequently used to
prevent unauthorized Internet users from accessing private networks
connected to the Internet, especially intranets. All messages entering or
leaving the intranet pass through the firewall, which examines each
message and blocks those that do not meet the specified security criteria.
There are several types of firewall techniques:
•
Packet filter: Looks at each packet entering or leaving the network and accepts or rejects it based on user-defined rules. Packet
filtering is fairly effective and transparent to users, but it is difficult to configure. In addition, it is susceptible to IP spoofing.
•
Application gateway: Applies security mechanisms to specific
applications, such as FTP and Telnet servers. This is very effective, but can impose a performance degradation.
•
Circuit-level gateway: Applies security mechanisms when a TCP
or UDP connection is established. Once the connection has been
made, packets can flow between the hosts without further checking.
•
Proxy server: Intercepts all messages entering and leaving the
network. The proxy server effectively hides the true network
addresses.
In practice, many firewalls use two or more of these techniques in concert.
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3 Logging Into the TAC Xenta 527
3
Logging Into the TAC Xenta 527
3.1
Connecting Through a Web Browser
1
Start Internet Explorer.
2
Type the Xenta 527’s IP address in the address field in the browser
and click the Go arrow.
Fig. 3.1:
3.2
Typing the Xenta 527’s IP Address
Using a Self-Signed Certificate
If you are using a self-signed certificate (i.e. a self-signed certificate has
been created in the XBuilder project and sent to the target), you will see
the Security Alert dialog when you connect to the Xenta 527. This dialog will appear each time you connect to the Xenta 527, unless you
install the certificate on your system.
Fig. 3.2: Security Alert
1
Proceed by performing one of the following actions:
•
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If you trust the content and would like to proceed without
installing the self-signed certificate, click Yes and proceed
with Step 3, below.
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2
•
If you do not trust the content and would like to abort the connection, click No. In this case, do not perform any of the following steps.
•
You can view, and optionally install, the self-signed certificate
by clicking View Certificate. If you wish to install the certificate, proceed with Step 2, below.
If you are viewing the certificate and wish to install it, perform the
following steps:
Fig. 3.3:
Viewing the Self-signed Certificate
a
Click Install Certificate. The Install Certificate Wizard
opens.
b
Click Next in each dialog presented by the wizard. We recommend that you use the default settings. When the final dialog
appears, click Finish to end the wizard.
c
Close and restart the web browser.
d
In the web browser’s address field, type the Xenta 527’s IP
address.
Fig. 3.4:
Typing the Xenta 527’s IP Address
Since the certificate is installed, no security alert dialog will
appear when you connect to the Xenta 527. Proceed to Step 3.
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3
3 Logging Into the TAC Xenta 527
Log in as the System Administrator by performing the following
steps:
Fig. 3.5:
Logging In
a
The root account is the system administrator. Therefore, enter
a Username of root.
b
Enter the password for the root account. The default password
for this account is root.
c
Click Login.
Being logged in as the System Administrator, you are now able to set up
I/NET communications and create user accounts.
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3 Logging Into the TAC Xenta 527
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4 Setting Up I/NET Communications
4
Setting Up I/NET Communications
4.1
Defining I/NET Host IP Addresses
In order for the TAC Xenta 527 to communicate with I/NET devices
from across an Ethernet, it must first obtain the IP addresses of remote
I/NET hosts from at least one I/NET reference host. A Reference Host
is any I/NET workstation or NetPlus Router that serves as a source of
IP addresses. Any host workstation or NetPlus Router attached to an
Ethernet LAN can be used as a Reference Host.
I/NET host IP addresses may be entered from a web page or from the
console, or downloaded as part of an XBuilder project. You can also
assign an I/NET host number to the Xenta 527 while you are defining
IP addresses.
From a Web Browser:
1
Expand the INet section of the navigation tree as shown in the following figure and select Configuration Profile to define Host IP
addresses.
Fig. 4.1: Defining Reference Host IP Addresses from a Web Browser
2
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Define an IP Address for each reference host. If you define less
then eight reference hosts, set the unused fields to "0.0.0.0".
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4 Setting Up I/NET Communications
3
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Assign an I/NET host number to the Xenta 527. This can be any
number from 1 to 63. Make sure that the number you define is
unique among all hosts on the I/NET network.
From a Console Window:
In order to enter host IP addresses from a console window, you will
need to connect a serial cable between the Xenta 527 and your PC workstation. You can then use a terminal emulator such as Windows Hyperterminal to communicate with the Xenta 527. If necessary, refer to
Fig. 2.1 (page 15) to view a typical serial cable connection.
1
After logging into the Xenta 527, begin entering host IP addresses
by typing inethost at the command line (see the figure below).
Fig. 4.2: Entering Host IP Addresses from a Console Window
The inethost command is only available from the console. The
addresses you define enable the Xenta 527 to communicate with
one or more reference hosts. Up to eight reference host IP addresses
can be defined. Set any unused reference hosts to "0.0.0.0".
2
Assign an I/NET host number to the Xenta 527. This can be any
number from 1 to 63. Make sure that the number you define is
unique among all hosts on the I/NET network
From an XBuilder Project:
In Project mode, the I/NET network is imported into XBuilder. When
you transfer the compiled project to the Xenta 527, any Host IP
addresses that you have defined from a web browser or from a console
window will be overwritten.
1
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In XBuilder, open or create a project that uses the X527 project
template. For instructions on how to create a project, refer to “Creating a Project That Will Include I/NET Items” on page 40.
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2
4 Setting Up I/NET Communications
In the Network pane of XBuilder, expand the IP Backbone item
and highlight the INET object.
Fig. 4.3:
3
In the parameters for the INET object, define IP addresses for up to
eight reference hosts. Set any unused reference hosts to "0.0.0.0".
Fig. 4.4:
4.2
The INET Object in XBuilder
Setting IP Addresses from XBuilder
4
Define an I/NET host number for the Xenta 527. This can be any
number from 1 to 63. Make sure that the number you define is
unique among all hosts on the I/NET network.
5
Compile the project and download it to the TAC Xenta 527.
Defining Host Masks
Masks are part of a filtering system I/NET uses to route messages,
alarms, and data to host workstations. The TAC Xenta 527 also makes
use of masks in order to receive alarm and event information from the
I/NET system.
The masks you define in the Xenta 527 are sent to remote hosts in the
I/NET system, allowing them to determine whether to send messages to
the Xenta 527. These remote hosts (workstations and NetPlus Routers)
compare this mask information to the mask information that accompanies each message received from an I/NET controller. If this comparison results in a match, the message is routed from the remote host to
your Xenta 527.
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4 Setting Up I/NET Communications
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Expand the INet section of the navigation tree as shown in the following figure and select Host Masks Summary to define Host IP
addresses.
Fig. 4.5: Defining Host Routing Masks
2
In the Host Mask Summary, click on a host IP address to set its
routing masks. The Host Routing Mask Editor opens.
Fig. 4.6: Launching the Host Routing Mask Editor
3
Activate (!) or deactivate (#) masking positions as necessary.
You can define up to 32 different masks for alarms, and another 32
different masks for events. The masks you define in this editor are
sent to the selected host, allowing it to determine whether to send
messages to the Xenta 527.
If necessary, you can use the Set All and Clear All buttons to speed
up the selection process.
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4
With all masks properly defined, click Save to accept your settings.
5
Repeat these steps as necessary to define masks for other I/NET
hosts.
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5 Securing the Web Server
5
Securing the Web Server
5.1
Setting up Password-protected User Accounts
The TAC Xenta 527 is a multi-user system that allows each user to have
access to specific parts of the system. The authorization level of the different users can only be set by the system administrator, the “root” user.
For security reasons, you should change the password for the root user
while you are commissioning the Xenta 527.
Read and read/write authorization is assigned at the directory level. The
rights are set recursively, which means that subdirectories get the same
access level as the folder in which they are located.
The Xenta 527 uses the Xenta 511’s method for assigning read or read/
write rights to objects. However, the Xenta 527 also allows you to
assign user access rights to I/NET links and stations.
Fig. 5.1: User Administration
In User Administration you can create a new user by performing the following steps:
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1
Select Create New User. The Create User screen displays (see the
figure on the next page).
2
In the User Details section, enter the user’s name and a brief
description of this user account. The four first characters of the
name are used as a signature in connection with I/NET events and
alarms.
3
In the Password Options section, define a password for the new
user.
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Fig. 5.2:
4
Creating a New User
Use the User Settings section to customize the new account. The
following options are available:
•
Profile – Assign one of the following profiles to this user:
–
Web User - The web user has minimal access to the system. This user cannot browse the I/NET system, control
I/NET points, access I/NET trend logs, or access I/NET
time schedules.
–
Operator - The operator has access to all viewers and
whatever is needed to supervise the operation of the
building. By default, the operator has read/write permission in the relevant parts of the system, and is able to handle all alarms.
A third setting, called Administrator, also exists, but this setting is restricted to the root user account. Refer to the Xenta
511 documentation for more information about these options.
•
HTTPS Idle TimeOut – This setting determines what duration
of user inactivity will cause automatic user logout. You can
choose a setting from 15 minutes to 24 hours.
•
FTP – Choose whether or not this user will have the ability to
transfer files to and from the Xenta 527 using FTP. Be aware
that FTP is not a secure method of communication. Passwords, etc. can easily be intercepted.
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5.2
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5
Use the Frame Settings section to link customized web pages to
this user account. Using this feature, you can design and specify
individual web pages for different users. Refer to the Xenta 511
documentation for further information about this feature.
6
Click the Create User button to create the new user account.
Assigning User Access Rights
An I/NET user can receive access rights to I/NET using the I/NET
Access Rights Explorer. Expand the navigation tree as shown in the following figure and select Access Rights. Initially, the Link layer of
your I/NET system is displayed. You can assign user access rights at
this level, and penetrate down to the next layer by selecting the appropriate link.
Fig. 5.3: Assigning User Access Rights to I/NET Links
After you penetrate a link, the stations available for that link are displayed. You can continue assigning user access rights as necessary to
each station.
Ultimately, a user’s access rights will be determined by the combination
of their link access rights, station access rights, and user authority.
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Fig. 5.4: Assigning User Access Rights to I/NET Controllers
The available selections are:
Link 00 Station 00
Station 01
Station 02
..
Station 63
Link 01 Station 00
Station 01
Station 02
..
Station 63
..
Link 99 Station 00
Station 01
Station 02
..
Station 63
The four first characters of the User name are used as a signature in connection with events and alarms.
I/NET User access rights are stored in a system file. This file can only
be edited in the system using the web browser, although the file may be
stored in the corresponding XBuilder project.
5.3
Logging Failed Login Attempts
The system creates a log file of any failed log in attempts. The log file
keeps the latest 50 entries. Each entry is 176 bytes. You can view the
log file by selecting Utilities > Error > Login Error Log in the System
view.
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5 Securing the Web Server
The errors shown are registered in the system login error log.
The format is as follows:
host - user date “url + error text” http status 0
Example:
172.20.10.105 - 203-008-01 01/Jun/2001:08:22:26 +0000 "GET /www/
index/index.html HTTP/1.1
Error: Bad Portal timestamp TS=20010404120000" 403 0
Here is a brief description of the error components:
Heading
Description
host
The fully qualified domain name or IP address of
the connecting machine.
user
The user ID used in the request.
date
Date and time when error occurred.
“url + error text” The http method and URL. An error explanation is
added.
http status
The http error code.
5.4
Extending Time Between Failed Login Attempts
As a deterrent to unauthorized users, the system takes an increasing
amount of time between log in attempts upon each failure. A login delay
is introduced separately, based on the user’s User ID and IP address, as
follows:
•
After 3 consecutive login failures, the login is disabled for 1
minute.
•
After the next login failure, the login is disabled for 2 minutes.
•
After the next login failure, the login is disabled for 3 minutes.
•
After the next login failure, the login is disabled for 4 minutes.
•
After the next and following login failures, the login is disabled
for 5 minutes.
A successful login or a system restart (RELOAD, WARMSTART,
COLDSTART) will reset the login attempt delay.
5.5
Configuring Secure Socket Layer Connections
SSL is short for Secure Sockets Layer, a protocol developed by
Netscape for transmitting private documents via the Internet.
SSL works by using a public key to encrypt data that is transferred via
the SSL connection. Both Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer
support SSL, and many web sites use the protocol to obtain confidential
user information, such as credit card numbers.
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SSL uses certificate-based authentication.
The TAC Xenta 527 is, by default, configured with a self-signed certificate from the factory. Some web browsers require parameters in the
certificate to be set according to the web site name, i.e. the IP address or
a DNS name. The SSL certificate generator creates a new certificate
with the correct parameter settings.
Certificates are used for the authentication and secure exchange of
information on non-secured networks, such as the Internet. Most commonly, server certificates are used to enable clients to verify the authenticity of web sites.
Two Different Certificates, Self-Signed and CA
In XBuilder you can choose between two types of certificates, selfsigned certificates and CA certificates.
Self-Signed Certificates
Self-Signed Certificates are created locally and thus not installed in
your browser. When a Self-Signed Certificate is used, the certificate
must also be installed on the client i.e. the computer used to browse the
Xenta 527.
The Xenta 527 device must be restarted to enable the new certificate.
The new certificate is accepted by browsers and may be installed.
The Getting Started section of this manual explains how to create and
use a self-signed certificate.
CA Certificates
CA Certificates are issued by trusted certificate authorities (CAs) like
Verisign. These certificates are already installed with the Internet
browser. Thus, when using a CA Certificate, there is no need to do anything to the client i.e. the computer used for browsing the Xenta 527.
Using a CA Certificate
1
Within an opened project in XBuilder, select Tools > Generate
Certificate from the menu.
The Generate Certificate dialog opens.
2
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Use the radio button and select CA-signed. Click Next.
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3
Use the CA-signed Certificate dialog to browse to the certificate
and the private key.
4
Click Next and then Finish to send the certificate to target.
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5
The Xenta 527 has to be restarted for the certificate to take effect.
Note that the CA Certificates are already installed with the browser.
Thus, nothing has to be done to the client computer, (i.e. the computer
containing the browser that is used to connect to the TAC Xenta 527.)
5.6
Preventing Remote Configuration Clients from
Altering Parameters
Local commands to prevent or allow remote configuration can be issued
to the Xenta 527 from a console window. This will require that you connect a serial cable between the Xenta 527 and your PC workstation. You
can then use a terminal emulator such as Windows Hyperterminal to
communicate with the Xenta 527. If necessary, refer to Fig. 2.1 (page
15) to view a typical serial cable connection.
By default, remote configuration is enabled. Regardless of the which
state is selected (i.e., enabled or disabled), the default state of “enabled”
is reinforced following a system restart RELOAD (typically at installation). Other restart types will keep the selected state.
You can disable remote configuration by issuing the following command on the local console:
> disrcfg<CR>
This command will disable remote configuration of the following
parameters:
•
DHCP enable/disable
•
IP-address
•
Subnet mask
•
Default gateway
•
DNS
•
Website name
•
Domain name
•
Host name
•
HTTP port
•
HTTPS port
•
Dynamic variables communication Port issued from the
web interface.
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You can enable remote configuration by issuing the following command on the local console:
>enrcfg<CR>
This command will enable remote configuration of the parameters
listed above.
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
6
Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
6.1
Using XBuilder
When you create an XBuilder project that uses the Xenta 527 template,
an "INET" object becomes available (see the figure below). This object
provides functions that allow you to add I/NET-related items to your
project.
Fig. 6.1: The INET Object in XBuilder
The DCU-to-XML Conversion Tool
The "INET" object in XBuilder relies on an DCU-to-XML conversion
tool that is included in the XBuilder installation. This tool converts
I/NET SAV files into an XML file that can then be imported into your
XBuilder project. When you import the XML file, XBuilder creates a
representation of the I/NET network. Any portions of the I/NET network that are defined in the I/NET SAV files will be included in the
associated XBuilder representation.
The I/NET Network in XBuilder
The following figure shows a portion of an I/NET network that has been
converted from a SAV file and imported into XBuilder. The figure is
annotated to describe how each object in the network view represents a
portion of the I/NET network.
Link Number
Station Number
Point Number
Bit Offset
Point Type
Point Signals
Page Link
Fig. 6.2: I/NET Point Structure in XBuilder
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Sequence of Tasks
The overall sequence that allows you to include I/NET-related items in
your project is as follows:
6.2
1
Create an XBuilder project that uses the Xenta 527 template.
2
Convert one or more I/NET SAV files to an XML file.
3
Import the XML file in order to create an XBuilder representation
of the I/NET network within your project.
4
Add resulting I/NET items to the web pages you create within
your project.
Creating a Project That Will Include I/NET Items
Use the following steps to create an XBuilder project that will contain
I/NET-related items.
1
Within XBuilder, start a new project by selecting File > New
Project... from the main menu.
2
In the Create New Project dialog, perform the following tasks:
Fig. 6.3:
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Entering Basic Project Information
a
Define a name for the new project.
b
Choose the appropriate storage location for the project files.
c
Select the X527 Project template.
d
Select OK to save these settings.
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In the Project Settings dialog, enter a description of the project and
set the other parameters as necessary. Select OK to continue.
Fig. 6.4:
4
In the Network pane of XBuilder, expand the IP Backbone item
and verify that an INET object is available.
Fig. 6.5:
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The INET Object in XBuilder
Highlight the INET object and define IP addresses for up to eight
reference hosts. Leave unused addresses set to 0.0.0.0.
Fig. 6.6:
6
Entering Project Settings
Setting IP Addresses from XBuilder
Set the HostNum parameter to a value from 1 to 63. This parameter defines the host address that I/NET will use in order to communicate with the Xenta 527. Make sure that the address you define is
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unique (i.e., it is not already being used by any other host device
on the I/NET network).
6.3
Converting and Importing I/NET SAV Files
Use the following steps to create a representation of the I/NET network
within your XBuilder project:
1
Right-click on the INET object and select Create Network from
SAV files from the resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.7:
Converting I/NET SAV Files
Note
The utility that converts I/NET SAV files to XML can also be used
from outside of XBuilder. Refer to “DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility” on page 61 for more information.
2
In the DCU to XML Conversion dialog, setup the conversion process by completing the following tasks:
Fig. 6.8:
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DCU to XML Conversion Dialog
a
Use the Add Files button to locate and select the I/NET SAV
files that you wish to convert. The files you select will appear
in the dialog’s Source SAV list.
b
Define a complete path and filename for the XML file that the
conversion process will create. The ... button opens a Save As
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
dialog that you can use in order to browse through your file
system.
c
3
Select OK to convert the selected SAV files into a single XML
file.
Import the newly-created XML file by right-clicking the INET
object and selecting Insert TAC INET Network... from the resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.9:
4
Importing the XML File
Select the appropriate XML file and click Open to import the file.
Fig. 6.10: Selecting the XML File
5
Expand the INET object and verify that your project now contains
imported I/NET network objects.
Fig. 6.11: Viewing the Imported I/NET Network
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6.4
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Updating Your Project with New I/NET SAV Files
Modifications within your I/NET system such as adding or deleting
points and point extensions will cause SAV files to change. If changes
occur in any of the I/NET SAV files that you have already converted
and imported into your project, you must update your project so that it
accurately represents the modified I/NET network. This will require
that you convert updated I/NET SAV files to a new version of the XML
file that you imported earlier.
Use the following steps to update the network in your project:
1
Right-click on the INET object and select Create Network from
SAV files from the resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.12: Converting I/NET SAV Files
2
In the DCU to XML Conversion dialog, setup the conversion process by completing the following tasks:
Fig. 6.13: DCU to XML Conversion Dialog
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a
Use the Add Files button to locate and select the updated
I/NET SAV files that you wish to convert. The files you select
will appear in the dialog’s Source SAV list.
b
Define a complete path and filename for the XML file that the
conversion process will create. Be sure to specify the same
path and filename for the resulting XML file that you defined
earlier, when you built the network in your current project.
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c
3
Select OK to convert the selected SAV files into a single XML
file.
Update the network in the project by right-clicking the INET
object and selecting Update Network from the resulting pop-up
menu.
Fig. 6.14: Updating the Network
XBuilder automatically selects the same XML file that was last
imported, and then re-imports it.
4
6.5
Expand the INET object and verify that your project now contains
updated I/NET network objects.
Displaying Dynamic I/NET Alarms and Events
from Web Pages
Note
Alarm and Event pages use Java to display dynamic information. If a
user attempts to view these pages from a web browser that is not Javaenabled, no data will display.
In the following example, we will configure the project to provide Javaenabled I/NET alarms and events pages.
1
Add an alarm page to the project by right-clicking the site in the
system view and selecting Add Page > Alarm Page from the
resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.15: Adding an Alarm Page
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Type a name for the new alarm page. In this example, we will
name the page "North Facility Alarms".
Fig. 6.16: Naming the Alarm Page
3
Make sure that the Show Dynamic Alarms parameter is set to
"Yes". This setting will allow I/NET alarms to display, rather than
Vista alarms.
Fig. 6.17: Showing Dynamic Alarms
4
Add an event page to the project by right-clicking the site in the
system view and selecting Add Page > Event Page from the
resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.18: Adding an Event Page
5
Type a name for the new event page. In this example, we will
name the page "North Facility Events".
Fig. 6.19: Naming the Event Page
6
By default, the event page will provide I/NET event data. You can
confirm this by making sure that the Event Type parameter is set
to "InetAMT."
Fig. 6.20: Setting the Event Type
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Highlight the "TAC_Xenta_527" object in the network pane and
make sure that the IP address, Username and Password parameters are defined.
Fig. 6.21: Checking the IP Address, Username, and Password
8
Compile the project and send it to the Xenta 527. Using a Web
browser, verify that the alarm and event pages display properly.
Fig. 6.22: Viewing the Event Page from a Web Browser
6.6
Using I/NET Point Signals
Within XBuilder, each I/NET point has associated signals. A point signal represents one particular aspect of the point. For example, the
"value" point signal represents the point’s current value. For a description of each I/NET point signal, refer to “Point Signals” on page 68.
You can use I/NET point signals within web pages and graphic pages in
your project. The procedures for doing so are described below.
6.6.1
Mapping I/NET Point Signals to Web Pages
Mapping an I/NET point to a web page can be as easy as dragging a signal from XBuilder’s network view and dropping it onto the appropriate
web page in the system view. The way the point information on a page
is displayed to the user, and the way it can be used, depends on the type
of web page on which it resides.
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In the following example, we will map I/NET point information to a
values page.
1
Add a values page to the project by right-clicking the site in the
system view and selecting Add page > Values page from the
resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.23: Adding a Values Page
2
Type a name for the new values page. In this example, we will
name the page "Main Lobby".
3
Add signals to the values page by dragging signals from the network view and dropping them on the values page. In this example,
we will add the value, state, test, alarm, old, and alarm_ack signals
for I/NET point 51040408 DA to the values page.
Fig. 6.24: Adding Signals to a Values Page
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
For each signal, enter a description. This text is what will appear
on the resulting web page, and should therefore, be useful to the
end-user.
Fig. 6.25: Entering a Description of the Signal
5
Compile the project and send it to the Xenta 527. Using a Web
browser, verify that the web page displays properly.
Note
When viewing a point’s value, be aware that the Xenta 527 uses an
Ansi-C 32-bit standard for floating points. Point values that exceed
this limit of floating points are subject to inconsistent displays.
Fig. 6.26: Viewing the Values Page from a Web Browser
6.6.2
Mapping I/NET Point Signals to Graphic Pages
In the following example, we will map I/NET point information to a
graphic page.
1
Add a graphic object to the project by right-clicking the site in the
system view and selecting Add Object > Graphic from the resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.27: Adding a Graphic Object
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In the New Graphic dialog, specify a name and location for the
new graphic.
Fig. 6.28: Saving the New Graphic Object
3
Type a name for the new graphic object. In this example, we will
name the object "graphic - Main Lobby".
Fig. 6.29: Naming the New Graphic Object
4
Open the new graphic in the Vista Graphic Editor by right-clicking
the object and selecting Edit Graphic... from the resulting pop-up
menu.
Fig. 6.30: Editing the Graphic
5
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Add a new item to the page by clicking a tool in the Drawing
Tools toolbar and then clicking on a blank area in the graphic
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page. In this example, we will add a Digital Presentation object to
the page and assign it an I/NET point value.
Fig. 6.31: Adding an Object to the Graphic Page
6
Right-click anywhere on the graphic page to change your cursor
back into an arrow.
7
Now double-click the new item on the graphic page to view its
attributes.
Fig. 6.32: Viewing the Item’s Attributes
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Link an I/NET point value to the graphic object by dragging a
"value" signal from XBuilder and dropping it onto the Object field
in the attributes dialog.
Fig. 6.33: Dragging and Dropping a Signal
9
The Object field now contains the path of the signal that you just
dropped. Set the other parameters in the attributes dialog as
desired and click OK to save your settings.
10 Save the graphic and return to XBuilder. Verify that the graphic
object in the system view now has a child item representing the
signal that you just linked to the graphic.
Fig. 6.34: Verifying the Linked Signal
11 Add a graphic page to the project by right-clicking the site in the
system view and selecting Add Page > Graphic Page from the
resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.35: Adding a Graphic Page
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
12 Type a name for the new graphic page. In this example, we will
name the page "page - Main Lobby".
Fig. 6.36: Naming the New Graphic Page
13 Link the graphic object to the graphic page by dragging and dropping the object onto the page.
Fig. 6.37: Linking a Graphic Object to a Graphic Page
14 Verify that the graphic page in the system view now has a child
item representing the graphic that you just linked to the page.
Fig. 6.38: Verifying the Linked Graphic
15 Compile the project and send it to the Xenta 527. Using a Web
browser, verify that the graphic page displays properly.
Fig. 6.39: Viewing the Graphic Page from a Web Browser
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6.7
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Using I/NET Page Links
In addition to the point signals that are associated with an I/NET network in XBuilder, page links are also available. The following I/NET
page links can be used within your project and are further described in
“Page Links” on page 69:
Point Control – Links to the Point Control page. This page link is
included with all I/NET points.
Trend – Links to the Trend Setup page. This page link is included
with I/NET points that have a trend (TR) extension.
Trendlog – Links to the Trend Chart page. This page link is
included with I/NET points that have a trend (TR) extension.
Time Schedule – Links to the Time Schedule page. This page link
is included with I/NET points that have a time schedule (TS)
extension.
An I/NET page link can be connected to a standard link page in
XBuilder. The link page can optionally be connected to a graphic page,
allowing a user to click on a defined area in the graphic to jump directly
to the appropriate I/NET page. The procedures for creating these connections are the same for each type of I/NET page link. For your convenience, procedures for linking the Trendlog and Time Schedule pages
to a graphic page are described below.
6.7.1
Linking an I/NET Trend Log to a Graphic Page
As a system administrator or user with "operator" privileges, you can
access an I/NET trend log by connecting to the Xenta 527 from a web
browser, selecting Utilities > INet > Browse I/NET from the navigation
tree, and browsing the I/NET system. Using this method, you can locate
an I/NET point that has a TR (trend) extension, configure the trend log
as necessary, and then view the trend log.
A quicker way to access a trend log would be to jump to it from a link,
without having to browse through the I/NET system. In the following
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example, we will create a link page that links directly to an I/NET trend
log, and then associate the link page with a link area on a graphic page.
1
Add a Link Page to the project by right-clicking the site in the system view and selecting Add Page > Link Page from the resulting
pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.40: Adding a Link Page
2
Type a name for the new link page. In this example, we will name
the page "link - Trend Log".
Fig. 6.41: Naming the New Link Page
3
Expand the link page object to expose its link.
Fig. 6.42: Expanding the Link Page Object
4
Associate the link with an I/NET trend log by dragging and dropping a Trendlog object onto the link object.
Fig. 6.43: Creating a Link to an I/NET Trend Log
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Now that you have created a link page that jumps to an I/NET
trend log, you can associate the link page with a link area on a
graphic page.
Perform one of the following tasks:
6
•
Open an existing graphic object by right-clicking the object
and selecting Edit Graphic... from the resulting pop-up menu.
•
Add a new graphic object to the project by performing the
first 4 steps in “Mapping I/NET Point Signals to Web Pages”
on page 47.
Add a new link area to the page by clicking the Link Area tool in
the Drawing Tools toolbar and then drawing a link area in the
graphic page. In this example, we will create a link area around an
I/NET point value.
Fig. 6.44: Creating a Link Area on the Graphic Page
7
Right-click anywhere on the graphic page to change your cursor
back into an arrow.
8
Right-click the link area and select Attributes from the resulting
pop-up menu. The Link Area attributes dialog opens.
Fig. 6.45: Viewing the Link Area Attributes
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Associate the link page in XBuilder with the link area on the
graphic page by dragging and dropping the link page object onto
the Linked Graphic Object field in the attributes dialog.
Fig. 6.46: Dragging and Dropping the Link
10 The Linked Graphic Object field now contains the path of the
link page that you just dropped. Click OK to save this setting.
11 Save the graphic and return to XBuilder.
12 Compile the project and send it to the Xenta 527. Using a Web
browser, verify that the graphic page now links to an I/NET trend
log.
Fig. 6.47: Verifying the Link from a Web Browser
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6.7.2
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Linking an I/NET Time Schedule to a Graphic Page
The TAC Xenta 527 provides a special editor that allows the system
administrator, or a user with "operator" privileges, to modify I/NET
Seven time schedules. The user can access this editor by browsing
through the I/NET system until they locate an I/NET point that has a TS
(time schedule) extension. However, you can also create a link on a
graphic page that, when clicked, can send the user directly to a time
schedule, without requiring the user to browse through the I/NET system.
In the following example, we will create a link page that connects to an
I/NET time schedule, and then associate the link page with a link area
on a graphic page.
1
Add a Link Page to the project by right-clicking the site in the system view and selecting Add Page > Link Page from the resulting
pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.48: Adding a Link Page
2
Type a name for the new link page. In this example, we will name
the page "link - Time Schedule".
Fig. 6.49: Naming the New Link Page
3
Expand the link page object to expose its link.
Fig. 6.50: Expanding the Link Page Object
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4
6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
Associate the link with an I/NET time schedule by dragging and
dropping a Time Schedule object onto the link object.
Fig. 6.51: Creating a Link to an I/NET Time Schedule
5
Now that you have created a link page that jumps to an I/NET time
schedule, you can associate the link page with a link area on a
graphic page.
Perform one of the following tasks:
6
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•
Open an existing graphic object by right-clicking the object
and selecting Edit Graphic... from the resulting pop-up menu.
•
Add a new graphic object to the project by performing the
first 4 steps in “Mapping I/NET Point Signals to Web Pages”
on page 47.
Add a new link area to the page by clicking the Link Area tool in
the Drawing Tools toolbar and then drawing a link area in the
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
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graphic page. In this example, we will create a link area around a
graphic that has been imported into the graphic page.
Fig. 6.52: Creating a Link Area on the Graphic Page
7
Right-click anywhere on the graphic page to change your cursor
back into an arrow.
8
Right-click the link area and select Attributes from the resulting
pop-up menu. The Link Area attributes dialog opens.
Fig. 6.53: Viewing the Link Area Attributes
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9
6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
Associate the link page in XBuilder with the link area on the
graphic page by dragging and dropping the link page object onto
the Linked Graphic Object field in the attributes dialog.
Fig. 6.54: Dragging and Dropping the Link
10 The Linked Graphic Object field now contains the path of the
link page that you just dropped. Click OK to save this setting.
11 Save the graphic and return to XBuilder.
12 Compile the project and send it to the Xenta 527. Using a Web
browser, verify that the graphic page now links to an I/NET time
schedule.
Fig. 6.55: Verifying the Link from a Web Browser
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
6.8
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Using the Find Function
When working on large projects the Find function may be used to identify variables and objects in the projects.
1
Activate the find function using any of the following methods:
•
Press Ctrl + F.
•
Choose Edit > Find from the main menu.
Fig. 6.56: Selecting Find from the Main Menu
•
Right-click an item in the System pane or Network pane and
select Find from the resulting pop-up menu.
Fig. 6.57: Selecting Find from a Pop-up Menu
2
Use the Find dialog to search through the project. If necessary,
narrow the search by specifying which objects, pages, and signals
to include in the search. By default, all items are included.
You can also use the Look in field to narrow the search to a specific
branch of the system or network. This field will automatically con-
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6 Creating Web Pages with XBuilder
tain an appropriate path if you activate the Find function by rightclicking on an item in the System pane or Network pane.
Fig. 6.58: The Find Dialog
3
Click Find to begin the search. The results are displayed in the
Output pane. A number of options are available when you select
an item in the results, as described below.
Fig. 6.59: Viewing the Results of the Find Function
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•
Jump to the source of any item in the results by double-clicking on the item. You can also right-click on the item and select
Go to the source from the pop-up menu.
•
Clear all items by right-clicking on any item in the results and
selecting Clear from the pop-up menu.
•
Delete the source of an item by right-clicking the item in the
results and selecting Delete from the pop-up menu. The
Delete option is not available for signal objects in the Network pane.
•
Rename any item associated with a System pane object by
right-clicking the item in the results and selecting Rename
from the pop-up menu.
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REFERENCE
7
I/NET Objects in XBuilder
8
DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
9
History Logs
10
Storing Data on the Xenta 527
TAC Xenta, Engineering TAC Xenta 527
7
7 I/NET Objects in XBuilder
I/NET Objects in XBuilder
The following figure shows a portion of an I/NET network in XBuilder.
The figure is annotated to describe how each object represents a portion
of the I/NET network. Each object is further described below.
Link Number
Station Number
Point Number
Bit Offset
Point Type
Point Signals
Page Link
Fig. 7.1: I/NET Point Structure in XBuilder
Each device and point in I/NET has a unique address that identifies it in
the system. An address in the I/NET system consists of a series of alphanumeric characters, each describing the route from the top of the LAN
hierarchy to the final device or input/output point. This addressing
structure consists of four pairs of numbers and the point type. The format for the address is:
LLSSPPBB PT
where:
LL =
the 2-digit link number
SS =
the 2-digit station number
PP =
the 2-digit point number
BB =
the 2-digit bit offset number
PT =
the 2-letter point type
These identification numbers are called system addresses. Each point
address is determined by the address of the equipment passed through
to reach it.
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7 I/NET Objects in XBuilder
7.1
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Network Objects
The following objects in XBuilder represent levels of the I/NET network:
7.2
•
Link — This object represents the software link address (00–99)
that leads to a specific I/NET controller LAN. By expanding this
object, you can access stations connected to the controller LAN.
•
Station — This object represents the address (00–63) of a particular controller on the controller LAN. By expanding this object,
you can access the points defined for the controller.
•
Point — This object represents the address (00–31) of a particular
memory location within the selected station.
•
Bit Offset — This object represents the bit offset (00–09) of the
the selected memory location.
•
Point Type — This object represents the two-letter point type designation for the selected point.
Point Signals
The following I/NET point signals are available in XBuilder. As
described below, not all signals are available for all point types.
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•
value (all point types) — This signal represents the value of the
selected point. For all point types except DC and DO, an operator
with proper authority can log into the Xenta 527 and use this signal to view or change the point’s value. For DC and DO points, an
operator would have to change the value of the "control" signal
(described below) in order to change the point’s value.
•
state (DA, DC, DI, DM, and DO points only) — This read-only
signal shows the textual state of the point. This text is based on the
state descriptions assigned to the point in I/NET. Refer to the
I/NET Seven documentation for a description of state descriptions.
•
control (DC and DO points only) — Use this signal to manually
control the point. This signal’s default value is 0. A change in this
signal’s value causes the value to be sent to the point. Therefore,
even if you wish to send the default value of 0 to the point, you
must temporarily change the signal’s value to 1 and then back to 0.
Refer to the I/NET Seven documentation for a description of control descriptions.
•
test (all point types) — This signal represents the value of the
point’s test mode setting. A value of 1 indicates that the point is
operating in test mode. An operator with proper authority can log
into the Xenta 527 and use this signal to view or change the point’s
test mode condition.
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7.3
7 I/NET Objects in XBuilder
•
manual (output points only) — This signal represents the value of
the point’s manual mode setting. A value of 1 indicates that the
point is operating in manual mode. An operator with proper
authority can log into the Xenta 527 and use this signal to view or
change the point’s manual mode condition.
•
alarm (all point types) — This read-only signal represents the
value of the point’s "alarm" state. A value of 1 indicates that the
point is currently in alarm.
•
old (all point types) — This read-only signal represents the value
of the point’s "old" state. A value of 1 indicates that the point
value is invalid or is no longer communicating.
•
unack (all point types) — This read-only signal represents the
value of the point’s "unacknowledged" alarm state. A value of 1
indicates that the point’s alarm is unacknowledged. If an authorized user acknowledges the alarm, this value will change to 0.
•
alarm_ack (all point types) — This signal allows an authorized
operator to acknowledge an alarm associated with the point. The
user can acknowledge an alarm by setting this signal’s value to 1.
Once the Xenta 527 verifies that I/NET has acknowledged the
alarm, this signal’s value will return to 0.
Page Links
Along with the signals described above, page links are also available for
I/NET points. You can add these links to Link Pages within an XBuilder
project. As described below, not all page links are available for all
points.
•
Point Control — The Point Control link is included with all
I/NET point types. This link allows the system administrator, or a
user with "operator" privileges, to access the Point Control screen.
Fig. 7.2: Point Control from a Web Browser
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7 I/NET Objects in XBuilder
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•
Trend — The Trend link is included with I/NET points that have a
Trend Sampling (TR) extension. This link allows the system
administrator, or a user with "operator" privileges, to access the
Trend Setup screen.
Fig. 7.3: Trend Setup from a Web Browser
•
Trendlog — The Trendlog link is included with I/NET points that
have a Trend Sampling (TR) extension. This link allows the system administrator, or a user with "operator" privileges, to access
the Trend chart.
Fig. 7.4: Trend Chart Displayed in a Web Browser
•
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Time Schedule — The Time Schedule link is included with
I/NET points that have a Trend Schedule (TS) extension. This link
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7 I/NET Objects in XBuilder
allows the system administrator, or a user with "operator" privileges, to access the Time Schedule screen.
Fig. 7.5: Time Schedule Editor Displayed in a Web Browser
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8
8 DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
In order to create and use I/NET system objects within XBuilder, you
must first convert I/NET SAV files into an XML file that you can then
import into your project. This conversion process relies on an I/NET-toXBuilder utility that is included in the XBuilder installation.
As described in “Converting and Importing I/NET SAV Files” on page
42, you can launch this utility from within XBuilder by right-clicking
on the INET object in your project and selecting Create Network from
SAV files from the resulting pop-up menu. However, you can also
launch and use this utility from outside of XBuilder, as described below.
8.1
Launching the Utility from an Explorer Window
The DCU-to-XML conversion utility is located in the XBuilder installation directory. You can launch the utility as a stand-alone application
by locating and executing the file named DCUXML.EXE. This causes
the DCU to XML Conversion dialog box to appear.
Fig. 8.1: DCU to XML Conversion Dialog
You can use the conversion utility just as if you had launched it from
XBuilder. Refer to “Converting and Importing I/NET SAV Files” on
page 42 for instructions.
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8 DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
8.2
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Running the Utility from the Command Line
The DCU-to-XML conversion utility can be run as a command-line
application, as follows:
1
Click the Start button in Windows and select Run... from the
resulting menu. The Run dialog opens.
Fig. 8.2:
2
Type CMD.EXE in the text field and select OK. A command window opens.
Fig. 8.3:
3
Command Window
At the command prompt, use the change directory command (CD)
to go to the XBuilder installation directory. In the example below,
XBuilder is installed at its default location on C drive.
Fig. 8.4:
4
The Run Dialog
Changing to the XBuilder Installation Directory
Run the utility using the following syntax:
dcuxml.exe
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output_file
input_file(s)
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8 DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
Example:
The following command will initiate the conversion of two I/NET SAV
files (DCU5101.SAV and DCU5104.SAV) into an XML output file
named LINK51.XML. The input files reside in the root directory of C
drive (as will the resulting XML output file).
dcuxml.exe c:\link51.xml c:\dcu5101.sav
c:\dcu5104.sav
Using the command in the example above will cause the utility to
open and look like this:
Fig. 8.5:
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DCU-to-XML Conversion Utility
5
If necessary, make adjustments to the configuration. When the
configuration is correct, click OK to run the conversion.
6
When the conversion is complete, the utility automatically closes.
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9 History Logs
9
History Logs
9.1
Occurrences of I/NET System and Web Server
Alarms and Events
The TAC Xenta 527 can store a total of 1,000 events and alarms (added
together). They are stored in a non-volatile managed memory buffer.
This allows the Xenta 527 to maintain its stored events and alarms even
during power interruptions.
9.2
Records of Individuals Who Modified an Alarm
Status
All changes made to the status of I/NET alarms made by the logged-in
user are stored as events in the Xenta 527 memory buffer. These
changes are also stored in the I/NET system, and identify the user. The
information used to identify the user will differ, depending on how the
user made the changes.
I/NET records identify the user as follows:
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•
When changes are made from the Xenta 527 alarm view,
I/NET records will contain the user’s initials (i.e., the first 4 characters of the user name) and the user’s complete user name.
•
When changes are made from a Point Control dialog, I/NET
records will contain only the user’s initials (i.e., the first 4 characters of the user name).
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10 Storing Data on the Xenta 527
10
Storing Data on the Xenta 527
10.1
Data Limits
The TAC Xenta 527 has the following data storage limits:
10.2
•
Max project size = 10 MB
•
Max number of Xenta 511 type Alarms = 300
•
Max number of Xenta 511 type Trendlogs = 150
•
Max number of Xenta 511 type Time Schedules = 50
Web Server Data
The following Web server data is stored in the TAC Xenta 527:
•
User information
•
User information for up to 64 users
•
Client information including passwords and connection information
•
Log files containing historical data
•
Graphics
10.3
Protecting Stored Data
10.3.1
Maintaining Data During Power Interruptions
The TAC Xenta 527 configuration (including user information and
project files) and dynamic data (including alarms, events, and trend
logs) is stored in non-volatile memory. This allows the Xenta 527 to
maintain its stored information even during power interruptions.
10.3.2
Backing Up and Restoring Data
XBuilder provides the tools necessary to allow you to backup and
restore Xenta 527 data files. The following data can be backed up and
restored:
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•
Event Data
•
Trend Logs
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•
Alarm History
•
Project Data
Backing Up and Restoring Event, Trendlog, and Alarm
History Data
When you backup data from the Xenta 527, the data gets stored with the
currently open XBuilder project. If desired, you can then backup the
project to further protect the stored data.
The following steps describe how to backup and restore event, trendlog,
and alarm history data. Project backup and restore procedures are
described separately.
1
Open the project that will be used as the storage location for the
data that you are backing up.
2
Select Tools > Backup Operations from the XBuilder menu. A
sub-menu opens, allowing you to choose the desired operation.
Fig. 10.1: Initiating the Event Data Backup Process
3
Choose the desired operation to backup or restore the associated
data.
Backing Up Project Data
Use the following procedures to backup project data:
1
Open the project that you want to back up and view the project settings by selecting Project > Settings... from the XBuilder menu.
Fig. 10.2: Opening the Project Settings
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2
10 Storing Data on the Xenta 527
In the resulting dialog box, make sure that the Send Project
backup file to Target option is activated (!).
Fig. 10.3: Project Settings
3
Compile the project and send it to the Xenta 527. A backup file
will be included in the sent data.
Restoring Project Data
Use the following procedures to restore project data:
1
Restore a project by selecting Project > Get from Target... from
the XBuilder menu.
Fig. 10.4: Restoring a Project
2
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In the resulting dialog box, specify an appropriate setting for each
parameter. If you have a project already open, the fields in this dia-
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log will initially contain settings based on the open project. If no
project is currently open, the fields will be blank.
Fig. 10.5: Uploading a Project from the Xenta 527
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3
Select OK to get the project from the Xenta 527.
4
If differences are found between the currently open project and the
project being retrieved from the Xenta 527, they will be displayed
in a dialog box. In this case, you can choose which configuration
to use. Select either Project or Target.
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APPENDIX
A
Frequently Asked Questions
(FAQs)
B
Troubleshooting
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A
A Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
What if I need to remove the Xenta 527 from the network?
Before you remove the TAC Xenta 527 from the network, you should
first remove all host masks that you have defined. This will ensure that
other I/NET hosts stop their transmission of alarms and events to the
Xenta 527.
Remove host masks as follows:
1
Expand the INet section of the navigation tree as shown in the following figure and select Host Masks Summary.
Fig. A.1: Opening the Host Mask Summary
2
In the Host Mask Summary, click on a host IP address to set its
routing masks. The Host Routing Mask Editor opens.
Fig. A.2: Launching the Host Routing Mask Editor
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A Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
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3
Click the Clear All button to remove all mask settings for this IP
address.
4
Click Save to accept your settings.
5
Repeat these steps as necessary to remove the masks for all other
IP addresses.
What if I need to perform a full installation of system
software for a Xenta 527 that is already operational?
When you load system software onto the Xenta 527, you have a choice
of whether to perform a software update or a full installation. If you
intend to perform a full installation, you should first remove all host
masks that you have defined in the Xenta 527. This will ensure that
other I/NET hosts stop their transmission of alarms and events to the
Xenta 527.
The steps for the overall process are as follows:
1
Remove all host masks from the Xenta 527. The instructions for
removing host masks are described on the previous page.
2
Perform the system software installation as follows:
3
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a
Connect the PC to the same network as the Xenta 527.
b
Start the installation program TACXenta527-nnnn.exe
(obtained via TARAI or from a CD).
c
Type user name ‘root’, your password, and the TAC Xenta
527’s IP address.
d
Follow the instructions on the screen.
When the software installation is complete, re-define host masks
on the Xenta 527 as necessary. Refer to “Defining Host Masks”,
on page 27 for instructions.
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B
B Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
This section addresses common issues that may arise while you are configuring or using the TAC Xenta 527.
My Alarms and/or Events pages are completely blank
Dynamic alarm and event pages use Java to display periodically
updated information. If you attempt to view these pages from a web
browser that is not Java-enabled, no data will display.
If Java is properly installed, but alarm and event pages appear blank
when you view them from a web browser, you may need to clear the
Java cache. The following steps describe how to clear the Java cache:
1
Open the Windows Control Panel by clicking the Start button and
selecting Control Panel from the resulting menu.
2
Double-click the Java Plug-in icon to open the Java Plug-in Control Panel. Select the Cache panel.
3
Clear the Java cache by clicking the Clear button.
4
At the confirmation screen, select Yes to clear the cache.
With the Java cache clear, re-connect to the Xenta 527 and verify that
alarms and events pages display properly.
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B Troubleshooting
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Changes to my XBuilder project do not always appear when
viewed from a web browser
As you design your building control application, you will most likely
compile and send your XBuilder project to the Xenta 527 at various
stages of development. This allows you to verify the results of project
changes as you make them.
If you find that a changed web page is not displaying correctly when you
view the project from a web browser, the browser may be displaying a
cached version of the page. In this case, you will have to clear the web
browser’s temporary files in order to view the updated web page.
The following steps describe how to clear Internet Explorer’s temporary
files:
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1
Select Tools > Internet Options from the web browser’s menu.
The Internet Options dialog opens.
2
In the "Temporary Internet files" section of the dialog, click the
Delete Files... button. This causes a confirmation dialog to open.
3
Select OK to delete all temporary internet files.
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B Troubleshooting
A network proxy/firewall is preventing the Xenta 527 from
establishing proper communications.
Your network configuration plays a key role in how the Xenta 527 communicates with the internet, I/NET, and Vista. If you are unable to
establish proper network communications, ensure that the necessary
ports are open and available to the Xenta 527. The TAC Xenta 527 uses
the following communication ports:
•
Port 80 (http access)
•
Port 443 (https access)
•
Port 20/21 (FTP access)
•
Port 25 (SMTP access)
•
Port 80 (Status Viewer, Alarm Viewer and Graphics Viewer)
•
Port 1068 (LTA for Vista)
•
Port 161 (snmp access)
•
UDP Port 50069 (I/NET system access)
Perhaps you are unable to make the necessary configuration changes to
your proxies/firewalls because of restrictions imposed by your company’s network security policies. In this case, you have the option of
choosing alternate communication ports.
The following steps describe how to use alternate communication ports:
1
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Expand the navigation tree as shown in the following figure and
select HTTP Server.
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2
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Set the communication port assignments to the appropriate values.
Use the following fields:
•
HTTP Port
•
HTTPS Port
•
Dynamic variables communication Port
3
Accept your settings by selecting Save & Restart.
4
Configure your network to allow communication on the ports you
assigned to the Xenta 527.
5
Verify that the Xenta 527 can now successfully communicate
across the Internet and with your building control systems.
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Index
Index
Events, I/NET 45, 77
extending login time 33
A
F
About this Manual 9
Access Rights 31
address, I/NET 67
alarm
modification records 77
point signal 69
alarm_ack, point signal 69
Alarms, I/NET 45, 77
Appendix 83
authorization level 29
failed logins 32
FAQs 85
Filenames 11
Find Function, using 62
Firewalls 19
Frame Settings 31
Frequently Asked Questions 85
B
Bit Offset object 68
C
certificate
CA 34
self signed 21
SSL 34
Configuration
Clients 36
Instructions 15
Profile 25
control, point signal 68
Conversion Utility 73
D
data
limits 79
storage 79
DCU-to-XML Conversion 39, 73
DHCP 15
DISRCFG command 36
DNS 15
Docnet 9
dynamic web pages 45
E
ENRCFG command 37
Error log
login 32
Event Type parameter 46
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G
Gateway 15, 19
Getting Started 13
Graphic Pages 49
H
History Logs 77
host masks 27, 85
HostNum parameter 41
HTTPS Idle TimeOut 30
Hyperterminal 15
I
I/NET
Network 39
Objects 67
Point Mapping 47, 49
Point Structure 67
SAV Files 42, 44
Time Schedule 58
Trend Log 54
IP address 15, 21–22, 25
J
Java 87
K
Keystrokes 11
L
Link object 68
logging in 21
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Index
M
manual, point signal 69
Menu Commands 11
N
Network Objects 68
O
old, point signal 69
P
Packet filter 19
Page Links 69
Password 47
Point Control 69
Point object 68
point signals 68
alarm 69
alarm_ack 69
control 68
manual 69
old 69
test 68
unack 69
value 68
Point Type object 68
Points, Mapping 47, 49
ports 17, 89
Power Interruptions 79
Prerequisites 10
project
backing up 80
creating 40
restoring 81
template 40
updating 44
Protecting Stored Data 79
Proxy Server 18
TAC Xenta, Engineering TAC Xenta 527
Subnet mask 15
system administrator 29
T
temporary files 88
Terminal Emulator 15
test, point signal 68
Time Schedule 70
Time Schedule, I/NET 58
Trend 70
Trend Log, I/NET 54
Trendlog 70
Troubleshooting 87
Typographic Conventions 10
U
unack, point signal 69
User
Accounts 29
Settings 30
Username parameter 47
V
value, point signal 68
W
web pages, creating 39
Web Server
Data 79
Security 29
X
XBuilder 67
XBuilder, using 39
XML
Conversion Utility 73
file 39
R
Reference 65
reference host 25
Remote Configuration 36
S
SAV files 42
Secure Socket Layer 33
Security 29
SSL Certificate 33
state, point 68
Station object 68
storing data 79
92 (94)
TAC AB, April 2004
0-004-7682-0 (EN)
TAC helps people feel and function better, as a direct result of greater indoor climate. This is
®
made possible by TAC’s concept of Open Systems for Building IT , which utilizes information
technology to provide clients with advantages such as indoor climate optimization, energy
savings, flexibility, security, reduced expenses and user-friendly operation.
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